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Sample records for fe-doped calcium sulfide

  1. Magnetic properties study on Fe-doped calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. C.; Vasconcelos, I. F.; Sombra, A. S. B.; Valente, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    Calcium phosphates are very important for applications in medicine due to their properties such as biocompatibility and bioactivity. In order to enhance these properties, substitution of calcium with other ions has been proposed. Partial substitution of calcium by different ions has been made in order to improve the properties of the calcium phosphates and also to allow new applications of apatite in medicine. In this work, hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2—HAP] was prepared by high-energy dry milling (20 h) and mixed with iron oxide (5 wt.%). The mixture was calcinated at 900 °C for 5 h with a heating rate of 3 °C min-1 in an attempt to introduce iron oxide into the HAP structure. The sintered sample was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization. The 57Fe-Mössbauer spectra of the calcium phosphate oxides were also measured, revealing the presence of iron in three different phases: Ca2Fe2O5, Fe2O3 and hydroxyapatite.

  2. Effect of Si and Fe doping on calcium phosphate glass fibre reinforced polycaprolactone bone analogous composites.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, M Shah; Ahmed, I; Muja, N; Almeida, S; Rudd, C D; Bureau, M N; Nazhat, S N

    2012-04-01

    Reinforcing biodegradable polymers with phosphate-based glass fibres (PGF) is of interest for bone repair and regeneration. In addition to increasing the mechanical properties, PGF can also release bioinorganics, as they are water soluble, a property that may be controllably translated into a fully degradable composite. Herein, the effect of Si and Fe on the solubility of calcium-containing phosphate-based glasses (PG) in the system (50P(2)O(5)-40CaO-(10-x)SiO(2)-xFe(2)O(3), where x=0, 5 and 10 mol.%) were investigated. On replacing SiO(2) with Fe(2)O(3), there was an increase in the glass transition temperature and density of the PG, suggesting greater crosslinking of the phosphate chains. This significantly reduced the dissolution rates of degradation and ion release. Two PG formulations, 50P(2)O(5)-40CaO-10Fe(2)O(3) (Fe10) and 50P(2)O(5)-40CaO-5Fe(2)O(3)-5SiO(2) (Fe5Si5), were melt drawn into fibres and randomly incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL). Initially, the flexural strength and modulus significantly increased with PGF incorporation. In deionized water, PCL-Fe(5)Si(5) displayed a significantly greater weight loss and ion release compared with PCL-Fe10. In simulated body fluid, brushite was formed only on the surface of PCL-Fe(5)Si(5). Dynamic mechanical analysis in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C revealed that the PCL-Fe10 storage modulus (E') was unchanged up to day 7, whereas the onset of PCL-Fe(5)Si(5)E' decrease occurred at day 4. At longer-term ageing in PBS, PCL-Fe(5)Si(5) flexural strength and modulus decreased significantly. MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts seeded onto PCL-PGF grew up to day 7 in culture. PGF can be used to control the properties of biodegradable composites for potential application as bone fracture fixation devices. PMID:22248526

  3. Hydrogen sulfide promotes calcium uptake in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Perry, Steve F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can act as a signaling molecule for various ion channels and/or transporters; however, little is known about its potential involvement in Ca(2+) balance. Using developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an in vivo model system, the present study demonstrated that acute exposure to H2S donors increased Ca(2+) influx at 4 days postfertilization, while chronic (3-day) exposure caused a rise in whole body Ca(2+) levels. The mRNA expression of Ca(2+)-transport-related genes was unaffected by H2S exposure, suggesting that posttranscriptional modifications were responsible for the altered rates of Ca(2+) uptake. Indeed, treatment of fish with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 abolished the H2S-mediated stimulation of Ca(2+) influx, suggesting that H2S increased Ca(2+) influx by activating cAMP-protein kinase A pathways. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) are two key enzymes in the endogenous synthesis of H2S. Using an antisense morpholino knockdown approach, we demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx was reduced in CBS isoform b (CBSb)- but not in CSE-deficient fish. Interestingly, the reduction in Ca(2+) influx in CBSb-deficient fish was observed only in fish that were acclimated to low-Ca(2+) water (i.e., 25 μM Ca(2+); control: 250 μM Ca(2+)). Similarly, mRNA expression of cbsb but not cse was increased in fish acclimated to low-Ca(2+) water. Results from whole-mount immunohistochemistry further revealed that CBSb was expressed in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-rich cells, which are implicated in Ca(2+) uptake in zebrafish larvae. Collectively, the present study suggests a novel role for H2S in promoting Ca(2+) influx, particularly in a low-Ca(2+) environment. PMID:25948733

  4. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheeswari, S.; Sriram, R.; Brindha, P.; Kurian, Gino A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model. Materials and Methods: The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH), sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques. Results: The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4. Conclusion: Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O3 2-and SO4 2- moiety produced by the test compounds. PMID:26200543

  5. Investigating potential sources of Mercury's exospheric Calcium: Photon-stimulated desorption of Calcium Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Chris J.; McLain, Jason L.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Gann, Reuben D.; DeSimone, Alice; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2016-02-01

    Ground-based and MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging observations detected Ca0 and Ca+ in the exosphere of Mercury as well as unexpectedly high levels of sulfur on Mercury's surface. The mineral oldhamite ((Mg,Ca)S) could be a predominant component of the Mercury surface, particularly within the hollows identified within craters, and could therefore serve as a source of the observed exospheric calcium. Laboratory measurements on the photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of CaS powder (an analog for oldhamite) at a wavelength of λ = 355 nm have been conducted, utilizing resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to determine the yields and velocity distributions of Ca0. The desorbing Ca0 could be fit using two Maxwell-Boltzmann components: a 600 (±30) K thermal component and a 1389 (±121) K nonthermal component, the latter accounting for ~25% of the observed signal. Cross sections for PSD using 3.4 eV photons were found to be 1.1 (±0.7) × 10-20 cm2 for Ca0 and 3.2 (±0.9) × 10-24 cm2 for Ca+. Adopting these cross sections, a Monte Carlo model of the release of Ca0 by PSD from the Tyagaraja crater finds the neutral microexosphere created from this process to be substantial even if only 1% CaS is assumed in the hollows. Diffuse reflectance UV-visible measurements were made on the CaS powder to determine a bandgap, Eg, of 2.81 (±0.14) eV via the Tauc method.

  6. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. PMID:26493746

  7. Fe-doped InN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xinqiang; Liu Shitao; Ma Dingyu; Zheng Xiantong; Chen Guang; Xu Fujun; Tang Ning; Shen Bo; Zhang Peng; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi; Huang Sen; Chen, Kevin J.; Zhou Shengqiang; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2012-10-22

    Iron(Fe)-doped InN (InN:Fe) layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that Fe-doping leads to drastic increase of residual electron concentration, which is different from the semi-insulating property of Fe-doped GaN. However, this heavy n-type doping cannot be fully explained by doped Fe-concentration ([Fe]). Further analysis shows that more unintentionally doped impurities such as hydrogen and oxygen are incorporated with increasing [Fe] and the surface is degraded with high density pits, which probably are the main reasons for electron generation and mobility reduction. Photoluminescence of InN is gradually quenched by Fe-doping. This work shows that Fe-doping is one of good choices to control electron density in InN.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  9. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  10. Enhanced electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness of Fe doped carbon nanotubes/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhou; Ejembi, John; Nwigboji, Ifeanyi; Zhao, Guang-Lin; Southern University A&M College Team

    2014-03-01

    Fe doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/epoxy composites were fabricated for the investigation of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. Compared with the pristine MWCNTs, a small amount of Fe doping into the MWCNTs can substantially improve the EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of MWCNTs/epoxy composites. The highest EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites is -32 to -41 dB in the measured frequency range from 26 to 40 GHz for the sample with 8 wt.% Fe doped MWCNT loading. The contribution of EMI SE of the composites is mainly due to dielectric loss rather than magnetic loss. This work is funded by Air Force and NSF.

  11. Enhanced electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness of Fe doped carbon nanotubes/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhou; Wei, Guodong; Zhao, Guang-Lin

    2013-10-01

    Fe doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/epoxy composites were fabricated for the investigation of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. Compared with the pristine MWCNTs, a small amount of Fe doping into the MWCNTs can substantially improve the EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of MWCNTs/epoxy composites. The highest EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites is -32 to -41 dB in the measured frequency range from 26 to 40 GHz for the sample with 8 wt. % Fe doped MWCNT loading. The contribution of EMI SE of the composites is mainly due to dielectric loss rather than magnetic loss.

  12. Room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods: Microwave-assisted synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Singh, Shashi B.; Das, Raja; Poddar, Pankaj; Kulkarni, Sulabha K.

    2011-02-15

    One-dimensional (1D) undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods of average length {approx}1 {mu}m and diameter {approx}50 nm have been obtained using a microwave-assisted synthesis. The magnetization (M) and coercivity (H{sub c}) value obtained for undoped ZnO nanorods at room temperature is {approx}5x10{sup -3} emu/g and {approx}150 Oe, respectively. The Fe doped ZnO samples show significant changes in M -H loop with increasing doping concentration. Both undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods exhibit a Curie transition temperature (T{sub c}) above 390 K. Electron spin resonance and Moessbauer spectra indicate the presence of ferric ions. The origin of ferromagnetism in undoped ZnO nanorods is attributed to localized electron spin moments resulting from surface defects/vacancies, where as in Fe doped samples is explained by F center exchange mechanism. -- Graphical abstract: Room temperature ferromagnetism has been reported in undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods of average length {approx}1 {mu}m and diameter {approx}50 nm. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} Microwave-assisted synthesis of undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods. {yields} Observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods. {yields} Transition temperature (T{sub c}) obtained in undoped and doped samples is above 390 K. {yields} In undoped ZnO origin of ferromagnetism is explained in terms of defects/vacancies. {yields} Ferromagnetism in Fe doped ZnO is explained by F-center exchange mechanism.

  13. Preparation, characterization and electronic structures of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.Y.; Liu, X.T.; Qin, W.W.; Liu, X.S.; Cai, N.N.; Wang, X.Q.; Lin, X.J.; Zhang, G.H.; Xu, D.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mesoporous Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers were prepared on a large scale by sol–gel method. • Fe-doping greatly enhance the visible-light photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} fibers. • First-principle study the effects of different replaced sites on the absorption edge and band gap. - Abstract: Mesoporous and nanostructured Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers were fabricated on a large scale by sol–gel method combined with the polyorganotitanium as the precursor and ferric nitrate as dopant. The prepared fibers were characterized by XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms and UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution under UV and visible-light irradiation. Compared with different types of photocatalysts, the 0.5%Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers exhibit super photocatalytic activity. This is ascribed to the fact that the Fe-doping induces the shift of the absorption edge into the visible-light range with the narrowing of the band gap and reduces the recombination of the photo-generated electrons and holes. Furthermore, first-principle study for their electronic structures was carried out to confirm the effects of different replaced lattice sites on the red shift of the absorption edge and the changes of the band gap of the Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers.

  14. TDPAC measurements in pure and Fe-doped In 2 O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena, C.; Costa, M. S.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Saxena, R. N.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2013-05-01

    Measurements of the electric quadrupole interactions were used to characterize pure and Fe-doped In2O3 samples using perturbed γ- γ angular correlation (PAC) technique with 111In-111Cd radioactive probe. The samples of pure as well as 1 % and 5 % Fe-doped In2O3 were prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The PAC measurements were carried out with a conventional fast-slow coincidence set-up using four BaF2 detectors as a function of temperature from 295 K to 1073 K. The powder XRD spectra analyzed with Rietveld method as well as SEM and EDS results showed that Fe-doped samples are homogeneous without any secondary iron oxide phases. The PAC spectra of pure and 1 % Fe-doped In2O3 show well-known characteristic quadrupole frequencies for the two non-equivalent sites in the bixbyte structure. The hyperfine parameters in these cases change little with temperature. For the 5 % Fe-doped sample however the PAC spectra changed significantly and a third frequency with large η appears.

  15. Structural, magnetic, and transport properties of Fe-doped CoTiSb epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, N. Y.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Che, W. R.; Shan, R.; Qin, J.

    2015-11-07

    Epitaxial intrinsic and Fe-doped CoTiSb thin films with C1{sub b} structure were grown on MgO(100) substrates by magnetron sputtering. The semiconducting-like behavior in both intrinsic and Fe-doped thin films was demonstrated by temperature dependence of longitudinal resistivity. The Fe-doped CoTiSb films with a wide range of doping concentrations can maintain semiconducting-like and magnetic properties simultaneously, while the semiconducting behavior is weakening with the increasing Fe concentration. For 21 at. % Fe-doped film, low lattice magnetic moment (around 0.65 μ{sub B}) and high resistivity (larger than 800 μΩ cm) are beneficial to its application as a magnetic electrode in spintronic devices. Anomalous Hall effect of 21 at. % Fe-doped film was also investigated and its behaviors can be treated well by recent-reported anomalous Hall scaling including the contribution of spin-phonon skew scattering.

  16. Importance of doping and frustration in itinerant Fe-doped Cr2Al

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Susner, M. A.; Parker, D. S.; Sefat, A. S.

    2015-05-12

    We performed an experimental and theoretical study comparing the effects of Fe-doping of Cr2Al, an antiferromagnet with a N el temperature of 670 K, with known results on Fe-doping of antiferromagnetic bcc Cr. (Cr1-xFex)2Al materials are found to exhibit a rapid suppression of antiferromagnetic order with the presence of Fe, decreasing TN to 170 K for x=0.10. Antiferromagnetic behavior disappears entirely at x≈0.125 after which point increasing paramagnetic behavior is exhibited. Moreover, this is unlike the effects of Fe doping of bcc antiferromagnetic Cr, in which TN gradually decreases followed by the appearance of a ferromagnetic state. Theoretical calculations explainmore » that the Cr2Al-Fe suppression of magnetic order originates from two effects: the first is band narrowing caused by doping of additional electrons from Fe substitution that weakens itinerant magnetism; the second is magnetic frustration of the Cr itinerant moments in Fe-substituted Cr2Al. In pure-phase Cr2Al, the Cr moments have an antiparallel alignment; however, these are destroyed through Fe substitution and the preference of Fe for parallel alignment with Cr. This is unlike bulk Fe-doped Cr alloys in which the Fe anti-aligns with the Cr atoms, and speaks to the importance of the Al atoms in the magnetic structure of Cr2Al and Fe-doped Cr2Al.« less

  17. Fe doped TiO2-graphene nanostructures: synthesis, DFT modeling and photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Nasrin; Ayissi, Serge; Charpentier, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    In this work, Fe-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles ranging from a 0.2 to 1 weight % were grown from the surface of graphene sheet templates containing -COOH functionalities using sol-gel chemistry in a green solvent, a mixture of water/ethanol. The assemblies were characterized by a variety of analytical techniques, with the coordination mechanism examined theoretically using the density functional theory (DFT). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed excellent decoration of the Fe-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles on the surface of the graphene sheets >5 nm in diameter. The surface area and optical properties of the Fe-doped photocatalysts were measured by BET, UV and PL spectrometry and compared to non-graphene and pure TiO(2) analogs, showing a plateau at 0.6% Fe. Interactions between graphene and Fe-doped anatase TiO(2) were also studied theoretically using the Vienna ab initio Simulation Package based on DFT. Our first-principles theoretical investigations validated the experimental findings, showing the strength in the physical and chemical adsorption between the graphene and Fe-doped TiO(2). The resulting assemblies were tested for photodegradation under visible light using 17β-estradiol (E2) as a model compound, with all investigated catalysts showing significant enhancements in photocatalytic activity in the degradation of E2. PMID:25002220

  18. Superparamagnetic behavior of Fe-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, M.; Onuma, K.; Kondo, T.; Miike, K.; Miyasaka, T.; Mori, K.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2014-02-20

    SnO{sub 2} is an n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.62 eV, and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles doped with magnetic ions are expected to realized new diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Realizing ferromagnetism at room temperature is important for spintronics device applications, and it is interesting that the magnetic properties of these DMS systems can be varied significantly by modifying the preparation methods or conditions. In this study, the magnetic properties of Fe-doped (3% and 5%) SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles, prepared using our novel chemical preparation method and encapsulated in amorphous SiO{sub 2}, were investigated. The particle size (1.8–16.9 nm) and crystal phase were controlled by the annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction confirmed a rutile SnO{sub 2} single-phase structure for samples annealed at 1073–1373 K, and the composition was confirmed using X-ray fluorescence analysis. SQUID magnetometer measurements revealed superparamagnetic behavior of the 5%-Fe-doped sample at room temperature, although SnO{sub 2} is known to be diamagnetic. Magnetization curves at 5 K indicated that the 3%-Fe-doped has a larger magnetization than that of the 5%-Fe-doped sample. We conclude that the magnetization of the 5%-Fe-doped sample decreased at 5 K due to the superexchange interaction between the antiferromagnetic coupling in the nanoparticle system.

  19. Fe doped TiO2-graphene nanostructures: synthesis, DFT modeling and photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhangi, Nasrin; Ayissi, Serge; Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles ranging from a 0.2 to 1 weight % were grown from the surface of graphene sheet templates containing -COOH functionalities using sol-gel chemistry in a green solvent, a mixture of water/ethanol. The assemblies were characterized by a variety of analytical techniques, with the coordination mechanism examined theoretically using the density functional theory (DFT). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed excellent decoration of the Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles on the surface of the graphene sheets >5 nm in diameter. The surface area and optical properties of the Fe-doped photocatalysts were measured by BET, UV and PL spectrometry and compared to non-graphene and pure TiO2 analogs, showing a plateau at 0.6% Fe. Interactions between graphene and Fe-doped anatase TiO2 were also studied theoretically using the Vienna ab initio Simulation Package based on DFT. Our first-principles theoretical investigations validated the experimental findings, showing the strength in the physical and chemical adsorption between the graphene and Fe-doped TiO2. The resulting assemblies were tested for photodegradation under visible light using 17β-estradiol (E2) as a model compound, with all investigated catalysts showing significant enhancements in photocatalytic activity in the degradation of E2.

  20. Influence of Fe doping on the structural, optical and acetone sensing properties of sprayed ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Prajapati, C.S.; Kushwaha, Ajay; Sahay, P.P.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: All the films are found to be polycrystalline ZnO possessing hexagonal wurtzite structure. The intensities of all the peaks are diminished strongly in the Fe-doped films, indicating their lower crystallinity as compared to the undoped ZnO film. The average crystallite size decreases from 35.21 nm (undoped sample) to 15.43 nm (1 at% Fe-doped sample). - Highlights: • Fe-doped ZnO films show smaller crystallinity with crystallite size: 15–26 nm. • Optical band gap in ZnO films decreases on Fe doping. • Fe-doped films exhibit the normal dispersion for the wavelength range 450–600 nm. • PL spectra of the Fe-doped films show quenching of the broad green-orange emission. • Acetone response of the Fe-doped films increases considerably at 300 °C. - Abstract: The ZnO thin films (undoped and Fe-doped) deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis technique have been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that all the films possess hexagonal wurtzite structure of zinc oxide having crystallite sizes in the range 15–36 nm. On 1 at% Fe doping, the surface roughness of the film increases which favors the adsorption of atmospheric oxygen on the film surface and thereby increase in the gas response. Optical studies reveal that the band gap decreases due to creation of some defect energy states below the conduction band edge, arising out of the lattice disorder in the doped films. The refractive index of the films decreases on Fe doping and follows the Cauchy relation of normal dispersion. Among all the films examined, the 1 at% Fe-doped film exhibits the maximum response (∼72%) at 300 °C for 100 ppm concentration of acetone in air.

  1. Fe doped ZnO thin film for mediator-less biosensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Shibu; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2012-05-01

    Fe doped ZnO (FZO) thin film is prepared by pulsed laser deposition for its application as mediator-less biosensing matrix. Fe doping introduces redox centre in ZnO along with shallow donor level and promotes the electron transfer capability due to substitution of Fe at Zn sites. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, was immobilized on surface of the prepared matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the developed bio-electrode, GOx/FZO/indium tin oxide/Glass is sensitive to glucose concentration with enhanced response (0.2 µA mM-1 cm-2) and low Km (3.01 mM). The results show promising application of Fe doped ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for mediator-less biosensing.

  2. Effect of Fe doping concentration on photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanosheets under natural sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhra, Richa; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    A facile room temperature, aqueous solution-based chemical method has been adopted for large-scale synthesis of Fe doped ZnO nanosheets. The XRD and SEM results reveal the as-synthesized products well crystalline and accumulated by large amount of interweave nanosheets, respectively. Energy dispersive spectroscopy data confirmed Fe doping of the ZnO nanosheets with a varying Fe concentration. The photoluminescence spectrum reveals a continuous suppression of defect related emissions intensity by increasing the concentration of the Fe ion. A photocatalytic activity using these samples under sunlight irradiation in the mineralization of methylene blue dye was investigated. The photocatalytic activity of Fe doped ZnO nanosheets depends upon the presence of surface oxygen vacancies.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe-doped TiO2 nanostructure photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghia Nguyen, Van; Khoa Truong Nguyen, Ngoc; Nguyen, Phi Hung

    2011-09-01

    Fe-doped TiO2 catalyst was prepared by the hydrothermal method. The resulting nanopowders were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman and UV-visible spectroscopies. The photocatalytic activity of the Fe-doped TiO2 was tested by decomposition of methylene orange with a concentration of 10 mg l‑1 in aqueous solution. The obtained results showed that methylene orange was significantly degraded after irradiation for 90 min under a halogen lamp and sunlight. The doping effect on the photocatalytic activity of the iron-doped catalyst samples are discussed.

