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Sample records for fe-containing zeolite catalysts

  1. Improved zeolitic isocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, A.J.; Habib, M.M.; Moore, R.O.; Law, D.V.; Convery, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Chevron Research Company introduced the first low pressure, low temperature catalytic hydrocracking process--ISOCRACKING--in 1959. Within the last four years, Chevron has developed and commercialized three new zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalysts. ICR 209 is Chevron`s latest noble metal ISOCRACKING catalyst. It offers improved liquid yield stability, longer life, and superior polynuclear aromatics control compared to its predecessor. ICR 209`s high hydrogenation activity generates the highest yields of superior quality jet fuel of any zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalyst. The second new ISOCRACKING catalyst, ICR 208, is a base metal catalyst which combines high liquid selectivity and high light naphtha octane in hydrocrackers operating for maximum naphtha production. ICR 210 is another new base metal catalyst which offers higher liquid yields and longer life than ICR 208 by virtue of a higher hydrogenation-to-acidity ratio. Both ICR 208 and ICR 210 have been formulated to provide higher liquid yield throughout the cycle and longer cycle length than conventional base metal/zeolite catalysts. This paper will discuss the pilot plant and commercial performances of these new ISOCRACKING catalysts.

  2. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  3. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  4. Cracking process with catalyst of combined zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E. M.; Winter, W. E.

    1981-09-01

    A hydrocarbon cracking catalyst comprises an ultrastable y-type crystalline zeolite, a small pore crystalline zeolite such as mordenite, an inorganic oxide matrix and, optionally, a porous inert component. The cracking catalyst has a high activity and selectivity for the production of high octane naphtha fractions from higher boiling point hydrocarbonaceous oils. Catalytic cracking processes utilizing the catalyst are also provided.

  5. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  6. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  7. Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-26

    This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

  8. Zeolites as catalysts in oil refining.

    PubMed

    Primo, Ana; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-11-21

    Oil is nowadays the main energy source and this prevalent position most probably will continue in the next decades. This situation is largely due to the degree of maturity that has been achieved in oil refining and petrochemistry as a consequence of the large effort in research and innovation. The remarkable efficiency of oil refining is largely based on the use of zeolites as catalysts. The use of zeolites as catalysts in refining and petrochemistry has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in the chemistry of the XXth century. In this tutorial review, the introductory part describes the main features of zeolites in connection with their use as solid acids. The main body of the review describes important refining processes in which zeolites are used including light naphtha isomerization, olefin alkylation, reforming, cracking and hydrocracking. The final section contains our view on future developments in the field such as the increase in the quality of the transportation fuels and the coprocessing of increasing percentage of biofuels together with oil streams. This review is intended to provide the rudiments of zeolite science applied to refining catalysis. PMID:24671148

  9. Bound zeolite catalyst and process for using the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.L.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.; Funk, W.G.; Steger, J.J.; Fung, S.C.; Cross, V.R.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for reforming naphtha. The process comprises (a) contacting the naphtha in the presence of hydrogen at elevated temperatures with a catalyst comprising a binder, a type L zeolite containing exchangeable cations of which at least 75% are selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, calcium and barium, at least one Group VIII noble metal, the particles of which are well dispersed over the surface of the catalyst and at least 90% of the noble metal associated with the zeolite is in the form of particles having a diameter of less than about 7 A; and (b) recovering reformed product.

  10. Chemical Interactions in Multimetal/Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.

    2004-04-16

    This two-year project has led to a significant improvement in the fundamental understanding of the catalytic action of zeolite-supported redox catalysts. It turned out to be essential that we could combine four strategies for the preparation of catalysts containing transition metal (TM) ions in zeolite cavities: (1) ion exchange from aqueous solution; (2) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a volatile halide onto a zeolite in its acidic form; (3) solid state ion exchange; and (4) hydrothermal synthesis of a zeolite having TM ions in its lattice, followed by a treatment transporting these ions to ''guest positions''. Technique (2) enables us to position more TM ions into cavities than permitted by the conventional technique (1).viz one positive charge per Al centered tetrahedron in the zeolite lattice. The additional charge is compensated by ligands to the TM ions, for instance in oxo-ions such as (GaO){sup +} or dinuclear [Cu-O-Cu]{sup 2+}. While technique (3) is preferred over CVD where volatile halides are not available, technique (4) leads to rather isolated ''ex lattice'' oxo-ions. Such oxo-ions tend to be mono-nuclear, in contrast to technique (2) which preferentially creates dinuclear oxo-ions of the same TM element. A favorable element for the present research was that the PI is also actively engaged in a project on the reduction of nitrogen oxides, sponsored by EMSI program of the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy, Office of Science. This combination created a unique opportunity to test and analyze catalysts for the one step oxidation of benzene to phenol and compare them with catalysts for the reduction of nitrogen oxides, using hydrocarbons as the reductant. In both projects catalysts have been used which contain Fe ions or oxo-ions in the cavities the zeolite MFI, often called ZSM-5. With Fe as the TM-element and MFI as the host zeolite we found that catalysts with high Fe content, prepared by technique (2) were optimal for the

  11. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-12-21

    Research is proposed on two groups of zeolite based catalysts that contain two transition elements. In one group both metals are fully reduced, in the other group one element is left as a positive ion; it can act as a chemical anchor'', or as a catalyst promoter for the reduced metal. The objective is to explore the potential of such materials for designing superior catalysts for synthesis and conversion of hydrocarbons and other energy carriers. ENDOR, EXAFS, CO-FTIR and TPD will be used to identify the interaction of Mn[sup 2+] ions with Rh[sub n] particles in the same zeolite cage. EXAFS at the Kedge of Fe and Pd, FTIR and Moessbauer spectroscopy will be used to characterize Fe ions and alloyed Fe atoms in PdFe/NaHY. The catalysts will be probed with CO hydrogenation and conversion of hydrocarbons. Methods Which proved successful in our study of Y supported bimetal systems will be applied to identify the state of Pt and Cu in ZSM-5, a catalyst system holding large promise for NO abatement, even in the presence of oxygen.

  12. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    Mechanistic explanations have been found for the migration of atoms and ions through the zeolite channels leading to specific distribution of ions and the metal clusters. In this report, we summarize the state of understanding attained on a number of topics in the area of mono- and multimetal/zeolite systems, to which our recent research has made significant contributions. The following topics are discussed: (1) Formation of isolated metal atoms in sodalite cages; (2) differences of metal/zeolite systems prepared by ion reduction in channels or via isolated atoms; (3) rejuvenation of Pd/NaY and Pd/HY catalysts by oxidative redispersion of the metal; (4) formation of mono- or bimetal particles in zeolites by programmed reductive decomposition of volatile metal complexes; (5) cation-cation interaction as a cause of enhanced reducibility; (6) formation of palladium carbonyl clusters in supercages; (7) enhanced catalytic activity of metal particle-proton complexes for hydrocarbon conversion reactions; (8) stereoselectivity of catalytic reactions due to geometric constraints of particles in cages.

  13. The role of zeolite in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over cobalt-zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sineva, L. V.; Asalieva, E. Yu; Mordkovich, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The review deals with the specifics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for the one-stage syncrude production from CO and H2 in the presence of cobalt-zeolite catalytic systems. Different types of bifunctional catalysts (hybrid, composite) combining a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and zeolite are reviewed. Special attention focuses on the mechanisms of transformations of hydrocarbons produced in the Fischer-Tropsch process on zeolite acid sites under the synthesis conditions. The bibliography includes 142 references.

  14. Towards liquid fuels from biosyngas: effect of zeolite structure in hierarchical-zeolite-supported cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sartipi, Sina; Alberts, Margje; Meijerink, Mark J; Keller, Tobias C; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek

    2013-09-01

    Wax on, wax off: Bifunctional cobalt-based catalysts on zeolite supports are applied for the valorization of biosyngas through Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. By using these catalysts, waxes can be hydrocracked to shorter-chain hydrocarbons, increasing the selectivity towards the C5 -C11 (gasoline) fraction. The zeolite topology and the amount and strength of acid sites are key parameters to maximize the performance of these bifunctional catalysts, steering Fischer-Tropsch product selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons. PMID:23765635

  15. Upgrading of coal-derived liquids. 1. Catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts and commercial HDS catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, R.; Hara, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yokoyama, S.; Nakata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Maekawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of various zeolite catalysts and commercial hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts to the secondary hydrotreatment of coal-derived liquids was examined in relation to the chemical structure of upgraded liquids. The catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts for HI conversion is lower than are the activities of Ni-Mo, Ni-Co-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. However, as regards hydrogenation and the removal of nitrogen, zeolite catalysts such as natural clinoptilolite and mordenite have almost the same activity as do Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. As to the removal of oxygen, it was proved that zeolite catalysts had a functionality to remove oxygen as CO/sub x/ gas, and HDS catalysts had a high activity for hydrodeoxygenation. 10 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  16. An analysis of commerical zeolite catalysts by multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, L.

    1990-09-21

    This work involves studying two commercial hydrocracking catalysts by solid state multinuclear NMR silicon 29 and aluminum 27 with the goal of developing a method of determining the fraction zeolite in the catalysts. The zeolite fraction is known to be one of the faujasite zeolites type X or Y. The clay matrix of the catalyst is assumed to be kaolinite. Fresh, air-exposed commercial hydrocracking catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. Sample 33351-86 was known to be a physical mixture of a Y zeolite and a clay matrix. The other catalyst, 33351-20, was composed of a faujasite zeolite grown within a clay matrix. Both were suspected of being about 20 wt % zeolite. Nothing is known about the state of pretreatment or cation exchange. A portion of each catalyst was calcined in a porcelain crucible in air at 500{degree}C for two hours with a hour heating ramp preceding and a two hour cooling ramp following calcination. 64 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    For Pt/NaY catalysts our analysis of the mechanism of metal particle formation has enabled us to produce at will samples which contain either the majority of the Pt particles in supercages, without filling these cages completely, or the Pt particles bulge into neighboring cages. The catalytic selectivity is distinctly different for these preparations, in the former case molecules can enter a supercage which is partially filled by the Pt cluster, in the second case adsorption takes place through the cage window. Applying the same principles of catalyst preparation of bimetallic catalysts enables us to produce PtCu particles in supercages of NaY, which contain, initially a Pt core, surrounded by a Cu mantle. Earlier we have found that Ni ions migrate into hexagonal prisms during calcination of Ni/NaY; this process can be partially suppressed by first filling these prisms with Mn or Cr ions. In more recent work we found that addition of Pt strongly lowers the temperature of Ni reduction. Part of the Ni ions is reduced by hydrogen while still inside the smaller cages. This reduction process is, however, reversible; at elevated temperature and in an inert atmosphere protons re-oxidize the Ni atoms and dihydrogen gas is developed. In this way it seems possible to count the Ni atoms in small cages. The calcination stage in the preparation of zeolite supported metals has been studied in considerable detail for Pd/NaY. The Pd is introduced as a tetrammin complex; during calcination the ammine ligands are successively oxidized. Once three ammine ligands are destroyed, the Pd ions which carry only one ligand, surprisingly jump from the supercages to the sodalite cage.

  18. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose Using Nano Zeolite and Zeolite/Matrix Catalysts in a GC/Micro-Pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose, as a model compound of biomass, was catalyzed over zeolite (HY,.HZSM-5) and zeolite/matrix (HY/Clay, HM/Clay) in a GC/micro-pyrolyzer at 500 degrees C, to produce the valuable products. The catalysts used were pure zeolite and zeolite/matrix including 20 wt% matrix content, which were prepared into different particle sizes (average size; 0.1 mm, 1.6 mm) to study the effect of the particle size of the catalyst for the distribution of product yields. Catalytic pyrolysis had much more volatile products as light components and less content of sugars than pyrolysis only. This phenomenon was strongly influenced by the particle size of the catalyst in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Also, in zeolite and zeolite/matrix catalysts the zeolite type gave the dominant impact on the distribution of product yields. PMID:27483802

  19. Destructive hydroisomerization of naphtha cuts over zeolitic nickel aluminosilicate catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Abad-zade, K.I.; Rustamov, M.I.

    1987-05-01

    The authors discuss a process developed for hydroisomerization of low-octane naphtha cuts with the aim of obtaining light isoparaffinic hydrocarbons. A zeolitic Ni-Al-Si catalyst with highly dispersed nickel was synthesized. The characteristics of the naphtha cuts used are provided. Data is given on the influence of temperature on destructive hydroisomerization of the 85-195/sup 0/C cut. It is found that the zeolitic Ni-Al-Si catalyst is adequate in activity so that the naphtha cut can be subjected to thorough destructive hydroisomerization through an ionic mechanism with little formation of C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ hydrocarbons.

  20. Catalytic desulfurization of organic sulfur compounds over zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka, M.; Aomura, K.

    1980-03-01

    Various kinds of zeolites, such as Na-zeolites, MeY and HY, showed catalytic activity for the dehydrosulfurization of ethanethiol. The catalytic activity of MeY in the dehydrosulfurization of ethanethiol at 400/sup 0/C was changed by the kind of metal ions in the zeolites and a volcano shape order was observed between the catalytic activity and the electronegativity, Xi, of the metal ions. The order of the catalytic activity was NaX>NaY>NaA. The changes in the activity of HY in ethanethiol dehydrosulfurization and cumene dealkylation by calcination agreed with the decrease in the Bronsted acidity determined by Ward but was independent of Lewis acidity. Me/sup 0/Y, such as Co/sup 0/Y, Ni/sup 0/Y, Cu/sup 0/Y and Ag/sup 0/Y, showed higher catalytic activity than a commercial hydrodesulfurization catalyst and the order of the activity was Ni/sup 0/Y>Co/sup 0/Y>Cu/sup 0/Y>Ag/sup 0/Y. Reduced and presulfided Me/sup 0/Y zeolites showed selective hydrodesulfurization activity for thiophene. The remarkable promoting effect of NiO and MoO/sub 3/ upon the catalytic activity of Me/sup 0/Y was not observed in the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene. Zeolite catalysts have a possibility of use as effective hydrodesulfurization catalysts for petroleum if further improvement in catalyst deactivation of Me/sup 0/Y zeolite is accomplished. The investigation of the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene over Me/sup 0/Y zeolites would become a good model to clarify the mechanism of the hydrodesulfurization of petroleum.

  1. Adsorption of methanol in zeolite, gallosilicate and SAPO catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limtrakul, Jumras

    1995-04-01

    Methanol adsorption in zeolite, gallosilicate and silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) catalysts has been investigated within the framework of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. Full optimization of all cluster models and their complexes has been carried out at the DZP/SCF level of theory. Physisorbed methanol and methoxonium cation complexed to the framework catalyst are found for SAPO catalysts, the latter complexes are observed only at high coverages, while only hydrogen-bonded physisorbed methanol complexes are obtained for gallosilicates and zeolitic catalysts. The conversion energy of the hydrogen-bonded physisorbed structure, H 3SiOHAl(OH) 2OPH 3/[CH 3OH] 2 to the methoxonium structure, H 3SiOAl(OH) 2OPH 3]/[CH 3OH 2+][CH 3OH], is about 6.69 kcal/mol. Comparison with hydrogen halides and related complexes of methanol shows that protonated SAPO/methanol is a very strong acid.

  2. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    This report treats four subject areas: PtCu/NaY and Pd/Cu/NaY catalysts; reducibility of Ni in PdNi/NaY catalysts; CO hydrogenation over PdNi/NaY catalysts; and PdFe/NaY, Ga/H-ZSM5 and PtGa/H-ZSM5 catalysts.

  3. Synthesis H-Zeolite catalyst by impregnation KI/KIO3 and performance test catalyst for biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayat, W.; Rizky Wicaksono, Adit; Hakim Firdaus, Lukman; Okvitarini, Ndaru

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this research is to produce H-catalyst catalyst that was impregnated with KI/KIO3. The catalyst was analyzed about surface area, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and performance test of catalyst for biodiesel production. An H-Zeolite catalyst was synthesized from natural zeolite with chemical treatment processing, impregnation KI/KIO3 and physical treatment. The results shows that the surface area of the catalyst by 27.236 m2/g at a concentration of 5% KI. XRD analysis shows peak 2-θ at 23.627o indicating that KI was impregnated on H-zeolite catalyst. The catalyst was tested in production of biodiesel using palm oil with conventional methods for 3 hour at temperature of 70-80 oC. The result for conversion Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) reached maximum value on 87.91% under production process using catalyst 5% KIO3-H zeolite.

  4. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  5. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  6. Mechanochemical approach for selective deactivation of external surface acidity of ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi; Sato, Koki; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Tatami, Junichi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Wakihara, Toru

    2015-03-01

    The acid sites associated with the external surface of zeolite particles are responsible for undesirable consecutive reactions, such as isomerization, alkylation, and oligomerization, resulting in a lower selectivity to a target product; therefore, the selective modification (deactivation) of the external surface of zeolite particles has been an important issue in zeolite science. Here, a new method for surface deactivation of zeolite catalyst was tested via a mechanochemical approach using powder composer. Postsynthetic mechanochemical treatment of ZSM-5 zeolite causes a selective deactivation of catalytically active sites existing only on the external surface, as a potentially useful catalyst for highly selective production of p-xylene. PMID:25654542

  7. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  8. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs. PMID:26544169

  9. Selective Ring Opening of 1-Methylnaphthalene Over NiW-Supported Catalyst Using Dealuminated Beta Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Sang; Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Rang; Kim, Joo-Wan; Kim, Tae-Wan; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ung; Lee, Chang-Ha; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Nanoporous Beta zeolite was dealuminated by weak acid treatment for reducing the acidity. Bi-functional catalysts were prepared using commercial Beta zeolites and the dealuminated zeolites for acidic function, NiW for metallic function. 1-Methylnaphthalene was selected as a model compound for multi-ring aromatics in heavy oil, and its selective ring opening reaction has been investigated using the prepared bi-functional catalysts with different acidity in fixed bed reaction system. The dealuminated Beta zeolites, which crystal structure and nanoporosity were maintained, showed the higher SiO2/Al2O3 ratio and smaller acidity than their original zeolite. NiW-supported catalyst using the dealuminated Beta zeolite with SiO2/Al203 mole ratio of 55 showed the highest performance for the selective ring opening. The acidity of catalyst seemed to play an important role as active sites for the selective ring opening of 1-methylnaphthalene but there should be some optimum catalyst acidity for the reaction. The acidity of Beta zeolite could be controlled by the acid treatment and the catalyst with the optimum acidity for the selective ring opening could be prepared. PMID:27433655

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF TRANSITION METAL OXIDE-ZEOLITE CATALYSTS TO CONTROL CHLORINATED VOC AIR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of transition metal oxide (TMO)-zeolite oxidation catalysts to control chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) air emissions. esearch has been initiated to enhance the utility of these catalysts by the development of a sorption-catalyst sy...

  11. Nanocrystalline SSZ-39 zeolite as an efficient catalyst for the methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process.

    PubMed

    Martín, Nuria; Li, Zhibin; Martínez-Triguero, Joaquín; Yu, Jihong; Moliner, Manuel; Corma, Avelino

    2016-04-26

    The synthesis of nanosized SSZ-39 zeolite has been achieved using a high silica FAU zeolite as the Si and Al source and tetraethylphosphonium (TEP) cations as OSDAs. The obtained SSZ-39 material shows a remarkably high catalyst lifetime compared to conventional SSZ-13 and SSZ-39 materials. PMID:26947336

  12. "Decoking" of a "coked" zeolite catalyst in a glow discharge.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Al-Jalal, A A; Bakhtiari, I A

    2003-09-01

    "Decoking" of a "coked" zeolite catalyst in a glow discharge in oxygen is investigated. The "decoking" process involves reactions of atomic oxygen (O atoms) with "coke" and yields gases such as CO, CO(2) as well as other gaseous products that could be easily pumped out. Three different modes of discharge were investigated including a static mode, a flowing-gas mode, and a periodic-purge mode where the oxygen and other gaseous products of the discharge were replaced by fresh O(2)gas after short but regular intervals of time. In some cases, additional heating was also used to provide base temperatures of the order of 100 degrees C to facilitate penetration of oxygen atoms into the inner layers and cages of the zeolite catalyst. This paper presents some results of spectroscopic analytical techniques used to monitor the atomization of oxygen, oxidation of "coke", and to confirm the process of "decoking". More specifically, radiation emission on the 3 s (5)S- 3p (5)P transitions of O around 777.2-777.5 nm were selected for monitoring the atomization of O(2). On the other hand, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the amount of residual carbon and extent of "decoking". Furthermore, evolution of CO and CO(2) gases as a function of time was systematically monitored in real time. For CO, the 451.1 nm band head belonging to the B(1) Sigma - A(1) Pi bands of the Angstrom system of the CO spectrum was used, while for CO(2), the band head at 353.4 nm belonging to the CO(2)(+) spectrum was used. The rates of evolution of CO and CO(2) were related to the rate of "decoking" of the catalyst. It is noted that in the periodic-purge mode, about 63% of the total yield of CO from a given sample of the catalyst appears in the first 3-min exposure to discharge whereas it takes up to 15 min to remove nearly 94% of the removable carbon under our experimental conditions. PMID:12861433

  13. Catalytic conversion of palm oil to hydrocarbons: Performance of various zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Twaiq, F.A.; Zabidi, N.A.M.; Bhatia, S.

    1999-09-01

    The catalytic cracking of palm oil to fuels was studied in a fixed bed microreactor operated at atmospheric pressure, a reaction temperature of 350--450 C and weight hourly space velocities (WHSVs) of 1--4 h{sup {minus}1}. HZSM-5, zeolite {beta}, and ultrastable Y (USY) zeolites with different pore sizes were used to study the effects of reaction temperature and WHSV on the conversion of palm oil and yields of gasoline. The performances of HZSM-5-USY and HZSM-5-zeolite {beta} hybrid catalysts containing 10, 20, and 30 wt % HZSM-5 were investigated. Potassium-impregnated K-HZSM-5 catalysts with different potassium loadings were used to study the effect of acidity on the selectivity for gasoline formation. The major products obtained were organic liquid product (OLP), hydrocarbon gases, and water. HZSM-5 catalyst gave conversion of 99 wt % and a gasoline yield of 28 wt % at a reaction temperature of 350 C and WHSV of 1 h{sup {minus}1} and was the best among the three zeolites tested. The HZSM-5-USY hybrid catalyst performed better than USY catalyst as it resulted in a higher gasoline yield, whereas HZSM-5-zeolite {beta} hybrid catalyst gave lower conversion compared to that of zeolite {beta}. The selectivity for gasoline decreased from 45 to 10 wt % with an increase in potassium concentration from 0 to 1.5 wt %.

  14. The general mathematical model of CO oxidation reaction over Pd-zeolite catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkina, E. S.; Tolstunova, E. D.

    2001-10-01

    A new distributed mathematical model of reaction of CO oxidation over Pd-zeolite catalyst is presented. The model takes into account passing of the reactant flow through the catalyst layer, diffusion in pores of zeolite matrix, reaction on the surface of embedded Pd clusters, heat effect of the reaction, heat and mass transfer across the catalyst layer. Reaction on the Pd clusters is described by the new point model suggested herein. The model admits the existence of regular, chaotic and mixed-mode oscillations at the values of the parameters close to the experimental conditions.

  15. Effect of the formation of secondary pores in zeolite ZSM-5 on the properties of molybdenum-zeolite catalysts for methane aromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    A study is performed of 4% Mo/ZSM-5 (30) catalysts for methane aromatization prepared by solid-phase synthesis with mechanical mixing of a zeolite with MoO3 followed by calcination at 550°C. Zeolite etched with sodium hydroxide solutions and dealuminated with aluminum nitrate solutions is used as a support. Catalytic studies of the catalysts are conducted. The effect of treating the initial zeolite on the properties of catalysts in methane aromatization is determined. The effect subsequently treating a zeolite support has on the acid sites of a catalyst is confirmed by means of temperature-programmed reduction and the temperature-programmed desorption of NH3. The formation of molybdenum ions in the +5 oxidation state during catalysis and the presence of graphitized carbon deposits on a spent catalyst's surface are confirmed by EPR and temperature-programmed oxidation.

