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Sample records for fe-15cr-20ni steels irradiated

  1. Silicon's role in determining swelling in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimura, N. ); Garner, F. A. ); Newkirk, J.W. )

    1991-11-01

    Two silicon-modified alloy series, one based on Fe-15Cr-20Ni and another based on Fe-15Cr-25Ni were irradiated at target temperatures between 399 and 649{degree}C in EBR-II. The influence of silicon on swelling is more complex than previously envisioned and indicates that silicon plays two or more competing roles while in solution. Radiation-induced formation of {gamma}{prime} (Ni{sub 3}Si) precipitates is dependent on silicon and nickel content, as well as temperature. Precipitation of {gamma}{prime} appears to play only a minor role in void formation.

  2. Silicon`s role in determining swelling in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimura, N.; Garner, F. A.; Newkirk, J.W.

    1991-11-01

    Two silicon-modified alloy series, one based on Fe-15Cr-20Ni and another based on Fe-15Cr-25Ni were irradiated at target temperatures between 399 and 649{degree}C in EBR-II. The influence of silicon on swelling is more complex than previously envisioned and indicates that silicon plays two or more competing roles while in solution. Radiation-induced formation of {gamma}{prime} (Ni{sub 3}Si) precipitates is dependent on silicon and nickel content, as well as temperature. Precipitation of {gamma}{prime} appears to play only a minor role in void formation.

  3. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  4. Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by Laves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Takeyama, M.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2007-11-01

    Creep strengthening of Al-modified austenitic stainless steels by MC carbides or Fe2Nb Laves phase was explored. Fe-20Cr-15Ni-(0-8)Al and Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base alloys (at. pct) with small additions of Nb, Mo, W, Ti, V, C, and B were cast, thermally-processed, and aged. On exposure from 650 °C to 800 °C in air and in air with 10 pct water vapor, the alloys exhibited continuous protective Al2O3 scale formation at an Al level of only 5 at. pct (2.4 wt pct). Matrices of the Fe-20Cr-15Ni-5Al base alloys consisted of γ (fcc) + α (bcc) dual phase due to the strong α-Fe stabilizing effect of the Al addition and exhibited poor creep resistance. However, adjustment of composition to the Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base resulted in alloys that were single-phase γ-Fe and still capable of alumina scale formation. Alloys that relied solely on Fe2Nb Laves phase precipitates for strengthening exhibited relatively low creep resistance, while alloys that also contained MC carbide precipitates exhibited creep resistance comparable to that of commercially available heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels. Phase equilibria studies indicated that NbC precipitates in combination with Fe2Nb were of limited benefit to creep resistance due to the solution limit of NbC within the γ-Fe matrix of the alloys studied. However, when combined with other MC-type strengtheners, such as V4C3 or TiC, higher levels of creep resistance were obtained.

  5. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  6. Nanoindentation on ion irradiated steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, P.; Vieh, C.; Greco, R. R.; Kabra, S.; Valdez, J. A.; Cappiello, M. J.; Maloy, S. A.

    2009-06-01

    Radiation induced mechanical property changes can cause major difficulties in designing systems operating in a radiation environment. Investigating these mechanical property changes in an irradiation environment is a costly and time consuming activity. Ion beam accelerator experiments have the advantage of allowing relatively fast and inexpensive materials irradiations without activating the sample but do in general not allow large beam penetration depth into the sample. In this study, the ferritic/martensitic steel HT-9 was processed and heat treated to produce one specimen with a large grained ferritic microstructure and further heat treated to form a second specimen with a fine tempered martensitic lath structure and exposed to an ion beam and tested after irradiation using nanoindentation to investigate the irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties. It is shown that the HT-9 in the ferritic heat treatment is more susceptible to irradiation hardening than HT-9 after the tempered martensitic heat treatment. Also at an irradiation temperature above 550 °C no detectable hardness increase due to irradiation was detected. The results are also compared to data from the literature gained from the fast flux test facility.

  7. Susceptibility of irradiated steels to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossin, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Investigation determined whether irradiated pressure-vessel steels 4340 and 212-B are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and to catastrophic failure. Hydrogen-charging conditions which completely embrittled 4340 steel had negligible effect on 212-B steel in tensile and delayed-failure tests.

  8. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüle, Wolfgang; Hausen, Hermann

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300°C and 500°C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of "primary" creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the "secondary" creep stage begins. The "primary" creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These "primary" creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of α-ferrite below about 400°C and of carbides below about 700°C, and not to irradiation creep. The "secondary" creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature ( Qirr = 0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels.

  9. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  10. Neutron Irradiation Resistance of RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Dafferner, Bernhard; Aktaa, Jarir

    2008-07-01

    The neutron irradiation resistance of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 and international reference steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) have been investigated after irradiation in the Petten High Flux Reactor up to 16.3 dpa at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 deg. C). The embrittlement behavior and hardening are investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with sub-size specimens. Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement and hardening of EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement vs. hardening behavior of RAFM steels within a proper model in terms of the parameter C={delta}DBTT/{delta}{sigma} indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 deg. C with 0.17 {<=} C {<=} 0.53 deg. C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 deg. C indicates non hardening embrittlement. A role of He in a process of embrittlement is investigated in EUROFER97 based steels, that are doped with different contents of natural B and the separated {sup 10}B-isotope (0.008-0.112 wt.%). Testing on small scale fracture mechanical specimens for determination of quasi-static fracture toughness will be also presented in a view of future irradiation campaigns. (authors)

  11. Irradiation hardening of reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Morimura, T.; Narui, M.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation response on the tensile properties of 9Cr2W steels has been investigated following FFTF/MOTA irradiations at temperatures between 646 and 873 K up to doses between 10 and 59 dpa. The largest irradiation hardening accompanied by the largest decrease in the elongation is observed for the specimens irradiated at 646 K at doses between 10 and 15 dpa. The irradiation hardening appears to saturate at a dose of around 10 dpa at the irradiation temperature. No hardening but softening was observed in the specimens irradiated at above 703 K to doses of 40 and 59 dpa. Microstructural observation by transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that the dislocation loops with the a<100> type Burgers vector and small precipitates which were identified to be M 6C type carbides existed after the irradiation at below 703 K. As for the void formation, the average size of voids increased with increasing irradiation temperature from 646 to 703 K. No voids were observed above 703 K. Irradiation softening was attributed to the enhanced recovery of martensitic structure under the irradiation. Post-irradiation annealing resulted in hardening by the annealing at 673 K and softening by the annealing at 873 K.

  12. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  13. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, T.M.

    2000-04-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. Because the RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a redundant backup system does not exist, it is imperative to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established.

  14. Hydrogen retention in ion irradiated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, J.D.; Lewis, M.B.; Lee, E.H.

    1998-11-01

    In the future 1--5 MW Spallation Neutron Source, target radiation damage will be accompanied by high levels of hydrogen and helium transmutation products. The authors have recently carried out investigations using simultaneous Fe/He,H multiple-ion implantations into 316 LN stainless steel between 50 and 350 C to simulate the type of radiation damage expected in spallation neutron sources. Hydrogen and helium were injected at appropriate energy and rate, while displacement damage was introduced by nuclear stopping of 3.5 MeV Fe{sup +}, 1 {micro}m below the surface. Nanoindentation measurements showed a cumulative increase in hardness as a result of hydrogen and helium injection over and above the hardness increase due to the displacement damage alone. TEM investigation indicated the presence of small bubbles of the injected gases in the irradiated area. In the current experiment, the retention of hydrogen in irradiated steel was studied in order to better understand its contribution to the observed hardening. To achieve this, the deuterium isotope ({sup 2}H) was injected in place of natural hydrogen ({sup 1}H) during the implantation. Trapped deuterium was then profiled, at room temperature, using the high cross-section nuclear resonance reaction with {sup 3}He. Results showed a surprisingly high concentration of deuterium to be retained in the irradiated steel at low temperature, especially in the presence of helium. There is indication that hydrogen retention at spallation neutron source relevant target temperatures may reach as high as 10%.

  15. Mechanical properties of irradiated 9Cr-2WVTa steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Rieth, M.

    1998-09-01

    An Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel has excellent strength and impact toughness before and after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the High Flux Reactor (HFR). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increased only 32 C after 28 dpa at 365 C in FFTF, compared to a shift of {approx}60 C for a 9Cr-2WV steel--the same as the 9Cr-2WVTa steel but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile properties before and after irradiation. The 9Cr-2WVTa steel has a smaller prior-austenite grain size, but otherwise microstructures are similar before irradiation and show similar changes during irradiation. The irradiation behavior of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel differs from the 9Cr-2WV steel and other similar steels in two ways: (1) the shift in DBTT of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF does not saturate with fluence by {approx}28 dpa, whereas for the 9Cr-2WV steel and most similar steels, saturation occurs at <10 dpa, and (2) the shift in DBTT for 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF and HFR increased with irradiation temperature, whereas it decreased for the 9Cr-2WV steel, as it does for most similar steels. The improved properties of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel and the differences with other steels were attributed to tantalum in solution.

  16. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  17. Microstructural analysis of neutron-irradiated martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, J. J.; Klueh, R. L.

    1996-06-01

    Four martensitic steels for fusion applications were examined by transmission electron microscopy after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at 420°C to 7.8 X 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), about 35 dpa. There were two commercial steels, 9Cr-IMoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW, and two experimental reduced-activation steels, 9Cr-2WV and 9Cr-2WVTa. Before irradiation, the tempered martensite microstructures of the four steels contained a high dislocation density, and the major precipitate was M 23C 6 carbide, with few MC carbides. Irradiation caused minor changes in these precipitates. Voids were found in all irradiated specimens, but swelling remained below 1%, with the 9Cr-1MoVNb having the highest void density. Although the 12Cr-IMoVW steel showed the best swelling resistance, it also contained the highest density of radiation-induced new phases, which were identified as chi-phase and possibly α'. Radiation-induced chi-phase was also observed in the 9Cr-1MoVNb steel. The two reduced-activation steels showed very stable behavior under irradiation: a high density of dislocation loops replaced the original high dislocation density; moderate void swelling occurred, and no new phase formed. The differences in microstructural evolution of the steels can explain some of the mechanical properties observations made in these steels.

  18. Weldability of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kyoichi; Nishimura, Seiji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuji; Kato, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of weldability in neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is an important issue to be addressed in the planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internals. In this work, samples selected from reactor internal components which had been irradiated to fluence from 8.5 × 10 22 to 1.4 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) corresponding to helium content from 0.11 to 103 appm, respectively, were subjected to tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding with heat input ranged 0.6-16 kJ/cm. The weld defects were characterized by penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The integrity of the weld was better when there were less helium and at lower heat input. Tensile properties of weld joint containing 0.6 appm of helium fulfilled the requirement for unirradiated base metal. Repeated thermal cycles were found to be very hazardous. The results showed the combination of material helium content and weld heat input where materials can be welded with little concern to invite cracking. Also, the importance of using properly selected welding procedures to minimize thermal cycling was recognized.

  19. Hydrogen transport through stainless steel under plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of gas exchange through stainless steel surface of the plasma chamber under irradiation with hydrogen atoms in oxygen atmosphere or oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasma. Dependence of this process on various irradiation parameters, such as the metal temperature, energy of irradiating ions, gas composition of plasma are studied. It is shown, that desorption from stainless steel is activated with the increase of the plasma chamber walls temperature and energy of irradiating ions. Hydrogen release occurs also under irradiation of the walls by helium and argon plasmas added with oxygen, however the amount of released hydrogen is several times lower than in the case of irradiation with oxygen contaminated deuterium plasma.

  20. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  1. Irradiation-induced precipitation modelling of ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, You Fa; Faulkner, Roy G.; Lu, Zheng

    2009-06-01

    In high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels typically used in reactor pressure vessels (RPV), irradiation-induced microstructure changes affect the performance of the components. One such change is precipitation hardening due to the formation of solute clusters and/or precipitates which form as a result of irradiation-enhanced solute diffusion and thermodynamic stability changes. The other is irradiation-enhanced tempering which is a result of carbide coarsening due to irradiation-enhanced carbon diffusion. Both effects have been studied using a recently developed Monte Carlo based precipitation kinetics simulation technique and modelling results are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreements have been achieved.

  2. Experimental studies of irradiated and hydrogen implantation damaged reactor steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, Vladimír; Pecko, Stanislav; Sojak, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Radiation degradation of nuclear materials can be experimentally simulated via ion implantation. In our case, German reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This unique non-destructive method can be effectively applied for the evaluation of microstructural changes and for the analysis of degradation of reactor steels due to neutron irradiation and proton implantation. Studied specimens of German reactor pressure vessel steels are originally from CARINA/CARISMA program. Eight specimens were measured in as-received state and two specimens were irradiated by neutrons in German experimental reactor VAK (Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl) in the 1980s. One of the specimens which was in as-received and neutron irradiated condition was also used for simulation of neutron damage by hydrogen nuclei implantation. Defects with the size of about 1-2 vacancies with relatively small contribution (with intensity on the level of 20-40 %) were observed in "as-received" steels. A significant increase in the size of the induced defects due to neutron damage was observed in the irradiated specimens resulting in 2-3 vacancies. The size and intensity of defects reached a similar level as in the specimens irradiated in the nuclear reactor due to the implantation of hydrogen ions with energies of 100 keV (up to the depth <500 nm).

  3. Evaluation of irradiation hardening of proton irradiated stainless steels by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Kuribayashi, Yutaka; Nogami, Shuhei; Kasada, Ryuta; Hasegawa, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Ion irradiation experiments are useful for investigating irradiation damage. However, estimating the irradiation hardening of ion-irradiated materials is challenging because of the shallow damage induced region. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prove usefulness of nanoindentation technique for estimation of irradiation hardening for ion-irradiated materials. SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was used and it was irradiated by 1 MeV H+ ions to a nominal displacement damage of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 8 dpa at 573 K. The irradiation hardness of the irradiated specimens were measured and analyzed by Nix-Gao model. The indentation size effect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The hardness of the irradiated specimens changed significantly at certain indentation depths. The depth at which the hardness varied indicated that the region deformed by the indenter had reached the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated regions. The hardness of the irradiated region was proportional to the inverse of the indentation depth in the Nix-Gao plot. The bulk hardness of the irradiated region, H0, estimated by the Nix-Gao plot and Vickers hardness were found to be related to each other, and the relationship could be described by the equation, HV = 0.76H0. Thus, the nanoindentation technique demonstrated in this study is valuable for measuring irradiation hardening in ion-irradiated materials.

  4. Corrosion of stainless steel for HLW containers under gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, K.; Muraoka, S.

    1993-12-31

    The corrosion behavior of type 304 stainless steel was studied under gamma irradiation as part of the evaluation for the long-term durability of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal containers. Gamma rays, generated from fission products in high-level radioactive waste, are considered to change the environment around the canisters and overpacks. The redox potentials for NaCl solutions and corrosion potentials of stainless steel were measured to consider the effects of gamma irradiation, by using an electrochemical method. The pitting potentials of stainless steel for NaCl solutions were also measured to examine the pitting corrosion under gamma irradiation. As a result of this experiment, it is concluded that the oxidizing properties as a result of the formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} produced by gamma irradiation depended on the concentration of Cl{sup -}, and that the strength of oxidizing properties of 1M (mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3}) NaCl solution was particularly high, and the pitting corrosion as found for 1M NaCl solution under gamma irradiation at the dose rate of 2.6{times}10{sup 2} C/kg{center_dot}h (1.0{times}10{sup 6} R/h) at 60{degrees}C, by using an electrochemical method.

  5. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  6. The Irradiation Performance and Microstructural Evolution in 9Cr-2W Steel Under Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Charit, Indrajit; Pasebani, Somayeh

    2016-02-01

    Grade 92 steel (9Cr-2W) is a ferritic-martensitic steel with good mechanical and thermal properties. It is being considered for structural applications in Generation IV reactors. Still, the irradiation performance of this alloy needs more investigation as a result of the limited available data. The irradiation performance investigation of Grade 92 steel would contribute to the understanding of engineering aspects including feasibility of application, economy, and maintenance. In this study, Grade 92 steel was irradiated by iron ion beam to 10, 50, and 100 dpa at 30 and 500 °C. In general, the samples exhibited good radiation damage resistance at these testing parameters. The radiation-induced hardening was higher at 30 °C with higher dislocation density; however, the dislocation density was less pronounced at higher temperature. Moreover, the irradiated samples at 30 °C had defect clusters and their density increased at higher doses. On the other hand, dislocation loops were found in the irradiated sample at 50 dpa and 500 °C. Further, the irradiated samples did not show any bubble or void.

  7. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  8. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Genevois, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2010-05-01

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 °C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  9. Intergranular stress distributions in polycrystalline aggregates of irradiated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; El Shawish, S.; Cizelj, L.; Tanguy, B.

    2016-08-01

    In order to predict InterGranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of post-irradiated austenitic stainless steel in Light Water Reactor (LWR) environment, reliable predictions of intergranular stresses are required. Finite elements simulations have been performed on realistic polycrystalline aggregate with recently proposed physically-based crystal plasticity constitutive equations validated for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel. Intergranular normal stress probability density functions are found with respect to plastic strain and irradiation level, for uniaxial loading conditions. In addition, plastic slip activity jumps at grain boundaries are also presented. Intergranular normal stress distributions describe, from a statistical point of view, the potential increase of intergranular stress with respect to the macroscopic stress due to grain-grain interactions. The distributions are shown to be well described by a master curve once rescaled by the macroscopic stress, in the range of irradiation level and strain considered in this study. The upper tail of this master curve is shown to be insensitive to free surface effect, which is relevant for IGSCC predictions, and also relatively insensitive to small perturbations in crystallographic texture, but sensitive to grain shapes.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of neutron irradiated ultrafine grained ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad Alsabbagh; Apu Sarkar; Brandon Miller; Jatuporn Burns; Leah Squires; Douglas Porter; James I. Cole; K. L. Murty

    2014-10-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on ultra-fine grain (UFG) low carbon steel prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) has been examined. Counterpart samples with conventional grain (CG) sizes have been irradiated alongside with the UFG ones for comparison. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to 1.24 dpa. Atom probe tomography revealed manganese, silicon-enriched clusters in both ECAP and CG steel after neutron irradiation. X-ray quantitative analysis showed that dislocation density in CG increased after irradiation. However, no significant change was observed in UFG steel revealing better radiation tolerance.

  11. Evaluation of weld crack susceptibility for neutron irradiated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Narui, M.

    In order to clarify the mechanisms of weld cracking, especially for heat affected zone cracking in heavily neutron irradiated stainless steels and to establish a measure to evaluate crack susceptibility, a mini-sized Varestraint (variable restraint) test machine for hot laboratory operation was designed and fabricated. This unique PIE facility was successfully applied in the hot laboratory of IMR Oarai Branch of Tohoku University. The maximum restraint applied was 4% at the surface of the specimen. Specimen surface morphology and specimen microstructures were inspected by video microscope, SEM and TEM. Under the 2% surface restraint condition, clear formation of heat affected zone (HAZ) crack was observed for the case of neutron irradiation to produce 0.5 appm He and of 2.4 kJ heat input by TIG.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking on irradiated 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Gen; Nakajima, Nobuo; Konishi, Takao; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2001-02-01

    Tests on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) were carried out by using cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel (SS) in-core flux thimble tubes which were irradiated up to 5×10 26 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at 310°C in a Japanese PWR. Unirradiated thimble tube was also tested for comparison with irradiated tubes. Mechanical tests such as the tensile, hardness tests and metallographic observations were performed. The susceptibility to SCC was examined by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) under PWR primary water chemistry condition and compositional analysis on the grain boundary segregation was made. Significant changes in the mechanical properties due to irradiation such as a remarkable increase of strength and hardness, and a considerable reduction of elongation were seen. SSRT results revealed that the intergranular fracture ratio (%IGSCC) increased as dissolved hydrogen (DH) increased. In addition, SSRT results in argon gas atmosphere showed a small amount of intergranular cracking. The depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and the enrichment of Ni and Si were observed in microchemical analyses on the grain boundary.

  13. Mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated nickel-containing martensitic steels: I. Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Hashimoto, N.; Sokolov, M. A.; Shiba, K.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2006-10-01

    Tensile and Charpy specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and these steels doped with 2% Ni were irradiated at 300 and 400 °C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) up to ≈12 dpa and at 393 °C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to ≈15 dpa. In HFIR, a mixed-spectrum reactor, ( n, α) reactions of thermal neutrons with 58Ni produce helium in the steels. Little helium is produced during irradiation in FFTF. After HFIR irradiation, the yield stress of all steels increased, with the largest increases occurring for nickel-doped steels. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increased up to two times and 1.7 times more in steels with 2% Ni than in those without the nickel addition after HFIR irradiation at 300 and 400 °C, respectively. Much smaller differences occurred between these steels after irradiation in FFTF. The DBTT increases for steels with 2% Ni after HFIR irradiation were 2-4 times greater than after FFTF irradiation. Results indicated there was hardening due to helium in addition to hardening by displacement damage and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  14. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1990-06-01

    Samples of ultra high purity stainless steel have been fabricated into 2mm {times} 2mm rectangular bars and irradiated to one dpa ({approximately}l {times} 10{sup 19} p{sup +}/cm{sup 2}) using 3.4 MeV protons (>20{mu}A) while controlling the sample temperature at 400{degree}C. Samples are pressed onto a water-cooled and electrically heated copper block with a thin layer of Sn in between to improve thermal conductivity. The irradiation produced a significant prompt radiation field but sample activation was limited to {beta}-decay and this decayed rapidly in less than 48 h. Samples were hydrogen charged and strained at slow rates at {minus}30{degree}C insitu in the Auger electron spectrometer to successfully fracture several samples intergranularly for grain boundary composition analysis. An ultra-high purity (UHP) alloy of Fe-19Cr-9Ni was irradiated to 1 dpa at 400C {plus minus} 5C and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} torr in the tandem accelerator of the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, resulting in a dislocation network density of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} cm{sup 2} and a dislocation loop density of 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3} along with the dissolution of small precipitates present in the unirradiated sample. EPR experiments on the UHP irradiated alloy showed no significant increase in charge passed upon reactivation, over an unirradiated sample experiencing the same thermal history. An SCC waterloop and autoclave system has been completed and a sample has been designed to measure the susceptibility of the irradiated microstructure as compared to the unirradiated microstructure.

  16. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hongen; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (Tirr) in the range of 25-450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With Tirr below ˜314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and Tirr showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher Tirr above ˜314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  17. Proton irradiation creep of FM steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Was, Gary S.

    2015-04-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel T91 was subjected to irradiation with 3 MeV protons while under load at stresses of 100-200 MPa, temperatures between 400 °C and 500 °C, and dose rates between 1.4 × 10-6 dpa/s and 5 × 10-6 dpa/s to a total dose of less than 1 dpa. Creep behavior was analyzed for parametric dependencies. The temperature dependence was found to be negligible between 400 °C and 500 °C, and the dose rate dependence was observed to be linear. Creep rate was proportional to stress at low stress values and varied with stress to the power 14 above 160 MPa. The large stress exponent of the proton irradiation creep experiments under high stress suggested that dislocation glide was driving both thermal and irradiation creep. Microstructure observations of anisotropic dislocation loops also contributed to the total creep strain. After subtracting the power law creep and anisotropic dislocation loop contributions, the remaining creep strain was accounted for by dislocation climb enabled by stress induced preferential absorption (SIPA) and preferential dislocation glide (PAG).

  18. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructural evolution in candidate low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira; Yoshino, Masahiko; Asakura, Kentaro

    1994-09-01

    Fe-(2.25-12)Cr-2W-V, Ta low activation ferritic steels (JLF series steels) were developed in the fusion materials development program of Japanese universities. Microstructural observations, including precipitation response, were performed after neutron irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA. The preirradiation microstructure was stable after irradiation at low temperature (< 683 K). Recovery of martensitic lath structure and coarsening of precipitates took place above 733 K. Precipitates observed after irradiation were the same as those in unirradiated materials in 7-9Cr steels, and no irradiation induced phase was identified. The irradiation induced shift in DBTT in the 9Cr-2W steel proved to be very small which is a reflection of stable precipitation response in these steels. A high density of fine α' precipitates was observed in the 12Cr steel which might be responsible for the large irradiation hardening found in the 12Cr steel. Void formation was observed in 7-9Cr steels irradiated at 683 K, but the amount of void swelling was very small.

  19. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  20. Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels under helium implantation and heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengqing; Zhang, Chonghong; Yang, Yitao; Meng, Yancheng; Jang, Jinsung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels after multi-energy He-ion implantation, or after irradiation with energetic heavy ions including Xe and Bi-ions was investigated with nano-indentation technique. Three kinds of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels including the commercial MA956 (19Cr-3.5Al), the 16Cr-0.1Ti and the 16Cr-3.5Al-0.1Zr were used. Data of nano-hardness were analyzed with an approach based on Nix-Gao model. The depth profiles of nano-hardness can be understood by the indentation size effect (ISE) in specimens of MA956 implanted with multi-energy He-ions or irradiated with 328 MeV Xe ions, which produced a plateau damage profile in the near-surface region. However, the damage gradient overlaps the ISE in the specimens irradiated with 9.45 Bi ions. The dose dependence of the nano-hardness shows a rapid increase at low doses and a slowdown at higher doses. An 1/2-power law dependence on dpa level is obtained. The discrepancy in nano-hardness between the helium implantation and Xe-ion irradiation can be understood by using the average damage level instead of the peak dpa level. Helium-implantation to a high dose (7400 appm/0.5 dpa) causes an additional hardening, which is possibly attributed to the impediment of motion dislocations by helium bubbles formed in high concentration in specimens.

  1. A study on the microstructure and mechanical property of proton irradiated A508-3 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-hong; Lei, Jing; Shu, Guo-gang; Wan, Qiang-mao

    2015-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and the nanoindentation technique were employed to study the dislocation loops and hardening induced in proton irradiated A508-3 steel. The A508-3 steel specimens were irradiated to the dose of 0.054, 0.163, 0.271 dpa at room temperature (RT), 0.163 pa at 250 °C and 0.163, 0.271 dpa at 290 °C. The effect of dose and temperature on the dislocation loops and irradiation hardening was investigated. The results indicated that the dislocation loops were formed in proton irradiated A508-3 steel. The size and number density generally increased with increasing dose at RT. When the irradiation temperature changed from RT to 290 °C, the loop size increased and the loop number density decreased. The irradiation hardening increased with dose. The effect of temperature on the irradiation induced hardening was discussed.

  2. Microstructure and nanoindentation of the CLAM steel with nanocrystalline grains under Xe irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yongqin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xiaolin; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Farong; Long, Yi

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an early look at irradiation effects on China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel with nanocrystalline grains (NC-CLAM steels) under 500 keV Xe-ion bombardment at room temperature to doses up to 5.3 displacements per atom (dpa). The microstructure in the topmost region of the steel is composed of nanocrystalline grains with an average diameter of 13 nm. As the samples were implanted at low dose, the nanocrystalline grains had martensite lath structure, and many dislocations and high density bubbles were introduced into the NC-CLAM steels. As the irradiation dose up to 5.3 dpa, a tangled dislocation network exists in the lath region, and the size of the bubbles increases. X-ray diffraction results show that the crystal quality decreases after irradiation, although the nanocrystals obviously coarsen. Grain growth under irradiation may be ascribed to the direct impact of the thermal spike on grain boundaries in the NC-CLAM steels. In irradiated samples, a compressive stress exists in the surface layer because of grain growth and irradiation-introduced defects, while the irradiation introduced grain-size coarsening and defects gradients from the surface to matrix result in a tensile stress in the irradiated NC-CLAM steels. Nanoindentation was used to estimate changes in mechanical properties during irradiation, and the results show that the hardness of the NC-CLAM steels increases with increasing irradiation dose, which was ascribed to the competition between the grain boundaries and the irradiation-introduced defects.

  3. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M. Z.; Liu, P. P.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wan, F. R.; He, Z. B.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M23C6 precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M23C6 precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation.

  4. Mechanical property changes of low activation ferritic/martensitic steels after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Hamilton, M. L.; Narui, M.

    Mechanical property changes of Fe- XCr-2W-0.2V,Ta ( X: 2.25-12) low activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Japanese Low Activation Ferritic/martensitic (JLF) steels and F82H after neutron irradiation were investigated with emphasis on Charpy impact property, tensile property and irradiation creep properties. Dose dependence of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) in JLF-1 (9Cr steel) irradiated at 646-700 K increased with irradiation up to 20 dpa and then decreased with further irradiation showing highest DBTT of 260 K at 20 dpa. F82H showed similar dose dependence in DBTT to JLF-1 with higher transition temperature than that of JLF-1 at the same displacement damage. Yield strength in JLF steels and F82H showed similar dose dependence to that of DBTT. Yield strength increased with irradiation up to 15-20 dpa and then decreased to saturate above about 40 dpa. Irradiation hardening in 7-9%Cr steels (JLF-1, JLF-3, F82H) were observed to be smaller than those in steels with 2.25%Cr (JLF-4) or 12%Cr (JLF-5). Dependences of creep strain on applied hoop stress and neutron fluence were measured to be 1.5 and 1, respectively. Temperature dependence of creep coefficient showed a maximum at about 700 K which was caused by irradiation induced void formation or irradiation enhanced creep deformation. Creep coefficient of F82H was larger than those of JLF steels above 750 K. This was considered to be caused by the differences in N and Ta concentration between F82H and JLF steels.

  5. Tensile and charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on eight reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on the steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 365{degrees}C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15-17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 365{degrees}C. Thermal aging had little effect on the tensile behavior or the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in the upper-shelf energy (USE). After {approx}7 dpa, the strength of the steels increased and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (i.e., the strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness, as measured by an increase in DBTT and a decrease in the USE, remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels were the most irradiation resistant.

  6. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  7. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program Series 4 and 5)

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, R.G.; McGowan, J.J.; Menke, B.H.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    Multiple testing is done at two laboratories of typical nuclear pressure vessel materials (both irradiated and unirradiated) and statistical analyses of the test results. Multiple tests are conducted at each of several test temperatures for each material, standard deviations are determined, and results from the two laboratories are compared. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (current practice welds). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds.

  8. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels after low fluence irradiation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this work is the determination of the possible effect of the simultaneous formation of helium and displacement damage during irradiation on the Charpy impact behavior. Subsize Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and 12Cr-1MoVW with 2%Ni (12Cr-1MOVW-2Ni) were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400{degree}C to damage levels up to 2.5 dpa. The objective was to study the effect of the simultaneous formation of displacement damage and transmutation helium on impact toghness. Despite the low fluence relative to previous irradiations of these steels, significant increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) occurred. The 12Cr-1MoVW-2Ni steel irradiated at 400{degree}C had the largest increase in DBTT and displayed indications of intergranular fracture. A mechanism is proposed to explain how helium can affect the fracture behaviour of this latter steel in the present tests, and how it affected all three steels in previous experiments, where the steels were irradiated to higher fluences.

  9. Fractal characteristics of fracture morphology of steels irradiated with high-energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yongqiang; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Chonghong; Chen, Jiachao; Yang, Yitao; Zhang, Liqing; Song, Yin

    2015-06-01

    A fractal analysis of fracture surfaces of steels (a ferritic/martensitic steel and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steel) before and after the irradiation with high-energy ions is presented. Fracture surfaces were acquired from a tensile test and a small-ball punch test (SP). Digital images of the fracture surfaces obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) by using the pixel covering method. Boundary of binary image and fractal dimension were determined with a MATLAB program. The results indicate that fractal dimension can be an effective parameter to describe the characteristics of fracture surfaces before and after irradiation. The rougher the fracture surface, the larger the fractal dimension. Correlation of the change of fractal dimension with the embrittlement of the irradiated steels is discussed.

  10. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated highly embrittled steel and intergranular fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; McCabe, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated a submerged-arc (SA) weld irradiated to a high level of embrittlement and a temper embrittled base metal that exhibits significant intergranular fracture (IGF) relative to representation by the Master Curve. The temper embrittled steel revealed that the intergranular mechanism significantly extended the transition temperature range up to 150 C above To. For the irradiated highly embrittled SA weld study, a total of 21 1T compact specimens were tested at five different temperatures and showed the Master Curve to be nonconservative relative to the results, although that observation is uncertain due to evidence of intergranular fracture.

  11. Migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The model of the migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium and the formation of helium-vacancy pore nuclei in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation has been proposed. As illustrations of its application, the dependences of the characteristics of pore nuclei on the temperature of neutron irradiation have been calculated. The results of the calculations have been compared with the experimental data in the literature on measuring the characteristics of radiation-induced porosity that arises upon the irradiation of shells of fuel elements of a 16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Si-Ti-Nb-V-B steel in a fast BN600 neutron reactor at different temperatures.

  12. Hydrogen isotope transfer in austenitic steels and high-nickel alloy during in-core irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Polosukhin, B.G.; Sulimov, E.M.; Zyrianov, A.P.; Kalinin, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    The transfer of protium and deuterium in austenitic chromium-nickel steels and in a high-nickel alloy was studied in a specially designed facility. The transfer parameters of protium and deuterium were found to change greatly during in-core irradiation, and the effects of irradiation increased as the temperature decreased. Thus, at temperature T<673K, the relative increase in the permeability of hydrogen isotopes under irradiation can be orders of magnitude higher in these steels. Other radiation effects were also observed, in addition to the changes from the initial values in the effects of protium and deuterium isotopic transfer. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Fracture properties of neutron-irradiated martensitic 9Cr-WVTa steels below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Narui, M.; Kayano, H.

    1994-09-01

    Fracture properties of the reduced activation martensitic 9Cr-1WVTa and 9Cr-3WVTa steels were investigated by carrying out instrumented Charpy impact tests and tensile tests at temperatures below room temperature after irradiation in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor at 493 and 538 K. Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel was also examined for comparison. The irradiation-induced increase in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was 53, 26 and 40 K for the {1}/{3} size Charpy specimens of 9Cr-1WVTa, 9Cr-3WVTa and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels, respectively, which resulted primarily from the irradiation-induced increase in yield stress. The cleavage fracture stress was 1820-1870 MPa for the three steels in unirradiated conditions, which was scarcely affected by irradiation. The deflections to the maximum load and to the brittle fracture initiation were decreased by irradiation. In the tensile test, quasi-cleavage fracture occurred at 77 K in both unirradiated and irradiated conditions. The cleavage fracture stress was 1320-1380 MPa for the tensile specimens of the three steels, which was about 1.4 times smaller than that for the Charpy specimens.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Irradiation Embrittlement of SQV2A Steel by Using Magnetic Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Cheng Weiying; Nakahigashi, Shigeo; Komura, Ichiro; Fujiwara, Koji; Takahashi, Norio

    2006-03-06

    Irradiation embrittlement of SQV2A steel was evaluated by magnetic methods. Thermal aging (TA) and electron irradiation (EI) specimens were prepared to evaluate the thermal aging and the irradiation damage effects separately. B-H loops changed with TA and EI. Higher harmonics of AC magnetization signals were sensitive to micro-structure changing of specimens. The intensity of the 3rd harmonics increased linearly with over 100 years of equivalent operation time by Larson-Miller parameter of nuclear power plants.

  15. Tensile properties of reduced activation Fe-9Cr-2W steels after FFTF irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurishita, H.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.; Kimura, A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Gelles, D. S.

    1994-09-01

    In order to develop radiation resistant steels with reduced activation for fusion reactor applications, the effect of fast neutron irradiation was investigated on the tensile properties of five types of Fe-9Cr-2W martensitic steel with and without small additions of boron, yttrium and aluminum. Miniature tensile specimens of the steels were irradiated to 28 dpa at 663 K and 33-35 dpa at 703, 793 and 873 K in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and were deformed at temperatures between 300 and 873 K. The yield and ultimate tensile stresses were not significantly affected by the irradiations, but the total elongation was considerably decreased by the irradiation at 663 K. The reduction in elongation depended strongly on the test temperature with a maximum at around 673 K. The addition of yttrium alone tended to increase the high temperature strength, while the simultaneous addition of yttrium and aluminum tended to decrease the total elongation.

  16. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  17. Study on the mechanical properties evolution of A508-3 steel under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Ding, Hui; Shu, Guo-gang; Wan, Qiang-mao

    2014-11-01

    In an effort to study the effect of irradiation on the hardening behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel, nanoindentation was employed to investigate the mechanical properties of A508-3 steel after an irradiation with 190 keV proton to the dose range of 0.054-0.271 displacement per atom (dpa) at room temperature. The results show that the relationship between the nanohardness and indent depth is in accordance with the Nix-Gao model. The nanohardness of A508-3 steel increases notably with the dose. In addition, the contribution of the irradiation-induced microstructural defects including matrix damage and nano clusters to the irradiation hardening is discussed.

  18. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  19. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  20. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  1. Irradiation creep of low-activation ferritic steels in FFTF/MOTA*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Asakura, K.; Yoshino, M.; Namba, C.; Eiholzer, C. R.

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep behavior of low-activation steels, developed as structural materials for fusion reactors (JLF series steels), was investigated to obtain a fundamental understanding of these alloys under fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. (2.25-8)Cr(1-2)W bainitic steels and 12Cr-2W ferritic steels showed superior creep resistance to type-316 stainless steels under fast neutron irradiation up to 520°C. At temperatures below 460°C the creep strain increased with increasing Cr content up to 7 Cr, and further increments of Cr content up to 12% reduced the creep strain. At temperatures between 460 and 600°C, 7-8 Cr ferritic steels showed the largest creep strain. Swelling-enhanced creep, near the peak swelling temperature of 410°C, was also observed. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel JLF-1 presented excellent properties, suggesting it as a leading candidate alloy for structural components of fusion reactors.

  2. Void swelling of Japanese candidate martensitic steels under FFTF/MOTA irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimura, T.; Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1996-12-01

    Microstructural observations of six Japanese candidate 7-9% Cr reduced activation martensitic steels were carried out after heavy neutron irradiation in order to investigate the void swelling behavior of each steel. Neutron irradiations were performed in the FFTF/MOTA up to 67 dpa at temperatures between 638 and 873 K. Transmission electron microscope observations revealed that voids were formed in all the steels irradiated to 67 dpa at 703 K, and the highest void swelling was observed in JLM-1 which was added with 30 wt.ppm of boron (0.74%), and the minimum void swelling was observed in F82H steel (0.12%). The 9% Cr martensitic steels showed the peak of void swelling at temperatures around 700 K, where void swelling gradually increased with increasing irradiation fluence to 30 dpa and increased rapidly above it. It is considered that the incubation period of void swelling of 9% Cr martensitic steels (JLM series) is about 30 dpa. JLM-1 showed the highest void swelling rate (0.045%/dpa at most). The addition of 30 wt.ppm of boron enhanced void swelling, while it was suppressed by the addition of 100 wt.ppm Ti in the 9% Cr martensitic steel. The JLF-3 steel (7.03% Cr) and F82H (7.65% Cr) showed less void swelling than JLF-I (9.04% Cr). The alloying effects on the swelling behavior of the steels were interpreted in terms of the difference in the precipitation morphology of carbides.

  3. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  4. Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J.

    1996-12-31

    9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

  5. Tensile properties and damage microstructures in ORR/HFIR-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakai, E.; Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J. P.; Jistukawa, S.; Sawai, T.; Hishinuma, A.

    2000-12-01

    The synergistic effect of displacement damage and helium generation under neutron irradiation on tensile behavior and microstructures of austenitic stainless steels was investigated. The steels were irradiated at 400°C in the spectrally-tailored (ST) Oak Ridge research reactor/high flux isotope reactor (ORR/HFIR) capsule to 17 dpa with a helium production of about 200 appm and in the HFIR target capsule to 21 and 34 dpa with 1590 and 2500 appm He, respectively. The increase of yield strength in the target irradiation was larger than that in the ST irradiation because of the high-number density of Frank loops, bubbles, voids, and carbides. Based on the theory of dispersed barrier hardening, the strengths evaluated from these clusters coincide with the measured increase of yield strengths. This analysis suggests that the main factors of radiation hardening in the ST and the target irradiation at 400°C are Frank-type loops and cavities, respectively.