  4. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  5. Improved gas sensing and dielectric properties of Fe doped hydroxyapatite thick films: Effect of molar concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mene, Ravindra U.; Mahabole, Megha P.; Mohite, K.C.; Khairnar, Rajendra S.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We report improved gas sensing and dielectric characteristics of Fe ion exchanged HAp films. • Fe doped HAp film shows maximum gas response at relatively lower temperature. • Response and gas uptake capacity of sensors is improved for appropriate amount of Fe ions in HAp matrix. • Fe-HAp films exhibit remarkable improvement in dielectric properties compared to pure HAp. • Fe doped HAp films show significant improvement in gas sensing as well as in dielectric properties. - Abstract: In the present work Fe doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HAp) thick films has been successfully utilized to improve the gas sensing as well as its dielectric properties. Initially, HAp nano powder is synthesized by chemical precipitation process and later on Fe ions are doped in HAp by ion exchange process. Structural and morphological modifications are observed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The sensing parameters such as operating temperature, response/recovery time and gas uptake capacity are experimentally determined. The Fe-HAp (0.05 M) film shows improved CO and CO{sub 2} gas sensing capacity at lower operating temperature compared to pure HAp. Moreover, variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss for pure and Fe-HAp thick films are studied as a function of frequency in the range of 10 Hz–1 MHz. The study reveals that Fe doped HAp thick films improve the sensing and dielectric characteristics as compared to pure HAp.

  6. Ferromagnetic interactions and martensitic transformation in Fe doped Ni-Mn-In shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, D. N.; Priolkar, K. R.; Emura, S.; Nigam, A. K.

    2014-11-14

    The structure, magnetic, and martensitic properties of Fe doped Ni-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization, resistivity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and EXAFS. While Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) alloys are ferromagnetic and non martensitic, the martensitic transformation temperature in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.5}In{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y} and Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.6}In{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y} increases for lower Fe concentrations (y ≤ 0.05) before decreasing sharply for higher Fe concentrations. XRD analysis reveals presence of cubic and tetragonal structural phases in Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} at room temperature with tetragonal phase content increasing with Fe doping. Even though the local structure around Mn and Ni in these Fe doped alloys is similar to martensitic Mn rich Ni-Mn-In alloys, presence of ferromagnetic interactions and structural disorder induced by Fe affect Mn-Ni-Mn antiferromagnetic interactions resulting in suppression of martensitic transformation in these Fe doped alloys.

  7. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  8. Theoretical study of the adsorption of pentachlorophenol on the pristine and Fe-doped boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruo-xi; Zhang, Dong-ju; Zhu, Rong-xiu; Liu, Cheng-bu

    2014-02-01

    To explore the novel application of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), we investigated the interaction of pentachlorophenol (PCP) pollutant with the pristine and Fe doped (Fe-doped) (8, 0) single-walled BNNTs by performing density functional theory calculations. Compared with the weak physisorption on the pristine BNNT, PCP molecule presents strong chemisorption on the Fe-doped BNNT. The calculated data for the electronic properties indicate that doping Fe atom into the BNNT significantly improves the electronic transport property of BNNT, induces magnetism in the BNNT, and increases its adsorption sensitivity toward PCP molecule. It is suggested that doping BNNTs with Fe is an available strategy for improving the properties of BNNTs, and that Fe-doped BNNT would be a potential resource for adsorbing PCP pollutant in environments. PMID:24504454

  9. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao; Liang, Xiaohui; Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu; Jin, Meili; Sun, Dianjun; Zhang, Weihua; Zhong, Xin

    2016-09-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H2S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H2S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca(2+)]i and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H2S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21(Cip/WAK-1) and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H2S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H2S is related to the PLC-IP3 receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. PMID:27502588

  10. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  11. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of Fe-doped barium stannate thin films grown by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, K. K.; Aravind, Arun; Jayaraj, M. K.

    2013-10-01

    Barium stannate is a wide band gap semiconductor with cubic perovskite structure. Polycrystalline bulk samples of BaSn1-xFexO3d (BFS), with x = 0.00, 0.02, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.10 were prepared by solid-state reaction. In this paper, we report the growth of undoped and Fe doped barium stannate thin films on fused silica substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique at a relatively high substrate temperature and low oxygen pressure. The deposited films have wide bandgap and are transparent in the visible region. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the films confirmed the cubic structure. Microstructural studies were carried out using micro-Raman spectroscopy and AFM analysis. Defect induced Raman shifts were observed in the samples. Magnetic studies revealed an increase in magnetic properties for films doped with 10 at% Fe doped samples.

  12. Ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in Fe doped BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Bipul; Ravi, S.; Perumal, A.; Pamu, D.

    2014-09-01

    We report the investigation of crystal structure, magnetic and dielectric properties of BaTi1-xFexO3 samples for x=0.0-0.3. The parent compound is found to crystallize in tetragonal structure while Fe doped samples are found to crystallize in the mixture of tetragonal and hexagonal phases but they are free from any impurity phase. Room temperature ferromagnetism with the transition temperature (Tc) of 462 K was observed for x=0.3 sample. Fe doped samples exhibit ferroelectric transition with transition temperature (TcF) in the range of 390 K for x=0.0-312 K for x=0.2. The dielectric constant, ε‧ is found to decrease with the increase in doping concentrations.

  13. Synthesis of Fe Doped ZnO Nanowire Arrays that Detect Formaldehyde Gas.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoo Sang; Seo, Hyo Won; Kim, Su Hyo; Kim, Young Keun

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their chemical and thermal stability and doping effects on providing electrons to the conduction band, doped ZnO nanowires have generated interest for use in electronic devices. Here we report hydrothermally grown Fe-doped ZnO nanowires and their gas-sensing properties. The synthesized nanowires have a high crystallinity and are 60 nm in diameter and 1.7 μm in length. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to understand the doping effects on the microstructures and gas sensing properties. When the Fe-doped ZnO nanowire arrays were evaluated for gas sensing, responses were recorded through changes in temperature and gas concentration. Gas sensors consisting of ZnO nanowires doped with 3-5 at.% Fe showed optimum formaldehyde (HCHO) sensing performance at each working temperature. PMID:27483827

  14. High-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Fe)Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Nguyen Thanh; Hai, Pham Nam; Anh, Le Duc; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    We show high-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga1-x,Fex)Sb (x = 23% and 25%) thin films grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and anomalous Hall effect measurements indicate intrinsic ferromagnetism of these samples. The Curie temperature reaches 300 K and 340 K for x = 23% and 25%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far in intrinsic III-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  15. Preparation of Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles immobilized on polyamide fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Hong

    2012-10-01

    A thin layer of nano-scaled Fe-doped TiO2 particles prepared by hydrothermal method is immobilized on the surface of polyamide 6 (PA6) fiber using tetrabutyl titanate as the precursor, ferric trichloride as the doping agent and chitosan as the dispersant agent. The morphology, crystal structure, thermal behavior, composition and chemical structure of PA6 fabric before and after treatments are characterized by means of scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis techniques. The properties of diffuse reflectance spectrum, tensile, air permeability, whiteness, yellowness and photocatalytic activity are also analyzed. It is found that the anatase phase Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles with crystal size of 12 nm or so are synthesized, and simultaneously grafted onto the fiber surface during the processing. Compared with the TiO2-coated fabric, the thermal stability of the Fe-doped TiO2-coated fabric changes a little. The absorption ability to ultraviolet (UV) rays and visible light is greatly improved. The breaking force and breaking elongation increase to some extent because of the shrinkage of fabric. The air permeability decreases distinctly. The color of PA6 fabric changes from white to light brownish because of the introduction of ferric trichloride. The photocatalytic activity of methylene blue decolorization is enhanced under sunlight and UV irradiation.

  16. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin onto synthetic Fe-doped geomimetic chrysotile

    PubMed Central

    Adamiano, Alessio; Lesci, Isidoro Giorgio; Fabbri, Daniele; Roveri, Norberto

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic stoichiometric and Fe-doped geomimetic chrysotile nanocrystals represent a reference standard to investigate the health hazard associated with mineral asbestos fibres. Experimental evidence suggests that the generation of reactive oxygen species and other radicals, catalysed by iron ions at the fibre surface, plays an important role in asbestos-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. In this study, structural modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto synthetic chrysotile doped with different amounts of Fe has been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and analytical pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. FT-IR data evidenced a marked increase in disordered structures like random coil and β-turn of BSA–nanocrystal adduct with 0.52 wt% of Fe doped. The TGA profile of the BSA revealed that its interaction with the synthetic chrysotile surface was strongly affected by the substitution of Fe into the chrysotile structure. The 2,5-diketopiperazine yields, formed upon thermal degradation of the polypeptide chain (pyrolysis–gas chromatography), changed when the BSA was adsorbed on the nanofibres. In general, results suggested that minute amount (less than 1 wt%) of Fe doping in chrysotile affected the protein–nanofibre interactions, supporting the role that this element may play in asbestos toxicity. The catalytic role of iron and the consequent unfolding of protein due to the structural surface modification of nanofibres were also evaluated. PMID:26018963

  17. Single-step preparation, characterization and photocatalytic mechanism of mesoporous Fe-doped sulfated titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Zhong, Hui; Tian, Congxue; Jiang, Zhiqiang

    2011-07-01

    Mesoporous Fe-doped sulfated titania photocatalysts were prepared by one-step thermal hydrolysis of industrial titanyl sulfate and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. The effects of the m(Fe)/m(TiO2) on the structures of the titania photocatalysts were investigated. The photocatalytic activity of the mesoporous Fe-doped sulfated titania catalysts was evaluated using the photooxidation of methylene blue in aqueous solutions under UV light irradiation. The results indicated that Fe3+ substitutes Ti4+ in titania lattice, which induced the formation of oxygen vacancies. The oxygen vacancies are favorable to the dissociation adsorption H2O and formation of surface hydroxyl group. Fe3+ captures the photoinduced electrons or holes that are conductive to the efficient separation of the photogenerated carriers, but too many doping Fe3+ will promote recombination of the photogenerated carrier. Sulfur species in the form of sulfate are incorporated into the network of Tisbnd Osbnd Ti and coordinated to titania in bidentate model, resulting in the strong inductive effect, large specific surface area, and mesoporous structure. All these are beneficial to improve the photocatalytic activities of the mesoporous Fe-doped sulfated titania photocatalysts.

  18. Comparative study of (N, Fe) doped TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larumbe, S.; Monge, M.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of N and Fe doping on the structural, optical, photocatalytic and magnetic properties of TiO2 nanoparticles is analyzed. Undoped, N and Fe doped TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used as the alkoxyde precursor and iron (III) nitrate and urea were the employed precursors to obtain Fe and N doped TiO2 nanoparticles, respectively. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetrical Analysis (TGA) enabled the analysis of the thermal decomposition process and the final calcination temperature. X-Ray Diffraction patterns of the calcined nanoparticles displayed a monophasic anatase structure in all the samples with mean crystallite diameter around 4-6 nm. The introduction of Fe or N induced a red-shift in the absorption spectra. Such a red-shift is characterized by a decrease in the band-gap energy and the occurrence of an absorption (Urbach) tail in the visible region. Finally, the photocatalytic efficiency was evaluated under UV and Visible light, obtaining an improvement of the kinetic constants in the nitrogen doped TiO2 nanoparticles with respect to undoped and Fe doped TiO2. The differences in the photocatalytic response under Fe and N doping are also analyzed in terms of the magnetic response of the analyzed photocatalysts.

  19. Ferromagnetic behaviour of Fe-doped ZnO nanograined films

    PubMed Central

    Protasova, Svetlana G; Mazilkin, Andrei A; Tietze, Thomas; Goering, Eberhard; Schütz, Gisela; Straumal, Petr B; Baretzky, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Summary The influence of the grain boundary (GB) specific area s GB on the appearance of ferromagnetism in Fe-doped ZnO has been analysed. A review of numerous research contributions from the literature on the origin of the ferromagnetic behaviour of Fe-doped ZnO is given. An empirical correlation has been found that the value of the specific grain boundary area s GB is the main factor controlling such behaviour. The Fe-doped ZnO becomes ferromagnetic only if it contains enough GBs, i.e., if s GB is higher than a certain threshold value s th = 5 × 104 m2/m3. It corresponds to the effective grain size of about 40 μm assuming a full, dense material and equiaxial grains. Magnetic properties of ZnO dense nanograined thin films doped with iron (0 to 40 atom %) have been investigated. The films were deposited by using the wet chemistry “liquid ceramics” method. The samples demonstrate ferromagnetic behaviour with J s up to 0.10 emu/g (0.025 μB/f.u.ZnO) and coercivity H c ≈ 0.03 T. Saturation magnetisation depends nonmonotonically on the Fe concentration. The dependence on Fe content can be explained by the changes in the structure and contiguity of a ferromagnetic “grain boundary foam” responsible for the magnetic properties of pure and doped ZnO. PMID:23844341

  20. Fe Doped CdTeS Magnetic Quantum Dots for Bioimaging†

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Ajoy K.; Sharma, Parvesh; Sohn, Han-Byul; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Das, Ritesh. K.; Hebard, Arthur F.; Zeng, Huadong; Baligand, Celine; Walter, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    A facile synthesis of 3-6 nm, water dispersible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting, quantum dots (QDs) magnetically doped with Fe is presented. Doping of alloyed CdTeS nanocrystals with Fe was achieved in situ using a simple hydrothermal method. The magnetic quantum dots (MQDs) were capped with NAcetyl-Cysteine (NAC) ligands, containing thiol and carboxylic acid functional groups to provide stable aqueous dispersion. The optical and magnetic properties of the Fe doped MQDs were characterized using several techniques. The synthesized MQDs are tuned to emit in the Vis-NIR (530-738 nm) wavelength regime and have high quantum yields (67.5-10%). NIR emitting (738 nm) MQDs having 5.6 atomic% Fe content exhibited saturation magnetization of 85 emu/gm[Fe] at room temperature. Proton transverse relaxivity of the Fe doped MQDs (738 nm) at 4.7 T was determined to be 3.6 mM−1s−1. The functional evaluation of NIR MQDs has been demonstrated using phantom and in vitro studies. These water dispersible, NIR emitting and MR contrast producing Fe doped CdTeS MQDs, in unagglomerated form, have the potential to act as multimodal contrast agents for tracking live cells. PMID:24634776

  1. Enhanced magnetic moment in ultrathin Fe-doped CoFe2O4 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, J. A.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Kumah, D. P.; Arena, D. A.; Henrich, V. E.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of film thickness on the magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe-doped cobalt ferrite (Co1-xFe2+xO4) grown on MgO (001) substrates is investigated by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism, while the distribution of the Co2+ cations between the octahedral and tetrahedral lattice sites is studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. For films thinner than 10 nm, there is a large enhancement of the magnetic moment; conversely, the remanent magnetization and coercive fields both decrease, while the magnetic spin axes of all the cations become less aligned with the [001] crystal direction. In particular, at 300 K the coercive fields of the thinnest films vanish. The spectroscopy data show that no changes occur in the cation distribution as a function of film thickness, ruling this out as the origin of the enhanced magnetic moment. However, the magnetic measurements all support the possibility that these ultrathin Fe-doped CoFe2O4 films are transitioning into a superparamagnetic state, as has been seen in ultrathin Fe3O4. A weakening of the magnetic interactions at the antiphase boundaries, leading to magnetically independent domains within the film, could explain the enhanced magnetic moment in ultrathin Fe-doped CoFe2O4 and the onset of superparamagnetism at room temperature.

  2. Effect of Fe doping on the electrochemical capacitor behavior of MnO2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonguzhali, R.; Shanmugam, N.; Gobi, R.; Senthilkumar, A.; Viruthagiri, G.; Kannadasan, N.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the influence of Fe doping on the capacitance behavior of MnO2 nanoparticles synthesized by chemical precipitation was investigated. During the doping process the concentration of Fe was increased from 0.025 M to 0.125 M in steps of 0.025 M. The products obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. To demonstrate the suitability of Fe-doped MnO2 for capacitor applications, cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance were recorded. Among the different levels of doping, the specific capacitance of 912 F/g was delivered by 0.075 M of Fe-doped MnO2 at a scan rate of 10 mV/s, which is almost more than fourfold that of the bare MnO2 electrode (210 F/g). Moreover, for the same concentration the charge, discharge studies revealed the highest specific capacitance of 1084 F/g at a current density of 10 A/g.

  3. Effect of Fe-doping on nonlinear optical responses and carrier trapping dynamics in GaN single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yu; Yang, Junyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Xingzhi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Song, Yinglin

    2015-08-03

    We presented a quantitative study on the Fe-doping concentration dependence of optical nonlinearities and ultrafast carrier dynamics in Fe-doped GaN (GaN:Fe) single crystals using picosecond Z-scan and femtosecond pump-probe with phase object techniques under two-photon excitation. In contrast to the two-photon absorption that was found to be independent on the Fe-doping, the nonlinear refraction decreased with the Fe concentration due to the fast carrier trapping effect of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} deep acceptors, which simultaneously acted as an efficient non-radiative recombination channels for excess carriers. Remarkably, compared to that of Si-doped GaN bulk crystal, the free-carrier refraction effect in GaN:Fe crystals was found to be enhanced considerably since Fe-doping and the effective carrier lifetime (∼10 ps) could be tuned over three orders of magnitude at high Fe-doping level of 1 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}.

  4. Characterization of the Fe-Doped Mixed-Valent Tunnel Structure 2 Manganese Oxide KOMS-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson J. C.; Shen X.; Morey A.M.; Liu J.; Ding Y.; Cai J.; Durand J.; Wang Q.; Wen W.; Hines W.A.; Bai J.; Frenkel A.I.; Reiff W.; Aindow M.; Suib S.L.

    2011-11-10

    A sol-gel-assisted combustion method was used to prepare Fe-doped manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (Fe-KOMS-2) materials with the cryptomelane structure. Characterization of the nanopowder samples over a wide range of Fe-doping levels (0 {le} Fe/Mn {le} 1/2) was carried out using a variety of experimental techniques. For each sample, Cu K{alpha} XRD and ICP-AES were used to index the cryptomelane structure and determine the elemental composition, respectively. A combination of SEM and TEM images revealed that the morphology changes from nanoneedle to nanorod after Fe doping. Furthermore, TGA scans indicated that the thermal stability is also enhanced with the doping. Anomalous XRD demonstrated that the Fe ions replace the Mn ions in the cryptomelane structure, particularly in the (211) planes, and results in a lattice expansion along the c axis, parallel to the tunnels. Reasonable fits to EXAFS data were obtained using a model based on the cryptomelane structure. Moessbauer spectra for selected Fe-KOMS-2 samples indicated that the Fe is present as Fe{sup 3+} in an octahedral environment similar to Mn in the MnO{sub 6} building blocks of KOMS-2. Magnetization measurements detected a small amount of {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} second phase (e.g., 0.6 wt % for the Fe/Mn = 1/10 sample), the vast majority of the Fe being in the structure as Fe{sup 3+} in the high-spin state.

  5. Doping concentration driven morphological evolution of Fe doped ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, A.; Goswami, N.; Kumar, Y.; Agarwal, V.; Olive-Méndez, S. F.

    2014-10-28

    In this paper, systematic study of structural, vibrational, and optical properties of undoped and 1-10 at.% Fe doped ZnO nanostructures, synthesized adopting chemical precipitation route, has been reported. Prepared nanostructures were characterized employing an assortment of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, namely Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μRS), and UV-visible and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. With Fe incorporation, a gradual morphological transformation of nanostructures is demonstrated vividly through SEM/TEM characterizations. Interestingly, the morphology of nanostructures evolves with 1–10 at. % Fe doping concentration in ZnO. Nanoparticles obtained with 1 at. % Fe evolve to nanorods for 3 at. % Fe; nanorods transform to nanocones (for 5 at. % and 7 at. % Fe) and finally nanocones transform to nanoflakes at 10 at. % Fe. However, at all these stages, concurrence of primary hexagonal phase of Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O along with the secondary phases of cubic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and rhombohedric Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is revealed through XRD analysis. Based on collective XRD, SEM, TEM, and EDX interpretations, a model for morphological evolution of nanostructures was proposed and the pivotal role of Fe dopant was deciphered. Furthermore, vibrational properties analyzed through Raman and FTIR spectroscopies unravel the intricacies of formation and gradual enhancement of secondary phases with increased Fe concentration. UV-visible and PL spectroscopic analyses provided further insight of optical processes altering with Fe incorporation. The blue shift and gradual quenching of visible photoluminescence with Fe doping was found in accordance with structural and vibrational analyses and explicated accordingly.

  6. Interplay between chemical state, electric properties, and ferromagnetism in Fe-doped ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Peng, J. J.; Song, C.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-03-14

    Valence state of Fe ions plays an important role in the physical properties of Fe doped ZnO films. Here, a series of Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O films with different Fe concentrations (x = 0, 2.3, 5.4, 7.1, and 9.3 at. %) were prepared to investigate their structural, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, bipolar resistive switching properties, and electrical-control of ferromagnetism at room temperature. The structure characterizations indicate that the chemical state of Fe ions substituting Zn{sup 2+} site changes from Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+} with the increase of Fe dopant concentration. We found enhanced piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties in Zn{sub 0.977}Fe{sub 0.023}O films with more Fe{sup 3+} due to the smaller Fe{sup 3+} ionic size in comparison with Zn{sup 2+} while the increase of Fe{sup 2+} concentration by a larger amount of Fe dopant results in the worse ferroelectric and piezoelectric performance. All Pt/Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O/Pt devices show bipolar resistive switching properties. Especially, devices with lower Fe dopant concentration exhibit better endurance properties due to their higher crystalline quality. The variation of oxygen vacancies during resistive switching provides an opportunity to tune ferromagnetism of Fe-doped ZnO films, giving rise to the integration of charge and spin into a simple Pt/Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O/Pt devices. The multifunctional properties of Fe-doped ZnO films are promising for communication systems and information storage devices.

  7. ALCHEMI of Fe-doped B2-ordered NiAl alloys with different doping levels

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.; Duncan, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The ALCHEMI technique yields exact expressions for best-fit parameters in terms of ionization localization constants and site distributions of 3 elements distributed over two sublattices. In this paper, a graphical plotting technique is applied to Fe-doped NiAl B2-ordered alloys Ni{sub 0.5-x}Fe{sub x}Al{sub 0.5}, with x=0.02 or 0.10. The thin foil samples were examined in an electron microscope with an x-ray spectrometer.