  16. Decreased methane formation from the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide using zeolite/cobalt-manganese oxide composite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Johns, M; Landon, P; Alderson, T; Hutchings, G J

    2001-12-01

    A composite catalyst comprising a physical mixture of a zeolite and a cobalt/manganese oxide Fischer-Tropsch catalyst decreases the formation of methane in the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide without significantly affecting conversion. PMID:12240011

  17. Palladium-Zeolite nanofiber as an effective recyclable catalyst membrane for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungsu; Chan, Sophia; Yip, Garriott; Joo, Hyunjong; Yang, Heejae; Ko, Frank K

    2016-09-15

    Zeolite is an exciting natural material due to its unique capability of ammonium nitrogen (NH3N) adsorption in water. In this study, multifunctional hybrid composites of zeolite/palladium (Ze/Pd) on polymer nanofiber membranes were fabricated and explored for sustainable contaminant removal. SEM and XRD demonstrated that zeolite and palladium nanoparticles were uniformly distributed and deposited on the nanofibers. NH3N recovery rate was increased from 23 to 92% when palladium coated zeolite was embedded on the nanofiber. Multifunctional nanofibers of Ze/Pd membranes were able to adsorb NH3N on the zeolites placed on the surface of fibers and palladium catalysts were capable of selective oxidation of NH3N to N2 gas. The cycling of NH3N adsorption-oxidation, high flux, hydrophilicity, and flexibility of the membrane makes it a strong candidate for water treatment. PMID:27253639

  18. Emission control through Cu-exchanged X-zeolite catalysts: Experimental studies and theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Das, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    Catalysts based on X-zeolite have been developed by exchanging its Na{sup +} ion with Copper ions and its effectiveness in reducing NO{sub x} in an actual SI engine exhaust has been tested. Unlike noble metals, the doped X-zeolite catalysts, studied here, exhibit significant NO{sub x} reduction for a wide {lambda} range and exhibit a slow rate of decrease with increase in {lambda} ratio. Back pressure developed across the catalyst bed was found to be well-affordable and power loss due to back pressure is only minimal. During 30 hours of testing of the catalyst, no significant deactivation was observed. Additionally a mathematical model has been developed to predict the performance of the catalyst and to validate that against experimental results. Results predicted by the mathematical model agree well with the experimental results and absolute average deviation of experimental conversion efficiency is found to be less than 5% of the predicted value.

  19. A large-cavity zeolite with wide pore windows and potential as an oil refining catalyst.

    PubMed

    Corma, Avelino; Díaz-Cabañas, María J; Martínez-Triguero, Joaquín; Rey, Fernando; Rius, Jordi

    2002-08-01

    Crude oil is an important feedstock for the petrochemical industry and the dominant energy source driving the world economy, but known oil reserves will cover demand for no more than 50 years at the current rate of consumption. This situation calls for more efficient strategies for converting crude oil into fuel and petrochemical products. At present, more than 40% of oil conversion is achieved using catalysts based on faujasite; this zeolite requires extensive post-synthesis treatment to produce an ultrastable form, and has a large cavity accessible through four 0.74-nm-wide windows and thus limits the access of oil molecules to the catalytically active sites. The use of zeolites with better accessibility to their active sites should result in improved catalyst efficiency. To date, two zeolites with effective pore diameters exceeding that of faujasite have been reported, but their one-dimensional pore topology excludes use in oil refining. Similarly, zeolites with large pores and a three-dimensional pore topology have been reported, but in all these materials the pore openings are smaller than in faujasite. Here we report the synthesis of ITQ-21, a zeolite with a three-dimensional pore network containing 1.18-nm-wide cavities, each of which is accessible through six circular and 0.74-nm-wide windows. As expected for a zeolite with this structure, ITQ-21 exhibits high catalytic activity and selectivity for valuable products in preliminary oil refining tests. PMID:12152074

  20. Zeolite-based SCR catalysts and their use in diesel engine emission treatment

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Yang, Xiaofan

    2016-08-02

    A catalyst comprising a zeolite loaded with copper ions and at least one trivalent metal ion other than Al.sup.+3, wherein the catalyst decreases NO.sub.x emissions in diesel exhaust. The trivalent metal ions are selected from, for example, trivalent transition metal ions, trivalent main group metal ions, and/or trivalent lanthanide metal ions. In particular embodiments, the catalysts are selected from Cu--Fe-ZSM5, Cu--La-ZSM-5, Fe--Cu--La-ZSM5, Cu--Sc-ZSM-5, and Cu--In-ZSM5. The catalysts are placed on refractory support materials and incorporated into catalytic converters.

  1. Zeolite-based SCR catalysts and their use in diesel engine emission treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Yang, Xiaofan

    2015-03-24

    A catalyst comprising a zeolite loaded with copper ions and at least one trivalent metal ion other than Al.sup.+3, wherein the catalyst decreases NO.sub.x emissions in diesel exhaust. The trivalent metal ions are selected from, for example, trivalent transition metal ions, trivalent main group metal ions, and/or trivalent lanthanide metal ions. In particular embodiments, the catalysts are selected from Cu--Fe-ZSM5, Cu--La-ZSM-5, Fe--Cu--La-ZSM5, Cu--Sc-ZSM-5, and Cu--In-ZSM5. The catalysts are placed on refractory support materials and incorporated into catalytic converters.

  2. Alkylation of isobutane by butenes on a cobalt-containing zeolite catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil`ev, A.N.; Galinskii, A.A.

    1995-05-10

    It is shown that the polycationic form of a faujasite-type zeolite, CoLaCaNaY, exhibits high catalytic activity in alkylation of isobutane by butenes. The service life of the catalyst, which terminates when oxidative regeneration is necessary, is significantly extended.

  3. A capsule catalyst with a zeolite membrane prepared by direct liquid membrane crystallization.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlin; Xu, Hengyong; Kido, Yuko; Yoneyama, Yoshiharu; Suehiro, Yoshifumi; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2012-05-01

    A sheltered existence: Direct liquid-membrane crystallization is used as a low-cost, low-waste, yet highly effective method to prepare a catalyst encapsulated by a H-β zeolite. Through vapor-liquid exchange, a continuous and sufficient, but not excessive supply of both water and template is the key part of this method. PMID:22287226

  4. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  5. NMR Studies of Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yisun; Hoard, John; Lambert, Christine; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF

    2008-06-26

    The effects of hydrothermal aging of Cu/zeolite urea-SCR catalysts on their reactivity and material properties was assessed by performance tests and multiple characterization techniques that included 27Al NMR and XRD. Three aging protocols were used that consisted of varying temperature during hydrothermal aging with or without exposure to aqueous urea solution. Differences in behavior were even found for samples hydrothermally aged immediately following exposure to the urea solution or if the sample was dried overnight before hydrothermal aging. The combination of urea and high temperature exposure increased the deactivation of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts beyond that observed by hydrothermal aging alone, with an immediate high temperature exposure following wetting of the catalyst core with aqueous urea causing the most significant deterioration in performance. The impact of urea on SCR catalyst durability was also found to increase with the aging temperature. NMR analysis suggested that aging with urea resulted in relatively more dealumination of the zeolite for the SCR catalysts in this study.

  6. Metalloenzyme-Like Zeolites as Lewis Acid Catalysts for C-C Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-10-19

    The use of metalloenzyme-like zeolites as Lewis acid catalysts for C-C bond formation reactions has received increasing attention over the past few years. In particular, the observation of direct aldol condensation reactions enabled by hydrophobic zeolites with isolated framework metal sites has encouraged the development of catalytic approaches for producing chemicals from biomass-derived compounds. The discovery of new Diels-Alder cycloaddition/dehydration routes and experimental and computational studies of Lewis acid catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions have given a further boost to this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26465652

  7. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy study of L-zeolite- and silica-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.B.; Laska, T.E.; Balaraman, P.; Root, T.W.; Dumesic, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    NMR studies of CO adsorbed on small Pt particles show evidence of changes in the metallic nature of these particles with size. Large particles on silica or the exterior of zeolite crystallites have conduction-band electrons that cause a Knight shift for adsorbed CO. Small particles in zeolite cavities are diamagnetic clusters, and yield spectra for linear and bridging carbonyls similar to those of transition-metal cluster compounds. {sup 13}C NMR of CO offers a simple probe of metal dispersion and particle size for these Pt catalysts and other noble metal systems. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. H-β Zeolite: an Efficient, Reusable Catalyst for One-Pot Synthesis of Isatins from Anilines.

    PubMed

    Raj, Victor Paul; Shaikh, Tanveer Mahamadali; Sudalai, Arumugam

    2010-06-01

    We describe a simple and highly efficient procedure for the single-step preparation of isatins from the commercially available anilines using H-β zeolite as a truly heterogeneous catalyst. H-β zeolite is readily separated from reaction mixture by simple filtration and reused several times without considerable loss of activity. PMID:24061745

  9. Adsorption and plasma-catalytic oxidation of acetone over zeolite-supported silver catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Quang Hung; Sanjeeva Gandhi, M.; Mok, Young Sun

    2015-01-01

    The abatement of acetone using a combination of non-thermal plasma, catalysis and adsorption was investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor packed with silver-coated zeolite pellets serving as both adsorbent and catalyst. The removal of acetone in this reactor system was carried out by cyclic operation comprising two repetitive steps, namely, adsorption followed by plasma-catalytic oxidation. The effects of the zeolite-supported silver catalyst on the reduction of unwanted ozone emission and the behavior for the formation of gaseous byproducts were examined. The experimental results showed that the zeolite-supported catalyst had a high acetone adsorption capacity of 1.07 mmol g-1 at 25 °C. Acetone with a concentration of 300 ppm was removed from the gas stream and enriched on the zeolite surface during the adsorption step of the cyclic process (100 min). In the succeeding step, the adsorbed acetone was plasma-catalytically treated under oxygen-flowing atmosphere to recover the adsorption capability of the surface. The plasma-catalytic oxidation of the acetone adsorbed in the previous 100 min adsorption step was completed in 15 min. The abatement of acetone by the cyclic adsorption and plasma-catalytic oxidation process was able to increase the performance of the reactor with respect to the energy efficiency, compared to the case of continuous plasma-catalytic treatment. The use of the zeolite-supported silver catalyst largely decreased the emission of unreacted ozone and increased the amount of gaseous byproducts such as carbon oxides and aldehydes due to the enhanced oxidation of the adsorbed acetone and intermediates.

  10. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-09-30

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, Al-SBA-15, containing strong Broensted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt% Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst will be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks to naphtha and middle distillates.

  11. Spectroscopic and XRD characterisation of zeolite catalysts active for the oxidative methylation of benzene with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Long, Mervyn A.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-03-01

    The benzene methylation with methane over zeolite catalysts was previously shown in our laboratory to require the presence of oxygen. Thus, a two-step mechanism involving the intermediate formation of methanol by partial oxidation of methane followed by the methylation of benzene with methanol in the second step, was postulated. This paper now reports the results of the characterisation of the zeolite catalysts used for the oxidative benzene methylation reaction in order to provide some information about their composition, structure, properties and their behaviour before and after the reaction. The catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), FT-IR and solid state NMR. XRD results indicate that the crystalline structures of all the ZSM-5 and H-beta catalysts remained unchanged after batch reaction of benzene with methane over the catalysts in agreement with the observation that the catalysts recovered from the reactor could be reused without loss of activity. Elemental analyses and FT-IR data show that as the level of metal ion exchange increases, the Brönsted acid concentration decreases but this metal ion exchange does not totally remove Brönsted acidity. FT-IR results further show that only a small amount of acid sites is actually necessary for a catalyst to be active since used catalysts containing highly reduced Brönsted acidity are found to be reusable without any loss of their activity. 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR together with FT-IR spectra also show that all the active zeolites catalysts contain some extra-framework octahedral aluminium in addition to the normal tetrahedral framework aluminium. The presence of this extra-lattice aluminium does not, however, have any adverse effect on the crystallinity of the catalysts both before and after oxidative benzene methylation reaction. There appears also to be no significant dealumination

  12. Production of biofuel from waste cooking palm oil using nanocrystalline zeolite as catalyst: process optimization studies.

    PubMed

    Taufiqurrahmi, Niken; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Subhash

    2011-11-01

    The catalytic cracking of waste cooking palm oil to biofuel was studied over different types of nano-crystalline zeolite catalysts in a fixed bed reactor. The effect of reaction temperature (400-500 °C), catalyst-to-oil ratio (6-14) and catalyst pore size of different nanocrystalline zeolites (0.54-0.80 nm) were studied over the conversion of waste cooking palm oil, yields of Organic Liquid Product (OLP) and gasoline fraction in the OLP following central composite design (CCD). The response surface methodology was used to determine the optimum value of the operating variables for maximum conversion as well as maximum yield of OLP and gasoline fraction, respectively. The optimum reaction temperature of 458 °C with oil/catalyst ratio=6 over the nanocrystalline zeolite Y with pore size of 0.67 nm gave 86.4 wt% oil conversion, 46.5 wt% OLP yield and 33.5 wt% gasoline fraction yield, respectively. The experimental results were in agreement with the simulated values within an experimental error of less than 5%. PMID:21924606

  13. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-06-20

    Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalysts with strong Broensted acid sites and Al stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination was synthesized from the addition of hydrothermally aged zeolite Y precursor to SBA-15 synthesis mixture under mildly acidic condition of pH 5.5. The materials possessed surface areas between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Up to 2 wt. % Al was present in the most aluminated sample that was investigated, and the Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination, even after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. The catalyst's activity was not affected by the aging time of the precursor for up to the 24 hr aging time investigated. This method of introducing Al and maintaining it in a total tetrahedral coordination is very effective, in comparison to other direct and post synthesis alumination methods reported. The catalytic performance of the zeolite Y/SBA-15 composite materials will be compared with that of pure SBA-15. The catalysts will then be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  14. Characterization of Na+- beta-Zeolite Supported Pd and Pd Ag Bimetallic Catalysts using EXAFS, TEM and Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,W.; Lobo, R.; Chen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Flow reactor studies of the selective hydrogenation of acetylene in the presence of ethylene have been performed on Na+ exchanged {beta}-zeolite supported Pd, Ag and PdAg catalysts, as an extension of our previous batch reactor studies [W. Huang, J.R. McCormick, R.F. Lobo, J.G. Chen, J. Catal. 246 (2007) 40-51]. Results from flow reactor studies show that the PdAg/Na+-{beta}-zeolite bimetallic catalyst has lower activity than Pd/Na+-{beta}-zeolite monometallic catalyst, while Ag/Na+-{beta}-zeolite does not show any activity for acetylene hydrogenation. However, the selectivity for the PdAg bimetallic catalyst is much higher than that for either the Pd catalyst or Ag catalyst. The selectivity to byproduct (ethane) is greatly inhibited on the PdAg bimetallic catalyst as well. The results from the current flow reactor studies confirmed the pervious results from batch reactor studies [W. Huang, J.R. McCormick, R.F. Lobo, J.G. Chen, J. Catal. 246 (2007) 40-51]. In addition, we used transmission electron microscope (TEM), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and FTIR of CO adsorption to confirm the formation of Pd-Ag bimetallic alloy in the PdAg/Na+-{beta}-zeolite catalyst.

  15. Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Toops, Todd J; Nguyen, Ke; Foster, Adam; Bunting, Bruce G; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Jiao, Jian

    2010-01-01

    A single-cylinder diesel engine with an emissions control system - diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), Fe-zeolite selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF) - was used to perform accelerated thermal aging of the SCR catalyst. Cyclic aging is performed at SCR inlet temperatures of 650, 750 and 850 degrees C for up to 50 aging cycles. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated thermal aging protocol, a field-aged SCR catalyst of similar formulation was also evaluated. The monoliths were cut into sections and evaluated for NO{sub x} performance in a bench-flow reactor. While the rear section of both the field-aged and the accelerated engine-aged SCR catalysts maintained high NO{sub x}conversion, 75-80% at 400 degrees C, the front section exhibited a drastic decrease to only 20-35% at 400 degrees C. This two-tiered deactivation was also observed for field-aged samples that were analyzed in this study. To understand the observed performance changes, thorough materials characterization was performed which revealed two primary degradation mechanisms. The first mechanism is a general Fe-zeolite deterioration which led to surface area losses, dealumination of the zeolite, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal growth. This degradation accelerated above 750 degrees C, and the effects were generally more severe in the front of the catalyst. The second deactivation mechanism is linked to trace levels of Pt that are suspected to be volatizing from the DOC and depositing on the front section of the SCR catalyst. Chemical evidence of this can be seen in the high levels of NH{sub 3} oxidation (80% conversion at 400 degrees C), which coincides with the decrease in performance.

  16. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-31

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. New results indicated that good quality highly ordered nanoporous silica host can be synthesized in the presence of zeolite Y seed precursor depending on the amount of precursor added. Preliminary research on the catalytic performance of the materials is underway. Probe acid catalyzed reactions, such as the cracking of cumene is currently being conducted. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of ZeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite catalysts of improved structural and

  17. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions. PMID:19135790

  18. DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

    2005-08-01

    The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

  19. Using High-Voltage Direct Current in Removing Coke from a Zeolite Catalyst Grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz

    2009-03-01

    Zeolite catalysts are commonly used in petroleum refining processes. Over a period of time, these catalysts lose their activity due to gradual deposition of carbonaceous materials, called coke. The coked catalysts are usually reactivated by combusting the coke at elevated temperatures in presence of an oxygen-enriched gas. But the elevated temperatures cause damages to the structure of the catalyst which result in reduced activity. Normally, the catalyst is reactivated 3 or 4 times before it must be returned to the manufacturer for reclamation of the valuable platinum and/or rhenium content. This study is an attempt to come up with a new procedure to remove coke from a zeolite catalyst grain using high-voltage direct current. It is found that the process is self-terminated due to the loss of electrical conductivity of the grain. In addition, it is found that there an optimum current range for which up to 90% of the coke can be removed. Higher or lower currents result in much smaller removal of the coke.

  20. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-21

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of polymer-SBA15 nanocomposites will be conducted by changing the amount and chemistry of the zeolitic precursors added; and (4) Investigation on the catalytic properties of the materials using probe catalytic reactions (such as cumene cracking), followed by catalytic testing for heavy oil conversion.

  1. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-03-31

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of a mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, AlSBA-15. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst contains strong Br{umlt o}nsted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt % Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at a temperature of 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into a psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst is being evaluated for the conversion of a heavy petroleum feedstock to naphtha and middle distillates. This phase was significantly delayed during the past six months due to a serious malfunction of the fume hoods in the Clark Atlanta University's Research Center for Science and Technology, where the project is being conducted. The fume hood system was repaired and the catalyst evaluation is now underway.

  2. Mathematical modelling of diffusion and reaction in blocked zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, S.; Hall, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical model for diffusion and reaction in blocked zeolites is developed which takes into account nonidealities arising from interaction between sorbed molecules as well as the effect of pore and surface blocking. The model combines a microscopic approach, in which expressions for chemical potential and diffusive fluxes are calculated within the lattice-gas framework, with the more traditional continuum approach which takes into account the effect of surface blocking. The effect of pore blocking on the diffusive fluxes is accounted for through an effective medium approximation.

  3. Selective Transformation of Various Nitrogen-Containing Exhaust Gases toward N2 over Zeolite Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning; Lei, Zhigang; Chen, Biaohua

    2016-03-23

    In this review we focus on the catalytic removal of a series of N-containing exhaust gases with various valences, including nitriles (HCN, CH3CN, and C2H3CN), ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxides (NO(x)), which can cause some serious environmental problems, such as acid rain, haze weather, global warming, and even death. The zeolite catalysts with high internal surface areas, uniform pore systems, considerable ion-exchange capabilities, and satisfactory thermal stabilities are herein addressed for the corresponding depollution processes. The sources and toxicities of these pollutants are introduced. The important physicochemical properties of zeolite catalysts, including shape selectivity, surface area, acidity, and redox ability, are described in detail. The catalytic combustion of nitriles and ammonia, the direct catalytic decomposition of N2O, and the selective catalytic reduction and direct catalytic decomposition of NO are systematically discussed, involving the catalytic behaviors as well as mechanism studies based on spectroscopic and kinetic approaches and molecular simulations. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are given. In the present work, emphasis is placed on the structure-performance relationship with an aim to design an ideal zeolite-based catalyst for the effective elimination of harmful N-containing compounds. PMID:26889565

  4. Use of multi-transition-metal-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, K.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.; Kwong, C.W.; Wan, M.P.

    2008-04-15

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas. It has a global warming potential (GWP) 23 times greater than carbon dioxide. Reducing methane emissions would lead to substantial economic and environmental benefits. This study investigated the performance of multi-transition-metal-(Cu, Cr, Ni, and Co)-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement. The catalytic activity in methane combustion using multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was studied with different parameters including the molar percentage of metal loading, the space velocity, and the inlet methane concentration under atmospheric pressure and at a relatively low reaction temperature of 500 C. The performance of the catalysts was determined in terms of the apparent activation energy, the number of active sites of the catalyst, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. This study showed that multi-ion-exchanged catalysts outperformed single-ion-exchanged and acidified 13X catalysts and that lengthening the residence time led to a higher methane conversion percentage. The enhanced catalytic activity in the multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was attributed to the presence of exchanged transition ions instead of acid sites in the catalyst. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was influenced by the metal loading amount, which played an important role in affecting the apparent activation energy for methane combustion, the active sites, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. Increasing the amount of metal loading in the catalyst decreased the apparent activation energy for methane combustion and also the BET surface area of the catalyst. An optimized metal loading amount at which the highest catalytic activity was observed due to the combined effects of the various factors was determined. (author)

  5. Catalytic cracking of a Gippsland reduced crude on zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Guerzoni, F.N.; Abbot, J. )

    1994-06-01

    Cracking reactions of a Gippsland reduced crude have been investigated at 520[degrees]C over HY and HZSM-5. Gasolines with similar characteristics can be obtained on both zeolites, although the mechanistic routes to these products are quite distinct. Changes in aromatic product selectivities are consistent with the zeolite pore geometries. Minor quantities of aromatics are formed via hydrogen transfer processes involving product olefins and naphthenes over the faujasite and the cyclization (and to a lesser extent oligomerization) of olefinic species on the pentasil. Dehydrogenation of naphthenic species in the feedstock is also important for aromatic formation. While paraffins are formed via hydrogen transfer processes together with cracking and isomerization of feed paraffins on HY, only the latter route can explain formation of saturated species on HZSM-5. The removal of linear paraffins from the GRC was traced as a function of conversion on HY. It was found that the relative reactivity of the linear paraffins increased monotonically with paraffin chain length. 43 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. The curious case of zeolite-clay/binder interactions and their consequences for catalyst preparation.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Gareth T; Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Oord, Ramon; Paalanen, Pasi; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-07-01

    Zeolite-based catalyst bodies are commonly employed in a range of important industrial processes. Depending on the binder and shaping method chosen, vast differences in the reactivity, selectivity and stability are obtained. Here, three highly complementary micro-spectroscopic techniques were employed to study zeolite ZSM-5-binder interactions in SiO2-, Al2O3-, SiO2 : Al2O3- (2 : 1 mix) and kaolinite-bound catalyst pellets. We establish how their preparation influences the zeolite-clay/binder interactions. Using thiophene as an acid-catalyzed staining reaction, light absorbing oligomers produced in each sample were followed. To our surprise, kaolinite decreased the overall reactivity of the sample due to the phase change of the binder, creating a hard impenetrable outer layer. Aluminum migration to the zeolite was observed when Al2O3 was selected as a binder, creating additional Brønsted acid sites, which favored the formation of ring-opened thiophene oligomers compared to the larger oligomer species produced when SiO2 was used as a binder. In the latter case, the interaction of the Si-OH groups in the binder with thiophene was revealed to have a large impact in creating such large oligomer species. Furthermore, the combination of a SiO2 : Al2O3 mix as a binder enhanced the reactivity, possibly due to the creation of additional Brønsted acid sites between the two binder components during pellet preparation. It is evident that, independent of the shaping method, the intimate contact between the zeolite and binder heavily impacts the reactivity and product selectivity, with the type of binder playing a vital role. PMID:27101314

  7. Effect of Unburned Methyl Esters on the NOx Conversion of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.; Ratcliff, M.; Pedersen, D.; McCormick, R.; Cavataio, G.; Ura, J.

    2010-03-01

    Engine and flow reactor experiments were conducted to determine the impact of biodiesel relative to ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on inhibition of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction over an Fe-zeolite catalyst. Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts have the ability to adsorb and store unburned hydrocarbons (HC) at temperatures below 300 C. These stored HCs inhibit or block NO{sub x}-ammonia reaction sites at low temperatures. Although biodiesel is not a hydrocarbon, similar effects are anticipated for unburned biodiesel and its organic combustion products. Flow reactor experiments indicate that in the absence of exposure to HC or B100, NO{sub x} conversion begins at between 100 and 200 C. When exposure to unburned fuel occurs at higher temperatures (250-400 C), the catalyst is able to adsorb a greater mass of biodiesel than of ULSD. Experiments show that when the catalyst is masked with ULSD, NO{sub x} conversion is inhibited until it is heated to 400 C. However, when masked with biodiesel, NO{sub x} conversion is observed to begin at temperatures as low as 200 C. Engine test results also show low-temperature recovery from HC storage. Engine tests indicate that, overall, the SCR system has a faster recovery from HC masking with biodiesel. This is at least partially due to a reduction in exhaust HCs, and thus total HC exposure with biodiesel.

  8. Cracking of long-chain alkyl aromatics on USY zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A. ); Miguel, P.J.; Orchilles, A.V. ); Koermer, G.S. )

    1992-05-01

    Long-chain alkyl aromatics are important precursors for FCC gasoline. It is well known that for short-chain alkyl aromatics like cumene the dominant cracking process is simple alkyl aryl cleavage. In contrast the authors have found that for long-chain alkyl aromatics like 1-phenylheptane, cracking over in situ USY catalysts is much more complex. Cracking in a long alkyl side chain results in a carbenium ion that isomerizes easily and gives self-alkylation of the aromatic ring. Self-alkylation produces coke precursors and heavy gasoline aromatics. Product selectivities vary with zeolite unit cell size in ways that are rationalized on the basis of decreasing acid site density and zeolite adsorption properties.