  6. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Progress report, October 1994--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-10-01

    This document is the October 1994-March 1995 Progress Report for the Heavy Section Steel Irradiation Program. The report contains a summary of activities in each of the 14 tasks of the HSSI Program, including: (1) Program management, (2) Fracture toughness shifts in high-copper weldments, (3) Fracture toughness shifts in low upper-shelf welds, (4) Irradiation effects in a commercial low upper-shelf weld, (5) Irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials, (6) Annealing effects in low upper-shelf welds, (7) Microstructural analysis of radiation effects, (8) In-service irradiated and aged material evaluations, (9) Japanese power development reactor vessel steel examination, (10) fracture toughness curve shift method, (11) Special technical assistance, (12) Technical assistance for JCCCNRS, (13) Correlation monitor materials, and (14) Test reactor irradiation coordination. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Effect of cold work on tensile behavior of irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tensile specimens were irradiated in ORR at 250, 290, 450, and 500/sup 0/C to produce a displacement damage of approx.5 dpa and 40 at. ppM He. Irradiation at 250 and 290/sup 0/C caused an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and a decrease in ductility relative to unaged and thermally aged controls. The changes were greatest for the 20%-cold-worked steel and lowest for the 50%-cold-worked steel. Irradiation at 450/sup 0/C caused a slight relative decrease in strength for all cold-worked conditions. A large decrease was observed at 500/sup 0/C, with the largest decrease occurring for the 50%-cold-worked specimen. No bubble, void, or precipitate formation was observed for specimens examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The irradiation hardening was correlated with Frank-loop and ''black-dot'' loop damage. A strength decrease at 500/sup 0/C was correlated with dislocation network recovery. Comparison of tensile and TEM results from ORR-irradiated steel with those from steels irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor indicated consistent strength and microstructure changes.

  8. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Nanostructure evolution in ODS Eurofer steel under irradiation up to 32 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhkin, S. V.; Orlov, N. N.; Aleev, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Kozodaev, M. A.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Chalykh, B. B.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.

    2015-01-01

    The nanostructure of the ODS Eurofer steel (9% CrWVTa + 0.5% Y2O3) has been studied after irradiation by iron ions to a damaging dose of 32 dpa. This steel in the initial state is characterized by the presence of a significant amount (˜1024 m-3) of nanosized (2-4 nm) clusters containing atoms of V, Y, O, and N. An analysis of the distribution of various chemical elements in the tested volumes has revealed variations in the composition of the matrix and of the nanosized clusters during irradiation. The data obtained were compared with the results for the ODS Eurofer steel subjected to reactor irradiation to a dose of 32 dpa.

  10. TEM characterization of dislocation loops in irradiated bcc Fe-based steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2012-12-08

    In this study, we describe a methodology to examine dislocation loops in irradiated steels based on a combination of crystallographic information and g*b invisibility criteria. Dislocation loops in transmission electron microscope (TEM) images can be conveniently analyzed using this method. Through this analysis approach, dislocation loops in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels irradiated at 400 *C have been examined. The predominant types of loops found in irradiated RAFM steels were h100i{200} and 1/2h111i 111. The size, density, and density anisotropy of these two types of dislocation loops were quantified. It was observed that the h100i{200} loop density is more than twice that of 1/2h111i{111} loops. A large density anisotropy of h100i{200} loops was identified.

  11. Reactor Materials Program electrochemical potential measurements by ORNL with unirradiated and irradiated stainless steel specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Effect of irradiation of stainless steel on electrochemical potential (ECP) was investigated by measurements in dilute HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions, conditions simulating reactor moderator. The electrodes were made from unirradiated/irradiated, unsensitized/sensitized specimens from R-reactor piping. Results were inconclusive because of budgetary restrictions. The dose rate may have been too small to produce a significant radiolytic effect. Neither the earlier CERT corrosion susceptibility tests nor the present ECP measurements showed a pronounced effect of irradiation on susceptibility of the stainless steel to IGSCC; this is confirmed by the absence in the stainless steel of the SRS reactor tanks (except for the C Reactor tank knuckle area).

  12. Void denuded zone formation for Fe-15Cr-15Ni steel and PNC316 stainless steel under neutron and electron irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekio, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2015-03-01

    Irradiation-induced void denuded zone (VDZ) formation near grain boundaries was studied to clarify the effects of minor alloying elements on vacancy diffusivity during irradiation in practical PNC316 stainless steel developed for nuclear reactor core materials. The test materials were Fe-15Cr-15Ni steel without additives and PNC316 stainless steel; the latter contains minor alloying elements to improve the void swelling resistance. These steels were neutron-irradiated in the experimental fast reactor JOYO at temperatures from 749 K to 775 K and fast neutron doses of 18-103 dpa, and electron irradiation was also carried out using 1 MeV high voltage electron microscopy at temperatures of 723 K and 773 K and doses up to 14.4 dpa. VDZ formation was analyzed by TEM microstructural observation after irradiation by considering radiation-induced segregation near the grain boundaries. VDZs were formed near random grain boundaries with higher misfit angles in both Fe-15Cr-15Ni and PNC316 steels. The VDZ widths in the PNC316 stainless steel were narrower than those for the Fe-15Cr-15Ni steel for all neutron and electron irradiations. The VDZ width analysis implied that the vacancy diffusivity was reduced in PNC316 stainless steel as a result of interaction of vacancies with minor alloying elements.

  13. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program. Volume 5, No. 2, Progress report, April 1994--September 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-07-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established with its primary goal to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior and the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water RPV integrity. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is arranged into 14 tasks: (1) program management, (2) fracture toughness curve shift in high-copper weldments (Series 5 and 6), (3) K{sub lc} and K{sub la} curve shifts in low upper-shelf (LUS) welds (Series 8), (4) irradiation effects in a commercial LUS weld (Series 10), (5) irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials (Series 11), (6) annealing effects in LUS welds (Series 9), (7) microstructural and microfracture analysis of irradiation effects, (8) in-service irradiated and aged material evaluations, (9) Japan Power Development Reactor (JPDR) steel examination, (10) fracture toughness curve shift method, (11) special technical assistance, (12) technical assistance for Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) Working Groups 3 and 12, (13) correlation monitor materials, and (14) test reactor coordination. Progress on each task is reported.

  14. Effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening in stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, N.; Miwa, Y.; Kondo, K.; Kaji, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening were studied in advance for predicting irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking. The specimens of SUS316 and SUS316L with several % plastic strains, which correspond to weld residual stress, were prepared by bending and keeping deformation under irradiation. Ion irradiations of 12 MeV Ni 3+ were performed at 330, 400 and 550 oC to 45 dpa. No bended specimen was simultaneously irradiated with the bended specimen. The residual stress was estimated by X-ray residual stress measurements before and after the irradiation. The micro-hardness was measured by using nanoindenter. The residual stress did not relax even for the case of the higher temperature aging at 500 oC for the same time of irradiation. The residual stress after ion irradiation up to high dpa, however, relaxed at these experimental temperatures. The irradiation hardening of stressed specimen was obviously lower than that of un-stressed one in case of SUS316L irradiated at 300 oC to 12 dpa.

  15. Irradiation-induced microchemical changes in highly irradiated 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.

    2016-02-01

    Cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 74 dpa in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were analyzed by atom probe tomography (APT) to extend knowledge of solute clusters and segregation at higher doses. The analyses confirmed that those clusters mainly enriched in Ni-Si or Ni-Si-Mn were formed at high number density. The clusters were divided into three types based on their size and Mn content; small Ni-Si clusters (3-4 nm in diameter), and large Ni-Si and Ni-Si-Mn clusters (8-10 nm in diameter). The total cluster number density was 7.7 × 1023 m-3. The fraction of large clusters was almost 1/10 of the total density. The average composition (in at%) for small clusters was: Fe, 54; Cr, 12; Mn, 1; Ni, 22; Si, 11; Mo, 1, and for large clusters it was: Fe, 44; Cr, 9; Mn, 2; Ni, 29; Si, 14; Mo,1. It was likely that some of the Ni-Si clusters correspond to γ‧ phase precipitates while the Ni-Si-Mn clusters were precursors of G phase precipitates. The APT analyses at grain boundaries confirmed enrichment of Ni, Si, P and Cu and depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and Mn. The segregation behavior was consistent with previous knowledge of radiation induced segregation.

  16. Charpy impact tests on martensitic/ferritic steels after irradiation in SINQ target-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yong; Marmy, Pierre

    2005-08-01

    Charpy impact tests were performed on martensitic/ferritic (MF) steels T91, F82H, Optifer-V and Optimax-A/-C irradiated in SINQ Target-3 up to 7.5 dpa and 500 appm He in a temperature range of 120-195 °C. Results demonstrate that for all the four kinds of steels, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increases with irradiation dose. The difference in the DBTT shifts (ΔDBTT) of the different steels is not significant after irradiation in the SINQ target. The ΔDBTT data from the previous small punch (Δ DBTT SP) and the present Charpy impact (ΔDBTT CVN) tests can be correlated with the expression: Δ DBTT SP = 0.4ΔDBTT CVN. All the ΔDBTT data fall into a linear band when they are plotted versus helium concentration. The results indicate that helium effects on the embrittlement of MF steels are significant, particularly at higher concentrations. It suggests that MF steels may not be very suitable for applications at low temperatures in spallation irradiation environments where helium production is high.

  17. Impact behavior of reduced-activation steels irradiated to 24 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    Charpy impact properties of eight reduced-activation Cr-W ferritic steels were determined after irradiation to {approx}21-24 dpa in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at 365{degree}C. Chromium concentrations in the eight steels ranged from 2.25 to 12wt% Cr (steels contained {approx}0.1%C). the 2 1/4Cr steels contained variations of tungsten and vanadium, and the steels with 5, 9, and 12% Cr, contained a combination of 2% W and 0.25% V. A 9Cr in FFTF to {approx}6-8 and {approx}15-17 dpa. Irradiation caused an increase in the DBTT and decrease in the USE, but there was little further change in the DBTT from that observed after the 15-17 dpa irradiation, indicating that the shift had essentially saturated with fluence. The results are encouraging because they indicate that the effect of irradiation on toughness can be faorably affected by changing composition and microstructure.

  18. Dependence of impact properties on irradiation temperature in reduced-activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Narui, Minoru; Misawa, Toshihei; Matsui, Hideki; Kohyama, Akira

    1998-10-01

    Ductile-brittle transition (DBT) behavior of 9%Cr-2%W reduced-activation martensitic (RAM) steels has been investigated following neutron irradiation in the fast flux test facility, materials open test facility (FFTF/MOTA) at different temperatures. Both the irradiations at 663 and 733 K cause an increase in DBT temperature, while the irradiation at 663 K induces the hardening and the softening at 733 K. Microstructural observation by transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that small dislocation loops existed in the specimen irradiated at 663 K and no such a loop, but relatively large M 6C carbides and Laves phase were formed by the irradiation at 733 K. There appears to be a linear dependence between ΔDBTT and Δ σY in neutron irradiated RAM steels when irradiation induces the hardening. Irradiation embrittlement accompanied by the softening is considered to be due to reduction of cleavage fracture stress caused by the irradiation-induced recovery of the martensitic structure, namely decrease in dislocation density and formation of large precipitates.

  19. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy study on Fe-ion irradiated NHS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiping; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Xing; Cui, Minghuan; Li, Bingsheng; Sun, Jianrong; Yao, Cunfeng; Wei, Kongfang; Shen, Tielong; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Ji; Song, Peng; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong

    2015-02-01

    In order to study the evolution of irradiation-induced vacancy-type defects at different irradiation fluences and temperatures, a new type of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel named NHS (Novel High Silicon) was irradiated by 3.25 MeV Fe-ion at room temperature and 723 K to fluences of 4.3 × 1015 and 1.7 × 1016 ions/cm2. After irradiation, vacancy-type defects were investigated with variable-energy positron beam Doppler broadening spectra. Energetic Fe-ions produced a large number of vacancy-type defects in the NHS steel, but one single main type of vacancy-type defect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated samples. The concentration of vacancy-type defects decreased with increasing temperature. With the increase of irradiation fluence, the concentration of vacancy-type defects increased in the sample irradiated at RT, whereas for the sample irradiated at 723 K, it decreased. The enhanced recombination between vacancies and excess interstitial Fe atoms from deeper layers, and high diffusion rate of self-interstitial atoms further improved by diffusion via grain boundary and dislocations at high temperature, are thought to be the main reasons for the reversed trend of vacancy-type defects between the samples irradiated at RT and 723 K.

  20. Shear Punch Properties of Low Activation Ferritic Steels Following Irradiation in ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, Ruby M.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.; Ermi, August M.

    2001-10-01

    Shear punch post-irradiation test results are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 degrees centigrade to {approx}10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2Cr, 9Cr and 12Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Comparison of results with tensile test results showed good correlations with previously observed trends except where disks were improperly manufactured because they were too thin or because engraving was faulty.

  1. Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking of irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment using heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J.; Hure, J.; Tanguy, B.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.-C.; Andrieu, E.

    2016-08-01

    IASCC has been a major concern regarding the structural and functional integrity of core internals of PWR's, especially baffle-to-former bolts. Despite numerous studies over the past few decades, additional evaluation of the parameters influencing IASCC is still needed for an accurate understanding and modeling of this phenomenon. In this study, Fe irradiation at 450 °C was used to study the cracking susceptibility of 304 L austenitic stainless steel. After 10 MeV Fe irradiation to 5 dpa, irradiation-induced damage in the microstructure was characterized and quantified along with nano-hardness measurements. After 4% plastic strain in a PWR environment, quantitative information on the degree of strain localization, as determined by slip-line spacing, was obtained using SEM. Fe-irradiated material strained to 4% in a PWR environment exhibited crack initiation sites that were similar to those that occur in neutron- and proton-irradiated materials, which suggests that Fe irradiation may be a representative means for studying IASCC susceptibility. Fe-irradiated material subjected to 4% plastic strain in an inert argon environment did not exhibit any cracking, which suggests that localized deformation is not in itself sufficient for initiating cracking for the irradiation conditions used in this study.

  2. He and H irradiation effects on the nanoindentation hardness of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Siben; Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Huang, Qunying; Xin, Jingping; Zhao, Ziqiang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, He and H ion irradiation induced hardening behavior of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was investigated, and the influence of Si on irradiation hardening was also examined. CLAM steel with different Si contents, Heat 0912 and Heat 0408D, were irradiated with single He (He concentration range from 0 to 2150 appm) ion beam and He/H dual ion beams. Then nanoindentation tests were applied to evaluate the ion irradiation induced hardening effect. The result of Heat 0912 showed hardening effect would be more serious with higher He concentration, and the trend saturated when He concentration reach 1000 appm. Comparing the result of Heat 0912 and Heat 0408D, higher Si content might improve the resistance to hardening.

  3. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi; Pawel, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  4. Fatigue behavior of type 316 stainless steel following neutron irradiation inducing helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Liu, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    Since a tokamak fusion reactor operates in a cyclic mode, thermal stresses will result in fatigue in structural components, especially the first wall and blanket. Type 316 stainless steel in the 20% cold-worked condition has been irradiated in the HFIR in order to introduce helium as well as displacement damage. A miniature hourglass specimen was developed for the reactor irradiations and subsequent fully reversed low cycle fatigue testing. For material irradiated and tested at 430/sup 0/C in vacuum to a damage level of 7 to 15 dpa and containing 200 to 1000 appm He, a reduction in life by a factor of 3 to 10 was observed. An attempt was made to predict irradiated fatigue life by fitting data from irradiated material to a power law equation similar to the universal slopes equation and using ductility ratios from tensile tests to modify the equation for irradiated material.

  5. TEM, XRD and nanoindentation characterization of Xenon ion irradiation damage in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. F.; Li, J. J.; Li, D. H.; Liu, R. D.; Lei, G. H.; Huang, Q.; Yan, L.

    2014-11-01

    Cross-sectional and bulk specimens of a 20% cold-worked 316 austenitic stainless steel (CW 316 SS) has been characterized by TEM, XRD and nanoindentation to determine the microstructural evolution and mechanical property changes of 316 SS after irradiation with 7 MeV Xe26+ ions. TEM results reveal the presence of dislocation loops with a number density of approximately 3 × 1022 m-3 and sizes between 3 to 10 nm due to the collapse of vacancy rich cores inside displacement cascades. Peak broadening observed in XRD diffraction patters reveal systematic changes to lattice parameters due to irradiation. The calculated indentation values in irradiated 316 SS were found to be much higher in comparison to the unirradiated specimen, indicating the dose dependent effect of irradiation on hardness. The relationship between irradiation induced microstructural evolution and the changes to the mechanical properties of CW 316 SS are discussed in the context of fluence and irradiation temperature.

  6. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  7. The microstructure of neutron irradiated type-348 stainless steel and its relation to creep and hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; Beeston, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    Annealed type-348 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 33 to 39 dpa at 350°C were examined by transmission electron microscopy to determine the cause of pronounced irradiation creep and hardening. The irradiation produced very high densities of 1-2 nm diameter helium bubbles, 2-20 nm diameter faulted (Frank) dislocation loops and 10 nm diameter precipitate particles. These defects account for the observed irradiation hardening but do not explain the creep strains. Too few point defects survive as faulted dislocation loops for significant creep by the stress-induced preferential absorption (SIPA) mechanism and there are not enough unfaulted dislocations for creep by climb-induced glide. Also, the irradiation-induced precipitates are face-centred cubic G-phase (a niobium nickel suicide), and cannot cause creep. It is suggested that the irradiation creep occurs by a grain-boundary movement mechanism such as diffusion accomodated grain-boundary sliding.

  8. Evolution of microstructure after irradiation creep in several austenitic steels irradiated up to 120 dpa at 320 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault-Laborne, A.; Garnier, J.; Malaplate, J.; Gavoille, P.; Sefta, F.; Tanguy, B.

    2016-07-01

    Irradiation creep was investigated in different austenitic steels. Pressurized tubes with stresses of 127-220 MPa were irradiated in BOR-60 at 320 °C to 120 dpa. Creep behavior was dependent on both chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels. Different steels irradiated with and without stress were examined by TEM. Without stress, the irradiation produced high densities of dislocation lines and Frank loops and, depending on the type of steels, precipitates. Stress induced an increase of the precipitate mean size and density and, for some grades, an increase of the mean loop size and a decrease of their density. An anisotropy of Frank loop density or size induced by stress was not observed systematically. Dislocation line microstructure seems not to be different between the stressed and unstressed specimens. No cavities were detectable in these specimens. By comparing with the data from this work, the main irradiation creep models are discussed.

  9. Comparison of irradiated and hydrogen implanted German RPV steels using PAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecko, Stanislav; Sojak, Stanislav; Slugeň, Vladimír

    2015-12-01

    Radiation degradation of nuclear materials can be experimentally simulated via ion implantation. In our case, German reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This spectroscopic method is a really effective tool for the evaluation of microstructural changes and for the analysis of degradation of reactor steels due to irradiation. German commercial reactor pressure vessel steels, originally from CARISMA program, were used in our study. The German experimental reactor VAK was selected as the proper irradiation facility in the 1980s. A specimen in as-received state and 2 different irradiated cuts from the same material were measured by PALS and size of defects with their intensity was indentified. Afterwards there was prepared an experiment with concern in simulation of neutron irradiation by hydrogen ion implantation on a linear accelerator with energy of 100 keV. Results are concerning on comparison between defects caused by neutron irradiation and hydrogen implantation. The size and intensity of defects reached a similar level as in the specimens irradiated in the nuclear reactor due to hydrogen ions implantation.

  10. Damage structure of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-03-01

    TEM disk specimens of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either about 90 C or 250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. The irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 3.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 6.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}, a black dot density of 2.2 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3} and 1.6 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively, in the steels, and a high density (<1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}) of precipitates in matrix. Cavities could be observed in the specimens after the irradiation. It is suggested that the dislocation loops, the black dots, and the precipitates cause irradiation hardening, an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the uniform elongation, in the 316LN steel irradiated at low temperature.

  11. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019more » n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.« less

  12. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  13. Microstructural evolution of RPV steels under proton and ion irradiation studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Wu, Y. C.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Toyama, T.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation at low temperature (∼373 K) has been investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The PAS results indicated that both proton and heavy ion irradiation produce a large number of matrix defects, which contain small-size defects such as vacancies, vacancy-solute complexes, dislocation loops, and large-size vacancy clusters. In proton irradiated RPV steels, the size and number density of vacancy cluster defects increased rapidly with increasing dose due to the migration and agglomeration of vacancies. In contrast, for Fe ion irradiated steels, high density, larger size vacancy clusters can be easily induced at low dose, showing saturation in PAS response with increasing dose. No clear precipitates, solute-enriched clusters or other forms of solute segregation were observed by APT. Furthermore, dislocation loops were observed by TEM after 1.0 dpa, 240 keV proton irradiation, and an increase of the average nanoindentation hardness was found. It is suggested that ion irradiation produces many point defects and vacancy cluster defects, which induce the formation of dislocation loops and the increase of nanoindentation hardness.

  14. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  15. Crack initiation behavior of neutron irradiated model and commercial stainless steels in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate key factors affecting the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility of eleven neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel alloys. Four commercial purity and seven high purity stainless steels were fabricated with specific changes in composition and microstructure, and irradiated in a fast reactor spectrum at 320 °C to doses between 4.4 and 47.5 dpa. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were performed in normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or primary water (PW) environments to isolate the effects of environment, elemental solute addition, alloy purity, alloy heat, alloy type, cold work, and irradiation dose. The irradiated alloys showed a wide variation in IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the relative changes in mechanical properties and crack morphology. Cracking susceptibility measured by %IG was enhanced in oxidizing environments, although testing in the lowest potential environment caused an increase in surface crack density. Alloys containing solute addition of Ni or Ni + Cr exhibited no IASCC. Susceptibility was reduced in materials cold worked prior to irradiation, and increased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation-induced hardening was accounted for by the dislocation loop microstructure, however no relation between crack initiation and radiation hardening was found.

  16. Microstructural development under irradiation in European ODS ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäublin, R.; Ramar, A.; Baluc, N.; de Castro, V.; Monge, M. A.; Leguey, T.; Schmid, N.; Bonjour, C.

    2006-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels based on the ferritic/martensitic steel EUROFER97 are promising candidates for a fusion reactor because of their improved high temperature mechanical properties and their potential higher radiation resistance relative to the base material. Several EUROFER97 based ODS F/M steels are investigated in this study. There are the Plansee ODS steels containing 0.3 wt% yttria, and the CRPP ODS steels, whose production route is described in detail. The reinforcing particles represent 0.3-0.5% weight and are composed of yttria. The effect of 0.3 wt% Ti addition is studied. ODS steel samples have been irradiated with 590 MeV protons to 0.3 and 1.0 dpa at room temperature and 350 °C. Microstructure is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties are assessed by tensile and Charpy tests. While the Plansee ODS presents a ferritic structure, the CRPP ODS material presents a tempered martensitic microstructure and a uniform distribution of the yttria particles. Both materials provide a yield stress higher than the base material, but with reduced elongation and brittle behaviour. Ti additions improve elongation at high temperatures. After irradiation, mechanical properties of the material are only slightly altered with an increase in the yield strength, but without significant decrease in the total elongation, relative to the base material. Samples irradiated at room temperature present radiation induced defects in the form of blacks dots with a size range from 2 to 3 nm, while after irradiation at 350 °C irradiation induced a0<1 0 0>{1 0 0} dislocation loops are clearly visible along with nanocavities. The dispersed yttria particles with an average size of 6-8 nm are found to be stable for all irradiation conditions. The density of the defects and the dispersoid are measured and found to be about 2.3 × 10 22 m -3 and 6.2 × 10 22 m -3, respectively. The weak impact of irradiation on mechanical properties of ODS F

  17. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  18. Small punch test evaluation of neutron-irradiation-induced embrittlement of a Cr-Mo low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.-H. . E-mail: shsonguk@yahoo.co.uk; Faulkner, R.G.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Marmy, P.; Weng, L.-Q.

    2004-09-15

    Neutron-irradiation-induced embrittlement of a 2.25Cr1Mo steel is investigated by means of small punch testing along with scanning electron microscopy. There is an apparent irradiation-induced embrittlement effect after the steel is irradiated at about 400 deg. C for 86 days with a neutron dose rate of 1.75x10{sup -8} dpa/s. The embrittlement is mainly nonhardening embrittlement caused by impurity grain boundary segregation.

  19. Initial tensile test results from J316 stainless steel irradiated in the HFIR spectrally tailored experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel alloys. In this experiment, the spectrum has been tailored to reduce the thermal neutron flux and achieve a He/dpa level near that expected in a fusion reactor.

  20. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  1. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q.; Zhang, C. Yang, Z. G.; Ji, Y. Z.; Zang, H.; Shen, T. L.

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300–500 nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ∼840 nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  2. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  3. The effects of neutron irradiation on fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.

    1999-05-21

    Austenitic stainless steels are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor pressure vessel internal components because of their superior fracture toughness properties. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods leads to significant reduction in the fracture resistance of these steels. This paper presents results of fracture toughness J-R curve tests on four heats of Type 304 stainless steel that were irradiated to fluence levels of {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV) at {approx}288 C in a helium environment in the Halden heavy water boiling reactor. The tests were performed on 1/4-T compact tension specimens in air at 288 C; crack extensions were determined by both DC potential and elastic unloading compliance techniques.

  4. Microstructure and microhardness of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.8 dpa in STIP-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ target irradiation program (STIP-V) up to 20.8 dpa/1564 appm He. Microhardness measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations have been performed to investigate irradiation induced hardening effects. The results of CLAM steel specimens show similar trend in microhardness and microstructure changes with irradiation dose, compared to F82H/Optimax-A steels irradiated in STIP-I/II. Defects and helium bubbles were observed in all specimens, even at a very low dose of 5.4 dpa. For defects and bubbles, the mean size and number density increased with increasing irradiation dose to 13 dpa, and then the mean size increased and number density decreased with the increasing irradiation dose to 20.8 dpa.

  5. Analytical description of true stress-true strain curves for neutron-irradiated stainless austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Byun, Thak Sang; Busby, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an investigation for the deformation hardening behaviors of neutron-irradiated stainless steels in terms of true stress( ) true strain( ) curves. It is commonly accepted that the - curves are more informative for describing plastic flow, but there are few papers devoted to using the true curves for describing constitutive behaviors of materials. This study uses the true curves obtained from stainless steel samples irradiated to doses in the range of 0 55 dpa by various means: finite element calculation, optic extensomentry, and recalculation of engineering curves. It is shown that for the strain range 0 0.6 the true curves can be well described by the Swift equation: =k ( - 0)0.5. The influence of irradiation on the parameters of the Swift equation is investigated in detail. It is found that in most cases the k-parameter of this equation is not changed significantly by irradiation. Since large data scattering was observed for the 0-parameter, a modified Swift equation =k*( - 0 2/k2)0.5 was proposed and evaluated. This equation is based on the concept of zero stress, which is, in general, close to yield stress. The relationships among k, 0, and damage dose are discussed in detail, so as to more accurately describe the true curves for irradiated stainless steels.

  6. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  7. Structure and composition of phases occurring in austenitic stainless steels in thermal and irradiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction techniques coupled with quantitative x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phases which develop in austenitic stainless steels during exposure to thermal and to irradiation environments. In AISI 316 and Ti-modified stainless steels some thirteen phases have been identified and characterized in terms of their crystal structure and chemical composition. Irradiation does not produce any completely new phases. However, as a result of radiation-induced segregation principally of Ni and Si, and of enhanced diffusion rates, several major changes in phase relationships occur during irradiation. Firstly, phases characteristic of remote regions of the phase diagram appear unexpectedly and dissolve during postirradiation annealing (radiation-induced phases). Secondly, some phases develop with their compositions significantly altered by the incorporation of Ni or Si (radiation-modified phases).

  8. Response of 9Cr-ODS Steel to Proton Irradiation at 400 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; Y. Q. Wu

    2014-09-01

    The stability of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters, dislocation structure, and grain boundary segregation in 9Cr-ODS steels has been investigated following proton irradiation at 400 °C with damage levels up to 3.7 dpa. A slight coarsening and a decrease in number density of nanoclusters were observed as a result of irradiation. The composition of nanoclusters was also observed to change with a slight increase of Y and Cr concentration in the nanoclusters following irradiation. Size, density, and composition of the nanoclusters were investigated as a function of nanocluster size, specifically classified to three groups. In addition to the changes in nanoclusters, dislocation loops were observed after irradiation. Finally, radiation-induced enrichment of Cr and depletion of W were observed at grain boundaries after irradiation.

  9. Characterization of ion beam irradiated 304 stainless steel utilizing nanoindentation and Laue microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Chen, K.; Li, Y.; Kunz, M.; Jiao, Z.; Was, G. S.; Abad, M. D.; Minor, A. M.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-03-01

    Characterizing irradiation damage in materials utilized in light water reactors is critical for both material development and application reliability. Here we use both nanoindentation and Laue microdiffraction to characterize both the mechanical response and microstructure evolution due to irradiation. Two different irradiation conditions were considered in 304 stainless steel: 1 dpa and 10 dpa. In addition, an annealed condition of the 10 dpa specimen for 1 h at 500 °C was evaluated. Nanoindentation revealed an increase in hardness due to irradiation and also revealed that hardness saturated in the 10 dpa case. Broadening using Laue microdiffraction peaks indicates a significant plastic deformation in the irradiated area that is in good agreement with both the SRIM calculations and the nanoindentation results.

  10. Post-irradiation annealing effect on helium diffusivity in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, R.; Morisawa, J.; Kawano, S.; Oliver, B. M.

    2004-08-01

    As an experimental basis for helium induced weld cracking of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels, helium diffusivity has been evaluated by measuring helium release at high temperature. Isochronal and isothermal experiments were performed at temperatures between 700 and 1300 °C for 304 and 316L stainless steels. In 1 h isochronal experiments, helium was released beginning at ˜900 °C and reaching almost 100% at 1300 °C. No apparent differences in helium release were observed between the two stainless steel types. At temperatures between 900 and 1300 °C, the diffusion rate was calculated from the time dependence of the helium release rate to be: D0=4.91 cm 2/s, E=289 kJ/mol. The observed activation energy suggests that the release of helium from the steels is associated with the removal of helium from helium bubbles and/or from vacancy diffusion.

  11. Post-Irradiation Annealing Effect on Helium Diffusivity in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Katsura, Ryoei; Morisawa, J; Kawano, S; Oliver, Brian M.

    2004-08-01

    As an experimental basis for helium induced weld cracking of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels, helium diffusivity has been evaluated by measuring helium release rates at high temperature. Isochronal and isothermal experiment were performed at temperatures between 700 and 1300 for Type 304 and 316L stainless steels. In 1 hour isochronal experiments, helium was released beginning at {approx}900 and reaching near 100% at 1300. No apparent differences in helium release rate were observed between Type 304 and 316L stainless steels. At temperatures between 1100 and 1300, the diffusion rate was calculated from the time dependence of the helium release rate to be:?D0=3.42?104 cm2/s, E=173.2 kJ/mol. The observed activation energy suggests that the release of helium from the steels is associated with the removal of helium from helium bubbles.

  12. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  13. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  14. Monitoring microstructural evolution in irradiated steel with second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Wall, James J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-31

    Material damage in structural components is driven by microstructural evolution that occurs at low length scales and begins early in component life. In metals, these microstructural features are known to cause measurable changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Physically, the interaction of a monochromatic ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and vacancies, generates a second harmonic wave that is proportional to the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques thus have the capability to evaluate initial material damage, particularly before crack initiation and propagation occur. This paper discusses how the nonlinear ultrasonic technique of second harmonic generation can be used as a nondestructive evaluation tool to monitor microstructural changes in steel, focusing on characterizing neutron radiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. Current experimental evidence and analytical models linking microstructural evolution with changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are summarized.

  15. Study of irradiation effects in China low activation martensitic steel CLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qunying; Li, Jiangang; Chen, Yixue

    2004-08-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFM steels) are presently considered as the primary structural materials for a demonstration (DEMO) fusion plant and the first fusion power reactors because of their attractive properties. Studies on various properties of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) are underway. The activation level of CLAM steel was calculated with the widely used inventory code FISPACT with the latest data library FENDL/A-2 based on the first wall (FW) neutron spectrum of the fusion-driven subcritical system (FDS) from the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP/4C calculation with FENDL-2 data library. The results were compared with the activation levels of other RAFM steels, such as EUROFER97, F82H, JLF-1 and 9Cr-2WVTa etc., under the same irradiation conditions. Furthermore, the dominant nuclides to γ-ray dose rate of CLAM steel were analyzed. The required control levels of impurities in CLAM steel will soon be implemented based on the hands-on and remote recycling dose rate limits.

  16. IRRADIATION CREEP AND SWELLING OF RUSSIAN FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED TO VERY HIGH EXPOSURES IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR AT 305-335 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoraishin, A. M.; Porollo, S. I.; Shulepin, S. V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Garner, Francis A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2003-09-03

    Russian ferritic martensitic (F(slash)M) steels EP(dash)450, EP(dash)852 and EP(dash)823 were irradiated in the BN(dash)350 fast reactor in the form of gas-pressurized creep tubes. The first steel is used in Russia for hexagonal wrappers in fast reactors. The other steels were developed for compatibility with Pb(dash)Bi coolants and serve to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. In an earlier paper we published data on irradiation creep of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash) 823 at temperatures between 390 and 520 degrees C, with dpa levels ranging from 20 to 60 dpa. In the current paper new data on the irradiation creep and swelling of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash)852 at temperatures between 305 and 335 degrees C and doses ranging from 61 to 89 dpa are presented. Where comparisons are possible, it appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation related densification. These irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F(slash)M steels is about one half that of austenitic steels.

  17. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program: Volume 3, Progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-02-01

    The primary goal of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. Effects of specimen size, material chemistry, product form and microstructure, irradiation fluence, flux, temperature and spectrum, and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is arranged into 10 tasks: (1) program management, (2) K{sub Ic} curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) K{sub Ia} curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub Ic} and K{sub Ia} curve shifts in low upper-shelf welds, (6) irradiation effects in a commercial low upper-shelf weld, (7) microstructural analysis of irradiation effects, (8) in-service aged material evaluations, (9) correlation monitor materials, and (10) special technical assistance. This report provides an overview of the activities within each of these tasks from October 1991 to September 1992.

  18. Microstructural analysis of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-09-01

    Disk specimens of ferritic-martensitic steel, HT9 and F82H, irradiated to damage levels of {approximately}3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either {approximately}90 C or {approximately}250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. Before irradiation, tempered HT9 contained only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. Irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 8 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. in the HT9 irradiated at 250 C, a radiation-induced phase, tentatively identified as {alpha}{prime}, was observed with a number density of less than 1 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. On the other hand, the tempered F82H contained M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and a few MC carbides; irradiation at 250 C to 3 dpa caused minor changes in these precipitates and induced a dislocation loop density of 2 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}. Difference in the radiation-induced phase and the loop microstructure may be related to differences in the post-yield deformation behavior of the two steels.

  19. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Semiannual progress report, October 1996--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, T.M.

    1998-02-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. Because the RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a redundant backup system does not exist, it is imperative to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV`s fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established. Its primary goal is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior and, in particular, the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water RPV integrity. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is arranged into eight tasks: (1) program management, (2) irradiation effects in engineering materials, (3) annealing, (4) microstructural analysis of radiation effects, (5) in-service irradiated and aged material evaluations, (6) fracture toughness curve shift method, (7) special technical assistance, and (8) foreign research interactions. The work is performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Positron study of steel NF 709 after irradiation and thermal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Simko, F.; Pekarcikova, M.; Sojak, S.; Slugen, V.

    2015-12-01

    New improved austenitic steel NF 709 was studied in term of thermal and radiation stability in consideration of its application as structural material for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. Samples of steel NF 709 were exposed to two strains: annealing at 1000 °C in argon atmosphere and simulated irradiation performed by helium ion implantation. Changes of the microstructure after the experimental strains were observed by positron annihilation techniques. The microstructure after both treatments indicated growing of vacancy defects; although these changes were small or in the range of error bar. Thus, material NF 709 can be considered as well resistant to these applied strains.

  1. Cracking behavior of thermally aged and irradiated CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, W.-Y.; Natesan, K.; Li, Z.; Yang, Y.; Rao, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    To assess the combined effect of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the cracking behavior of CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel, crack growth rate (CGR) and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were carried out on compact-tension specimens in high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen. Both unaged and thermally aged specimens were irradiated at ∼320 °C to 0.08 dpa. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h apparently had no effect on the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking behavior in the test environment. The cracking susceptibility of CF-8 was not elevated significantly by neutron irradiation at 0.08 dpa. Transgranular cleavage-like cracking was the main fracture mode during the CGR tests, and a brittle morphology of delta ferrite was often seen on the fracture surfaces at the end of CGR tests. The fracture toughness J-R curve tests showed that both thermal aging and neutron irradiation can induce significant embrittlement. The loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation was more pronounced in the unaged than aged specimens. After neutron irradiation, the fracture toughness values of the unaged and aged specimens were reduced to a similar level. G-phase precipitates were observed in the aged and irradiated specimens with or without prior aging. The similar microstructural changes resulting from thermal aging and irradiation suggest a common microstructural mechanism of inducing embrittlement in CF-8.

  2. Effects of silicon, carbon and molybdenum additions on IASCC of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, J.; Miwa, Y.; Kohya, T.; Tsukada, T.

    2004-08-01

    To study the effects of minor elements on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), high purity type 304 and 316 stainless steels (SSs) were fabricated and minor elements, Si or C were added. After neutron irradiation to 3.5 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E>1 MeV), slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) of irradiated specimens were conducted in oxygenated high purity water at 561 K. Specimen fractured surfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) after the SSRTs. The fraction of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the fractured surface after the SSRTs increased with neutron fluence. In high purity SS with added C, the fraction of IGSCC was the smallest in the all SSs, although irradiation hardening level was the largest of all the SSs. Addition of C suppressed the susceptibility to IGSCC.

  3. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  4. Re-weldability of neutron irradiated Type 304 and 316L stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Y.; Koshiishi, M.; Kashiwakura, K.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawano, S.

    2004-08-01

    Weldability of irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied to develop the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals. Type 304 and 316L SSs were irradiated at ambient temperature in the US Advanced Test Reactor. The multi-pass bead-on-plate TIG (GTA) and YAG laser welding with heat input levels less than 1 MJ/m were performed on specimens containing helium up to 18 appm. In this paper, results of cross-sectional micrograph observations of the heat affected zone were considered in light of helium bubble properties. The tendency for weld crack formation of irradiated Type 316L SS was compared with that of irradiated Type 304 SS.

  5. Effect of irradiation temperature on void swelling of China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Fei; Qiao Jiansheng; Huang Yina; Wan Farong Ohnuki, Soumei

    2008-03-15

    CLAM is one composition of a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel (RAFM), which is being studied in a number of institutes and universities in China. The effect of electron-beam irradiation temperature on irradiation swelling of CLAM was investigated by using a 1250 kV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM). In-situ microstructural observations indicated that voids formed at each experimental temperature - 723 K, 773 K and 823 K. The size and number density of voids increased with increasing irradiation dose at each temperature. The results show that CLAM has good swelling resistance. The maximum void swelling was produced at 723 K; the swelling was about 0.3% when the irradiation damage was 13.8 dpa.