  8. Influence of Fe-Doping on the Structural, Morphological, Optical, Magnetic and Antibacterial Effect of ZnO Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Basith, N Mohamed; Vijaya, J Judith; Kennedy, L John; Bououdina, M; Shenbhagaraman, R; Jayavel, R

    2016-02-01

    Pure and Fe-doped ZnO nanostructures with different weight ratios (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 at wt% of Fe) were successfully synthesized by a facile microwave combustion method using urea as a fuel. The detailed structural characterization was performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD patterns refined by the Rietveld method indicated that Fe-doped ZnO have a single pure phase with wurtzite structure, suggesting that Fe ions are successfully incorporated into ZnO crystal lattice by occupying Zn ionic sites. Interestingly, the morphology was found to change substantially from grains to nanoflakes and then into nanorods with the variation of Fe-content. The optical band gap estimated using DRS was found to be red-shifted from 3.220 eV for the pure ZnO nanostructures, then decreases up to 3.200 eV with increasing Fe-content. Magnetic studies showed that Fe-doped ZnO nanostructures exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and the saturation magnetization attained a maximum value of 8.154 x 10(-3) emu/g for the highest Fe-content. The antibacterial activity of pure and Fe-doped ZnO nanostructures against a Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. Pure ZnO and Fe-doped ZnO exhibited antibacterial activity, but it was considerably more effective in the 1.5 wt% Fe-doped ZnO nanostructures. PMID:27433623

  9. Effects of calcining temperature on photocatalytic activity of Fe-doped sulfated titania.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Tian, Congxue

    2012-01-01

    Using industrial titanyl sulfate as a raw material, Fe-doped sulfated titania (FST) photocatalysts were prepared by using the one-step thermal hydrolysis method and characterized using XRD, SEM, TGA-DSC, FTIR, UV-Vis DRS and N(2) adsorption-desorption techniques. The effects of calcining temperature on the structure of the titania were investigated. The photocatalytic activity of the FST was evaluated using the photodegradation of methylene blue and photooxidation of phenol in aqueous solutions under UV and visible light irradiation, respectively. The results evinced that Ti(4+) is substituted by Fe(3+) in titania lattice and forms impurity level within the band gap of titania, which consequently induces the visible light absorption and visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity. The synergistic effects of Fe-doping and sulfation are beneficial to the efficient separation of the photogenerated carriers and also improve the quantum efficiency of photocatalysis. In addition, Brönsted acidity arisen from the strong inductive effect of sulfate is also conducive to enhancing the photocatalytic performance of FST. However, when the calcining temperature is higher than 800°C, sulfur species and surface hydroxyl groups decompose and desorb from FST and the specific surface area decreases sharply. Moreover, severe sintering and rutile phase formation occur simultaneously. All these are detrimental to photocatalytic activity of FST. PMID:22486465

  10. Strain-Induced Extrinsic High-Temperature Ferromagnetism in the Fe-Doped Hexagonal Barium Titanate

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, A.; Pregelj, M.; Gomilšek, M.; Jagličić, Z.; Pajić, D.; Telling, M.; Arčon, I.; Mikulska, I.; Valant, M.

    2015-01-01

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors possessing intrinsic static magnetism at high temperatures represent a promising class of multifunctional materials with high application potential in spintronics and magneto-optics. In the hexagonal Fe-doped diluted magnetic oxide, 6H-BaTiO3-δ, room-temperature ferromagnetism has been previously reported. Ferromagnetism is broadly accepted as an intrinsic property of this material, despite its unusual dependence on doping concentration and processing conditions. However, the here reported combination of bulk magnetization and complementary in-depth local-probe electron spin resonance and muon spin relaxation measurements, challenges this conjecture. While a ferromagnetic transition occurs around 700 K, it does so only in additionally annealed samples and is accompanied by an extremely small average value of the ordered magnetic moment. Furthermore, several additional magnetic instabilities are detected at lower temperatures. These coincide with electronic instabilities of the Fe-doped 3C-BaTiO3-δ pseudocubic polymorph. Moreover, the distribution of iron dopants with frozen magnetic moments is found to be non-uniform. Our results demonstrate that the intricate static magnetism of the hexagonal phase is not intrinsic, but rather stems from sparse strain-induced pseudocubic regions. We point out the vital role of internal strain in establishing defect ferromagnetism in systems with competing structural phases. PMID:25572803

  11. Novel Fe doped mesoporous TiO 2 microspheres: Ultrasonic-hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haibin; Liu, Guocong; Chen, Shuguang; Liu, Qicheng

    2010-04-01

    Novel Fe doped mesoporous TiO 2 microspheres were fabricated by an ultrasonic-hydrothermal method when tetrabutyl titanate was used as a precursor and octadecylamine was used as a structure-directing agent. The mesoporous materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements, XPS, FL, and UV-vis. The results suggest that both ultrasonic treatment and hydrothermal procedure are critical for the fabrication of Fe doped mesoporous TiO 2 microspheres with a combination of regular morphology, large specific surface area, high crystallinity, and high thermal stability. Low-angle XRD and TEM images indicate that the disordered wormhole-like mesostructure of Fe doped TiO 2 microspheres with diameters of about 300-400 nm is actually formed by the agglomerization of nanoparticles with an average size of about 10 nm. The photocatalytic activity of Fe doped mesoporous TiO 2 microspheres was evaluated by the photodegradation of methyl orange. A small amount of Fe 3+ can obviously enhance their photocatalytic activity. The optimal atomic ratio of Fe to Ti for photocatalytic activity is about 0.5 at%.

  12. Preparation of Fe-doped colloidal SiO(2) abrasives and their chemical mechanical polishing behavior on sapphire substrates.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hong; Gu, Qian; Chen, Ruling; Wang, Zhanyong

    2015-08-20

    Abrasives are one of key influencing factors on surface quality during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Silica sol, a widely used abrasive in CMP slurries for sapphire substrates, often causes lower material removal rate (MRRs). In the present paper, Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 composite abrasives were prepared by a seed-induced growth method in order to improve the MRR of sapphire substrates. The CMP performance of Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 abrasives on sapphire substrates was investigated using UNIPOL-1502 CMP equipment. Experimental results indicate that the Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 composite abrasives exhibit lower surface roughness and higher MRR than pure colloidal SiO2 abrasives for sapphire substrates under the same testing conditions. Furthermore, the acting mechanism of Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 composite abrasives in sapphire CMP was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Analytical results show that the Fe in the composite abrasives can react with the sapphire substrates to form aluminum ferrite (AlFeO3) during CMP, which promotes the chemical effect in CMP and leads to improvement of MRR. PMID:26368752

  13. Aminothiazole-derived N,S,Fe-doped graphene nanosheets as high performance electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Zhi-You; Lai, Yu-Jiao; Rauf, Muhammad; Wang, Ying; Pan, Jing; Zhuang, Lin; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Tian, Na; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2015-12-14

    N,S,Fe-doped graphene nanosheets were directly synthesized from aminothiazole, a precursor molecule that contains N and S atoms, through Fe catalysis under heat treatment. The graphene nanosheets exhibited high electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction in both acidic and alkaline media during rotating disk electrode half-cell and fuel cell tests. PMID:26451800

  14. XRD analysis of undoped and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles by Williamson Hall method

    SciTech Connect

    Bharti, Bandna; Barman, P. B.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-28

    Undoped and Fe doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method at room temperature. The synthesized samples were annealed at 500°C. For structural analysis, the prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystallite size of TiO{sub 2} and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were calculated by Scherer’s formula, and was found to be 15 nm and 11 nm, respectively. Reduction in crystallite size of TiO{sub 2} with Fe doping was observed. The anatase phase of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. By using Williamson-Hall method, lattice strain and crystallite size were also calculated. Williamson–Hall plot indicates the presence of compressive strain for TiO{sub 2} and tensile strain for Fe-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles annealed at 500°C.

  15. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  16. Importance of doping and frustration in itinerant Fe-doped Cr2Al

    SciTech Connect

    Susner, M. A.; Parker, D. S.; Sefat, A. S.

    2015-05-12

    We performed an experimental and theoretical study comparing the effects of Fe-doping of Cr2Al, an antiferromagnet with a N el temperature of 670 K, with known results on Fe-doping of antiferromagnetic bcc Cr. (Cr1-xFex)2Al materials are found to exhibit a rapid suppression of antiferromagnetic order with the presence of Fe, decreasing TN to 170 K for x=0.10. Antiferromagnetic behavior disappears entirely at x≈0.125 after which point increasing paramagnetic behavior is exhibited. Moreover, this is unlike the effects of Fe doping of bcc antiferromagnetic Cr, in which TN gradually decreases followed by the appearance of a ferromagnetic state. Theoretical calculations explain that the Cr2Al-Fe suppression of magnetic order originates from two effects: the first is band narrowing caused by doping of additional electrons from Fe substitution that weakens itinerant magnetism; the second is magnetic frustration of the Cr itinerant moments in Fe-substituted Cr2Al. In pure-phase Cr2Al, the Cr moments have an antiparallel alignment; however, these are destroyed through Fe substitution and the preference of Fe for parallel alignment with Cr. This is unlike bulk Fe-doped Cr alloys in which the Fe anti-aligns with the Cr atoms, and speaks to the importance of the Al atoms in the magnetic structure of Cr2Al and Fe-doped Cr2Al.

  17. Study of structural and optical properties of Fe doped CuO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Poonam; Gupta, Ankita; Kaur, Sarabjeet; Singh, Vishal; Kumar, Sacheen; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    Iron doped Copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method at different concentration (3%, 6%, 9%) at 300-400° C with Copper Acetate and Ferric Chloride as precursors in presence of Polyethylene Glycol and Sodium Hydroxide as stabilizing agent. Effect of doping on the structural and optical properties is studied. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction and UV-Visible Spectroscopy for examining the size and the band gap respectively. The X-Ray Diffraction plots confirmed the monoclinic structure of Copper oxide suggesting the Cu atoms replaced by Fe atoms and no secondary phase was detected. The indirect band gap of Fe doped CuO nanoparticles is 2.4eV and increases to 3.4eV as the concentration of dopant increases. The majority of particle size is in range 8 nm to 35.55 nm investigated by X-ray diffractometer.

  18. Magnetization reversal and negative volume thermal expansion in Fe doped Ca2RuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, T. F.; Yuan, S. J.; Ye, F.; Chi, S.; Terzic, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, Z.; Liu, X.; Parkin, S.; Mao, W. L.; Cao, G.

    We report structural, magnetic, transport and thermal properties of single-crystal Ca2Ru1-xFexO4 (0 <= x <= 0.2) as functions of pressure, magnetic field and temperature. The central findings of this work are a pronounced magnetization reversal and a negative thermal expansion that are induced by Fe doping. Our results including neutron diffraction data suggest that the magnetization reversal is primarily a result of different temperature dependences of two antiparallel, competing Ru and Fe sublattices and that the negative thermal expansion is achieved via magnetic and metal-insulator transitions. We will present and discuss our results with comparison drawn with relevant systems. This work was supported by the NSF via Grant No. DMR-1265162.

  19. Enhanced multiferroic characteristics in Fe-doped BiTiO ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Q.; Yang, F. J.; Cao, W. Q.; Wang, H.; Yang, C. P.; Wang, D. Y.; Chen, K.

    2010-07-01

    Modification of Bi 4Ti 3O 12 multiferroic ceramics prepared by a conventional solid state reaction method were investigated by substituting Ti partly with Fe. The introduction of Fe does not change the layered perovskite structure of Bi 4Ti 3O 12. Upon increasing Fe content, the remnant polarization of the samples is enhanced. The magnetism of the ceramics at room temperature develops from diamagnetism to weak ferromagnetism with increasing Fe doping. The largest variations of 15% and 6% in remnant polarization and magnetization, achieved in a Bi 4Ti 1Fe 2O 12-δ sample after poling it in a magnetic field at 1 T and a DC electric field at 30 kV/cm for 10 min, are evidence of magnetoelectric coupling between the electric dipoles and magnetic dipoles at room temperature. The present results suggest a new candidate for a room temperature multiferroic material with enhanced properties.

  20. Structure and magnetism of Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Das, A. K.; Karmakar, D.; Rao, T. V. Chandrasekhar; Ghatak, J.

    2008-07-01

    SnO2 nanoparticles doped with Fe of different concentrations were synthesized by a chemical coprecipitation method. After calcination at 600°C , the samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. XRD shows that the solubility of Fe in SnO2 ( Sn1-xFexO2 : primary phase where Fe substitutes Sn in SnO2 matrix) is less than 7.5% (x<0.075) and Fe2O3 (hematite) or (Fe1-ySny)2O3 (where Sn substitutes Fe in Fe2O3 matrix) is evolved as a secondary phase for x≥0.075 along with Sn1-xFexO2 (primary phase). TEM shows that the particles are crystalline and of size in the nanometric regime (10±3nm) . The M(T) and M(H) studies indicated an antiferromagnetic (AFM) interaction in 3% and 5% (atomic weight) Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles. The observed AFM interaction can be explained by the bound magnetic polaron model for insulating diluted magnetic semiconductor systems. It is seen that the strength of AFM interaction reduces with increase in doping concentration. On the other hand, 7.5% Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles show the ferromagnetic interaction, but the origin of the observed ferromagnetism is identified due to the presence of (Fe1-ySny)2O3 as a secondary phase.

  1. Comparison of the low-temperature specific heat of Fe- and Co-doped Bi1.8Pb0.2Sr2Ca(Cu1-xMx)2O8 (M=Fe or Co): Anomolously enhanced electronic contribution due to Fe doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M. K.; Franck, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Specific-heat data of Fe-doped Bi1.8Pb0.2Sr2Ca(Cu1-xFex)2O8 in the range 2-20 K are presented for x=1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 %. The data are compared with our previous measurements on Co-doped bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide superconductors of nominal composition Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (BISCO 2212). Both Fe and Co are magnetic substitutions with effective moments close to their free-ion value. In the normal state the magnetic susceptibility increases by more than a factor 2 over the doping range due to effective-mass enhancement. In the superconducting state both ions act as magnetic pair breakers. For Co doping the normal-state linear term γ is observed, enhanced due to the effective-mass increase. For Fe doping we observe a large anomalous contribution to the electronic specific heat starting near 15 K and leading at the lowest temperature to a linear term near γ0=72 mJ/mole K2 (1 mole=1 formula unit). The anomalous term is typical of heavy fermion behavior. Comparison with specific-heat data of Co-doped BISCO 2212 suggests that hybridization between 3d electrons of the dopant and the planar carriers is more effective for Fe doping than for Co doping.

  2. Electrical properties of lead-free Fe-doped niobium-rich potassium lithium tantalate niobate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar S.

    2013-12-01

    Lead-free, 0.025 wt% Fe-doped niobium-rich potassium lithium tantalate niobate Fe: K0.95Li0.05Ta1-xNbxO3 single crystals have been grown by the top-seeded melt growth method. All the transition temperatures have been determined by the dielectric constant and loss-dependent temperature. The spontaneous polarizations computed by the integration of pyroelectric coefficients over all the temperatures are consistent with the results of the P-E hysteresis loops. The piezoelectric constants and electromechanical coupling factors are attractive among lead-free piezoelectric materials. With suitable Fe-doping, the electrical properties of KLTN single crystals have been improved overall and can be compared to those of the current important lead-based piezoelectric materials.

  3. Understanding the role of iron in the magnetism of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, J J; Barrero, C A; Punnoose, A

    2015-06-21

    The actual role of transition metals like iron in the room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles is still an unsolved problem. While some studies concluded that the Fe ions participate in the magnetic interaction, others in contrast do not believe Fe to play a direct role in the magnetic exchange interaction. To contribute to the understanding of this issue, we have carefully investigated the structural, optical, vibrational and magnetic properties of sol-gel synthesized Zn1-xFexO (0 < x < 0.10) nanoparticles. No Fe(2+) was detected in any sample. We found that high spin Fe(3+) ions are substitutionally incorporated at the Zn(2+) in the tetrahedral-core sites and in pseudo-octahedral surface sites in ZnO. Superficial OH(-) was observed in all samples. For x ≤ 0.03, an increment in Fe doping concentration decreased a and c lattice parameters, average Zn-O bond length, average crystallite size and band gap; while it increased the degree of distortion and quadrupole splitting. Undoped ZnO nanoparticles exhibited very weak RTFM with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼0.47 memu g(-1) and this value increased to ∼2.1 memu g(-1) for Zn0.99Fe0.01O. Very interestingly, the Ms for Zn0.99Fe0.01O and Zn0.97Fe0.03O increased by a factor of about ∼2.3 by increasing annealing for 1 h to 3 h. For x ≥ 0.05, ferrimagnetic disordered spinel ZnFe2O4 was formed and this phase was found to become more ordered with increasing annealing time. Fe does not contribute directly to the RTFM, but its presence promoted the formation of additional single charged oxygen vacancies, zinc vacancies, and more oxygen-ended polar terminations at the nanoparticle surface. These defects, which are mainly superficial, altered the electronic structure and are considered as the main sources of the observed ferromagnetism. PMID:25994044

  4. Effects of Fe doping on the structures and properties of hexagonal birnessites - Comparison with Co and Ni doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hui; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan; Hu, Tiandou; Zheng, Lirong; Qiu, Guohong; Koopal, Luuk K.; Tan, Wenfeng

    2013-09-01

    Fe-doped hexagonal birnessite was synthesized by adding Fe3+ to the initial reactants, and the effects of Fe doping on the structures and properties of birnessite were investigated and compared with the effects of Co and Ni doping. The underlying mechanisms controlling the incorporation of transition metals (TMs) into the birnessite structure were proposed. Compared to the un-doped control, Fe-doped birnessite has weaker crystallinity, i.e., less stacking of the phyllomanganate sheets in the c direction, and larger surface area. Combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Mn K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectra demonstrates that Fe doping decreases the Mn average oxidation state (AOS) but has little effect on the basic layer structure and local Mn environments. Fe(III) located in the birnessite layers exhibits high-spin (HS) configuration whereas layer Mn(III) and Co(III) plausibly adopt low-spin (LS) state. The TMs decrease the thickness of birnessite plate crystals along the c axis and affect the unit cell parameter b in the order Fe > Ni > Co. Co and Fe incorporate into the birnessite layers by substitution for Mn(IV) while Ni substitutes for Mn(III). The substitution of TMs into the birnessite layers is governed by the coordination radius (CR), crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE) and oxidation state of the TMs. The variations in potassium contents in doped birnessites together with TM K-edge EXAFS data indicate that most of the Fe (˜81-82%) or Ni (˜66-76%) incorporated into the birnessite structure exists in the interlayer regions, while most of the Co (˜71-80%) occurs in the manganese layers. The compatibility of these TM ions in the birnessite layers is in the order Co > Ni > Fe. The smaller the difference between the CR of Fe, Co or Ni and Mn(IV) or Mn(III), the more dopants are compatible within the Mn layers.

  5. Enhancement of Photo-Oxidation Activities Depending on Structural Distortion of Fe-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeonwoo; Yang, Sena; Jeon, Eun Hee; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Namdong; Kim, Hyun Sung; Lee, Hangil

    2016-01-01

    To design a high-performance photocatalytic system with TiO2, it is necessary to reduce the bandgap and enhance the absorption efficiency. The reduction of the bandgap to the visible range was investigated with reference to the surface distortion of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced by varying Fe doping concentrations. Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles (Fe@TiO2) were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and analyzed by various surface analysis techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy. We observed that Fe doping over 5 wt.% gave rise to a distorted structure, i.e., Fe2Ti3O9, indicating numerous Ti3+ and oxygen-vacancy sites. The Ti3+ sites act as electron trap sites to deliver the electron to O2 as well as introduce the dopant level inside the bandgap, resulting in a significant increase in the photocatalytic oxidation reaction of thiol (-SH) of 2-aminothiophenol to sulfonic acid (-SO3H) under ultraviolet and visible light illumination.

  6. Influence of Fe doping on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of ZnS diluted magnetic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, D.; Raland, RD.; Borah, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    Fe doped ZnS nanoparticles with different concentrations of Fe, synthesized by microwave assisted co-precipitation method have been reported. The incorporation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions into ZnS lattice are confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron Paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study. XRD and High Resolution Transmission electron Microscope (HRTEM) results confirm the phase purity of the samples and indicate a reduction of the particle size with increase in Fe concentration. EDAX analysis confirms the presence of Zn, S and Fe in the samples. A yellow-orange emission peak is observed in Photoluminescence (PL) spectra which exhibits the Characteristic 4T2 (4G)-6A1 (6S) transition of Fe3+ ion. The room temperature magnetic studies as analyzed from M-H curves were investigated from vibrating samples magnetometer (VSM) which shows a weak ferro and superparamagnetic like behavior in 1% and 3% Fe-doped ZnS nanocrystals, whereas; at 10% Fe-doping concentrations, antiferromagnetism behavior is achieved. The ZFC-FC measurement reveals that the blocking temperature of the nanoparticle is above the room temperature.

  7. Enhancement of Photo-Oxidation Activities Depending on Structural Distortion of Fe-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeonwoo; Yang, Sena; Jeon, Eun Hee; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Namdong; Kim, Hyun Sung; Lee, Hangil

    2016-12-01

    To design a high-performance photocatalytic system with TiO2, it is necessary to reduce the bandgap and enhance the absorption efficiency. The reduction of the bandgap to the visible range was investigated with reference to the surface distortion of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced by varying Fe doping concentrations. Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles (Fe@TiO2) were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and analyzed by various surface analysis techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy. We observed that Fe doping over 5 wt.% gave rise to a distorted structure, i.e., Fe2Ti3O9, indicating numerous Ti(3+) and oxygen-vacancy sites. The Ti(3+) sites act as electron trap sites to deliver the electron to O2 as well as introduce the dopant level inside the bandgap, resulting in a significant increase in the photocatalytic oxidation reaction of thiol (-SH) of 2-aminothiophenol to sulfonic acid (-SO3H) under ultraviolet and visible light illumination. PMID:26822520

  8. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of Mn and Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, C. Soundararajan, N.; Ramachandran, K.

    2015-08-15

    Mn and Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared by a simple precipitation method. The synthesized particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) techniques. XRD analysis showed the cubic structure of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. SEM and TEM images confirmed the formation of interconnected nanoparticles. Mn and Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} showed broad absorption in the visible region compared to undoped sample and the band gap values are red shifted. Five Raman active modes were observed from the Raman spectra. FTIR spectra confirmed the spinel structure of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the doping of Mn and Fe shifts the vibrational modes to lower wave number region. The magnetic measurements confirmed that Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} shows a little ferromagnetic behavior compared to undoped and Mn-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which could be related to the uncompensated surface spins and the finite size effects.