  9. Combustion of volatile organic compounds over composite catalyst of Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ and beta zeolite.

    PubMed

    Takamitsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sano, Tsuneji

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was carried out over a composite catalyst comprising Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ and protonated beta zeolite. The conversion of several VOCs such as ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, 2-propanol, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chloroethane over the composite catalyst was higher than the conversion over the conventional Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst, indicating a remarkable improvement in the oxidation activity of the composite. On the other hand, no difference in the conversion of methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, benzene, and chloroethylene was observed for the composite catalyst versus the Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst. To clarify the role of the zeolite component, the reaction products obtained using the composite catalyst were compared with those obtained using the Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst. For the cases in which considerable improvement in the oxidation activity was observed with the composite, it was revealed that the conversion of VOCs to intermediate compounds took place over the acidic sites of the zeolite; the intermediates tended to be easily oxidized to CO₂ on the Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst. In addition, the composite catalyst also exhibited high durability. High catalytic activity was maintained even after aging at 600°C for more than 1000 h. PMID:23445410

  10. Local ammonia storage and ammonia inhibition in a monolithic copper-beta zeolite SCR catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Auvray, Xavier P; Partridge Jr, William P; Choi, Jae-Soon; Pihl, Josh A; Yezerets, Alex; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Currier, Neal; Olsson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3} was studied on a Cu-beta zeolite catalyst, with specific focus on the distributed NH{sub 3} capacity utilization and inhibition. In addition, several other relevant catalyst parameter distributions were quantified including the SCR zone, or catalyst region where SCR occurs, and NO and NH{sub 3} oxidation. We show that the full NH{sub 3} capacity (100% coverage) is used within the SCR zone for a range of temperatures. By corollary, unused NH{sub 3} capacity exists downstream of the SCR zone. Consequently, the unused capacity relative to the total capacity is indicative of the portion of the catalyst unused for SCR. Dynamic NH{sub 3} inhibition distributions, which create local transient conversion inflections, are measured. Dynamic inhibition is observed where the gas phase NH{sub 3} and NO concentrations are high, driving rapid NH{sub 3} coverage buildup and SCR. Accordingly, we observe dynamic inhibition at low temperatures and in hydrothermally aged states, but predict its existence very near the catalyst front in higher conversion conditions where we did not specifically monitor its impact. While this paper addresses some general distributed SCR performance parameters including Oxidation and SCR zone, our major new contributions are associated with the NH{sub 3} capacity saturation within the SCR zone and dynamic inhibition distributions and the associated observations. These new insights are relevant to developing accurate models, designs and control strategies for automotive SCR catalyst applications.

  11. Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water

    SciTech Connect

    Moliner, Manuel; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2010-04-06

    The isomerization of glucose into fructose is a large-scale reaction for the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS; reaction performed by enzyme catalysts) and recently is being considered as an intermediate step in the possible route of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Here, it is shown that a large-pore zeolite that contains tin (Sn-Beta) is able to isomerize glucose to fructose in aqueous media with high activity and selectivity. Specifically, a 10% (wt/wt) glucose solution containing a catalytic amount of Sn-Beta (1:50 Sn:glucose molar ratio) gives product yields of approximately 46% (wt/wt) glucose, 31% (wt/wt) fructose, and 9% (wt/wt) mannose after 30 min and 12 min of reaction at 383 K and 413 K, respectively. This reactivity is achieved also when a 45 wt% glucose solution is used. The properties of the large-pore zeolite greatly influence the reaction behavior because the reaction does not proceed with a medium-pore zeolite, and the isomerization activity is considerably lower when the metal centers are incorporated in ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The Sn-Beta catalyst can be used for multiple cycles, and the reaction stops when the solid is removed, clearly indicating that the catalysis is occurring heterogeneously. Most importantly, the Sn-Beta catalyst is able to perform the isomerization reaction in highly acidic, aqueous environments with equivalent activity and product distribution as in media without added acid. This enables Sn-Beta to couple isomerizations with other acid-catalyzed reactions, including hydrolysis/isomerization or isomerization/dehydration reaction sequences [starch to fructose and glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) demonstrated here].

  12. Selective preparation of zeolite X and A from flyash and its use as catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Volli, Vikranth; Purkait, M K

    2015-10-30

    This work discusses the utilization of flyash for synthesis of heterogeneous catalyst for transesterification. Different types of zeolites were synthesized from alkali fusion followed by hydrothermal treatment of coal flyash as source material. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain highly crystalline zeolite based on degree of crystallinity and cation exchange capacity (CEC). The effect of CEC, acid treatment, Si/Al ratio and calcination temperature (800, 900 and 1000 °C) on zeolite formation was also studied. Pure, single phase and highly crystalline zeolite was obtained at flyash/NaOH ratio (1:1.2), fusion temperature (550 °C), fusion time (1 h), hydrothermal temperature (110 °C) and hydrothermal time (12h). The synthesized zeolite was ion-exchanged with potassium and was used as catalyst for transesterification of mustard oil to obtain a maximum conversion of 84.6% with 5 wt% catalyst concentration, 12:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, reaction time of 7 h at 65 °C. The catalyst was reused for 3 times with marginal reduction in activity. PMID:25956640

  13. Syngas to olefins via dimethyl ether over zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.G.; Sardesai, A.; Lee, S.

    1998-12-31

    Coal or natural gas-based syngas can be converted to dimethyl ether (DME) in a dual catalytic, single-stage liquid phase process. The process described here converts dimethyl ether to lower olefins, such as ethylene, propylene, and butenes. Thus, a novel process of producing olefins from syngas via dimethyl ether has been introduced. The process feasibility of dimethyl ether conversion has been evaluated and the range of products of this process has also been identified. The effect of operating parameters and catalyst characteristics on product selectivity has been studied. The superior process advantages as well as its competitive economics quite clearly identify this process to be quite promising when conducted on an industrial scale.

  14. Production of alkyl-aromatics from light oxygenates over zeolite catalysts for bio-oil refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trung Q.

    Upgrading of light oxygenates derived from biomass conversion, such as propanal and glycerol, to more valuable aromatics for biofuels has been demonstrated on zeolite catalysts. Aromatics with a high ratio of C 9/(C8+C7) and little benzene are produced at much higher yield from oxygenates than from olefins at mild conditions over HZSM-5. It is proposed that C9 aromatics are predominantly produced via acid-catalyzed aldol condensation. This reaction pathway is different from the pathway of propylene and other hydrocarbon aromatization that occurs via a hydrocarbon pool at more severe conditions with major aromatic products C6 and C7. In fact, investigation on the effect of crystallite size HZSM-5 has shown a higher ratio of C9/(C8+C 7) aromatics on small crystallite. This is due to faster removal of products from the shorter diffusion path length. As a result, a longer catalyst lifetime, less isomerization, and less cracking were observed on small crystallites. Beside crystallite size, pore geometry of zeolites was also found to significantly affect aromatic production for both conversion of propanal and glycerol. It is shown that the structure of the HZSM-22, with a one-dimensional and narrower channel system, restricts the formation of aromatics. In contrast, a higher yield of aromatic products is observed over HZSM-5 with its three-dimensional channel system. By increasing channel dimension and connectivity of the channels, increasing catalyst activity was also observed due to more accessible acid sites. It was also found that glycerol is highly active for dehydration on zeolites to produce high yields of acrolein (propenal), a high value chemical. To maximize aromatics from glycerol conversion, HZSM-5 and HY were found to be effective. A two-bed reactor of Pd/ZnO and HZSM-5 was used to first deoxygenate/hydrogenate glycerol over Pd/ZnO to intermediate oxygenates that can further aromatize on HZSM-5. The end results are very promising with significant improvement

  15. Highly-basic large-pore zeolite catalysts for NOx reduction at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Vogtlin, George E.

    2004-02-03

    A high-surface-area (greater than 600 m2/g), large-pore (pore size diameter greater than 6.5 angstroms), basic zeolite having a structure such as an alkali metal cation-exchanged Y-zeolite is employed to convert NO.sub.x contained in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust to N.sub.2 and O.sub.2. Preferably, the invention relates to a two-stage method and apparatus for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust such as diesel engine exhaust that includes a plasma oxidative stage and a selective reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and added hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean-NO.sub.x catalyst including the basic zeolite at relatively low temperatures to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O.

  16. Dynamic Structural Changes in a Molecular Zeolite-Supported Iridium Catalyst for Ethene Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-11-16

    The structure of a catalyst often changes as a result of changes in the reactive environment during operation. Examples include changes in bulk phases, extended surface structures, and nanoparticle morphologies; now we report real-time characterization of changes in the structure of a working supported catalyst at the molecular level. Time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data demonstrate the reversible interconversion of mononuclear iridium complexes and tetrairidium clusters inside zeolite Y cages, with the structure controlled by the C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} ratio during ethene hydrogenation at 353 K. The data demonstrate break-up of tetrairidium clusters into mononuclear complexes indicated by a decrease in the Ir-Ir coordination number in ethene-rich feed. When the feed composition was switched to first equimolar and then to a H{sub 2}-rich (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} = 0.3) feed, the EXAFS spectra show the reformation of tetrairidium clusters as the Ir-Ir coordination number increased again. When the feed composition was cycled from ethene-rich to H{sub 2}-rich, the predominant species in the catalyst cycled accordingly. Evidence confirming the structural change is provided by IR spectra of iridium carbonyls formed by probing of the catalyst with CO. The data are the first showing how to tune the structure of a solid catalyst at the molecular scale by choice of the reactant composition.

  17. Deactivation behaviors of zeolite and silica-alumina catalysts in the degradation of polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Uemichi, Yoshio; Hattori, Masahiko; Itoh, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Junko; Sugioka, Masatoshi

    1998-03-01

    For chemical recycling of waste plastics, HZSM-5, HY, and H-mordenite zeolites and silica-alumina were examined as catalysts for the degradation of polyethylene in a fixed-bed flow reactor system, and their activities and deactivation behaviors caused by coke deposition were studied. HZSM-5 catalyst was fond to be very effective for the production of gasoline-range fuel oils mainly consisting of isoparaffins and aromatics and showed no deactivation due to a very low yield of coke deposited on the catalyst surface, whereas in the degradation of polystyrene a marked deactivation was observed. Silica-alumina gradually deactivated as time on stream increased, but the degree of deactivation was less than expected from the deposition of a significant amount of coke, probably because the coke deposition in the large pores of the catalyst caused no marked influence on the diffusion of the decomposed fragments involved in the reaction. On the other hand, deactivations of HY and H-mordenite were striking; the latter was most abruptly deactivated, resulting in a marked decrease in the liquid yield. From the surface area measurements of the used catalysts, it was suggested that the pores of HY were sufficiently filled out with coke, while pore blocking by coke occurred in the unidimensional channels of H-mordenite.

  18. Hollow zeolitic imidazolate framework nanospheres as highly efficient cooperative catalysts for [3+3] cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wei, Yongyi; Wu, Xiaotao; Jiang, Huangyong; Wang, Wei; Li, Hexing

    2014-10-01

    Herein we describe a novel, hollow-structured zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8-H) nanosphere as a highly efficient catalyst for [3+3] cycloaddition reactions. The programmed installation of acidic Zn(2+) species and basic imidazolate moieties creates a synergistic catalytic system. Appropriate positioning of these functionalities in the catalytic system makes it possible to bring two substrates into close proximity and activate them cooperatively. Moreover, the flexible shell and the surface mesopores of ZIF-8-H provide the capacity for favorable binding of various sized substrates, stabilizing intermediates via their multiple force networks and the increased accessibility of the active sites. These features render ZIF-8-H a more highly active promoter than its homogeneous precursors, bulk ZIF-8 and ZIF-8-N nanoparticles. Finally, the robust catalyst can be easily recovered and reused 10 times without loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25255467

  19. Effect of coke formation on the transformations of butylenes on a high-silica zeolite catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashimov, F. A.; Kozharov, A. I.; Nadirov, P. A.; Mirzai, J. I.

    2010-08-01

    The transformations of butylenes on a high-silica zeolite catalyst (HHSZC) at 423-773 K were studied. Liquid reaction products formed above 443 K. The liquid phase of the reaction products mainly consisted of aliphatic hydrocarbons at 448-523 K and aromatic hydrocarbons at 623-723 K. The catalyst activity in the formation of liquid products did not show itself until 4-6% consolidation products (CPs) accumulated on its surface. DTA and gravimetric studies showed that CPs were nonuniform in composition. Some of the CPs were removed by decomposition under nitrogen, while others by oxidation with oxygen. It was inferred from ammonia adsorption data that the accumulation of CPs on the surface of HHSZC led to a decrease in the number of acid centers.

  20. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons by catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae with zeolites: catalyst screening in a pyroprobe.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhenyi; Ma, Xiaochen; Li, Yun; Chen, Paul; Liu, Yuhuan; Lin, Xiangyang; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae and egg whites was investigated to evaluate the performance of different zeolites for the production of aromatic hydrocarbons. Three zeolites with different structures (H-Y, H-Beta and H-ZSM5) were used to study the effect of catalyst type on the aromatic yield. All three catalysts significantly increased the aromatic yields from pyrolysis of microalgae and egg whites compared with non-catalytic runs, and H-ZSM5 was most effective with a yield of 18.13%. Three H-ZSM5 with silica-to-alumina ratios of 30, 80 and 280 were used to study the effect of Si/Al ratio on the aromatic yield. The maximum yield was achieved at the Si/Al ratio of 80, which provides moderate acidity to achieve high aromatic production and reduce coke formation simultaneously. Aromatic production increased with the incorporation of copper or gallium to HZSM-5. However, other studied metals either had no significant influence or led to a lower aromatic yield. PMID:23642438

  1. Iron alloy Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. V. FeCo on Y zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.; Schwartz, L.H.; Butt, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    A series of Fe, Co, and FeCo catalysts on Y-zeolite support, prepared both by ion exchange and impregnation, has been investigated and compared with a previously reported series supported on wide-pore SiO/sub 2/. Characterization methods were X-ray diffraction, H/sub 2/ and CO chemisorption, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and atomic absorption. The oxidation, reduction, and carburization behavior of the iron-containing catalysts were observed by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The reversibility of FeY (ion exchanged) in oxidation-reduction cycles was confirmed. The ion-exchanged catalysts (FeY, FeCoY) do not show any iron metal, or alloy or carbide phase after reduction or attempted carburization. In contrast with prior results with silica-supported Fe and FeCo, where there appear to be significant differences, Fe/HY (impregnated) and FeCo/HY appear quite similar in characterization by Moessbauer spectroscopy and in reaction behavior. A 1/1:CO/H/sub 2/ feed was used to investigate the Fischer-Tropsch reaction at 1 atm and 523 K. Some additional runs were made at a total pressure of 13.6 atm. As in prior studies it was found that the CO turnover frequency in general decreases with increasing CO conversion. A higher selectivity for higher molecular weight products is found for HY-supported catalysts, and in all cases an approximate behavior in accord with the Schultz-Anderson distribution was observed. 23 references.

  2. Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy of catalysts: Adsorption and coke formation in zeolites and vibrational spectra of supported metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Yek Tann

    2001-10-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to study the physicochemical and catalytic properties of zeolites and supported metal oxide catalysts using UV Raman spectroscopy. In order to reduce the thermal degradation and possible photodecomposition of adsorbates by UV radiation, we have developed a novel fluidized bed method for measuring the UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The UV Raman spectra of various organic compounds adsorbed in zeolites H-USY and H-ZSM-5 are recorded. When measurements are performed on stationary and spinning samples, the Raman spectra show the presence of coke, a typical end product of heat and photochemistry. In contrast, the Raman peaks of the unreacted adsorbates dominate the spectra measured using the fluidized bed method. These results indicate that the fluidized bed technique is a good method for measuring UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The formation of coke in the methanol-to-gasoline conversion over zeolite H-ZSM-5 causes deactivation of the catalyst. To gain insight into the formation of coke, we have studied this reaction using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectral changes suggest coke is produced from conjugated olefins via cyclopentadiene intermediates. Aromatic compounds in gasoline may also be produced from cyclopentadienes. The adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolites may alter the molecular sieving characteristics of these materials which ultimately affect their performance as catalysts and adsorbents. We have quantified the adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolite H-RHO using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of the zeolite after the adsorption of water, methanol or acetonitrile are consistent with an increase in the average T-O-T angle of the zeolite of 5-8°. The adsorption of ammonia, on the other hand, decreases the average T-O-T angle by 5°. Because of certain advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy, recently there is a strong interest in

  3. Constructing a polyfunctional zeolite-encaged metal catalyst for the multistage oxidation of ethanol into ethyl acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhtakhtinskii, T.N.; Aliev, A.M.; Kuliev, A.R.

    1995-08-01

    To construct an efficient polyfunctional catalyst for the given multistage reaction, the authors previously studied the catalysts HNaY, clinosorb, H-clinoptilolite, and H-mordenite in the reaction of esterification of ethanol with acetic acid; CuH-clinoptilolite, Cu-clinosorb, CuH-mordenite, and CuHNaY in the reaction of oxidative dehydration of ethanol; PdH-clinoptilolite, Pd-clinosorb, PdH-mordenite, and PdHNaY in the oxidation of ethanol; and CuPdH-clinoptilolite in the oxidative transformation of ethanol into ethyl acetate. The catalytic activity of these zeolites and other Pd- and Cu-containing zeolite catalysts, which the authors synthesized by the ion-exchange technique, was studied in a flow-circulating set-up.

  4. Photocatalytic decomposition of NO at 275 K on titanium oxide catalysts anchored within zeolite cavities and framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hiromi; Ichihashi, Yuichi; Zhang, Shu Guo; Matsumura, Yasuyuki; Souma, Yoshie; Tatsumi, Takashi; Anpo, Masakazu

    1997-11-01

    Titanium oxide species prepared in the Y-zeolite cavities via an ion-exchange method and those of the Ti-silicalite catalyst prepared hydrothermally exhibit high photocatalytic reactivity for the direct decomposition of NO into N 2, O 2 and N 2O at 275 K with a high selectivity for the formation of N 2. The in situ photoluminescence and XAFS investigations indicate that these titanium oxide species are highly dispersed and exist in a tetrahedral coordination in the zeolite cavities and its framework. The charge transfer excited state of these titanium oxide species plays a significant role in the direct decomposition of NO with a high selectivity for the formation of N 2, while the catalysts involving the aggregated octahedrally coordinated titanium oxide species and the bulk powdered TiO 2 catalyst mainly produce N 2O.

  5. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-11-15

    Composite materials of SBA-15/zeolite Y were synthesized from zeolite Y precursor and a synthesis mixture of mesoporous silicate SBA-15 via a hydrothermal process in the presence of a slightly acidic media of pH 4-6 with 2M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The SBA-15/ZY composites showed Type IV adsorption isotherms, narrow BJH average pore size distribution of 4.9 nm, surface areas up to 800 m{sup 2}2/g and pore volumes 1.03 cm{sup 3}, all comparable to pure SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Chemical analysis revealed Si/Al ratio down to 8.5 in the most aluminated sample, and {sup 27}AlSS MAS NMR confirmed aluminum was in tetrahedral coordination. This method of introduction of Al in pure T{sub d} coordination is effective in comparison to other direct and post synthesis alumination methods. Bronsted acid sites were evident from a pyridinium peak at 1544 cm-1 in the FTIR spectrum after pyridine adsorption, and from NH{sub 3} -TPD experiments. SBA-15/ZY composites showed significant catalytic activities for the dealkylation of isopropylbenzene to benzene and propene, similar to those of commercial zeolite Y. It was observed that higher conversion for catalysts synthesized with high amount of ZY precursor mixture added to the SBA-15. Over all the composites has shown good catalytic activity. Further studies will be focused on gaining a better understand the nature of the precursor, and to characterize and to locate the acid sites in the composite material. The composite will also be evaluated for heavy oil conversion to naphtha and middle distillates.

  6. Kinetics of toluene alkylation with methanol on HZSM-8 zeolite catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Y.S.; Halger, A.B.; Prasada Rao, T.S.R. )

    1989-07-01

    A detailed kinetic study of the alkylation of toluene with methanol on HZSM-8 zeolite was carried out in a fixed bed reactor. The catalyst showed high activity, selectivity, and stability. An attempt has been made to relate the overall changes taking place during the reaction. The experimental data are analyzed, and a reaction mechanism proposed based on the product pattern. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson model with dual-site mechanism was used to derive the rate equation. The unknown parameters in the rate equations are estimated by a nonlinear regression method. The kinetic model based on the proposed reaction mechanism has predicted the conversion values, which are in close agreement with the experimentally observed values.

  7. Tip Growth Of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained By Pyrolyzation Of Camphor Oil With Zeolite Embedded With Fe/Ni/Mn Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Highly efficient synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized by thermal decomposition of camphor oil, on a zeolite support impregnated with Fe/Ni/Mn (molar ratio of Fe:Ni:Mn = 1:1:1) catalyst in the temperature range from 550-950° C by the thermal CVD method. Besides the surface fluidization of the catalyst nanoparticles themselves, assistance of the metal oxides embedded in zeolite supports is supposed to be responsible for high activity and selectivity of the Fe/Ni/Mn catalyst over which carbon source (camphor oil) successfully decomposes. The CNT yield was higher at 850° C and can be considered as the optimum deposition temperature. This result demonstrates that zeolite impregnated with the catalyst Fe/Ni/Mn is a suitable support for effective formation of CNTs. The morphological studies support `tip growth mechanism' for the growth of the CNT's in our case. The as-grown CNTs were characterized by FESEM and FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. Selective conversion of organic pollutant p-chlorophenol to formic acid using zeolite Fenton catalyst.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chensi; Ma, Jianqing; Liu, Wanpeng; Wen, Yuezhong; Rashid, Sadia

    2016-10-01

    Effective remediation technologies which can converse the harmful organic pollutants to high-value chemicals are crucial both for wastewater treatment and energy regeneration. This study provides an evidence that extracting useful chemicals from wastewater is feasible through selective conversion of p-chlorophenol to high value formic acid as an example. The reported system works with a readily available Fe-containing ZSM-5 catalyst, water as the solvent and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The yield of formic acid reached up to 50.7% when the Si/Al ratio of ZSM-5 was 80 and the Fe-content was 1.4%. By X-ray adsorption fine structure (XAFS), NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) technique, the pyridine adsorption Fourier-transition infrared (Py-IR) spectroscopy and adsorption measurements, it was concluded that the controllable degradation of p-CP could be approached through selective adsorption, the moderate Brønsted acid sites for H2O2 activation and the properly selective conversion control due to extra-framework coordination unsaturated sites (CUS) of Fe. This approach might provide a new avenue for the field of organic pollutant remediation. PMID:27459155

  9. Design and modification of zeolite capsule catalyst, a confined reaction field, and its application in one-step isoparaffin synthesis from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Guohui Yang; Jingjiang He; Yi Zhang; Yoshiharu Yoneyama; Yisheng Tan; Yizhuo Han; Tharapong Vitidsant; Noritatsu Tsubaki

    2008-05-15

    Four kinds of zeolite capsule catalyst with different crystallization conditions were prepared and utilized for the middle isoparaffin direct synthesis via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction. Characterization results exhibited that these capsule catalysts had a compact, integral H-ZSM-5 shell. In FTS reactions on these zeolite capsule catalysts, hydrocarbons of C11+ were totally suppressed, accompanied by a sharp anti-Anderson-Schultz-Flory (ASF) law product distribution. The selectivity of light isoparaffin was improved obviously, but with the increase of the olefin's selectivity. Two-stage isoparaffin synthesis reaction, using the combination of zeolite capsule catalyst with hydrogenation catalyst of Pd/SiO{sub 2} in a single reactor as dual-bed catalyst, was also conducted for converting the residual olefins produced by the single zeolite capsule catalyst. Dependent on the palladium role of hydrogenation and hydrogen spillover, almost all the olefins effused from the first stage of zeolite capsule catalyst were hydrogenated, mostly converted to isoparaffin. The selectivity of isoparaffin in the final products was increased markedly as expected. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Reactions of aqueous glucose solution over solid-acid Y-zeolite catalyst at 110-160 C

    SciTech Connect

    Lourvanij, K.; Rorrer, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of glucose with solid-acid Y-zeolite catalyst were studied to see if this heterogeneous system could produce oxygenated hydrocarbons by shape-selective, acid-catalyzed processes at fairly low temperatures. Experimentally, aqueous solutions of glucose (12 wt %) were reacted with HY-zeolite powder in a well-mixed batch reactor at temperatures ranging from 110 to 160 C and catalyst concentrations ranging from 2 to 20 g/150 ml. Unreacted glucose and oxygenated hydrocarbon products were measured by HPLC as a function of reaction time (0-24 h) and process conditions. Glucose conversions of 100% were obtained at 160 C after an 8-h reaction time. The apparent activation energy based on glucose conversion was 23.25 [plus minus] 0.40 kcal/mol. Several acid-catalyzed reactions were identified, including isomerization of glucose to fructose, partial dehydration of glucose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), rehydration and cleavage of HMF to formic acid and 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, and carbonization . Polymers of HMF and seven minor additional products in the lower molecular weight organic acids/aldehydes/ketones elution range were also isolated by HPLC. High yields of organic acids relative to HMF and lowered selectivity of HMF in the bulk phase relative to the homogeneous acid-catalyzed reaction suggests the possibility of molecular sieving reactions within the Y-zeolite in addition to reactions on the outer surface of the Y-zeolite particle.