  6. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  7. Helium behavior in ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Kuriplach, Jan; Shen, Tielong; Sabelova, Veronika; Sato, Koichi; Dai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Two positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) techniques have been used for the investigation of helium behavior in STIP samples. Positron lifetime measurements and coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy have been employed together in a complex PAS characterization of RAFM steel irradiated in a mixed neutron-proton spectrum up to 20 dpa and 1800 appm He. Both techniques show an increase of the He-to-dpa ratio up to ∼10 dpa. At higher irradiation loads, the ratio is decreasing, which was attributed to the formation and growth of helium bubbles.

  8. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  9. Heavy-section steel technology and irradiation programs-retrospective and prospective views

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Bass, Bennett Richard; Rosseel, Thomas M; Merkle, John Graham; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2007-01-01

    In 1965, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), at the advice of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), initiated the process that resulted in the establishment of the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In 1989, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program, formerly the HSST task on irradiation effects, was formed as a separate program, and, in 2007, the HSST/HSSI Programs, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), celebrated 40 years of continuous research oriented toward the safety of light-water nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV). This paper presents a summary of results from those programs with a view to future activities.

  10. Properties of copper?stainless steel HIP joints before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Laukkanen, A.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2002-12-01

    The tensile and fracture behaviour of CuCrZr and CuAl25 IG0 alloys joint to 316L(N) stainless steel by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) have been determined in unirradiated and neutron-irradiated conditions. The tensile and fracture behaviour of copper alloy HIP joint specimens are dominated by the properties of the copper alloys, and particularly, by the strength mismatch and mismatch in strain hardening capacities between copper alloys and stainless steel. The test temperature, neutron irradiation and thermal cycles primarily affect the copper alloy HIP joint properties through changing the strength mismatch between the base alloys. Changes in the loading conditions i.e. tensile, bend ( JI) and mixed-mode bend ( JI/ JII) lead to different fracture modes in the copper alloy HIP joint specimens.

  11. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Ioka, Ikuo; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Hamada, Shozo; Hishinuma, Atkinichi; Robertson, J.P.

    1999-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400 C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/.dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small not only for base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  12. Analysis of Tensile Deformation and Failure in Austenitic Stainless Steels: Part II- Irradiation Dose Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation effects on stable and unstable deformations and fracture behaviors in irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs) have been studied in detail based on the equivalent true stress versus true strain curves. An iterative technique in finite element simulation was used to obtain the equivalent true stress-true strain data from experimental tensile curves. It was shown that the strain hardening rate was retained at a high level on unstable deformation after significant irradiation and was independent of the irradiation dose up to the initiation of a localized necking. The equivalent fracture stress was nearly independent of irradiation dose before the damage (embrittlement) mechanism changed. In low dose range (< ~ 2dpa), the fracture strain and tensile fracture energy decreased rapidly with dose and at higher doses they decreased gradually to saturated levels, which were still high for irradiated materials. It was also found that the fracture properties for EC316LN SS were less sensitive to irradiation dose than those for 316 SS, although their uniform tensile properties showed almost the same dose dependencies. It was confirmed that the dose dependence of tensile fracture properties evaluated by the linear approximation model for nominal stress was accurate enough for practical use without elaborate calculations.

  13. Microstructural stability of a self-ion irradiated lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Burns, Jatuporn; Alsagabi, Sultan; Butt, Darryl P.; Cole, James I.; Price, Lloyd M.; Shao, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Thermally stable nanofeatures with high number density are expected to impart excellent high temperature strength and irradiation stability in nanostructured ferritic steels (NFSs) which have potential applications in advanced nuclear reactors. A lanthana-bearing NFS (14LMT) developed via mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering was used in this study. The sintered samples were irradiated by Fe2+ ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 °C and 500 °C. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of the irradiated samples were studied using different microscopy techniques and nanoindentation, respectively. Overall morphology and number density of the nanofeatures remained unchanged after irradiation. Average radius of nanofeatures in the irradiated sample (100 dpa at 500 °C) was slightly reduced. A notable level of irradiation hardening and enhanced dislocation activity occurred after ion irradiation except at 30 °C and ≥50 dpa. Other microstructural features like grain boundaries and high density of dislocations also provided defect sinks to assist in defect removal.

  14. Welding-induced microstructure in austenitic stainless steels before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, R.; Schäublin, R.; Gavillet, D.; Baluc, N.

    2007-02-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of welded joints made of austenitic stainless steels have been investigated. The materials were welded AISI 304 and AISI 347, so-called test weld materials, and irradiated with neutrons at 300 °C to 0.3 and 1.0 dpa. In addition, an AISI 304 type from a decommissioned pressurised water reactor, so-called in-service material, which had accumulated a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa at about 300 °C, was investigated. The microstructure of heat-affected zones and base materials was analysed before and after irradiation, using transmission electron microscopy. Neutron diffraction was performed for internal stress measurements. It was found that the heat-affected zone contains, relative to the base material, a higher dislocation density, which relates well to a higher residual stress level and, after irradiation, a higher irradiation-induced defect density. In both materials, the irradiation-induced defects are of the same type, consisting in black dots and Frank dislocation loops. Careful analysis of the irradiation-induced defect contrast was performed and it is explained why no stacking fault tetrahedra could be identified.

  15. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  16. Microstructural stability of a self-ion irradiated lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Burns, Jatuporn; Alsagabi, Sultan; Butt, Darryl P.; Cole, James I.; Price, Lloyd M.; Shao, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Thermally stable nanofeatures with high number density are expected to impart excellent high temperature strength and irradiation stability in nanostructured ferritic steels (NFSs) which have potential applications in advanced nuclear reactors. A lanthana-bearing NFS (14LMT) developed via mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering was used in this study. The sintered samples were irradiated by Fe2+ ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 °C and 500 °C. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of the irradiated samples were studied using different microscopy techniques and nanoindentation, respectively. Overall morphology and number density of the nanofeatures remained unchanged after irradiation. Average radius of nanofeatures in the irradiated sample (100 dpa at 500 °C) was slightly reduced. A notable level of irradiation hardening and enhanced dislocation activity occurred after ion irradiation except at 30 °C and ⩾50 dpa. Other microstructural features like grain boundaries and high density of dislocations also provided defect sinks to assist in defect removal.

  17. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradiation to high doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Anderoglu, Osman; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-06-01

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)12%Cr1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiation-induced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature (<430 °C). This article aims at a comprehensive discussion on the thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in the HT9 steel after irradiation up to 3148 dpa at 378504 °C. A specimen reuse technique has been established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 × 3 × 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 °C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 °C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.

  18. Effect of recrystallization on ion-irradiation hardening and microstructural changes in 15Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Yoosung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    The effects of recrystallization on ion-irradiation hardening and microstructural changes were investigated for a 15Cr-ODS ferritic steel. Dual ion-irradiation experiments were performed at 470 °C using 6.4 MeV Fe3+ ions simultaneously with energy-degraded 1 MeV He+ ions. The displacement of damage at 600 nm depth from the specimen surface was 30 dpa. Nano-indentation test with Berkovich type indentation tip was measured by constant stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. Results from nano-indentation tests indicate irradiation hardening in ODS steels even at 470 °C, while it wasn't observed in reduced activation ferritic steel. Recrystallized ODS steel shows a larger irradiation hardening, which is considered to be due to the reduction of grain boundaries and interfaces of matrix/oxide particles. In 20% cold rolled ODS steel after recrystallization, both the hardening and bubble number density were lower than those of recrystallized ODS steel, suggesting that dislocations generated by cold rolling suppress bubble formation. Based on the estimation of irradiation hardening from TEM observation results, it is considered that the bubbles are not the main factor controlling ion-irradiation hardening.

  19. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  20. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  1. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  2. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation were investigated in situ in a neutron-irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Channel formation was observed at ∼70% of the polycrystalline yield stress of the irradiated materials (σ0.2). It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the σ0.2, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young's modulus) in channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in "soft" grains with a high Schmid factor located near "stiff" grains with high elastic stiffness. The spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one-third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. In the AISI 304 steel, channels in grains oriented close to <0 0 1>||TA (tensile axis) and <1 0 1>||TA were twin free and grain with <1 1 1>||TA and grains oriented close to a Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  3. Positron annihilation study of neutron irradiated model alloys and of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Almazouzi, A.

    2009-03-01

    The hardening and embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels are of great concern in the actual nuclear power plant life assessment. This embrittlement is caused by irradiation-induced damage, and positron annihilation spectroscopy has been shown to be a suitable method for analysing most of these defects. In this paper, this technique (both positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening) has been used to investigate neutron irradiated model alloys, with increasing chemical complexity and a reactor pressure vessel steel. It is found that the clustering of copper takes place at the very early stages of irradiation using coincidence Doppler broadening, when this element is present in the alloy. On the other hand, considerations based on positron annihilation spectroscopy analyses suggest that the main objects causing hardening are most probably self-interstitial clusters decorated with manganese in Cu-free alloys. In low-Cu reactor pressure vessel steels and in (Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu) alloys, the main effect is still due to Cu-rich precipitates at low doses, but the role of manganese-related features becomes pre-dominant at high doses.

  4. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  6. Mechanical properties of 1950's vintage 304 stainless steel weldment components after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Thomas, J.K. ); Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L. ); Lott, R.A.; Begley, J.A.; Shogan, R.P. . Science and Technology Center)

    1991-01-01

    The reactor vessels of the nuclear production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were constructed in the 1950's from Type 304 stainless steel plates welded with Type 308 stainless steel filler using the multipass metal inert gas process. An irradiated mechanical properties database has been developed for the vessel with materials from archival primary coolant system piping irradiated at low temperatures (75 to 150{degrees}C) in the State University of New York at Buffalo reactor (UBR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses of 0.065 to 2.1 dpa. Fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-V impact properties of the weldment components (base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ)) have been measured at temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 125{degrees}C in the L-C and C-L orientations for materials in both the irradiated and unirradiated conditions for companion specimens. Fracture toughness and tensile properties of specimens cut from an SRS reactor vessel sidewall with doses of 0.1 and 0.5 dpa were also measured at temperatures of 25 and 125{degrees}C. The irradiated materials exhibit hardening with loss of work hardenability and a reduction in toughness relative to the unirradiated materials. The HFIR-irradiated materials show an increase in yield strength between about 20% and 190% with a concomitant tensile strength increase between about 15% to 30%. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameters and Charpy-V energy absorption both decrease and show only a slight sensitivity to dose. The irradiation-induced decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J{sub def} at 1 mm crack extension) is between 20% to 65%; the range of J{sub 1C} values are 72.8 to 366 kJ/m{sup 2} for the irradiated materials. Similarly, Charpy V-notch results show a 40% to 60% decrease in impact energies.

  7. Mechanical properties of 1950`s vintage 304 stainless steel weldment components after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Thomas, J.K.; Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L.; Lott, R.A.; Begley, J.A.; Shogan, R.P.

    1991-12-31

    The reactor vessels of the nuclear production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were constructed in the 1950`s from Type 304 stainless steel plates welded with Type 308 stainless steel filler using the multipass metal inert gas process. An irradiated mechanical properties database has been developed for the vessel with materials from archival primary coolant system piping irradiated at low temperatures (75 to 150{degrees}C) in the State University of New York at Buffalo reactor (UBR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses of 0.065 to 2.1 dpa. Fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-V impact properties of the weldment components (base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ)) have been measured at temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 125{degrees}C in the L-C and C-L orientations for materials in both the irradiated and unirradiated conditions for companion specimens. Fracture toughness and tensile properties of specimens cut from an SRS reactor vessel sidewall with doses of 0.1 and 0.5 dpa were also measured at temperatures of 25 and 125{degrees}C. The irradiated materials exhibit hardening with loss of work hardenability and a reduction in toughness relative to the unirradiated materials. The HFIR-irradiated materials show an increase in yield strength between about 20% and 190% with a concomitant tensile strength increase between about 15% to 30%. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameters and Charpy-V energy absorption both decrease and show only a slight sensitivity to dose. The irradiation-induced decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J{sub def} at 1 mm crack extension) is between 20% to 65%; the range of J{sub 1C} values are 72.8 to 366 kJ/m{sup 2} for the irradiated materials. Similarly, Charpy V-notch results show a 40% to 60% decrease in impact energies.

  8. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact properties of Cr-W-V ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered ferritic and martensitic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at 393°C to ≈14 dpa on eight steels with 2.25%, 5%, 9%, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5% and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with ≈25% δ-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy (USE). The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393°C were compared with previous results at 365°C, all but a 5Cr and a 9Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  9. Hardening and microstructural evolution of A533b steels irradiated with Fe ions and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.; Arase, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Wells, P.; Onishi, T.; Odette, G. R.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation hardening and embrittlement of A533B steels is heavily dependent on the Cu content. In this study, to investigate the effect of copper on the microstructural evolution of these materials, A533B steels with different Cu levels were irradiated with 2.4 MeV Fe ions and 1.0 MeV electrons. Ion irradiation was performed from room temperature (RT) to 350 °C with doses up to 1 dpa. At RT and 290 °C, low dose (<0.1 dpa) hardening trend corresponded with ΔH ∝ (dpa)n, with n initially approximately 0.5 and consistent with a barrier hardening mechanism, but saturating at ≈0.1 dpa. At higher dose levels, the radiation-induced hardening exhibited a strong Cu content dependence at 290 °C, but not at 350 °C. Electron irradiation using high-voltage electron microscopy revealed the growth of interstitial-type dislocation loops and enrichment of Ni, Mn, and Si in the vicinities of pre-existing dislocations at doses for which the radiation-induced hardness due to ion irradiation was prominent.

  10. Analysis of tensile deformation and failure in austenitic stainless steels: Part II - Irradiation dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation effects on the stable and unstable deformation and fracture behavior of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) have been studied in detail based on the equivalent true stress versus true strain curves. An iterative finite element simulation technique was used to obtain the equivalent true stress-true strain data from experimental tensile curves. The simulation result showed that the austenitic stainless steels retained high strain hardening rate during unstable deformation even after significant irradiation. The strain hardening rate was independent of irradiation dose up to the initiation of a localized necking. Similarly, the equivalent fracture stress was nearly independent of dose before the damage (embrittlement) mechanism changed. The fracture strain and tensile fracture energy decreased with dose mostly in the low dose range <˜2 dpa and reached nearly saturation values at higher doses. It was also found that the fracture properties for EC316LN SS were less sensitive to irradiation than those for 316 SS, although their uniform tensile properties showed almost the same dose dependencies. It was confirmed that the dose dependence of tensile fracture properties evaluated by the linear approximation model for nominal stress was accurate enough for practical use without elaborate calculations.

  11. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Semiannual progress report, October 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1997-04-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents which have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. In particular, it is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPVs fracture resistance which occurs during service, since without that radiation damage, it is virtually impossible to postulate a realistic scenario that would result in RPV failure. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established with its primary goal to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior and, in particular, the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water RPV integrity. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties.

  12. Degradation of mechanical properties of stainless steel cladding due to neutron irradiation and thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.

    1994-09-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect following neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 X 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to -125{degrees}C) and no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub {kappa}}) much more than did thermal aging alone. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimens become available. Also, long-term thermal exposure of the three-wire cladding as well as type 308 stainless steel weld materials at 343{degrees}C is in progress.

  13. Alloying effect of Ni and Cr on irradiated microstructural evolution of type 304 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-11-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear power plants imposes significant challenges to core structural materials that suffer increased fluences. This paper presents the microstructural evolution of a type 304 stainless steel and its variants alloyed with extra Ni and Cr under neutron irradiation at ˜320 °C for up to 10.2 dpa. Similar to the reported data of type 304 variants, a large amount of Frank loops, ultrafine G-phase/M23C6 particles, and limited amount of cavities were observed in the irradiated samples. The irradiation promoted the growth of pre-existing M23C6 at grain boundaries and resulted in some phase transformation to CrC in the alloy with both extra Ni and Cr. A new type of ultrafine precipitates, possibly (Ti,Cr)N, was observed in all the samples, and its amount was increased by the irradiation. Additionally, α-ferrite was observed in the type 304 steel but not in the Ni or Ni + Cr alloyed variants. The effect of Ni and Cr alloying on the microstructural evolution is discussed.

  14. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  15. Irradiation testing of 316L(N)-IG austenitic stainless steel for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Osch, E. V.; Horsten, M. G.; de Vries, M. I.

    1998-10-01

    In the frame work of the European Fusion Technology Programme and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), ECN is investigating the irradiation behaviour of the structural materials for ITER. The main structural material for ITER is austenitic stainless steel Type 316L(N)-IG. The operating temperatures of (parts of) the components are envisaged to range between 350 and 700 K. A significant part of the dose-temperature domain of irradiation conditions relevant for ITER has already been explored, there is, however, very little data at about 600 K. Available data tend to indicate a maximum in the degradation of the mechanical properties after irradiation at this temperature, e.g. a minimum in ductility and a maximum of hardening. Therefore an irradiation program for plate material 316L(N)-IG, its Electron Beam (EB) weld and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) weld metal, and also including Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) 316L(N) powder and solid-solid joints, was set up in 1995. Irradiations have been carried out in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten at a temperature of 600 K, at dose levels from 1 to 10 dpa. The paper presents the currently available post-irradiation test results. Next to tensile and fracture toughness data on plate, EB and TIG welds, first results of powder HIP material are included.

  16. Microstructure of HFIR-irradiated 12-Cr 1 MoVW ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Klueh, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the fusion materials development program in the United States, a 12 Cr-1 MoVW ferritic steel was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to a damage level of 36 dpa at 300, 400, 500, and 600/sup 0/C. During irradiation in HFIR, a transmutation reaction of nickel results in the production of helium, to a level of 99 at. ppM in the present experiment. The microstructures were evaluated after irradiation and the results are presented. Cavities were found at all temperatures. Small cavities (3 to 9 nm) were observed after irradiation at 300, 500 and 600/sup 0/C. At 500 and 600/sup 0/C, the cavities were found preferentially at dislocations, lath boundaries, and prior austenite grain boundaries. After irradiation at 400/sup 0/C, larger cavities (4 to 30 nm) were observed homogeneously distributed throughout the tempered martensite structure. The maximum swelling was 0.07% after irradiation at 400/sup 0/C. Comparision of the results with other studies in which helium was not present at such high levels indicated helium enhances the swelling of 12 Cr-1 MoVW.

  17. Deformation Microstructure of a Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Klueh, R.L.; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.; Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.

    2003-09-15

    In order to determine the contributions of different microstructural features to strength and to deformation mode, microstructure of deformed flat tensile specimens of irradiated reduced activation F82H (IEA heat) base metal (BM) and its tungsten inert-gas (TIG) weldments (weld metal and weld joint) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), following fracture surface examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After irradiation, the fracture surfaces of F82H BM and TIG weldment showed a martensitic mixed quasi-cleavage and ductile-dimple fracture. The microstructure of the deformed region of irradiated F82H BM contained dislocation channels. This suggests that dislocation channeling could be the dominant deformation mechanism in this steel, resulting in the loss of strain-hardening capacity. While, the necked region of the irradiated F82H TIG, where showed less hardening than F82H BM, showed deformation bands only. From these results, it is suggested that the pre-irradiation microstructure, especially the dislocation density, could affect the post-irradiation deformation mode.

  18. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1997-09-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program was established to quantitatively assess the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior of typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. During this period, fracture mechanics testing of specimens of the irradiated low upper shelf (LUS) weld were completed and analyses performed. Heat treatment of five RPV plate materials was initiated to examine phosphorus segregation effects on the fracture toughness of the heat affected zone of welds. Initial results show that all five materials exhibited very large prior austenite grain sizes as a consequence of the initial heat treatment. Irradiated and annealed specimens of LUS weld material were tested and analyzed. Four sets of Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens were aged at various temperatures and tested to examine the reason for overrecovery of upper shelf energy that has been observed. Molecular dynamics cascade simulations were extended to 40 keV and have provided information representative of most of the fast neutron spectrum. Investigations of the correlation between microstructural changes and hardness changes in irradiated model alloys was also completed. Preliminary planning for test specimen machining for the Japan Power Development Reactor was completed. A database of Charpy impact and fracture toughness data for RPV materials that have been tested in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions is being assembled and analyzed. Weld metal appears to have similar CVN and fracture toughness transition temperature shifts, whereas the fracture toughness shifts are greater than CVN shifts for base metals. Draft subcontractor reports on precracked cylindrical tensile specimens were completed, reviewed, and are being revised. Testing on precracked CVN specimens, both quasi-static and dynamic, was evaluated. Additionally, testing of compact specimens was initiated as an experimental comparison of constraint limitations. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Semiannual progress report, September 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only component in the primary pressure boundary for which, if it should rupture, the engineering safety systems cannot assure protection from core damage. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. In particular, ft is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV`s fracture resistance that occurs during service. The Heavy-Section Steel (HSS) Irradiation Program has been established; its primary goal is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels, as they relate to light-water RPV integrity. The program includes the direct continuation of irradiation studies previously conducted within the HSS Technology Program augmented by enhanced examinations of the accompanying microstructural changes. During this period, the report on the duplex-type crack-arrest specimen tests from Phase 11 of the K{sub la} program was issued, and final preparations for testing the large, irradiated crack-arrest specimens from the Italian Committee for Research and Development of Nuclear Energy and Alternative Energies were completed. Tests on undersize Charpy V-notch (CVN) energy specimens in the irradiated and annealed weld 73W were completed. The results are described in detail in a draft NUREG report. In addition, the ORNL investigation of the embrittlement of the High Flux Isotope RPV indicated that an unusually large ratio of the high-energy gamma-ray flux to fast-neutron flux is most likely responsible for the apparently accelerated embrittlement.

  20. Removal of Metal-Oxide Layers Formed on Stainless and Carbon Steel Surfaces by Excimer Laser Irradiation in Various Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kameo, Yutaka; Nakashima, Mikio; Hirabayashi, Takakuni

    2002-02-15

    To apply the laser ablation technique for decontamination of metal wastes contaminated with radioactive nuclides, the effect of irradiation atmospheres on removal of oxide layers on steel surfaces by laser ablation was studied. Based on the assumption that the absorption of laser light follows the Lambert-Beer law, ablation parameters, such as absorption length and threshold fluence for ablation, of sintered Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and stainless and carbon steels were measured in He, O{sub 2}, Kr, or SF{sub 6} atmospheres. The results indicated that SF{sub 6} was the most effective gas of all irradiation atmospheres studied for the exclusive removal of oxide layers formed on stainless and carbon steel samples in high-temperature pressurized water. Secondary ion mass spectroscopic measurement and scanning electron microscopic observation confirmed that no oxide layer existed on the steel samples after the exclusive removal with laser irradiation.

  1. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  2. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-09-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

  3. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For amore » single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.« less

  4. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  5. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, M; Maloy, S

    2013-01-01

    Static fracture toughness tests have been performed for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens to expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were from the ACO-3 duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3 148 dpa at 378 504oC. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa m occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed in all tests at higher irradiation temperatures. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa m was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the dose range 3 148 dpa. A post upper-shelf behavior was observed for the non-irradiated and high temperature (>430 C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  6. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1990: Volume 1, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1993-11-01

    The primary goal of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) program is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. The program includes the direct continuation of irradiation studies previously conducted within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology program augmented by enhanced examinations of the accompanying microstructural changes. Effects of specimen size, material chemistry, product form and microstructure, irradiation fluence, flux, temperature and spectrum, and post-irradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. During this period detailed statistical analyses of the fracture data on K{sub lc} shift of high-copper welds revealed greater shifts in fracture toughness than in Charpy transition temperatures. Testing of the duplex specimens from the second phase of the irradiated crack arrest testing on high-copper welds was initiated. Short-term aging studies were conducted on stainless steel weld-overlay cladding. Additional determinations were made of chemistry and unirradiated RT{sub NDT}s of the low upper-shelf weld metal from the Midland reactor and fracture toughness testing begun. An initial model describing the evolution of radiation-induced self-defect/solute clusters and other microstructures was developed and experiments initiated to examine the effects of low-energy, low-temperature neutron irradiations.

  7. Dual beam irradiation of nanostructured FeCrAl oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-L.; Richter, A.; Kögler, R.; Talut, G.

    2011-05-01

    Nanostructured ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy is an ideal candidate for fission/fusion power plant materials, particularly in the use of a first-wall and blanket structure of a next generation reactor. These steels usually contain a high density of Y-Ti-O and Y-Al-O nanoparticles, high dislocation densities and fine grains. The material contains nanoparticles with an average diameter of 21 nm and was treated by several cold rolling procedures, which modify the dislocation density. Structural analysis with HRTEM shows that the chemical composition of the initial Y 2O 3 oxide is modified to perovskite YAlO 3 (YAP) and Y 2Al 5O 12 garnet (YAG). Irradiation of these alloys was performed with a dual beam irradiation of 2.5 MeV Fe +/31 dpa and 350 keV He +/18 appm/dpa. Irradiation causes atomic displacements resulting in vacancy and self-interstitial lattice defects and dislocation loops. Extended SRIM calculations for ODS steel indicate a clear spatial separation between the excess vacancy distribution close to the surface and the excess interstitials in deeper layers of the material surface. The helium atoms are supposed to accumulate mainly in the vacancies. Additionally to structural changes, the effect of the irradiation generated defects on the mechanical properties of the ODS is investigated by nanoindentation. A clear hardness increase in the irradiated area is observed, which reaches a maximum at a close surface region. This feature is attributed to synergistic effects between the displacement damage and He implantation resulting in He filled vacancies. Fine He cavities with diameters of a few nanometers were identified in TEM images.

  8. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  9. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  10. Welding-induced mechanical properties in austenitic stainless steels before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, R.; Schäublin, R.; Gavillet, D.; Baluc, N.

    2007-03-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of welded joints made of austenitic stainless steels have been investigated. The materials are welded AISI 304 and AISI 347, so-called test weld materials, irradiated with neutrons at 573 K to doses of 0.3 and 1.0 dpa. In addition, an AISI 304 from a decommissioned pressurised water reactor, so-called in-service material, which had accumulated a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa at about 573 K, was investigated. The mechanical properties of heat-affected zones and base materials were analysed before and after irradiation. Tensile parameters were determined at room temperature and at 573 K, for all materials and irradiation conditions. In the test weld materials it is found that radiation hardening is lower and loss of ductility is higher in the heat-affected zone than in the base material. In the in-service material radiation hardening is about the same in heat-affected zone and base material. After irradiation, deformation takes place by stacking faults and twins, at both room temperature and high temperature, contrary to unirradiated materials, where deformation takes place by twinning at room temperature and by dislocation cells at high temperature. No defect free channels are observed.

  11. Properties of precipitation hardened steel irradiated at 323 K in the Japan materials testing reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, M.; Matsui, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hoshiya, T.; Tsukada, T.; Ohmi, M.; Mimura, H.; Ooka, N.; Hide, K.

    A precipitation hardening type 630 stainless steel was irradiated in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in contact with the reactor primary coolant. The temperature of the irradiated specimens was about 330 K. The fast neutron ( E > 1 MeV) fluence for the specimens ranged from 10 24 to 10 26 m -2. Tension tests and fracture toughness tests were carried out at room temperature, while Charpy impact tests were done at temperatures of 273-453 K. Tensile strength data showed a peak of 1600 MPa at around 7 × 10 24 m -2, then gradually decreased to about 1500 MPa at 1.2 × 10 26 m -2. The elongation decreased with irradiation from 12% for unirradiated material to 6% at 1.2 × 10 26 m -2. The fractography after the tension test revealed that the fracture was ductile. Fracture toughness decreased to about a half of the value for unirradiated material with irradiation. The cleavage fracture was dominant on the fractured surface. Charpy impact tests showed an increase of ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) by 60 K with irradiation.

  12. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  13. IAEA international studies on irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Steele, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    In last 25 years, three phases a Co-operative Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels has been organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This programme started with eight countries in 1971 and finally 16 countries took part in phase III of the Programme in 1983. Several main efforts were put into preparation of the programme, but the principal task was concentrated on an international comparison of radiation damage characterization by different laboratories for steels of {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} (with high impurity contents) and {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} (with low impurity contents) types as well as on development of small scale fracture mechanics procedures applicable to reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes. This year, a new programme has been opened, concentrated mostly on small scale fracture mechanics testing.

  14. Effect of neutron irradiation at low temperature on the embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.

    1998-10-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation to fluence of 2.0 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) in temperature range 70-300°C on mechanical properties and structure of the experimental reduced-activation ferritic 0.1%C-(2.5-12)%Cr-(1-2)%W-(0.2-0.7)%V alloys were investigated. The steels were studied in different initial structural conditions obtained by changing the modes of heat treatments. Effect of neutron irradiation estimated by a shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature (ΔDBTT) and reduction of upper shelf energy (ΔUSE) highly depends on both irradiation condition and steel chemical composition and structure. For the steel with optimum chemical composition (9Cr-1.5WV) after irradiation to 2 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E ⩾ 0.5 MeV) at 280°C the ΔDBTT does not exceed 25°C. The shift in DBTT increased from 35°C to 110°C for the 8Cr-1.5WV steel at a decrease in irradiation temperature from 300°C to 70°C. The CCT diagrams are presented for several reduced-activated steels.

  15. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-02-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  16. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-14

    To expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials, fracture toughness has been evaluated for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were machined from the ACO-3 fuel duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3–148 dpa at 378–504 C. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa pm occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed when irradiation temperature was higher. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa pm was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the wide dose range 3–148 dpa. A slow decrease of fracture toughness with test temperature above room temperature was observed for the nonirradiated and high temperature (>430 *C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  17. Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Keiji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Orihara, Hideto; Sakai, Yusuke; Ohya, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Tamaki; Shobu, Takahisa; Akita, Koichi; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2015-05-07

    Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains occurring in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels was investigated using high-energy X-ray analysis and domain theory based on the variational principle. The measured triaxial stresses inside the specimen were compressive and the stress in the rolling direction became more dominant than stresses in the other directions. The calculations based on the variational principle of magnetic energy for closure domains showed that the measured triaxial stresses made the closure domains more stable than the basic domain without closure domains. The experimental and calculation results reveal that the laser-introduced internal stresses result in the occurrence of the closure domains.

  18. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  19. Microstructural Aspects of Irradiation Damage in A508 Gr 4N Forging Steel: Composition and Flux Effects

    SciTech Connect

    M.G. Burke; R.J. Stofanak; J.M. Hyde; C.A. English; W.L. Server

    2002-10-09

    Neutron irradiation can promote significant changes in the microstructure and associated mechanical properties of low alloy steels. In particular, irradiation can induce the formation of non-equilibrium phases and segregation, which may lead to a degradation in toughness. In this study, the microstructural changes caused by neutron irradiation have been characterized in A508 Grade (Gr) 4N-type steels ({approx}3.5% Ni) using a variety of state-of-the-art analytical techniques including 3D-Atom Probe Field-Ion Microscopy and Small Angle Neutron Scattering, along with post-irradiation annealing studies combining Positron Annihilation Lineshape Analysis and hardness measurements. Important differences between conventional and ''superclean'' A508 Gr 4N steel have been identified in this investigation. The data indicate that Ni is not the controlling factor in the irradiation damage behavior of these materials; rather, the Mn content of the steel is a dominant factor in the irradiation-induced microstructural development of solute-related hardening features.

  20. A Physically-Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels1

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, Ernest D.; Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based, empirically calibrated model for estimating irradiation-induced transition temperature shifts in reactor pressure vessel steels, based on a broader database and more complete understanding of embrittlement mechanisms than was available for earlier models. Brief descriptions of the underlying radiation damage mechanisms and the database are included, but the emphasis is on the model and the quality of its fit to U.S. power reactor surveillance data. The model is compared to a random sample of surveillance data that were set aside and not used in fitting and to selected independent data from test reactor irradiations, in both cases showing good ability to predict data that were not used for calibration. The model is a good fit to the surveillance data, with no significant residual error trends for variables included in the model or additional variables that could be included.

  1. Influence of crystal orientation on hardness and nanoindentation deformation in ion-irradiated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Terumitsu; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Fukuya, Koji; Takashima, Keisuke

    2011-10-01

    The influence of crystal orientation on hardness and the range of plastic deformation caused by nanoindentation was investigated in a solution annealed type 316 stainless steel irradiated with Fe 2+ ions. The hardness was a function of grain orientation and was correlated with the Taylor factor averaged over three normal directions of the contact surface of the Berkovich indenter. The transmission electron microscope observations of the deformation microstructure under the indentations showed that the range of plastic deformation reached up to 10 times the indent depth for unirradiated material and depended on the orientation relation between the contact surface of the indenter and the slip directions. The range of plastic deformation decreased as the damage structure developed in ion irradiation.

  2. High-temperature fatigue life of type 316 stainless steel containing irradiation induced helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Liu, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    Specimens of 20%-cold-worked AISI type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 550/sup 0/C to a maximum damage level of 15 dpa and a transmutation produced helium level of 820 at. ppM. Fully reversed strain controlled fatigue tests were performed in a vacuum at 550/sup 0/C. No significant effect of the irradiation on low-cycle fatigue life was observed; however, the strain range of the 10/sup 7/ cycle endurance limit decreased from 0.35 to 0.30%. The relation between total strain range and number of cycles to failure was found to be ..delta..epsilon/sub T/ = 0.02N/sub f//sup -0/ /sup 12/ + N/sub f//sup -0/ /sup 6/ for N/sub f/ < 10/sup 7/ cycles.

  3. Microstructural Evolution of Type 304 and 316 Stainless Steels Under Neutron Irradiation at LWR Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Stoller, R. E.; Field, K. G.; Yang, Y.; Nam, H.; Morgan, D.; Wirth, B. D.; Gussev, M. N.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Life extension of light water reactors will expose austenitic internal core components to irradiation damage levels beyond 100 displacements per atom (dpa), leading to profound microstructural evolution and consequent degradation of macroscopic properties. Microstructural evolution, including Frank loops, cavities, precipitates, and segregation at boundaries and the resultant radiation hardening in type 304 and 316 stainless steel (SS) variants were studied in this work via experimental characterization and multiple simulation methods. Experimental data for up to 40 heats of type 304SS and 316SS variants irradiated in different reactors to 0.6-120 dpa at 275-375°C were generated from this work or collected from literature reports. These experimental data were then combined with models of Frank loop and cavity evolution, computational thermodynamics and precipitation, and ab initio and rate theory integrated radiation-induced segregation models to provide insights into microstructural evolution and degradation at higher doses.

  4. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  5. Microstructural evolution of type 304 and 316 stainless steels under neutron irradiation at LWR relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Stoller, Roger E.; Field, Kevin G.; Yang, Ying; Morgan, Dane; Wirth, Brian D.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Nam, H.

    2015-12-11

    Extension of light water reactors' useful life will expose austenitic internal core components to irradiation damage levels beyond 100 displacements per atom (dpa), which will lead to profound microstructural evolution and consequent degradation of macroscopic properties. Microstructural evolution, including Frank loops, cavities, precipitates, and segregation at boundaries and the resultant radiation hardening in type 304 and 316 stainless steel (SS) variants, were studied in this work via experimental characterization and multiple simulation methods. Experimental data for up to 40 heats of type 304SS and 316SS variants irradiated in different reactors to 0.6–120 dpa at 275–375°C were either generated from this work or collected from literature reports. These experimental data were then combined with models of Frank loop and cavity evolution, computational thermodynamics and precipitation, and ab initio and rate theory integrated radiation-induced segregation models to provide insights into microstructural evolution and degradation at higher radiation doses.

  6. Grain boundary segregation in neutron-irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Nozawa, Y.; Van Renterghem, W.; Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y.; Al Mazouzi, A.; Van Dyck, S.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of solute atoms at a grain boundary (GB) in 304 stainless steel (SS), neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 °C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, was investigated using laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). Ni, Si, and P enrichment and Cr and Fe depletion at the GB were evident. The full-width at half-maximum of the RIS region was ˜3 nm for the concentration profile peaks of Ni and Si. The atomic percentages of Ni, Si, and Cr at the GB were ˜19%, ˜7%, and ˜14%, respectively, in agreement with previously-reported values for neutron-irradiated SS. A high number density of intra-granular Ni-Si rich precipitates formed in the matrix. A precipitate-denuded zone with a width of ˜10 nm appeared on both sides of the GB.

  7. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Hide, K.; Mayuzumi, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2000-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) have been used as core component materials for light water reactors. As reactors age, however, the material tends to suffer from degradation primarily resulting from irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) as well as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steels (SS) were examined by slow strain rate (SSR) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests in 290 C water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and by SSR tensile tests in 290 C inert gas environment. Neutron fluences ranged from 4 x 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (energy [E] > 1 MeV). percent intergranular (%IG) cracking, which has been used as an intergranular (IG) cracking susceptibility indicator in the SSR SCC tests, changes anomalously with neutron fluence in spite of the strain-to-failure rate decreasing with an increase of neutron fluence. Apparently, %IG is a misleading indicator for the irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS when IG cracking susceptibility is compared at different neutron fluences, test temperatures, DO, and strain rates. These test parameters may affect deformation and fracture behaviors of the irradiated SS during the SSR SCC tests, resulting in changing %IG, which is given by the ratio of the total IG cracking area to the entire fracture surface area. It is suggested that strain-to-IG crack initiation for the irradiated, thermally sensitized SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS is the alternative indicator in the SSR SCC tests. An engineering expedient to determine the IG crack initiation strain is given by a deviating point on superposed stress-strain curves in inert gas and in oxygenated water. The strain-to-IG crack initiation becomes smaller with an increase of neutron fluence and DO. The SSR tensile tests in inert gas are needed to obtain strain-to-IG crack initiation in

  8. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  9. Strain hardening during mechanical twining and dislocation channeling in irradiated 316 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hashimoto, Naoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Localized deformation mechanisms and strain-hardening behaviors in irradiated 316 and 316LN stainless steels were investigated, and a theoretical model was proposed to explain the linear strain-hardening behavior during the localized deformation. After low temperature irradiation to significant doses the deformation microstructure changed from dislocation tangles to channels or to mechanical twins. It was also observed that irradiation hardening straightened gliding dislocations and increased the tendency for forming pileups. Regardless of these microstructural changes, the strain-hardening behavior was relatively insensitive to the irradiation. This dose-independent strain-hardening rate resulted in dose independence of the true stress parameters such as the plastic instability stress and true fracture stress. In the proposed model, the long-range back stress was formulated as a function of the number of pileup dislocations per slip band and the number of slip bands in a grain. The calculation results confirmed the experimental observation that strain-hardening rate was insensitive to the change in deformation mechanism because the long-range back stress hardening became as high as the hardening by tangled dislocations.

  10. Stability of the strengthening nanoprecipitates in reduced activation ferritic steels under Fe2+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-02-01

    The stability of MX-type precipitates is critical to retain mechanical properties of both reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) and conventional FM steels at elevated temperatures. Radiation resistance of TaC, TaN, and VN nanoprecipitates irradiated up to ∼49 dpa at 500 °C using Fe2+ is investigated in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) utilized in standard and scanning mode (STEM) reveals the non-stoichiometric nature of the nanoprecipitates. Irradiation did not alter their crystalline nature. The radiation resistance of these precipitates, in an order of reduced resistance, is TaC, VN, and TaN. Particle dissolution, growth, and reprecipitation were the modes of irradiation-induced instability. Irradiation also facilitated formation of Fe2W type Laves phase limited to the VN and TaN bearing alloys. This result suggests that nitrogen level should be controlled to a minimal level in alloys to gain greater radiation resistance of the MX-type precipitates at similar temperatures as well as postpone the formation and subsequent coarsening of Laves phase.