  9. Characterization of transparent superconductivity Fe-doped CuCrO2 delafossite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddee, Chutirat; Kamwanna, Teerasak; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2016-09-01

    Delafossite CuCr1-xFexO2 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) semiconductors were synthesized using a self-combustion urea nitrate process. The effects of Fe concentration on its microstructural, optical, magnetic, and electrical properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results revealed the delafossite structure in all the samples. The lattice spacing of CuCr1-xFexO2 slightly increased with increasing substitution of Fe at the Cr sites. The optical properties measured at room temperature using UV-visible spectroscopy showed a weak absorbability in the visible light and near IR regions. The corresponding direct optical band gap was about 3.61 eV, exhibiting transparency in the visible region. The magnetic hysteresis loop measurements showed that the Fe-doped CuCrO2 samples exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. This indicated that the substitution of Fe3+ for Cr3+ produced a mixed effect on the magnetic properties of CuCrO2 delafossite oxide. The temperature dependent resistivity measurements clearly revealed the presence of superconductivity in the CuCr1-xFexO2 with a superconducting transition up to 118 K.

  10. Structural and magnetic characterization of (TM=Co, Fe) doped SnO2 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra Palomino, A.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Perales Perez, O.

    2009-03-01

    Recent indications of intrinsic room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism in transition metal doped-SnO2 have increased its attractiveness as promising material for nano-optoelectronic and spintronics-based devices. A control over dopant speciation and the determination of the size-dependence of the properties at the nanoscale, become then indispensable. We present here the conditions for the room-temperature synthesis of doped SnO2 in ethanol using SnCl2 and LiHO precursors, and the characterization of the resulting bare, Co and Fe- doped SnO2 powders. X-ray diffraction patterns of bare and doped SnO2 showed the formation of an amorphous structure from the produced powder at RT. However, a pure phase of rutile structure was observed when the samples were annealed in air or Ar at 400^oC. 100nm diameter wires were observed after annealing using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of magnetic characterization of the materials using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) will also be presented and discussed.

  11. Structural properties of pure and Fe-doped Yb films prepared by vapor condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Ayala, C.; Passamani, E.C.; Suguihiro, N.M.; Litterst, F.J.; Baggio Saitovitch, E.

    2014-10-15

    Ytterbium and iron-doped ytterbium films were prepared by vapor quenching on Kapton substrates at room temperature. Structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to study the microstructure of pure and iron-doped films and thereby to understand the effects induced by iron incorporation. A coexistence of face centered cubic and hexagonal close packed-like structures was observed, the cubic-type structure being the dominant contribution. There is an apparent thickness dependence of the cubic/hexagonal relative ratios in the case of pure ytterbium. Iron-clusters induce a crystalline texture effect, but do not influence the cubic/hexagonal volume fraction. A schematic model is proposed for the microstructure of un-doped and iron-doped films including the cubic- and hexagonal-like structures, as well as the iron distribution in the ytterbium matrix. - Highlights: • Pure and Fe-doped Yb films have been prepared by vapor condensation. • Coexistence of fcc- and hcp-type structures was observed. • No oxide phases have been detected. • Fe-clustering does not affect the fcc/hcp ratio, but favors a crystalline texture. • A schematic model is proposed to describe microscopically the microstructure.

  12. Electrical and optical properties of Fe doped AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Kozhukhova, E. A.; Dabiran, A. M.; Chow, P. P.; Wowchak, A. M.; Pearton, S. J.

    2010-01-15

    Electrical and optical properties of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied in the Al composition range 15%-45%. Undoped films were semi-insulating, with the Fermi level pinned near E{sub c}-0.6-0.7 eV. Si doping to (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} rendered the 15% Al films conducting n-type, but a large portion of the donors were relatively deep (activation energy 95 meV), with a 0.15 eV barrier for capture of electrons giving rise to strong persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effects. The optical threshold of this effect was {approx}1 eV. Doping with Fe to a concentration of {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} led to decrease in concentration of uncompensated donors, suggesting compensation by Fe acceptors. Addition of Fe strongly suppressed the formation of PPC-active centers in favor of ordinary shallow donors. For higher Al compositions, Si doping of (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} did not lead to n-type conductivity. Fe doping shifted the bandedge luminescence by 25-50 meV depending on Al composition. The dominant defect band in microcathodoluminescence spectra was the blue band near 3 eV, with the energy weakly dependent on composition.

  13. Carrier Mediated Ferromagnetism in Fe-doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Lan; Contreras-Guerrero, Rocio; Droopad, Ravi; Lee, Byounghak

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of III-V dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) and the subsequent unsuccessful search for room temperature ferromagnetism in DMSs have motivated researches on alternate dilute magnetic systems. Recent progresses in thin flim growth techniques of perovskite oxides suggest that dilute magnetic oxides (DMOs) can be viable candidates to improve the magnetic properties of DMSs. In this talk we present an ab initio study of Fe-doped SrTiO3. We find that a ferromagnetic ordering among localized Fe t2g spins is mediated by itinerant Fe eg electrons. The exchange interaction between t2g and eg electrons depends on crystal field splitting, on-site electron-electron interaction, and the relative energy of Fe d-ortbitals to oxygen p-orbitals. The exchange coupling and the majority-minority spin splitting decrease with decreasing carrier concentration, confirming that itinerant carriers mediate the ferromagnetism. C. Ma is supported by NSF of China (Grant Nos. 11247023 and 11304218), Jiangsu Qing Lan Project, and Jiangsu Overseas Research & Training Program. R.C.-G, R.D., and B.L. are supported by AFOSR, Award Number FA9550-10-1-0133.

  14. Effect of Fe doping on structural and impedance properties of PZTFN ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Pal, Vijayeta; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    An attempts have been made to synthesis the ceramics Pb1-3x/2 Fex(Zr0.52Ti0.48)1-5y/4 NbyO3 abbreviated as (PFZTN) for x = 1-6 mol% and y = 5.5 mol% by a semi-wet route. In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of Fe doping on structural and electrical properties of the PFZTN ceramics. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns reveal that PFZTN ceramics are single phase in nature. However, for x = 0.05 and 0.06, a secondary phase appears as discernible from the XRD profiles. Rietveld analysis of the powder diffraction data shows the presence of coexistence of tetragonal (P4mm space group) and rhombohedral phases (R3c space group) occurs near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) at x ≥ = 0.05. The log-log plots show that the conductivity increases with increase of temperature. The ac conductivity becomes sensitive at high frequency region and shifted towards higher frequency side with increasing temperature. It is observed that the activation energy (Ea) decreases with increasing frequency. This complex perovskite structure can be used as a multilayer ceramic capacitors and electromechanical transducers.

  15. Strong effect of low-dimensional Fe-doped cobalt niobate on a strongly ferrimagnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nlebedim, Cajetan; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the first investigation of the effect of Fe-doped cobalt niobate (CoNb2O6) imbedded in the matrix of a strongly ferrimagnetic cobalt-iron oxide, is presented. The temperature dependence of the magnetic properties and how they change with variations in the concentration of CoNb2O6 is also presented. CoNb2O6 is a prototypical low-dimensional material belonging to the pyrochlore-type AB2O6 systems. Its low-dimensional magnetic characteristics can help in understanding the magnetic properties of higher order systems. It has been investigated for applications in resonators and capacitors. This work shows that the magnetization of the ferrimagnetic phase is strongly affected by the concentration of Co ions in the low-dimensional phase, below 15 K but changes in coercivity with temperature were predominantly due to the ferrimagnetic phase. The systematic variation in the concentration of both phases and the cation ratio in each phase, enable us to understand the variation of the magnetic properties with temperature. This work provides useful insights into tuning the magnetism in strongly magnetic materials with transition metal AB2O6 systems imbedded in their matrices. This work was supported by the USDoE, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division. The research was performed at Ames Laboratory, operated for the USDoE by Iowa State University (Contract # DE-AC02-07CH11358).

  16. Preparation and Charge Density in (Co, Fe)-Doped La-Ca-Based Chromite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, R.; Thenmozhi, N.; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2016-05-01

    Transition metal-doped lanthanum chromites (La0.8Ca0.2)(Cr0.9-x Co0.1Fe x )O3 (x = 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12) have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. The synthesized samples were characterized for their structural properties using powder x-ray diffraction analysis, which shows that the grown samples are orthorhombic in structure with single phase. The nature of bonding and the charge distribution of the grown samples have been analyzed by maximum entropy method. Further, the samples were characterized for their optical and magnetic properties using ultraviolet-visible spectra and vibrating sample magnetometry. The microstructural studies were carried by scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. From the optical absorption spectra, it was found that the energy band gap of the samples ranges from 2.135 eV to 2.405 eV. From vibrating sample magnetometer measurements, ferromagnetic like behaviour with large coercive field was observed for Fe doping concentration of x = 0.12. Since the doped lanthanum chromites have good mechanical properties and electrical conductivity at high temperature, these materials are used in solid oxide fuel cells.

  17. Correlation between oxygen vacancies and magnetism in Fe-doped In2O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yukai; Wang, Shiqi; Feng, Deqiang; Wu, Zhonghua; Liu, Jiwen

    2013-07-01

    Correlation between oxygen vacancies and magnetic property in the as-deposited and annealed (In0.93Fe0.07)2O3 films has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, magnetization measurement, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extend X-ray absorption fine structure. Magnetic measurement reveals that clear room temperature ferromagnetism is observed for the as-deposited film, in which the doped Fe ions substitute for In sites of the In2O3 lattice and Fe-related secondary phases or clusters as the source of ferromagnetism is safely ruled out. After high-temperature annealing in air, the crystalline structure of film and occupation sites of Fe ions keep unchanged, whereas the magnetic property has a dramatic decrease. Based on X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis and multiple-scattering theoretical calculations, it is found that the content of oxygen vacancy of film remarkably decreases, even disappears by annealing in air, which resulting in greatly decreasing the ferromagnetism. These results further provide strong evidence that the oxygen vacancies play an important role in activating the ferromagnetic interactions in Fe-doped In2O3.

  18. Preparation and Charge Density in (Co, Fe)-Doped La-Ca-Based Chromite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, R.; Thenmozhi, N.; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2016-08-01

    Transition metal-doped lanthanum chromites (La0.8Ca0.2)(Cr0.9- x Co0.1Fe x )O3 ( x = 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12) have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. The synthesized samples were characterized for their structural properties using powder x-ray diffraction analysis, which shows that the grown samples are orthorhombic in structure with single phase. The nature of bonding and the charge distribution of the grown samples have been analyzed by maximum entropy method. Further, the samples were characterized for their optical and magnetic properties using ultraviolet-visible spectra and vibrating sample magnetometry. The microstructural studies were carried by scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. From the optical absorption spectra, it was found that the energy band gap of the samples ranges from 2.135 eV to 2.405 eV. From vibrating sample magnetometer measurements, ferromagnetic like behaviour with large coercive field was observed for Fe doping concentration of x = 0.12. Since the doped lanthanum chromites have good mechanical properties and electrical conductivity at high temperature, these materials are used in solid oxide fuel cells.

  19. A close correlation between induced ferromagnetism and oxygen deficiency in Fe doped In 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, R. K.; Samariya, A.; Kumar, Sudhish; Sharma, S. C.; Xing, Y. T.; Deshpande, U. P.; Shripathi, T.; Saitovitch, E.

    2010-11-01

    We report on the reversible manipulation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe (5%) doped In 2O 3 polycrystalline magnetic semiconductor. The X-ray diffraction and photoemission measurements confirm that the Fe ions are well incorporated into the lattice, substituting the In 3+ ions. The magnetization measurements show that the host In 2O 3 has a diamagnetic ground state, while it shows weak ferromagnetism at 300 K upon Fe doping. The as-prepared sample was then sequentially annealed in hydrogen, air, vacuum and finally in air. The ferromagnetic signal shoots up by hydrogenation as well as vacuum annealing and bounces back upon re-annealing the samples in air. The sequence of ferromagnetism shows a close inter-relationship with the behavior of oxygen vacancies ( Vo). The Fe ions tend to a transform from 3+ to 2+ state during the giant ferromagnetic induction, as revealed by photoemission spectroscopy. A careful characterization of the structure, purity, magnetic, and transport properties confirms that the ferromagnetism is due to neither impurities nor clusters but directly related to the oxygen vacancies. The ferromagnetism can be reversibly controlled by these vacancies while a parallel variation of carrier concentration, as revealed by resistance measurements, appears to be a side effect of the oxygen vacancy variation.

  20. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium sulfide usually is used twice a week for the first ... it is irritating. Rinse off all of the lotion.Do not use this medication on children younger ...

  1. Observation of structural inhomogeneity at degraded Fe-doped SrTiO3 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascienzo, D.; Greenbaum, S.; Bayer, T. J. M.; Maier, R.; Randall, C. A.; Ren, Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the detection of structural inhomogeneity across anode and cathode interfaces in electrically degraded reduced and oxidized Fe-doped SrTiO3 (Fe:STO) single crystals by optical second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy. SHG spectra were collected from several regions across the anode and cathode interfaces in both degraded reduced and oxidized Fe:STO crystals. We identify the formation of defect concentration gradients along both degraded reduced and oxidized anode interfaces. While the broken symmetries decrease from the outer region towards the central region of the reduced anode, the opposite trend is seen in the degraded oxidized anode. These results are attributed to the formation of centrosymmetric Fe4+:Ti4+-O6 octahedral structures in the central region of the reduced sample's degraded anode and non-centrosymmetric Jahn-Teller distortions in the central region of the oxidized sample's degraded anode. The observed changes in SHG intensity from the outer region towards the central region of the degraded cathode interfaces is accompanied by a structural phase transition in the inner and outer regions, marked by strong changes to the s-polarized intensity spectra. We explain the SHG intensity changes by the formation of lower order symmetry Fe3+:Ti3+-O6 structures in the outer region and a modification of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility near the central regions due to the clustering of dissociated oxygen vacancies. These significant structural and spatial inhomogeneities are linked directly to the field-driven migration of oxygen ions and vacancies.

  2. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  3. Electrically Active Defects in GaN Layers Grown With and Without Fe-doped Buffers by Metal-organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Parish, G.; Fichtenbaum, N.; Keller, S.; Mishra, U. K.; Nener, B. D.

    2008-05-01

    Electrically active defects in n-GaN films grown with and without an Fe-doped buffer layer have been investigated using conventional and optical deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Conventional DLTS revealed three well- defined electron traps with activation energies E a of 0.21, 0.53, and 0.8 eV. The concentration of the 0.21 and 0.8 eV defects was found to be slightly higher in the sample without the Fe-doped buffer, whereas the concentration of the 0.53 eV trap was higher in the sample with the Fe-doped buffer. A minority carrier trap with E a ≈ 0.65 eV was detected in both samples using optical DLTS; its concentration was ˜40% higher in the sample without the Fe-doped buffer. Mobility spectrum analysis and multiple magnetic-field measurements revealed that the electron mobility in the topmost layer of both samples was similar, but that the sample without the Fe-doped buffer layer was affected by parallel conduction through underlying layers with lower electron mobility.

  4. Phase conjugation of vector fields by degenerate four-wave mixing in a Fe-doped LiNbO₃.

    PubMed

    Qian, Sheng-Xia; Li, Yongnan; Kong, Ling-Jun; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2014-08-15

    We propose a method to generate the phase-conjugate wave of the vector field by degenerate four-wave mixing in a c-cut Fe-doped LiNbO3 crystal. We demonstrate experimentally that the phase-conjugate wave of the vector field can be generated. In particular, the phase-conjugate vector field has also the peculiar function of compensating the polarization distortion, as the traditional phase-conjugate scaler field can compensate the phase distortion. PMID:25121905

  5. Ab-initio investigation of spin-dependent transport properties in Fe-doped armchair graphyne nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GolafroozShahri, S.; Roknabadi, M. R.; Shahtahmasebi, N.; Behdani, M.

    2016-12-01

    An ab-initio study on the spin-polarized transport properties of H-passivated Fe-doped graphyne nanoribbons is presented. All the calculations were based on density functional theory (DFT). Doping single magnetic atom on graphyne nanoribbons leads to metallicity which can significantly improve the conductivity. The currents are not degenerate for both up and down spin electrons and they are considerably spin-polarized. Therefore a relatively good spin-filtering can be expected. For configurations with geometric symmetry spin-rectifying is also observed. Therefore they can be applied as a dual spin-filter or a dual spin-diode in spintronic equipment.

  6. Generation of Terahertz Radiation from Fe-doped InGaAsP Using 800 nm to 1550 nm Pulsed Laser Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, O.; Freeman, J. R.; Cunningham, J. E.; Cannard, P. J.; Robertson, M. J.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Moodie, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate efficient generation of terahertz (THz) frequency radiation by pulsed excitation, at wavelengths between 800 and 1550 nm, of photoconductive (PC) switches fabricated using Fe-doped InGaAsP wafers, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Compared to our previous studies of Fe-doped InGaAs wafers, Fe:InGaAsP wafers exhibited five times greater dark resistivity to give a value of 10 kΩ cm, and Fe:InGaAsP PC switches produced five times higher THz power emission. The effect of Fe-doping concentration (between 1E16 and 1.5E17 cm-3) on optical light absorption (between 800 and 1600 nm), on resistivity, and on THz emission is also discussed.

  7. Design and synthesis of two-dimensional porous Fe-doped LiCoPO4 nano-plates as improved cathode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ling; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Li; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) Fe-doped LiCoPO4 nano-plates with porous structure have been successfully fabricated using NH4CoPO4·H2O nanosheets as templates followed by Fe doping and high temperature annealing. The obtained Fe-doped LiCoPO4 nano-plates exhibit several merits in morphology and crystal structure, including well-crystallized feature, porous structure, numerous interconnected pathway, improved electric conductivity and good structural stabilization. All the advantages endow the nano-plates with enhanced electrochemical performance when they are used as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this research, high specific capacity, excellent cyclability and outstanding rate capability in electrochemical energy storage are presented. This synthetic strategy is simple, effective, and could be broadly applied in designed synthesis of other electrode materials for LIBs.

  8. Generation of continuous wave terahertz frequency radiation from metal-organic chemical vapour deposition grown Fe-doped InGaAs and InGaAsP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Reshma A.; Freeman, Joshua R.; Rosamond, Mark C.; Hatem, Osama; Chowdhury, Siddhant; Ponnampalam, Lalitha; Fice, Martyn; Seeds, Alwyn J.; Cannard, Paul J.; Robertson, Michael J.; Moodie, David G.; Cunningham, John E.; Davies, A. Giles; Linfield, Edmund H.; Dean, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the generation of continuous wave terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from photomixers fabricated on both Fe-doped InGaAs and Fe-doped InGaAsP, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The photomixers were excited using a pair of distributed Bragg reflector lasers with emission around 1550 nm, and THz radiation was emitted over a bandwidth of greater than 2.4 THz. Two InGaAs and four InGaAsP wafers with different Fe doping concentrations were investigated, with the InGaAs material found to outperform the InGaAsP in terms of emitted THz power. The dependencies of the emitted power on the photomixer applied bias, incident laser power, and material doping level were also studied.

  9. Room-Temperature Magnetocapacitance in Fe-Doped K0.5Na0.5Nb0.95Ta0.05O3 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Yang, Wenlong; Li, Yu; Meng, Qingxin; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2012-10-01

    Ferroelectric and magnetic properties of Fe-doped potassium-sodium tantalate niobate (K0.5Na0.5(Nb0.95Ta0.05)1-xFexO3-x; x = 0 and 0.01) ceramics prepared by the conventional sintering method were investigated. In comparison with pure ceramics, the 0.01 Fe-doped ceramics show magnetic and ferroelectric properties simultaneously at room temperature. The relative dielectric constant significantly decreases after applying a magnetic field for the Fe-doped ceramics, indicating the coupling between ferroelectric and ferromagnetic orders. Magnetocapacitance of -0.77% was observed at room temperature and 50 kHz by the application of a magnetic field of 5000 Oe.

  10. Evolution of structural and optical properties of photocatalytic Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Prabitha B. Maneeshya, L. V. Justinvictor, V. B. Daniel, Georgi P. Joy, K. Thomas, P. V.

    2014-01-28

    Undoped and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films have been prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. Pure TiO{sub 2} thin film exhibited an amorphous-like nature. With increase in iron concentration (0–0.1 at%), the films exhibited better crystallization to anatase phase . Red shift of absorption edge was observed in the UV-vis transmittance spectra . At higher Fe concentration (0.5 at%), onset of phase transformation to rutile is noticed. Photocatalytic properties of pure and 0.1 at% Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films were investigated by degradation of methylene blue in UV light, visible light and light from Hg vapor lamp. 70% degradation of methylene blue was observed in the presence of Fe doped film in comparison with 3% degradation in presence of pure TiO{sub 2} film when irradiated using visible light for 2 h.

  11. Local structure of Fe in Fe-doped misfit-layered calcium cobaltite: An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Prasoetsopha, Natkrita; Pinitsoontorn, Supree; Bootchanont, Atipong; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Srepusharawoot, Pornjuk; Kamwanna, Teerasak; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2013-08-15

    Polycrystalline Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+δ} ceramics (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05) were fabricated using a simple thermal hydro-decomposition method and a spark plasma sintering technique. Thermoelectric property measurements showed that increasing Fe concentration resulted in a decrease in electrical resistivity, thermopower and thermal conductivity, leading to an improvement in the dimensionless figure-of-merit, >35% for x=0.05 at 1073 K. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the local structure of Fe ions in the Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+δ} structure for the first time. By fitting data from the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra and analyzing the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra incorporated with first principle simulation, it was shown that Fe was substituted for Co in the the Ca{sub 2}CoO{sub 3} (rocksalt, RS) layer rather than in the CoO{sub 2} layer. Variation in the thermoelectric properties as a function of Fe concentration was attributed to charge transfer between the CoO{sub 2} and the RS layers. The origin of the preferential Fe substitution site was investigated considering the ionic radii of Co and Fe and the total energy of the system. - Graphical abstract: The Fe K-edge XANES spectra of: (a) experimental result in comparison to the simulated spectra when Fe atoms were substituted in the RS layer; (b) with magnetic moment; (c) without magnetic moment, and in the CoO{sub 2} layer; (d) with magnetic moment and (e) without magnetic moment. Highlights: • Synthesis, structural studies, and thermoelectric properties of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+δ}. • Direct evidence for the local structure of the Fe ions in the Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+δ} using XAS analysis. • EXAFS and XANES analysis showed that Fe was likely to be situated in the RS layer structure. • Changes in TE property with Fe content was due to charge transfer between the CoO{sub 2} and the RS layers. • Total energy calculation showed energetically favorable Fe substitution in the RS layer.