  11. Osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite framework; highly active catalyst in the aerobic oxidation of alcohols under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Akbayrak, Serdar; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Ozkar, Saim

    2010-08-28

    Osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite-Y framework were reproducibly prepared by a simple two step procedure involving the incorporation of osmium(III) cations into the zeolite matrix by ion-exchange, followed by their reduction within the cavities of zeolite with sodium borohydride in aqueous solution all at room temperature. The composition and morphology of osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite framework, as well as the integrity and crystallinity of the host material were investigated by using ICP-OES, XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, TEM/EDX, mid-IR, far-IR spectroscopies, and N(2)-adsorption/desorption technique. The results of the multiprong analysis reveal the formation of osmium(0) nanoclusters within the cavities of zeolite-Y without causing alteration in the framework lattice, formation of mesopores, or loss in the crystallinity of the host material. More importantly, far-IR studies showed that after the reduction of Os(3+) cations by sodium borohydride the Na(+) cations reoccupy their authentic cation sites restoring the integrity of zeolite-Y. The catalytic activity of osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite framework was tested in the aerobic oxidation of activated, unactivated and heteroatom containing alcohols to carbonyl compounds and was found to provide high activity and selectivity even under mild conditions (80 degrees C and 1 atm O(2) or air). Moreover, they were found to be stable enough to be isolated and bottled as solid material, which can be reused as active catalyst under the identical conditions of the first run. PMID:20614055

  12. Magnetic and Mössbauer study of metal-zeolite interaction in catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannaparayil, Thomas; Oskooie-Tabrizi, M.; Lo, C.; Mulay, L. N.; Melson, G. A.; Rao, V. U. S.

    1984-03-01

    Molecular sieve aluminosilicates, such as ZSM-5 and mordenite, when impregnated with highly dispersed Fe, yield catalysts for the selective conversion of coal-derived syngas (CO+H2) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Fe performs the primary Fischer-Tropsch (FT) syngas to yield light olefins which are converted by the acidic (H+) and shape-selective function of the zeolite to high octane gasoline components. The physical aspects of the Fe-mordenite interaction studied by magnetic measurements, Mössbauer, and IR spectroscopy are reported and correlations with the catalytic properties are drawn. Mordenite samples with [SiO2/Al2O3] ratio in the range 12 - 60 were impregnated with 15 wt. % Fe using Fe3(CO)12; decarbonylation yielded superparamagmetic dispersions of γ-Fe2O3, in the range 1.4-5.0 nm; the smallest particles were obtained for a ratio=17. Hydrogen chemisorption also revealed a similar trend in Fe dispersions. No samples, other than the one with a ratio=60 and containing the largest particles could be carbided under usual conditions. The acidity of the mordenite and the aromatics fraction in liquid hydrocarbons from syngas conversion also showed maxima at a ratio=17. The presence of a strong metal-support interaction between Fe and mordenite was thus influenced by the varying ratios in the mordenite in a manner that paralleled the acidity and catalytic activity.

  13. High stability zone zeolites in octane catalysts - New products from Union Carbide Corporation and Katalistiks International, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Rabo, J.A.; Pellet, R.J.; Magee, J.S.; Mitchell, B.R.; Moore, J.W.; Letzsch, W.S.; Upson, L.L.; Magnusson, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of zeolite cracking catalysts to moderate the research octane number and, to lesser extent, the motor octane number of FCC gasoline has been known for well over ten years. Considerable effort has been made during this period to understand the mechanism of the catalytic reactions involved. This paper discusses the following: 1) Silicon Enriched Framework Y Zeolites (SEF-Y) when compared with aluminum deficient faujasites exhibit both increased thermal and hydrothermal stability. Collapse temperatures as measured by DTA are at least 200/sup 0/C higher for the enriched framework materials. 2) The increased stability afforded by the Framework Silicon Enrichment process is believed to be due to the drastically reduced number of defects compared with dealuminated structures. 3) High Stability Zone Zeolite catalysts containing SEF-Y exhibit less non-selective cracking resulting in both improved gasoline and coke selectivity while maintaining octane levels at least as high as dealuminated species. 4) The improved selectivity is believed due to the much reduced silica/alumina and alumina ''debris'' present in the SEF-Y compared with dealuminated structures.

  14. Heteropoly acid encapsulated into zeolite imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) cage as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for Friedel-Crafts acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Muhammad; Jiang, Sai; Ji, Shengfu

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy has been developed for the encapsulation of the phosphotungstic heteropoly acid (H3PW12O40 denoted as PTA) into zeolite imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) cage and the PTA@ZIF-67(ec) catalysts with different PTA content were prepared. The structure of the catalysts was characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, FT-IR, ICP-AES and TG. The catalytic activity and recovery properties of the catalysts for the Friedel-Crafts acylation of anisole with benzoyl chloride were evaluated. The results showed that 14.6-31.7 wt% PTA were encapsulated in the ZIF-67 cage. The PTA@ZIF-67(ec) catalysts had good catalytic activity for Friedel-Crafts acylation. The conversion of anisole can reach ~100% and the selectivity of the production can reach ~94% over 26.5 wt% PTA@ZIF-67(ec) catalyst under the reaction condition of 120 °C and 6 h. After reaction, the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture by the centrifugation. The recovered catalyst can be reused five times and the selectivity can be kept over 90%.

  15. Degradation of a textile dye, Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G), by heterogeneous sonophotoFenton process in the presence of Fe-containing TiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nazlı; Gündüz, Gönül; Dükkancı, Meral

    2015-03-01

    In this study, degradation of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) was investigated with ultrasound-assisted heterogeneous photoFenton process by iron-containing TiO2 catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method and characterized by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, nitrogen adsorption, and ICP-AES measurements. Almost complete color removal (99.9 %) was achieved after a reaction time of 90 min while chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be removed by 24 % only with the 1 wt% iron-containing TiO2 catalyst. Initial color removal after 15 min of reaction and total COD abatement after 90 min of reaction decreased with increasing calcination temperature of the catalyst from 573 to 973 K. This indicated that the catalytic activity of the catalyst depend on the percentage of anatase phase in the TiO2, which was decreased with increasing calcination temperature. PMID:24756679

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Deoxygenation Reactions over Proton-Form and Molybdenum-Modified Zeolite Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, Jeremy William

    .04-0.10, HCOOH/CH 4 = 0.01-0.03, CO2/CH4 = 0.01-0.03) on Mo/H-ZSM-5 formulations at 950 K and atmospheric pressure in an effort to couple deoxygenation and dehydrogenation reaction sequences results instead in a two-zone, stratified bed reactor configuration consisting of upstream oxygenate/CH4 reforming and downstream CH4 dehydroaromatization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and chemical transient experiments show that molybdenum carbide is formed inside zeolite micropores during CH4 reactions. The addition of an oxygenate co-feed causes oxidation of the active molybdenum carbide catalyst while producing CO and H2 until completely converted. Forward rates of C6H6 synthesis are unperturbed by the introduction of an oxygenate co-feed after rigorously accounting for the thermodynamic reversibility caused by the H2 produced in oxygenate reforming reactions and the fraction of the active catalyst deemed unavailable for CH 4 dehydroaromatization. All effects of co-processing C1-2 oxygenates and molecular H2 with CH4 can be interpreted in terms of an approach to equilibrium. Co-processing H2O, CO2, or light (C1-2, C/Heff < 0.25) oxygenates with CH4 at 950 K over Mo/H-ZSM-5 catalysts results in complete fragmentation of the oxygenate and CO as the sole oxygen-containing product. The C/Heff accounts for removal of O as CO and describes the net C6H6 and total hydrocarbon synthesis rates at varying (0.0-0.10) C1-2 oxygenate and H2 to CH4 co-feed ratios. Co-processing larger (C 3-5, C/Heff ≥ 0.25) oxygenates with CH4 results in incomplete fragmentation of the co-fed oxygenate and preferential pathways of C6H6 synthesis that exclude CH4 incorporation. This results in greater net C6H6 synthesis rates than would be predicted from observations made when co-processing C1-2 oxygenates. Catalytic technologies have served a crucial role in processing petroleum feedstocks and are faced with new challenges as the feedstock shifts to chemically diverse but renewable biomass sources. This research

  17. Product Selectivity Controlled by Zeolite Crystals in Biomass Hydrogenation over a Palladium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengtao; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Hong; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2016-06-29

    This work delineates the first example for controlling product selectivity in metal-catalyzed hydrogenation of biomass by zeolite crystals. The key to this success is to combine the advantages of both Pd nanoparticles (highly active sites) and zeolite micropores (controllable diffusion of reactants and products), which was achieved from encapsulation of the Pd nanoparticles inside of silicalite-I zeolite crystals as a core-shell structure (Pd@S-1). In the hydrogenation of biomass-derived furfural, the furan selectivity over the Pd@S-1 is as high as 98.7%, outperforming the furan selectivity (5.6%) over conventional Pd nanoparticles impregnated with S-1 zeolite crystals (Pd/S-1). The extraordinary furan selectivity in the hydrogenation over the Pd@S-1 is reasonably attributed to the distinguishable mass transfer of the hydrogenated products in the zeolite micropores. PMID:27308846

  18. Quantifying defects in zeolites and zeolite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Karl Daniel

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates that are frequently used as catalysts to transform chemical feedstocks into more useful materials in a size- or shape-selective fashion; they are one of the earliest forms of nanotechnology. Zeolites can also be used, especially in the form of zeolite membranes (layers of zeolite on a support), to separate mixtures based on the size of the molecules. Recent advances have also created the possibility of using zeolites as alkaline catalysts, in addition to their traditional applications as acid catalysts and catalytic supports. Transport and catalysis in zeolites are greatly affected by physical and chemical defects. Such defects can be undesirable (in the case of zeolite membranes), or desirable (in the case of nitrogen-doped alkaline zeolites). Studying zeolites at the relevant length scales requires indirect experimental methods such as vapor adsorption or atomic-scale modeling such as electronic structure calculations. This dissertation explores both experimental and theoretical characterization of zeolites and zeolite membranes. Physical defects, important in membrane permeation, are studied using physical adsorption experiments and models of membrane transport. The results indicate that zeolite membranes can be modeled as a zeolite powder on top of a support---a "supported powder," so to speak---for the purposes of adsorption. Mesoporosity that might be expected based on permeation and confocal microscopy measurements is not observed. Chemical defects---substitutions of nitrogen for oxygen---are studied using quantum mechanical models that predict spectroscopic properties. These models provide a method for simulating the 29Si NMR spectra of nitrogendefected zeolites. They also demonstrate that nitrogen substitutes into the zeolite framework (not just on the surface) under the proper reaction conditions. The results of these studies will be valuable to experimentalists and theorists alike in our efforts to understand the

  19. ZEOLITES: EFFECTIVE WATER PURIFIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are known for their adsorption, ion exchange and catalytic properties. Various natural zeolites are used as odor and moisture adsorbents and water softeners. Due to their acidic nature, synthetic zeolites are commonly employed as solid acid catalysts in petrochemical ind...

  20. Carbon-14 tracer study of the conversion of labeled n-propylcyclopentane during n-octane aromatization with a Pt-zeolite L catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Chenshi Huang; Sparks, D.E.; Dabbagh, H.A.; Davis, B.H. )

    1992-03-01

    n-Propylene cyclopentane or n-propylcyclopentane labeled in the ring with {sup 14}C was converted together with n-octane using a Pt-KL zeolite catalyst operating at 482 C and ca. 14 bar. The products indicate that hydrogenolysis to produce isooctanes, not ring expansion to produce aromatics, is the major reaction pathway for the alkyl cyclopentane compound. Dilution of the {sup 14}C activity in n-propylcyclopentane during the conversion shows that C{sub 5} as well as C{sub 6} cyclization occurs during the conversion of n-octane. The current data were obtained with a catalyst that has a Pt crystal size range that is similar to those reported earlier. Furthermore, the conversion data for n-octane and n-propylcyclopentane using the Pt-KL zeolite catalyst are very similar to data obtained with catalysts based on other nonacidic supports where the Pt crystals cannot be located in a zeolite type channel. Thus, for n-octane conversion, it appears that the Pt in L zeolite catalysts has selectivities that are similar to Pt on other nonacidic supports.

  1. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Do, Phuong T M; McAtee, Jesse R; Watson, Donald A; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structure of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst has been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels-Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions. PMID:23316419

  2. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Do, Phuong T.M.; McAtee, Jesse R.; Watson, Donald A.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structure of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst has been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels-Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions. PMID:23316419

  3. Acidic and basic properties of zeolite-containing cracking catalyst in the process of butene-1 isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursalova, L. A.; Guseinova, E. A.; Adzhamov, K. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The process of butene-1 isomerization in the presence of two groups of samples of zeolite-containing catalyst (ZCC) that earlier participated in the traditional and oxidative catalytic cracking of vacuum gasoil is investigated. It is established that the nature of the reaction mixture and conditions of the cracking process are key factors in forming the acidic and basic properties of the catalyst. It is shown that the highest activity in the butene-1 isomerization into cis-/ trans-butene-2 is demonstrated by ZCC samples that participated in the oxidative catalytic cracking (oxycracking). It is suggested that the enhanced catalytic activity of this group of ZCC samples was related to the availability of acid-base centers in the form of radical-like oxygen along with protic- and aprotic-type acidic centers in the structure of the oxidative compaction products.

  4. Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Dähn, R.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-04-01

    In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

  5. Decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane over CeO2 modified USY zeolite catalysts: effect of acidity and redox property on the catalytic behavior.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Xue, Xiaomin; Zhou, Renxian

    2010-11-15

    CeO(2) modified ultrastable Y zeolite (CeO(2)-USY) catalysts were prepared and were used as the catalysts for the decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE). The catalytic behavior of these catalysts was evaluated by micro-reaction and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) technique. The results reveal that CeO(2)-USY catalysts exhibit good catalytic activity for DCE decomposition and high selectivity to the formation of CO(2) and HCl. Both acidity and redox property play important roles in the DCE decomposition, and the synergy between CeO(2) species and USY zeolite shows an enhancement in the catalytic activity for DCE decomposition. CeO(2)-USY (1:8) with high dispersion of CeO(2) species and a much more suitable combination of acidity and redox property exhibits the best catalytic activity. PMID:20709452

  6. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N.; Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  7. ZSM-5 zeolite single crystals with b-axis-aligned mesoporous channels as an efficient catalyst for conversion of bulky organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fujian; Willhammar, Tom; Wang, Liang; Zhu, Longfeng; Sun, Qi; Meng, Xiangju; Carrillo-Cabrera, Wilder; Zou, Xiaodong; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2012-03-14

    The relatively small and sole micropores in zeolite catalysts strongly influence the mass transfer and catalytic conversion of bulky molecules. We report here aluminosilicate zeolite ZSM-5 single crystals with b-axis-aligned mesopores, synthesized using a designed cationicamphiphilic copolymer as a mesoscale template. This sample exhibits excellent hydrothermal stability. The orientation of the mesopores was confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. More importantly, the b-axis-aligned mesoporous ZSM-5 shows much higher catalytic activities for bulky substrate conversion than conventional ZSM-5 and ZSM-5 with randomly oriented mesopores. The combination of good hydrothermal stability with high activities is important for design of novel zeolite catalysts. The b-axis-aligned mesoporous ZSM-5 reported here shows great potential for industrial applications. PMID:22380406

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF H-Y AND CR-Y ZEOLITE CATALYSTS DURING THE OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF CFC11 AND CFC12

    EPA Science Inventory

    The long term stability-deactivation characteristics of two Y zeolite catalysts, namely H-Y and cation exchanged Cr-Y, were studied during the oxidative destruction of CFC11 and CFC12 feeds. Experiments were carried out at 300 degrees C and 500 h-1 space velocity. Properties of...

  9. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2004-06-30

    The focus of this project is to improve the catalytic performance of zeolite Y for heavy petroleum hydrocracking by synthesizing nanoparticles of the zeolite ({approx}20-30 nm) inside nanoporous silicate or aluminosilicate hosts of similar pore diameters. The encapsulated zeolite nanoparticles are expected to possess pores of reduced diffusional path lengths, hence hydrocarbon substrates will diffuse in, are converted and the products quickly diffused out. This is expected to prevent over-reaction, hence minimizing pore blockage and active sites deactivation. In this phase of the project, research activities were focused on refining procedures to: (a) improve the synthesis of ordered, high surface area nanoporous silica, such as SBA-15, with expanded pore size using trimethylbenzene as additive to the parent SBA-15 synthesis mixture; and (b) reduce the particle size of zeolite Y such that they can be effectively incorporated into the nanoporous silicas. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica containing enlarged pores of diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished.

  10. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram

    2003-09-03

    The focus of this project is to improve the catalytic performance of zeolite Y for petroleum hydrocracking by synthesizing nanoparticles of the zeolite ({approx}20-25 nm) inside nanoporous silicate or aluminosilicate hosts. The encapsulated zeolite nanoparticles are expected to possess reduced diffusional path lengths, hence hydrocarbon substrates will diffuse in, are converted and the products quickly diffused out. This is expected to prevent over-reaction and the blocking of the zeolite pores and active sites will be minimized. In this phase of the project, procedures for the synthesis of ordered nanoporous silica, such as SBA-15, using block copolymers and nonionic surfactant were successful reproduced. Expansion of the pores sizes of the nanoporous silica using trimethylbenzene is suggested based on shift in the major X-Ray Diffraction peak in the products to lower 2 angles compared with the parent SBA-15 material. The synthesis of ordered nanoporous materials with aluminum incorporated in the predominantly silicate framework was attempted but is not yet successful, and the procedures needs will be repeated and modified as necessary. Nanoparticles of zeolite Y of particle sizes in the range 40 nm to 120 nm were synthesized in the presence of TMAOH as the particle size controlling additive.

  11. Chemical imaging of catalyst deactivation during the conversion of renewables at the single particle level: etherification of biomass-based polyols with alkenes over H-Beta zeolites.

    PubMed

    Parvulescu, Andrei N; Mores, Davide; Stavitski, Eli; Teodorescu, Cristian M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Gebbink, Robertus J M Klein; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2010-08-01

    The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear alpha-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 microm large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols. PMID:20662520

  12. One-Pot Template-Free Synthesis of Cu-MOR Zeolite toward Efficient Catalyst Support for Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural under Ambient Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Jingyan; Hou, Wei; Liu, Yangqing; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Supported catalysts are widely studied, and exploring new promising supports is significant to access more applications. In this work, novel copper-containing MOR-type zeolites Cu-MOR were synthesized in a one-pot template-free route and served as efficient supports for vanadium oxide. In the heterogeneous oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF) with molecular oxygen (O2) under ambient pressure, the obtained catalyst demonstrated high yield (91.5%) and good reusability. Even under the ambient air pressure, it gave a DFF yield of 72.1%. Structure-activity relationship analysis indicated that the strong interaction between the framework Cu species and the guest V sites accounted for the remarkable performance. This work reveals that the Cu-MOR zeolite uniquely acts as the robust support toward well-performed non-noble metal heterogeneous catalyst for biomass conversion. PMID:27523255

  13. Photocatalytic oxidation of NOx over TiO2/HZSM-5 catalysts in the presence of water vapor: Effect of hydrophobicity of zeolites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gaofei; Hu, Yun; Jiang, Shumei; Wei, Chaohai

    2012-07-15

    TiO(2) hybridized with HZSM-5 zeolites photocatalysts were prepared by a simple solid state dispersion method. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance and FT-IR spectroscopy. The photocatalytic oxidation of NO(x) over TiO(2)/HZSM-5 having different Si/Al ratios was carried out under various levels of humidity and different pre-adsorption times in dark. The TiO(2)/HZSM-5 composite catalysts exhibited higher NO conversion and lower NO(2) formation than pure TiO(2). Pre-adsorption with water vapor and the high humidity during the photoreaction were harmful to the reactivity of TiO(2) hybridized with hydrophilic HZSM-5 zeolite. However, the photocatalytic reactivity of TiO(2) hybridized with hydrophobic zeolite varied little with increase in humidity. The results indicated that the high photocatalytic reactivity of TiO(2)/HZSM-5 catalysts is largely depended on the hydrophobicity of the zeolites. PMID:22579762

  14. A Single-Site Platinum CO Oxidation Catalyst in Zeolite KLTL: Microscopic and Spectroscopic Determination of the Locations of the Platinum Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Joseph D.; Chotigkrai, Nutchapon; Xu, Pinghong; Enderle, Bryan; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-01

    A stable site-isolated mononuclear platinum catalyst with a well-defined structure is presented. Platinum complexes supported in zeolite KLTL were synthesized from [Pt(NH3)4](NO3)2, oxidized at 633 K, and used to catalyze CO oxidation. Finally, IR and X-ray absorption spectra and electron micrographs determine the structures and locations of the platinum complexes in the zeolite pores, demonstrate the platinum-support bonding, and show that the platinum remained site isolated after oxidation and catalysis.

  15. Control of carbon monoxide (CO) from automobile exhaust by a dealuminated zeolite supported regenerative MnCo2O4 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Arun, P S; Ranjith, B P; Shibli, S M A

    2013-03-19

    We synthesized MnCo(2)O(4) catalyst with very high porosity on the surface of dealuminated zeolite molecular sieves (DAZMS) for CO oxidation under actual automobile conditions. The MnCo(2)O(4) catalyst was selected on the basis of preliminary DFT study using the software ADF BAND. The MnCo(2)O(4) catalyst had comparatively higher CO adsorption energy and very low oxygen vacancy formation energy. The synthesized MnCo(2)O(4)/DAZMS catalyst was characterized by XRD, XRF, BET, SEM, and Confocal Microscopy. The Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that porosity of the dealuminated zeolite surface was significantly enhanced after the catalyst loading process. The completely precious metal free and DAZMS-supported catalyst exhibited excellent CO oxidation ability with renewed activity for seven months under actual automobile conditions with reference to normal and cold start conditions. The synthesized MnCo(2)O(4)/DAZMS not only exhibited surprisingly high catalytic activity for CO oxidation at a temperature resembling a cold start period but was also sufficiently stable/active under actual automobile conditions and ambient conditions containing large amounts of CO,H(2)O,CO(2), and NO(x) at 155-715 °C. These significant results revealed the flexible use of the present catalyst system for a wide variety of automobiles from a small gasoline-fuelled vehicle to a large diesel-fuelled vehicle that may produce high CO-content exhaust. PMID:23406461

  16. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  17. Direct Decomposition of Methane to Hydrogen on Metal-Loaded Zeolite Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

    2005-08-01

    The regeneration of a Ru-Mo/ZSM5 catalyst used to produce hydrogen by decomposition reactions was examined at 873 K in either flowing hydrogen or air. The Ru-Mo/ZSM5 catalyst was deactivated under methane decomposition reaction conditions at temperatures of 873, 973, and 1073 K. The effect of reaction and regeneration conditions on catalyst activity, BET surface area and temperature programmed oxidation profiles is discussed. Regeneration using hydrogen was found to be less effective than air oxidation for the conditions explored. The methane decomposition reactions produced hydrogen primarily through the formation of liquid aromatics. The highest hydrogen production rates were obtained at 1073 K, however, deactivation was greatest at this temperature and the catalyst was not fully regenerated. A better selectivity to liquids combined with a relatively stable catalyst activity indicates that 973 K may be adequate for longer term catalyst and cycled regeneration analyses.

  18. HERFD-XANES and XES as complementary operando tools for monitoring the structure of Cu-based zeolite catalysts during NOx-removal by ammonia SCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günter, T.; Doronkin, D. E.; Carvalho, H. W. P.; Casapu, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the potential of hard X-ray techniques to characterize catalysts under working conditions. Operando high energy resolution fluorescence detected (HERFD) XANES and valence to core (vtc) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have been used in a spatially-resolved manner to study Cu-zeolite catalysts during the standard-SCR reaction and related model conditions. The results show a gradient in Cu oxidation state and coordination along the catalyst bed as the reactants are consumed. Vtc-XES gives complementary information on the direct adsorption of ammonia at the Cu sites. The structural information on the catalyst shows the suitability of X-ray techniques to understand catalytic reactions and to facilitate catalyst optimization.