  11. In situ and tomographic observations of defect free channel formation in ion irradiated stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Kacher, J; Liu, G S; Robertson, I M

    2012-11-01

    The effects of heavy-ion irradiation on dislocation processes in stainless steels were investigated using in situ irradiation and deformation in the transmission electron microscope as well as post mortem electron tomography to retrieve information on the three-dimensional dislocation state. Irradiation-induced defects were found to pose a strong collective barrier to dislocation motion, leading to dislocation pileups forming in grain interiors and at grain boundaries. The passage of multiple dislocations along the same slip plane removes the irradiation defects and leads to the eventual formation of a defect-free channel. These channels are composed of densely tangled dislocation networks which line the channel-matrix walls as well as residual dislocation debris in the channel interiors. The structures of the dislocation tangles were found to be similar to those encountered in later stages of deformation in unirradiated materials, with the exception that they developed earlier in the deformation process and were confined to the defect free channels. Also, defect free channels were found to widen through both source widening as well as complex cross-slip mechanisms. PMID:22365051

  12. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on microstructural evolution in CF8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Ying; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Baldo, Peter M.; Lian, Tiangan

    2016-04-01

    The microstructural evolution in ferrite and austenitic in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) CF8, as received or thermally aged at 400 °C for 10,000 h, was followed under TEM with in situ irradiation of 1 MeV Kr ions at 300 and 350 °C to a fluence of 1.9 × 1015 ions/cm2 (∼3 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility. For the unaged CF8, the irradiation-induced dislocation loops appeared at a much lower dose in the austenite than in the ferrite. At the end dose, the austenite formed a well-developed dislocation network microstructure, while the ferrite exhibited an extended dislocation structure as line segments. Compared to the unaged CF8, the aged specimen appeared to have lower rate of damage accumulation. The rate of microstructural evolution under irradiation in the ferrite was significantly lower in the aged specimen than in the unaged. This difference is attributed to the different initial microstructures in the unaged and aged specimens, which implies that thermal aging and irradiation are not independent but interconnected damage processes.

  13. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yang, Yong; Huang, Yina; Allen, T.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2012-11-01

    As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10-6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.

  14. Fatigue behavior of irradiated helium-containing ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Vitek, J. M.; Liu, K. C.

    1986-11-01

    The martensitic alloys 12Cr-1MoVW and 9Cr-1MoVNb have been irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and subsequently tested in fatigue. In order to achieve helium levels characteristic of fusion reactors, the 12Cr-1MoVW was doped with 1 and 2% Ni, resulting in helium levels of 210 and 410 appm at damage levels of 25 dpa. The 9Cr-1MoVNb was irradiated to a damage level of 3 dpa and contained less than 5 appm He. Irradiations were carried out at 55°C and testing at 22°C. No significant changes were found in 9Cr-1MoVNb upon irradiation at this damage level, but effects that could possibly be attributed to helium were found in 12Cr-1MoVW. Levels of 210 and 410 appm He produced cyclic strengthening of 29 and 34% over unirradiated nickel-doped materials, respectively. This cyclic hardening, attributable largely to helium, resulted in degradation of the cyclic life. However, the fatigue life remained comparable to or better than unirradiated 20%-cold-worked 316 stainless steel.

  15. Irradiation-induced sensitization of austenitic stainless steel in-core components

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.

    1990-10-01

    High- and commercial-purity specimens of Type 304 SS from BWR absorber rod tubes, irradiated during service to fluence levels of 6 {times} 10{sup 20} to 2 {times} 10{sup 21} n{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) in two reactors, were examined by Auger electron spectroscopy to characterize irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation and depletion of alloying and impurity elements, which have been associated with irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of the steel. Ductile and intergranular fracture surfaces were produced by bending of hydrogen-charged specimens in the ultra-high vacuum of Auger microscope. The intergranular fracture surfaces in high-fluence commercial-purity material were characterized by relatively high levels of Si, P, and In segregation. An Auger energy peak at 59 eV indicated either segregation of an unidentified element or formation of an unidentified compound on the grain boundary. In contrast to the commercial-purity material, segregation of the impurity elements and intergranular failure in the high-purity material were negligible for a similar fluence level. However, grain boundary depletion of Cr was more significant in high-purity material than in commercial-purity material, which indicates that irradiation-induced segregation of impurity elements and depletion of alloying elements are interdependent. 7 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  17. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program: Progress report for April--September 1995. Volume 6, Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1996-08-01

    The goal of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of effects of neutron irradiation on material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. Effects of specimen size, material chemistry, product form and microstructure, irradiation fluence, flux, temperature and spectrum, and post-irradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is arranged into 14 tasks: (1) program management, (2) fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}) curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) crack-arrest toughness (K{sub Ia}) curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub Ic} and K{sub Ia} curve shifts in low upper-shelf welds, (6) annealing effects in low upper-shelf welds, (7) irradiation effects in a commercial low upper-shelf weld, (8) microstructural analysis of irradiation effects, (9) in-service aged material evaluations, (10) correlation monitor materials, (11) special technical assistance, (12) JPDR steel examination, (13) technical assistance for JCCCNRS Working Groups 3 and 12, and (14) additional requirements for materials. This report provides an overview of the activities within each of these task from April through September 1995.

  18. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  19. Hydrogen and oxygen trapping and retention in stainless steel and graphite materials irradiated in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Ermakov, V.; Kaplevsky, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigation of energy and flux dependences of hydrogen isotopes and oxygen trapping in carbon materials (carbon fiber composite and pyrolitic graphite), and metals (stainless steel and nickel) under irradiation in the deuterium gas discharge plasma with and without oxygen addition. The dependence of hydrogen trapping on ion energy, ion current density, oxygen addition in deuterium plasma are presented and analyzed. The sorbed molecules, containing hydrogen atoms from the residual gas and deuterium atoms of the working gas are shown to be the important source of hydrogen trapping in both carbon based materials and stainless steel. Irradiation of the SS vacuum vessel with the neutrals or/and ions of (D2 + O2) plasma initiate the hydrogen diffusion from the vessel wall and H2, HD, D2O, HDO, H2O molecule formation on the wall surface. Trapping of the low energy plasma particles and the particles from the sorbed molecules as well as modification of working gas composition are considered as the processes provided at the expense of the potential energy of plasma particles with respect to the surface and occurred through their inelastic collisions with the surface. The hydrogen trapping occurred due to “potential” processes was named as “potential”, and in contrast the trapping of fast particles due to their kinetic energy was labeled as “kinetic”.

  20. Microstructural characterization of deformation localization at small strains in a neutron-irradiated 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2014-09-01

    A specific phenomenon - highly localized regions of deformation - was found and investigated at the free surface and near-surface layer of a neutron irradiated AISI 304 stainless steel bend specimen deformed to a maximum surface strain of 0.8%. It was shown that local plastic deformation near the surface might reach significant levels being localized at specific spots even when the maximum free surface strain remains below 1%. The effect was not observed in non-irradiated steel of the same composition at similar strain levels. Cross-sectional EBSD analysis demonstrated that the local misorientation level was highest near the free surface and diminished with increasing depth in these regions. (S)TEM indicated that the local density of dislocation channels might vary up to an order of magnitude. These channels may contain twins or may be twin free depending on grain orientation and local strain levels. BCC-phase (α-martensite) formation associated with channel-grain boundary intersection points was observed using EBSD and STEM in the near-surface layer.

  1. Slow positron beam and nanoindentation study of irradiation-related defects in reactor vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Yichu; Zhang, Chonghong; Ren, Ai; Xu, Chaoliang; Qian, Wangjie

    2014-08-01

    In order to understand the nature of the hardening after radiation in reactor vessel steels, China A508-3 steels were implanted by proton with an energy of 240 keV up to 2.5 × 1016, 5.5 × 1016, 1.1 × 1017, and 2.5 × 1017 ions cm-2, respectively. Vacancy type defects were detected by energy-variable positron beam Doppler broadening technique and then nanoindentation measurements were performed to investigate proton-induced hardening effects. The results showed that S-parameter increased as a function of positron incident energy after irradiation, and the increasing rate of the S-parameter near the surface was larger than that in the bulk due to radiation damage. The size of vacancy type defects increased with dose. Irradiation induced hardening was shown that the average hardness increased with dose. Moreover a direct correlation between positron annihilation parameter and hardness was found based on Kasada method.

  2. True stress-strain curve acquisition for irradiated stainless steel including the range exceeding necking strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Koshiishi, Masato

    2015-10-01

    True stress-strain curves were obtained for irradiated 316L stainless steel by a tensile test and by a curve estimation procedure. In the tensile test, the digital image correlation technique together with iterative finite element analysis was applied in order to identify curves for strain larger than the necking strain. The true stress-strain curves were successfully obtained for the strain of more than 0.4 whereas the necking strain was about 0.2 in the minimum case. The obtained true stress-strain curves were approximated well with the Swift-type equation including the post-necking strain even if the exponential constant n was fixed to 0.5. Then, the true stress-strain curves were estimated by a curve estimation procedure, which was referred to as the K-fit method. Material properties required for the K-fit method were the yield and ultimate strengths or only the yield strength. Some modifications were made for the K-fit method in order to improve estimation accuracy for irradiated stainless steels.

  3. Microstructural evolution of HFIR-irradiated low activation F82H and F82H-{sup 10}B steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, E.; Shiba, K.; Sawai, T.; Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-03-01

    Microstructures of reduced-activation F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta) and the F82H steels doped with {sup 10}B, irradiated at 250 and 300 C to 3 and 57 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), were examined by TEM. In the F82H irradiated at 250 C to 3 dpa, dislocation loops, small unidentified defect clusters with a high number density, and a few MC precipitates were observed in the matrix. The defect microstructure after 300 C irradiation to 57 dpa is dominated by the loops, and the number density of loops was lower than that of the F82H-{sup 10}B steel. Cavities were observed in the F82H-{sup 10}B steels, but the swelling value is insignificant. Small particles of M{sub 6}C formed on the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides that were present in both steels before the irradiation at 300 C to 57 dpa. A low number density of MC precipitate particles formed in the matrix during irradiation at 300 C to 57 dpa.

  4. Heavy-section steel technology and irradiation programs-retrospective and prospective views

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Bass, Bennett Richard; Rosseel, Thomas M; Merkle, John Graham; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2007-01-01

    In 1965, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), at the advice of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), initiated the process that resulted in the establishment of the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Dr. Spencer H. Bush of Battelle Northwest Laboratory, the man being honored by this symposium, representing the ACRS, was one of the Staff Advisors for the program and helped to guide its technical direction. In 1989, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program, formerly the HSST task on irradiation effects, was formed as a separate program, and this year the HSST/HSSI Programs, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), celebrate 40 years of continuous research oriented toward the safety of light-water nuclear reactor pressure vessels. This paper presents a summary of results from those programs with a view to future activities. The HSST Program was established in 1967 and initially included extensive investigations of heavy-section low-alloy steel plates, forgings, and welds, including metallurgical studies, mechanical properties, fracture toughness (quasi-static and dynamic), fatigue crack-growth, and crack arrest toughness. Also included were irradiation effects studies, thermal shock analyses, testing of thick-section tensile and fracture specimens, and non-destructive testing. In the subsequent decades, the HSST Program conducted extensive large-scale experiments with intermediate-size vessels (with varying size flaws) pressurized to failure, similar experiments under conditions of thermal shock and even pressurized thermal shock (PTS), wide-plate crack arrest tests, and biaxial tests with cruciform-shaped specimens. Extensive analytical and numerical studies accompanied these experiments, including the development of computer codes such as the recent Fracture Analysis of Vessels Oak Ridge (FAVOR) code currently being used for PTS evaluations. In the absence of radiation

  5. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  6. Influence of neutron irradiation on mechanical and dimensional stability of irradiated stainless steels, and its possible impact on spent fuel storage

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Francis A.

    2007-04-27

    Stainless steels used as cladding and structural materials in nuclear reactors undergo very pronounced changes in physical and mechanical properties during irradiation at elevated temperatures, often quickly leading to an increased tendency toward embrittlement. On a somewhat longer time scale there arise very significant changes in component volume and relative dimensions due to void swelling and irradiation creep. Irradiation creep is an inherently undamaging process but once swelling exceeds the 5-10% range austenitic steels become exceptionally brittle. Other processes also contribute to embrittlement and thereby contribute to difficulty in storing and handling of spent fuel assemblies removed from decommissioned fast reactors. In light water reactors other forms of embrittlement develop prior to reaching significant levels of void swelling. A review is presented of our current understanding of the radiation-induced changes in physical and mechanical properties that contgribute to embrittlement.

  7. Low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels after high-dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.; Povstyanko, A.; Prokhorov, V.; Diegele, E.; Lässer, R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated to a displacement damage dose of up to 70 dpa at 330-337 °C in the BOR 60 reactor within the ARBOR 2 irradiation programme. The influence of neutron irradiation on the fatigue behaviour was determined for the as-received EUROFER97, pre-irradiation heat-treated EUROFER97 HT and F82H-mod steels. Strain-controlled push-pull loading was performed using miniaturized cylindrical specimens at a constant temperature of 330 °C with total strain ranges between 0.8% and 1.1%. Comparison of the LCF behaviour of irradiated and reference unirradiated specimens was performed for both the adequate total and inelastic strains. Neutron irradiation-induced hardening may have various effects on the fatigue behaviour of the steels. The reduction of inelastic strain in the irradiated state compared with the reference unirradiated state at common total strain amplitudes may increase fatigue lifetime. The increase in the stress at the adequate inelastic strain, by contrast, may accelerate fatigue damage accumulation. Depending on which of the two effects mentioned dominates, neutron irradiation may either extend or reduce the fatigue lifetime compared with the reference unirradiated state. The results obtained for EUROFER97 and EUROFER97 HT confirm these considerations. Most of the irradiated specimens show fatigue lifetimes comparable to those of the reference unirradiated state at adequate inelastic strains. Some irradiated specimens, however, show lifetime reduction or increase in comparison with the reference state at adequate inelastic strains.

  8. Manufacturing and STA-investigation of witness-samples for the temperature monitoring of structural steels under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevryukov, O. N.; Fedotov, V. T.; Polyansky, A. A.; Pokrovski, S. A.; Kuzmin, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The object of investigations was alloys based on lead and cadmium used as fuse monitors to control the maximum irradiation temperature (fuse temperature monitors, FTM) of samples from structural steels under irradiation in a research reactor IR-8. The result of the work was selected and tested initial materials for production of alloys. A technological scheme of the production of alloys for FTM has been developed and experimental studies of the properties of these alloys have been carried out.

  9. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  10. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  11. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, J. D.; Ramuhalli, P.; McCloy, J. S.; Xu, K.; Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R.

    2015-03-01

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the "state of health" of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  12. Meso-Scale Magnetic Signatures for Nuclear Reactor Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; McCloy, John S.; Xu, Ke; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Jiang, Weilin; Edwards, Danny J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2015-03-31

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light-water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the ‘state of health’ of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results to integrate advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in a material. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. In future efforts, microstructural measurements and meso-scale magnetic measurements on thin films will be used to gain insights into the structural state of these materials to study the impact of irradiation on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  13. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J. D. Ramuhalli, P. Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R.; McCloy, J. S. Xu, K.

    2015-03-31

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the “state of health” of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  14. Warm PreStress effect on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; Vaille, C.; Wident, P.; Moinereau, D.; Landron, C.; Chapuliot, S.; Benhamou, C.; Tanguy, B.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the Warm Prestress (WPS) effect on 16MND5 (A508 Cl3) RPV steel, irradiated up to a fluence of 13 ·1023 n .m-2 (E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of 288 ° C, corresponding to more than 60 years of operations in a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Mechanical properties, including tensile tests with different strain rates and tension-compression tests on notched specimens, have been characterized at unirradiated and irradiated states and used to calibrate constitutive equations to describe the mechanical behavior as a function of temperature and fluence. Irradiation embrittlement has been determined based on Charpy V-notch impact tests and isothermal quasi-static toughness tests. Assessment of WPS effect has been done through various types of thermomechanical loadings performed on CT(0.5 T) specimens. All tests have confirmed the non-failure during the thermo-mechanical transients. Experimental data obtained in this study have been compared to both engineering-based models and to a local approach (Beremin) model for cleavage fracture. It is shown that both types of modeling give good predictions for the effective toughness after warm prestressing.

  15. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  16. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  17. Results of crack-arrest tests on irradiated a 508 class 3 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Milella, P.P.; Pini, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Ten crack-arrest toughness values for irradiated specimens of A 508 class 3 forging steel have been obtained. The tests were performed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K{sub la} of Ferritic Steels, E 1221-88. None of these values are strictly valid in all five ASTM E 1221-88 validity criteria. However, they are useful when compared to unirradiated crack-arrest specimen toughness values since they show the small (averaging approximately 10{degrees}C) shifts in the mean and lower-bound crack-arrest toughness curves. This confirms that a low copper content in ASTM A 508 class 3 forging material can be expected to result in small shifts of the transition toughness curve. The shifts due to neutron irradiation of the lower bound and mean toughness curves are approximately the same as the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J temperature shift. The nine crack-arrest specimens were irradiated at temperatures varying from 243 to 280{degrees}C, and to a fluence varying from 1.7 to 2.7 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). The test results were normalized to reference values that correspond to those of CVN specimens irradiated at 284{degrees}C to a fluence of 3.2 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) in the same capsule as the crack-arrest specimens. This adjustment resulted in a shift to lower temperatures of all the data, and in particular moved two data points that appeared to lie close to or lower than the American Society of Mechanical Engineers K{sub la} curve to positions that seemed more reasonable with respect to the remaining data. A special fixture was designed, fabricated, and successfully used in the testing. For reasons explained in the text, special blocks to receive the Oak Ridge National Laboratory clip gage were designed, and greater-than-standard crack-mouth opening displacements measured were accounted for. 24 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Irradiation creep of SA 304L and CW 316 stainless steels: Mechanical behaviour and microstructural aspects. Part I: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J.; Bréchet, Y.; Delnondedieu, M.; Pokor, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Renault, A.; Averty, X.; Massoud, J. P.

    2011-06-01

    Solution annealed 304L (SA 304L) and cold work 316 (CW 316) austenitic stainless steel irradiation creep behaviour have been studied thoroughly. Irradiations were carried out in fast breeder reactors BOR-60 (at 330 °C, up to 120 dpa) and EBR-II (at 375 °C, up to 10.5 dpa), and in the OSIRIS mixed spectrum reactor (at 330 °C, up to 9.8 dpa). After an incubation threshold, the irradiation creep of the austenitic stainless steels is linear in stress and in dose. Creep appears to be athermal in this temperature range. A significant difference in the behaviour is measured between the creep of SA 304L and CW 316. In order to study the anisotropy of loop population, which would be the signature of a possible stress induced preferential absorption (SIPA) mechanism for irradiation creep, special attention was given to the measurement of anisotropy of loop distribution between the four families. The anisotropy induced by an applied stress has been shown to be in the range of the statistical scatter in the situation where no stress is applied. TEM microstructural analyses performed on this sample show slight difference between the microstructure of specimens deformed under irradiation and the microstructure of specimens irradiated without stress under the same irradiation conditions.

  19. Microstructural characterization of irradiated PWR steels using the atom probe field-ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Burke, M.G.

    1987-08-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of a neutron-irradiated A533B pressure vessel steel weld. The atomic spatial resolution of this technique permits a complete structural and chemical description of the ultra-fine features that control the mechanical properties to be made. A variety of fine scale features including roughly spherical copper precipitates and clusters, spherical and rod-shaped molybdenum carbide and disc-shaped molybdenum nitride precipitates were observed to be inhomogeneously distributed in the ferrite. The copper content of the ferrite was substantially reduced from the nominal level. A thin film of molybdenum carbides and nitrides was observed on grain boundaries in addition to a coarse copper-manganese precipitate. Substantial enrichment of manganese and nickel were detected at the copper-manganese precipitate-ferrite interface and this enrichment extended into the ferrite. Enrichment of nickel, manganese and phosphorus were also measured at grain boundaries.

  20. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  1. Composite model of microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel under fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A rate-theory-based model has been developed which includes the simultaneous evolution of the dislocation and cavity components of the microstructure of irradiated austenitic stainless steels. Previous work has generally focused on developing models for void swelling while neglecting the time dependence of the dislocation structure. These models have broadened our understanding of the physical processes that give rise to swelling, e.g., the role of helium and void formation from critically-sized bubbles. That work has also demonstrated some predictive capability by successful calibration to fit the results of fast reactor swelling data. However, considerable uncertainty about the values of key parameters in these models limits their usefulness as predictive tools. Hence the use of such models to extrapolate fission reactor swelling data to fusion reactor conditions is compromised.

  2. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron irradiated stainless steel submerged-arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of stainless steel cladding increasing the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws is highly dependent upon the irradiated properties of the cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged-arc, single-wire, oscillating electrode method. Three layers of cladding were applied to provide a cladding thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. There was considerable dilution of the type 309 in the first layer of cladding as a result of excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens for the irradiation study were taken from near the base plate/cladding interface and also from the upper layers of cladding. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to neutron fluences of 2 x 10/sup 23/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding showed a 5 to 40% increase in yield strength accompanied by a slight increase in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing.

  3. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  4. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    To expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials, fracture toughness has been evaluated for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were machined from the ACO-3 fuel duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3-148 dpa at 378-504 °C. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 °C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa √m occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 °C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed when irradiation temperature was higher. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa √m was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 °C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the wide dose range 3-148 dpa. A slow decrease of fracture toughness with test temperature above room temperature was observed for the nonirradiated and high temperature (>430 °C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  5. Effect of ITER components manufacturing cycle on the irradiation behaviour of 316L(N)-IG steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodchenkov, B. S.; Prokhorov, V. I.; Makarov, O. Yu; Shamardin, V. K.; Kalinin, G. M.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Golosov, O. A.

    2000-12-01

    The main options for the manufacturing of high heat flux (HHF) components is hot isostatic pressing (HIP) using either solid pieces or powder. There was no database on the radiation behaviour of these materials, and in particular stainless steel (SS) 316L(N)-IG with ITER components manufacturing thermal cycle. Irradiation of wrought steel, powder-HIP, solid-HIP and HIPed joints has been performed within the framework of an ITER task. Specimens cut from 316L(N)-IG plate, HIP products, and solid-HIP joints were irradiated in the SM-3 reactor in Dimitrovgrad up to 4 and 10 dpa at 175°C and 265°C. The paper describes the results of post-irradiation tensile and fracture toughness tests.

  6. Microstructure and Nano-Hardness of 10 MeV Cl-Ion Irradiated T91 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Wang, Xianping; Gao, Yunxia; Zhuang, Zhong; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Qianfeng; Liu, Changsong

    2015-12-01

    Hardening and elemental segregation of T91 martenstic steel irradiated by 10 MeV Cl ions to doses from 0.06 dpa to 0.83 dpa were investigated with the nanoindentation technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results demonstrated that the irradiation hardening was closely related with irradiation dose. By increasing the dose, the hardness increased rapidly at first from the initial value of 3.15 GPa before irradiation, and then tended to saturate at a value of 3.58 GPa at the highest dose of 0.83 dpa. Combined with TEM observation, the mechanism of hardening was preliminary attributed to the formation of M(Fe,Cr)23C6 carbides induced by the high energy Cl-ion irradiation. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11374299, 11375230, 11274309)

  7. Tensile, low cycle fatigue and fracture toughness behaviour of type 316L steel irradiated to 0.3 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josefsson, Bertil; Bergenlid, Ulf

    1994-09-01

    The effect of a low dose neutron irradiation on the tensile, low cycle fatigue and fracture toughness properties of type 316L steel plate and weld material was investigated. The specimens were irradiated at a temperature of about 35°C to a neutron fluence of approximately 2.5 × 10 20 n/cm 2 ( E > 1 MeV). The testing was performed at 75, 250 and 450°C. Irradiated tensile specimens showed a substantial radiation hardening combined with some reduction of elongations. There was no significant effect of the irradiation on the low cycle fatigue endurances. The fracture toughness of the TIG weld specimens was roughly half of that of the 316L plate and electron beam weld. Some reductions of toughness owing to the irradiation were observed.

  8. Porous microstructures induced by picosecond laser scanning irradiation on stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Kedian; Cui, Jianlei; Wang, Jiuhong

    2016-03-01

    A study of porous surfaces having micropores significantly smaller than laser spot on the stainless steel 304L sample surface induced by a picosecond regenerative amplified laser, operating at 1064 nm, is presented. Variations in the interaction regime of picosecond laser pulses with stainless steel surfaces at peak irradiation fluences(Fpk=0.378-4.496 J/cm2) with scanning speeds(v=125-1000 μm/s) and scan line spacings(s=0-50 μm) have been observed and thoroughly investigated. It is observed that interactions within these parameters allows for the generation of well-defined structured surfaces. To investigate the formation mechanism of sub-focus micropores, the influence of key processing parameters has been analyzed using a pre-designed laser pulse scanning layout. Appearances of sub-focus ripples and micropores with the variation of laser peak fluence, scanning speed and scan line spacing have been observed. The dependencies of surface structures on these interaction parameters have been preliminarily verified. With the help of the experimental results obtained, interaction parameters for fabrication of large area homogeneous porous structures with the feature sizes in the range of 3-15 μm are determined.

  9. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  10. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  11. Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of ODS steels of different Cr-contents during helium implantation under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Henry, J.; de Carlan, Y.; Sauvage, T.; Duval, F.; Barthe, M. F.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-06-01

    Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of two ferritic ODS steels with 12% and 14% Cr have been studied by homogeneously implantation with helium under uniaxial tensile stresses from 40 to 300 MPa. The maximum dose was about 1.2 dpa (5000 appm-He) with displacement damage rates of 1 × 10-5 dpa/s at a temperature of 300 °C. Irradiation creep compliances were measured to be 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12 and 14Cr ODS, respectively. Subsequently, microstructural evolution was studied in detail by TEM observations, showing dislocation loops and bubbles distributed homogenously in the matrix. Some bubbles were attached to ODS particles. Finally, the effects of Cr content on irradiation creep and microstructural changes are discussed, including earlier results of a 19Cr ODS and a PM2000 ferritic steel. Irradiation creep rates of both 12Cr and 14Cr-ODS ferritic steels a temperature of 300 °C show linear stress dependence up to 300 MPa at. Irradiation creep rate per dose rate and stress at a temperature of 300 °C amounts to 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12Cr- and 14Cr-ODS, respectively. Irradiation creep properties are remarkably insensitive to Cr content, grain size and dispersoid size. Dislocation loops and helium bubbles are distributed homogenously in the matrix. In the case of high density fine dispersoids, most bubbles are attached to ODS particles. This may suppress loop formation as well as growth of bubbles, thereby increasing the resistance of ODS ferritic steels against helium embrittlement.

  12. On the formation of stacking fault tetrahedra in irradiated austenitic stainless steels - A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibli, Raluca; Schäublin, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels, because of their low stacking fault energy and high shear modulus, should exhibit a high ratio of stacking fault tetrahedra relative to the overall population of radiation induced nanometric defects. Experimental observations of stacking fault tetrahedra by transmission electron microscopy in commercial-purity stainless steels are however scarce, while they abundantly occur in high-purity or model austenitic alloys irradiated at both low and high temperatures, but not at around 673 K. In commercial alloys, the little evidence of stacking fault tetrahedra does not follow such a trend. These contradictions are reviewed and discussed. Reviewing the three possible formation mechanisms identified in the literature, namely the Silcox and Hirsch Frank loop dissociation, the void collapse and the stacking fault tetrahedra growth, it seems that the later dominates under irradiation. Black dots, are very small defect clusters, smaller than 1 nm in diameter, which cannot be resolved in TEM being below its spatial resolution in diffraction contrast. They can be created directly from the collapse of the cascade as undefined 3D clusters of point defects, namely vacancies, interstitials or impurities, or could be already well-defined nanometric voids, vacancy or interstitial dislocation loops [7]. Dislocation loops, either Frank or perfect dislocation loops, are generated by vacancies or interstitials coalescing as platelets between two adjacent {1 1 1} close-packed planes. Perfect loops are scarcer than Frank loops. For irradiation temperatures below 573 K some authors identified that Frank loops are of interstitial nature, while black dots are predominantly of vacancy nature [8-11]. More recent studies [12] contradict this statement and conclude that Frank loops with sizes in the range of 1-30 nm can be either vacancy or interstitial type. Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are three-dimensional stacking fault configurations in the shape of

  13. Evolution of magnetic properties of cladding austenitic steel under irradiation in a reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalkin, Yu. G.; Kozlov, A. V.; Evseev, M. V.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic properties of samples of austenitic steel ChS-68 cut from the cladding of a fuel element, which was irradiated in a BN-600 fast-neutron reactor to a maximal damage dose of ˜80 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures of 370-587°C, have been investigated. It has been established that irradiation with fast neutrons leads to the formation of ferromagnetic microregions, the effective sizes and concentration of which depend on the damage dose. It has been shown that, at damage doses higher than ˜55 dpa, small spontaneous magnetization and magnetization hysteresis, which are characteristic of the ferromagnetic state, appear in the samples. It is assumed that the ferromagnetic microregions are the nuclei of the α' phase and the radiation-induced segregation microregions, in which the spacing between the nearest iron atoms exceeds the critical distance that determines the change in the sign of exchange interaction. Arguments in favor of this assumption are presented.

  14. Tritium permeation in EUROFER97 steel in EXOTIC-9/1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Magielsen, A. J.; Stijkel, M. P.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the tritium permeation study in EUROFER97 carried out within the EXOTIC (EXtraction Of Tritium In Ceramics) irradiation experiment. In the EXOTIC 9/1 experiment, a pebble bed assembly containing Lithium Titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles is irradiated for 300 days in the High Flux Reactor (HFR), in the temperature range between 340 and 580 °C, reaching a lithium burn up of 3.5% and 1.2 dpa of damage in steel. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the in-pile tritium release characteristics of Li2TiO3 pebbles. Additionally tritium permeation through the EUROFER97 pebble bed wall was measured on line. The permeation of tritium was studied at steady state conditions, during temperature transients, and at different hydrogen concentrations in the helium purge gas flow. The model used in the analysis of the experimental data which account for co-permeation of tritium and hydrogen is presented. It has been demonstrated that the permeation of tritium under experiment conditions proceeds in the diffusion limited regime. From the analysis of the experimental data the permeability and diffusivity of tritium in EUROFER97 is determined.

  15. Characterization of irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks removed from the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vevera, Bradley J; Hyres, James W; McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks were removed from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) for post-irradiation examination (PIE) to assess mechanical property changes due to radiation damage and erosion of the target vessel. Topics reviewed include high-resolution photography of the disk specimens, cleaning to remove mercury (Hg) residue and surface oxides, profile mapping of cavitation pits using high frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), high-resolution surface replication, and machining of test specimens using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), tensile testing, Rockwell Superficial hardness testing, Vickers microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was evident in the pre- and post-cleaning photography and permitted accurate placement of the test specimens on the disks. Due to the limited amount of material available and the unique geometry of the disks, machine fixturing and test specimen design were critical aspects of this work. Multiple designs were considered and refined during mock-up test runs on unirradiated disks. The techniques used to successfully machine and test the various specimens will be presented along with a summary of important findings from the laboratory examinations.

  16. Microstructural evolution of type 304 and 316 stainless steels under neutron irradiation at LWR relevant conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Lizhen; Stoller, Roger E.; Field, Kevin G.; Yang, Ying; Morgan, Dane; Wirth, Brian D.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Nam, H.

    2015-12-11

    Extension of light water reactors' useful life will expose austenitic internal core components to irradiation damage levels beyond 100 displacements per atom (dpa), which will lead to profound microstructural evolution and consequent degradation of macroscopic properties. Microstructural evolution, including Frank loops, cavities, precipitates, and segregation at boundaries and the resultant radiation hardening in type 304 and 316 stainless steel (SS) variants, were studied in this work via experimental characterization and multiple simulation methods. Experimental data for up to 40 heats of type 304SS and 316SS variants irradiated in different reactors to 0.6–120 dpa at 275–375°C were either generated from thismore » work or collected from literature reports. These experimental data were then combined with models of Frank loop and cavity evolution, computational thermodynamics and precipitation, and ab initio and rate theory integrated radiation-induced segregation models to provide insights into microstructural evolution and degradation at higher radiation doses.« less

  17. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  18. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  19. Microstructural evolution of P92 ferritic/martensitic steel under Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Shuoxue; Guo Liping; Li Tiecheng; Chen Jihong; Yang Zheng; Luo Fengfeng; Tang Rui; Qiao Yanxin; Liu Feihua

    2012-06-15

    Irradiation damage in P92 ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated by Ar{sup +} ion beams to 7 and 12 dpa at elevated temperatures of 290 Degree-Sign C, 390 Degree-Sign C and 550 Degree-Sign C has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The precipitate periphery (the matrix/carbide interface) was amorphized only at 290 Degree-Sign C, while higher irradiation temperature could prevent the amorphization. The formation of the small re-precipitates occurred at 290 Degree-Sign C after irradiation to 12 dpa. With the increase of irradiation temperature and dose, the phenomenon of re-precipitation became more severe. The voids induced by irradiation were observed after irradiation to 7 dpa at 550 Degree-Sign C, showing that high irradiation temperature ({>=} 550 Degree-Sign C) was a crucial factor which promoted the irradiation swelling. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that segregation of Cr and W in the voids occurred under irradiation, which may influence mechanical properties of P92 F/M steel. - Graphical Abstract: High density of small voids, about 2.5 nm in diameter, was observed after irradiation to 12 dpa at 550 Degree-Sign C, which was shown in panel a (TEM micrograph). As shown in panel b (SEM image), a large number of nanometer-sized hillocks were formed in the surface irradiated at 550 Degree-Sign C, and the mean size was {approx} 30 nm. The formation of the nanometer-sized hillocks might be due to the voids that appeared as shown in TEM images (panel a). High irradiation temperature ({>=} 550 Degree-Sign C) was a crucial factor for the formation of void swelling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small carbides re-precipitated in P92 matrix irradiated to 12 dpa at 290 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High density of voids was observed at 550 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Segregation of Cr and W in voids occurred under irradiation.

  20. Influence of Ar-ions irradiation on the oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic steel P92 in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi; Shen, Yinzhong; Zhu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic-marensitic steel P92 with and without Ar-ions irradiation in supercritical water at 823 K(550 °C)/25 MPa for different exposure times was investigated by a variety of characterization techniques. A distinct difference in oxidation morphology between irradiated and unirradiated samples was observed. The oxide morphology of samples with a relatively moderate radiation intensity was similar with that of samples without irradiation. Many small oxide particles were observed in the region with a relatively high radiation intensity but their size was increased gradually with increasing exposure times. Exfoliation of oxide layer occurred for irradiated samples exposed for 100 h. Chromium-rich oxide layer with a chromium content of more than 20 wt pct along with a small-scale three-layer oxide structures were observed in Ar-ions irradiated samples, arising from the microstructural change in steel samples after the irradiation. Mechanism for the exfoliation of oxide layer is also discussed.

  1. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of model austenitic stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.; Karlsen, T. M.

    1999-10-26

    Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted on model austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and {approx} 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. At {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, a high-purity heat of Type 316L SS that contains a very low concentration of Si exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. In unirradiated state, Types 304 and 304L SS did not exhibit a systematic effect of Si content on alloy strength. However, at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, yield and maximum strengths decreased significantly as Si content was increased to >0.9 wt.%. Among alloys that contain low concentrations of C and N, ductility and resistance to TGSCC and IGSCC were significantly greater for alloys with >0.9 wt.% Si than for alloys with <0.47 wt.% Si. Initial data at {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} were also consistent with the beneficial effect of high Si content. This indicates that to delay onset of and reduce susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), at least at low fluence levels, it is helpful to ensure a certain minimum concentration of Si. High concentrations of Cr were also beneficial; alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater susceptibility to IASCC than alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of irradiated model austenitic stainless steel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Karlsen, T. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Strain, R. V.

    1999-07-16

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests (SSRTs) and posttest fractographic analyses by scanning electron microscopy were conducted on 16 austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} and {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. Following irradiation to a fluence of {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}, a high-purity laboratory heat of Type 316L SS (Si {approx} 0.024 wt%) exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. The other 15 alloys exhibited negligible susceptibility to IGSCC at this low fluence. The percentage of TGSCC on the fracture surfaces of SSRT specimens of the 16 alloys at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) could be correlated well with N and Si concentrations; all alloys that contained <0.01 wt.% N and <1.0 wt. % Si were susceptible, whereas all alloys that contained >0.01 wt.% N or >1.0 wt.% Si were relatively resistant. High concentrations of Cr were beneficial. Alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater percentages of TGSCC and IGSCC than those alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  3. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Volume 4, No. 2. Semiannual progress report, April 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-03-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents which have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. In particular, it is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV`s fracture resistance which occurs during service, since without that radiation damage, it is virtually impossible to postulate a realistic scenario that would result in RPV failure. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior and, in particular, the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is arranged into 14 tasks: (1) program management, (2) fracture toughness (K{sub lc}) curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) crack-arrest toughness (K{sub la}) curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub lc} and K{sub la} curve shifts in low upper-shelf (LUS) welds, (6) annealing effects in LUS welds, (7) irradiation effects in a commercial LUS weld, (8) microstructural analysis of irradiation effects, (9) in-service aged material evaluations, (10) correlation monitor materials, (11) special technical assistance, (12) Japan Power Development Reactor steel examination, (13) technical assistance for Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) Working Groups 3 and 12, and (14) additional requirements for materials.

  4. Depth distribution of Frank loop defects formed in ion-irradiated stainless steel and its dependence on Si addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongyue; Murakami, Kenta; Dohi, Kenji; Nishida, Kenji; Soneda, Naoki; Li, Zhengcao; Liu, Li; Sekimura, Naoto

    2015-12-01

    Although heavy ion irradiation is a good tool to simulate neutron irradiation-induced damages in light water reactor, it produces inhomogeneous defect distribution. Such difference in defect distribution brings difficulty in comparing the microstructure evolution and mechanical degradation between neutron and heavy ion irradiation, and thus needs to be understood. Stainless steel is the typical structural material used in reactor core, and could be taken as an example to study the inhomogeneous defect depth distribution in heavy ion irradiation and its influence on the tested irradiation hardening by nano-indentation. In this work, solution annealed stainless steel model alloys are irradiated by 3 MeV Fe2+ ions at 400 °C to 3 dpa to produce Frank loops that are mainly interstitial in nature. The silicon content of the model alloys is also tuned to change point defect diffusion, so that the loop depth distribution influenced by diffusion along the irradiation beam direction could be discussed. Results show that in low Si (0% Si) and base Si (0.42% Si) samples the depth distribution of Frank loop density quite well matches the dpa profile calculated by the SRIM code, but in high Si sample (0.95% Si), the loop number density in the near-surface region is very low. One possible explanation could be Si's role in enhancing the effective vacancy diffusivity, promoting recombination and thus suppressing interstitial Frank loops, especially in the near-surface region, where vacancies concentrate. By considering the loop depth distribution, the tested irradiation hardening is successfully explained by the Orowan model. A hardening coefficient of around 0.30 is obtained for all the three samples. This attempt in interpreting hardening results may make it easier to compare the mechanical degradation between different irradiation experiments.

  5. Features of structure-phase transformations and segregation processes under irradiation of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neklyudov, I. M.; Voyevodin, V. N.

    1994-09-01

    The difference between crystal lattices of austenitic and ferritic steels leads to distinctive features in mechanisms of physical-mechanical change. This paper presents the results of investigations of dislocation structure and phase evolution, and segregation phenomena in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels and alloys during irradiation with heavy ions in the ESUVI and UTI accelerators and by neutrons in fast reactors BOR-60 and BN-600. The influence of different factors (including different alloying elements) on processes of structure-phase transformation was studied.

  6. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Schubert, L.E.