  12. Fe-doped nanostructured titanates synthesized in a single step route

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A.M.L.M.; Marinkovic, B.A.; Suguihiro, N.M.; Smith, D.J.; Costa, M.E.H.M. da; Paciornik, S.

    2015-01-15

    for the synthesis of nanotitanates. • Fe-doped nanotitanates have been prepared in a single step wet chemistry route. • The morphology of the nanometric titanates is a function of the temperature. • Mössbauer spectroscopy reveals Fe{sup 3} {sup +} in octahedral sites inside nanosheets. • The Fe incorporation in nanosheets improved the visible light absorption.

  13. Characteristics and anticorrosion performance of Fe-doped TiO2 films by liquid phase deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Xu, Chao; Feng, ZuDe

    2014-09-01

    Fe-doped TiO2 thin films were fabricated by liquid phase deposition (LPD) method, using Fe(III) nitrate as both Fe element source and fluoride scavenger instead of commonly-used boric acid (H3BO3). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-vis spectrum were employed to examine the effects of Fe element on morphology, structure and optical characteristics of TiO2 films. The as-prepared films were served as photoanode applied to photogenerated cathodic protection of SUS304 stainless steel (304SS). It was observed that the photoelectrochemical properties of the as-prepared films were enhanced with the addition of Fe element compared to the undoped TiO2 film. The highest photoactivity was achieved for Ti13Fe (Fe/Ti = 3 molar ratio) film prepared in precursor bath containing 0.02 M TiF4 + 0.06 M Fe(NO3)3 under white-light illumination. The effective anticorrosion behaviors can be attributed to the Fe element incorporation which decreases the probability of photogenerated charge-carrier recombination and extends the light response range of Fe-doped TiO2 films appeared to visible-light region.

  14. Effect of Al and Fe doping in ZnO on magnetic and magneto-transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Deepika; Tripathi, Malvika; Vaibhav, Pratyush; Kumar, Aman; Kumar, Ritesh; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The structural, magnetic and magneto-transport of undoped ZnO, Zn0.97Al0.03O, Zn0.95Fe0.05O and Zn0.92Al0.03Fe0.05O thin films grown on Si(100) substrate using pulsed laser deposition were investigated. The single phase nature of the films is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The possibility of Fe metal cluster in Fe doped/co-doped films is ruled out by Fe 2p core level photoelectron spectra. From O 1s core level spectra it is observed that oxygen vacancy is present in all the films. The undoped ZnO film shows magnetic ordering below ∼175 K, whereas Fe doped/codoped samples show magnetic ordering even at 300 K. The Al doped sample reveals paramagnetic behavior. The magneto-transport measurements suggest that the mobile carriers undergo exchange interaction with local magnetic moments.

  15. Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles as new high capacity anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Franziska; Bresser, Dominic; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Herein, Fe-doped tin oxide is presented for the first time as new high-capacity lithium-ion anode material. Pure SnO2, Fe-doped SnO2 (Sn0.9Fe0.1O2, SFO), and carbon-coated SFO (SFO-C) were synthesized and morphologically and electrochemically characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller method, and galvanostatic (dis-)charge measurements. Doping SnO2 with Fe results in a substantially enhanced reversible specific capacity and coulombic efficiency. After ten cycles the reversible capacity of SFO-C was about 1519 mAh g-1, i.e., almost twice the specific capacity obtained for pure SnO2 (764 mAh g-1). Moreover, limiting the reversible capacity to 600 mAh g-1 shows the great potential of SFO-C for application in lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Observation of stimulated emission from a single Fe-doped AlN triangular fiber at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liangbao; Jin, Shifeng; Wang, Wenjun; Zuo, Sibin; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Shunchong; Zhu, Kaixing; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a well known wide-band gap semiconductor that has been widely used in fabricating various ultraviolet photo-electronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate that a fiber laser can be achieved in Fe-doped AlN fiber where Fe is the active ion and AlN fiber is used as the gain medium. Fe-doped single crystal AlN fibers with a diameter of 20-50 μm and a length of 0.5-1 mm were preparated successfully. Stimulated emission (peak at about 607 nm and FWHM ~0.2 nm) and a long luminescence lifetime (2.5 ms) were observed in the fibers by a 532nm laser excitation at room temperature. The high quality long AlN fibers are also found to be good optical waveguides. This kind of fiber lasers may possess potential advantages over traditional fiber lasers in enhancing power output and extending laser wavelengths from infrared to visible regime.

  17. Observation of stimulated emission from a single Fe-doped AlN triangular fiber at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liangbao; Jin, Shifeng; Wang, Wenjun; Zuo, Sibin; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Shunchong; Zhu, Kaixing; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a well known wide-band gap semiconductor that has been widely used in fabricating various ultraviolet photo-electronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate that a fiber laser can be achieved in Fe-doped AlN fiber where Fe is the active ion and AlN fiber is used as the gain medium. Fe-doped single crystal AlN fibers with a diameter of 20-50 μm and a length of 0.5-1 mm were preparated successfully. Stimulated emission (peak at about 607 nm and FWHM ~0.2 nm) and a long luminescence lifetime (2.5 ms) were observed in the fibers by a 532 nm laser excitation at room temperature. The high quality long AlN fibers are also found to be good optical waveguides. This kind of fiber lasers may possess potential advantages over traditional fiber lasers in enhancing power output and extending laser wavelengths from infrared to visible regime. PMID:26647969

  18. Observation of stimulated emission from a single Fe-doped AlN triangular fiber at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liangbao; Jin, Shifeng; Wang, Wenjun; Zuo, Sibin; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Shunchong; Zhu, Kaixing; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a well known wide-band gap semiconductor that has been widely used in fabricating various ultraviolet photo-electronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate that a fiber laser can be achieved in Fe-doped AlN fiber where Fe is the active ion and AlN fiber is used as the gain medium. Fe-doped single crystal AlN fibers with a diameter of 20–50 μm and a length of 0.5–1 mm were preparated successfully. Stimulated emission (peak at about 607 nm and FWHM ~0.2 nm) and a long luminescence lifetime (2.5 ms) were observed in the fibers by a 532nm laser excitation at room temperature. The high quality long AlN fibers are also found to be good optical waveguides. This kind of fiber lasers may possess potential advantages over traditional fiber lasers in enhancing power output and extending laser wavelengths from infrared to visible regime. PMID:26647969

  19. Modulation of Calcium Signaling of Angiotensin AT1, Endothelin ETA, and ETB Receptors by Silibinin, Quercetin, Crocin, Diallyl Sulfides, and Ginsenoside Rb1.

    PubMed

    Bahem, Ruba; Hoffmann, Anja; Azonpi, Arnaud; Caballero-George, Catherina; Vanderheyden, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Angiotensin II and endothelin-1 are potent vasoconstrictive peptides that play a central role in blood pressure regulation. Both peptides exert their pleiotropic effects via binding to their respective G-protein-coupled receptors, i.e., angiotensin AT1 and endothelin type A and type B receptors. In the present study, we have selected six structurally different plant-derived compounds with known cardioprotective properties to evaluate their ability to modulate calcium signaling of the above-mentioned receptors. For this purpose, we used and validated a cellular luminescence-based read-out system in which we measured intracellular calcium signaling in Chinese hamster ovary cells that express the calcium sensitive apo-aequorin protein. Firstly, silibinin, a flavanolignan that occurs in milk thistle (Silybum marianum), was investigated and found to be an antagonist for the human angiotensin AT1 receptor with an affinity constant of about 9 µM, while it had no effect on endothelin type A or type B receptor activation. Quercetin and crocin partially impeded intracellular calcium signaling resulting in a non-receptor-related reduction of the responses recorded for the three investigated G-protein-coupled receptors. Two organosulfur compounds, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide, as well as the triterpene saponin ginsenoside Rb1 did not affect the activation of the angiotensin AT1 and endothelin type A and type B receptors. In conclusion, we were able, by using a nonradioactive cellular read-out system, to identify a novel pharmacological property of the flavanolignan silibinin. PMID:25519917

  20. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  1. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide ; 7783 - 06 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  2. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Influence of Fe-doping on the structural, optical, and magnetic properties of ZnO thin films prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goktas, A.; Mutlu, I. H.; Yamada, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Zn1-xFexO thin films with different Fe (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.20) content were produced by sol-gel dip coating method. The influence of Fe doping on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of ZnO thin films was investigated. X-ray diffraction has shown that the films are polycrystalline and textured with c-axis of the hexagonal structure along the growth direction. Scanning electron microscope has indicated that the surface of the films is homogeneous with no cracking and the grain sizes tend to decrease with the increase of Fe-doping concentration. Ultraviolet-visible measurements show a reduction in band gap of the films with increase in Fe content from 3.27 eV to 3.10 eV. The magnetic measurements performed at 5, 100, 200 and 300 K using a SQUID magnetometer revealed the dominant paramagnetic behavior until Fe doping ratio of 10% and clear magnetic hysteresis loops at 5 and 100 K for the highest Fe doping ratio of 20%. The observed ferromagnetic behavior is likely related to a partial incorporation of Zn into the Fe3O4, i.e. Fe3-xZnxO4 composition or disorders as well as some defects.

  4. Preparation and photoelectric properties of Fe-doped mesoporous TiO2 thick films used in DSSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yian; Shen, Yue; Gu, Feng; Lu, Huina; Wu, Mingming; Wang, Linjun

    2009-08-01

    Fe-doped mesoporous TiO2 (M-TiO2-Fe) thick films were prepared by sol-gel and screen printing process. Raman characteristics results show that the M-TiO2-Fe thick film possesses a certain degree of the anatase phase, which may have advantages on photocatalysis and photovoltaic ability. Derived from small angel X-Ray diffraction (SAXRD), the films exhibit mesoporous structure with pore size around 7-8 nm. Eg of the films was obviously narrowed from 3.4 eV to 3.0 eV, which allows the thick films using more light to initiate photovoltaic process. Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on M-TiO2-Fe was structured and chlorophyl was used as sensitizers. The solar cells have an open circuit voltage above 260mV.

  5. Optical and structural properties of Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles prepared by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navneet; Abhinav, Singh, Gurwinder Pal; Singh, Vishal; Kumar, Sacheen; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    Today nanomaterials plays important role in every field, due to their unique mechanical, chemical and electrical properties which are completely different from the bulk materials. With reduction in the size of material its properties are dynamically changed. Semiconductor materials are widely used in electronic devices but in the field of optoelectronic these materials have some limitations. Tin oxide could be the material which could be used in these applications without limitations. Doped Tin Oxide is an oxygen deficient material which could be beneficial for transparent conducting oxide. Iron doped SnO2 prepared by co-precipitation method. Studies on structural properties of undoped and doped SnO2 were done by X-ray diffraction. The XRD results have shown that the size of the nanoparticles decreases with Fe doping down to 53nm. Optical Properties were studied by UV-visible spectroscopy. Band gap was found to decrease with increase in iron content in samples.

  6. Highly-active oxygen evolution electrocatalyzed by a Fe-doped NiSe nanoflake array electrode.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chun; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2016-03-25

    Alkaline water electrolysis offers a simple method for mass production of hydrogen but suffers from the sluggish kinetics of the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER), calling for the development of low-cost and durable oxygen evolution electrocatalysts with high activity. In this communication, we report a highly-active robust oxygen evolution electrode, developed by in situ hydrothermal growth of an Fe-doped NiSe nanoflake array directly on a macroporous FeNi foam (Fe-NiSe/FeNi foam). This electrode catalyzes the OER with an onset overpotential as low as 200 mV and needs overpotentials of 245 and 264 mV to achieve 50 and 100 mA cm(-2), respectively, in 1.0 M KOH. Remarkably, it is also highly robust to drive 500 and 1000 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of 246 and 263 mV, respectively, in 30 wt% KOH. PMID:26935420

  7. Fe solubility, growth mechanism, and luminescence of Fe doped ZnO nanowires and nanorods grown by evaporation-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemán, Belén; Ortega, Yanicet; García, José Ángel; Fernández, Paloma; Piqueras, Javier

    2011-07-01

    Fe doped ZnO nanowires, nanorods, and urchin-like nanostructures have been grown using an evaporation-deposition method with compacted mixtures of ZnS and Fe2O3 powders, with different Fe contents as precursors. Treatments at 950 °C under argon flow lead to the growth of iron doped nanowires, nanorods, and other nanostructures on the surface of the compacted sample. The incorporation of iron into the nanostructures has been investigated via energy dispersive spectroscopy as well as by cathodoluminescence in a scanning electron microscope and photoluminescence in an optical microscope. The iron content in the structures is limited to the range of 0.5-0.7 at.% and does not depend on the content in the precursor. Bright and dark field imaging and twist contour analysis via transmission electron microscopy support the possibility of a dislocation driven growth of the nanowires.

  8. TREATMENT OF METAL FINISHING WASTES BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involved precipitating heavy metals normally present in metal finishing wastewaters by a novel process which employs ferrous sulfide addition (Sulfex), as well as by conventional treatment using calcium hydroxide for comparison purposes. These studies consisted of la...

  9. Endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide facilitates T-type calcium channel currents in Cav3.2-expressing HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Miyamoto, Yosuke; Kanaoka, Daiki; Ide, Hiroki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Ohkubo, Tsuyako; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2014-02-28

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter, is formed from l-cysteine by multiple enzymes including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). We have shown that an H2S donor, NaHS, causes hyperalgesia in rodents, an effect inhibited by knockdown of Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels), and that NaHS facilitates T-channel-dependent currents (T-currents) in NG108-15 cells that naturally express Cav3.2. In the present study, we asked if endogenous and exogenous H2S participates in regulation of the channel functions in Cav3.2-transfected HEK293 (Cav3.2-HEK293) cells. dl-Propargylglycine (PPG), a CSE inhibitor, significantly decreased T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, but not in NG108-15 cells. NaHS at 1.5mM did not affect T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, but enhanced T-currents in NG108-15 cells. In the presence of PPG, NaHS at 1.5mM, but not 0.1-0.3mM, increased T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells. Similarly, Na2S, another H2S donor, at 0.1-0.3mM significantly increased T-currents in the presence, but not absence, of PPG in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells. Expression of CSE was detected at protein and mRNA levels in HEK293 cells. Intraplantar administration of Na2S, like NaHS, caused mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect blocked by NNC 55-0396, a T-channel inhibitor. The in vivo potency of Na2S was higher than NaHS. These results suggest that the function of Cav3.2 T-channels is tonically enhanced by endogenous H2S synthesized by CSE in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, and that exogenous H2S is capable of enhancing Cav3.2 function when endogenous H2S production by CSE is inhibited. In addition, Na2S is considered a more potent H2S donor than NaHS in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:24508802

  10. Comparison of the low-temperature specific heat of Fe- and Co-doped Bi{sub 1.8}Pb{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 2}Ca(Cu{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}{ital M}{sub {ital x}}){sub 2}O{sub 8} ({ital M}=Fe or Co): Anomolously enhanced electronic contribution due to Fe doping

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.K.; Franck, J.P.

    1996-04-01

    Specific-heat data of Fe-doped Bi{sub 1.8}Pb{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 2}Ca(Cu{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Fe{sub {ital x}}){sub 2}O{sub 8} in the range 2{endash}20 K are presented for {ital x}=1, 2, 4, 6, and 8{percent}. The data are compared with our previous measurements on Co-doped bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide superconductors of nominal composition Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BISCO 2212). Both Fe and Co are magnetic substitutions with effective moments close to their free-ion value. In the normal state the magnetic susceptibility increases by more than a factor 2 over the doping range due to effective-mass enhancement. In the superconducting state both ions act as magnetic pair breakers. For Co doping the normal-state linear term {gamma} is observed, enhanced due to the effective-mass increase. For Fe doping we observe a large anomalous contribution to the electronic specific heat starting near 15 K and leading at the lowest temperature to a linear term near {gamma}{sub 0}=72 mJ/moleK{sup 2} (1 mole=1 formula unit). The anomalous term is typical of heavy fermion behavior. Comparison with specific-heat data of Co-doped BISCO 2212 suggests that hybridization between 3{ital d} electrons of the dopant and the planar carriers is more effective for Fe doping than for Co doping. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in Fe-doped Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiganesh, G. Jaya, S. Mathi

    2014-04-24

    Using the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory, we have studied the magnetism and electronic structure of Fe-doped Zinc Phosphide (Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2}). Our results show that the half-metallic ground state and ferromagnetic stability for the small Fe concentrations considered in our study. The stability of the doped material has been studied by calculating the heat of formation and analyzing the minimum total energies in nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic phases. A large value of the magnetic moment is obtained from our calculations and our calculation suggests that the Fe-doped Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} may be a useful material in semiconductor spintronics.

  12. Structure and magnetic properties of Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films prepared by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, N. Sai; Kaleemulla, S. Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Krishnamoorthi, C.; Begam, M. Rigana; Amarendra, G.

    2015-06-24

    Pure and Fe (7 at.%) doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were grown onto the glass substrates by electron beam evaporation technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the pure and Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films have been studied. The undoped and Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films shown ferromagnetic property at room temperature. A magnetization of 24 emu/cm{sup 3} was observed for pure In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. The magnetization of 38.23 emu/cm{sup 3} was observed for the Fe (7 at.%) doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films.

  13. Crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase in Fe-doped Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Na Hyun; Lee, Kyujoon; Kim, Jinsu; Jang, Jungwon; Kim, Jinhee; Jung, Myung-Hwa

    2014-06-01

    In Fe-doped Bi2Te3, we have observed higher mobility, larger linear magnetoresistance, and anomalous quantum oscillations. The angle dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations gives two different periodicities depending on the angle from the c-axis. The low-angle SdH period is identified with a surface origin, while the high-angle period is against the surface origin. The high-angle SdH period well agrees with the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) period with a bulk origin. The physical parameters obtained from the quantum oscillations support the crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase by Fe doping in Bi2Te3.

  14. Exploring a new phenomenon in the bactericidal response of TiO2 thin films by Fe doping: Exerting the antimicrobial activity even after stoppage of illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghibi, Sanaz; Vahed, Shohreh; Torabi, Omid; Jamshidi, Amin; Golabgir, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-01

    Antibacterial properties of Fe-doped TiO2 thin films prepared on glass by the sol-gel hot-dipping technique were studied. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under ultra violet and visible light. The antibacterial properties of the coatings were investigated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisia and Aspergillus niger. The principle of incubation methods was also discussed. The results indicated that Fe doping of thin films eventuated in high antibacterial properties under visible light and this performance remained even after stoppage of illumination. This article tries to provide some explanation for this fact.

  15. Crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase in Fe-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Na Hyun; Lee, Kyujoon; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Jinsu; Jang, Jungwon; Kim, Jinhee

    2014-06-23

    In Fe-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, we have observed higher mobility, larger linear magnetoresistance, and anomalous quantum oscillations. The angle dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations gives two different periodicities depending on the angle from the c-axis. The low-angle SdH period is identified with a surface origin, while the high-angle period is against the surface origin. The high-angle SdH period well agrees with the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) period with a bulk origin. The physical parameters obtained from the quantum oscillations support the crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase by Fe doping in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  16. Interlinked multiphase Fe-doped MnO2 nanostructures: a novel design for enhanced pseudocapacitive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziya; Wang, Fengping; Li, Yan; Hu, Jianlin; Lu, Yanzhen; Xu, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Structure designing and morphology control can lead to high performance pseudocapacitive materials for supercapacitors. In this work, we have designed interlinked multiphase Fe-doped MnO2 nanostructures (α-MnO2/R-MnO2/ε-MnO2) to enhance the electrochemical properties by a facile method. These hierarchical hollow microspheres assembled by interconnected nanoflakes, and with plenty of porous nanorods radiating from the spherical shells were hydrothermally obtained. The supercapacitor electrode prepared from the unique construction exhibits outstanding specific capacitance of 267.0 F g-1 even under a high mass loading (~5 mg cm-2). Obviously improved performances compared to pure MnO2 are also demonstrated with a good rate capability, high energy density (1.30 mW h cm-3) and excellent cycling stability of 100% capacitance retention after 2000 cycles at 2 A g-1. The synergistic effects of alternative crystal structures, appropriate crystallinity and optimal morphology are identified to be responsible for the observations. This rational multiphase composite strategy provides a promising idea for materials scientists to design and prepare scalable electrode materials for energy storage devices.Structure designing and morphology control can lead to high performance pseudocapacitive materials for supercapacitors. In this work, we have designed interlinked multiphase Fe-doped MnO2 nanostructures (α-MnO2/R-MnO2/ε-MnO2) to enhance the electrochemical properties by a facile method. These hierarchical hollow microspheres assembled by interconnected nanoflakes, and with plenty of porous nanorods radiating from the spherical shells were hydrothermally obtained. The supercapacitor electrode prepared from the unique construction exhibits outstanding specific capacitance of 267.0 F g-1 even under a high mass loading (~5 mg cm-2). Obviously improved performances compared to pure MnO2 are also demonstrated with a good rate capability, high energy density (1.30 mW h cm-3) and

  17. Fabrication of Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles and investigation of photocatalytic decolorization of reactive red 198 under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Halimeh; Eshaghi, Akbar; Hosseini, Seyed Rahman; Ghani, Kamal

    2016-09-01

    In this research, Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles with various Fe concentrations (0. 0.1, 1, 5 and 10wt%) were prepared by a sol-gel method. Then, nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), BET surface area, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The photocatalytic activity of the nano-particles was evaluated through degradation of reactive red 198 (RR 198) under UV and visible light irradiations. XRD results revealed that all samples contained only anatase phase. DRS showed that the Fe doping in the titania induced a significant red shift of the absorption edge and then the band gap energy decreased from 3 to 2.1eV. Photocatalytic results indicated that TiO2 had a highest photocatalytic decolorization of the RR 198 under UV irradiation whereas photocatalytic decolorization of the RR 198 under visible irradiation increased in the presence of Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles. Among the samples, Fe-1wt% doped TiO2 nanoparticles showed the highest photocatalytic decolorization of RR198 under visible light irradiation. PMID:27150776

  18. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  19. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-11-26

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  20. Structural transitions, magnetic properties, and electronic structures of Co(Fe)-doped MnNiSi compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Wei, Z. Y.; Liu, E. K. Wang, S. G.; Wang, W. H.; Wu, G. H.; Liu, G. D.