  19. Conversion of waste cooking oil to jet biofuel with nickel-based mesoporous zeolite Y catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    Three types of zeolites (Meso-Y, SAPO-34, and HY) loaded with nickel were used to convert waste cooking oil to jet biofuel. Mesoporous zeolite Y exhibited a high jet range alkane selectivity of 53% and a proper jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity of 13.4% in liquid fuel products. Reaction temperature was optimized to produce quality jet biofuel. Zeolite Meso-Y exhibited a high jet range alkane yield of 40.5% and a low jet range aromatic hydrocarbon yield of 11.3% from waste cooking oil at 400°C. The reaction pathway for converting waste cooking oil to jet biofuel was proposed. Experimental results showed that waste cooking oil mainly deoxygenated to heptadecane (C17H36) and pentadecane (C15H30) through the decarbonylation pathway for the first 3h. Long chain alkanes cracked into jet range alkanes (C8-C16). Cycloalkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons were produced through cyclization and dehydrogenation pathways. PMID:26342341

  20. Effect of the nature of a structure-forming additive on the physicochemical properties of zeolites and the activity of Zn-containing catalysts based on them in ethane aromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosmerikova, L. N.; Barbashin, Ya. E.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    The effect the nature of the structure-forming additive has on the physicochemical properties of synthesized zeolites and the activity of Zn-containing catalysts prepared on their basis in converting ethane into aromatic hydrocarbons is studied. It is shown that the structure-forming additive plays an important role in the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites. It is found that the highest activity and stability in ethane aromatization is exhibited by a catalyst based on a zeolite synthesized using hexamethylenediamine as a template.

  1. Chromium removal by zeolite-rich materials obtained from an exhausted FCC catalyst: Influence of chromium incorporation on the sorbent structure.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maximiliano R; Pereyra, Andrea M; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Basaldella, Elena I

    2013-10-15

    A spent FCC catalyst was converted into a zeolitic mixture, and the product obtained was afterward used as trapping material for Cr(III) species frequently found in aqueous solutions. Eventual changes in the sorbent structure produced by Cr incorporation were studied by different characterization techniques such as point of zero charge determinations (PZC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and infrared absorption (FTIR). The XRD and FTIR analyses indicated that chromium incorporation produces an amorphization of the material, and PZC measurements show no surface adsorption of charged chromium species. SEM and EDX analyses clearly show that after chromium sorption, the initial microspheroidal catalyst morphology was maintained, and the presence of chromium species was mainly detected in the outer microsphere surface, where the zeolite crystals were hydrothermally grown. PMID:23910499

  2. XAFS Study on Nano-Sized Pd Metal Catalyst Deposited on Ti-Containing Zeolite by a Photo-Assisted Deposition (PAD) Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hiromi; Miura, Yuki; Tomonari, Masanori; Masui, Yosuke; Mori, Kohsuke

    2007-02-02

    The nano-sized Pd metal catalyst can be highly deposited on Ti-containing silicalite zeolite (TS-1) under UV-light irradiation (PAD-Pd/TS-1) using a photo-assisted deposition (PAD) method. The nano-sized Pd metal was deposited having the direct interaction with the photo-excited tetrahedrally coordinated titanium oxide moieties of TS-1. Under a flow of H2 and O2 in water, H2O2 could be synthesized efficiently on this nano-sized Pd metal catalyst.

  3. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  4. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  5. Transient Spectroscopic Characterization of the Genesis of a Ruthenium Complex Catalyst Supported on Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Isao; Gates, Bruce C.

    2010-01-12

    A mononuclear ruthenium complex anchored to dealuminated zeolite HY, Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sup 2+} (acac = acetylacetonate, C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sup 2}{sup -}), was characterized in flow reactors by transient infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Ru K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The combined results show how the supported complex was converted into a form that catalyzes ethene conversion to butene. The formation of these species resulted from the removal of acac ligands from the ruthenium (as shown by IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra) and the simultaneous decrease in the symmetry of the ruthenium complex, with the ruthenium remaining mononuclear and its oxidation state remaining essentially unchanged (as shown by EXAFS and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra). The removal of anionic acac ligands from the ruthenium was evidently compensated by the bonding of other anionic ligands, such as hydride from H2 in the feed stream, to form species suggested to be Ru(H)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +}, which is coordinatively unsaturated and inferred to react with ethene, leading to the observed formation of butene in a catalytic process.

  6. Template-synthesized porous silicon carbide as an effective host for zeolite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lijun; Ma, Ding; Yao, Songdong; Liu, Xiumei; Han, Xiuwen; Shen, Wenjie; Bao, Xinhe

    2009-12-14

    A facile method has been developed for the fabrication of porous silicon carbide (SiC) by means of sintering a mixture of SiC powder and carbon pellets at a relatively lower temperature, that is, 1450 degrees C, in air. The pore density and the total pore volume of the resulting porous SiC could be tuned by changing the initial SiC/C weight ratio. The structure evolution and the associated property changes during the preparation were examined through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, (29)Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, and mercury-intrusion porosimetry analyses. Silica and SiO(x)C(y) ceramics formed in situ during the calcination process acted as binders of the porous SiC grains. The porous SiC can be used as a host for the growth of ZSM-5 zeolite crystals to form the ZSM-5/porous-SiC composite material. After loading another catalytic active component of molybdenum, a novel catalytic material, Mo-ZSM-5/porous-SiC, was obtained, which exhibited improved catalytic activity in the methane dehydroaromatization reaction. PMID:19885894

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of aluminum-free Mn-β zeolite: a catalyst for phenol hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Wu, Juan; Gao, Bingying; He, Hongyun

    2015-02-01

    Zeolite beta, especially heteroatomic zeolite beta, has been widely used in the industries of fine chemicals and petroleum refining because of its outstanding thermal stability, acid resistance, and unique 3-D open-frame structure. In this paper, aluminum-free Mn-β zeolite was hydrothermally synthesized in the SiO2-MnO2-(TEA)2O-NaF-H2O system. The effect of the chemical composition of the precursor mixture to the crystallization of the Al-free Mn-β zeolite was investigated. The synthesized Al-free Mn-β zeolite was characterized by inductively coupled plasma (ICP), XRD, thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), N2 adsorption-desorption, FT-IR, UV-vis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that the synthesized zeolite has a structure of β zeolite with good crystallinity and Mn ions present in the framework of the zeolite. The synthesized Al-free Mn-β zeolite shows great catalytic activity toward the phenol hydroxylation reaction using H2O2 as the oxidant. Approximately 35% of phenol conversion and ∼98% of dihydroxybenzene selectivity can be obtained under the optimal conditions. PMID:25556927

  8. A Comparative Study of N2O Formation during the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3 on Zeolite Supported Cu Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hai-Ying; Wei, Zhehao; Kollar, Marton; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study was carried out on a small-pore CHA.Cu and a large-pore BEA.Cu zeolite catalyst to understand the lower N2O formation on small-pore zeolite supported Cu catalysts in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3. On both catalysts, the N2O yield increases with an increase in the NO2/NOx ratios of the feed gas, suggesting N2O formation via the decomposition of NH4NO3. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NH4NO3 is more stable on CHA.Cu than on BEA.Cu. In situ FTIR spectra following stepwise (NO2 + O2) and (15NO + NH3 + O2) adsorption and reaction, and product distribution analysis using isotope-labelled reactants, unambiguously prove that surface nitrate groups are essential for the formation of NH4NO3. Furthermore, CHA.Cu is shown to be considerably less active than BEA.Cu in catalyzing NO oxidation and the subsequent formation of surface nitrate groups. Both factors, i.e., (1) the higher thermal stability of NH4NO3 on CHA.Cu, and (2) the lower activity for this catalyst to catalyze NO oxidation and the subsequent formation of surface nitrates, likely contribute to the higher SCR selectivity with less N2O formation on this catalyst as compared to BEA.Cu. The latter is determined as the primary reason since surface nitrates are the source that leads to the formation of NH4NO3 on the catalysts.

  9. Large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals as models for the methanol-to-hydrocarbons process: bridging the gap between single-particle examination and bulk catalyst analysis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jan P; Mores, Davide; Aramburo, Luis R; Teketel, Shewangizaw; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Olsbye, Unni; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-06-24

    The catalytic, deactivation, and regeneration characteristics of large coffin-shaped H-ZSM-5 crystals were investigated during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction at 350 and 500 °C. Online gas-phase effluent analysis and examination of retained material thereof were used to explore the bulk properties of large coffin-shaped zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in a fixed-bed reactor to introduce them as model catalysts for the MTH reaction. These findings were related to observations made at the individual particle level by using polarization-dependent UV-visible microspectroscopy and mass spectrometric techniques after reaction in an in situ microspectroscopy reaction cell. Excellent agreement between the spectroscopic measurements and the analysis of hydrocarbon deposits by means of retained hydrocarbon analysis and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry of spent catalyst materials was observed. The obtained data reveal a shift towards more condensed coke deposits on the outer zeolite surface at higher reaction temperatures. Zeolites in the fixed-bed reactor setup underwent more coke deposition than those reacted in the in situ microspectroscopy reaction cell. Regeneration studies of the large zeolite crystals were performed by oxidation in O2 /inert gas mixtures at 550 °C. UV-visible microspectroscopic measurements using the oligomerization of styrene derivatives as probe reaction indicated that the fraction of strong acid sites decreased during regeneration. This change was accompanied by a slight decrease in the initial conversion obtained after regeneration. H-ZSM-5 deactivated more rapidly at higher reaction temperature. PMID:23649944

  10. Enhancement of Treatment Efficiency of Recalcitrant Wastewater Containing Textile Dyes Using a Newly Developed Iron Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 Heterogeneous Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Asghar, Anam; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Fenton oxidation, an advanced oxidation process, is an efficient method for the treatment of recalcitrant wastewaters. Unfortunately, it utilizes H2O2 and iron-based homogeneous catalysts, which lead to the formation of high volumes of sludge and secondary pollutants. To overcome these problems, an alternate option is the usage of heterogeneous catalyst. In this study, a heterogeneous catalyst was developed to provide an alternative solution for homogeneous Fenton oxidation. Iron Zeolite Socony Mobile-5 (Fe-ZSM-5) was synthesized using a new two-step process. Next, the catalyst was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and tested against a model wastewater containing the azo dye Acid Blue 113. Results showed that the loading of iron particles reduced the surface area of the catalyst from 293.59 to 243.93 m2/g; meanwhile, the average particle size of the loaded material was 12.29 nm. Furthermore, efficiency of the developed catalyst was evaluated by performing heterogeneous Fenton oxidation. Taguchi method was coupled with principal component analysis in order to assess and optimize mineralization efficiency. Experimental results showed that under optimized conditions, over 99.7% degradation and 77% mineralization was obtained, with a 90% reduction in the consumption of the developed catalyst. Furthermore, the developed catalyst was stable and reusable, with less than 2% leaching observed under optimized conditions. Thus, the present study proved that newly developed catalyst has enhanced the oxidation process and reduced the chemicals consumption. PMID:26517827

  11. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate. PMID:24790940

  12. Chemical Imaging of Catalyst Deactivation during the Conversion of Renewables at the Single Particle Level: The Etherification of Biomass-based Polyols with Alkenes over H-Beta Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    A Parvulescu; D Mores; E Stavitski; C Teodorescu; P Bruijnicx; R Klein Gebbing; B Weckhuysen

    2011-12-31

    The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear {alpha}-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 {micro}m large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols.

  13. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  14. Selective synthesis and characterization of single-site HY zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and their use as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khivantsev, Konstantin

    Single-site Rh(CO)2, Rh(C2H4)2 and Rh(NO)2 complexes anchored on various dealuminated HY zeolites can be used as precursors for the selective surface mediated synthesis of well-defined site-isolated Rh(CO)(H)x complexes. DFT calculations and D 2 isotope exchange experiments provide strong evidence for the formation of a family of site isolated mononuclear rhodium carbonyl hydride complexes (including the first examples of RhH complexes with undissociated H2 ligands): Rh(CO)(H2), Rh(CO)(H)2, and Rh(CO)(H). The fraction of each individual complex formed varies significantly with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite and the nature of the precursor used. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(CO)2 complexes are very active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. There is strong evidence for the cooperation mechanism between mononuclear rhodium complexes and Bronsted acid sites of the zeolite support in C-C bond formation process, as well as ethane formation. Finally, it is shown that the dimerization pathway selectivity can be progressively tuned (and completely switched off) by modifying the number of Bronsted acid sites on the zeolite surface. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(NO)2 complexes can be selectively formed upon exposure of Rh(CO)2/HY to the gas phase NO/He. They are structurally similar to Rh(CO)2/HY with Rh(I) retaining square planar geometry and nitrosyl ligands adopting a linear configuration. Rh(NO)2/HY30 is active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. This is the first unprecedented example of a supported transition-metal nitrosyl complex capable of performing a catalytic reaction. Moreover, this is the first example of a site-isolated Rh complex with ligands other than ethylene or carbonyl, which can catalyze both ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization. Unlike its dicarbonyl counterpart, dinitrosyl rhodium complex has a uniquely different reactivity towards ethylene and hydrogen

  15. Hexane cracking over steamed phosphated zeolite H-ZSM-5: promotional effect on catalyst performance and stability.

    PubMed

    van der Bij, Hendrik E; Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Wang, Jian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-12-15

    The nature behind the promotional effect of phosphorus on the catalytic performance and hydrothermal stability of zeolite H-ZSM-5 has been studied using a combination of (27) Al and (31) P MAS NMR spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption tomography and n-hexane catalytic cracking, complemented with NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and N2 physisorption. Phosphated H-ZSM-5 retains more acid sites and catalytic cracking activity after steam treatment than its non-phosphated counterpart, while the selectivity towards propylene is improved. It was established that the stabilization effect is twofold. First, the local framework silico-aluminophosphate (SAPO) interfaces, which form after phosphatation, are not affected by steam and hold aluminum atoms fixed in the zeolite lattice, preserving the pore structure of zeolite H-ZSM-5. Second, the four-coordinate framework aluminum can be forced into a reversible sixfold coordination by phosphate. These species remain stationary in the framework under hydrothermal conditions as well. Removal of physically coordinated phosphate after steam-treatment leads to an increase in the number of strong acid sites and increased catalytic activity. We propose that the improved selectivity towards propylene during catalytic cracking can be attributed to local SAPO interfaces located at channel intersections, where they act as impediments in the formation of bulky carbenium ions and therefore suppress the bimolecular cracking mechanism. PMID:25370739

  16. Hydrocarbon cracking with mixture of zeolites y and zsm-5

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1981-09-15

    A hydrocarbon cracking catalyst comprises an ultrastable y-type crystalline zeolite, a small pore crystalline zsm-type zeolite, an inorganic oxide matrix and, optionally, a porous inert component. The cracking catalyst has a high activity and selectivity for the production of high octane naphtha fractions from higher boiling point hydrocarbonaceous oils. Catalytic cracking processes utilizing the catalyst are also provided.

  17. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distancesmore » determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction of the catalytic properties of numerous supported metal complexes, as summarized in detail here.« less

  18. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distances determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction

  19. The effect of soot on ammonium nitrate species and NO2 selective catalytic reduction over Cu-zeolite catalyst-coated particulate filter.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Oana; Tamm, Stefanie; Stenfeldt, Marie; Olsson, Louise

    2016-02-28

    interacting with the ammonium nitrate species on the CuxOy or other copper species on the surface of the zeolite particles, which reduces the ammonium nitrate blocking of the catalyst and thereby results in higher NO2 SCR activity. PMID:26755757

  20. Synthesis and testing of nanosized zeolite Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Davood

    This work focuses on the synthesis and testing of nanosized zeolite Y. The synthesis formulations of faujasite-type structure of zeolite Y prepared in nanosized form are described. The synthetic zeolite Y is the most widely employed for the preparation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts. The synthesis of zeolite Y is very complicated process. The mean particle size of zeolite Y is 1800 nm. The major challenge of this work involved reducing this average particle size to less than 500 nm. The preliminary experiments were conducted to obtain the pure zeolite Y using the soluble silicates as a silica source. This was achieved by applying the experimental design approach to study the effects of many parameters. The ageing time turned out to be the most significant variable affecting product purity. Based on the preliminary results, a detailed investigation was carried out to determine the effects of silica-alumina precursor preparations on zeolite Y synthesis. Aluminosilicate precursors were prepared by gelling and precipitation of soluble silicate. The as-prepared precursors were used for the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolite Y. The procedure of the precipitation of soluble silicate yielded pure zeolite Y at the conventional synthesis conditions. The extent of purity of zeolite Y depends on the surface areas of aluminosilicate precursors. A novel approach to zeolite Y synthesis was employed for the preparation of the pure nanosized zeolite Y. This was achieved by applying the method of impregnation of precipitated silica. This novel method of impregnation for zeolite Y preparation allows eliminating the vigorous agitation step required for the preparation of a homogeneous silica solution, thereby simplifying the synthesis of zeolite Y in one single vessel. In case of the synthesis of nanosized zeolite Y, the effect of varying the organic templates on the formation of nanosized particles of zeolite Y was investigated, while all other reaction parameters were

  1. Preparation of USY zeolite VOx supported catalysts from V(AcAc)3 and NH4VO3. Catalytic properties for the dehydrogenation of n-butane in oxygen-free atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Elba M; Sanchez, Miguel D; Tonetto, Gabriela; Volpe, María A

    2005-12-01

    The preparation of different samples of vanadia supported on ultrastable zeolite (VO(x)/USY) is discussed. The samples were prepared in order to obtain highly dispersed V-species, avoiding the formation of crystalline vanadia and the destruction of the zeolite framework. Two methods were employed for preparing VO(x)/USY samples: an organic route using V(AcAc)3 and an inorganic route using NH4VO3. The characterization of the samples was performed with XRD, TPR, NH3-TPD, and N2 isotherms. From these results it is concluded that when VO(x) is supported on the surface of USY from acidic aqueous solution of ammonium metavanadate, the destruction of the zeolite framework is accomplished. For higher pH values in the impregnating solution, undesired V2O5 is formed on the USY surface. On the other hand, VO(x)/USY prepared from the organic precursor shows no destruction of the USY structure. In addition, highly dispersed VO(x) are formed, though for relatively high V loadings (6%) an obstruction of the zeolite windows takes place. The samples are tested as catalysts for gas phase dehydrogenation of n-butane to olefins. The catalysts prepared from NH4VO3 are almost inactive for the reaction. On the other hand, both samples prepared from V(AcAc)3 present initial conversion levels in the 8-12% range. However, the selectivity depends on the V loading, the catalysts with 6% loading being the most selective (75%). The catalytic patterns of the samples (activity and selectivity) are in agreement with the physicochemical features of the VO(x)/USY surface. PMID:16023658

  2. NO{sub X} REDUCTION BEHAVIOR OF ALUMINA AND ZEOLITE CATALYSTS IN COMBINATION WITH NON-THERMAL PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, A.G.

    2000-08-20

    Lean burn gasoline and diesel engines provide improved fuel economy when compared to engines operating under stoichiometric fuel/air conditions. At the same time, lean burn and diesel engines present a problem for emission control. Because they operate under oxidizing conditions, the conventional three-way catalyst is not effective in NOx reduction [1,2]. In addition, the wide temperature range of automobile exhaust gases present a challenge for catalyst design. The temperature of exhaust gases from a light duty diesel engine can vary from 150 to 500 C, depending on the operating conditions. To date, a catalyst that operates with high NOx conversion efficiency over the entire operating range has not been found. Non-thermal plasma assisted catalysis has been shown to be a promising technology for NOx reduction in lean burn and diesel exhaust gases [3,4]. The approach exploited in this paper is to use a plasma in combination with several catalysts, each of which are active over unique temperature ranges. It was reported in the literature, that the one of the essential roles of plasma treatment is to oxidize NO to easier reducible NO2 [7]. In this contribution, the other important function of plasma treatment, namely partial oxidation of propylene, will be demonstrated.

  3. Cracking vegetable oil from Callophylluminnophyllum L. seeds to bio-gasoline by Ni-Mo/Al2O3 and Ni-Mo/Zeolite as micro-porous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitri, Effendi, R.; Tursiloadi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Natural minerals such as zeolite are local natural resources in the various regions in Indonesia. Studies on the application of natural mineral currently carried out by national research institutions, among others, as a filler, bleaching agent, or dehydration agent. However, not many studies that utilize these natural minerals as green catalysts material which has high performance for biomass conversion processes and ready to be applied directly by the bio-fuel industry. The trend movement of green and sustainable chemistry research that designing environmentally friendly chemical processes from renewable raw materials to produce innovative products derived biomass for bio-fuel. Callophylluminnophyllum L. seeds can be used as raw material for bio-energy because of its high oil content. Fatty acid and triglyceride compounds from this oil can be cracked into bio-gasoline, which does not contain oxygen in the hydrocarbon structure. Bio-gasoline commonly is referred to as drop-in biofuel because it can be directly used as a substitute fuel. This paper focused on the preparation and formulation of the catalyst NiMo/H-Zeolite and Ni-Mo/Al2O3 which were used in hydro-cracking process of oil from Callophylluminnophyllum L. seeds to produce bio-gasoline. The catalysts were analyzed using XRD, BET and IR-adsorbed pyridine method. The results of hydro-cracking products mostly were paraffin (C10-C19) straight chain, with 59.5 % peak area based on GC-MS analysis.

  4. Towards a full understanding of the nature of Ni(II) species and hydroxyl groups over highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolite supported nickel catalysts prepared by a deposition-precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Hui; Chao, Zi-Sheng; He, Hao; Huang, Chen; Liu, Ya-Juan; Yi, Wen-Jun; Wei, Xue-Ling; An, Jun-Fang

    2016-02-14

    Highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolite supported nickel catalysts prepared by a deposition-precipitation (D-P) method were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), hydrogen temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2-absorption/desorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (27)Al magic-angle nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) techniques. The results showed that the D-P of nickel species occurred predominantly on the internal surface of highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolite, in which the internal silanol groups located on the hydroxylated mesopores or nanocavities played a key role. During the D-P process, nickel hydroxide was first deposited-precipitated via olation/polymerization of neutral hydroxoaqua nickel species over the HZSM-5 zeolite. With the progress of the D-P process, 1 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate was formed over the HZSM-5 via the hetero-condensation/polymerization between charged hydroxoaqua nickel species and monomer silicic species generated due to the partial dissolution of the HZSM-5 framework. The 1 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate could also be generated via the hydrolytic adsorption of hydroxoaqua nickel species and their subsequent olation condensation. After calcination, the deposited-precipitated nickel hydroxide was decomposed into nickel oxide, while the 1 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate was transformed into 2 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate. According to the above mechanism, Ni(ii) species were present both in the form of nickel oxide and 2 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate, which were mutually separated from each other, being highly dispersed over HZSM-5 zeolite. PMID:26745008

  5. Mesostructured zeolites: bridging the gap between zeolites and MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Prasomsri, Teerawit; Jiao, Wenqian; Weng, Steve Z; Garcia Martinez, Javier

    2015-05-28

    Surfactant-templating is one of the most versatile and useful techniques to implement mesoporous systems into solid materials. Various strategies based on various interactions between surfactants and solid precursors have been explored to produce new structures. Zeolites are invaluable as size- and shape-selective solid acid catalysts. Nevertheless, their micropores impose limitations on the mass transport of bulky feed and/or product molecules. Many studies have attempted to address this by utilizing surfactant-assisting technology to alleviate the diffusion constraints. However, most efforts have failed due to micro/mesopore phase separation. Recently, a new technique combining the uses of cationic surfactants and mild basic solutions was introduced to synthesise mesostructured zeolites. These materials sustain the unique characteristics of zeolites (i.e., strong acidity, crystallinity, microporosity, and hydrothermal stability), including tunable mesopore sizes and degrees of mesoporosity. The mesostructured zeolites are now commercially available through Rive Technology, and show superior performance in VGO cracking. This feature article provides an overview of recent explorations in the introduction of mesoporosity into zeolites using surfactant-templating techniques. Various porous materials, preparation methods, physical and catalytic properties of mesostructured zeolites will be discussed. PMID:25866848

  6. Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

    2009-06-30

    This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  7. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-22

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  8. Properties of Zeolite A Obtained from Powdered Laundry Detergent: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoot, Alison L.; Lindquist, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce students to the myriad properties of zeolites using the sodium form of zeolite A (Na-A) from laundry detergent. Experiments include extracting Na-A from detergent, water softening properties, desiccant properties, ion-exchange properties, and Zeolite HA as a dehydration catalyst. (JRH)

  9. Design and fabrication of zeolite macro- and micromembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Lik Hang Joseph

    2001-07-01

    The chemical nature of the support surface influences zeolite nucleation, crystal growth and elm adhesion. It had been demonstrated that chemical modification of support surface can significantly alter the zeolite film and has a good potential for large-scale applications for zeolite membrane production. The incorporation of titanium and vanadium metal ions into the structural framework of MFI zeolite imparts the material with catalytic properties. The effects of silica and metal (i.e., Ti and V) content, template concentration and temperature on the zeolite membrane growth and morphology were investigated. Single-gas permeation experiments were conducted for noble gases (He and Ar), inorganic gases (H2, N2, SF6) and hydrocarbons (methane, n-C4, i-C4) to determine the separation performance of these membranes. Using a new fabrication method based on microelectronic fabrication and zeolite thin film technologies, complex microchannel geometry and network (<5 mum), as well as zeolite arrays (<10 mum) were successfully fabricated onto highly orientated supported zeolite films. The zeolite micropatterns were stable even after repeated thermal cycling between 303 K and 873 K for prolonged periods of time. This work also demonstrates that zeolites (i.e., Sil-1, ZSM-5 and TS-1) can be employed as catalyst, membrane or structural materials in miniature chemical devices. Traditional semiconductor fabrication technology was employed in micromachining the device architecture. Four strategies for the manufacture of zeolite catalytic microreactors were discussed: zeolite powder coating, uniform zeolite film growth, localized zeolite growth, and etching of zeolite-silicon composite film growth inhibitors. Silicalite-1 was also prepared as free-standing membrane for zeolite membrane microseparators.