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructures and the hardness of stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation at a dose of 7.2 × 1019 n cm-2 (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 1013 n cm-2 s-1 at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography and by a nanoindentation technique. To isolate the effects of the neutron irradiation, we compared the results of the measurements of the neutron-irradiated samples with those from a sample aged at 300 °C for a duration equivalent to that of the irradiation. The Cr concentration fluctuation was enhanced in the δ-ferrite phase of the irradiated sample. In addition, enhancement of the concentration fluctuation of Si, which was not observed in the aged sample, was observed. The hardening in the δ-ferrite phase occurred due to both irradiation and aging; however, the hardening of the irradiated sample was more than that expected from the Cr concentration fluctuation, which suggested that the Si concentration fluctuation and irradiation-induced defects were possible origins of the additional hardening.

  8. Irradiation embrittlement of 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo steel at 400°C and its electrochemical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Y.; Fukaya, K.; Suzuki, M.; Eto, M.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of normalized and tempered 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo steel was evaluated by conducting postirradiation tensile and Charpy impact tests. The specimens were irradiated at 400°C to a fluence as high as 3 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV). Only slight hardening was observed because of the high temperature of irradiation. However, irradiation at 400°C to a fluence larger than 1 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) caused high Charpy shifts accompanied by intergranular fracture. Results of electrochemical tests indicated that a possible element responsible for intergranular fracture was phosphorus.

  9. Comparison of the mechanical properties of T91 steel from the MEGAPIE, and TWIN-ASTIR irradiation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinović, M. J.; Stergar, E.; Lambrecht, M.; Gavrilov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of spallation target components exposed to combined effects of proton and neutron irradiations and in contact with liquid metal provide important information for the assessment of structural component integrity, which is crucial for the design of accelerator driven reactor concepts such as the MYRRHA reactor. In this study we perform tensile tests on T91 steel samples extracted from the MEGAPIE, and from the TWIN-ASTIR experiment. The tests are performed at different temperatures as well as with and without the contact with liquid metal. In both groups of samples we observed significant influence of liquid metal on the tensile properties, in particular reduction of total elongation. The influence of different conditions in two irradiation programs on the mechanical properties, such as irradiation temperature fluctuations, the presence of neutron/proton irradiation, with and without the contact with lead-bismuth eutectic, different flux and fluence, are also discussed.

  10. Effects of laser irradiation on iron loss reduction for Fe-3%Si grain-oriented silicon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Imafuku, Muneyuki . E-mail: crystal@re.nsc.co.jp; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Akita, Koichi; Iwata, Keiji; Fujikura, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    The effects of laser irradiation on iron loss reduction for Fe-3%Si grain-oriented silicon steel sheet were investigated. The local tensile residual stress states near the laser irradiated cavity lines were observed by using the new X-ray stress measurement method for a single crystal. Although the higher laser power induced the larger tensile residual stresses, the minimum iron loss was obtained at the medium tensile residual stress conditions of about 100-200 MPa. The increase of Vickers hardness was observed with increasing laser power, which was the mark of the plastic deformations induced by the laser irradiation. The tensile residual stress reduces eddy current loss and the plastic deformation increases hysteresis loss of the material. The total iron loss is determined by the balance of these two effects of laser irradiation.

  11. Magnetic evaluation of irradiation hardening in A533B reactor pressure vessel steels: Magnetic hysteresis measurements and the model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Klingensmith, D.; Odette, G. R.; Kikuchi, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We report results of measurements of magnetic minor hysteresis loops for neutron-irradiated A533B nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels varying alloy composition and irradiation condition. A minor-loop coefficient, which is obtained from a scaling power law between minor-loop parameters exhibits a steep decrease just after irradiation, followed by a maximum in the intermediate fluence regime for most alloys. A model analysis assuming Avrami-type growth for Cu-rich precipitates and an empirical logarithmic law for relaxation of residual stress demonstrates that an increment of the coefficient due to Cu-rich precipitates increases with Cu and Ni contents and is in proportion to a yield stress change, which is related to irradiation hardening.

  12. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program. Volume 2, No. 1: Semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1994-07-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established with its primary goal to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. The HSSI Program is arranged into nine tasks: (1) program management, (2) K{sub ic} curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) K{sub ia} curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub ic} and K{sub ia} curve shifts in low upper-shelf (LUS) weld, (6) irradiation effects in a commercial LUS weld, (7) microstructural analysis of irradiation, (8) in-service aged material evaluations, and (9) correlation monitor materials. During this period, additional analyses on the effects of precleavage stable ductile tearing on the toughness of high-copper welds 72W and 73W demonstrated that the size effects observed in the transition region are not due to substantial differences in ductile tearing behavior. Possible modifications to irradiated duplex crack-arrest specimens were examined to increase the likelihood of their successful testing. Characterization of a second batch of 72W and 73W welds was begun and results of the Charpy V-notch testing is provided. A review of literature on the annealing response of reactor pressure vessel steels was initiated.

  13. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF FAST REACTOR IRRADIATION CONDITIONS ON THE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF TWO FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; McClellan, K. J.; Romero, T. J.; Kohno, Y.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Kimura, Akihiko

    2006-09-15

    Tensile testing has been performed at 25 and at ~400°C on two ferritic/martensitic steels (JFMS and HT-9) after irradiation in FFTF to up to ~70 dpa at 373 to 433°C. As observed in previous studies, this range of irradiation temperatures has a significant effect on hardening. The percent increase in yield stress decreases with increasing irradiation temperature from 373 to 433ºC. The JFMS alloy, which has 0.7 wt. % silicon, exhibits approximately a factor of two increase in yield strength between tests at 427°C and at 373°C, and shows an increase in hardening with increasing dose. A comparison of the JFMS tensile properties to the properties of other ferritic/martensitic steels suggests that this hardening is due to precipitation of a Si-rich Laves phase in this alloy. The HT-9 alloy, which contains more chromium and more carbon but less silicon (0.2 wt. %), less molybdenum and less nickel, hardens during irradiation at 373°C, but shows less hardening for irradiations performed at 427ºC and no increase in yield stress with increasing dose beyond 10 dpa.

  15. The effects of fast reactor irradiation conditions on the tensile properties of two ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, M. B.; McClellan, K. J.; Romero, T.; Kohno, Y.; Garner, F. A.; Kurtz, R. J.; Kimura, A.

    2006-09-01

    Tensile testing has been performed at 25 and at ˜400 °C on two ferritic/martensitic steels (JFMS and HT-9) after irradiation in FFTF to up to ˜70 dpa at 373-433 °C. As observed in previous studies, this range of irradiation temperatures has a significant effect on hardening. The percent increase in yield stress decreases with increasing irradiation temperature from 373 to 433 °C. The JFMS alloy, which has 0.7 wt% silicon, exhibits approximately a factor of two increase in yield strength between tests at 427 and at 373 °C, and shows an increase in hardening with increasing dose. A comparison of the JFMS tensile properties to the properties of other ferritic/martensitic steels suggests that this hardening is due to precipitation of a Si-rich laves phase in this alloy. The HT-9 alloy, which contains more chromium and more carbon but less silicon (0.2 wt%), less molybdenum and less nickel, hardens during irradiation at 373 °C, but shows less hardening for irradiations performed at 427 °C and no increase in yield stress with increasing dose beyond 10 dpa.

  16. Irradiation effects on 17-7 PH stainless steel, A-201 carbon steel, and titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, R. A.; Hartley, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Irradiation effects on three materials from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Surveillance Program were determined. An increase of 105 K in the nil-ductility temperature for A-201 steel was observed at a fluence of approximately 3.1 x 10 to the 18th power neutrons/sq cm (neutron energy E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). Only minor changes in the mechanical properties of 17-7 PH stainless steel were observed up to a fluence of 2 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). The titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy maintained its notch toughness up to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV).

  17. Characterization of neutron-irradiated HT-UPS steel by high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Li, Meimei

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first measurement of neutron-irradiated microstructure using far-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) in a high-temperature ultrafine-precipitate-strengthened (HT-UPS) austenitic stainless steel. Grain center of mass, grain size distribution, crystallographic orientation (texture), diffraction spot broadening and lattice constant distributions of individual grains were obtained for samples in three different conditions: non-irradiated, neutron-irradiated (3dpa/500 °C), and irradiated + annealed (3dpa/500 °C + 600 °C/1 h). It was found that irradiation caused significant increase in grain-level diffraction spot broadening, modified the texture, reduced the grain-averaged lattice constant, but had nearly no effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution, as well as the grain size-dependent lattice constant variations. Post-irradiation annealing largely reversed the irradiation effects on texture and average lattice constant, but inadequately restored the microstrain.

  18. Development of radiation damage during in-situ Kr++ irradiation of Fesbnd Nisbnd Cr model austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desormeaux, M.; Rouxel, B.; Motta, A. T.; Kirk, M.; Bisor, C.; de Carlan, Y.; Legris, A.

    2016-07-01

    In situ irradiations of 15Cr/15Nisbnd Ti and 15Cr/25Nisbnd Ti model austenitic steels were performed at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM)-Tandem user Facility (Argonne National Laboratory) at 600 °C using 1 MeV Kr++. The experiment was designed in the framework of cladding development for the GEN IV Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). It is an extension of previous high dose irradiations on those model alloys at JANNuS-Saclay facility in France, aimed at investigating swelling mechanisms and microstructure evolution of these alloys under irradiation [1]. These studies showed a strong influence of Ni in decreasing swelling. In situ irradiations were used to continuously follow the microstructure evolution during irradiation using both diffraction contrast imaging and recording of diffraction patterns. Defect analysis, including defect size, density and nature, was performed to characterize the evolving microstructure and the swelling. Comparison of 15Cr/15Nisbnd Ti and 15Cr/25Nisbnd Ti irradiated microstructure has lent insight into the effect of nickel content in the development of radiation damage caused by heavy ion irradiation. The results are quantified and discussed in this paper.

  19. The high temperature three point bend testing of proton irradiated 316L stainless steel and Mod 9Cr 1Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Zubelewicz, A.; Romero, T.; James, M. R.; Sommer, W. F.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The predicted operating conditions for a lead-bismuth eutectic target to be used in an accelerator driven system for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative span a temperature range of 300-600 °C while being irradiated by a high energy (˜600 MeV) proton beam. Such spallation conditions lead to high displacement rates coupled with high accumulation rates of helium and hydrogen up to 150 appm/dpa. Some candidate materials for these applications include Mod9Cr-1Mo and 316L stainless steel. To investigate the effect of irradiation on these materials, the mechanical properties are being measured through three point bend testing on Mod 9Cr-1Mo and 316L at 25, 250, 350 and 500 °C after irradiation in a high energy proton beam (500-800 MeV) to a dose of 9.8 dpa at temperatures from 200 to 320 °C. By comparing measurements made in bending to tensile measurements measured on identically irradiated materials, a measurement of 0.2% offset yield stress was obtained from 0.05% offset yield stress measured in three point bend testing. Yield stress increased by more than a factor of two after irradiation to 9.8 dpa. Observation of the outer fiber surface of 316L showed very localized deformation when tested after irradiation at 70 °C and deformation on multiple slip systems when tested after irradiation at 250-320 °C.

  20. Mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated nickel-containing martensitic steels: II. Review and analysis of helium-effects studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Hashimoto, N.; Sokolov, M. A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Shiba, K.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2006-10-01

    In part I of this helium-effects study on ferritic/martensitic steels, results were presented on tensile and Charpy impact properties of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and these steels containing 2% Ni after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to 10-12 dpa at 300 and 400 °C and in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 15 dpa at 393 °C. The results indicated that helium caused an increment of hardening above irradiation hardening produced in the absence of helium. In addition to helium-effects studies on ferritic/martensitic steels using nickel doping, studies have also been conducted over the years using boron doping, ion implantation, and spallation neutron sources. In these previous investigations, observations of hardening and embrittlement were made that were attributed to helium. In this paper, the new results and those from previous helium-effects studies are reviewed and analyzed.

  1. Microstructural evolution of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in spectrally tailored experiment in ORR at 400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, T.; Maziasz, P. J.; Kanazawa, H.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-09-01

    Several different heats of austenitic stainless steel, including Japanese-PCA(JPCA), were irradiated in the spectrally tailored ORR experiment at 400°C to 7.4 dpa. The levels of helium generated were 155 appm for JPCA (16Ni, 30 wppm B) and 102 appm for standard type 316 steel (13Ni). The mean He: dpa ratio throughout the irradiation falls between 15 and 20 appm He/dpa, which is close to the He/dpa values expected for fusion. Swelling was measured by transmission electron microscopy and by precision immersion densitometry. All the CW alloys showed swelling that was at or below the detection limit of the densitometer (0.1%). No measurable swelling was detected in the SA JPCA alloy, while the highest value of 0.8% was observed in the SA high-purity alloy. One Ti-modified steel with low C also showed a relatively high swelling value of 0.5%, while standard type 316 steel showed only 0.15% swelling. TEM observation gave consistent but slightly larger values of swelling.

  2. Swelling and microstructure of austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 CW after high dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu. V.; Garner, F. А.

    2009-08-01

    Austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 serving as fuel pin cladding was irradiated in the 20% cold-worked condition in the BN-600 fast reactor in the range 56-84 dpa. This steel was developed to replace EI-847 which was limited by its insufficient resistance to void swelling. Comparison of swelling between EI-847 and ChS-68 under similar irradiation conditions showed improvement of the latter steel by an extended transient regime of an additional ˜10 dpa. Concurrent with swelling was the development of a variety of phases. In the temperature range 430-460 °С where the temperature peak of swelling was located, the principal type of phase generated during irradiation was G-phase, with volume fraction increasing linearly with dose to ˜0.5% at 84 dpa. While the onset of swelling is concurrent with formation of G-phase, the action of G-phase cannot be confidently ascribed to significant removal from solution of swelling-suppressive elements such as silicon. A plausible mechanism for the higher resistance to void swelling of ChS-68 as compared with EI-847 may be related to an observed higher stability of faulted dislocation loops in ChS-68 that impedes the formation of a glissile dislocation network. The higher level of boron in ChS-68 is thought to be one contributor that might play this role.

  3. Raman spectroscopic analysis of iron chromium oxide microspheres generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Soto-Bernal, J J; Frausto-Reyes, C; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2015-06-15

    Iron chromium oxide microspheres were generated by pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of two commercial samples of stainless steel at room temperature. An Ytterbium pulsed fiber laser was used for this purpose. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the microspheres, whose size was found to be about 0.2-1.7 μm, as revealed by SEM analysis. The laser irradiation on the surface of the stainless steel modified the composition of the microspheres generated, affecting the concentration of the main elemental components when laser power was increased. Furthermore, the peak ratio of the main bands in the Raman spectra has been associated to the concentration percentage of the main components of the samples, as revealed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. These experiments showed that it is possible to generate iron chromium oxide microspheres on stainless steel by laser irradiation and that the concentration percentage of their main components is associated with the laser power applied. PMID:25797225

  4. Tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels and their weld joints after irradiation by the ORR-spectrally-tailoring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Maziasz, P. J.; Ishiyama, T.; Gibson, L. T.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-09-01

    Tensile specimens of the Japanese heat of PCA (JPCA) and type 316 stainless steels were irradiated in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) to a peak dose of 7.4 dpa and a peak helium level of 105 appm in the temperature range between 328 and 673 K. Specimens of type 316 steel with weld joints produced by tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) welding techniques were also included. Irradiation caused both increases in flow stress and decreases in elongation. Weld joint specimens exhibited both lower strength and elongation after irradiation. The reduction of area (RA) for the TIG weld joint specimens decreased by a factor of 5 compared to unirradiated base metal specimens, however, they still fractured in a ductile mode. The EB weld joints maintained RA levels similar to that of the unirradiated base metal specimens. Post-radiation ductilities of weld joints and base metal specimens of these steels should be adequate for their application to next generation fusion experimental devices, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER).

  5. Integrated analysis of millisecond laser irradiation of steel by comprehensive optical diagnostics and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubenskaia, M.; Smurov, I.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Complimentary optical diagnostic tools are applied to provide comprehensive analysis of thermal phenomena in millisecond Nd:YAG laser irradiation of steel substrates. The following optical devices are employed: (a) infrared camera FLIR Phoenix RDASTM equipped by InSb sensor with 3 to 5 µm band pass arranged on 320 × 256 pixels array, (b) ultra-rapid camera Phantom V7.1 with SR-CMOS monochrome sensor in the visible spectral range, up to 105 frames per second for 64 × 88 pixels array, (c) original multi-wavelength pyrometer in the near-infrared range (1.370-1.531 µm). The following laser radiation parameters are applied: variation of energy per pulse in the range 15-30 J at a constant pulse duration of 10 ms with and without application of protective gas (Ar). The evolution of true temperature is restored based on the method of multi-colour pyrometry; by this way, melting/solidification dynamics is analysed. Emissivity variation with temperature is studied, and hysteresis type functional dependence is found. Variation of intensity of surface evaporation visualised by the camera Phantom V7.1 is registered and linked with the surface temperature evolution, different surface roughness and influence of protective gas atmosphere. Determination of the vapour plume temperature based on relatively intensities of spectral lines is done. The numerical simulation is carried out applying the thermal model with phase transitions taken into account.

  6. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the three-wire, series-arc method. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens. Since irradiation of the stainless steel cladding to 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) was conducted at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h, tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN), and compact fracture toughness specimens were thermally aged at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. Additional specimens are being aged to 20,000 and 50,000 h. Thermal aging of three-wire, series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1604 h resulted in appreciable decrease (16%) in the CVN upper-shelf energy, but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect, following neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>MeV), was a 22% reduction in the CVN upper-shelf energy and a 29{degrees}C shift at the 41-J level. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small or negligible. However, the combined effect after neutron irradiation was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) and no apparent change in ultimate strength and total elongation. Also, neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimen become available.

  7. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1991-12-31

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the three-wire, series-arc method. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens. Since irradiation of the stainless steel cladding to 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) was conducted at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h, tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN), and compact fracture toughness specimens were thermally aged at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. Additional specimens are being aged to 20,000 and 50,000 h. Thermal aging of three-wire, series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1604 h resulted in appreciable decrease (16%) in the CVN upper-shelf energy, but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect, following neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>MeV), was a 22% reduction in the CVN upper-shelf energy and a 29{degrees}C shift at the 41-J level. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small or negligible. However, the combined effect after neutron irradiation was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) and no apparent change in ultimate strength and total elongation. Also, neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimen become available.

  8. Phase diffusionless γ↔α transformations and their effect on physical, mechanical and corrosion properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated with neutrons and charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimkin, O. P.

    2016-04-01

    The work presents relationships of γ→α' and α'→γ-transformations in reactor 12Cr18Ni10Ti and 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 austenitic stainless steels induced by cold work, irradiation and/or temperature. Energy and mechanical parameters of nucleation and development of deformation-induced martensitic α'-phase in the non-irradiated and irradiated steels are given. The mechanisms of localized static deformation were investigated and its effect on martensitic γ→α' transformation is determined. It has been shown that irradiation of 12Cr18Ni10Ti steel with heavy Kr ions (1.56MeV/nucleon, fluence of 1·1015 cm-2) results in formation of α'-martensite in near-surface layer of the sample. Results of systematic research on reversed α'→γ-transformation in austenitic metastable stainless steels irradiated with slow (VVR-K) and fast (BN-350) neutrons are presented. The effect of annealing on strength and magnetic characteristics was determined. It was found that at the temperature of 400 °C in the irradiated with neutrons samples (59 dpa) an increase of ferromagnetic α'-phase and microhardness was observed. The obtained results could be used during assessment of operational characteristics of highly irradiated austenitic steels during transportation and storage of Fuel Assemblies for fast nuclear reactors.

  9. Characterization of neutron-irradiated ferritic model alloys and a RPV steel from combined APT, SANS, TEM and PAS analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Lambrecht, M.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Malerba, L.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Barbu, A.; Gómez-Briceño, D.; Ulbricht, A.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under irradiation is a mandatory task that has to be elucidated in order to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. To build up predictive tools, a substantial experimental data base is needed at the nanometre scale to extract quantitative information on neutron-irradiated materials and to validate the theoretical models. To reach this experimental goal, ferritic model alloys and French RPV steel were neutron irradiated in a test reactor at an irradiation flux of 9 × 10 17 nm -2 s, doses from 0.18 to 1.3 × 10 24 nm -2 and 300 °C. The main goal of this paper is to report the characterization of the radiation-induced microstructural change in the materials by using the state-of-the-art of characterization techniques available in Europe at the nanometre scale. Possibilities, limitations and complementarities of the techniques to each other are highlighted.

  10. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, A. V.; Panyukov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  11. Auger electron spectroscopy study of alloy 718 and 304L stainless steel irradiated with 800 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Mazarío, M.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Lancha, A. M.

    2001-07-01

    It is well known that radiation produces changes in materials microstructure such as formation of defects, dissolution and redistribution of secondary phases, precipitation of new phases, etc. and changes in the grain boundary microchemistry by a process known as radiation-induced segregation (RIS). This paper describes the grain boundary microchemical characterization of alloy 718 and 304L stainless steel irradiated with high-energy protons at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), performed by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, non-irradiated alloy 718 was characterized as reference. The Auger results showed that as a consequence of exposure to proton radiation, the changes observed in alloy 718 were the disappearance of the nickel and niobium rich grain boundaries precipitates and RIS of the major alloying elements (nickel to grain boundaries, and chromium and iron away from grain boundaries). On the other hand, in irradiated AISI 304L no differences were observed between intergranular and transgranular areas.

  12. Stability of nanoclusters in 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened steel under heavy ion-irradiation by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; V. Shutthanandan; Y.Q. Wu

    2014-12-01

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 C, 450 C, and 600 C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 1023 to 3.6 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  13. Microstructural development due to long-term aging and ion irradiation behavior in weld metals of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Ikeda, S.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    In a candidate austenitic stainless steel (316F) for fusion reactor structural materials, irradiation behavior of the weld metal produced by electron-beam welding (containing 7.9 vol% δ-ferrite) was investigated in terms of microstructural development. The densities of interstitial clusters in the γ-phase of the weld metal irradiated with He-ions at 673 and 773 K were about four times larger than those in 316F. Voids were formed in the δ-ferrite of the weld irradiated at 773 K. The number of clusters decreased in the weld metal (γ-phase) aged at 773 to 973 K, compared with that in the as-welded metal. The change in cluster density could be attributed to a Ni concentration increase in the γ-phase of the weld metal during aging.

  14. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Malerba, L.

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a "grey alloy" approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe-C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe-C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  15. Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Miller, Brandon; Chichester, Heather J.M.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  16. Relationship between lath boundary structure and radiation induced segregation in a neutron irradiated 9 wt.% Cr model ferritic/martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Miller, Brandon D.; Chichester, Heather J. M.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-02-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes which migrate to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs where low energy structures have suppressed RIS responses. This relationship between local GB structure and RIS has been demonstrated primarily in ion-irradiated specimens. A 9 wt.% Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of a neutron radiation environment on the RIS response at different GB structures. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  17. Mechanical properties and microstructure of three Russian ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in BN-350 reactor to 50 dpa at 490C

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Ioltukhovsky, A. G.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are being considered for application in fusion reactors, intense neutron sources, and accelerator-driven systems. While EP-450 is traditionally used with sodium coolants in Russia, EP-823 and EI-852 steels with higher silicon levels have been developed for reactor facilities using lead-bismuth coolant. To determine the influence of silicon additions on short-term mechanical properties and microstructure, ring specimens cut from cladding tubes of these three steels were irradiated in sodium at 490С in the BN-350 reactor to 50 dpa. Post-irradiation tensile testing and microstructural examination show that EI-852 steel (1.9 wt% Si) undergoes severe irradiation embrittlement. Microstructural investigation showed that the formation of near-continuous -phase precipitates on grain boundaries is the main cause of the embrittlement.

  18. Irradiation creep and stress-enhanced swelling of Fe-16Cr-15Ni-Nb austenitic stainless steel in BN-350

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobjev, A.N.; Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V.

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation creep and void swelling will be important damage processes for stainless steels when subjected to fusion neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures. The absence of an irradiation device with fusion-relevant neutron spectra requires that data on these processes be collected in surrogate devices such as fast reactors. This paper presents the response of an annealed austenitic steel when exposed to 60 dpa at 480{degrees}C and to 20 dpa at 520{degrees}C. This material was irradiated as thin-walled argon-pressurized tubes in the BN-350 reactor located in Kazakhstan. These tubes were irradiated at hoop stresses ranging from 0 to 200 MPa. After irradiation both destructive and non-destructive examination was conducted.

  19. Tensile response of low activation ferritic steels irradiated in ORR at temperatures in the range 60-400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, M. L.; Gelles, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    Post-irradiation tensile test results are reported for a series of low activation steels containing manganese following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 60, 200, 330 and 400 °C to ˜10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2Cr, 9Cr and 12Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Strengths are higher in all alloys for irradiation conditions below 400 °C, with peak hardening occurring following irradiation at 200 °C. The 9Cr alloy class exhibited the smallest increases in hardening. Test results were consistent with previous results obtained on fast flux test facility-irradiated specimens. Manganese does not appear to play a role in the hardening observed at these low irradiation temperatures.

  20. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure and the mechanical and corrosion properties of the ultrafine-grained stainless Cr-Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimkin, O. P.; Gusev, M. N.; Tsai, K. V.; Yarovchuk, A. V.; Rybalchenko, O. V.; Enikeev, N. A.; Valiev, R. Z.; Dobatkin, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    It has been revealed that the neutron irradiation of ultrafine-grained (UFG) 08Kh18N10T steel after severe plastic deformation (SPD) does not lead to the appearance of defects of radiation origin up to a fluence of 2 × 1020 n/cm2 (~0.05 dpa) and that the strength properties of the material are retained after irradiation. At the same time, this irradiation reduces the corrosion resistance of the steel in a chlorine-containing medium, especially after heating at 550°C with a holding for 1 h after SPD.

  1. Modeling of microstructure evolution in austenitic stainless steels irradiated under light water reactor condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.; Stoller, R. E.

    2001-10-01

    A model for microstructure development in austenitic alloys under light water reactor irradiation conditions is described. The model is derived from the model developed by Stoller and Odette to describe microstructural evolution under fast neutron or fusion reactor irradiation conditions. The model is benchmarked against microstructure measurements in 304 and 316 SS irradiated in a boiling water reactor core using one material-dependent and three irradiation-based parameters. The model is also adapted for proton irradiation at higher dose rate and higher temperature and is calibrated against microstructure measurements for proton irradiation. The model calculations show that for both neutron and proton irradiations, in-cascade interstitial clustering is the driving mechanism for loop nucleation. The loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by interstitial cluster diffusion was found to be an important factor in determining the loop density. The model also explains how proton irradiation can produce an irradiated dislocation microstructure similar to that in neutron irradiation.

  2. Helium effects on microstructural change in RAFM steel under irradiation: Reaction rate theory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Nakasuji, T.; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.

    2015-06-01

    Reaction rate theory analysis has been conducted to investigate helium effects on the formation kinetics of interstitial type dislocation loops (I-loops) and helium bubbles in reduced-activation-ferritic/martensitic steel during irradiation, by focusing on the nucleation and growth processes of the defect clusters. The rate theory model employs the size and chemical composition dependence of thermal dissociation of point defects from defect clusters. In the calculations, the temperature and the production rate of Frenkel pairs are fixed to be T = 723 K and PV = 10-6 dpa/s, respectively. And then, only the production rate of helium atoms was changed into the following three cases: PHe = 0, 10-7 and 10-5 appm He/s. The calculation results show that helium effect on I-loop formation quite differs from that on bubble formation. As to I-loops, the loop formation hardly depends on the existence of helium, where the number density of I-loops is almost the same for the three cases of PHe. This is because helium atoms trapped in vacancies are easily emitted into the matrix due to the recombination between the vacancies and SIAs, which induces no pronounced increase or decrease of vacancies and SIAs in the matrix, leading to no remarkable impact on the I-loop nucleation. On the other hand, the bubble formation depends much on the existence of helium, in which the number density of bubbles for PHe = 10-7 and 10-5 appm He/s is much higher than that for PHe = 0. This is because helium atoms trapped in a bubble increase the vacancy binding energy, and suppress the vacancy dissociation from the bubble, resulting in a promotion of the bubble nucleation. And then, the helium effect on the promotion of bubble nucleation is very strong, even the number of helium atoms in a bubble is not so large.

  3. Microstructure of austenitic stainless steels irradiated at 400°C in the ORR and the HFIR spectral tailoring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, N.; Wakai, E.; Robertson, J. P.; Sawai, T.; Hishinuma, A.

    2000-07-01

    Microstructural evolution in solution-annealed Japanese-PCA (JPCA-SA) and four other austenitic stainless steels, irradiated at 400°C to 17.3 dpa in the ORR and the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) spectrally tailored experiment, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mean He/dpa ratio throughout the irradiation fell between 12 and 16 appm He/dpa , which is close to the He/dpa values expected for fusion. In all the specimens, a bi-modal size distribution of cavities was observed and the number densities were about 1.0×10 22 m -3. There was no significant difference between the number densities in the different alloys, although the root mean cubes of the cavity radius are quite different for each alloy. Precipitates of the MC type were also observed in the matrix and on grain boundaries in all alloys except a high-purity (HP) ternary alloy. The JPCA-SA (including 0.06% carbon and 0.027% phosphorus) and standard type 316 steel (including 0.06% carbon and 0.028% phosphorus) showed quite low-swelling values of about 0.016 and 0.015%, respectively, while a HP ternary austenitic alloy showed the highest swelling value of 2.9%. This suggests that the existence of impurities affects the cavity growth in austenitic stainless steels even at 400°C.

  4. Swelling, microstructural development and helium effects in type 316 stainless steel irradiated in HFIR and EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    This work examines the swelling and microstructural development of a single heat of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel irradiated to produce displacement damage and a high, continuous helium generation rate, in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Similar irradiation of the same heat of steel in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II is used as a base line for comparing displacement damage accompanying a very low continuous helium generation rate. At temperatures above and below the void swelling regime (approx. 350 to 625/sup 0/C) swelling is greater in HFIR than in EBR-II. In the temprature range of 350 to 625/sup 0/C, cavity formation, precipitation and dislocation recovery are both enhanced and accelerated in HFIR, often causing swelling at lower dose than in EBR-II. In HFIR, however, cavities appear to be bubbles rather than voids. They are about 10 times smaller and 20 to 50 times more numerous than voids in EBR-II. Thus, the swelling becomes greater in EBR-II than in HFIR for 20%-CW 316 in the void swelling temperature ranges as fluence increases. Such differences in swelling and microstructural behavior must be understood in order to anticipate the behavior of materials during fusion irradiation.

  5. Comparison of different experimental and analytical measures of the thermal annealing response of neutron-irradiated RPV steels

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    The thermal annealing response of several materials as indicated by Charpy transition temperature (TT) and upper-shelf energy (USE), crack initiation toughness, K{sub Jc}, predictive models, and automated-ball indentation (ABI) testing are compared. The materials investigated are representative reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels (several welds and a plate) that were irradiated for other tasks of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program and are relatively well characterized in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. They have been annealed at two temperatures, 343 and 454 C (650 and 850 F) for varying lengths of time. The correlation of the Charpy response and the fracture toughness, ABI, and the response predicted by the annealing model of Eason et al. for these conditions and materials appears to be reasonable. The USE after annealing at the temperature of 454 C appears to recover at a faster rate than the TT, and even over-recovers (i.e., the recovered USE exceeds that of the unirradiated material).

  6. Investigation on femto-second laser irradiation assisted shock peening of medium carbon (0.4% C) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Kumari, Renu; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on the peening behavior of 0.4% C steel has been evaluated. Laser irradiation has been conducted with a 100 μJ and 300 fs laser with multiple pulses under varied energy. Followed by laser irradiation, a detailed characterization of the processed zone was undertaken by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction technique. Finally, the residual stress distribution, microhardness and wear resistance properties of the processed zone were also evaluated. Laser processing leads to shock peening associated with plasma formation and its expansion, formation of martensite and ferrito-pearlitic phase in the microstructure. Due to laser processing, there is introduction of residual stress on the surface which varies from high tensile (140 MPa) to compressive (-335 MPa) as compared to 152 MPa of the substrate. There is a significant increase in microhardness to 350-500 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of substrate. The fretting wear behavior against hardened steel ball shows a significant reduction in wear depth due to laser processing. Finally, a conclusion of the mechanism of wear has been established.

  7. Irradiation creep in type 316 stainless steel and us PCA with fusion reactor He/dpa levels*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Horak, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    Irradiation creep was investigated in Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) and US Fusion Program PCA using a tailored spectrum of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor in order to achieve a He/dpa value characteristic of a fusion reactor first wall. Pressurized tubes with stresses of 20 to 470 MPa were irradiated at temperatures of 330, 400, 500, and 600°C. It was found that irradiation creep was independent of temperature in this range and varied linearly with stress at low stresses, but the stress exponent increased to 1.3 and 1.8 for 316 SS and PCA, respectively, at higher stresses. Specimens of PCA irradiated in the ORR and having helium levels up to 200 appm experienced a 3 to 10 times higher creep rate than similar specimens irradiated in the FFTF and having helium levels below 20 appm. The higher creep rates are attributed to either a lower flux or the presence of helium. A mechanism involving interstitial helium-enhanced climb is proposed.

  8. Hardness and microstructural response to thermal annealing of irradiated ASTM A533B class 1 plate steel

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, D.E.; Kumar, A.S.; Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1999-10-01

    Hardness measurements were used to determine the post-irradiation annealing response of A533B class 1 plate steel irradiated to a fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) at 150 C. Rockwell hardness measurements indicated that the material had hardened by 6.6 points on the B scale after irradiation. The irradiation induced hardness increase was associated with a decrease in upper shelf energy from 63.4 J to 5-1.8 J and a temperature shift in the Charpy curve at the 41 J level from 115 C to 215 C. Specimens were annealed after irradiation at temperatures of 343 C (650 F), 399 C (750 F), and 454 C (850 F) for durations of up to one week (168 h). Hardness measurements were made to chart recovery of hardness as a function of time and temperature. Specimens annealed at the highest temperature 454 C recovered the fastest, fully recovering within 144 h. Specimens annealed at 399 C recovered completely within 168 h. Specimens annealed at the lowest temperature, 343 C recovered only {approximately}70% after 168 h of annealing. After neutron irradiation, a new feature of black spot damage was found to be superimposed on the unirradiated microstructure. The density of black spots was found to vary from 2.3 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} with an average diameter of 2.85 nm. Following annealing at 454 C for 24 h the black spot damage was completely annealed out. It was concluded that the black spot damage was responsible for 70% of the irradiation-induced hardness.

  9. Temperature effect on characteristics of void population formed in the austenitic steel under neutron irradiation up to high damage dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.; Skryabin, L. A.; Kinev, E. A.

    2002-12-01

    Radiation-induced porosity in fuel pin cladding of the BN-600 reactor fabricated of cold-worked austenitic steel 16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn irradiated to different damage dose 20-90 dpa at 410-600 °C has been examined by transmission electron microscopy. Formation and growth of various types of voids were shown to occur according to their both duration and mechanism of nucleation. Dependencies of average diameters and concentration of all void types on neutron irradiation damage dose were plotted for various temperature ranges. The change of void population with increasing dose at various temperature ranges was analyzed based on point defect kinetic. The contribution of different types of voids to swelling was examined.

  10. Evolution of the radiation-induced defect structure in 316 type stainless steel after post-irradiation annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Renterghem, W.; Konstantinović, M. J.; Vankeerberghen, M.

    2014-09-01

    The thermal stability of Frank loops, black dots, cavities and γ‧ precipitates in an irradiated 316 stainless steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The samples were retrieved from a thimble tube irradiated at around 320 °C up to 80 dpa in a commercial nuclear power reactor, and thermally annealed, varying both annealing temperature and time. With increasing annealing temperature the density of all defects gradually decreased, resulting in the complete removal of Frank loops at 550 °C. In contrast to other defects, the density of the γ‧ precipitates sharply decreased with increasing annealing time, which indicates that the dissolution of the γ‧ precipitates is governed by the iron diffusion length.

  11. Influence of helium on deuterium retention in reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (F82H) under simultaneous deuterium and helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushiji, K.; Lee, H. T.; Oya, M.; Hamaji, Y.; Ibano, K.; Ueda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium and helium retention in Japanese reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel (F82H) under simultaneous D-He irradiation at 500, 625, 750, and 818 K was studied. This study aims to clarify tritium retention behavior in RAFM steels to assess their use as plasma facing materials. The irradiation fluence was kept constant at 1 × 1024 D m-2. Four He desorption peaks were observed with He retention greatest at 625 K. At T > 625 K a monotonic decrease in He retention was observed. At all temperatures a systematic reduction in D retention was observed for the simultaneous D-He case in comparison to D-only case. This suggests that He implanted at the near surface in RAFM steels may reduce the inward penetration of tritium in RAFM steels that would result in lower tritium inventory for a given fluence.

  12. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji

    2011-09-01

    The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, "Joyo", demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, "Monju". The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and 137Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  13. 55Fe effect on enhancing ferritic steel He/dpa ratio in fission reactor irradiations to simulate fusion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haibo; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2013-11-01

    How to increase the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio in a fission reactor neutron spectrum is an important question for fusion reactor material testing. An early experiment showed that the accelerated He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 2.3 was achieved for 96% enriched 54Fe in iron with 458.2 effective full power days (EFPD) irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL. Greenwood suggested that the transmutation produced 55Fe has a thermal neutron helium production cross section which may have an effect on this result. In the current work, the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio is studied in the neutron spectrum of HFIR with 55Fe thermal neutron helium production taken into account. The available ENDF-b format 55Fe incident neutron cross section file from TENDL, Netherlands, is first input into the calculation model. A benchmark calculation for the same sample as used in the aforementioned experiment was used to adjust and evaluate the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section values. The analysis shows a decrease of a factor of 6700 for the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section in the intermediate and low energy regions is required in order to fit the experimental results. The best fit to the cross section value at thermal neutron energy is about 27 mb. With the adjusted 55Fe (n, a) cross sections, calculation show that the 54Fe and 55Fe isotopes can be enriched by the isotopic tailoring technique in a ferritic steel sample irradiated in HFIR to significantly enhance the helium production rate. The results show that a 70% enriched 54Fe and 30% enriched 55Fe ferritic steel sample would produce a He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 13 initially in the HFIR peripheral target position (PTP). After one year irradiation, the ratio decreases to about 10. This new calculation can be used to guide future isotopic tailoring experiments designed to increase the He(appm)/dpa ratio in fission reactors. A benchmark experiment is suggested to be performed to evaluate the 55Fe (n, a) cross section

  14. Microstructural examination of low activation ferritic steels following irradiation in ORR at 330 and 400 °C to ˜10 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    2004-08-01

    Microstructural examinations are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 °C to ˜10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2% Cr, 9% Cr and 12% Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Results include compositional changes in precipitates and microstructural changes as a function of composition and irradiation temperature. It is concluded that temperatures in ORR are on the order of 50 °C higher than anticipated.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking and intergranular corrosion of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuya, K.; Shima, S.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.

    1992-09-01

    The effects of irradiation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility were investigated in solution-treated Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys and JPCA irradiated to 5.3×1024 n/m2 (E > 1 MeV) at 573 K. In Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys, the irradiation enhanced IGC i n boiling HNO3 + Cr6+ solution when the alloys contained phosphorus and silicon and induced SCC in all the alloys with strain rate tensile tests in 571 K water containing 32 ppm oxygen. With increasing phosphorus and silicon contents. IGC was promoted but IGSCC was suppressed after irradiation. The results indicated that these elements are not the main contributors to irradiation-assisted SCC, although they affect SCC behavior. The Japanese Prime Candidate Alloy (JPCA) had better SCC resistance than Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys under the present irradiation condition.