    2015-05-07

    The structural transitions, magnetic properties, and electronic structures of Co(Fe)-doped MnNiSi compounds are investigated by x-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), magnetic measurements, and first-principles calculations. Results indicate that all samples undergo a martensitic transition from the Ni{sub 2}In-type parent phase to TiNiSi-type orthorhombic phase at high temperatures. The substitution of Co(Fe) for Mn in Mn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}NiSi (x = 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4) and Mn{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}NiSi (y = 0.26, 0.30, 0.36, 0.46, and 0.55) samples decreases the structural transition temperature and Curie temperature of martensite. The martensite phases show a typical ferromagnetic behavior with saturation field being basically unchanged with increasing Co(Fe) content, while the saturation magnetization shows a decreasing tendency. The theoretically calculated moments are in good agreement with the experimentally measured results. The orbital hybridizations between different 3d elements are analyzed from the distribution of density of states.

  1. Interlinked multiphase Fe-doped MnO2 nanostructures: a novel design for enhanced pseudocapacitive performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziya; Wang, Fengping; Li, Yan; Hu, Jianlin; Lu, Yanzhen; Xu, Mei

    2016-03-24

    Structure designing and morphology control can lead to high performance pseudocapacitive materials for supercapacitors. In this work, we have designed interlinked multiphase Fe-doped MnO2 nanostructures (α-MnO2/R-MnO2/ε-MnO2) to enhance the electrochemical properties by a facile method. These hierarchical hollow microspheres assembled by interconnected nanoflakes, and with plenty of porous nanorods radiating from the spherical shells were hydrothermally obtained. The supercapacitor electrode prepared from the unique construction exhibits outstanding specific capacitance of 267.0 F g(-1) even under a high mass loading (∼5 mg cm(-2)). Obviously improved performances compared to pure MnO2 are also demonstrated with a good rate capability, high energy density (1.30 mW h cm(-3)) and excellent cycling stability of 100% capacitance retention after 2000 cycles at 2 A g(-1). The synergistic effects of alternative crystal structures, appropriate crystallinity and optimal morphology are identified to be responsible for the observations. This rational multiphase composite strategy provides a promising idea for materials scientists to design and prepare scalable electrode materials for energy storage devices. PMID:26977698

  2. Fabrication of a 3D active mixer based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS cones with magnetic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Elaheh

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an active 3D mixer for lab-on-chip applications is presented. The micrometer size cone shape holes are ablated on a PMMA sheet utilizing a CO2 laser. The holes are filled with Fe micro-particles and the whole structure is molded with PDMS which cause the Fe micro-particles to be trapped in a PDMS cone structure. These Fe-doped PDMS cones are placed in a PMMA micro-channel structure fabricated by CO2 laser machining. By applying an external periodic magnetic field, the cones periodically bend in the micro-channel and stir the fluid. The fabrication method and the effect of the magnetic field on the bending of the cones with different aspect ratios is also discussed utilizing computer simulation. Doping the polymers with micro- and nano-metallic particles has been carried out by different research groups before, but according to our knowledge, application of such structures for the fabrication of a 3D active mixer has not been presented before.

  3. Electrochemical reactions and cathode properties of Fe-doped Li2O for the hermetically sealed lithium peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Kosuke; Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Ogasawara, Yoshiyuki; Okuoka, Shin-ichi; Yonehara, Koji; Ono, Hironobu; Sumida, Yasutaka; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    Fe-doped Li2O (FDL) is synthesized mechanochemically and is demonstrated as a new Co-free cathode material for use in sealed Li2O2 batteries, which have been proposed as high energy density batteries. Fe3+ ions are substitutionally doped into the Li sites in an antifluorite-type Li2O structure to create FDL. The FDL consists of (Li0.82Fe0.06)2O (d-FDL) and high-temperature form of Li5FeO4 (o-FDL), in which Fe3+ ions disorderly and orderly arranged, respectively. According to the Mössbauer spectra and quantitative peroxide species analysis, the FDL cathode operates principally based on the redox reaction between O22- and O2-. X-ray diffraction study reveals that the reversible formation of O22- proceeds mainly in the d-FDL. An irreversible side reaction involving the evolution of oxygen gas occurs when the cathode is charged to more than 250 mAh g-1. The FDL (Fe/(Li + Fe) = 10 at%) cathode exhibits a reversible capacity of 200 mAh g-1 over 200 cycles at a current density of 22.5 mA g-1.

  4. FP-LAPW investigation of electronic, magnetic, elastic and thermal properties of Fe-doped zirconium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Sirajuddeen, M. Mohamed Sheik Banu, I. B. Shameem

    2014-05-15

    Full Potential- Linear Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW) method has been employed to study the electronic, magnetic, elastic and thermal properties of Fe-doped Zirconium nitride. In this work, Fe-atoms were doped into the super cell of ZrN in doping concentrations of 12.5%, 25% and 37.5% to replace Zr atoms. Electronic properties such as band structure and DOS were plotted and compared for the doped compounds. Charge density contours were plotted for all the doped compounds. The non-magnetic ZrN doped in different Fe concentrations were found to be ferromagnetic. Magnetic moments have been calculated and compared. Elastic properties have been studied and compared with electronic properties. Appearance of magnetic ordering and its influence with the elastic properties have been reported. Impact of 3d states of Fe in DOS plot on the elastic nature of the compounds has been highlighted. Thermal properties such as Debye temperature and molar heat capacities at low temperature have been determined. Debye temperature is found to decrease with higher doping concentrations. Molar heat capacities are found to increase with higher concentrations of Fe atoms.

  5. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  6. Role of epitaxial strain on the magnetic structure of Fe-doped CoFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, J. A.; Kumah, D. P.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Arena, D. A.; Henrich, V. E.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic structure of Fe-doped CoFe2O4 (Co1-xFe2+xO4) grown on MgO (0 0 1) and SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrates is studied with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and soft x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. X-ray and electron diffraction show that the choice of substrate has large effects on the strain, crystal structure and surface morphology of Co1-xFe2+xO4 thin films. Samples grown on MgO have small, coherent strains and surfaces that are nearly atomically flat, whereas films grown on SrTiO3 have large tensile strains and surfaces terminated with islands, which indicate the presence of a large density of misfit dislocations. These differences in structural properties correlate with the large differences seen in the magnetic structure; samples grown on SrTiO3 have larger magnetic moments and increased anisotropies compared to those grown on MgO. Most strikingly, the large magnetic spin and orbital moments found in the films grown on SrTiO3 suggest a suppression of anti-phase boundary formation, which we attribute to the large compressive lattice mismatch and the formation of misfit dislocations during the film growth in order to relieve the epitaxial strain. This results in the films grown on SrTiO3 having magnetic properties that are more similar to bulk Co1-xFe2+xO4 than those grown on MgO, demonstrating that epitaxial strain can result in large changes in the magnetic structure of Co1-xFe2+xO4.

  7. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  8. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  9. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  10. Morphology-controlled synthesis and novel microwave electromagnetic properties of hollow urchin-like chain Fe-doped MnO{sub 2} under 10 T high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yuping, Duan; Jia, Zhang; Hui, Jing; Shunhua, Liu

    2011-05-15

    Fe-doped MnO{sub 2} with a hollow sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized under a high magnetic field of 10 T. The formation mechanism was investigated and discussed in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EMPA, and vector network analysis. By doping MnO{sub 2} with Fe, the relative complex permittivity of MnO{sub 2} and its corresponding loss tangent clearly decreases, but its relative complex permeability and its corresponding loss tangent markedly increases. Moreover, the theoretically calculated values of reflection loss show that with increasing the Fe content, the as-prepared Fe-doped MnO{sub 2} exhibits good microwave absorption capability. -- Graphical Abstract: Fe-doped MnO{sub 2} with a hollow sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized in a high magnetic field of 10 T via a simple chemical process. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Fe-doped MnO{sub 2} with a hollow sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized. {yields} We investigated formation mechanism and electromagnetic properties of the Fe-doped MnO{sub 2}. {yields} By doping MnO{sub 2} with Fe, the electromagnetic properties are improved obviously.

  11. Ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets: a novel peroxidase mimetic, Fe doping-mediated catalytic performance enhancement and application to rapid, highly sensitive optical detection of glucose.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Liu, Qian; Asiri, Abdullah M; Qusti, Abdullah H; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Sun, Xuping

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C3N4) possess peroxidase activity. Fe doping of the nanosheets leads to peroxidase mimetics with greatly enhanced catalytic performance and the mechanism involved is proposed. We further demonstrate the novel use of such Fe-g-C3N4 as a cheap nanosensor for simple, rapid, highly selective and sensitive optical detection of glucose with a pretty low detection limit of 0.5 μM. PMID:24121798

  12. Structural and magnetic properties of pristine and Fe-doped NiO nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A.K.; Das, D.

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, HR-TEM techniques. ► Magnetic properties of the samples were compared. ► Surface spins frozen at lower temperatures resulted a spin glass. ► The samples show enhancement of coercivity with decreased temperature. -- Abstract: Ni{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O (x = 0 and 0.03) nanoparticles are synthesized by a chemical route. XRD and TEM measurements confirm phase purity and crystallinity of the nanoparticles. Fe substitution in NiO reduces considerably the average particle size of the nanoparticles. The pristine NiO sample with size 14 nm and Fe-substituted sample having size 7 nm show room temperature ferromagnetism. The pristine NiO having 31 nm size and Fe-substituted sample with size 25 nm are found to be antiferromagnetic. The M–H and M–T behavior of the pristine and Fe-doped samples are explained with a core–shell model with an antiferromagnetic core and a ferromagnetic shell. The disordered spins at the shell give rise to a spin-glass like frozen state below 10 K. The obtained room temperature ferromagnetism in the pristine and Fe-doped NiO has been attributed to particle size effect.

  13. Synthesis and visible light photocatalysis of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} mesoporous layers deposited on hollow glass microbeads

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Lifeng; Wang Yuansheng; Niu Mutong; Chen Guoxin; Cheng Yao

    2009-10-15

    Nano-composite of Fe-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals loaded on the hollow glass microbeads was prepared by co-thermal hydrolysis deposition and calcining treatment. The adherence of TiO{sub 2} mesoporous layers to the surfaces of hollow glass microbeads prevented the aggregation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and benefited to their catalytic activity. The doping of Fe ions makes the absorption edge of the TiO{sub 2} based nano-composite red-shifted into the visible region. An effective photodegradation of the methyl orange aqueous solution was achieved under visible light (lambda>420 nm) irradiation, revealing the potential applicability of such nano-composite in some industry fields, such as air and water purifications. - Graphical abstract: Nano-composite of Fe-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals loaded on the hollow glass microbeads was prepared by co-thermal hydrolysis deposition. Photodegradation of the methyl orange was achieved under visible light irradiation, revealing the potential applicability of such nano-composite in some industry fields.

  14. Study of the relation between oxygen vacancies and ferromagnetism in Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nano-powders

    SciTech Connect

    Mudarra Navarro, Azucena M.; Rodríguez Torres, Claudia E. Fabiana Cabrera, A.; Bilovol, Vitaliy; Errico, L. A.; Weissmann, M.

    2014-06-14

    In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical study of structural and magnetic properties of Fe doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanopowders. We show that Fe-doping induces the formation of oxygen vacancies in the first-sphere coordination of iron ions, which are in +2 and +3 oxidation states. We found that Fe ions form dimers that share one oxygen vacancy in the case of Fe{sup 3+} and two oxygen vacancies in the case of Fe{sup 2+}. The saturation magnetization is almost independent of iron concentration and slightly increases with the relative fraction of Fe{sup 2+}. Ab initio calculations show that two Fe ions sharing an oxygen vacancy are coupled ferromagnetically, forming a bound magnetic polaron (BMP), but two neighbor BMPs are aligned antiparallel to each other. Extra electron doping plays a fundamental role mediating the magnetic coupling between the ferromagnetic entities: carriers, possibly concentrated at grain boundaries, mediate between the BMP to produce ferromagnetic alignment.

  15. Magnetism mediated by a majority of [Fe³⁺ + VO²⁻] complexes in Fe-doped CeO₂ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paidi, V K; Ferreira, N S; Goltz, D; van Lierop, J

    2015-08-26

    We examine the role of Fe(3+) and vacancies (V(O)) on the magnetism of Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles of Ce(100-x)Fe(x)O2 (x  =  0, 0.26, 1.82, 2.64, 5.26, 6.91, and 7.22) were prepared by a co-precipitation method, and their structural, compositional and magnetic properties were investigated. The CeO2 nanoparticles had a mixed valance of Ce(4+) and Ce(3+) ions, and doping introduced Fe(3+) ions. The decrease in Ce(3+) and increase in Fe(3+) concentrations indicated the presence of more [Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)] complexes with Fe loading in the particles. Charge neutralization, Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-) + 2Ce(4+) ↔ 2Ce(3+) + Fe(3+), identified the impact of V(O) on the magnetism, where our results suggest that the Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticle magnetism is mediated by a majority of [Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)]-Ce(3+) -[Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)] complexes. PMID:26235592

  16. Comparative study of the Raman vibrational modes in pure and Fe-doped La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnache, O.; Osorio, J.

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study of Raman spectra at room temperature of La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO) and La2/3Ca1/3Mn0.97Fe0.03O3 (LCMFO) thin films, grown on monocrystalline substrates LaAlO3, is presented. The films were grown with thickness between 30 and 130 nm under identical deposition conditions by DC magnetron sputtering system at high O2 pressure. In order to observe changes in the vibration modes of the lattice due to the substitution of Mn by Fe ions, we compared the different values of wave numbers obtained from the fittings of each Raman spectrum. The results show that the characteristic-and most intense-peak at ∼486 cm-1 corresponds to the substrate. In the LCMO thick films, Raman modes are very weak and mix up with the substrate one, whereas in LCMFO, these modes were found in three intervals around 220-250 cm-1 (υ1), 450-520 cm-1 (υ2) and 610-720 cm-1 (υ3). A mode at ∼717 cm-1 is associated to structural disorder due to Fe doping effect. In both LCMO and LCMFO films, the conduction mechanism are related with electron localization and the electronic transition is mediated by phonons. According to the T* values from resistivity data fit (Variable Range Model -VRH), it is observed once more that the Fe doping relaxes the strain effects.

  17. Observation of the large magnetocaloric effect and suppression of orbital entropy change in Fe-doped MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. H.; Luo, X. E-mail: ypsun@issp.ac.cn; Hu, L.; Tan, S. G.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, B.; Chen, J.; Song, W. H.; Sun, Y. P. E-mail: ypsun@issp.ac.cn

    2014-01-21

    We present the structural and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}V{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3), and investigate the magnetocaloric effect in those compounds. The ferrimagnetic spin ordering is enhanced with the Fe doping at Mn site of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the orbital ordering is suppressed. Large magnetic entropy changes up to 3.8 J/kg K as well as the relative cooling power up to 110 J/kg at the field change of 0-2 T for Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}V{sub 2}O{sub 4} are calculated from the isothermal magnetization measurements. The large orbital entropy change of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4} is suppressed by the Fe doping, while the spin entropy contribution arising from the strong spin-orbit coupling remains. Moreover, the doping of Fe broadens the temperature span of the large magnetic entropy change and increases the relative cooling power of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4} by 2.4 times.

  18. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  19. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  20. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  1. Electronic, Energetic and Chemical Effects of Intrinsic Defects and Fe-Doping of CoAl2O4: A DFT+U Study

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.; Yan, Y.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Wei, S.-H.

    2008-01-01

    The spinel cobalt aluminate has gained interest as a potential photoelectrochemical catalyst for the renewable production of hydrogen. Using band structure theory, we determine the energetics of possible intrinsic point defects in spinel CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and analyze their effect on its electronic and chemical properties. Extrinsic Fe-doping is also examined. Cation vacancies are found to be shallow acceptors, but their formation energy is sensitive to the growth conditions; an oxygen rich environment is required to enhance the p-type conductivity. Fe is an isovalent substituent on the Co (Al) site, exhibiting a preference for octahedral coordination, and forms a deep donor (acceptor) level near the center of the band gap, corresponding to a Fe(II) to Fe(III) transition.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of UV-treated Fe-doped bismuth lanthanum titanate-doped TiO2 layers in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Myoung Geun; Bark, Chung Wung

    2016-06-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been extensively studied because they constitute promising low-cost alternatives to their conventional semiconductor-based counterparts. However, much of the effort aimed at achieving high conversion efficiencies has focused on dye and liquid electrolytes. In this work, we report the photovoltaic characteristics of DSSCs fabricated by mixing TiO2 with Fe-doped bismuth lanthanum titanate (Fe-BLT). These nanosized Fe-BLT powders were prepared by using a high-energy ball-milling process. In addition, we used a UV radiation-ozone (UV-O3) treatment to change the surface wettability of TiO2 from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and thereby prevented the easy separation of the Fe-BLT-mixed TiO2 from the fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) coating glass.

  3. Detection of Fe2+ valence states in Fe doped SrTiO3 epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Koehl, Annemarie; Kajewski, Dariusz; Kubacki, Jerzy; Lenser, Christian; Dittmann, Regina; Meuffels, Paul; Szot, Kristof; Waser, Rainer; Szade, Jacek

    2013-06-01

    We present an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study on Fe-doped SrTiO3 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The Fe L2,3 edge spectra are recorded for doping concentrations from 0-5% after several annealing steps at moderate temperatures. The Fe valence state is determined by comparison with an ilmenite reference sample and calculations according to the charge transfer multiplet model. We found clear evidence of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) oxidation states independently of the doping concentration. The Fe(2+) signal is enhanced at the surface and increases after annealing. The Fe(2+) configuration is in contrast to the mixed Fe(3+)/Fe(4+) valence state in bulk material and must be explained by the specific defect structure of the thin films due to the kinetically limited growth which induces a high concentration of oxygen vacancies. PMID:23615619

  4. A comparative study of the defects in Fe-doped or undoped semi-insulating InP after high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkaoui, K.; Kallel, S.; Marrakchi, G.; Karoui, A.

    1996-12-31

    Fe-doped or undoped semi-insulating InP samples submitted to high temperature annealing process have been studied by Photoinduced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS) in order to compare the traps observed. The PICTS spectra of these samples show separately the presence of a multitude of traps having activation energies ranging from 0.12 eV to 0.66 eV. The Fe{sub In} trap level has not been clearly observed in all the samples. The comparison of the thermal parameters of the observed traps allows to assign some of them to a same defect. However, the identification seems to be less evident concerning other traps and should be rather related to the properties of the starting material.

  5. Fabrication of Fe-Doped LiCoO2 Sandwich-Like Nanocomposites as Excellent Performance Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Huijuan; Yang, Jiao; Mu, Yanping; Wang, Yu

    2015-12-21

    In this article, the two-layer sandwiched graphene@LiFe0.Co0.8O2 nanoparticles (SG@LFCO) have been prepared and investigated as high-rate and long-life cathode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The materials possess a high-surface area (267.1 m(2) g(-1)) and lots of void spaces. By combining various favorable conditions, such as Fe doping, coating graphene, and designing novel morphology, the as-prepared materials deliver a specific capacity of 115 mAh g(-1) at 10 C. At the 0.1 C cycling rate, the capacity retention of 97.2% is sustained after 250 cycles and a coulombic efficiency of around 97.6% is obtained. PMID:26552860

  6. The properties of Co- and Fe-doped GDC for low-temperature processing of solid oxide fuel cell by electron-beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seon-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Choi, Hyung-Wook

    2013-08-01

    This study is transition metal oxides (FeO and CoO) were added to Gd-doped ceria (Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95, GDC) powder for preparing the thin-film electrolyte used in the Ni-GDC anode-supported intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Recently much attention was aimed at successful powder preparation with high sinter activity and conductivity. However, one of the challenges in preparing the GDC electrolytes is the densification issue. It is difficult to achieve the densification of GDC below 1600 degrees C. To overcome this drawback, attentions of the research on the densification of the GDC electrolyte is paid more on changing of the fabrication technology, the powder properties, and the sintering mechanism. Among them, Fe3+ and Co2+ showed the significant beneficial effect on the grain boundary conductivity. So, electrolyte powder made of Co- and Fe-doped GDC by solid-state reaction method. And thin-film electrolyte was fabricated on the presintered Ni-GDC cermet anode substrate by E-beam evaporating method and then co-sintered to form the electrolyte/anode bilayer. We realized crystal structure of Co and Fe doped Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 (GDC) electrolyte by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphology was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the sintered samples were performed. The performance of the cells was evaluated over 500-800 degrees C using humidified hydrogen as fuel and air as oxidant. PMID:23882837

  7. [Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A in water by Fe doped-TiO2 nanotube arrays under simulated solar light irradiation].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-Liang; Yu, Ze-Bin; Chen, Ying; Xu, Tian-Zuo; Peng, Zhen-Bo; Liu, Yu-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Seeking an efficient treatment method for bisphenol A ( BPA), a representative endocrine disrupting compound, is important for environmental remediation and human health. Herein, the degradation of BPA by means of photoelectrocatalysis was investigated. Fe doped-TiO2 nanotube arrays ( Fe/TNA ) served as the photoanode, and a xenon lamp simulated the solar light source. First, undoped TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNA) and a series of Fe/TNA were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of Fe/TNA showed a red-shift and an enhancement of the absorption in the visible-light region compared to TNA. Then, experimental conditions including Fe doping content, current intensity and aeration rate were varied to demonstrate their effects on the elimination of BPA. It was observed that the degradation of BPA could be fitted to the quasi-first-order equation. Under the following conditions: Fe/TNA prepared by 0.9 mol x L(-1) Fe(NO3)3 solution dip-coating as photoanode, titanium foil as cathode, current intensity of 1.15 mA x cm(-2) and initial BPA concentration of 10 mg x L(-1), 72.3% BPA was decomposed during 4 h reaction, with a rate constant of 5.32 x 10(-3) min(-1). Aeration enhanced the removal rate of BPA to 82.7% and 94.1% with an aerating rate of 1.0 L x min(-1) using titanium foil as cathode and an aerating rate of 0.2 L x min(-1) using carbon cloth as cathode, respectively, and the corresponding rate constants were 7.20 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 11.6 x 10(-3) min(-1), respectively. PMID:26031084

  8. Photocatalytic characteristics of single phase Fe-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles sensitized with vitamin B{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz; Bayati, R.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Anatase TiO{sub 2}/B{sub 12} hybrid nanostructured catalyst was successfully synthesized by sol–gel technique. • The nanoparticle catalyst was doped with iron at several concentrations. • Nanoparticles were characterized in detail by XRD, Raman, TEM, EDS, and spectroscopy techniques. • The formation mechanism and role of point defects on photocatalytic properties were discussed. • A structure-property-processing correlation was established. - Abstract: We report a processing-structure-property correlation in B{sub 12}-anatase titania hybrid catalysts doped with several concentrations of iron. Our results clearly show that low-level iron doping alters structure, defect content, and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO{sub 2}. XRD and Raman studies revealed formation of a single-phase anatase TiO{sub 2} where no iron based segregation in particular iron oxide, was detected. FT-IR spectra clearly confirmed sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with vitamin B{sub 12}. TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns confirmed crystallization of anatase nanoparticles with a radius of 15–20 nm. Both XRD and Raman signals showed a peak shift and a peak broadening which are surmised to originate from creation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancy and titanium interstitial. The doped samples revealed a narrower band gap as compared to undoped samples. Photocatalytic activity of the samples was assessed through measuring the decomposition rate of rhodamine B. It was found that sensitization with vitamin B{sub 12} and Fe-doping significantly enhances the photocatalytic efficiency of the anatase nanoparticles. We also showed that there is an optimum Fe-doping level where the maximum photocatalytic activity is achieved. The boost of photocatalytic activity was qualitatively understood to originate from a more effective use of the light photons, formation of point defects, which enhance the charge separation, higher carrier mobility.