  10. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  11. Hydrocarbon cracking catalyst and process utilizing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-12-16

    A hydrocarbon cracking catalyst comprises an ultrastable y-type crystalline zeolite, a small pore crystalline zsm-type zeolite, an inorganic oxide matrix and, optionally, a porous inert component. The cracking catalyst has a high activity and selectivity for the production of high octane naphtha fractions from higher boiling point hydrocarbonaceous oils. Catalytic cracking processes utilizing the catalyst are also provided.

  12. Hydrocarbon cracking catalyst and process utilizing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-12-30

    A hydrocarbon cracking catalyst comprises an ultrastable y-type crystalline zeolite, a small pore crystalline zeolite such as mordenite, an inorganic oxide matrix and, optionally, a porous inert component. The cracking catalyst has a high activity and selectivity for the production of high octane naphtha fractions from higher boiling point hydrocarbonaceous oils. Catalytic cracking processes utilizing the catalyst are also provided.

  13. Removal of ethylene from air stream by adsorption and plasma-catalytic oxidation using silver-based bimetallic catalysts supported on zeolite.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quang Hung; Lee, Sang Baek; Mok, Young Sun

    2015-03-21

    Dynamic adsorption of ethylene on 13X zeolite-supported Ag and Ag-M(x)O(y) (M: Co, Cu, Mn, and Fe), and plasma-catalytic oxidation of the adsorbed ethylene were investigated. The experimental results showed that the incorporation of Ag into zeolite afforded a marked enhancement in the adsorptivity for ethylene. The addition of transition metal oxides was found to have a positive influence on the ethylene adsorption, except Fe(x)O(y). The presence of the additional metal oxides, however, appeared to somewhat interrupt the diffusion of ozone into the zeolite micro-pores, leading to a decrease in the plasma-catalytic oxidation efficiency of the ethylene adsorbed there. Among the second additional metal oxides, Fe(x)O(y) was able to reduce the emission of ozone during the plasma-catalytic oxidation stage while keeping a high effectiveness for the oxidative removal of the adsorbed ethylene. The periodical treatment consisting of adsorption followed by plasma-catalytic oxidation may be a promising energy-efficient ethylene abatement method. PMID:25576654

  14. Hydrocracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hilfman, L.; O'Hara, M.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a process for the conversion of heavy hydrocarbon oil boiling above about 650/sup 0/F into lower boiling hydrocarbons, which comprises hydrocracking the heavy oil in admixture with hydrogen and in contact with a catalyst with comprising a ra re earth exchange metal component and a platinum group metal component supported on a mixture of ziegler alumina and a zeolite.

  15. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite for Acylation of Veratrole with Acetic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Aisha Mahmood Abdulkareem, Al-Turkustani; Selvin, Rosilda

    2016-04-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation of veratrole using homogeneous acid catalysts such as AlCl3, FeCl3, ZnCl2, and HF etc. produces acetoveratrone, (3',4'-dimethoxyacetophenone), which is the intermediate for synthesis of papavarine alkaloids. The problems associated with these homogeneous catalysts can be overcome by using heterogeneous solid catalysts. Since acetoveratrone is a larger molecule, large pore Beta zeolites with smaller particle sizes are beneficial for the liquid-phase acylation of veratrole, for easy diffusion of reactants and products. The present study aims in the acylation of veratrole with acetic anhydride using nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite catalyst. A systematic investigation of the effects of various reaction parameters was done. The catalysts were characterized for their structural features by using XRD, TEM and DLS analyses. The catalytic activity of nanocrystalline Beta zeolite was compared with commercial Beta zeolite for the acylation and was found that nanocrystalline Beta zeolite possessed superior activity. PMID:27451793

  16. Atomic sites and stability of Cs+ captured within zeolitic nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaname; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Kurata, Hiroki; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Sasaki, Yukichi

    2013-01-01

    Zeolites have potential application as ion-exchangers, catalysts and molecular sieves. Zeolites are once again drawing attention in Japan as stable adsorbents and solidification materials of fission products, such as 137Cs+ from damaged nuclear-power plants. Although there is a long history of scientific studies on the crystal structures and ion-exchange properties of zeolites for practical application, there are still open questions, at the atomic-level, on the physical and chemical origins of selective ion-exchange abilities of different cations and detailed atomic structures of exchanged cations inside the nanoscale cavities of zeolites. Here, the precise locations of Cs+ ions captured within A-type zeolite were analyzed using high-resolution electron microscopy. Together with theoretical calculations, the stable positions of absorbed Cs+ ions in the nanocavities are identified, and the bonding environment within the zeolitic framework is revealed to be a key factor that influences the locations of absorbed cations. PMID:23949184

  17. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  18. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-12-31

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  19. Olefins from methanol by modified zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, T.; Takegami, Y.

    1982-11-01

    Compares the effects of modified catalysts (ZSM-34 and ZSM-5 class zeolites) on methanol conversion to olefins (MTO) with regard to olefin selectivity and cost. Presents tables with prices of olefins in the US and Japan; comparison of methanol-cracking with naphtha cracking; methanol conversion data for Type-1, Type-II and reference catalysts; hydrocarbon distribution from MTO processes; and speculative economics for MTO processes of Concept-1 and 2. Diagrams the proposed MTO process scheme. Scanning electron micrographs of the zeolite catalysts are shown. Graphs indicate the change of ethylene prices in the US since 1978 and forecast ethylene prices in several countries. Concludes that the prices of ethylene for both MTO processes examined compare favorably with products of conventional processes.

  20. Synthesis strategies in the search for hierarchical zeolites.

    PubMed

    Serrano, D P; Escola, J M; Pizarro, P

    2013-05-01

    formation of organic-inorganic composites that, upon calcination, are transformed into hierarchical zeolites. However, in spite of this impressive progress in novel strategies for the preparation of hierarchical zeolites, significant challenges are still ahead. The overall one is the development of methods that are versatile in terms of zeolite structures and compositions, capable of tuning the secondary porosity properties, and being scaled up in a cost-effective way. Recent works have demonstrated that it is possible to scale-up easily the synthesis of hierarchical zeolites by desilication. Economic aspects may become a significant bottleneck for the commercial application of hierarchical zeolites since most of the synthesis strategies so far developed imply the use of more expensive procedures and reagents compared to conventional zeolites. Nevertheless, the use of hierarchical zeolites as efficient catalysts for the production of high value-added compounds could greatly compensate these increased manufacturing costs. PMID:23138888

  1. Synthesis and catalytic applications of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials

    PubMed Central

    Vernimmen, Jarian; Cool, Pegie

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the last decade, research concerning nanoporous siliceous materials has been focused on mesoporous materials with intrinsic zeolitic features. These materials are thought to be superior, because they are able to combine (i) the enhanced diffusion and accessibility for larger molecules and viscous fluids typical of mesoporous materials with (ii) the remarkable stability, catalytic activity and selectivity of zeolites. This review gives an overview of the state of the art concerning combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. Focus is put on the synthesis and the applications of the combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. The different synthesis approaches and formation mechanisms leading to these materials are comprehensively discussed and compared. Moreover, Ti-containing nanoporous materials as redox catalysts are discussed to illustrate a potential implementation of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. PMID:22259762

  2. Synthesis and characterization of nitrogen substituted zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fulya

    The interest in basic solid materials, particularly for basic zeolites has considerably increased in the last two decades because of their potential use in catalysis and separation. Basic zeolites have most often been obtained by ion-exchange or impregnation with alkali metal cations or grafting of organic bases onto zeolite pore walls. Such materials often suffer from instability and/or pore blockage, because none of these approaches places basic sites directly into the zeolite framework. Recently zeolitic materials have been made with some of the bridging oxygen atoms in Si--O--Si and/or Si--O--Al linkages replaced by NH groups, i.e. by substitution of framework oxygen by nitrogen. As a result, the basic strength of the framework increases due to the lower electronegativity of nitrogen with respect to oxygen. In this study, solid base catalysts are obtained by nitrogen substitution of the faujasite type of zeolites under ammonia flow at high temperatures. The efficiency of the reaction is tested by using zeolites with different aluminum contents and extraframework cations and varying the reaction conditions such as ammonia flow rate, reaction temperature and duration. The characterization studies show that high levels of nitrogen substitution can be achieved while maintaining porosity, particularly for NaY and low-aluminum HY zeolites, without a significant loss in the crystallinity. 27Al and 29 Si MAS NMR experiments performed on the nitrogen substituted zeolites show dealumination of the framework and preferential substitution for Si--OH--Al sites at the early stages of the reaction (temperatures at 750--800 °C). No preference is seen for reactions performed at higher temperatures and longer reaction times (e.g., 850 °C and 48 h). X-ray PDF analysis performed on the modified zeolites show that the Si-N distance in the 1st shell is longer than Si-O bond distance and Si-Si/Al bond distance of the Si-O/N-Si/Al linkage decreases, as an indication of a decrease in

  3. ''KN'' series cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klapstov, V.F.; Khlebrikova, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    The basic directions in improving high-activity zeolitic cracking catalysts at the present stage are improvements in the resistance to attrition and increases in the bulk density of the catalysts, along with a changeover to relatively waste-free catalyst manufacturing technology. Catalysts of the ''KN'' series have been synthesized recently with improved quality characteristics. Low-waste technology is used in manufacturing them. Data are presented which show that the KN catalysts are better than the other Soviet catalysts. The starting materials and reagents in preparing the KN catalysts are technical alumina, rare-earth element nitrates, a natural component (such as clay conforming to specification TU-21-25-146-75), sodium hydroxide, and granulated sodium silicate. The preparation of the KN catalysts is described and no silica gel is used in manufacturing the KN series catalyst, in contrast to the RSG-6Ts catalyst. The use of KN series catalysts in place of KMTsR in catalytic cracking units will result in an increase in the naphtha yield by at least 20% by weight, as well as a reduction of the catalyst consumption by a factor of 2-3. A changeover to the commerical production of this catalyst will make it possible to reduce saline waste by a factor of 8-10 and reduce the catalyst cost by a factor of 1.5-2.

  4. Tight bifunctional hierarchical catalyst.

    PubMed

    Højholt, Karen T; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; Beato, Pablo

    2011-12-28

    A new concept to prepare tight bifunctional catalysts has been developed, by anchoring CoMo(6) clusters on hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites for simultaneous use in HDS and hydrocracking catalysis. The prepared material displays a significant improved activity in HDS catalysis compared to the impregnated counterpart. PMID:22048337

  5. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  6. Dealumination of zeolite {beta} via dicarboxylic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, M.R.; Fung, A.S.; Kennedy, G.J.; Degnan, T.F.

    1996-10-10

    It is demonstrated that zeolite {beta} and zeolite {beta} containing catalysts can be dealuminated to very low acidity levels using a novel oxalic acid treatment without reducing zeolite integrity. The effect of the oxalic acid treatment has been studied over a wide range of treatment conditions for both silica-bound and unbound zeolite {beta} catalysts. Greater than 90% dealumination is observed with a concomitant reduction in n-hexane-cracking activity as measured by the alpha ({alpha}) test. Removal of framework aluminum occurs via a two-step hyrolysis/chelation mechanism, with the oxalic acid acting both as an acid and as a chelating agent. Framework aluminum removal is accompanied by the formation of internal silanol groups. Water soluble aluminum oxalates are present in the extracted solutions. Silanol groups are annealed with extended oxalic acid treatment. Oxalic acid treatment results in a unique contraction of the zeolite {beta} lattice structure not observed for mineral acid treated or steamed zeolite {beta} catalysts. 15 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Effect of crystal size on physical and catalytic properties of ZSM-5 type zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voogd, P.

    1991-09-01

    Diffusion of C6-alkanes in zeolite ZSM-5 and its aluminum free variant silicate-1 receives the greatest attention in the thesis. A physical property of zeolite like the ability to sorb, in particular, nonpolar compounds, was utilized in studying hydrocarbon diffusion by performing adsorption and desorption experiments. The diffusional behavior of the zeolite ZSM-5 and of aluminated silicate-1 at catalytically relevant temperatures was studied by way of a catalytic property of the zeolite. Descriptions of physical studies on nitrogen sorption in ZSM 5 type zeolites and of catalytic studies on the conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons complete the thesis which tries to give a better understanding of adsorptive, diffusional, and catalytic behavior by describing experiments in which only one parameter has been varied, the zeolite crystal size. Discussions and conclusions are directed towards the industrial application of zeolite ZSM-5, as a catalyst.

  8. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

    2014-12-09

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  9. Heterogeneous radiolysis of CO 2 in the presence of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibov, A. A.; Velibekova, G. Z.; Agayev, T. N.

    Radiation catalytic activity of different zeolites Ca A, Na X, Na Y, LiNa Y, Ba M in CO 2 radiolysis has been investigated. This has led to studies in the catalyst porosity, the number of adsorbed CO 2 molecules and adsorption forces on their surface on the yield of CO 2 radiolysis products. A mechanism has been suggested for the observed CO 2 radiolysis processes over different zeolites. One of the possible ways to increase CO yield in radiolytic processes of CO 2 decomposition is to use various types of catalyst. (1-3) Therefore, the development of a scientific basis for appropriate catalyst selection is becoming of particular interest. For this purpose, heterogeneous CO 2 radiolysis in the presence of high-silica zeolites has been studied in this paper.

  10. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Benavides, Pahola T.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  11. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoub, Muhammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Inayat, Abrar

    2014-10-24

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N{sub 2} adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 °C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  12. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Muhammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Inayat, Abrar

    2014-10-01

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N2 adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 °C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  13. Controlled synthesis of mixed-valent Fe-containing metal organic frameworks for the degradation of phenol under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiao; Liu, Min; Li, Keyan; Han, Yitong; Zuo, Yi; Wang, Junhu; Song, Chunshan; Zhang, Guoliang; Guo, Xinwen

    2016-05-10

    A series of MIL-53(Fe)-type materials, Fe(BDC)(DMF,F), were prepared by using different ratios of n(FeCl3)/n(FeCl2), which have varied amounts of Fe(2+) in their frameworks. From FeCl3 to FeCl2, the structures of the synthesized samples transform from MIL-53(Fe) to Fe(BDC)(DMF,F). Along with this structure transformation, the crystal morphology goes through a striking change from a small irregular shape to a big triangular prism. This phenomenon indicates that the addition of FeCl2 is beneficial for the formation of a Fe(BDC)(DMF,F) structure. The catalytic activity of these iron-containing MOFs was tested in phenol degradation with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant at near neutral pH and 35 °C. The degradation efficiency of these samples increases gradually from MIL-53(Fe) to Fe(BDC)(DMF,F). (57)Fe Mössbauer spectra reveal that Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) coexist in the Fe(BDC)(DMF,F) framework, and the highest amount of Fe(2+) in the sample prepared with mixed FeCl3 and FeCl2 is 26.0%. The result illustrates that the amount of Fe(2+) in the samples can be controlled using varied n(FeCl3)/n(FeCl2) in the feed. The diverse amount of Fe(2+) in this series of FeMOF materials exactly explains the distinction of reaction efficiency. The iron leaching tests, structures of the fresh and used catalysts, and the data of the recycling runs show that the Fe-containing MOFs are stable in this liquid-phase reaction. PMID:26862863

  14. Hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Pallavi

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct is classified as types class C and class F. Class C fly ash is traditionally recycled for concrete applications and Class F fly ash often disposed in landfills. Class F poses an environmental hazard due to disposal and leaching of heavy metals into ground water and is important to be recycled in order to mitigate the environmental challenges. A major recycling option is to reuse the fly ash as a low-cost raw material for the production of crystalline zeolites, which serve as catalysts, detergents and adsorbents in the chemical industry. Most of the prior literature of fly ash conversion to zeolites does not focus on creating high zeolite surface area zeolites specifically with hierarchical pore structure, which are very important properties in developing a heterogeneous catalyst for catalysis applications. This research work aids in the development of an economical process for the synthesis of high surface area hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash. In this work, synthesis of zeolites from fly ash using classic hydrothermal treatment approach and fusion pretreatment approach were examined. The fusion pretreatment method led to higher extent of dissolution of silica from quartz and mullite phases, which in turn led to higher surface area and pore size of the zeolite. A qualitative kinetic model developed here attributes the difference in silica content to Si/Al ratio of the beginning fraction of fly ash. At near ambient crystallization temperatures and longer crystallization times, the zeolite formed is a hierarchical faujasite with high surface area of at least 360 m2/g. This work enables the large scale recycling of class F coal fly ash to produce zeolites and mitigate environmental concerns. Design of experiments was used to predict surface area and pore sizes of zeolites - thus obviating the need for intense experimentation. The hierarchical zeolite catalyst supports tested for CO2 conversion, yielded hydrocarbons

  15. Beryllosilicate frameworks and zeolites.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jennifer A; Weller, Mark T

    2010-11-10

    Using inspiration derived from studying naturally occurring minerals, a series of framework beryllosilicates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. These include two new zeolite topologies, a unique layered beryllosilicate, and beryllosilicate analogues of numerous aluminosilicate zeolites. Materials with the structure of the rare zeolite mineral nabesite have been synthesized for the first time, including both sodium and potassium derivatives. The structural chemistry of these beryllosilicates frameworks is discussed with reference to the networks of linked tetrahedra, which include the first instance of pentagonal, two-dimensional Cairo-tiling of silicate tetrahedra in one of the new zeolite topologies, their porosity, and their thermal stability. PMID:20949941

  16. Molecular simulations and experimental studies of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloy, Eric C.

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicate tetrahedral framework materials that have symmetric cages and channels with open-diameters between 0.2 and 2.0 nm. Zeolites are used extensively in the petrochemical industries for both their microporosity and their catalytic properties. The role of water is paramount to the formation, structure, and stability of these materials. Zeolites frequently have extra-framework cations, and as a result, are important ion-exchange materials. Zeolites also play important roles as molecular sieves and catalysts. For all that is known about zeolites, much remains a mystery. How, for example, can the well established metastability of these structures be explained? What is the role of water with respect to the formation, stabilization, and dynamical properties? This dissertation addresses these questions mainly from a modeling perspective, but also with some experimental work as well. The first discussion addresses a special class of zeolites: pure-silica zeolites. Experimental enthalpy of formation data are combined with molecular modeling to address zeolitic metastability. Molecular modeling is used to calculate internal surface areas, and a linear relationship between formation enthalpy and internal surface areas is clearly established, producing an internal surface energy of approximately 93 mJ/m2. Nitrate bearing sodalite and cancrinite have formed under the caustic chemical conditions of some nuclear waste processing centers in the United States. These phases have fouled expensive process equipment, and are the primary constituents of the resilient heels in the bottom of storage tanks. Molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and density functional theory, is used to simulate these materials with respect to structure and dynamical properties. Some new, very interesting results are extracted from the simulation of anhydrous Na6[Si6Al 6O24] sodalite---most importantly, the identification of two distinct

  17. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene. PMID:27486717

  18. Effect of hierarchical porosity and phosphorus modification on the catalytic properties of zeolite Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Zheng, Jinyu; Luo, Yibin; Da, Zhijian

    2016-09-01

    The zeolite Y is considered as a leading catalyst for FCC industry. The acidity and porosity modification play important roles in determining the final catalytic properties of zeolite Y. The alkaline treatment of zeolite Y by dealumination and alkaline treatment with NaOH and NaOH&TBPH was investigated. The zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, transmission electron microscope, NMR, NH3-TPD and IR study of acidity. Accordingly, the hierarchical porosity and acidity property were discussed systematically. Finally, the catalytic performance of the zeolites Y was evaluated in the cracking of 1,3,5-TIPB. It was found that desilication with NaOH&TBPH ensured the more uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity with higher microporosity, while preserving higher B/L ratio and moderate Brønsted acidities resulting in catalysts with the most appropriated acidity and then with better catalytic performance.

  19. Optimization of composition of bizeolitic cracking catalyst in order to increase naphtha yield and quality

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V.Y.; Kaliko, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.

    1983-11-01

    It is necessary to develop high-selectivity zeolite-containing catalysts that will increase the yield of olefinic hydrocarbons in cracked gas. This paper reports on work aimed at selecting the optimal composition of a bizeolitc zatalyst system to minimize the yield of naphtha cut and improve its octane characteristics. Several series of catalysts samples were prepared. It is found that the optimal composition of the bizeolitic catalyst can be best regulated by gradual introduction of the catalyst containing the SHS zeolite into zeolite-containing catalyst circulating in an operating cracker.

  20. Hydrogen Adsorption in Zeolite Studied with Sievert and Thermogravimetric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnicenoks, P.; Sivars, A.; Grinberga, L.; Kleperis, J.

    2012-08-01

    Natural clinoptilolite (mixture from clinoptilolite, quartz and muscovite) is activated with palladium and tested for hydrogen adsorption capability at temperatures RT - 200°C. Thermogravimetric and volumetric methods showed that zeolite activated with palladium (1.25%wt) shows markedly high hydrogen adsorption capacity - up to 3 wt%. Lower amount of adsorbed hydrogen (~1.5 wt%) was found for raw zeolite and activated with higher amount of palladium sample. Hypothesis is proposed that the heating of zeolite in argon atmosphere forms and activates the pore structure in zeolite material, where hydrogen encapsulation (trapping) is believed to occur when cooling down to room temperature. An effect of catalyst (Pd) on hydrogen sorption capability is explained by spillover phenomena were less-porous fractions of natural clinoptilolite sample (quartz and muscovite) are involved.

  1. The stability of copper oxo species in zeolite frameworks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vilella, Laia; Studt, Felix

    2016-03-07

    Cu-exchanged zeolites are promising heterogeneous catalysts, as they provide a confined environment to carry out highly selective reactions. Furthermore, the knowledge of how the zeolite framework and the location of Al atoms therein affect the adsorption of copper species is still not well understood. In this work, DFT was used to investigate the adsorption of potential Cu oxo active species suggested in the literature [Cu(η2-O2), Cu(µ-O)Cu, and Cu2O2] into zeolites with different pore sizes and shapes (AFI, CHA, TON, MOR, and MFI). The calculations revealed that both monomeric and dimeric Cu oxo species bind strongly to the O atoms ofmore » the lattice. For the monometallic species similar adsorption energies are obtained with the different zeolite frameworks, whereas an optimum Al–Al distance is required for the dimeric species.« less

  2. Electron transfer reactions within zeolites: Radical cation from benzonorbornadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchumani, K.; Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R.