  16. New Dosimetric Interpretation of the DV50 Vessel-Steel Experiment Irradiated in the OSIRIS MTR Reactor Using the Monte-Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malouch, Fadhel

    2016-02-01

    An irradiation program DV50 was carried out from 2002 to 2006 in the OSIRIS material testing reactor (CEA-Saclay center) to assess the pressure vessel steel toughness curve for a fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) equivalent to a French 900-MWe PWR lifetime of 50 years. This program allowed the irradiation of 120 specimens out of vessel steel, subdivided in two successive irradiations DV50 n∘1 and DV50 n∘2. To measure the fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) received by specimens after each irradiation, sample holders were equipped with activation foils that were withdrawn at the end of irradiation for activity counting and processing. The fast effective cross-sections used in the dosimeter processing were determined with a specific calculation scheme based on the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-3 (and the nuclear data ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90). In order to put vessel-steel experiments at the same standard, a new dosimetric interpretation of the DV50 experiment has been performed by using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4 and more recent nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and IRDF-2002). This paper presents a comparison of previous and recent calculations performed for the DV50 vessel-steel experiment to assess the impact on the dosimetric interpretation.

  17. Extreme embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel irradiated to 75--81 dpa at 335--360 C

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S.I.; Vorobjev, A.N.; Konobeev, Yu.V.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment conducted in the BN-350 fast reactor in Kazakhstan that involved the irradiation of argon-pressurized thin-walled tubes (0--2000 MPa hoop stress) constructed from Fe-16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Nb stabilized steel in contact with the sodium coolant, which enters the reactor at {approximately}270 C. Tubes in the annealed condition reached 75 dpa at 335 C, and another set in the 20% cold-worked condition reached 81 dpa at 360 C. Upon disassembly all tubes, except those in the stress-free condition, were found to have failed in an extremely brittle fashion. The stress-free tubes exhibited diameter changes that imply swelling levels ranging from 9 to 16%. It is expected that stress-enhancement of swelling induced even larger swelling levels in the stressed tubes. The embrittlement is explained in terms of the sensitivity of the swelling regime to displacement rate and the large, unprecedented levels of swelling reached at 335--360 C at these high neutron fluences. The failure mechanism appears to be identical to that observed at similar swelling levels in other austenitic steels irradiated in US fast reactors at 400--425 C, whereby stress-concentration between voids and nickel segregation at void surfaces predisposes the steel to an epsilon martensite transformation followed by formation of alpha martensite at crack tips. The very slow strain rate inherent in such creep tests and the relatively high helium levels may also contribute to the failure.

  18. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of type 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Ioka, Ikuo; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    1996-12-31

    A single heat of solution annealed 316 ss was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400 C. Tensile properties were studied vs dose and temperature. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking (STN), and strain hardening capacity were seen. Magnitude of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength and decrease STN to <0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in STN occur after irradiation at 330 C but failure mode remains ductile.

  19. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Progress report, September 30, 1989--June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1990-06-01

    Samples of ultra high purity stainless steel have been fabricated into 2mm {times} 2mm rectangular bars and irradiated to one dpa ({approximately}l {times} 10{sup 19} p{sup +}/cm{sup 2}) using 3.4 MeV protons (>20{mu}A) while controlling the sample temperature at 400{degree}C. Samples are pressed onto a water-cooled and electrically heated copper block with a thin layer of Sn in between to improve thermal conductivity. The irradiation produced a significant prompt radiation field but sample activation was limited to {beta}-decay and this decayed rapidly in less than 48 h. Samples were hydrogen charged and strained at slow rates at {minus}30{degree}C insitu in the Auger electron spectrometer to successfully fracture several samples intergranularly for grain boundary composition analysis. An ultra-high purity (UHP) alloy of Fe-19Cr-9Ni was irradiated to 1 dpa at 400C {plus_minus} 5C and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} torr in the tandem accelerator of the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, resulting in a dislocation network density of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} cm{sup 2} and a dislocation loop density of 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3} along with the dissolution of small precipitates present in the unirradiated sample. EPR experiments on the UHP irradiated alloy showed no significant increase in charge passed upon reactivation, over an unirradiated sample experiencing the same thermal history. An SCC waterloop and autoclave system has been completed and a sample has been designed to measure the susceptibility of the irradiated microstructure as compared to the unirradiated microstructure.

  20. Neutron Exposure Parameters for the Dosimetry Capsule in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Baldwin; F.B.K. Kam; I. Remec

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the computational methodology for the least-squares adjustment of the dosimetry data from the HSSI 10.OD dosimetry capsule with neutronics calculations. It presents exposure rates at each dosimetry location for the neutron fluence greater than 1.0 MeV, fluence greater than 0.1 MeV, and displacements per atom. Exposure parameter distributions are also described in terms of three- dimensional fitting functions. When fitting functions are used it is suggested that an uncertainty of 6% (1 o) should be associated with the exposure rate values. The specific activity of each dosimeter at the end of irradiation is listed in the Appendix.

  1. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianchao; Wan, F.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.; Certain, Alicia G.; Shutthanandan, V.; Wu, Yaqiao

    2014-12-01

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 °C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 × 1023 to 3.6 × 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  2. Surface morphology and void formation in 316L stainless steel irradiated with high energy C-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. G.; Chen, K. Q.; Li, L. W.; Zhang, C. H.; Quan, J. M.; Hou, M. D.; Xu, R. H.; Ma, F.; Jin, Y. F.; Li, C. L.; Sun, Y. M.

    This work reports the study of changes of surface topography and bulk structure of 316L stainless steel (SS) irradiated at 773 K with 51.4 MeV C-ions to a fluence of 1.14 × 10 22 ions/m 2. The calculated damage levels at the surface and at the damage peak position were 0.9 and 124 displacements per atom (dpa), respectively. The changes of surface topography and bulk structure were checked at room temperature by the use of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 1 MV high voltage electron microscopy (HVEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with cross-section technique. The experimental results suggested that high dose carbon ion irradiation led to (1) serious pitting, flaking, and crazing along grain boundaries of the irradiated surface; (2) voids formed in the area around the damage peak and mean void swelling is about 4%. The void swelling data deduced from the SEM and TEM observations were the same within the experimental error. Furthermore, some phase change has been detected in the carbon ion stop region. All these observed phenomena were interrelated and have been discussed.

  3. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of the stainless steel electroslag weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Onizawa, K.; Suzuki, M.

    2013-11-01

    Microstructural changes in the stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation with a fluence of 7.2 × 1023 n m-2 (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 1017 n m-2 s-1 at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography. The results showed a difference in the microstructural changes that result from neutron irradiation and thermal aging. Neutron irradiation resulted in the slight progression of Cr spinodal decomposition and an increase in the fluctuation of the Si, Ni, and Mn concentrations in the ferrite phases, with formation of γ‧-like clusters in the austenite phases. On the other hand, thermal aging resulted in the considerable progression of the Cr spinodal decomposition, formation of G-phases, and a decrease in the Si and an increase in the Ni and Mn concentration fluctuations at the matrix in the ferrite phases, without the microstructural changes in the austenite phases.

  4. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimbal, Daniel; Fournier, Lionel; Barbu, Alain

    2016-01-01

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium.

  5. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti-Y-O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature.

  6. Atom probe characterization of nano-scaled features in irradiated ODS Eurofer steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhkin, S. V.; Aleev, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Nikitin, A. A.; Iskandarov, N. A.; Vladimirov, P.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2011-02-01

    Our previous investigations of unirradiated ODS Eurofer by tomographic atom probe (TAP) revealed numerous nano-scaled features (nanoclusters) enriched in vanadium, yttrium and oxygen. In this work the effect of neutron irradiation on nanostructure behaviour of ODS Eurofer (9%-CrWVTa) was investigated. The irradiation was performed in the research reactor BOR-60 (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) where materials were irradiated at 330 °С to 32 dpa. TAP studies were performed on the needles prepared from parts of broken Charpy specimens. For all specimens except one, which was tested at 500 °C, the Charpy tests were performed at temperatures not exceeding the irradiation temperature. A high number density 2-4 × 10 24 m -3 of ultra fine 1-3 nm diameter nanoclusters enriched in yttrium, oxygen, manganese and chromium was observed in the irradiated state. The composition of detected clusters differs from that for unirradiated ODS Eurofer. It was observed in this work that after neutron irradiation vanadium atoms had left the clusters, moving from the core into solid solution. The concentrations of yttrium and oxygen in the matrix, as it was detected, increase several times under irradiation. In the samples tested at 500 °C both the number density of clusters and the yttrium concentration in the matrix decrease by a factor of two.

  7. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.; Garner, F. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Okita, T.; Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y.; Allen, T. R.

    2015-10-01

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void swelling

  8. Microstructural evolution of austenitic stainless steels irradiated to 17 dpa in spectrally tailored experiment of the ORR and HFIR at 400{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, E.; Hashimoto, N.; Gibson, L.T.

    1997-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of austenitic JPCA aged and solution annealed JPCA, 316R, C, K, and HP steels irradiated at 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored experiments of the ORR and HFIR has been investigated. The helium generation rates were about 12-16 appm He/dpa on the average up to 17.3 dpa. The number densities and average diameters of dislocation loops in the steels have ranges of 3.3 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and 15.2-26.3 nm, respectively, except for HP steel for which they are 1.1 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} and 8.0 nm. Precipitates are formed in all steels except for HP steel, and the number densities and average diameters have ranges of 5.2 x 10{sup 20} - 7.7 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and 3.4- 19.3 nm, respectively. In the 216R, C, and K steels, the precipitates are also formed at grain boundaries, and the mean sizes of these are about 110, 50, and 50 nm, respectively. The number densities of cavities are about 1 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} in all the steels. The swelling is low in the steels which form the precipitates.

  9. Fatigue behavior at 650/sup 0/C of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel irradiated at 550/sup 0/C in the HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Liu, K.C.

    1984-01-01

    Type 316 stainless steel in the 20%-cold-worked condition was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and subsequently tested in fatigue. The specimens were irradiated at 550/sup 0/C to damage levels of 8 to 12 dpa and transmutation helium levels of 300 to 500 at. ppM. Fatigue testing at 650/sup 0/C revealed that cyclic life was not significantly affected by the irradiation. However, unlike the results of tests of the same material at 550/sup 0/C, no endurance limit was observed. The absence of an endurance limit is interpreted in terms of thermal creep.

  10. Ultra high vacuum fracture and transfer device for AES analysis of irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Urie, M.W.; Panayotou, N.F.; Robinson, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum fracture and transfer device for analysis of irradiated and non-irradiated SS 316 fuel cladding is described. Mechanical property tests used to study the behavior of cladding during reactor transient over-power conditions are reported. The stress vs temperature curves show minimal differences between unirradiated cladding and unfueled cladding. The fueled cladding fails at a lower temperature. All fueled specimens failed in an intergranular mode. (FS)

  11. Defect and void evolution in oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels under 3.2 MeV Fe + ion irradiation with simultaneous helium injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.-S.; Hunn, J. D.; Hashimoto, N.; Larson^1, D. L.; Maziasz, P. J.; Miyahara, K.; Lee, E. H.

    2000-08-01

    In an attempt to explore the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fission and fusion structural materials applications, a set of ODS steels with varying oxide particle dispersion were irradiated at 650°C, using 3.2 MeV Fe + and 330 keV He + ions simultaneously. The void formation mechanisms in these ODS steels were studied by juxtaposing the response of a 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel and solution annealed AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel under the same irradiation conditions. The results showed that void formation was suppressed progressively by introducing and retaining a higher dislocation density and finer precipitate particles. Theoretical analyses suggest that the delayed onset of void formation in ODS steels stems from the enhanced point defect recombination in the high density dislocation microstructure, lower dislocation bias due to oxide particle pinning, and a very fine dispersion of helium bubbles caused by trapping helium atoms at the particle-matrix interfaces.

  12. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343{degrees}C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288{degrees}C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond.

  13. Prevention of ductility loss in hydrogen-charged steel by gamma-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, T.; Ikeya, M.; Touge, M.

    1984-11-01

    Hydrogen is known as a constituent which degrades the mechanical properties of metals and alloys, particularly their ductility. The degradation of mechanical properties, called hydrogen embrittlement, is a serious problem in metals and alloys under a hydrogen environment, e.g., pickling, welding, plating, etc. Although many researches have been made to clarify the nature and the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in steels (1), little has been reported on the method of prevention of hydrogen embrittlement except for works by Pressouyre and Bernstein (2,3). They showed that the susceptibility of ferrous alloys to hydrogen embrittlement is reduced by addition of titanium. Recently, we found that hydrogen in stainless steels is outgassed upon exposure to ionizing radiation (4-7). Therefore, hydrogen embrittlement in steels is expected to be influenced by ionizing radiation. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of prevension of hydrogen embrittlement by examining the effect of gammairradiation on the ductility in a low carbon steel electrolytically charged with hydrogen.

  14. Pre-irradiation spatial distribution and stability of boride particles in rapidly solidified boron-doped stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kanani, N.; Arnberg, L.; Harling, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The time temperature behavior of boride particles has been studied in rapidly solidified ultra low carbon and nitrogen modified 316 stainless steel with 0.088% boron and 0.45% zirconium. The results show that the as-splat-cooled specimens exhibit precipitates at the grain boundaries and triple junctions. For temperatures up to about 750/sup 0/C no significant microstructural changes occur for short heat treatment times. In the temperature range of 750 to 950/sup 0/C, however, particles typically 100 to 500 A in diameter containing Zr and B are formed within the grains. Higher temperatures enhance the formation of such particles and give rise to particle networks. The results show that a fine and uniform distribution of the boride particles almost exclusively within the grains can be achieved if proper annealing conditions are chosen. This type of distribution is an important requirement for the homogeneous production of helium during neutron irradiation in fast reactors.

  15. Characterization of phosphorus segregation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels by atom probe field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Russell, K.F.

    1995-04-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy characterization of A533B and Russian VVER 440 and 1000 pressure vessel steels has been performed to determine the phosphorus coverage of grain and lath boundaries. Field ion micrographs of grain and lath boundaries have revealed that they are decorated with a semi-continuous film of discrete brightly-imaging precipitates that were identified as molybdenum carbonitride precipitates. In addition, extremely high phosphorus levels were measured at the boundaries. The phosphorus segregation was found to be confined to an extremely narrow region indicative of monolayer-type segregation. The phosphorus coverages determined from the atom probe results of the unirradiated materials were in excellent agreement with predictions based on McLean`s equilibrium model of grain boundary segregation. The boundary phosphorus coverage of a neutron-irradiated weld material was significantly higher than that observed in the unirradiated material.

  16. Influence of irradiation parameters in nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser micro-machining of stainless steel for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. Paula; López, Ana J.; Ramil, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the working parameters in the micro-machining process of stainless steel 316L by means of 355 nm Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser. Our target is the surface modification of metallic bioimplants to favour osseointegration. Well organized structures, like a matrix of drilling holes or a pattern of grooves, were created in the metallic surface by means of different treatments in which both laser parameters and irradiation schemes were varied. Processed metal surfaces were characterized by confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy SEM. The results allowed us to establish the most adequate processing parameters to generate textured micro-features in a range suitable for biomedical applications

  17. On the correlation between irradiation-induced microstructural features and the hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Meslin, E.; Malerba, L.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-11-01

    A correlation is attempted between microstructural observations by various complementary techniques, which have been implemented within the PERFECT project and the hardening measured by tensile tests of reactor pressure vessel steel and model alloys after irradiation to a dose of ˜7 × 10 19 n cm -2. This is done, using the simple hardening model embodied by the Orowan equation and applying the most suitable superposition law, as suggested by a parametric study using the DUPAIR line tension code. It is found that loops are very strong obstacles to dislocation motion, but due to their low concentration, they only play a minor role in the hardening itself. For the precipitates, the contrary is found, although they are quite soft (due to their very small sizes and their coherent nature), they still play the dominant role in the hardening. Vacancy clusters are important for the formation of both loops and precipitates, but they will play almost no role in the hardening by themselves.

  18. Corrosion processes of austenitic stainless steels and copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    The US Department of Energy is evaluating a site located at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, as a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The rock at the proposed repository horizon (above the water table) is densely welded, devitrified tuff, and the fluid environment in the repository is expected to be primarily air-steam. A more severe environment would be present in the unlikely case of intrusion of vadose groundwater into the repository site. For this repository location, austenitic stainless steels and copper-based materials are under consideration for waste container fabrication. This study focuses on the effects of gamma irradiation on the electrochemical mechanisms of corrosion for the prospective waste container materials. The radiolytic production of such species as hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid are shown to exert an influence on corrosion mechanisms and kinetics.

  19. Extreme embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel irradiated to 75-81 dpa at 335-360{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S.I.; Vorobjev, A.N.; Konobeev, Yu.V.

    1997-04-01

    It is generally accepted that void swelling of austenitic steels ceases below some temperature in the range 340-360{degrees}C, and exhibits relatively low swelling rates up to {approximately}400{degrees}C. This perception may not be correct at all irradiation conditions, however, since it was largely developed from data obtained at relatively high displacement rates in fast reactors whose inlet temperatures were in the range 360-370{degrees}C. There is an expectation, however, that the swelling regime can shift to lower temperatures at low displacement rates via the well-known {open_quotes}temperature shift{close_quotes} phenomenon. It is also known that the swelling rates at the lower end of the swelling regime increase continuously at a sluggish rate, never approaching the terminal 1%/dpa level within the duration of previous experiments. This paper presents the results of an experiment conducted in the BN-350 fast reactor in Kazakhstan that involved the irradiation of argon-pressurized thin-walled tubes (0-200 MPa hoop stress) constructed from Fe-16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Nb stabilized steel in contact with the sodium coolant, which enters the reactor at {approx}270{degrees}C. Tubes in the annealed condition reached 75 dpa at 335{degrees}C, and another set in the 20% cold-worked condition reached 81 dpa at 360{degrees}C. Upon disassembly all tubes, except those in the stress-free condition, were found to have failed in an extremely brittle fashion. The stress-free tubes exhibited diameter changes that imply swelling levels ranging from 9 to 16%. It is expected that stress-enhancement of swelling induced even larger swelling levels in the stressed tubes.

  20. The Effect of Local Heating by Laser Irradiation for Aluminum, Deep Drawing Steel and Copper Sheets in Incremental Sheet Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Pekka; Väisänen, Tapio; Salmi, Mika

    Incremental sheet forming is a technique where a metal sheet is formed into a product usually by a CNC-controlled (Computer Numerical Control) round tipped tool. The part is formed as the tool indents into the sheet and follows a contour of the desired product. In single point incremental forming (SPIF) there is no need for tailored tools and dies, since the process requires only a CNC machine, a clamping rig and a simple tool. The effect of applying local heating by laser irradiation from the bottom side of the metal sheet is investigated with a SPIF approach. Using a laser light source for local heating should increase the material ductility and decrease material strength, and thus, increase the formability. The research was performed using 0.50-0.75 mm thick, deep drawing steel, aluminum and copper sheets. The forming was done with a round tipped tool, whose tip diameter was 4 mm. In order to achieve selective heating, a 1 kW fiber laser was attached to a 3-axis stepper motor driven CNC milling machine. The results show that the applied heating increased the maximum achievable wall angle of aluminum and copper products. However, for the steel sheets the local heating reduced the maximum achievable wall angle and increased the surface roughness.

  1. Effects of dose rate on microsturctural evolution and swelling in austenitic steels under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, T.; Kamada, T.; Sekimura, N.

    2000-12-01

    Effects of dose rate on microstructural evolution in a simple model austenitic ternary alloy are examined. Annealed specimens are irradiated with fast neutrons at several positions in the core and above core in FFTF/MOTA between 390°C and 435°C in a wide range of doses and dose rates. In Fe-15Cr-16Ni, swelling seems to increase linearly with dose without incubation dose. Cavities are observed even in the specimens irradiated to 0.07 dpa at 1.9×10-9 dpa/s. Both cavity nucleation and growth are enhanced by low dose rates. These are mainly caused by accelerated formation of dislocation loops at lower dose rates. Low dose rates enhance swelling by shortening incubation dose for the onset of steady-state swelling. In the specimens irradiated at higher dose rates to higher doses, high density of dislocation increases average cavity diameter, however decreases cavity density.

  2. Comparison of swelling and cavity microstructural development for type 316 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II and HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of swelling and cavity microstructures for one heat of 20% cold-worked (CW) type 316 stainless steel (316) irradiated at 500 to 650/sup 0/C in EBR-II (up to 75 dpa) and HFIR (up to 61 dpa) suggests that void growth and swelling are suppressed by the higher helium generation found in HFIR. Instead of voids, many small bubbles develop in the CW 316 in HFIR and resist conversion to voids. However, similar comparison of solution-annealed (SA) 316 irradiated in EBR-II and HFIR at 500 to 550/sup 0/C leads to an opposite conclusion; void swelling is enhanced by helium in HFIR. Many more bubbles nucleate in SA 316 at low fluence in HFIR compared to EBR-II, but bimodel distributions and rapid coarsening eventually lead to high swelling due to high concentrations of matrix ands precipitate-associated voids in HFIR. A key to the swelling resistance of the CW 316 in HFIR appears to be the development of a sufficiently cavity-dominated sink system in the early stages of evolution.

  3. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protective thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.

  4. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.; Marquis, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10-9 and 3.05 × 10-7 dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  5. In situ proton irradiation creep of ferritic-martensitic steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Was, Gary S.

    2013-10-01

    An irradiation creep apparatus was developed for in situ straining of T91 strip samples while exposed to 2-3 MeV proton irradiation at 300-600 °C. Thermal creep experiments were conducted at 600 °C, 47 MPa, and 500 °C, 160 MPa. The thermal creep strains were in reasonable agreement with literature data on bulk samples of T91. An irradiation creep experiment was conducted at 500 °C and 160 MPa with a damage rate range from 3.1 × 10-6 dpa/s to 4.9 × 10-6 dpa/s. The creep rate of T91 was found to increase linearly with dose rate. A TEM investigation of the irradiated microstructure showed signs of dislocation pileup, subgrain formation, and small dislocation loops. The results illustrate the utility of accelerator-creep experiments to obtain creep rates at low dose and the capability to observe transient changes in real time, thus providing the tools for isolating the effects of individual variables on creep rate of T91.

  6. Temperature dependence of the dislocation microstructure of PCA austenitic stainless steel irradiated in ORR spectrally-tailored experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziasz, P. J.

    1992-09-01

    Specimens of solution-annealed (SA) and 25% cold-worked (CW) prime-candidate-alloy (PCA) austenitic stainless steel were irradiated in ORR in spectrally-tailored experiments specially designed to produce fusion-relevant He/dpa ratios (12-18 appm He/dpa). SA and CW PCA were irradiated at 330 and 400°C to 13 dpa while only CW PCA was irradiated at 60, 200, 330 and 400°C to 7.4 dpa. Cavities and fine MC precipitates were only detectable at 330 and 400°C. Dislocations were a major component of the radiation-induced microstructure at 60-400°C. Mixtures of tiny “black-spot” loops, larger Frank loops, and network components of the total dislocation structure were very temperature dependent. Both SA and CW PCA contained Frank loops and network dislocations at 330 and 400°C, with SA PCA having more of both. Frank loop concentrations were maximum at 330°C and dislocations evolved most with dose at 400°C. At 60 and 200°C, the microstructure was dominated by very dense dispersions of tiny (1-3 nm diam) “black-spot” loops. No Frank loops were found at 60°C. Surprisingly, significant radiation-induced recovery of the as-cold-worked dislocation network occured in CW PCA at all temperatures. The nature of the radiation-induced microstructure makes a transition between 200 and 330°C.

  7. Precipitate behavior in self-ion irradiated stainless steels at high doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z.; Was, G. S.

    2014-06-01

    To study radiation-induced precipitation at high doses, solution annealed 304L SS and cold worked 316 SS were irradiated to 46 and 260 dpa at 380 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ and the radiation-induced precipitates were examined using atom probe tomography. Ni/Si-rich clusters were observed in all examined conditions. G-phase precipitates were observed in 316 SS at 46 dpa but only appeared in 304L SS at 260 dpa. Using the neutron irradiation to 46 dpa at 320 °C as a reference, the temperature shift for cold worked 316 SS appeared to be smaller than that of solution annealed 304L SS, probably due to the high density of dislocations, which served as defect sinks and mitigated the effect of high dose rate.

  8. A Hierarchical Upscaling Method for Predicting Strength of Materials under Thermal, Radiation and Mechanical loading - Irradiation Strengthening Mechanisms in Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Garmestani, Hamid; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    Stainless steels based on Fe-Cr-Ni alloys are the most popular structural materials used in reactors. High energy particle irradiation of in this kind of polycrystalline structural materials usually produces irradiation hardening and embrittlement. The development of predictive capability for the influence of irradiation on mechanical behavior is very important in materials design for next-generation reactors. Irradiation hardening is related to structural information crossing different length scale, such as composition, dislocation, crystal orientation distribution and so on. To predict the effective hardening, the influence factors along different length scales should be considered. A multiscale approach was implemented in this work to predict irradiation hardening of iron based structural materials. Three length scales are involved in this multiscale model: nanometer, micrometer and millimeter. In the microscale, molecular dynamics (MD) was utilized to predict on the edge dislocation mobility in body centered cubic (bcc) Fe and its Ni and Cr alloys. On the mesoscale, dislocation dynamics (DD) models were used to predict the critical resolved shear stress from the evolution of local dislocation and defects. In the macroscale, a viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model was applied to predict the irradiation hardening in samples with changes in texture. The effects of defect density and texture were investigated. Simulated evolution of yield strength with irradiation agrees well with the experimental data of irradiation strengthening of stainless steel 304L, 316L and T91. This multiscale model we developed in this project can provide a guidance tool in performance evaluation of structural materials for next-generation nuclear reactors. Combining with other tools developed in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the models developed will have more impact in improving the reliability of current reactors and affordability of new

  9. Effect of irradiation defects on the corrosion behaviors of steels exposed to lead bismuth eutectic in ADS: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; You, Yu-Wei; Li, Dong-Dong; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C S; Pan, B C; Wang, Zhiguang

    2015-05-14

    In accelerator driven systems (ADSs), steels will suffer not only from the irradiation damage produced by protons or neutrons, but also from the dissolution corrosion induced by the liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this work we investigate the interactions between LBE atoms (Pb, Bi) and the irradiation induced defects X (X is helium, vacancy or divacancy) in α-Fe based on first-principles calculations. It is found that LBE atoms repulse each other without irradiation defects, while they aggregate easily with the defects to form X-Pbn and X-Bin complexes. This indicates that the irradiation defects could promote the aggregation of LBE atoms in iron, especially Bi atoms. The total binding energies of the X-Pbn and X-Bin complexes increase with the number of Pb and Bi atoms, respectively. The origin of the total binding energies of the complexes is further discussed via the electronic structures and the distortion of the crystalline lattice. Finally, the concentration evolutions of the Vac-(Bi)n complexes and unbound vacancies with temperature are predicted by the mass action analysis. This work provides important information for the synergistic effect of irradiation and LBE corrosion on the steels in the ADSs, which can be used as basic parameters for further study. PMID:25891773

  10. Effect of the accelerating voltage during pulsed irradiation with Cr+ ions on the surface layer composition of carbon steel St3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, V. L.; Bykov, P. V.; Bayankin, V. Ya.; Bystrov, S. G.; Porsev, V. E.; Bureev, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of Cr2O3, CrO2, CrO3 and FeO, Fe2O3 oxides in surface layers of steel St3 samples irradiated with Cr+ ions has been revealed. The oxide content decreases with increasing accelerating voltage, which is caused by a more intense surface sputtering and a temperature increase. It has been found that the hardness of a surface layer ˜250 nm deep increases by 20% after irradiation with an accelerating voltage of 20 kV.

  11. Physical and mechanical modelling of neutron irradiation effect on ductile fracture. Part 1. Prediction of fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, Boris; Sorokin, Alexander; Smirnov, Valeriy; Potapova, Vera

    2014-09-01

    A physical-and-mechanical model of ductile fracture has been developed to predict fracture toughness and fracture strain of irradiated austenitic steels taking into account stress-state triaxiality and radiation swelling. The model is based on criterion of plastic collapse of a material unit cell controlled by strain hardening of a material and criterion of voids coalescence due to channel shearing of voids. The model takes into account deformation voids nucleation and growth of deformation and vacancy voids. For justification of the model experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steel 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade irradiated up to maximal dose 150 dpa with various swelling were used. Experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness were compared with the results predicted by the model. It has been shown that for prediction of the swelling effect on fracture toughness the dependence of process zone size on swelling should be taken into account.

  12. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, F.; Gillemot, F.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M.; Török, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.

    2015-06-01

    Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  13. Effects of phosphorus, silicon and sulphur on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels during electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuya, K.; Nakahigashi, S.; Ozaki, S.; Shima, S.

    1991-03-01

    Fe-18Cr-9Ni-1.5Mn austenitic alloys containing phosphorus, silicon and sulphur were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons at 573-773 K. Phosphorus increased the intersitial loop nucleation and decreased the void swelling by increasing void number density and suppressing void growth. Silicon had a similar effect to phosphorus but its effect was weaker than phosphorus. Sulphur enhanced void swelling through increasing the void density. Nickel enrichment at grain boundaries was suppressed only in the alloy containing phosphorus. These phosphorus effects may be explained by a strong interaction with interstitials resulting in a high density of sinks for point defects.

  14. Experimental study on double-pulse laser ablation of steel upon multiple parallel-polarized ultrashort-pulse irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Kraft, Sebastian; Hartwig, Lars; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, double-pulse laser processing is experimentally studied with the aim to explore the influence of ultrashort pulses with very short time intervals on ablation efficiency and quality. For this, sequences of 50 double pulses of varied energy and inter-pulse delay, as adjusted between 400 fs and 18 ns by splitting the laser beam into two optical paths of different length, were irradiated to technical-grade stainless steel. The depth and the volume of the craters produced were measured in order to evaluate the efficiency of the ablation process; the crater quality was analyzed by SEM micrographs. The results obtained were compared with craters produced with sequences of 50 single pulses and energies equal to the double pulse. It is demonstrated that double-pulse processing cannot exceed the ablation efficiency of single pulses of optimal fluence, but the ablation crater surface formed smoother if inter-pulse delay was in the range between 10 ns and 18 ns. In addition, the influence of pulse duration and energy distribution between the individual pulses of the double pulse on ablation was studied. For very short inter-pulse delay, no significant effect of energy variation within the double pulse on removal rate was found, indicating that the double pulse acts as a big single pulse of equal energy. Further, the higher removal efficiency was achieved when double-pulse processing using femtosecond pulses instead of picosecond pulses.

  15. New method for detection of Li inside He bubbles formed in B10-alloyed steel after neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Klimenkov, M; Möslang, A; Materna-Morris, E

    2013-03-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to detect and study the spatial distribution on the nanoscale of He and Li in boron-alloyed steel after neutron irradiation. Li and He are the products of the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li nuclear transmutation reaction and knowledge of their distribution is important to understand their influence on mechanical properties. Here, a new method is presented for the direct detection of Li in Fe, which is based on the analysis of the plasmon structure in EELS spectra. Li drops or particles in He bubbles show pronounced Li plasmon line at 10eV which can be extracted from the Fe/Cr plasmon. The Gaussian or linear interpolation of the Fe/Cr plasmon and its subtraction allows for the calculation of Li and He two-dimensional maps and the study their spatial distribution. The analysis of Li plasmon fine structure allows imaging surface effects in the Li drops. PMID:23332433

  16. Stainless steel wire mesh-supported ZnO for the catalytic photodegradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tan T; del Río, Laura; Valdés-Solís, Teresa; Marbán, Gregorio

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the activity of catalysts formed by nanostructured zinc oxide supported on stainless steel wire mesh for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. Catalysts prepared by means of different low temperature synthesis methods, as described in a previous work (Vu et al., Mater. Res. Bull. 47 (2012) 1577-1586) were tested. A new activity parameter was introduced in order to compare the catalytic activity of the different catalysts. The best catalyst showed a catalytic activity higher than that of the reference material TiO(2) P25 (Degussa-Evonik). This high activity is attributed to a higher quantum yield derived from the small particle length of the ZnO deposited on the wire mesh. The photocatalytic degradation kinetics of methylene blue fitted a potential model with n orders ranging from 0.5 to 6.9. Reaction orders over 1 were attributed to catalyst deactivation during the reaction resulting from the photocorrosion of ZnO. PMID:23291337

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Deformation Localization at Small Strains in a Neutron Irradiated 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T

    2014-01-01

    Deformation localization and structure evolution were investigated in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel deformed to 0.8% strain. Using SEM-EBSD, it was shown local plastic deformation may reach significant levels even when the bulk averaged strain level remains below 1%. Local misorientation values up to 24 were observed in these regions of high local plastic deformation. EBSD analysis of FIB lift-out specimens demonstrated that local misorientation level was highest near the free surface and diminished with increasing depth. (S)TEM observations on the same specimen indicated the local density of dislocation channels may vary up to an order of magnitude depending on local grain configuration, distance to the surface and/or local grain boundary structure. It was found that in the case of RT deformation, dislocation defect-free channels may contain twin or may be twin-free with twinning occurring inside channels. Formation of BCC-phase colonies (martensite) was observed in near-surface layer whereas no transformation in the volume of the specimen was detected at this strain level. Martensite formation was associated with channel-grain boundary intersection points where high local misorientation was observed using EBSD.

  18. Microstructure of TiB{sub 2}/carbon steel surface-alloyed materials fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Euh, K. Lee, S.; Shin, K.

    1999-12-01

    The processing and the microstructural analysis of TiB{sub 2}/carbon steel surface-alloyed materials using the irradiation of a high-energy electron beam were investigated in this study. The mixtures of TiB{sub 2} powders and flux were deposited on a plain carbon steel substrate, and then electron beam was irradiated on these mixtures using an electron beam accelerator. The microstructure of the irradiated surface layer was composed of a melted region, an interfacial region, a coarse-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ), and a fine-grained HAZ. A few residual micropores were found in the melted region of the specimen processed without flux because of irregular thermal transfer, but their number was decreased in the specimens processed with a considerable amount of flux. As a result of irradiation, the Ti content was homogeneously maintained throughout the melted region, whose hardness was greatly improved. This was associated with the microstructural modification including the segregation of Ti and B along solidification cell boundaries and the formation of fine Ti(C, N) particles. The proper flux mix ratio was 15 to 30% to obtain excellent surface alloying and a homogeneous microstructure.

  19. A Physically Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, Ernest D.; Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2007-11-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high-energy neutrons from the core, which causes changes in material toughness properties that increase with radiation exposure and are affected by many variables. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials is currently evaluated using Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG1.99/2), which presents methods for estimating the shift in Charpy transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (TTS) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). The purpose of the work reported here is to improve on the TTS correlation model in RG1.99/2 using the broader database now available and current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The USE database and models have not been updated since the publication of NUREG/CR-6551 and, therefore, are not discussed in this report. The revised embrittlement shift model is calibrated and validated on a substantially larger, better-balanced database compared to prior models, including over five times the amount of data used to develop RG1.99/2. It also contains about 27% more data than the most recent update to the surveillance shift database, in 2000. The key areas expanded in the current database relative to the database available in 2000 are low-flux, low-copper, and long-time, high-fluence exposures, all areas that were previously relatively sparse. All old and new surveillance data were reviewed for completeness, duplicates, and discrepancies in cooperation with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee E10.02 on Radiation Effects in Structural Materials. In the present modeling effort, a 10% random sample of data was reserved from the fitting process, and most aspects of the model were validated with that sample as well as other data not used in calibration. The model is a hybrid, incorporating both physically motivated features and empirical calibration to the U.S. power reactor surveillance

  20. Elevated temperature tensile properties of irradiated 20/25/Nb stainless steel fuel pin cladding at low and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravenor, J. G.; Douglas, J.

    1988-09-01

    Tensile specimens were prepared from 20/25/Nb stainless steel fuel pin cladding irradiated in a Commercial Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (CAGR) at temperatures in the range 622-866 K and integrated fast neutron doses up to 16 × 10 24n/ m2. The tests were performed in air at temperatures in the range 298-873 K at strain rates from 2 × 10 -5s-1 to 7.2 s -1. The tensile properties varied with irradiation temperature, test temperature and strain rate. At lower irradiation temperature, strengthening produced by fast neutron damage was accompanied by reduced elongation. Strengthening was also observed at higher irradiation temperatures, possibly due to precipitation phenomena. The maximum irradiation embrittlement was observed in tests at 873 K at low strain rates between 2 × 10 -4s-1 and 2 × 10 -5s-1. The failure mode of embrittled specimens irradiated at higher temperatures was characterized by prematurely ruptured ductile fibres, rather than by intergranular cracking.

  1. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on mechanical properties and structure of reduced-activation Cr-W-V steels of bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorynin, I. V.; Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.; Nesterova, E. V.; Klepikov, E. Yu

    2000-12-01

    Effects of molybdenum replacement by tungsten in steels of the bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes containing 2.5%, 8% and 11% Cr, respectively, were investigated. The phase composition and structure of the bainitic steels were varied by changing the cooling rates from the austenitization temperature (from values typical for normalization up to V=3.3 × 10-2°C/s) and then tempering. The steels were irradiated to a fluence of 4×1023 n/m2 (⩾0.5 MeV) at 270°C and to fluences of 1.3×1023 and 1.2×1024 n/m2 (⩾0.5 MeV) at 70°C. The 2.5Cr-1.4WV and 8Cr-1.5WV steels have shown lower values of the shifts in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) under irradiation in comparison with corresponding Cr-Mo steels. Radiation embrittlement at elevated irradiation temperature was lowest in bainitic 2.5Cr-1.4WV steel and martensitic-ferritic 11Cr-1.5WV steel. The positive effect of molybdenum replacement by tungsten at irradiation temperature ∼300°C is reversed at Tirr=70∘C.

  2. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF THREE RUSSIAN Mechanical Properties And Microstructure Of Three Russian Ferritic/Martensitic Steels Irradiated In BN-350 Reactor To 50 dpa at 490C

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoriashin, Alexander M; Porollo, S I; Konobeev, Yu V; Budylkin, N I; Minonova, E G; Loltukhovsky, A G; Leonteva-Smirnova, M V; Bochvar, A A; Garner, Francis A

    2007-03-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are being considered for application in fusion reactors, intense neutron sources, and accelerator-driven systems. While EP-450 is traditionally used with sodium coolants in Russia, EP-823 and EI-852 steels with higher silicon levels have been developed for reactor facilities using lead-bismuth coolant. To determine the influence of silicon additions on short-term mechanical properties and microstructure, ring specimens cut from cladding tubes of these three steels were irradiated in sodium at 490°С in the BN-350 reactor to 50 dpa. Post-irradiation tensile testing and microstructural examination show that EI-852 steel (1.9 wt% Si) undergoes severe irradiation embrittlement. Microstructural investigation showed that the formation of near-continuous phase precipitates on grain boundaries is the main cause of the embrittlement.

  3. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr 1MoVNb and 12Cr 1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to ≈20 dpa at 365°C and to ≈100 dpa at 420°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same steels were irradiated in FFTF to 4-5 dpa at 365°C and 35-36 dpa at 420°C. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, affected the impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering had relatively little effect on the impact behavior of both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties.

  4. Kinetic of solute clustering in neutron irradiated ferritic model alloys and a French pressure vessel steel investigated by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Barbu, A.

    2010-04-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation is partly due to the formation of solute clusters. To gain more insight into their formation mechanisms, ferritic model alloys (low copper Fe-0.08 at.% Cu, Fe-0.09 Cu-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%), and a copper free Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%)) and a French 16MND5 reactor pressure vessel steel, were irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 × 10 17 n( E> 1 MeV) m -2 s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 × 10 24 n( E> 1 MeV) m -2. Atom probe tomography analyses revealed that nanometer-size solute clusters were formed during irradiation in all the materials, even in the copper free Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy. It should be noted that solute segregation in a low-Ni ferritic material was never reported before in absence of the highly insoluble copper impurity. The manganese and nickel segregation is suggested to result from a radiation-induced mechanism.