  9. Removal of hydrogen sulfide from drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gilligan Jr., T. J.

    1985-10-22

    The present invention relates to a process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide which frequently becomes entrained in drilling fluid during the course of drilling operations through subterranean formations. The process consists of introducing a solid oxidant in powdered form into the circulating drilling fluid when hydrogen sulfide is encountered. The solid oxidants are selected from the group consisting of calcium hypochlorite (Ca-(OCl)/sub 2/), sodium perborate (NaBO/sub 3/), potassium permanganate (KMnO/sub 4/), and potassium peroxydisulfate (K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/). The solid oxidants are soluble in the drilling fluid, promoting fast and complete scavenging reactions without adversely altering the drilling fluid rheology.

  10. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  11. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  12. RECOVERY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE AND SULFUR FROM FGD SCRUBBER WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of key process steps in the proprietary Kel-S process for recovering calcium carbonate and sulfur from lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste. The steps are: reduction of the waste to calcium sulfide (using coal as...

  13. Sulfidation of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, C.; Michel, F. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Rapid development of nanotechnologies that exploit the properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) raises questions concerning the impact of Ag on the environment. Ag-NPs are currently among the most widely used in the nanotechnology industry and the amount released into the environment is expected to increase along with production (1). When present in geochemical systems, Ag-NPs may undergo a variety of changes due to varying redox, pH, and chemical conditions. Expected changes range from surface modification (e.g., oxidation, sulfidation, chloridation etc.) to complete dissolution and re-precipitation. In this context, the focus of our work is on understanding the behavior of synthetic Ag-NPs with different particle sizes under varying conditions relevant to the environment. Sulfidation of Ag-NPs is of particular interest since it among the processes most likely to occur in aqueous systems, in particular under reducing conditions. Three sizes of Ag-NPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone were produced using the polyol process (2) (7 ±1; 20 ±4, and 40 ±9 nm). Batch solutions containing the different Ag-NPs were subsequently reacted with Na2S solutions of different concentrations. The sulfidation process was followed step-wise for 24 hours and the corrosion products formed were characterized by electron microscopy (TEM/SEM), diffraction (XRD), and photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface charge (pHPZC) of the products formed during this process was also measured, as were changes in solubility and reactivity. Based on experimental observations we infer that the sulfidation process is the result of dissolution-precipitation and find that: (i) acanthite (Ag2S) is formed as a corrosion product; (ii) Ag-NPs aggregation increased with sulfidation rate; (iii) pHPZC increases with the rate of sulfidation; and (iv) the solubility of the corrosion products formed from sulfidation appears lower than that of non-sulfidated Ag-NPs. We observe size-dependent differences in

  14. A charge-based deep level transient spectroscopy measurement system and characterization of a ZnO-based varistor and a Fe-doped SrTiO3 dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takafumi; Long, Jeffrey; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Stitt, Joseph; Maier, Russell; Randall, Clive A.

    2016-02-01

    A charge-based deep level transient spectroscopy (Q-DLTS) method is applied to provide insights into the electronic behavior near grain boundaries and may provide new insights into mechanisms such as fatigue, degradation, dielectric aging, and dielectric breakdown. Here, we tested the Q-DLTS in both a ZnO varistor material and Fe-doped SrTiO3 materials. Comparisons are made to other data on ZnO varistors, and we obtain very good agreement for the energy levels. The status of deep traps in Fe-doped SrTiO3 dielectrics has been investigated where the relaxation was contrasted in a single crystal and polycrystalline ceramic materials. The relaxation is only observable in the polycrystalline materials, and was absent in single crystal Fe-doped crystals indicating that the deep traps originating from the Schottky barriers at the grain boundaries provide the DLTS signals. The energy associated with this grain boundary trap was found to be 1.26 eV.

  15. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  16. Fe doping effect on the structural, magnetic and surface properties of SnO2 nanoparticles prepared by a polymer precursor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón, F. H.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Gonzalez, I.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Macedo, W. A. A.; Morais, P. C.

    2016-04-01

    In this study the structural, magnetic and surface characterization of Fe-doped SnO2 nanopowders synthesized by a polymer precursor method is presented. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) data analysis shows the formation of rutile-type structure for all samples. For Fe-content up to 5.0 mol% lattice constants and unit cell volume values suggest substitutional solution of Fe3+- and Sn4+-ions in the SnO2 matrix and the likely generation of oxygen vacancies to account for charge compensation. Above 5.0 mol% Fe-content the entrance of Fe3+-ions into interstitial sites seems to be the dominant regime. Magnetic measurements confirm the ferric valence state and suggest the coexistence of weak ferromagnetic (FM) with strong paramagnetic (PM) phases. Using the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model the FM contribution has been associated to electrons trapped within oxygen vacancies (donor electrons) that form BMPs which overlap to create a spin-split impurity band. Despite the small size of the particles no evidence of thermal relaxation effects has been observed, which was assigned to the formation of aggregates of strongly interacting naked particles. Above  ≈1.0 mol% Fe-content, the antiferromagnetic (AFM) interaction associated to Fe-clusters seems to be dominant and only a PM phase is observed. These results are consistent with XPS data analysis which indicates that the magnetic properties are strongly correlated with the surface properties of the particles.

  17. Moessbauer investigation of {sup 57}Fe doped La{sub 4}Ni{sub 3}O{sub 10{+-}}{sub y} phases

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.D.; Bassat, J.M.

    2009-01-15

    {sup 57}Fe doped La{sub 4}Ni{sub 2.97}Fe{sub 0.03}O{sub 9.95} was synthesized by a citrate method and, afterwards, successfully oxidized and reduced by electrochemical methods. The compounds obtained were investigated by X-ray diffraction, electrical measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The study allowed to follow the variation of the two nickel sites environment with the oxygen stoichiometry and a deeper understanding of the electrical behavior versus oxygen non-stoichiometry was achieved. The Moessbauer study revealed that after both oxidation and reduction treatments, the major modifications were observed on the octahedra adjacent to the La{sub 2}O{sub 2} layers, while the middle octahedra of the triple perovskite block remained almost unchanged. The oxygen intercalation (oxidized treatment) takes place essentially in the La{sub 2}O{sub 2} layers and the oxygen desintercalation (reduction treatment) occurs in the octahedral sites adjacent to those layers. - Grapical abstract: Moessbauer spectra of oxidized and reduced Ruddlesden-Popper compounds La{sub 4}Ni{sub 2.97}Fe{sub 0.03}O{sub 10{+-}}{sub y}.

  18. Structural, XPS and magnetic studies of pulsed laser deposited Fe doped Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep; Prakash, Ram; Choudhary, R.J.; Phase, D.M.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Growth of Fe doped Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films by PLD. • XRD and Raman’s spectroscopy used for structure confirmation. • The electronic states of Eu and Fe are confirmed by XPS. • Magnetic properties reveals room temperature magnetic ordering in deposited film. - Abstract: Fe (4 at.%) doped europium (III) oxide thin film was deposited on silicon (1 0 0) substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique. Structural, spectral and magnetic properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and magnetization measurements. XRD and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the grown film is single phased and belongs to the cubic structure of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XPS study of the Eu{sub 1.92}Fe{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} film shows that Fe exists in Fe{sup 3+} ionic state in the film. The film exhibits magnetic ordering at room temperature.

  19. Impedance spectra of Fe-doped SrTiO3 thin films upon bias voltage: inductive loops as a trace of ion motion.

    PubMed

    Taibl, S; Fafilek, G; Fleig, J

    2016-08-01

    Mass and charge transport properties of slightly Fe-doped SrTiO3 (Fe:STO) thin films on a conducting substrate were investigated by means of impedance spectroscopy under different bias voltages and I-V measurements with varying scan rates. At measurement temperatures between 325 °C and 700 °C the applied bias voltage caused an unusual "inductive loop" in the low frequency range of impedance spectra. DC measurements showed that current-voltage curves strongly depend on the scan rate, indicating that different states of the sample became accessible to probe. Both findings can be understood in terms of bias induced ion motion, i.e. by stoichiometry polarization within the Fe:STO thin films upon voltage. Hence, the appearance of an "inductive loop" in the impedance spectra is considered a very general feature that might exist for many materials, particularly in oxide thin films. It may indicate ion motion and stoichiometry variations taking place in the corresponding frequency range. PMID:27088884

  20. Characterization of Fe-doped In-Sb-Te (Fe: 10 at.%) material with individual electrical-phase-change and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Mi; Dung, Dang Duc; Cho, Sunglae; Jung, Min Sang; Choi, Duck Kyun; Ahn, Docheon; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jae-Young; Jung, Min-Cherl

    2011-06-01

    We propose a new electrical-phase-change magnetic material, namely Fe-doped In-Sb-Te (FIST), for possible non-volatile multi-bit memory applications. FIST was formed by typical co-sputter method with Fe 10 at.% doping in In3Sb1Te2. FIST offers the electrical-phase-change and magnetic properties by way of the change of In 4d chemical bonding density and embedded Fe nanoclusters with the size of 4˜5 nm, respectively. It maintained the amorphous phase on the electrical-phase-change. Chemical state of In was only changed to increase the density of In-In chemical bonding during the electrical-phase-change without Fe nanoclusters contribution. Also, the magnetic property by Fe nanoclusters was not changed by the electrical-phase-change. On this basis, we propose the FIST material with the individual electrical-phase-change and magnetic properties for the multi-bit nonvolatile memory materials.

  1. Room temperature magnetism and metal to semiconducting transition in dilute Fe doped Sb1-xSex semiconducting alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Naveen; Sarkar, Mitesh; Chawda, Mukesh; Ganesan, V.; Bodas, Dhananjay

    2015-02-01

    The magnetism was observed in very dilute Fe doped alloy thin film Fe0.008Sb1-xSex, for x = 0.01 to 0.10. These thin films were grown on silicon substrate using thermal evaporation technique. Structural, electrical, optical, charge carrier concentration measurement, surface morphology and magnetic properties were observed using glancing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), four probe resistivity, photoluminescence, Hall measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) techniques, respectively. No peaks of iron were seen in GIXRD. The resistivity results show that activation energy increases with increase in selenium (Se) concentration. The Arrhenius plot reveals metallic behavior below room temperature. The low temperature conduction is explained by variable range-hopping mechanism, which fits very well in the temperature range 150-300 K. The decrease in density of states has been observed with increasing selenium concentration (x = 0.01 to 0.10). There is a metal-to-semiconductor phase transition observed above room temperature. This transition temperature is Se concentration dependent. The particle size distribution ˜47-61 nm is evaluated using AFM images. These thin films exhibit ferromagnetic interactions at room temperature.

  2. Facile preparation of novel dandelion-like Fe-doped NiCo2O4 microspheres@nanomeshes for excellent capacitive property in asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Ling; Mu, Yanping; Wang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we successfully synthesized the dandelion-like Fe-doped NiCo2O4 microspheres@nanomeshes (Fe-NCO-M@N-1h) using a facile hydrothermal method, followed by calcinations. In the unique structure, numerous nanoneedles radially grow on the surface of microsphere and some porous nanomeshes orderly develop in the inside of microsphere, therefore dandelion-like Fe-NCO-M@N-1h displays large specific surface area (101.15 m2 g-1) and more active sites. Electrochemical properties of the Fe-NCO-M@N-1h have been tested for symmetric supercapacitors (SCs) and asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). Benefiting from the structural advantages, Fe-NCO-M@N-1h electrode exhibits outstanding capacitive behaviors, such as the desirable specific capacitance and eminent rate performance (2237 and 1810 F g-1 at the current densities of 1 and 20 A g-1, respectively) and remarkable cycling performance (95.8% retention after 4500 cycles). Besides, a Fe-NCO-M@N-1h//AC-ASCs device has been constructed successfully, presenting the highest energy density of 46.68 Wh kg-1. The results indicate that the Fe-NCO-M@N-1h is a potential material for SCs.

  3. A novel disposable electrochemical sensor for determination of carbamazepine based on Fe doped SnO2 nanoparticles modified screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, N; Sekar, C; Ficarra, S; Tellone, E; Bonavita, A; Leonardi, S G; Neri, G

    2016-05-01

    An effective strategy to fabricate a novel disposable screen printing carbon electrode modified by iron doped tin dioxide nanoparticles for carbamazepine (CBZ) detection has been developed. Fe-SnO2 (Fe=0 to 5 wt.%) NPs were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method and assessed for their structural and morphological changes due to Fe doping into SnO2 matrix by X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of carbamazepine at the Fe-SnO2 modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry. Electron transfer coefficient α (0.63) and electron transfer rate constant ks (0.69 s(-1)) values of the 5 wt.% Fe-SnO2 modified SPCE indicate that the diffusion controlled process takes place on the electrode surface. The fabricated sensor displayed a good electrooxidation response towards the detection of CBZ at a lower oxidation potential of 0.8 V in phosphate buffer solution at pH7.0. Under the optimal conditions, the sensor showed fast and sensitive current response to CBZ over a wide linear range of 0.5-100 μM with a low detection limit of 92 nM. Furthermore, the practical application of the modified electrode has been investigated by the determination of CBZ in pharmaceutical products using standard addition method. PMID:26952397

  4. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  5. Sulfidation kinetics of silver nanoparticles reacted with metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Basilius; Voegelin, Andreas; Sinnet, Brian; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaegi, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have documented that the sulfidation of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP), possibly released to the environment from consumer products, occurs in anoxic zones of urban wastewater systems and that sulfidized Ag-NP exhibit dramatically reduced toxic effects. However, whether Ag-NP sulfidation also occurs under oxic conditions in the absence of bisulfide has not been addressed, yet. In this study we, therefore, investigated whether metal sulfides that are more resistant toward oxidation than free sulfide, could enable the sulfidation of Ag-NP under oxic conditions. We reacted citrate-stabilized Ag-NP of different sizes (10-100 nm) with freshly precipitated and crystalline CuS and ZnS in oxygenated aqueous suspensions at pH 7.5. The extent of Ag-NP sulfidation was derived from the increase in dissolved Cu(2+) or Zn(2+) over time and linked with results from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of selected samples. The sulfidation of Ag-NP followed pseudo first-order kinetics, with rate coefficients increasing with decreasing Ag-NP diameter and increasing metal sulfide concentration and depending on the type (CuS and ZnS) and crystallinity of the reacting metal sulfide. Results from analytical electron microscopy revealed the formation of complex sulfidation patterns that seemed to follow preexisting subgrain boundaries in the pristine Ag-NP. The kinetics of Ag-NP sulfidation observed in this study in combination with reported ZnS and CuS concentrations and predicted Ag-NP concentrations in wastewater and urban surface waters indicate that even under oxic conditions and in the absence of free sulfide, Ag-NP can be transformed into Ag2S within a few hours to days by reaction with metal sulfides. PMID:24678586

  6. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  7. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  8. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material. PMID:25747485

  9. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  10. Biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Rajganesh, B.; Woolsey, M.; Plato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refinering to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries have been successfully biotreated on bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a hazard primarily in the oil and gas industry, agriculture, sewage and animal waste handling, construction (asphalt operations and disturbing marshy terrain), and other settings where organic material decomposes under reducing conditions, and in geothermal operations. It is an insoluble gas, heavier than air, with a very low odor threshold and high toxicity, driven by concentration more than duration of exposure. Toxicity presents in a unique, reliable, and characteristic toxidrome consisting, in ascending order of exposure, of mucosal irritation, especially of the eye ("gas eye"), olfactory paralysis (not to be confused with olfactory fatigue), sudden but reversible loss of consciousness ("knockdown"), pulmonary edema (with an unusually favorable prognosis), and death (probably with apnea contributing). The risk of chronic neurcognitive changes is controversial, with the best evidence at high exposure levels and after knockdowns, which are frequently accompanied by head injury or oxygen deprivation. Treatment cannot be initiated promptly in the prehospital phase, and currently rests primarily on supportive care, hyperbaric oxygen, and nitrite administration. The mechanism of action for sublethal neurotoxicity and knockdown is clearly not inhibition of cytochrome oxidase c, as generally assumed, although this may play a role in overwhelming exposures. High levels of endogenous sulfide are found in the brain, presumably relating to the function of hydrogen sulfide as a gaseous neurotransmitter and immunomodulator. Prevention requires control of exposure and rigorous training to stop doomed rescue attempts attempted without self-contained breathing apparatus, especially in confined spaces, and in sudden release in the oil and gas sector, which result in multiple avoidable deaths. PMID:26563786

  12. ac susceptibility studies in Fe doped La0.65Ca0.35Mn1-xFexO3: Rare earth manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Wiqar Hussain; Hasanain, S. K.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of Fe substitution on Mn sites in the colossal magnetoresistive compounds La0.65Ca0.35Mn1-xFexO3 with 0.00≤x≤0.10 have been studied. A careful study in the magnetic properties has been carried out by the measurement of magnetic ac susceptibility. The temperature range of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) is greatly broadened with the addition of Fe. Substitution of Fe induces a gradual transition from a metallic ferromagnetic with a high Curie temperature (Tc=270 K) to a ferromagnetic insulator with low Tc=79 K. Increased spin disorder and decrease of Tc with increasing Fe content are evident. The variations in the critical temperature Tc and magnetic moment show a rapid change at about 4%-5% Fe. The effect of Fe is seen to be consistent with the disruption of the Mn-Mn exchange possibly due to the formation of magnetic clusters. An extraordinary behavior in the out of phase part (χ″) of ac susceptibility, characterized by double bump (shoulder), was observed around x=0.01 and 0.02. The shoulder in χ″ disappears at x≥0.04 Fe concentration. With increasing Fe concentration the χ″ peak shift to TFe doping. Doping with Fe bypasses the usually dominant lattice effects, but depopulates the hopping electrons and thus weakens the double exchange. The results were explained in terms of the formation of magnetic clusters of Fe ions.

  13. Field method for sulfide determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  14. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  15. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  16. Photovoltaic semiconductor materials based on alloys of tin sulfide, and methods of production

    DOEpatents

    Lany, Stephan

    2016-06-07

    Photovoltaic thin-film materials comprising crystalline tin sulfide alloys of the general formula Sn.sub.1-x(R).sub.xS, where R is selected from magnesium, calcium and strontium, as well as methods of producing the same, are disclosed.

  17. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  18. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  19. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  20. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels. These may include abnormal blood levels of albumin or immunoglobulins. Normal Results Children: 4.8 to ... 2016:chap 245. Read More Acute kidney failure Albumin - blood (serum) test Bone tumor Calcium blood test ...

  1. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  2. Electrobioleaching of base metal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Bioleaching of base metal sulfides, such as pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite, under the influence of applied direct current (DC) potentials is discussed. Contributions toward mineral dissolution from three effects, namely, galvanic, applied potential, and microbiological, are analyzed and compared. Sphalerite could be selectively bioleached in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans under an applied potential of -500 mV (SCE) from mixed sulfides containing sphalerite, pyrite, and chalcopyrite. Bacterial activity and growth were found to be promoted under electrobioleaching conditions. Probable mechanisms involved in the bioleaching of different sulfides under positive and negative applied potentials are discussed.

  3. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  4. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  5. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qi-cheng; Wen, Shu-ming; Zhao, Wen-juan; Cao, Qin-bo; Lü, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sulfide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  6. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  7. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  8. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  9. Thermoelectric Properties of Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, R.; Parker, J. B.; Zoltan, A.; Zoltan, L. D.; Danielson, L.; Raag, V.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes measurement of Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall effect in gamma-phase lanthanum sulfide with composition of La3-x S4. Results of study, part of search for high-temperature thermoelectric energy-conversion materials, indicate this sulfide behaves like extrinsic semiconductor over temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K, with degenerate carrier concentration controlled by stoichiometric ratio of La to S.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation by Myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bostelaar, Trever; Vitvitsky, Victor; Kumutima, Jacques; Lewis, Brianne E; Yadav, Pramod K; Brunold, Thomas C; Filipovic, Milos; Lehnert, Nicolai; Stemmler, Timothy L; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-07-13

    Enzymes in the sulfur network generate the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), from the amino acids cysteine and homocysteine. Since it is toxic at elevated concentrations, cells are equipped to clear H2S. A canonical sulfide oxidation pathway operates in mitochondria, converting H2S to thiosulfate and sulfate. We have recently discovered the ability of ferric hemoglobin to oxidize sulfide to thiosulfate and iron-bound hydropolysulfides. In this study, we report that myoglobin exhibits a similar capacity for sulfide oxidation. We have trapped and characterized iron-bound sulfur intermediates using cryo-mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Further support for the postulated intermediates in the chemically challenging conversion of H2S to thiosulfate and iron-bound catenated sulfur products is provided by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopy in addition to density functional theory computational results. We speculate that the unusual sensitivity of skeletal muscle cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide poisoning in ethylmalonic encephalopathy, resulting from the deficiency in a mitochondrial sulfide oxidation enzyme, might be due to the concentration of H2S by myoglobin in this tissue. PMID:27310035

  11. Aging in the relaxor and ferroelectric state of Fe-doped (1-x)(Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2})TiO₃-xBaTiO₃ piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sapper, Eva; Dittmer, Robert; Rödel, Jürgen; Damjanovic, Dragan; Erdem, Emre; Keeble, David J.; Jo, Wook; Granzow, Torsten

    2014-09-14

    Aging of piezoelectric properties was investigated in lead-free (1–x)(Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2})TiO₃-xBaTiO₃ doped with 1at.% Fe. The relaxor character of the un-poled material prevents macroscopic aging effects, while in the field-induced ferroelectric phase aging phenomena are similar to those found in lead zirconate titanate or barium titanate. Most prominent aging effects are the development of an internal bias field and the decrease of switchable polarization. These effects are temperature activated, and can be explained in the framework of defect complex reorientation. This picture is further supported by electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicating the existence of (Fe{sub Ti}´-V{sub O}{sup ••}){sup •} defect complexes in the Fe-doped material.