    1996-08-28

    Zeolites are being used as solid acid catalysts in a number of commercial processes. Occasionally zeolites are also reported to perform as electron transfer agents. Recently, we observed that radical cations of certain olefins and thiophene oligomers can be generated spontaneously within ZSM-5 zeolites. We noticed that these radical cations generated from diphenyl polyenes and thiophene oligomers were remarkably stable (at room temperature) within ZSM-5 and can be characterized spectroscopically at leisure. We have initiated a program on electron transfer processes within large pore zeolites. The basis of this approach is that once a cation radical is generated within a large pore zeolite, it will have sufficient room to undergo a molecular transformation. Our aim is to identify a condition under which electron transfer can be routinely and reliably carried out within large pore zeolites such as faujasites. To our great surprise, when benzonorbornadiene A and a number of olefins were included in divalent cation exchanged faujasites. they were transformed into products very quickly (<15 min). This observation allowed us to explore the use of zeolites as oxidants. Results of our studies on benzonorbornadiene are presented in this communication. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Production of hydroxyl radicals from Fe-containing fine particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Ren, Ke; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Laiguo; Li, Mei; Li, Xiaoying; Yang, Jian; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei; Xu, Zhencheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from ambient fine particles has been correlated with the soluble transition metal content of PM2.5, which also has clear association with particle-mediated cardiopulmonary toxicity. Hydroxyl radical (rad OH) is the most harmful ROS species through chemical reactions of redox-active particle components. Atmospheric Fe, as the dominant species of the transition metals in the atmosphere, is associated with rad OH generation in ambient particle extracts. Our results revealed that Fe-containing particles (18,730 in total number) contributed approximately 3.7% on average to all detected particles throughout the summer and winter sampling period in Guangzhou, which was clustered into four distinct particle classes, including Fe-rich, Metal-rich, NaK-rich and Dust-rich. Fe-rich class was the dominant one with a fraction of 61%, followed by Dust-rich (14%), Metal-rich (13%). and NaK-rich (12%). The iron oxide was enriched in the Fe-rich class. rad OH generation induced by Fe-containing fine particles collected in Guangzhou (GZ) was quantified in a surrogate lung fluid (SLF), and it was found that Fe-containing fine particles were generally much reactive in generating rad OH in the presence of four antioxidants (200 μM ascorbate, 300 μM citrate, 100 μM reduced L-glutathione, and 100 μM uric acid). The annual average rad OH amount produced in our samples was 132.98 ± 27.43 nmol rad OH mg-1 PM2.5. rad OH production had a clear seasonal pattern with higher amount in summer and lower in winter. By measuring the amount of total and SLF-soluble metal in our PM2.5 samples using ICP-MS, we found that ROS activities were associated with the ionizable Fe through Fenton type reactions in the Guangzhou PM2.5. Expected burdens of PM2.5 derived rad OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily particulate matter exposure in Guangzhou is already a concern, and it could produce much higher levels of rad OH, leading to higher

  4. Production of hydroxyl radicals from Fe-containing fine particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Ren, Ke; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Laiguo; Li, Mei; Li, Xiaoying; Yang, Jian; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei; Xu, Zhencheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from ambient fine particles has been correlated with the soluble transition metal content of PM2.5, which also has clear association with particle-mediated cardiopulmonary toxicity. Hydroxyl radical (rad OH) is the most harmful ROS species through chemical reactions of redox-active particle components. Atmospheric Fe, as the dominant species of the transition metals in the atmosphere, is associated with rad OH generation in ambient particle extracts. Our results revealed that Fe-containing particles (18,730 in total number) contributed approximately 3.7% on average to all detected particles throughout the summer and winter sampling period in Guangzhou, which was clustered into four distinct particle classes, including Fe-rich, Metal-rich, NaK-rich and Dust-rich. Fe-rich class was the dominant one with a fraction of 61%, followed by Dust-rich (14%), Metal-rich (13%). and NaK-rich (12%). The iron oxide was enriched in the Fe-rich class. rad OH generation induced by Fe-containing fine particles collected in Guangzhou (GZ) was quantified in a surrogate lung fluid (SLF), and it was found that Fe-containing fine particles were generally much reactive in generating rad OH in the presence of four antioxidants (200 μM ascorbate, 300 μM citrate, 100 μM reduced L-glutathione, and 100 μM uric acid). The annual average rad OH amount produced in our samples was 132.98 ± 27.43 nmol rad OH mg-1 PM2.5. rad OH production had a clear seasonal pattern with higher amount in summer and lower in winter. By measuring the amount of total and SLF-soluble metal in our PM2.5 samples using ICP-MS, we found that ROS activities were associated with the ionizable Fe through Fenton type reactions in the Guangzhou PM2.5. Expected burdens of PM2.5 derived rad OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily particulate matter exposure in Guangzhou is already a concern, and it could produce much higher levels of rad OH, leading to higher

  5. Dehydration of cyclohexanol as a test reaction for zeolite acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Karge, H.G.; Kosters, H.; Wada, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Dehydration of cyclohexanol was investigated using a fixed-bed continuous flow reactor with acidic mordenite-type, clinoptilolite-type, and faujasite-type (Y) zeolites as catalysts. The surface acidity of the catalysts employed was studied by IR using pyridine or 2,6-di-tert. butylpyridine as probe molecules. A correlation between the acidity and the rates of dehydration was clearly shown.

  6. Direct Dual-Template Synthesis of MWW Zeolite Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Margarit, Vicente J; Martínez-Armero, Marta E; Navarro, M Teresa; Martínez, Cristina; Corma, Avelino

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional zeolite with the topology of MWW sheets has been obtained by direct synthesis with a combination of two organic structure-directing agents. The resultant material consists of approximately 70% single and double layers and displays a well-structured external surface area of about 300 m(2) g(-1). The delaminated zeolite prepared by means of this single-step synthetic route has a high delamination degree, and the structural integrity of the MWW layers is well preserved. The new zeolite material displayed excellent activity, selectivity, and stability when used as a catalyst for the alkylation of benzene with propylene and found to be superior to the catalysts that are currently used for producing cumene. PMID:26381669

  7. Fluid catalytic cracking catalyst for reformulated gasolines: Kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetto, A. ); Farag, H.I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Blasetti, A.P. . Dept. de Procesos); Lasa, H.I. de . Faculty of Engineering Science)

    1994-12-01

    Changes of the relative importance of intradiffusion on USY zeolite crystals were studied as a way of affecting selectivity of catalytic cracking reactions. Zeolite crystals were synthesized (Si/Al = 2.4), activated and stabilized using ion exchange and steam calcination to obtain USSY (Ultra Stable Submicron Y) zeolites. After the activation the zeolites were pelletized (45--60 [mu]m particles). USSYs were tested in a novel Riser Simulator. Results obtained show that total aromatics (BTX), benzene, C[sub 4] olefins, and coke were significantly affected with the change of zeolite crystal sizes. Gasolines produced with USSY zeolites contain less aromatics and particularly lower benzene levels. Experimental results were analyzed with a model including several lumps: unconverted gas oil, gasoline, light gases, and coke. This model also accounts for catalyst deactivation as a function of coke on catalyst. Various kinetic parameters were determined with their corresponding spans for the 95% level of confidence.

  8. An Overview of Recent Development in Composite Catalysts from Porous Materials for Various Reactions and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zaiku; Liu, Zhicheng; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Qihua; Xu, Longya; Ding, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. PMID:20559508

  9. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  10. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  11. Catalytic pyrolysis of wheat bran for hydrocarbons production in the presence of zeolites and noble-metals by using TGA-FTIR method.

    PubMed

    Lazdovica, K; Liepina, L; Kampars, V

    2016-05-01

    Pyrolysis of wheat bran with or without catalysts was investigated using TGA-FTIR method in order to determine the influence of zeolite and noble metal catalysts on the evolution profile and relative yield of the volatile compounds. The addition of all catalysts decreased the volatile matter of wheat bran from 76.3% to 75.9%, 73.9%, 73.5%, 69.7% and increased the solid residue from 18.0% to 18.4%, 20.4%, 20.8%, 24.6% under the catalyst of ZSM-5, 5% Pd/C, MCM-41, and 5% Pt/C. Noble-metal catalysts had higher activity for deoxygenation of compounds containing carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups than zeolites. Degradation of nitrogen containing compounds atom proceeded better in presence of zeolites. Noble-metal catalysts promoted formation of aromatics and changed the profiles of evolved compounds whereas zeolites advanced formation of aliphatics and olefins. PMID:26874441

  12. Diagram of Zeolite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP) in Cambridge, MA, a NASA-sponsored Commercial Space Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Depicted here is one of the many here complex geometric shapes which make them highly absorbent. Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station

  13. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  14. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  15. A hierarchical Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite with superior catalytic performance for benzene hydroxylation to phenol.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hongchuan; Koekkoek, Arjan; Yang, Qihua; van Santen, Rutger; Li, Can; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2009-12-28

    We report the one-step synthesis of a highly active hierarchical Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst with a strongly improved lifetime in the selective hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with nitrous oxide; compared to the best Fe/ZSM-5 catalyst, the turnover number after 24 h on stream is almost four times higher. PMID:20024289

  16. FCCU operating changes optimize octane catalyst use

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, P.H.

    1986-09-01

    The use of octane-enhancing catalysts in a fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU) requires changes in the operation of the unit to derive maximum benefits from the octane catalyst. In addition to the impressive octane gain achieved by the octane catalyst, the catalyst also affects the yield structure, the unit heat balance, and the product slate by reducing hydrogen transfer reactions. Catalyst manufacturers have introduced new product lines based upon ultrastable Y type (USY) zeolites which can result in 2 to 3 research octane number (RON) gains over the more traditional rare earth exchanged Y type (REY) zeolites. Here are some operating techniques for the FCCU and associated processes that will allow maximum benefits from octane catalyst use.

  17. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry Y.S.

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  18. ZEOLITE CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, W; Herbert Nigg, H

    2007-09-13

    The Savannah River Site isolates tritium from its process streams for eventual recycling. This is done by catalyzing the formation of tritiated water (from process streams) and then sorbing that water on a 3A zeolite (molsieve) bed. The tritium is recovered by regenerating the saturated bed into a Mg-based water cracking unit. The process described has been in use for about 15 years. Recently chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was noted in the system piping. This has resulted in the need to replace the corroded piping and associated molecular sieve beds. The source of chlorine has been debated and one possible source is the zeolite itself. Since new materials are being purchased for recently fabricated beds, a more comprehensive analysis protocol for characterizing zeolite has been developed. Tests on archived samples indicate the potential for mobile chloride species to be generated in the zeolite beds.

  19. Composite zeolite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

  20. Bifunctional Nanostructured Base Catalysts: Opportunities for BioFuels

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, William

    2010-12-30

    ABSTRACT This research studied and develop novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We will focus on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts formed by two techniques: from (mixed) metal-oxide bases and by nitrogen substitution for oxygen in zeolites. These catalysts will be compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, catalytic fast pyrolysis, and transesterification reactions. These reactions are important in processes that are currently being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and will be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we have studied the aldol-condensation of acetone with furfural over oxides and zeolites, the conversion of sugars by rapid pyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our previous research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen-substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  1. Characterization of Chemical Properties, Unit Cell Parameters and Particle Size Distribution of Three Zeolite Reference Materials: RM 8850 - Zeolite Y, RM 8851 - Zeolite A and RM 8852 - Ammonium ZSM-5 Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Turner,S.; Sieber, J.; Vetter, T.; Zeisler, R.; Marlow, A.; Moreno-Ramirez, M.; Davis, M.; Kennedy, G.; Borghard, W.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites have important industrial applications including use as catalysts, molecular sieves and ion exchange materials. In this study, three zeolite materials have been characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as reference materials (RMs): zeolite Y (RM 8850), zeolite A (RM 8851) and ZSM-5 zeolite (RM 8852). They have been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical measurement methods: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gravimetry, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), calorimetry, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, laser light extinction, laser light scattering, electric sensing zone, X-ray sedimentation, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The chemical homogeneity of the materials has been characterized. Reference values are given for the major components (major elements, loss on ignition [LOI] and loss on fusion [LOF]), trace elements and Si/Al and Na/Al ratios. Information values are given for enthalpies of formation, unit cell parameters, particle size distributions, refractive indices and variation of mass with variation in relative humidity (RH). Comparisons are made to literature unit cell parameters. The RMs are expected to provide a basis for intercomparison studies of these zeolite materials.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline and mesoporous zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petushkov, Anton

    2011-12-01

    Mesoporous aggregates of nanocrystalline zeolites with MFI and BEA frameworks have been synthesized using a one-pot and single structure directing agent. The effect of different reaction conditions, such as temperature, time, pH and water content, on the particle size, surface area and mesopore volume has been studied. Nanocrystalline and mesoporous ZSM-5, beta and Y zeolites were modified with different transition metals and the resulting single- and double metal containing catalyst materials were characterized. Nanocrystalline Silicalite-1 zeolite samples with varying particle size were functionalized with different organosilane groups and the cytotoxic activity of the zeolite nanocrystals was studied as a function of particle size, concentration, organic functional group type, as well as the type of cell line. Framework stability of nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was tested under different pH conditions. The synthesized zeolites used in this work were characterized using a variety of physico-chemical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, Solid State NMR, nitrogen sorption, electron microscopy, Inductively Coupled Plasma -- Optical Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  3. Recent advances of pore system construction in zeolite-catalyzed chemical industry processes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Weimin; Tang, Yi; Xie, Zaiku

    2015-12-21

    The kaleidoscopic applications of zeolite catalysts (zeo-catalysts) in petrochemical processes has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in recent decades. About twenty types of zeolite have been industrially applied so far, and their versatile porous architectures have contributed their most essential features to affect the catalytic efficiency. This review depicts the evolution of pore models in zeolite catalysts accompanied by the increase in industrial and environmental demands. The indispensable roles of modulating pore models are outlined for zeo-catalysts for the enhancement of their catalytic performances in various industrial processes. The zeolites and related industrial processes discussed range from the uni-modal micropore system of zeolite Y (12-ring micropore, 12-R) in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), zeolite ZSM-5 (10-R) in xylene isomerization and SAPO-34 (8-R) in olefin production to the multi-modal micropore system of MCM-22 (10-R and 12-R pocket) in aromatic alkylation and the hierarchical pores in FCC and catalytic cracking of C4 olefins. The rational construction of pore models, especially hierarchical features, is highlighted with a careful classification from an industrial perspective accompanied by a detailed analysis of the theoretical mechanisms. PMID:26567526

  4. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, [sup 2]D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  5. Dual function cracking catalyst (DFCC) composition

    SciTech Connect

    Occelli, M.L.

    1986-10-07

    The patent describes a novel catalytic cracking composition comprising a cracking catalyst having high activity and, as a separate and distinct entity, a diluent comprising a substantially catalytically inactive crystalline aluminosilicte having a fresh MAT Activity below about 1. The diluent is clinoptilolite and the cracking catalyst contains a rare earth-exchanged crystalline aluminium silicate. The cracking catalyst comprises from about ten to about 60 weight percent of a zeolite having cracking characteristics dispersed in a refractory metal oxide matrix.

  6. Effects of Melt Thermal-Rate Treatment on Fe-Containing Phases in Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinglei; Geng, Haoran; Zhang, Shuo; Jiang, Huawei; Zuo, Min

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, effects of melt thermal-rate treatment (MTRT) on Fe-containing phases in hypereutectic Al-Si alloy were investigated. Results show that MTRT can refine microstructures and improve castability, mechanical properties, wear characteristics, and corrosion resistance of Fe-containing Al-Si alloy. When Al-15Si-2.7Fe alloy is treated with MTRT by 1203 K (930 °C) melt: coarse primary Si and plate-like Fe-containing phase both can be refined to small blocky morphology, and the long needle-like Fe-containing phase disappears almost entirely; ultimate tensile strength and elongation are 195 MPa and 1.8 pct, and increase by 12.7 and 50 pct, respectively; and the wear loss and coefficient of friction decrease 7 to 17 and 24 to 30 pct, respectively, compared with that obtained with conventional casting technique. Corrosion resistance of the alloy treated with MTRT by 1203 K (930 °C) melt is the best, that is it has the lowest i corr value and the highest E corr value. Besides, effects of MTRT on Al-15Si-xFe (x = 0.2, 0.7, 1.7, 3.7, 4.7) alloys were also studied, MTRT can only refine microstructure and improve mechanical properties of Al-15Si alloy with 0.7 to 3.7 pct Fe content greatly in the present work.

  7. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact.

  8. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  9. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  10. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  11. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P

    2012-11-20

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  12. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  13. Evaporation Mechanism of Cu from Liquid Fe Containing C and S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Youn-Bae

    2016-08-01

    A number of liquid-gas experiments were carried out in order to elucidate evaporation mechanism of Cu from liquid Fe containing C and S. Rate of Cu evaporation in liquid Fe droplets at 1873 K (1600 °C) was determined using electromagnetic levitation equipment. Evaporation rate of the Cu under various conditions (flow rate of gas mixtures, initial C, and S concentrations) was examined. It was found from a series of kinetic analyses of the experimental data that Cu evaporates in forms of Cu(g) and CuS(g). As was reported for the Sn evaporation from liquid iron (Jung et al. Met. Mater. Trans. 46B, 250-258, 2014), S plays two roles for the evaporation of Cu: accelerating the rate by forming CuS(g) and decelerating the rate by blocking evaporation sites. As a result of these combinatorial effects, the evaporation of Cu is decelerated at low S content, but is accelerated at high S content. Based on the elucidated mechanism, an evaporation model equation for Cu was developed in the present study, which takes into account (1) evaporation of Cu in the two forms (Cu(g) and CuS(g)), (2) surface blocking by S using ideal Langmuir adsorption, and (3) effect of C. The obtained rate constant of a reaction Cu i + S i = CuS i (g), k CuS R , is 1.37 × 10-9 m4 mol-1 s-1, and the residual rate constant, k CuS r , is 4.11 × 10-10 m4 mol-1 s-1 at 1873 K (1600 °C). Both of them were found to be one order lower than those for Sn evaporation.

  14. Liquid-phase alkylation of benzene with light olefins catalyzed by {beta} zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Bellussi, G.; Pazzuconi, G.; Perego, C.

    1995-11-01

    The catalytic performance of zeolite {beta} in the liquid-phase alkylation of benzene is compared with that of other solid catalysts. Zeolite {beta} is more active and more selective than zeolite Y in the alkylation with propylene and ethylene to cumene and ethylbenzene (EB). In the alkylation with propylene the overall selectivity of {beta} is higher than that of the traditional {open_quotes}solid phosphoric acid.{close_quotes} The catalytic activity is affected by the composition and the particle size of zeolite {beta} samples. Decreasing the framework Al content, by direct synthesis or by partial substitution of Al for B, produces a decrease in both conversion and selectivity in cumene and EB synthesis. A hypothesis to explain this behavior is given. The catalytic activity of zeolite {beta} is limited by intraparticle diffusion, as evidenced by the decreased activity corresponding to the particle size increase. 22 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Discovery of optimal zeolites for challenging separations and chemical transformations using predictive materials modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Peng; Jeon, Mi Young; Ren, Limin; Knight, Chris; Deem, Michael W.; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites play numerous important roles in modern petroleum refineries and have the potential to advance the production of fuels and chemical feedstocks from renewable resources. The performance of a zeolite as separation medium and catalyst depends on its framework structure. To date, 213 framework types have been synthesized and >330,000 thermodynamically accessible zeolite structures have been predicted. Hence, identification of optimal zeolites for a given application from the large pool of candidate structures is attractive for accelerating the pace of materials discovery. Here we identify, through a large-scale, multi-step computational screening process, promising zeolite structures for two energy-related applications: the purification of ethanol from fermentation broths and the hydroisomerization of alkanes with 18-30 carbon atoms encountered in petroleum refining. These results demonstrate that predictive modelling and data-driven science can now be applied to solve some of the most challenging separation problems involving highly non-ideal mixtures and highly articulated compounds.

  16. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. PMID:26138135

  17. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  18. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

  19. Base catalysis by alkali modified zeolites. III. Alkylation with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, P.E.; Davis, M.E. )

    1989-10-01

    Ion exchanged CsNaX and CsNaY, cesium acetate impregnated CsNaX (CsAce/CsNaX) and CsNaY (CsAce/CsNaY), and MgO have been reacted with isopropanol at 425 C and atmospheric pressure to assess their acid/base properties at a temperature consistent with that used in the side chain alkylation of toluene with methanol. The results suggest that the ability of the catalysts tested here to promote a base mediated reaction follow the order of MgO > CsAce/CsNaY > CsAce/CsNaX {approx equal} CsNaY > CsNaX. Selectivities to acetone measured at 4.73% conversion follow this order as well, ranging from 95.7% and 93.9% for MgO and CsAce/CsNaY, respectively, to 17.6% for the CsNaX. Thus, these catalysts can be grouped into two categories: (i) catalysts which vary in acid/base properties yet possess identical topology (e.g., the zeolites) and (ii) catalysts which vary in topology yet have similar acid/base properties (e.g., MgO and CsAce/CsNaY). These catalysts were compared using the side chain alkylation of toluene, ethane, methane, and acetone with methanol. For the impregnated zeolites, similar toluene conversions were observed. No formaldehyde was observed in the product stream of the impregnated Y zeolite. Both MgO and CsAce/CsNaY had similar methanol decomposition products; i.e., no formaldehyde and high CO formation, yet unlike CsAce/CsNaY no toluene conversion was observed for MgO. No conversion of ethane or methane was observed for either impregnated zeolite at 425 C.

  20. Synthetic Zeolites and Other Microporous Oxide Molecular Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, John D.

    1999-03-01

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol.

  1. Mechanistic proposal for the zeolite catalyzed methylation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Svelle, Stian; Bjørgen, Morten

    2010-12-01

    Alkylation and methylation reactions are important reactions in petrochemical production and form part of the reaction mechanism of many hydrocarbon transformation processes. Here, a new reaction mechanism is explored for the zeolite catalyzed methylation of arenes using quantum chemical calculations. It is proposed that the most substituted methylbenzenes, which will reside predominantly on the protonated form when adsorbed in a zeolite, can react directly with a neutral methanol molecule in the vicinity, thereby initiating the methylation reaction without having to return a proton to the zeolite surface. The calculated barriers are quite low, indicating that the suggested mechanism is plausible. This route might explain how the most substituted methylbenzenes can function as efficient reaction intermediates in the methanol to hydrocarbons reaction without themselves acting as catalyst poisons as a consequence of their high proton affinities. PMID:21049891

  2. Conversion of biomass to ethanol: Isomerization of xylose over HY zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.; Wen, J.; Thomas, S.

    1995-12-31

    Xylose, a pentose indigestible to most yeasts, was converted to ethanol by a two-step isomerization and fermentation. HY zeolite was used to catalyze the isomerization of xylose, and the xylulose produced was directly used as the carbon source in ethanol fermentation. Zeolite catalysts offer pH compatibility with yeast fermentation and the ability to carry out isomerization at higher temperature where equilibrium xylulose concentration is higher. Initial rate studies indicate that xylose consumption follows pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a specific rate constant of 6.2 x 10{sup -4} L/solution/g zeolite/h.

  3. The influence of zeolitic water on the rate of butadiene dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Zeolites find widespread usage as catalysts for a variety of chemical transformations. Frequently, the catalytically active agent is a transition metal ion located at an exchange site in contact with the zeolitic surface. Although the extraframework cation positions and relative populations can often be determined by spectroscopic methods, the influence of cation sitting and adsorbed reactant induced migration under reaction conditions is less well understood. This note describes the role which water exerts on the activity of copper-exchanged zeolite Y for the dimerization of butadiene to 4-vinylcyclohexene (4-VCH). 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Potential of sustainable hierarchical zeolites in the valorization of α-pinene.

    PubMed

    Nuttens, Nicolas; Verboekend, Danny; Deneyer, Aron; Van Aelst, Joost; Sels, Bert F

    2015-04-13

    In the valorization of α-pinene, which is an important biomass intermediate derived from turpentine oil, hierarchical (mesoporous) zeolites represent a superior class of catalysts. Hierarchical USY, ZSM-5, and beta zeolites have been prepared, characterized, and catalytically evaluated, with the aim of combining the highest catalytic performance with the most sustainable synthetic protocol. These zeolites are prepared by alkaline treatment in aqueous solutions of NH4 OH, NaOH, diethylamine, and NaOH complemented with tetrapropylammonium bromide. The hierarchical USY zeolite is the most attractive catalyst of the tested series, and is able to combine an overall organic-free synthesis with an up to sixfold activity enhancement and comparable selectivity over the conventional USY zeolite. This superior performance relates to a threefold greater activity than that of the commercial standard, namely, H2 SO4 /TiO2 . Correlation of the obtained benefits to the amount of solid lost during the postsynthetic modifications highlights that the highest activity gains are obtained with minor leaching. Furthermore, a highly zeolitic character, as determined by bulk XRD, is beneficial, but not crucial, in the conversion of α-pinene. The alkaline treatments not only result in a higher overall activity, but also a more functional external surface area, attaining up to four times the pinene conversions per square nanometer. The efficiency of the hierarchical USY zeolite is concomitantly demonstrated in the conversion of limonene and turpentine oil, which emphasizes its industrial potential. PMID:25736719

  5. Transversal spin freezing and re-entrant spin glass phases in chemically disordered Fe-containing perovskite multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanovich, V. A.; Laguta, V. V.

    We propose experimental verification and theoretical explanation of magnetic anomalies in the complex Fe-contained double perovskite multiferroics like PbFe$_{1/2}$Nb$_{1/2}$O$_3$. The theoretical part is based on our model of coexistence of long-range magnetic order and spin glass in the above substances. In our model, the exchange interaction is anisotropic, coupling antiferromagnetically $z$ spin components of Fe$^{3+}$ ions. At the same time, the $xy$ components are coupled by much weaker exchange interaction of ferromagnetic sign. In the system with spatial disorder (half of corresponding lattice cites are occupied by spinless Nb$^{5+}$ ions) such frustrating interaction results in the fact that antiferromagnetic order is formed by $z$ projection of the spins, while their $xy$ components contribute to spin glass behaviour. Our theoretical findings are supported by the experimental evidence of coexistence of antiferromagnetic and spin glass phases in chemically disordered Fe-contained double perovskite multiferroics.