  5. The effect of low dose irradiation on the impact fracture energy and tensile properties of pure iron and two ferritic martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianov, I.; Marmy, P.

    1998-10-01

    Two batches of subsize V-notched impact bend specimens and subsize tensile specimens have been irradiated in the Saphir test reactor of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The first batch of specimen has been irradiated at 250°C to a dose of 2.65 × 10 19 n/cm 2 (0.042 dpa) and the second batch has been irradiated at 400°C to a dose of 8.12 × 10 19 n/cm 2 (0.13 dpa). Three different materials in three different microstructures were irradiated: pure iron and two ferritic steels, the alloy MANET 2 and a low activation composition CETA. The results of the impact tests and of the corresponding tensile tests are presented. Despite the very low neutron dose, a significant shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is observed. The influence of the test temperature on the impact energy is discussed for the irradiated and unirradiated conditions, with special emphasis on the microstructure.

  6. Combined treatment of steel, including electrospark doping and subsequent irradiation with a high-intensity electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopotov, V. D.; Denisova, Yu A.; Teresov, A. D.; Petrikova, E. A.; Shugurov, V. V.; Seksenalina, M. A.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Klopotov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of steel with tungsten and titanium has been performed. The studies on the surface layer of steel modified using the combined method (electrospark doping and the subsequent electron-beam treatment) have been carried out. Formation in the surface layer of a multi-phase submicrocrystalline structure with high strength properties has been revealed.

  7. Neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis of the effect of irradiation dose and temperature on microstructure of irradiated HT-9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbrucker, P. L.; Brown, D. W.; Anderoglu, O.; Balogh, L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sisneros, T. A.; Almer, J.; Tulk, E. F.; Morgenroth, W.; Dippel, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    Material harvested from several positions within a nuclear fuel duct (the ACO-3 duct) used in a 6-year irradiation of a fuel assembly in the Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (FFTF) was examined using neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Samples with a wide range of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature history, reaching doses of up to 147 dpa and temperatures of up to 777 K, were examined. The response of various microstructural characteristics such as the weight fraction of M23C6 carbides, the dislocation density and character, and the crystallographic texture were determined using whole profile analysis of the diffraction data and related to the macroscopic mechanical behavior. For instance, the dislocation density was observed to be intimately linked with observed flow strength of the irradiated materials, following the Taylor law. In general, at the high doses studied in this work, the irradiation temperature is the predominant controlling factor of the dislocation density and, thus, the flow strength of the irradiated material. The results, representing some of the first diffraction work done on samples exposed to such a high received dose, demonstrate how non-destructive and stand-off diffraction techniques can be used to characterize irradiation induced microstructure and at least estimate mechanical properties in irradiated materials without exposing workers to radiation hazards.

  8. SANS and TEM of ferritic-martensitic steel T91 irradiated in FFTF up to 184 dpa at 413 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Anderoglu, O.; Dickerson, R.; Hartl, M.; Dickerson, P.; Aguiar, J. A.; Hosemann, P.; Toloczko, M. B.; Maloy, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steel T91 was previously irradiated in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) program of the Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (FFTF) at 413 °C up to 184 dpa. The microstructure was analyzed by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both SANS and TEM revealed a large fraction of voids with an average size of 29-32 nm leading to a calculated void swelling of 1.2-1.6% based on the volume fraction of the voids in the sample. SANS gave no indication of second phase particles having formed under irradiation in the material. Using TEM, one zone was found where a few G-phase particles were analyzed. Quantities were however too low to state reliable particle densities. No alpha prime (α') or Laves phase were observed in any of the investigated zones.

  9. Microstructural evolution of welded austenitic stainless steels irradiated in the spectrally-tailored ORR experiment at 400$deg;C*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, T.; Maziasz, P. J.; Hishinuma, A.

    1991-03-01

    Microstructural evolution of austenitic stainless steels and their welds has been examined after spectrally-tailored neutron irradiation. JPCA and 316W, containing 0.24 and 0.08 wt% of titanium, respectively, were electron-beam welded. TEM disks taken from these weld joints were irradiated in the ORR (Oak Ridge Research Reactor), to 7.4 dpa and almost 100 appm He. Base metal specimens of 316R with very low titanium content (0.005 wt%) were also irradiated. Specimens were examined by precision immersion densitometry before TEM observation. Only the 316R base metal showed measurable swelling by density change. Cavity swelling, determined by TEM observations in the base metals, was 0.29% for 316R, 0.06% for 316W and 0.03% for JPCA. Titanium effectively suppressed the cavity swelling of the base metals. The cellular microstructure of fusion zone remained after this irradiation both in JPCA and 316W with uniform distribution of cavities. Welding did not degrade the swelling resistance as measured either by immersion densitometry or TEM.

  10. Sub-micron magnetic patterns and local variations of adhesion force induced in non-ferromagnetic amorphous steel by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Feng, Yuping; Nieto, Daniel; García-Lecina, Eva; Mcdaniel, Clare; Díaz-Marcos, Jordi; Flores-Arias, María Teresa; Gerard M., O.'connor; Baró, Maria Dolors; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2016-05-01

    Periodic ripple and nanoripple patterns are formed at the surface of amorphous steel after femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation (FSPLI). Formation of such ripples is accompanied with the emergence of a surface ferromagnetic behavior which is not initially present in the non-irradiated amorphous steel. The occurrence of ferromagnetic properties is associated with the laser-induced devitrification of the glassy structure to form ferromagnetic (α-Fe and Fe3C) and ferrimagnetic [(Fe,Mn)3O4 and Fe2CrO4] phases located in the ripples. The generation of magnetic structures by FSPLI turns out to be one of the fastest ways to induce magnetic patterning without the need of any shadow mask. Furthermore, local variations of the adhesion force, wettability and nanomechanical properties are also observed and compared to those of the as-cast amorphous alloy. These effects are of interest for applications (e.g., biological, magnetic recording, etc.) where both ferromagnetism and tribological/adhesion properties act synergistically to optimize material performance.

  11. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to {approx}19.5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and to {approx}100 dpa at 420{degrees}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and 35-36 dpa at 420{degrees}C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties.

  12. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in microstructure/microchemistry, density and thermo-electric power of type 304L and 316 stainless steels irradiated in the Phénix reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault Laborne, Alexandra; Gavoille, Pierre; Malaplate, Joël; Pokor, Cédric; Tanguy, Benoît

    2015-05-01

    Annealed specimens of type 304L and 316 stainless steel and cold-worked 316 specimens were irradiated in the Phénix reactor in the temperature range 381-394 °C and to different damage doses up to 39 dpa. The microstructure and microchemistry of both 304L and 316 have been examined using the combination of the different techniques of TEM to establish the void swelling and precipitation behavior under neutron irradiation. TEM observations are compared with results of measurements of immersion density and thermo-electric power obtained on the same irradiated stainless steels. The similarities and differences in their behavior on different scales are used to understand the factors in terms of the chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels, affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the swelling behavior. Irradiation induces the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g., M6C and M23C6-type carbides, and γ'- and G-phases), Frank loops and cavities. According to the metallurgical state and chemical composition of the steel, the amount of each type of radiation-induced defects is not the same, affecting their density and thermo-electric power.

  13. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

  14. Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Takanori; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Stoller, Roger E; Odette, G.R.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

  15. A dual ion irradiation study of helium-dpa interactions on cavity evolution in tempered martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan; Robert Odette, G.; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Kondo, Sosuke; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-06-01

    Cavity evolutions in a normalized and tempered martensitic steel (TMS) and two nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) under Fe3+ and He+ dual ion beam irradiations (DII) at 500 °C and 650 °C were characterized. The irradiation conditions encompass a wide range of displacement per atom damage (dpa), He and He/dpa. The 500 °C DII produced damage and He levels of ≈10-47 dpa and ≈400-2000 appm, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that DII of a 8Cr TMS, at 500 °C to up to 60 dpa and 2100 appm He, produced a moderate density of non-uniformly distributed cavities with bimodal sizes ranging from ≈1 nm He bubbles to ≈20 nm faceted voids, and swelling ≈0.44%. In contrast, the same irradiation conditions produced only small ≈1.3 nm diameter bubbles and swelling of ≈0.05% in the NFA MA957. Similar bubble distributions were observed in MA957 and a developmental NFA DII at 650 °C up to ≈80 dpa and ≈3900 appm He. These results demonstrate the outstanding He management capability of the oxide nano-features in the NFA. The various data trends are shown as a function of dpa, He, He/dpa and He*dpa.

  16. Void formation and helium effects in 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated in HFIR and FFTF at 400/degree/C

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Martensitic/ferritic 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels doped with up to 2 wt% Ni have up to 450 appm He after HFIR irradiation to /approximately/38 dpa, but only 5 appm He after 47 dpa in FFTF. No fine He bubbles and few or no larger voids were observable in any of these steels after FFTF irradiation at 407/degree/C. By contrast, many voids were found in the undoped steels (30-90 appm He) irradiated in HFIR at 400/degree/C, while voids plus many more fine He bubbles were found in the Ni-doped steels (400-450 appm He). Irradiation in both reactors at /approximately/400/degree/C produced significant changes in the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary, dislocation, and precipitation structures that were sensitive to alloy composition, including doping with Ni. However, for each specific alloy the irradiation-produced changes were exactly the same comparing samples irradiated in FFTF and HFIR, particularly the Ni-doped steels. Therefore, the increased void formation appears solely due to the increased helium generation found in HFIR. While the levels of void swelling are relatively low after 37-39 dpa in HFIR (0.1-0.4%), details of the microstructural evolution suggest that void nucleation is still progressing, and swelling could increase with dose. The effect of helium on void swelling remains a valid concern for fusion application that requires higher dose experiments. 15 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program. Volume 2, No. 2: Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1994-10-01

    Goal is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure vessel stools as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. Effects of specimen size, material chemistry, product form and microstructure, irradiation fluence, flux, temperature and spectrum, and post-irradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is into 10 tasks: (1) program management, (2) K{sub Ic} curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) K{sub Ia} curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub Ic} and K{sub Ia} curve shifts in low upper-shelf welds, (6) irradiation effects in a commercial low upper-sheer weld, (7) microstructural analysis of irradiation effects, (8) in-service aged material evaluations, (9) correlation monitor materials, and (10) special technical assistance. This report provides an overview of the activities within each of these tasks from April to September 1991.

  18. Relationship between swelling and irradiation creep in cold-worked PCA stainless steel irradiated to {approximately}178 dpa at {approximately}400{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1993-09-01

    The eighth and final irradiation segment for pressurized tubes constructed from the fusion Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) has been completed in FFTF. At 178 dpa and {approximately}400{degrees}C, the irradiation creep of 20% cold-worked PCA has become dominated by the {open_quotes}creep disappearance{close_quotes} phenomenon. The total diametral deformation rate has reached the limiting value of 0.33%/dpa at the three highest stress levels employed in this test. The stress-enhancement of swelling tends to camouflage the onset of creep disappearance, however, requiring the use of several non-traditional techniques to extract the creep coefficients. No failures occurred in these tubes, even though the swelling ranged from {approximately}20 to {approximately}40%.

  19. Microstructural characterization of Eurofer-97 and Eurofer-ODS steels before and after multi-beam ion irradiations at JANNUS Saclay facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimbal, Daniel; Beck, Lucile; Troeber, Oliver; Gaganidze, Ermile; Trocellier, Patrick; Aktaa, Jarir; Lindau, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    RAFM steels such as Eurofer-97 and Eurofer-ODS are potential structural materials for future fusion reactors. In order to study their resistance to the high energy neutrons they will be subjected to in this context, we have irradiated these materials in single-, dual- and triple-beam mode to 26 dpa at 400 °C. In single-beam mode (Fe ions only), both materials resist swelling but dislocation loops form. For dual- (Fe and He ions) and triple-beam (Fe, He and H) modes, the same dislocation loop microstructure is observed as for the single-beam mode, but small cavities form, aided by the presence of gases. Despite the formation of cavities, swelling is very low for the present conditions. The influence of ODS particles on swelling is briefly discussed.

  20. Strain-induced phase transformation at the surface of an AISI-304 stainless steel irradiated to 4.4 dpa and deformed to 0.8% strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, M. N.; Field, K. G.; Busby, J. T.

    2014-03-01

    Surface relief due to localized deformation in a 4.4-dpa neutron-irradiated AISI 304 stainless steel was investigated using scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron backscattering diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy. It was found a body-centered-cubic (BCC) phase (deformation-induced martensite) had formed at the surface of the deformed specimen along the steps generated from dislocation channels. Martensitic hill-like formations with widths of ˜1 μm and depths of several microns were observed at channels with heights greater than ˜150 nm above the original surface. Martensite at dislocation channels was observed in grains along the [0 0 1]-[1 1 1] orientation but not in those along the [1 0 1] orientation.

  1. Tensile and fatigue data for irradiated and unirradiated AISI 310 stainless steel and titanium - 5 percent aluminum - 2.5 percent tin: Application of the method of universal slopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debogdan, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Irradiated and unirradiated tensile and fatigue specimens of AISI 310 stainless steel and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn were tested in the range of 100 to 10,000 cycles to failure to determine the applicability of the method of universal slopes to irradiated materials. Tensile data for both materials showed a decrease in ductility and increase in ultimate tensile strength due to irradiation. Irradiation caused a maximum change in fatigue life of only 15 to 20 percent for both materials. The method of universal slopes predicted all the fatigue data for the 310 SS (irradiated as well as unirradiated) within a life factor of 2. For the titanium alloy, 95 percent of the data was predicted within a life factor of 3.

  2. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  3. Comparative small-angle neutron scattering study of neutron-irradiated Fe, Fe-based alloys and a pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, F.; Lambrecht, M.; Ulbricht, A.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-04-01

    Irradiation-induced damage in reactor pressure vessel steels covers a multitude of different features at the nanometer size scale. The nature, formation kinetics and relative importance of these features are not yet well understood in detail. It also turned out that there is no single experimental technique capable of closing all the remaining gaps. The present approach is based on the idea that significant progress can be achieved by investigating the same set of neutron-irradiated model alloys of increasing complexity with several experimental techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The aim of the effort is to explore both complementarity and overlaps of the information gained from individual techniques and to close gaps by introducing proper models. In the present paper the results obtained by means of SANS are reported, self-consistent interpretation is given and the results are qualified for the discussion in combination with the other experimental techniques to be given in separate papers.

  4. Effect of titanium doping on accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in austenitic steel 16Cr15Ni3Mo(0-1)Ti at low temperature (80 K) electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Danilov, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of titanium doping on accumulation and annealing of radiation defects was investigated in austenitic stainless steel 16Cr15Ni3Mo under low temperature (80 K) electron irradiation. Steel has been taken in the quenched, aged and separation of solid solution states. The data obtained on the accumulation of radiation defects and their evolution during isochronous annealing. The types of defects and its complexes and the activation energy of the processes taking place with their participation is identified. The mechanisms of radiation- induced processes and the effect of titan doping is discussed.

  5. Microstructural evolution under dual ion irradiation and in-reactor creep of type 316 stainless steel welded joints*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Hishinuma, A.

    1994-09-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding was applied to 316SS and the titanium modified 316SS (JPCA). For the prospective improvement of swelling in welded joints, modified TIG or EB welding procedures utilizing titanium or nickel foil insertion were employed. For the case of EB welding of 15 mm thickness I-butt joint, the higher weld heat input showed better swelling resistance in the joints. The in-reactor creep results suggest that irradiation creep in welded joints may not be a big concern, as far as swelling resistance is maintained. So, Ni addition, stress relief treatment and high heat input for EB welding with optimization of welding condition are recommended for suppressing irradiation creep and swelling.

  6. Effect of gamma irradiation on stress corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel under ITER-relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. H.; Henager, C. H.

    1992-09-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests were conducted on Type 316 SS and PCA sensitized to 5 C/cm2 at 100°C in deionized water with 10 ppm Cl-. A constant K test specimen was cylically loaded at 1 Hz with an R of 0.5 and a δK of 11 MPa√m in an autoclave immersed in a 60Co source. Tests were conducted at 0, 2.3 × 102, and 6.5 × 105 rad/h. The average crack velocities were found to be 2.0 and 1.5×105 mm/cycle for the Type 316 SS and PCA, respectively, in the absence of gamma irradiation and 1.3 and 0.74×10-5 mm/cycle, respectively, at both gamma fluxes. Gamma irradiation may have shifted the potential to more reducing rather than more oxidizing, as observed by others in high-temperature water with low O2 activity. This study suggests that there is no significant detrimental effect of gamma irradiation on the subcritical crack growth behavior of unirradiated Type 316 SS and PCA at ITER-relevant conditions.

  7. Dependence of steady-state radiation swelling rate of l 0.1C-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si austenitic steel on dpa rate and irradiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, А. V.; Portnykh, I. А.

    2009-04-01

    A large number of swelling measurement data on the 0.1C-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si austenitic steel used as a fuel cladding at temperatures 640-870 К in the BN-600 fast reactor were analyzed. It was found that within irradiation temperatures 690-830 К a steady-state swelling dose rate was from 0.45%/dpa to 1.1%/dpa. By the statistical model of point defect migration for the 0.1C-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-S steel the dependence of the steady-state swelling rate on the irradiation temperature and displacement rate was calculated. The calculation data were consistent with the experimental data.

  8. Characteristics of radiation porosity formed upon irradiation in a BN-600 reactor in the fuel-element cans of cold-deformed steel EK-164 (06Kh16N20M2G2BTFR)-ID c.d.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnykh, I. A.; Kozlov, A. V.; Panchenko, V. L.; Mitrofanova, N. M.

    2012-05-01

    At present, it is the austenitic cold-deformed steel EK164 (06Kh16N20M2G2BTFR)-ID that is considered as a promising material for the achievement of a maximum damage (no less than 110 dpa) and maximum burnup (≥15%). In this work, we have determined the characteristics of porosity formed upon irradiation in a BN-600 reactor to the maximum damaging dose of 77 dpa in the materials of fuel-element cans made of cold-deformed steel EK164-ID c.d. A comparison has been made with analogous characteristics obtained earlier using the standard material, i.e., the cold-deformed steel ChS68 (06Kh16N 15M2G2TFR)-ID c.d.

  9. Highly antibacterial activity of N-doped TiO2 thin films coated on stainless steel brackets under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuai; Liu, Bo; Fan, Lingying; Yue, Ziqi; Liu, Bin; Cao, Baocheng

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method was used to prepare a TiO2 thin film on the surface of stainless steel brackets. Eighteen groups of samples were made according to the experimental parameters. The crystal structure and surface morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation were evaluated by measuring the degradation ratio of methylene blue. The sputtering temperature was set at 300 °C, and the time was set as 180 min, the ratio of Ar to N was 30:1, and annealing temperature was set at 450 °C. The thin films made under these parameters had the highest visible light photocatalytic activity of all the combinations of parameters tested. Antibacterial activities of the selected thin films were also tested against Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans. The results demonstrated the thin film prepared under the parameters above showed the highest antibacterial activity.

  10. The Effect of Oversize Solute Additions on the Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    M Hackett; G Was

    2005-08-12

    Solute additions of zirconium are believed to decrease RIS and dislocation density through point defect trapping and recombination, which in turn reduces grain boundary sensitization and IGSCC. In this work, the effect of zirconium on the microstructure, microchemistry, hardening and IGSCC behavior of 316SS doped with zirconium to levels of 0.31 and 0.45 wt% was studied. These alloys were then irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons to doses up to 7 dpa at a temperature of 400 C. Zr additions had relatively little effect on radiation hardening. Dislocation densities were reduced and average sizes slightly increased for the +Zr alloys relative to the 316SS. Although a low amount of swelling was seen in 316SS at 3 dpa, no voids were observed in either of the +Zr alloys at 3 or 7 dpa. The difference in RIS of Cr and Ni between 316SS and 316+LoZr at 3 dpa was negligible, though RIS for 316+HiZr was considerably less than 316+LoZr at 7 dpa. The link between the oversize solute addition of Zr and its effect on IASCC shows that although the percent strain to failure increased substantially for 316+LoZr compared to the 316SS, cracking behavior was substantially worse as the number of cracks and total crack length was increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  11. Results of charpy V-notch impact testing of structural steel specimens irradiated at {approximately}30{degrees}C to 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} in a commercial reactor cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at {approximately} 30{degrees}C ({approximately} 85{degrees}F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1MeV). The capsule included six CVN impact specimens of archival High Flux Isotope Reactor A212 grade B ferritic steel and five CVN impact specimens of a well-studied A36 structural steel. This irradiation was part of the ongoing study of neutron-induced damage effects at the low temperature and flux experienced by reactor supports. The plant operators shut down the plant before the planned exposure was reached. The exposure of these specimens produced no significant irradiation-induced embrittlement. Of interest were the data on unirradiated specimens in the L-T orientation machined from a single plate of A36 structural steel, which is the same specification for the structural steel used in some reactor supports. The average CVN energy of five unirradiated specimens obtained from one region of the plate and tested at room temperature was {approximately} 99 J, while the energy of 11 unirradiated specimens from other locations of the same plate was 45 J, a difference of {approximately} 220%. The CVN impact energies for all 18 specimens ranged from a low of 32 J to a high of 111 J. Moreover, it appears that the University of Kansas CVN impact energy data of the unirradiated specimens at the 100-J level are shifted toward higher temperatures by about 20 K. The results were an example of the extent of scatter possible in CVN impact testing. Generic values for the CVN impact energy of A36 should be used with caution in critical applications.

  12. Nuclear transmutation in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerova, A. R.; Shimanskii, G. A.; Belozerov, S. V.

    2009-05-01

    The investigations of the effects of nuclear transmutation in steels that are widely used in nuclear power and research reactors and in steels that are planned for the application in thermonuclear fusion plants, which are employed under the conditions of a prolonged action of neutron irradiation with different spectra, made it possible to study the effects of changes in the isotopic and chemical composition on the tendency of changes in the structural stability of these steels. For the computations of nuclear transmutation in steels, we used a program complex we have previously developed on the basis of algorithms for constructing branched block-type diagrams of nuclide transformations and for locally and globally optimizing these diagrams with the purpose of minimizing systematic errors in the calculation of nuclear transmutation. The dependences obtained were applied onto a Schaeffler diagram for steels used for structural elements of reactors. For the irradiation in fission reactors, we observed only a weak influence of the effects of nuclear transmutation in steels on their structural stability. On the contrary, in the case of irradiation with fusion neutrons, a strong influence of the effects of nuclear transmutation in steels on their structural stability has been noted.

  13. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms ofmore » the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.« less

  14. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Saleh, T. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Romero, T. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Li, S.; Cole, J. I.; Fielding, R.

    2016-01-01

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress-strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress-strain constitutive σ(ɛ) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ɛ) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ɛ) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ɛ) in the range of 0-10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are also analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. Notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel 12X18H9T after neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of BR-10 fast reactor at very low dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porollo, S. I.; Dvoriashin, A. M.; Konobeev, Yu. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shulepin, S. V.; Garner, F. A.

    2006-12-01

    Results are presented for void swelling, microstructure and mechanical properties of Russian 12X18H9T (0.12C-18Cr-9Ni-Ti) austenitic stainless steel irradiated as a pressure vessel structural material of the BR-10 fast reactor at ˜350 °C to only 0.64 dpa, produced by many years of exposure at the very low displacement rate of only 1.9 × 10 -9 dpa/s. In agreement with a number of other recent studies it appears that lower dpa rates have a pronounced effect on the microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. In general, lower dpa rates lead to the onset of swelling at much lower doses compared to comparable irradiations conducted at higher dpa rates.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel 12X18H9T after neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of BR-10 fast reactor at very low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Konobeev, Yury V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shulepin, S. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2006-12-01

    Results are presented for void swelling, microstructure andmechanical properties of Russian 12X18H9T (0.12C-18Cr-9Ni-Ti) austenitic stainless steel irradiated as a pressure vessel structure material of the BR-10 fast reactor at ~350C to only 0.64 dpa, produced by many years of exposure at the very low displacement rate of only 1.9x10-9 dpa/s. In agreement with a number of other recent studies it appears that lower dpa rates have a pronounced effect on the microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. In general, loweer dpa rates lead to the onset of swelling at much lower doses compared to comparable irradiations conducted at higher dpa rates.

  17. Experimental investigation of stress effect on swelling and microstructure of Fe-16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Nb austenitic stainless steel under low-temperature irradiation up to high damage dose in the BOR-60 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustroev, V. S.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.; Shamardin, V. K.

    2004-08-01

    The present paper was devoted to investigation of the stress effect on swelling and microstructure evolution of the Fe-15.8Cr-15.3Ni-2.8Mo-0.6Nb steel irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor at temperatures from 395 to 410 °C and damage doses from 79 to 98 dpa. Was found out that the stress increase leads to an increase of swelling, that can be associated with a decrease in incubation period with a practically constant swelling rate. Voids concentration increases at the first stage of irradiation when the void sizes are practically constant, and then the concentration reaches some saturation and swelling increase is caused by void growth.

  18. Erratum for: Master equation and Fokker-Planck methods for void nucleation and growth in irradiation swelling, Vacancy cluster evolution and swelling in irradiated 316 stainless steel and Radiation swelling behavior and its dependence on temperature, dose

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2005-01-03

    We have recently discovered an error in our void nucleation code used in three prior publications [1-3]. A term was omitted in the model for vacancy re-emission that (especially at high temperature) affects void nucleation and growth during irradiation as well as void annealing and Ostwald ripening of the size distribution after irradiation. The omission was not immediately detected because the calculations predict reasonable void densities and swelling behaviors when compared to experiment at low irradiation temperatures, where void swelling is prominent. (Comparable neutron irradiation experiments are less prevalent at higher temperatures, e.g., > 500 C.)

  19. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  20. Effect of dose and temperature parameters of neutron irradiation to maximum damaging dose of 77 dpa on characteristics of porosity formed in steel 0.07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnykh, I. A.; Kozlov, A. V.; Panchenko, V. L.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure of samples of cladding tubes made of steel 0.07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B (EK164) irradiated to different damaging doses (up to 77 dpa) in the BN-600 reactor at temperatures from 440 to 600°C has been investigated. Characteristics of radiation porosity formed during irradiation in different temperature intervals have been determined. The dependences of the porosity characteristics on the rate of generation of atomic displacements and temperature of neutron irradiation have been established.

  1. Generation and Retention of Helium and Hydrogen in Austenitic Steels Irradiated in a Variety of LWR and Test Reactor Spectral Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Francis A.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Edwards, Danny J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Grossbeck, Martin L.

    2002-03-31

    In fission and fusion reactor environments stainless steels generate significant amounts of helium and hydrogen by transmutation. The primary sources of helium are boron and nickel, interacting with both fast and especially thermal neutrons. Hydrogen arises primarily from fast neutron reactions, but is also introduced into steels at often much higher levels by other environmental processes. Although essentially all of the helium is retained in the steel, it is commonly assumed that most of the hydrogen is not retained. It now appears that under some circumstances, significant levels of hydrogen can be retained, especially when helium-nucleated cavities become a significant part of the microstructure. A variety of stainless steel specimens have been examined from various test reactors, PWRs and BWRs. These specimens were exposed to a wide range of neutron spectra with different thermal/fast neutron ratios. Pure nickel and pure iron have also been examined. It is shown that all major features of the retention of helium and hydrogen can be explained in terms of the composition, thermal/fast neutron ratio and the presence or absence of helium-nucleated cavities. In some cases, the hydrogen retention is very large and can exceed that generated by transmutation, with the additional hydrogen arising from either environmental sources and/or previously unidentified radioisotope sources that may come into operation at high neutron exposures.

  2. Effects of alloying elements on radiation hardening based on loop formation of electron-irradiated light water reactor pressure vessel model steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Takakuni; Hashimoto, N.; Ohnuki, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. R.

    2011-10-01

    Electron irradiations using a high voltage electron microscope were conducted on several reactor pressure vessel model alloys in order to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the formation and development of defect clusters. In addition, the effects of alloying elements on yield stress change after irradiation were considered, comparing the mean size and number density of dislocation loops with the irradiation-induced hardening. High Cu alloys formed Cu and Mn-Ni-Si rich clusters, and these are important in determining the yield stress increase. High Ni alloys formed a high density of small dislocation loops and probably Mn-Ni-Si rich cluster, which have the effect of increasing the yield stress. High P enhanced radiation-induced segregation on grain boundary, helping prevent dislocation movement.

  3. Modeling precipitation thermodynamics and kinetics in type 316 austenitic stainless steels with varying composition as an initial step toward predicting phase stability during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Povoden-Karadeniz, Erwin; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-07-01

    The long-term evolution of precipitates in type 316 austenitic stainless steels at 400 °C has been simulated using a numerical model based on classical nucleation theory and the thermodynamic extremum principle. Particular attention has been paid to the precipitation of radiation-induced phases such as γ‧ and G phases. In addition to the original compositions, the compositions for radiation-induced segregation at a dose level of 5, 10 or 20 dpa have been used in the simulation. In a 316 austenitic stainless steel, γ‧ appears as the main precipitate with a small amount of G phase forming at 10 and 20 dpa. On the other hand, G phase becomes relatively dominant over γ‧ at the same dose levels in a Ti-stabilized 316 austenitic stainless steel, which tends to suppress the formation of γ‧. Among the segregated alloying elements, the concentration of Si seems to be the most critical for the formation of radiation-induced phases. An increase in dislocation density as well as increased diffusivity of Mn and Si significantly enhances the precipitation kinetics of the radiation-induced phases within this model.

  4. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects and the hydrogen effect thereon in an austenitic steel 16Cr15Ni3Mo1Ti upon low-temperature neutron and electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Gothchitskii, B. N.; Danilov, S. E.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Zuev, Yu. N.; Kar'kin, A. E.; Parkhomenko, V. D.; Sagaradze, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen, accumulation and annealing of radiation defects on the physicomechanical properties of an austenitic Kh16N15M3T1 steel (16Cr15Ni3Mo1Ti) has been investigated upon low-temperature (77 K) neutron and electron irradiations. It has been shown that, when its concentration is about 300 at ppm, hydrogen reduces plasticity by 25%. The presence of helium (2.0-2.5 at ppm) introduced by the tritium-trick method exerts an effect on the yield strength and hardly affects embrittlement. Upon both electron and neutron irradiation, there is a linear relation between the increment of the yield strength and the square root of the increment of the residual electrical resistivity (the concentration of radiation defects). The annealing of vacancies occurs in the neighborhood of 300 K (energy for vacancy migration is 1.0-1.0 eV). Vacancy clusters dissociate near 480 K (energy for dissociation is 1.4-1.5 eV).

  5. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  6. Irradiation creep of SA 304L and CW 316 stainless steels: Mechanical behaviour and microstructural aspects. Part II: Numerical simulation and test of SIPA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J.; Bréchet, Y.; Delnondedieu, M.; Renault, A.; Pokor, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Massoud, J.-P.

    2011-06-01

    A cluster dynamic model has been adapted to test the Stress Induced Preferential Absorption of Defect (SIPA) on Frank loops hypothesis concerning irradiation creep, to reproduce quantitatively both microstructure evolution and its stress induced anisotropy and macroscopic creep rate. It is concluded that SIPA on Frank loops model can account for the observed defects structure, but is unable to reproduce quantitatively the creep rate.

  7. High energy X-ray diffraction study of the relationship between the macroscopic mechanical properties and microstructure of irradiated HT-9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomchik, C.; Almer, J.; Anderoglu, O.; Balogh, L.; Brown, D. W.; Clausen, B.; Maloy, S. A.; Sisneros, T. A.; Stubbins, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    Samples harvested from an HT-9 fuel test assembly (ACO-3) irradiated for six years in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reaching 2-147 dpa at 382-504 °C were deformed in-situ while collecting high-energy X-ray diffraction data to monitor microstructure evolution. With the initiation of plastic deformation, all samples exhibited a clear load transfer from the ferrite matrix to carbide particulate. This behavior was confirmed by modeling of the control material. The evolution of dislocation density in the material as a result of deformation was characterized through full pattern line profile analysis. The dislocation densities increased substantially after deformation, the level of dislocation evolution observed was highly dependent upon the irradiation temperature of the sample. Differences in both the yield and hardening behavior between samples irradiated at higher and lower temperatures suggest the existence of a transition in tensile behavior at an irradiation temperature near 420 °C dividing regions of distinct damage effects.

  8. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  9. Validation Analyses of IEAF-2001 Activation Cross-Section Data for SS-316 and F82H Steels Irradiated in a White d-Li Neutron Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.; v. Möllendorff, U.; Schmuck, I.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2005-05-01

    The evaluated intermediate-energy activation cross-section library IEAF-2001 has been tested against integral experiments with SS-316 and F82H steels exposed to a white neutron flux spectrum extending up to 55 MeV. By making use of the ALARA inventory code the expected γ-active product nuclide inventories were calculated and compared with the measured one. It was found that IEAF-2001 reasonably agrees with experimental data for most of the detected radioisotopes. The reasons for some larger disagreements were found to be the uncertainty of the sample elemental composition, non-validated neutron activation reaction cross sections, and sequential charge particle reactions.

  10. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  11. Orientation dependency of mechanical properties of 1950's vintage Type 304 stainless steel weldment components before and after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Databases of mechanical properties for both the piping and reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were developed from weldment components (base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ)) of archival piping specimens in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), and Compact Tension C(T) specimens were tested at 25 and 125C before and after irradiation at low temperatures (90 to 150C) to levels of 0.065 to 2.1 dpa. irradiation hardened the weldment components and reduced the absorbed energy and toughness properties from the unirradiated values. A marked difference in the Charpy V-notch absorbed energy and the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J[sub IC]) was observed for both the base and HAZ components with the C-L orientation being lower in toughness than the L-C orientation in both the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Fracture surface examination of the base and HAZ components of unirradiated C(T) specimens showed a channel'' morphology in the fracture surfaces of the C-L specimens, whereas equiaxed ductile rupture occurred in the L-C specimens. Chromium carbide precipitation in the HAZ component reduced the fracture toughness of the C-L and L-C specimens compared to the respective base component C-L and L-C specimens. Optical metallography of the piping materials showed stringers of second phase particles parallel to the rolling direction along with a banding or modulation in the microchemistry perpendicular to the pipe axis or rolling direction of the plate material.

  12. Orientation dependency of mechanical properties of 1950`s vintage Type 304 stainless steel weldment components before and after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Databases of mechanical properties for both the piping and reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were developed from weldment components (base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ)) of archival piping specimens in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), and Compact Tension C(T) specimens were tested at 25 and 125C before and after irradiation at low temperatures (90 to 150C) to levels of 0.065 to 2.1 dpa. irradiation hardened the weldment components and reduced the absorbed energy and toughness properties from the unirradiated values. A marked difference in the Charpy V-notch absorbed energy and the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J{sub IC}) was observed for both the base and HAZ components with the C-L orientation being lower in toughness than the L-C orientation in both the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Fracture surface examination of the base and HAZ components of unirradiated C(T) specimens showed a ``channel`` morphology in the fracture surfaces of the C-L specimens, whereas equiaxed ductile rupture occurred in the L-C specimens. Chromium carbide precipitation in the HAZ component reduced the fracture toughness of the C-L and L-C specimens compared to the respective base component C-L and L-C specimens. Optical metallography of the piping materials showed stringers of second phase particles parallel to the rolling direction along with a banding or modulation in the microchemistry perpendicular to the pipe axis or rolling direction of the plate material.

  13. Comparison of irradiation creep and swelling of an austenitic alloy irradiated in FFTF and PFR

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Munro, B.; Adaway, S.; Standring, J.

    1999-10-01

    comparative irradiation of identically constructed creep tubes in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Prototypic Fast Reactor (PFR) shows that differences in irradiation conditions arising from both reactor operation and the design of the irradiation vehicle can have a significant impact on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic stainless steels. In spite of these differences, the derived creep coefficients fall within the range of previously observed values for 316 SS.

  14. Characteristics of radiation porosity and structural phase state of reactor austenitic 07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B Steel after neutron irradiation at a temperature of 440-600°C to damaging doses of 36-94 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnykh, I. A.; Panchenko, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    The phase composition and the characteristics of vacancy voids in cold-worked steel 07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B (CW EK164-ID) after neutron irradiation at damaging doses of 36-94 dpa and temperatures of 440-600°C are investigated. In the entire range of damaging doses and temperatures, voids with different sizes are observed in the material. The maximum void size increases with irradiation temperature up to ~550°C, whereas their concentration decreases. At higher irradiation temperatures, almost no coarse voids are observed. The concentration of fine voids (to 10 nm in size) sharply increases with temperature from 440 to 480°C. Further increases in the temperature do not result in the noticeable concentration growth. In the irradiation temperature range of 440-515°C, second phases precipitate ( G phase, γ' phase, and complex fcc carbides). At higher irradiation temperatures, there are Laves-phase particles, fine second carbides of the MC type, and needle shape precipitates identified as phosphides in the material.

  15. Embrittlernent of irradiated F82H in the absence of irradiation hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, Ronald L; Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2009-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of 7-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels below 425-450 C produces microstructural defects and precipitation that cause an increase in yield stress. This irradiation hardening causes embrittlement, which is observed in a Charpy impact or fracture toughness test as an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature. Based on observations that show little change in strength in steels irradiated above 425-450 C, the general conclusion has been that no embrittlement occurs above these temperatures. In a recent study of F82H steel, significant embrittlement was observed after irradiation at 500 C. This embrittlement is apparently due to irradiation-accelerated Laves-phase precipitation. Observations of the embrittlement in the absence of hardening has been examined and analyzed with thermal-aging studies and computational thermodynamics calculations to illuminate and understand the effect.

  16. JPDR vessel steel examination

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel which has been irradiated during normal service. This task has been included with the HSSI Program to provide just such an evaluation of material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the JPDR. The JPDR was a small BWR that began operation in 1963. It operated until 1976, accumulating {approximately}17,000 h of operation, of which a little over 14,000 h were with the original 45-MWTh core, and the remaining fraction, late in life, with an upgraded 90-MWTh core. The pressure vessel of the JPDR, fabricated from A 302, grade B, modified steel with an internal weld overlay cladding of 304 stainless steel, is approximately 2 m ID and 73 mm thick. It was fabricated from two shell halves joined by longitudinal seam welds located 180{degrees} from each other. The rolling direction of the shell plates is parallel to the axis of the vessel. It operated at 273{degrees}C and reached a maximum fluence of about 2.3 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). The impurity contents in the base metal are 0.10 to 0.11% Cu and 0.010 to 0.017% P with a nickel content of 0.63 to 0.65%. Impurity contents of the weld metal are 0.11 to 0.14% Cu and 0.025 to 0.039% P with a nickel content of 0.59%.

  17. Chromium-molybdenum steels for fusion-reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1981-08-01

    Because ferritic steels have been found to have excellent resistance to swelling when irradiated in a fast-breeder reactor, Cr-Mo steels have recently become of interest for nuclear applications, both as cladding and duct material for fast-breeder reactors and as a first-wall and blanket structural material for fusion reactors. In this paper we will assess the Cr-Mo steels for fusion reactor applications. Possible approaches on how Cr-Mo steels may be further developed for this application will be proposed.

  18. Wear-resistant polytetrafluoroethylene via electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, T.A.; Peng, Y.L.

    1996-06-01

    The sliding wear and friction behavior of irradiation-modified PTFE (by 10 MeV electrons in ambient air) against polished stainless steel is studied. Steady-state wear rate is shown to decrease monotonically by more than three orders of magnitude as the dose of the irradiation is increased from 0 to 30 Mrad. Friction initially increases with increasing dose, reaching a miximum value at 5 Mrad, then decreases with subsequent increases in dose, attaining a value similar to that of unirradiated PTFE at 30 Mrad. Hardness monotonically increases with increasing dose; however, irradiated PTFE was not found to abrasively damage the steel countersurface as many wear-resistant particle-filled PTFE composites do. Wear reduction is accomplished as debris production transforms from that of numerous large plate-like debris for unirradiated PTFE to that of very fine debris for irradiated PTFE. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  19. The effect of tantalum on the mechanical properties of a 9Cr 2W 0.25V 0.07Ta 0.1C steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.; Rieth, M.