  6. Tailoring ZSM-5 Zeolites for the Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass to Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Thomas C; Gardner, David W; Thilakaratne, Rajeeva; Wang, Kaige; Hansen, Thomas W; Brown, Robert C; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-06-22

    The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose by zeolite-catalyzed fast pyrolysis involves a complex reaction network sensitive to the zeolite structure, crystallinity, elemental composition, porosity, and acidity. The interplay of these parameters under the reaction conditions represents a major roadblock that has hampered significant improvement in catalyst design for over a decade. Here, we studied commercial and laboratory-synthesized ZSM-5 zeolites and combined data from 10 complementary characterization techniques in an attempt to identify parameters common to high-performance catalysts. Crystallinity and framework aluminum site accessibility were found to be critical to achieve high aromatic yields. These findings enabled us to synthesize a ZSM-5 catalyst with enhanced activity, which offers the highest aromatic hydrocarbon yield reported to date. PMID:27167613

  7. Effect of the Si/Al ratio and of the zeolite structure on the performance of dealuminated zeolites for the reforming of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirniotis, P.G.; Zhang, W.

    1996-09-01

    Various 12-membered ring pore zeolites were employed for the reforming of synthetic hydrocarbon mixtures which simulate industrial naphthas. All the zeolites were dealuminated to various extents. It was found that, under the present conditions over the samples which are slightly dealuminated, bimolecular-condensation reactions followed by recracking are responsible for the relatively large selectivities of C{sub 4} paraffins. The monomolecular cracking (via pentacoordinated carbonium ions) of the latter hydrocarbons is responsible for the large generation of CH{sub 4} from the cracking of C{sub 4} paraffins. When the Si/Al ratio increases, the selectivity of methane passes through a steep minimum, while those of C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and C{sub 5} pass through a maximum. It was also found that the zeolite pore structure is a very important factor for the time on stream activity of zeolite-based catalysts. Zeolites with reduced aluminum content and pore structures, which do not favor the formation of coke precursors in their cavities, can lead to very promising catalysts for acid-catalyzed reactions. From this study a 12-membered ring pore zeolite, which demonstrates minimal coke deactivation, was identified.

  8. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. PMID:25078817

  9. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, {sup 2}D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  10. Synthesis of Zeolites Using the ADOR (Assembly-Disassembly-Organization-Reassembly) Route

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Paul S.; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are an important class of materials that have wide ranging applications such as heterogeneous catalysts and adsorbents which are dependent on their framework topology. For new applications or improvements to existing ones, new zeolites with novel pore systems are desirable. We demonstrate a method for the synthesis of novel zeolites using the ADOR route. ADOR is an acronym for Assembly, Disassembly, Organization and Reassembly. This synthetic route takes advantage of the assembly of a relatively poorly stable that which can be selectively disassembled into a layered material. The resulting layered intermediate can then be organized in different manners by careful chemical manipulation and then reassembled into zeolites with new topologies. By carefully controlling the organization step of the synthetic pathway, new zeolites with never before seen topologies are capable of being synthesized. The structures of these new zeolites are confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction and further characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. This new synthetic pathway for zeolites demonstrates its capability to produce novel frameworks that have never been prepared by traditional zeolite synthesis techniques. PMID:27078165

  11. Synthesis of Zeolites Using the ADOR (Assembly-Disassembly-Organization-Reassembly) Route.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Paul S; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are an important class of materials that have wide ranging applications such as heterogeneous catalysts and adsorbents which are dependent on their framework topology. For new applications or improvements to existing ones, new zeolites with novel pore systems are desirable. We demonstrate a method for the synthesis of novel zeolites using the ADOR route. ADOR is an acronym for Assembly, Disassembly, Organization and Reassembly. This synthetic route takes advantage of the assembly of a relatively poorly stable that which can be selectively disassembled into a layered material. The resulting layered intermediate can then be organized in different manners by careful chemical manipulation and then reassembled into zeolites with new topologies. By carefully controlling the organization step of the synthetic pathway, new zeolites with never before seen topologies are capable of being synthesized. The structures of these new zeolites are confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction and further characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. This new synthetic pathway for zeolites demonstrates its capability to produce novel frameworks that have never been prepared by traditional zeolite synthesis techniques. PMID:27078165

  12. Ru complexes of Hoveyda–Grubbs type immobilized on lamellar zeolites: activity in olefin metathesis reactions

    PubMed Central

    Žilková, Naděžda; Kubů, Martin; Mazur, Michal; Bastl, Zdeněk; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalysts with cationic tags on NHC ligands were linker-free immobilized on the surface of lamellar zeolitic supports (MCM-22, MCM-56, MCM-36) and on mesoporous molecular sieves SBA-15. The activity of prepared hybrid catalysts was tested in olefin metathesis reactions: the activity in ring-closing metathesis of citronellene and N,N-diallyltrifluoroacetamide decreased in the order of support MCM-22 ≈ MCM-56 > SBA-15 > MCM-36; the hybrid catalyst based on SBA-15 was found the most active in self-metathesis of methyl oleate. All catalysts were reusable and exhibited low Ru leaching (<1% of Ru content). XPS analysis revealed that during immobilization ion exchange between Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalyst and zeolitic support occurred in the case of Cl− counter anion; in contrast, PF6 − counter anion underwent partial decomposition. PMID:26664629

  13. The growth of zeolites A, X and mordenite in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, N.; Coker, E. N.; Dixon, A. G.; Warzywoda, J.; Thompson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials that form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide. They are used primarily as adsorbents and catalysts and support to a significant extent the positive balance of trade realized by the chemical industry in the United States (around $19 billion in 1991). The magnitude of their efforts can be appreciated when one realizes that since their introduction as 'cracking catalysts' in the early 1960's, they have saved the equivalent of 60 percent of the total oil production from Alaska's North Slope. Thus the performance of zeolite catalysts can have a profound effect on the U.S. economy. It is estimated that a 1 percent increase in yield of the gasoline fraction per barrel of oil would represent a savings of 22 million barrels of crude oil per year, representing a reduction of $400 million in the United States' balance of payments. Thus any activity that results in improvement in zeolite catalyst performance is of significant scientific and industrial interest. In addition, due to their 'stability,' uniformity, and, within limits, their 'engineerable' structures, zeolites are being tested as potential adsorbents to purify gases and liquids at the parts-per-billion levels needed in today's electronic, biomedical, and biotechnology industries and for the environment. Other exotic applications, such as host materials for quantum-confined semiconductor atomic arrays, are also being investigated. Because of the importance of this class of material, extensive efforts have been made to characterize their structures and to understand their nucleation and growth mechanisms, so as to be able to custom-make zeolites for a desired application. To date, both the nucleation mechanics and chemistry (such as what are the 'key' nutrients) are, as yet, still unknown for many, if not all, systems. The problem is compounded because there is usually a 'gel' phase present that is assumed to control the degree of

  14. Hydrocracking naphthas using mildly steamed, noble metal-containing zeolite beta

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, K.J. Jr.; Morrison, R.A.

    1989-03-14

    A method is described for hydrocracking a naphtha which comprises contacting the naphtha with a noble metal-containing zeolite beta naphtha hydrocracking catalyst at a pressure of about 0 to about 2000 psig, a temperature of about 400/sup 0/ to about 650/sup 0/F, a hydrogen or hydrocarbon molar ratio of about 0.1 to 1 to about 15 to 1 and a weight hourly space velocity of about 0.5 to about 20. Naphtha hydrocracking activity of the catalyst is enhanced by mild steaming of the zeolite beta catalyst prior to the contacting, the mild steaming being accomplished by steaming the zeolite catalyst in its fresh state under controlled conditions of temperature, time and steam partial pressure so as to initially increase the alpha activity of the catalyst and produce a steamed catalyst having a peak alpha activity, and subsequently reduce the alpha activity from the peak alpha activity to an alpha activity substantially the same as the alpha activity of the fresh catalyst and no more than 25% below the initial alpha activity of the fresh catalyst.

  15. Rapid synthesis of an aluminum-rich MSE-type zeolite by the hydrothermal conversion of an FAU-type zeolite.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Nishita, Yuji; Syahylah, Tuan; Wakihara, Toru; Kubota, Yoshihiro

    2013-06-10

    An aluminum-rich MSE-type zeolite (Si/Al is as small as 7) has been successfully synthesized in a remarkably short crystallization period of only 3 days by the hydrothermal conversion of an FAU-type zeolite, presumably by the assembly of four-membered-ring (4-R) aluminosilicate oligomers supplied by the double 6-R (D6R) components of the FAU framework with the aid of the structure-directing agents and seed crystals. The dealuminated version of the aluminum-rich MSE-type zeolite showed a high level of coke durability in addition to a significant yield of propylene, which indicates that this novel zeolitic material is suitable for industrial applications as a highly selective and long-lived catalyst. PMID:23606200

  16. Isobutane/2-butene alkylation on ultrastable Y zeolites: Influence of zeolite unit cell size

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A.; Martinez, A.; Martinez, C. )

    1994-03-01

    The alkylation reaction of isobutane with trans-2-butene has been carried out on a series of steam-dealuminated Y zeolites with unit cell sizes ranging from 2.450 to 2.426 nm. A fixed-bed reactor connected to an automatized multiloop sampling system allowed differential product analysis from very short (1 min or less) to longer times on stream. A maximum in the initial 2-butene conversion was found on samples with unit cell sizes between 2.435 and 2.450 nm. However, the TMP/DMH ratio, i.e., the alkylation-to-oligomerization ratio, continuously increased with zeolite unit cell size. The concentration of reactants in the pores, the strength distribution of Bronsted acid sites, and the extent of hydrogen transfer reactions, which in turn depend on the framework Si/Al ratio of a given zeolite, were seen to affect activity and product distribution of the catalysts. Finally, the influence of these factors on the aging characteristics of the samples was also discussed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Disilane-modified mordenite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Vansant, E.F. )

    1990-03-22

    The effective pore size of H-mordenite zeolite can be decreased by implantation of disilyl compounds. Chemisorption of disilane at high temperature results in denser packing of the implanted entities on the external surface. This in turn enhances the pore narrowing effect. After hydrolysis-dehydration, the external surface of the disilanated zeolite can be reactivated by partial rehydration; thus a successive modification of the zeolite surface is possible.

  18. Zeolite exposure and associated pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K.R.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Rom, W.N.; Moatamed, F.

    1985-06-01

    Naturally occurring zeolite minerals are aluminum silicates widespread in the earth's crust. Several of these minerals have fibrous forms and have been implicated as a possible cause of benign and malignant diseases of the lung and pleura in Turkey. This report describes a patient, living in an area of Nevada rich in zeolites, who presented with idiopathic pleural thickening and pulmonary fibrosis associated with extensive pulmonary deposition of zeolites.

  19. Metal nanoparticles as a conductive catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Coker, Eric N.

    2010-08-03

    A metal nanocluster composite material for use as a conductive catalyst. The metal nanocluster composite material has metal nanoclusters on a carbon substrate formed within a porous zeolitic material, forming stable metal nanoclusters with a size distribution between 0.6-10 nm and, more particularly, nanoclusters with a size distribution in a range as low as 0.6-0.9 nm.

  20. Development of a stable cobalt-ruthenium Fisher-Tropsch catalyst. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1995-02-01

    The reverse micelle catalyst preparation method has been used to prepare catalysts on four supports: magnesium oxide, carbon, alumina- titania and steamed Y zeolite. These catalysts were not as active as a reference catalyst prepared during previous contracts to Union Carbide Corp. This catalyst was supported on steamed Y zerolite support and was impregnated by a pore-filling method using a nonaqueous solvent. Additional catalysts were prepared via pore- filling impregnation of steamed Y zeolites. These catalysts had levels of cobalt two to three and a half times as high as the original Union Carbide catalyst. On a catalyst volume basis they were much more active than the previous catalyst; on an atom by atom basis the cobalt was about of the same activity, i.e., the high cobalt catalysts` cobalt atoms were not extensively covered over and deactivated by other cobalt atoms. The new, high activity, Y zerolite catalysts were not as stable as the earlier Union Carbide catalyst. However, stability enhancement of these catalysts should be possible, for instance, through adjustment of the quantity and/or type of trace metals present. A primary objective of this work was determination whether small amounts of ruthenium could enhance the activity of the cobalt F-T catalyst. The reverse micelle catalysts were not activated by ruthenium, indeed scanning transmission electronic microscopy (STEM) analysis provided some evidence that ruthenium was not present in the cobalt crystallites. Ruthenium did not seem to activate the high cobalt Y zeolite catalyst either, but additional experiments with Y zeolite-supported catalysts are required. Should ruthenium prove not to be an effective promoter under the simple catalyst activation procedure used in this work, more complex activation procedures have been reported which are claimed to enhance the cobalt/ruthenium interaction and result in activity promotion by ruthenium.

  1. Novel modified zeolites for energy-efficient hydrocarbon separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Arruebo, Manuel; Dong, Junhang; Anderson, Thomas (Burns and McDonnell, Kansas City, MO); Gu, Xuehong; Gray, Gary (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Bennett, Ron (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Nenoff, Tina Maria; Kartin, Mutlu; Johnson, Kaylynn (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Falconer, John; Noble, Richard

    2006-11-01

    We present synthesis, characterization and testing results of our applied research project, which focuses on the effects of surface and skeletal modification of zeolites for significant enhancements in current hydrocarbon (HC) separations. Zeolites are commonly used by the chemical and petroleum industries as catalysts and ion-exchangers. They have high potential for separations owing to their unique pore structures and adsorption properties and their thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. Because of zeolites separation properties, low cost, and robustness in industrial process, they are natural choice for use as industrial adsorbents. This is a multidisciplinary effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials for the separation of branched vs. linear organic molecules found in commercially important HC streams via adsorption based separations. The focus of this project was the surface and framework modification of the commercially available zeolites, while tuning the adsorption properties and the selectivities of the bulk and membrane separations. In particular, we are interested with our partners at Goodyear Chemical, on how to apply the modified zeolites to feedstock isoprene purification. For the characterization and the property measurements of the new and improved materials powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Residual Gas Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (RGA-MS), Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDAX), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and surface area techniques were utilized. In-situ carbonization of MFI zeolite membranes allowed for the maximum separation of isoprene from n-pentane, with a 4.1% enrichment of the binary stream with n-pentane. In four component streams, a modified MFI membrane had high selectivities for n-pentane and 1-3-pentadiene over isoprene but virtually no separation for the 2-methyl-2-butene/isoprene pair.

  2. Ammonia synthesis catalyzed by ruthenium supported on basic zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Fishel, C.T.; Davis, R.J.; Garces, J.M.

    1996-09-15

    Ammonia synthesis was catalyzed by ruthenium metal clusters, promoted by alkali and alkaline earth elements, supported on zeolite X, magnesia, and pure silica MCM-41. At atmospheric total pressure and temperatures ranging from 623 to 723 K, the turnover frequencies of ammonia synthesis on Ru/KX varied significantly with Fu cluster size, demonstrating the known structure sensitivity of the reaction. Therefore, zeolite and magnesia catalysts were prepared with similar Ru cluster sizes, about 1 nm in diameter, in order to properly evaluate the effect of promoters. The same high degree of metal dispersion could not be obtained with Ru/MCM-41 catalysts. The turnover frequency for ammonia synthesis over Ru/CsX exceeded that over Ru/KX, consistent with the rank of promoter basicity. However, alkaline earth metals were more effective promoters than alkali metals for Ru supported on both zeolite X and MCM-41. Since alkaline earth metals are less basic; this promotional effect was unexpected. In addition, the turnover frequency for ammonia synthesis on Ru/BaX exceeded that of Ru/MgO, a nonzeolitic material. Pore volumes for Ru/BaX and Ru/KX measured by N{sub 2} adsorption were essentially identical, suggesting that pore blockage by ions within the zeolites does not account for the differences in reaction rates. The kinetics of ammonia synthesis over ruthenium differed considerably from what has been reported for industrial iron catalysts. Most significantly, the order of reaction in H{sub 2} was negative over Ru but is positive over Fe. A likely cause of this change in reaction order is that dissociated hydrogen atoms cover a greater fraction of the Ru clusters compared to Fe under reaction conditions. 49 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Hierarchical Macro-meso-microporous ZSM-5 Zeolite Hollow Fibers With Highly Efficient Catalytic Cracking Capability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Jiang, Guiyuan; Liu, Ying; Di, Jiancheng; Wang, Yajun; Zhao, Zhen; Sun, Qianyao; Xu, Chunming; Gao, Jinsen; Duan, Aijun; Liu, Jian; Wei, Yuechang; Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Zeolite fibers have attracted growing interest for a range of new applications because of their structural particularity while maintaining the intrinsic performances of the building blocks of zeolites. The fabrication of uniform zeolite fibers with tunable hierarchical porosity and further exploration of their catalytic potential are of great importance. Here, we present a versatile and facile method for the fabrication of hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolite fibers with macro-meso-microporosity by coaxial electrospinning. Due to the synergistic integration of the suitable acidity and the hierarchical porosity, high yield of propylene and excellent anti-coking stability were demonstrated on the as-prepared ZSM-5 hollow fibers in the catalytic cracking reaction of iso-butane. This work may also provide good model catalysts with uniform wall thickness and tunable porosity for studying a series of important catalytic reactions. PMID:25450726

  4. Hierarchical macro-meso-microporous ZSM-5 zeolite hollow fibers with highly efficient catalytic cracking capability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Jiang, Guiyuan; Liu, Ying; Di, Jiancheng; Wang, Yajun; Zhao, Zhen; Sun, Qianyao; Xu, Chunming; Gao, Jinsen; Duan, Aijun; Liu, Jian; Wei, Yuechang; Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Zeolite fibers have attracted growing interest for a range of new applications because of their structural particularity while maintaining the intrinsic performances of the building blocks of zeolites. The fabrication of uniform zeolite fibers with tunable hierarchical porosity and further exploration of their catalytic potential are of great importance. Here, we present a versatile and facile method for the fabrication of hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolite fibers with macro-meso-microporosity by coaxial electrospinning. Due to the synergistic integration of the suitable acidity and the hierarchical porosity, high yield of propylene and excellent anti-coking stability were demonstrated on the as-prepared ZSM-5 hollow fibers in the catalytic cracking reaction of iso-butane. This work may also provide good model catalysts with uniform wall thickness and tunable porosity for studying a series of important catalytic reactions. PMID:25450726

  5. Adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of pharmaceuticals and pesticides by carbon doped-TiO2 coated on zeolites under solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    An, Ye; de Ridder, David Johannes; Zhao, Chun; Schoutteten, Klaas; Bussche, Julie Vanden; Zheng, Huaili; Chen, Gang; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of zeolite-supported carbon-doped TiO(2) composite catalysts toward target pollutants under solar light irradiation, the adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of 18 pharmaceuticals and pesticides with distinguishing features (molecular size and volume, and photolysis) were investigated using mordenite zeolites with SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratios of 18 and 240. Different quantities of carbon-doped TiO(2) were coated on the zeolites, and then the finished composite catalysts were tested in demineralized, surface, and hospital wastewater samples, respectively. The composite photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and surface area and porosity analyses. Results showed that a dispersed layer of carbon-doped TiO(2) is formed on the zeolite surface; this layer blocks the micropores of zeolites and reduces their surface area. However, these reductions did not significantly affect adsorption onto the zeolites. Our results demonstrated that zeolite-supported carbon-doped TiO(2) systems can effectively degrade 18 pharmaceuticals and pesticides in demineralized water under natural and simulated solar light irradiation. In surface and hospital wastewaters, zeolite-supported carbon-doped TiO(2) systems present excellent anti-interference capability against radical scavengers and competitive organics for pollutants removal, and higher pollutants adsorption on zeolites evidently enhances the removal rate of target pollutants in surface and hospital wastewater samples with a complicated matrix. PMID:27332831

  6. Amphiphilic organosilane-directed synthesis of crystalline zeolite with tunable mesoporosity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minkee; Cho, Hae Sung; Srivastava, Rajendra; Venkatesan, Chithravel; Choi, Dae-Heung; Ryoo, Ryong

    2006-09-01

    Zeolites are a family of crystalline aluminosilicate materials widely used as shape-selective catalysts, ion exchange materials, and adsorbents for organic compounds. In the present work, zeolites were synthesized by adding a rationally designed amphiphilic organosilane surfactant to conventional alkaline zeolite synthesis mixtures. The zeolite products were characterized by a complementary combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen sorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analyses show that the present method is suitable as a direct synthesis route to highly mesoporous zeolites. The mesopore diameters could be uniformly tailored, similar to ordered mesoporous silica with amorphous frameworks. The mesoporous zeolite exhibited a narrow, small-angle XRD peak, which is characteristic of the short-range correlation between mesopores, similar to disordered wormhole-like mesoporous materials. The XRD patterns and electron micrographs of the samples taken during crystallization clearly showed the evolution of the mesoporous structure concomitantly to the crystallization of zeolite frameworks. The synthesis of the crystalline aluminosilicate materials with tunable mesoporosity and strong acidity has potentially important technological implications for catalytic reactions of large molecules, whereas conventional mesoporous materials lack hydrothermal stability and acidity. PMID:16892049

  7. Fluorescence labelling as tool for zeolite particle tracking in nanoremediation approaches.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Glenn; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2016-04-15

    Colloidal Fe-zeolites such as Fe-BEA-35 are currently under study as new adsorbent and catalyst materials for in-situ chemical oxidation with H2O2. As for nanoremediation in general, the availability of suitable particle detection methods is a requirement for successful process development and particle tracing. Detection and distinguishing between natural colloids and introduced particles with a similar composition are a challenge. By means of fluorescence labelling, a highly specific detection option for Fe-BEA-35 was developed. 'Ship-in-a-bottle' synthesis of fluorescein within the zeolite pores, which was applied for the first time for a BEA type zeolite, provides a product with stable and non-extractable fluorescence. When the fluorescent labelled zeolite is added at a concentration of 1wt.% referring to the total zeolite mass, a very low detection limit of 1mg/L of total zeolite is obtained. Compared to commonly applied turbidity measurements, detection via fluorescence labelling is much more specific and sensitive. Fluorescence is only marginally affected by carboxymethyl cellulose, which is frequently applied as stabilizer in application suspensions but will be depleted upon contact with H2O2. Transport properties of fluorescent labelled and non-labelled Fe-zeolite particles are in agreement as determined in a column study with quartz sand and synthetic groundwater (classified as very hard). PMID:26849345

  8. Zeolite vitrification demonstration program: characterization of radioactive vitrified zeolite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J O; Daniel, J L; Marshall, R K

    1984-01-01

    The leach behavior of radioactive vitrified zeolite material was studied as part of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Zeolite Vitrification Program conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experimental procedures, test results, and discussions of the results are presented. The leach behavior of material from three canisters of vitrified zeolite is discussed in terms of the normalized weight loss of the glass-formers and the normalized activity loss of the fission products cesium and strontium. The leach behavior of the radioactive vitrified zeolite material is also compared to the leach behavior of MCC 76-68 reference glass. The effects of changes in the surface microstructure of the vitrified zeolite that occurred during leaching are also presented. 3 references, 23 figures, 10 tables.

  9. Transversal spin freezing and re-entrant spin glass phases in chemically disordered Fe-containing perovskite multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Stephanovich, V A; Laguta, V V

    2016-03-14

    We propose experimental verification and theoretical explanation of magnetic anomalies in the complex Fe-containing perovskite multiferroics like PbFe1/2Nb1/2O3 and PbFe1/2Ta1/2O3. The theoretical part is based on our model of coexistence of the long-range magnetic order and spin glass in the above compounds. In our model, the exchange interaction is anisotropic, coupling antiferromagnetically z spin components of Fe(3+) ions. At the same time, the xy components are coupled by much weaker exchange interaction of ferromagnetic sign. In the system with spatial disorder (half of the corresponding lattice sites are occupied by spinless Nb(5+) ions) such frustrating interaction results in the fact that the antiferromagnetic order is formed by the z projection of the spins, while their xy components contribute to spin glass behaviour. Our theoretical findings are supported by the experimental evidence of such a coexistence of antiferromagnetic and spin glass phases in chemically disordered Fe-containing complex perovskite multiferroics. PMID:26890550

  10. Thermal behavior of natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    Thermal behavior of natural zeolites impacts their application and identification and varies significantly from zeolite to zeolite. Zeolites evolve H{sub 2}0 upon heating, but recent data show that distinct ``types`` of water (e.g., loosely bound or tightly bound zeolitic water) do not exist. Rather water is bound primarily to extra-framework cations with a continuum of energies, giving rise to pseudocontinuous loss of water accompanied by a dynamic interaction between remaining H{sub 2}0 molecules and extra-framework cations. These interactions in the channels of zeolites give rise to dehydration dependent on the extra-framework cation, in addition to temperature and water vapor pressure. The dehydration reaction and the extra-framework cation also affect the thermal expansion/contraction. Most zeolites undergo dehydration-induced contractions that may be anisotropic, although minor thermal expansion can be seen with some zeolites. Such contractions can be partially or completely irreversible if they involve modifications of the tetrahedral framework and/or if rehydration is sluggish. Thermally induced structural modifications are also driven initially by dehydration and the concomitant contraction and migration of extra-framework cations. Contraction is accommodated by rotations of structural units and tetrahedral cation-oxygen linkages may break. Thermal reactions that involve breaking of tetrahedral cation-oxygen bonds markedly irreversible and may be kinetically limited, producing large differences between short- and long-term heating.