    1999-07-01

    An Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel has excellent strength and impact toughness before and after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the High Flux Reactor (HFR). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increased only 32°C after 28 dpa at 365°C in FFTF, compared to a shift of ≈60°C for a 9Cr-2WV steel the same as the 9Cr-2WVTa steel but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile properties before and after irradiation. The 9Cr-2WVTa steel has a smaller prior-austenite grain size, but otherwise microstructures are similar before irradiation and show similar changes during irradiation. The irradiation behavior of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel differs from the 9Cr-2WV steel and other similar steels in two ways: (1) the shift in DBTT of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF does not saturate with fluence by ≈28 dpa, whereas for the 9Cr-2WV steel and most similar steels, saturation occurs at <10 dpa, and (2) the shift in DBTT for 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF and HFR increased with irradiation temperature, whereas it decreased for the 9Cr-2WV steel, as it does for most similar steels. The improved properties of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel and the differences with other steels were attributed to tantalum in solution.

  20. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  1. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Design of YCF-1 mobile γ irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehu, Zhang; Chuanzhen, Wang

    1993-07-01

    YCF-1 Mobile irradiator is designed by BINE of China. It has been put into running in YanJi city of Jilin province. It is able to be moved to border and distance places and area lumped and spreading out of agricultural products to service. It can play a important role in demonstration and extending irradiation technology in food irradiation, disinfestation, sterilization and quarantine, etc. This paper describes the features and design considerations of mobile irradiator. This irradiator adopted Cesium-137 source. The design capacity of loading source is 9.25PBq (250kCi), A half-time of Cs- 137 is 30.2 years long, exchanging source is not needed utilization rate of energy is higher, and the shielding is thinner, The Weight is lighter, The dose rate on the surface of it is 0.0025mSv/h in accordance with national standard. The internal size of irradiation room is 1800×1800×900mm (L×W×H), The sheilding of irradiation room is a steel shell filled with lead. The thickness of lead is 18cm. The irradiator is installed on a special flat truck. The size of the truck is 7000×3400×4200mm (L×W×H). The weight of irradiator is more than 80 150kw. The main components and parts of irradiator are: source, source racks and hoist, irradiation chamber, storage source chamber, the product's transport system, dose monitoring system, ventilation system and safety interlock system, etc.

  3. Ferritic/martensitic steels - overview of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Gelles, D. S.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Odette, G. R.; van der Schaaf, B.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    Considerable research work has been conducted on the ferritic/martensitic steels since the last International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials in 1999. Since only a limited amount of that work can be reviewed in this paper, four areas will be emphasized: (1) the international collaboration under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to address potential problems with ferritic/martensitic steels and to prove their feasibility for fusion, (2) the major uncertainty that remains concerning the effect of transmutation helium on mechanical properties of the steels when irradiated in a fusion neutron environment, (3) development of new reduced-activation steels beyond the F82H and JLF-1 steels studied in the IEA collaboration, and (4) work directed at developing oxide dispersion-strengthened steels for operation above 650 °C.

  4. Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1995-04-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

  5. Irradiation performance of FFTF drivers using the D9 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, A.L.; Gneiting, B.C.; Bard, F.E.

    1994-12-31

    Five test assemblies similar in design to the Fast Flux Test Facility driver fuel assembly , but employing the alloy D9 in place of stainless steel 316 for duct, cladding, and wire wrap compnents were irradiated to demonstrate the improved performance of the new design. Results of post-irradiation examinations are discussed.

  6. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  7. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5...

  8. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5...

  9. Radiation damage of F/M and ODS alloys after Fe3+-ion irradiation at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young-Bum; Noh, Sanghoon; Jang, Jinsung; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, Fe3+ self-ion irradiation is used as means of introducing irradiation damage in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The ion accelerator named DuET (at Kyoto University, Japan) was used for irradiation with 6.4 MeV Fe3+ ions at 300 °C. The total number of accelerated ions was 2.5 × 1020 ions/m2, and the maximum damage rates in the F/M and the ODS steels were estimated to be roughly 6 dpa. The irradiation-induced hardness change in the damaged layer was evaluated by using nano-indentation. The F/M steel and the ODS steel commonly exhibited irradiation hardening; however, the irradiation hardening was more active in the F/M steel than in the ODS steel. The microstructure evolutions after the irradiation were investigated; point or line defects were dominantly observed in the F/M steel, while small circular cavities were typically observed in ODS steel.

  10. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  11. R&D of low activation ferritic steels for fusion in japanese universities*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kohno, Yutaka; Asakura, Kentaro; Kayano, Hideo

    1994-09-01

    Following the brief review of the R&D of low activation ferritic steels in Japanese universities, the status of 9Cr-2W type ferritic steels development is presented. The main emphasis is on mechanical property changes by fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. Bend test, tensile test, CVN test and in-reactor creep results are provided including some data about low activation ferritic steels with Cr variation from 2.25 to 12%. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel, denoted as JLF-1, showed excellent mechanical properties under fast neutron irradiation as high as 60 dpa. As potential materials for DEMO and beyond, innovative oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) quasi-amorphous low activation ferritic steels are introduced. The baseline properties, microstructural evolution under ion irradiation and the recent progress of new processes are provided.

  12. Swelling and swelling resistance possibilities of austenitic stainless steels in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion reactor helium generation rates in stainless steels are intermediate to those found in EBR-II and HFIR, and swelling in fusion reactors may differ from the fission swelling behavior. Advanced titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels exhibit much better void swelling resistance than AISI 316 under EBR-II (up to approx. 120 dpa) and HFIR (up to approx. 44 dpa) irradiations. The stability of fine titanium carbide (MC) precipitates plays an important role in void swelling resistance for the cold-worked titanium-modified steels irradiated in EBR-II. Futhermore, increased helium generation in these steels can (a) suppress void conversion, (b) suppress radiation-induced solute segregation (RIS), and (c) stabilize fine MC particles, if sufficient bubble nucleation occurs early in the irradation. The combined effects of helium-enhanced MC stability and helium-suppressed RIS suggest better void swelling resistance in these steels for fusion service than under EBR-II irradiation.

  13. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  14. [Food irradiation].

    PubMed

    Migdał, W

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by Codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19MeV, 1 kW) and an industrial unit Elektronika (10MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permission for irradiation for: spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. PMID:8619113

  15. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  16. Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Candidate SNS Target Container Materials after Proton and Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T.S.

    2001-11-09

    This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54 to 2.53 dpa. Irradiation temperatures were in the range 30 to 100 C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 C) and 164 C to study the effects of test temperature on the tensile properties. Test materials displayed significant radiation-induced hardening and loss of ductility due to irradiation. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative strain hardening. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 C to 164 C decreased the strength by 13 to 18% and the ductility by 8 to 36%. The tensile data for the EC316LN stainless steel irradiated in spallation conditions were in line with the values in a database for 316 stainless steels for doses up to 1 dpa irradiated in fission reactors at temperatures below 200 C. However, extra strengthening induced by helium and hydrogen contents is evident in some specimens irradiated to above about 1 dpa. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. It was estimated that the 316 stainless steels would retain more than 1% true stains to necking at 164 C after irradiation to 5 dpa. A calculation using reduction of area (RA) measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability.

  17. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  18. Supporting steel

    SciTech Connect

    Badra, C.

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) have just completed a pilot program on the technical and economic viability of direct ironmaking by a process based on bath smelting. In this process, oxygen, prereduced iron ore pellets, coal, and flux are charged into a molten slag bath containing a high percentage of carbon. The carbon removes oxygen from the iron ore and generates carbon monoxide and liquid iron. Oxygen is then injected to burn some of the carbon monoxide gas before it leaves the smelting vessel. The partially combusted gas is sued to preheat and prereduced the ore before it is injected into the bath. There are several competing cokeless ironmaking processes in various stages of development around the world. A brief comparison of these processes provides a useful perspective with which to gauge the progress and objectives of the AISI-DOE research initiative. The principal competing foreign technologies include the Corex process, DIOS, HIsmelt, and Jupiter. The advantages of the direct ironmaking process examined by AISI-DOE were not sufficiently demonstrated to justify commercialization without further research. However, enough knowledge was gained from laboratory and pilot testing to teach researchers how to optimize the direct ironmaking process and to provide the foundation for future research. Researchers now better understand issues such as the dissolution of materials, reduction mechanisms and rates, slag foaming and control, the behavior of sulfur, dust generation, and the entire question of energy efficiency--including post combustion and the role of coal/volatile matter.

  19. The effect of dose rate on the response of austenitic stainless steels to neutron radiaiton

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J I.; Trybus, Carole L.; Porter, D. L.; Tsai, Hanchung; Garner, Francis A.; Kenik, E A.; Yoshitake, T.; Ohta, Joji

    2006-01-01

    Depending on reactor design and component location, austenitic stainless steels may experience significantly different irradiation dose rates in the same reactor. Understanding the effect of dose rate on radiation performance is important to predicting component lifetime. This study examined the effect of dose rate on swelling, grain boundary segregation, and tensile properties in austenitic stainless steels through the examination of components retrieved from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) following its shutdown. Annealed 304 stainless steel, stress-relieved 304 stainless steel, 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel, and 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel were irradiated over a dose range of 1-56 dpa at temperatures from 371 to 440 C and dose rates from 0.5 to 5.8 ? 10*7 dpa/s. Density and tensile properties were measured for 304 and 316 stainless steel. Changes in grain boundary composition were examined for 304 stainless steel. Swelling appears to increase at lower dose rates in both 304 and 316 stainless steel, although the effect was not always statistically significant. Grain boundary segregation also appears to increase at lower dose rate in 304 stainless steel. For the range of dose rates examined, no measurable dose rate effect on tensile properties was noted for any of the steels.

  20. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  1. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  2. Irradiance gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.J. Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne ); Heckbert, P.S. . School of Computer Science Technische Hogeschool Delft . Dept. of Technical Mathematics and Informatics)

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  3. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  4. First principle-based AKMC modelling of the formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters in a neutron irradiated complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, R.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-09-01

    The formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters under neutron irradiation have been modelled in a complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of RPV steels, by means of first principle-based atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained reproduce most features observed in available experimental studies, highlighting the very good agreement between both series. According to simulation, solute-rich clusters form and develop via an induced segregation mechanism on either the vacancy or interstitial clusters, and these point defect clusters are efficiently generated only in cascade debris and not Frenkel pair flux. The results have revealed the existence of two distinct populations of clusters with different characteristic features. Solute-rich clusters in the first group are bound essentially to interstitial clusters and they are enriched in Mn mostly, but also Ni to a lesser extent. Over the low dose regime, their density increases in the alloy as a result of the accumulation of highly stable interstitial clusters. In the second group, the solute-rich clusters are merged with vacancy clusters, and they contain mostly Cu and Si, but also substantial amount of Mn and Ni. The formation of a sub-population of pure solute clusters has been observed, which results from annihilation of the low stable vacancy clusters on sinks. The results indicate finally that the Mn content in clusters is up to 50%, Cu, Si, and Ni sharing the other half in more or less equivalent amounts. This composition has not demonstrated any noticeable modification with increasing dose over irradiation.

  5. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  6. The steel scrap age.

    PubMed

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-01

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age. PMID:23442209

  7. Methods of forming steel

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Burch, Joseph V.

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

  8. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  9. Reactor Material Program Fracture Toughness of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Awadalla, N.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes the experimental procedure for Type 304 Stainless Steel fracture toughness measurements and the application of results. Typical toughness values are given based on the completed test program for the Reactor Materials Program (RMP). Test specimen size effects and limitations of the applicability in the fracture mechanics methodology are outlined as well as a brief discussion on irradiation effects.

  10. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haušild, Petr; Materna, Aleš; Kytka, Miloš

    2015-04-01

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  11. Corrosion behavior of carbon steels under tuff repository environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; Weiss, H.

    1984-10-01

    Carbon steels may be used for borehole liners in a potential high-level nuclear waste repository in tuff in Nevada. Borehole liners are needed to facilitate emplacement of the waste packages and to facilitate retrieval of the packages, if required. Corrosion rates of low carbon structural steels AISI 1020 and ASTM A-36 were determined in J-13 well water and in saturated steam at 100{sup 0}C. Tests were conducted in air-sparged J-13 water to attain more oxidizing conditions representative of irradiated aqueous environments. A limited number of irradiation corrosion and stress corrosion tests were performed. Chromium-molybdenum alloy steels and cast irons were also tested. These materials showed lower general corrosion but were susceptible to stress corrosion cracking when welded. 4 references, 4 tables.

  12. Quantitative TEM analysis of precipitation and grain boundary segregation in neutron irradiated EUROFER 97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural defects is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used to analyze the types and structure of precipitates, and the evolution of their size distributions and densities caused by neutron irradiation to a dose of 32 displacements per atom (dpa) at 330-340 °C in the irradiation experiment ARBOR 1. A significant growth of MX and M23C6 type precipitates is observed after neutron irradiation, while the precipitate density remains unchanged. Hardening caused by MX and M23C6 precipitate growth is assessed by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening (DBH) model, and shown to be of minor importance when compared to other irradiation effects like dislocation loop formation. Additionally, grain boundary segregation of chromium induced by neutron irradiation was investigated and detected in irradiated specimens.

  13. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  14. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Ashdown, B.G.

    1980-04-01

    Progress is reported concerning preparation of a materials handbook for fusion, creep-fatigue of first-wall structural materials, test results on miniature compact tension fracture toughness specimens, austenitic stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, iron-base alloys with long-range crystal structure, ferritic steels, irradiation experiments, corrosion testing, and hydrogen permeation studies. (FS)

  15. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  16. Tool steels. 5. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, G.; Krauss, G.; Kennedy, R.

    1998-12-31

    The revision of this authoritative work contains a significant amount of new information from the past nearly two decades presented in an entirely new outline, making this a must have reference for engineers involved in tool-steel production, as well as in the selection and use of tool steels in metalworking and other materials manufacturing industries. The chapter on tool-steel manufacturing includes new production processes, such as electroslag refining, vacuum arc remelting, spray deposition processes (Osprey and centrifugal spray), and powder metal processing. The seven chapters covering tool-steel types in the 4th Edition have been expanded to 11 chapters covering nine main groups of tool steels as well as other types of ultrahigh strength steels sometimes used for tooling. Each chapter discusses in detail processing, composition, and applications specific to the particular group. In addition, two chapters have been added covering surface modification and trouble shooting production and performance problems.

  17. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of stainless steels D9 and HT9

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, L.; Blomquist, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Renewed interest in the use of metallic fuels in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors has prompted study of the thermodynamic and transport properties of its materials. Two stainless steels are of particular interest because of their good performance under irradiation. These are D9, an austenitic steel, and HT9, a ferritic steel. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion data for these alloys are of particular interest in assessing in-reactor behavior. Because literature data were inadequate, measurements of these two properties for the two steels were performed and are reported to 1200 K. Of particular interest is the influence on these properties of a phase transition in HT9.

  18. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Ellen M. Rabenberg; Brian J. Jaques; Bulent H. Sencer; Frank A. Garner; Paula D. Freyer; Taira Okita; Darryl P. Butt

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  19. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  20. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Hino; K, Yamaguchi; Y, Yamauchi; Y, Hirohata; K, Tsuzuki; Y, Kusama

    2005-04-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall, vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study, deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus. After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 keV D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention. Ferritic steel sample was

  1. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  2. R and D of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Steels for High Burn-up Fuel Claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, A.; Cho, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Kasada, R.; Ukai, S.; Fujiwara, M.

    2004-07-01

    Research and development of fuel clad materials for high burn-up operation of light water reactor and super critical water reactor (SCPWR) will be shown with focusing on the effort to overcome the requirements of material performance as the fuel clad. Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels are well known as a high temperature structural material. Recent irradiation experiments indicated that the steels were quite highly resistant to neutron irradiation embrittlement, showing hardening without accompanying loss of ductility. High Cr ODS steels whose chromium concentration was in the range from 15 to 19 wt% showed high resistance to corrosion in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW). As for the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ODS steels, the critical hydrogen concentration required to hydrogen embrittlement is ranging 10{approx}12 wppm that is approximately one order of magnitude higher value than that of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel. In the ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel, indicating that the ODS steels are also resistant to helium He bubble-induced embrittlement. Finally, it is demonstrated that the ODS steels are very promising for the fuel clad material for high burn-up operation of water-cooling reactors. (authors)

  3. Irradiation creep in structural materials at ITER operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep is plastic deformation of a material under the influence of irradiation and stress. Below the regime of thermal creep, there remains a deformation mechanism under irradiation that is weakly temperature dependent and clearly different from thermal creep. This is irradiation creep. Both stress and irradiation are required for irradiation creep. Irradiation creep studies for applications in the past focused mostly on liquid metal fast breeder reactors where temperatures are usually above 400{degrees}C. Fusion reactors, especially nearterm devices such as the ITER will have components operating at temperatures as low as 100{degrees}C exposed to high neutron fluxes. Theories of irradiation creep based on steady-state point defect concentrations do not predict significant irradiation creep deformation at these temperatures; however, data from research reactors show that irradiation creep strains at 60{degrees}C are as high or higher than at temperatures above 300{degrees}C for austenitic stainless steels. Irradiation creep of nickel has also been observed at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Steel Industry Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  5. Modern Steel Framed Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Steel Construction, Inc., New York, NY.

    In view of the cost of structural framing for school buildings, ten steel-framed schools are examined to review the economical advantages of steel for school construction. These schools do not resemble each other in size, shape, arrangement or unit cost; some are original in concept and architecture, and others are conservative. Cost and…

  6. The Steel Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Describes studying the steel drum, an import from Trinidad, as an instrument of intellectual growth. Describes how developing a steel drum band provided Montessori middle school students the opportunity to experience some important feelings necessary to emotional growth during this difficult age: competence, usefulness, independence, and…

  7. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  8. EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, BUFFALO PLANT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ROLL SHOP. 8" BAR MILL DESIGNED AND BUILT BY DONNER STEEL CO. (PREDECESSOR OF REPUBLIC), 1919-1920. FOR DESCRIPTION OF ORIGINAL MILL SEE "IRON AGE", 116\\4 (23 JULY 1925): 201-204. - LTV Steel, 8-inch Bar Mill, Buffalo Plant, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  9. Investigation of irradiated soil byproducts.

    PubMed

    Brey, R R; Rodriguez, R; Harmon, J F; Winston, P

    2001-01-01

    The high dose irradiation of windblown soil deposited onto the surface of spent nuclear fuel is of concern to long-term fuel storage stability. Such soils could be exposed to radiation fields as great as 1.08 x 10(-3) C/kg-s (15,000 R/hr) during the 40-year anticipated period of interim dry storage prior to placement at the proposed national repository. The total absorbed dose in these cases could be as high as 5 x 10(7) Gy (5 x 10(9) rads). This investigation evaluated the potential generation of explosive or combustible irradiation byproducts during this irradiation. It focuses on the production of radiolytic byproducts generated within the pore water of surrogate clays that are consistent with those found on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Synthesized surrogates of localized soils containing combinations of clay, water, and aluminum samples, enclosed within a stainless steel vessel were irradiated and the quantities of the byproducts generated measured. Two types of clays, varying primarily in the presence of iron oxide, were investigated. Two treatment levels of irradiation and a control were investigated. An 18-Mev linear accelerator was used to irradiate samples. The first irradiation level provided an absorbed dose of 3.9 x 10(5)+/-1.4 x 10(5)Gy (3.9 x 10(7)+/-1.4 x 10(7) rads) in a 3-h period. At the second irradiation level, 4.8 x 10(5)+/-2.0 x 10(5)Gy (4.8 x 10(7)+/-2.0 x 10(7) rads) were delivered in a 6-h period. When averaged over all treatment parameters, irradiated clay samples with and without iron (III) oxide (moisture content = 40%) had a production rate of hydrogen gas that was a strong function of radiation-dose. A g-value of 5.61 x 10(-9)+/-1.56 x 10(-9) mol/J (0.054+/-0.015 molecules/100-eV) per mass of pore water was observed in the clay samples without iron (III) oxide for hydrogen gas production. A g-value of 1.07 x 10(-8)+/-2.91 x 10(-9) mol/J (0.103+0.028 molecules/100-eV) per mass of pore water was observed

  10. Development status of CLAM steel for fusion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    The China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel is being developed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology (INEST) under wide collaboration within China. Significant R&D work on CLAM steel was carried out to help make it suitable for industrial applications. The effect of refining processes and thermal aging on composition, microstructures and mechanical properties were investigated. Material properties before irradiation including impact, fracture toughness, thermal aging, creep and fatigue properties etc. were assessed. A series of irradiation tests in the fission reactor HFETR in Chengdu up to 2 dpa and in the spallation neutron source SINQ in Paul Scherrer Institute up to 20 dpa were performed. PbLi corrosion tests for more than 10,000 h were done in the DRAGON-I and PICOLO loops. Fabrication techniques for a test blanket module (TBM) are being developed and a 1/3 scale TBM prototype is being fabricated with CLAM steel. Recent progresses on the development status of this steel are presented here. The code qualification of CLAM steel is under plan for its final application in ITER-TBM and DEMO in the future.

  11. The compositional dependence of irradiation creep of austenitic alloys irradiated in PFR at 420{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Munro, B.

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation creep data are expensive and often difficult to obtain, especially when compared to swelling data. This requires that maximum use be made of available data sources in order to elucidate the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep for application to new alloys and to new environments such as those of proposed fusion environments. One previously untapped source of creep data is that of a joint U.S./U.K. experiment conducted in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) in Dounreay, Scotland. In this experiment, five austenitic steels were irradiated in a variety of starting conditions. In particular, these steels spanned a large range (15-40%) of nickel contents, and contained strong variations in Mo, Ti, Al, and Nb. Some alloys were solution-strengthened and some were precipitation-strengthened. Several were cold-worked. These previously unanalyzed data show that at 420{degrees}C all austenitic steels have a creep compliance that is roughly independent of the composition of the steel at 2{+-}1 x 10{sup {minus}6}MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}. The variation within this range may arise from the inability to completely separate the non-creep strains arising from precipitation reactions and the stress-enhancement of swelling. Each of these can be very sensitive to the composition and starting treatment of a steel.

  12. Evaluation of radiation hardening in ion-irradiated Fe based alloys by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Ren, Ai; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Chaoliang; Huang, Ping; Qian, Wangjie; Wu, Yichu; Zhang, Chonghong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoindentation in combination with ion irradiation offers the possibility to quantify irradiation hardening due to radiation damage. Irradiation experiments for Fe-1.0wt.%Cu alloys, China A508-3 steels, and 16MND5 steels were carried out at about 100 °C by proton and Fe-ions with the energy of 240 keV, 3 MeV respectively. The constant stiffness measurement (CSM) with a diamond Berkovich indenter was used to obtain the depth profile of hardness. The results showed that under 240 keV proton irradiation (peak damage up to 0.5 dpa), Fe-1.0wt.%Cu alloys exhibited the largest hardening (∼55%), 16MND5 steels resided in medium hardening (∼46%), and China A508-3(2) steels had the least hardening (∼10%). Under 3 MeV Fe ions irradiation (peak damage up to 1.37 dpa), both China A508-3(1) and 16MND5 steels showed the same hardening (∼26%). The sequence of irradiation tolerance for these materials is China A508-3(2) > 16MND5 ≈ China A508-3(1) > Fe-1.0wt.%Cu. Based on the determination of the transition depth, the nominal hardness H0irr was also calculated by Kasada method.

  13. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenberg, Ellen M.; Jaques, Brian J.; Sencer, Bulent H.; Garner, Frank A.; Freyer, Paula D.; Okita, Taira; Butt, Darryl P.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. An effective tensile strain hardening exponent was also obtained from the data which shows a relative decrease in ductility of steel with increased irradiation damage. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  14. Reweldability test of irradiated SS316 by the TIG welding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Oyamada, Rokuro

    1996-10-01

    Stainless steel is a candidate material for the structural material in fusion reactors. Rewelding of irradiated materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of in-vessel components. In the present work, the welding specimens made of type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in JMTR (Japan materials testing reactor) to a fast neutron fluence of ˜2.0 × 10 20 n/cm 2 ( E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of ˜200°C. The rewelding of unirradiated and/or irradiated stainless steel was performed by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method and the weldments of unirradiated and/or irradiated SS316 were characterized by tensile testing (test temp.: 20°C and 200°C), hardness, metallographical observation and SEM/XMA analyses.

  15. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  16. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  17. Small punch testing for irradiation embrittlement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses are used to evaluate nuclear reactor vessel integrity. These analyses require knowledge of a range of vessel material mechanical properties, particularly fracture properties. Estimation of vessel material fracture properties is currently made indirectly via correlations between embrittlement and vessel steel chemistry and neutron fluence, and by standard Charpy testing (for transition temperature or RT{sub NDT}) of surveillance material. The small punch test approach is a miniature specimen mechanical test which, based on accumulated experience with fossil plant steels, shows significant application potential for in-service nuclear reactor vessel irradiation embrittlement evaluation. The small punch test specimen is small enough to potentially overcome the surveillance material availability problem (30 small punch test specimens can be easily removed from a single standard half-Charpy bar) and even permit a direct vessel material interrogation by non-disruptive removal of miniature samples from the vessel. An immediate, near-term benefit of the small punch test approach will be the conservation of surveillance material. The results of preliminary feasibility testing on a heat of reactor vessel steel weld metal in the unirradiated, irradiated, and irradiated + annealed conditions show that the small punch test transition temperature correlates with the standard Charpy transition temperature. In addition, application of the small punch test-based fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}, J{sub Ic}) estimation method developed on a previous EPRI project (RP2426-38) produced toughness estimates for the irradiated steel within the {+-}25% accuracy range demonstrated on RP2426-38. The results show that the small punch test can be a viable means of evaluating irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. Recommendations are provided for further developing the test method for this application.

  18. In-service irradiated and aged material evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this task is to provide a direct assessment of actual material properties in irradiated components of nuclear reactors, including the effects of irradiation and aging. Four activities are currently in progress: (1) establishing a machining capability for contaminated or activated materials by completing procurement and installation of a computer-based milling machine in a hot cell; (2) machining and testing specimens from cladding materials removed from the Gundremmingen reactor to establish their fracture properties; (3) preparing an interpretive report on the effects of neutron irradiation on cladding; and (4) continuing the evaluation of long-term aging of austenitic structural stainless steel weld metal by metallurgically examining and testing specimens aged at 288 and 343{degrees}C and reporting the results, as well as by continuing the aging of the stainless steel cladding toward a total time of 50,000 h.

  19. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  20. Glass Stronger than Steel

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  1. Cobalt free maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Floreen, S.

    1984-04-17

    The subject invention is directed to ferrous-base alloys, particularly to a cobalt-free maraging steel of novel chemistry characterized by a desired combination of strength and toughness, notwithstanding that cobalt is non-essential.

  2. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  3. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  4. Life after Steel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Bobby Curran grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, finished high school, and followed his grandfather's steel-toed bootprints straight to Sparrows Point, a 3,000-acre sprawl of industry on the Chesapeake Bay. College was not part of the plan. A gritty but well-paying job at the RG Steel plant was Mr. Curran's ticket to a secure…

  5. Microstructural probing of ferritic/martensitic steels using internal transmutation-based positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Dai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the use of an internal 44Ti/44Sc radioisotope source for a direct microstructural characterization of ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels after irradiation in targets of spallation neutron sources. Gamma spectroscopy measurements show a production of ∼1MBq of 44Ti per 1 g of f/m steels irradiated at 1 dpa (displaced per atom) in the mixed proton-neutron spectrum at the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ). In the decay chain 44Ti → 44Sc → 44Ca, positrons are produced together with prompt gamma rays which enable the application of different positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) analyses, including lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Due to the high production yield, long half-life and relatively high energy of positrons of 44Ti, this methodology opens up new potential for simple, effective and inexpensive characterization of radiation induced defects in f/m steels irradiated in a spallation target.

  6. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  7. Final Report on MEGAPIE Target Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Dai

    2015-06-30

    Megawatt pilot experiment (MEGAPIE) was successfully performed in 2006. One of the important goals of MEGAPIE is to understand the behaviour of structural materials of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in flowing LBE (liquid lead-bismuth eutectic) environment by conducting post-irradiation examination (PIE). The PIE includes four major parts: non-destructive test, radiochemical analysis of production and distribution of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE, analysis of LBE corrosion effects on structural materials, T91 and SS 316L steels, and mechanical testing of the T91 and SS 316L steels irradiated in the lower part of the target. The non-destructive test (NDT) including visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement was performed in the proton beam window area of the T91 calotte of the LBE container, the most intensively irradiated part of the MEGAPIE target. The visual inspection showed no visible failure and the ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in thickness in the beam window area. Gamma mapping was also performed in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The gamma mapping results were used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. Radiochemical analysis of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE is to improve the understanding of the production and distribution of radionuclides in the target. The results demonstrate that the radionuclides of noble metals, 207Bi, 194Hg/Au are rather homogeneously distributed within the target, while radionuclides of electropositive elements are found to be deposited on the steel-LBE interface. The corrosion effect of LBE on the structural components under intensive irradiation was investigated by metallography. The results show that no evident corrosion damages. However, unexpected deep

  8. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  9. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  10. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  11. Glow discharge cleaning of carbon fiber composite and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A.; Begrambekov, L.; Brémond, S.; Douai, D.; Kuzmin, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergasov, S.

    2011-08-01

    The paper experimentally investigates and analyses the features and mechanisms of both of oxygen removal by deuterium glow discharge from CFC, pyrolytic graphite and stainless steel subjected to irradiation in oxygen contaminated plasma. It is shown that oxygen implanted in pyrolytic graphite (PG) perpendicular to basal plates is removed after sputtering the layer slightly thicker than oxygen stopping zone (≈2 nm). Fast deuterium ions penetrating into CFC during GDC transfer the trapped oxygen atoms into the bulk. Thus, much thicker surface layer has to be removed (500-1000 nm) for oxygen release. Irradiation of stainless steel in plasma leads to formation of a barrier layer with thickness (2-4 nm) equal, or slightly higher than stopping range of oxygen ions. The layer accumulates the main fraction of implanted oxygen and prevents its penetration into the bulk. After barrier layer sputtering oxygen spreads into the bulk. Parameters and conditions of optimum GDC are discussed.

  12. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Was, G. S.; Jiao, Z.; Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Maloy, S. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Sencer, B. H.; Hackett, M.

    2014-06-14

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide,more » irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiation and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiation establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiation to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.« less

  13. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G. S.; Jiao, Z.; Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Maloy, S. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Sencer, B. H.; Hackett, M.

    2014-06-14

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiation and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiation establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiation to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  14. Profiles in garbage: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1998-02-01

    Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. With less tin use in steel cans, the importance of the detinning market has declined substantially. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  15. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - neutron embrittlement.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  16. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, Kiyoyuki

    1994-12-31

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 or 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the test temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging than at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. Ferritic-martensitic steels are embrittled by the irradiation, and show the lowest toughness at room temperature.

  17. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - Neutron embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  18. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  19. Irradiation creep relaxation of void swelling-driven stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Swelling-driven-creep test specimens are used to measure the compressive stresses that develop due to constraint of irradiation void swelling. These specimens use a previously non-irradiated 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel holder to axially restrain two Type 304 stainless steel tubular specimens that were previously irradiated in the US Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) at 490 °C. One specimen was previously irradiated to fluence levels in the void nucleation regime (9 dpa) and the other in the quasi-steady void growth regime (28 dpa). A lift-off compliance measurement technique was used post-irradiation to determine compressive stresses developed during reirradiation of the two specimen assemblies in Row 7 of EBR-II at temperatures of 547 °C and 504 °C, respectively, to additional damage levels each of about 5 dpa. Results obtained on the higher fluence swelling-driven-creep specimen show that compressive stress due to constraint of swelling retards void swelling to a degree that is consistent with active load uniaxial compression specimens that were irradiated as part of a previously reported multiaxial in-reactor creep experiment. Swelling results obtained on the lower fluence swelling-driven creep specimen show a much larger effect of compressive stress in reducing swelling, demonstrating that the larger effect of stress on swelling is on void nucleation as compared to void growth. Test results are analyzed using a recently proposed multiaxial creep-swelling model.

  20. View northwest, wharf A, sheet steel bulkhead, steel lift tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northwest, wharf A, sheet steel bulkhead, steel lift tower - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  1. Recent Progress of R&D Activities on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Baluc, N.; Dai, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Konys, J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lindau, R.; Muroga, T.; Odette, George R.; Raj, B.; Stoller, Roger E.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Tavassoli, A,-A.F.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wan, F.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-03

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER TBM and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical porperties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation with different TBM and DEMO options

  2. Effect of Ni content on thermal and radiation resistance of VVER RPV steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Frolov, A. S.; Fedotova, S. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper thermal stability and radiation resistance of VVER-type RPV steels for pressure vessels of advanced reactors with different nickel content were studied. A complex of microstructural studies and mechanical tests of the steels in different states (after long thermal exposures, provoking embrittling heat treatment and accelerated neutron irradiation) was carried out. It is shown that nickel content (other things being equal) determines the extent of materials degradation under influence of operational factors: steels with a lower nickel concentration demonstrate a higher thermal stability and radiation resistance.

  3. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-12-31

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV.

  4. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  5. Process mapping of laser surface modification of AISI 316L stainless steel for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikarakara, Evans; Naher, Sumsun; Brabazon, Dermot

    2010-11-01

    A 1.5-kW CO2 laser in pulsed mode at 3 kHz was used to investigate the effects of varied laser process parameters and resulting morphology of AISI 316L stainless steel. Irradiance and residence time were varied between 7.9 to 23.6 MW/cm2 and 50 to 167 μs, respectively. A strong correlation between irradiance, residence time, depth of processing and roughness of processed steel was established. The high depth of altered microstructure and increased roughness were linked to higher levels of both irradiance and residence times. Energy fluence and surface temperature models were used to predict levels of melting occurring on the surface through the analysis of roughness and depth of the region processed. Microstructural images captured by the SEM revealed significant grain structure changes at higher irradiances, but due to increased residence times, limited to the laser in use, the hardness values were not improved.

  6. Helium-induced weld cracking in irradiated 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, A.K. )

    1989-01-01

    This report consists of slide notes for presentation to The Metallurgical Society of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (AIME). The meeting in question will be held October 3, 1989 in Indianapolis. This presentation will be the second of three consecutive talks contributed by SRL personnel dealing with helium-induced weld cracking.

  7. Continuous steel production and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Peaslee, Kent D.; Peter, Jorg J.; Robertson, David G. C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Zhang, Lifeng

    2009-11-17

    A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

  8. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  9. Alloyed steel wastes utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Alloyed steel chips and swarf formed during metal processing are looked upon as additional raw materials in metallurgical production. This paper presents some new methods for steel waste chips and swarf cleaning. One of them is swarf and steel chips cleaning in tetrachloroethylene with ultrasonic assistance and solvent regeneration. Thermal cleaning of waste chips and swarf provides off gas products utilization. The catalyst influence of the metal surface on the thermal decomposition of liquid hydrocarbons during the cleaning process has been studied. It has been determined that the efficiency of this metal waste cleaning technique depends on the storage time of the swarf. The waste chips and swarf cleaning procedures have been proven to be economically advantageous and environmentally appropriate.

  10. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  11. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at <0.3 T M ( T M is melting temperature) and up to 10 dpa (displacement per atom). Ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  12. Summary of the U.S. specimen matrix for the HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1998-03-01

    The US specimen matrix for the collaborative DOE/Monbusho HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule contains two ceramics and 29 different metals, including vanadium alloys, ferritic/martensitic steels, pure iron, austenitic stainless steels, nickel alloys, and copper alloys. This experiment is designed to provide fundamental information on the effects of brief low-temperature excursions on the tensile properties and microstructural evolution of a wide range of materials irradiated at nominal temperatures of 350 and 500 C to a dose of {approximately}5 dpa. A total of 340 miniature sheet tensile specimens and 274 TEM disks are included in the US-supplied matrix for the irradiation capsule.

  13. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  14. A review of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P.

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this review is to assess from the available data whether irradiation in PWR primary water can adversely affect the properties of stainless steels due to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). The following aspects are examined: (i) Irradiation damage of the material, (ii) The influence of water radiolysis. Since the irradiation damage processes are similar for both PWR and BWR systems, differences observed in the intergranular cracking properties of core components of both systems must be attributable to differences in the synergistic interactions with the coolant chemistry. These aspects are analysed in detail to determine to what extent BWR experience can be used to predict IASCC in PWR core components. Several related potential failure mechanisms are also reviewed such as radiation hardening, radiation creep and helium or hydrogen embrittlement. The probable role of some or all of these failure mechanisms in core component failures observed to date, and in experiments ostensibly designed to observe IASCC, is critically examined.

  15. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-01

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2-8 × 10-6 dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  16. Preliminary report on the irradiation conditions of the HFIR JP-23 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to irradiate a series of alloys over the temperature range 300 to 600{degrees}C to approximately 10 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The alloys covered a wide range of materials and treatments. The Japanese specimen matrix consisted of ferritic steels, vanadium alloys, copper alloys, molybdenum alloys, and titanium-aluminum compounds. The US specimen matrix consisted of vanadium alloys, 316 stainless steels, and isotopically tailored ferritic and austenitic alloys.

  17. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  18. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  19. Irradiation creep behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloys irradiated in a liquid sodium environment at the JOYO fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Matsui, Hideki; Narui, Minoru; Yamazaki, Masanori

    2013-06-01

    Irradiation experiments on V-4Cr-4Ti alloys with sodium-enclosed irradiation capsules in the JOYO fast reactor were conducted using pressurized creep tubes (PCTs). The irradiation creep strain was significantly larger than the thermal creep strain below 686 °C, but there was no swelling of the neutron-irradiated V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. At temperatures below 500 °C, the irradiation creep was found to be proportional to the square root of the neutron dose and linear with the stress level. Above 500 °C, it was expected to be proportional to the stress level to a power greater than unity, because the irradiation creep mechanism could change from the stress-induced preferred absorption mechanism (SIPA) to the preferred absorption glide mechanism (PGA). By comparing annealed PCT specimens with cold-worked specimens, the cold-worked V-4Cr-4Ti alloys exhibited a larger irradiation creep strain compared with the annealed alloys. The irradiation creep compliance of the V-4Cr-4Ti alloys were ˜10 × 10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 below 500 °C and 50-200 × 10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 above 500 °C, a value greater than that of commercial V-4Cr-4Ti alloys, austenitic steels and ferritic steels.

  20. Special steel production on common carbon steel production line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Huachun; Han, Jingtao; Hu, Haiping; Bian, Ruisheng; Kang, Jianjun; Xu, Manlin

    2004-06-01

    The equipment and technology of small bar tandem rolling line of Shijiazhuang Iron & Steel Co. in China has reached the 90's international advanced level in the 20th century, but products on the line are mostly of common carbon steel. Currently there are few steel plants in China to produce 45 steel bars for cold drawing, which is a kind of shortage product. Development of 45 steel for cold drawing has a wide market outlook in China. In this paper, continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curve of 45 steel for cold drawing used for rolling was set out first. According to the CCT curve, we determined some key temperature points such as Ac3 temperature and Ac1 temperature during the cooling procedure and discussed the precipitation microstructure at different cooling rate. Then by studying thermal treatment process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing, the influence of cooling time on microstructure was analyzed and the optimum cooling speed has been found. All results concluded from the above studies are the basis of regulating controlled cooling process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing. Finally, the feasible production process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing on common carbon steel production line combined with the field condition was recommended.