  12. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  13. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  14. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  15. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  16. Inhaled Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Gian Paolo; Searles, Robert; Yu, Binglan; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Breathing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to induce a suspended animation–like state with hypothermia and a concomitant metabolic reduction in rodents. However, the impact of H2S breathing on cardiovascular function remains incompletely understood. In this study, the authors investigated the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of inhaled H2S in a murine model. Methods The impact of breathing H2S on cardiovascular function was examined using telemetry and echocardiography in awake mice. The effects of breathing H2S on carbon dioxide production and oxygen consumption were measured at room temperature and in a warmed environment. Results Breathing H2S at 80 parts per million by volume at 27°C ambient temperature for 6 h markedly reduced heart rate, core body temperature, respiratory rate, and physical activity, whereas blood pressure remained unchanged. Echocardiography demonstrated that H2S exposure decreased both heart rate and cardiac output but preserved stroke volume. Breathing H2S for 6 h at 35°C ambient temperature (to prevent hypothermia) decreased heart rate, physical activity, respiratory rate, and cardiac output without altering stroke volume or body temperature. H2S breathing seems to induce bradycardia by depressing sinus node activity. Breathing H2S for 30 min decreased whole body oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production at either 27° or 35°C ambient temperature. Both parameters returned to baseline levels within 10 min after the cessation of H2S breathing. Conclusions Inhalation of H2S at either 27° or 35°C reversibly depresses cardiovascular function without changing blood pressure in mice. Breathing H2S also induces a rapidly reversible reduction of metabolic rate at either body temperature. PMID:18362598

  17. Enhancement of CO2 Adsorption and Catalytic Properties by Fe-Doping of [Ga2(OH)2(L)] (H4L = Biphenyl-3,3′,5,5′-tetracarboxylic Acid), MFM-300(Ga2)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are usually synthesized using a single type of metal ion, and MOFs containing mixtures of different metal ions are of great interest and represent a methodology to enhance and tune materials properties. We report the synthesis of [Ga2(OH)2(L)] (H4L = biphenyl-3,3′,5,5′-tetracarboxylic acid), designated as MFM-300(Ga2), (MFM = Manchester Framework Material replacing NOTT designation), by solvothermal reaction of Ga(NO3)3 and H4L in a mixture of DMF, THF, and water containing HCl for 3 days. MFM-300(Ga2) crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4122, a = b = 15.0174(7) Å and c = 11.9111(11) Å and is isostructural with the Al(III) analogue MFM-300(Al2) with pores decorated with −OH groups bridging Ga(III) centers. The isostructural Fe-doped material [Ga1.87Fe0.13(OH)2(L)], MFM-300(Ga1.87Fe0.13), can be prepared under similar conditions to MFM-300(Ga2) via reaction of a homogeneous mixture of Fe(NO3)3 and Ga(NO3)3 with biphenyl-3,3′,5,5′-tetracarboxylic acid. An Fe(III)-based material [Fe3O1.5(OH)(HL)(L)0.5(H2O)3.5], MFM-310(Fe), was synthesized with Fe(NO3)3 and the same ligand via hydrothermal methods. [MFM-310(Fe)] crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pmn21 with a = 10.560(4) Å, b = 19.451(8) Å, and c = 11.773(5) Å and incorporates μ3-oxo-centered trinuclear iron cluster nodes connected by ligands to give a 3D nonporous framework that has a different structure to the MFM-300 series. Thus, Fe-doping can be used to monitor the effects of the heteroatom center within a parent Ga(III) framework without the requirement of synthesizing the isostructural Fe(III) analogue [Fe2(OH)2(L)], MFM-300(Fe2), which we have thus far been unable to prepare. Fe-doping of MFM-300(Ga2) affords positive effects on gas adsorption capacities, particularly for CO2 adsorption, whereby MFM-300(Ga1.87Fe0.13) shows a 49% enhancement of CO2 adsorption capacity in comparison to the homometallic parent material. We thus report herein the

  18. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  19. Mechanistic chemical perspective of hydrogen sulfide signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is now a well-appreciated master regulator in a diverse array of physiological processes. However, as a consequence of the rapid growth of the area, sulfide biology suffers from an increasing number of controversial observations and interpretations. A better understanding of the underlying molecular pathways of sulfide's actions is key to reconcile controversial issues, which calls for rigorous chemical/biochemical investigations. Protein sulfhydration and coordination/redox chemical interactions of sulfide with heme proteins are the two most extensively studied pathways in sulfide biochemistry. These pathways are important mediators of protein functions, generate bioactive sulfide metabolites, contribute to sulfide storage/trafficking and carry antioxidant functions. In addition, inorganic polysulfides, which are oxidative sulfide metabolites, are increasingly recognized as important players in sulfide biology. This chapter provides an overview of our mechanistic perspective on the reactions that govern (i) sulfide's bioavailability (including the delicate enzyme machineries that orchestrate sulfide production and consumption and the roles of the large sulfide-storing pools as biological buffers), (ii) biological significance and mechanisms of persulfide formation (including the reduction of disulfides, condensation with sulfenic acids, oxidation of thiols with polysulfides and radical-mediated pathways), (iii) coordination and redox chemical interactions of sulfide with heme proteins (including cytochrome c oxidase, hemoglobins, myoglobins and peroxidases), and (iv) the chemistry of polysulfides. PMID:25725513

  20. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  1. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  2. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  3. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  4. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  5. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  6. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  7. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices. PMID:25073046

  8. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  9. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  10. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  11. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.490 Section 250.490 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen sulfide. (a)...

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Iron-Doped Lead Sulfide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülen, Yasir

    2015-10-01

    Thin films have improved the semiconductor device technology because their material characteristics could be changed in many different ways including changing the crystal morphology and size. This study reports manufacturing undoped and Fe-doped nanostructured PbS films on glass substrates by SILAR method. Both undoped and Fe-doped films are examined in terms of structural, optical, and morphological properties via SEM, Uv-vis spectrophotometry, and XRF analysis. Results revealed that all of the thin films were in a face-centered cubic structure and concentration of Fe doping influences the size of the thin film's nanoparticles. The optical band gap of the PbS films decreased as Fe-doping concentration is increased. The intercept values on the energy axis were in the range of 1.66 and 1.25 eV for 1 and 9 pct Fe-doped PbS films, respectively. The structural, optical, and morphological properties of the fabricated thin films directly depend on the Fe-doping ratio.

  13. SULFIDE PRECIPITATION OF HEAVY METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program was initiated with the objective of evaluating a new process, the sulfide precipitation of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters. The process was expected to effect a more complete removal of heavy metals than conventional lime processing because of the mu...

  14. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  15. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  16. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  17. Method of removing hydrogen sulfide from gases utilizing a zinc oxide sorbent and regenerating the sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, Vinod M.; Frost, David G.

    1984-01-01

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500.degree. C. to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent.

  18. Efficient new process for the desulfurization of mixtures of air and hydrogen sulfide via a dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, S.

    2015-10-01

    The efficient removal of hydrogen sulfide, H2S, from streams of H2S in air via a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A suitable plasma device with a reservoir for storing sorbent powder of various kinds within the plasma region was constructed. Plasma treatments of gas streams with high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in air yielded a removal of more than 98% of the initial hydrogen sulfide and a deposition of sulfur at the surface of the dielectric, while small amounts of sulfur dioxide were generated. The presence of calcium carbonate within the plasma region of the DBD device resulted in the removal of over 99% of the initial hydrogen sulfide content and the removal of 98% of the initial sulfur dioxide impurities from the gas mixture.

  19. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  20. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  1. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  2. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  3. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  4. SURFACE AREA OF CALCIUM OXIDE AND KINETICS OF CALCIUM SULFIDE FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of measurements of the reaction rates of H2S and COS with micrometer-size calcined limestone particles, as a function of the B.E.T. surface area of the CaO over the range of 5.8 to 79 sq m/g. Reactivity increased with the 2.3 power of specific surface ar...

  5. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  6. Sulfide-Driven Microbial Electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, YM; Ebrahim, A; Feist, AM; Embree, M; Zhang, T; Lovley, D; Zengler, K

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis, the conversion of carbon dioxide to organic molecules using electricity, has recently been demonstrated for acetogenic microorganisms, such as Sporomusa ovata. The energy for reduction of carbon dioxide originates from the hydrolysis of water on the anode, requiring a sufficiently low potential. Here we evaluate the use of sulfide as an electron source for microbial electrosynthesis. Abiotically oxidation of sulfide on the anode yields two electrons. The oxidation product, elemental sulfur, can be further oxidized to sulfate by Desulfobulbus propionicus, generating six additional electrons in the process. The eight electrons generated from the combined abiotic and biotic steps were used to reduce carbon dioxide to acetate on a graphite cathode by Sporomusa ovata at a rate of 24.8 mmol/day.m(2). Using a strain of Desulfuromonas as biocatalyst on the anode resulted in an acetate production rate of 49.9 mmol/day.m(2), with a Coulombic efficiency of over 90%. These results demonstrate that sulfide can serve effectively as an alternative electron donor for microbial electrosynthesis.

  7. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weihua; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC), T-type calcium channels (TTCC), sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX), transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26078804

  8. Influence of Fe doping and FeNi-layer thickness on the magnetic properties and GMI effect of electrodeposited Ni100-xFex/Cu (x = 0 95) wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Tung, Mai; Van Dung, Nguyen; Hoang Nghi, Nguyen; Phan, Manh-Huong; Peng, Hua-Xin

    2008-05-01

    A systematic study has been performed by the influence of Fe doping and FeNi-layer thickness on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect of electrodeposited Ni100-xFex/Cu (x = 0-95) composite wires. Results obtained show that there is a correlation between the structure, soft magnetic properties and the GMI effect. Among the compositions investigated, the largest MI ratio is achieved for Ni44Fe56/Cu as a result of it having the softest magnetic property (i.e. the lowest coercivity), which arises from the smallest nanograin size. As the NiFe-layer thickness (t) increases from 1 to 27.4 µm, the GMI ratio initially increases, reaches a maximum of 110% at t = 27.4 µm and then decreases for t > 27.4 µm. Interestingly, GMI curves show a single-peak feature for wires with t < 20 µm, but a double-peak one for wires with t >= 20 µm. This indicates that there is a formation of a circular domain structure with a well-defined circumferential anisotropy in the NiFe magnetic layer of the wires with t >= 20 µm. This in turn results in a great improvement in the GMI effect of these wires.

  9. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  10. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  11. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  12. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  13. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  14. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  15. Rapid Synthesis of Nonstoichiometric Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, S.; Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.; Hardister, H.

    1987-01-01

    New process relatively fast and simple. Improved method of synthesizing nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfide faster and simpler. Product purer because some of prior sources of contamination eliminated.

  16. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  17. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  18. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  19. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  20. Response of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase to sulfide exposure in the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Shao, Ming-Yu; Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Shi, Xiao-Li; Dong, Ying-Ping; Li, Jin-Long

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide is a natural, widely distributed, poisonous substance, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is responsible for the initial oxidation of sulfide in mitochondria. In this study, we examined the response of SQR to sulfide exposure (25, 50, and 150 μM) at mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels in the body wall and hindgut of the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus, a benthic organism living in marine sediments. The results revealed SQR mRNA expression during sulfide exposure in the body wall and hindgut increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner that increased significantly at 12 h and continuously increased with time. At the protein level, SQR expression in the two tissues showed a time-dependent relationship that increased significantly at 12 h in 50 μM sulfide and 6 h in 150 μM, and then continued to increase with time while no significant increase appeared after 25 μM sulfide exposure. SQR enzyme activity in both tissues increased significantly in a time-dependent manner after 50 μM sulfide exposure. We concluded that SQR expression could be induced by sulfide exposure and that the two tissues studied have dissimilar sulfide metabolic patterns. A U. unicinctus sulfide-induced detoxification mechanism was also discussed. PMID:21997848

  1. Variation in Sulfide Tolerance of Photosystem II in Phylogenetically Diverse Cyanobacteria from Sulfidic Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II. PMID:14766549

  2. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  3. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Fullerton; Ward, J.W.; Yorba, L.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  4. New biologically active hydrogen sulfide donors.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thomas; Raynaud, Francoise; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Ransy, Céline; Simonet, Serge; Crespo, Christine; Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Artaud, Isabelle; Galardon, Erwan

    2013-11-25

    Generous donors: The dithioperoxyanhydrides (CH3 COS)2 , (PhCOS)2 , CH3 COSSCO2 Me and PhCOSSCO2 Me act as thiol-activated hydrogen sulfide donors in aqueous buffer solution. The most efficient donor (CH3 COS)2 can induce a biological response in cells, and advantageously replace hydrogen sulfide in ex vivo vascular studies. PMID:24115650

  5. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain...

  6. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  7. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  8. Percutaneous absorption of selenium sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.; Skelly, E.M.; Weber, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine selenium levels in the urine of Tinea patients before and after overnight application of a 2.5% selenium sulfide lotion. Selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Hydride generation and carbon rod atomization were studied. It was concluded from this study that selenium is absorbed through intact skin. Selenium is then excreted, at least partially, in urine, for at least a week following treatment. The data show that absorption and excretion of selenium vary on an individual basis. Selenium levels in urine following a single application of selenium sulfide lotion do not indicate that toxic amounts of selenium are being absorbed. Repeated treatments with SeS/sub 2/ result in selenium concentrations in urine which are significantly higher than normal. Significant matrix effects are observed in the carbon rod atomization of urine samples for selenium determinations, even in the presence of a matrix modifier such as nickel. The method of standard additions is required to obtain accurate results in the direct determination of selenium in urine by carbon rod AAS.

  9. Characterization of low dimensional molybdenum sulfide nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho-Bragado, G. Alejandra; Elechiguerra, Jose Luis; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2008-03-15

    It is presented a detailed structural characterization of a nanostructured form of molybdenum disulfide. The material consists of a layer of highly textured molybdenum sulfide growing off a molybdenum dioxide core. The structure and chemical composition of the synthesized nanostructured sulfide was compared to two well-known forms of molybdenum disulfide, i.e. a commercial molybdenite sample and a poorly crystalline sulfide. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that the material reported here presents crystalline nanodomains with a crystal structure corresponding to the 2H polytype of molybdenum disulfide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate the differences between our sulfide and other materials such as amorphous MoS{sub 3}, oxysulfides and poorly crystalline MoS{sub 2}, corroborating the molybdenite-2H stacking in this form of sulfide. The material under study showed a high proportion of crystalline planes different from the basal plane.

  10. Synthesis of magnetic rhenium sulfide composite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Naimei; Tu, Weixia

    2009-10-01

    Rhenium sulfide nanoparticles are associated with magnetic iron oxide through coprecipitation of iron salts with tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Sizes of the formed magnetic rhenium sulfide composite particles are in the range 5.5-12.5 nm. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays spectra demonstrate the coexistence of Fe 3O 4 and ReS 2 in the composite particle, which confirm the formation of the magnetic rhenium sulfide composite nanoparticles. The association of rhenium sulfide with iron oxide not only keeps electronic state and composition of the rhenium sulfide nanoparticles, but also introduces magnetism with the level of 24.1 emu g -1 at 14 kOe. Surface modification with monocarboxyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG-COOH) has the role of deaggregating the composite nanoparticles to be with average hydrodynamic size of 27.3 nm and improving the dispersion and the stability of the composite nanoparticles in water.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide pollution in wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    AlDhowalia, K.H. )

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) found in wastewater collection systems and wastewater treatment facilities results from the bacterial reduction of the sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}). Hydrogen sulfide is a gas that occurs both in the sewer atmosphere and as a dissolved gas in the wastewater. When raw wastewater first enters the wastewater treatment facility by gravity most of the hydrogen sulfide is in the gaseous phase and will escape into the atmosphere at the inlet structures. Also some of the dissolved hydrogen sulfide will be released at points of turbulance such as at drops in flow, flumes, or aeration chambers. Several factors can cause excessive hydrogen sulfide concentrations in a sewerage system. These include septic sewage, long flow times in the sewerage system, high temperatures, flat sewer grades, and poor ventilation. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  12. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H{sub 2}S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H{sub 2}S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  13. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  14. Primordial Xenon in Allende Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. T.; Manuel, O. K.

    1995-09-01

    The Allende C3V carbonaceous chondrite incorporated isotopically anomalous components of several medium-heavy elements (Z=36-62) from nucleosynthesis [1]. Isotopically distinct Xe (Z=54) has been found in grains ranging from several _ to a few mm in size. Diamond [2] is the host of Xe that is enriched in isotopes produced by the very rapid p- and r-processes in a supernova explosion [3]. Silicon carbide [4] is the host of Xe that is enriched in the middle isotopes, 128-132Xe, produced by slow neutron capture [3] before a star reaches the supernova stage. The present study was undertaken to identify the isotopic composition of primitive Xe initially trapped in sulfides of the Allende meteorite. Two FeS mineral separates were analyzed by stepwise heating. One sample was first irradiated in a neutron flux to generate a tracer isotope, 131*Xe, by the 130Te(n, gamma beta-)131*Xe reaction. The release pattern of this tracer isotope, 131*Xe, closely paralleled the release of primordial 132Xe up to 950 degrees C, when the sulfide melted and released the bulk of its trapped Xe (Figure 1). The Xe released from both samples at 950 deg C was terrestrial in isotopic composition, except for enrichments from spallogenic and radiogenic components (Figure 2). From the results of this and earlier analyses of Xe in meteoritic FeS [5, 6, 7], we conclude that terrestrial-type Xe was dominant in the central region of the protoplanetary nebula, and it remains a major component in the FeS of diverse meteorites and in the terrestrial planets that are rich in Fe, S [8]. References: [1] Begemann F. (1993) Origin and Evolution of the Elements (N. Prantzos et al., eds.), 518-527, Cambridge Univ. [2] Lewis R. S. and Anders E. (1988) LPS XIX, 679-680. [3] Burbidge et al. (1957) Rev. Modern Phys., 29, 547-650. [4] Tang M. and Anders E. (1988) GCA, 52, 1235-1244. [5] Niemeyer S. (1979) GCA, 43, 843-860. [6] Lewis et al. (1979) GCA, 43, 1743-1752. [7] Hwaung G. and Manuel O. K. (1982) Nature, 299

  15. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting. PMID:18429501

  16. Mantle derived economic sulfide mineralization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutskaya, Nadezda; Gongalskiy, Bronislav; Svirskaya, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Sulfide ores of the unique Pt-Cu-Ni Noril'sk deposits are characterized by heavy sulfur isotopic composition (d34S = 6-18 ‰ ; Grinenko, 1985). These data are traditionally explained by the crustal contamination of the mantle melts by Devonian sedimentary rocks with anhydrites at certain depths or in a chamber of crystallization (Naldrett, 1992; Li et al., 2009). However, data on the distribution of major and trace elements and isotopic composition (their eNd, 87Sr/86Sr, d34S) in the contact zones of the intrusions with the host rocks are at variance with any significant in-situ contamination. Moreover , the mechanism of the "digestion" of this high-temperature material (Tm = 1430ºC) by the lower temperature magma (1250ºC) has never been analyzed and questioned. Our pioneering data on the sulfur radiogenic isotopes in the anhydrite are in conflict with the hypothesis that this mineral could serve as a sulfur source for the Noril'sk ores. The fact that the average composition of the intrusions is independent on the stratigraphic setting of these intrusions, which can be hosted by limestone, sandstone, and/or basalt, provides further support for the idea that no assimilation took place at the depths of the chambers in which the melts crystallized.The reason for the heavy sulfur isotopic composition of ores in the Noril'sk district is still uncertain. Last data obtained on the sulfur isotopic composition of basalts and ores from some intrusions in the Taimyr Peninsula likely provide a clue to this problem. The highest d34S values in rocks of all of the trap formations were detected in the Gudchikhinsky picrites (d34S = +8,7; Ripley et al., 2003) formed from a primitive mantle magma. They are geochemically similar to the rocks from the Dyumtaleysky Massif (d34S = 12.2; Krivolutskaya and Gongalsky, 2013) which crystallized from a primitive mantle-derived magma (with no Ta-Nb and Pb anomalies and high Gd/Yb ratio) too. This intrusion comprises economic important

  17. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  18. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  19. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  20. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  1. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Bones, like other tissues in the body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their ...

  2. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  3. REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF SULFIDE FROM TANNERY WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recovery of sulfide from tannery waste was accomplished through acidification with sulfuric acid in a closed system and removing hydrogen sulfide formed by blowing with air. Sulfide was then absorbed in caustic solution to produce re-usable sodium sulfide/sulfhydrate liquor for t...

  4. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  5. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  6. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  7. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  8. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the roles of calcium and vitamin D in bone health. Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling and it also affects bone mass through its impact on the remodeling rate. Typically, about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and ...

  9. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... or if your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ... injury. As you age, your body still needs calcium to keep your bones dense and strong. Most experts recommend at least ...

  10. Thermochemistry of calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide in fluoride slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Mitchell, A.

    1990-08-01

    Calcium oxide activity in binary CaF2-CaO and ternary CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 and CaF2-CaO-SiO2 slags has been determined by CO2-slag equilibrium experiments at 1400 °C. The carbonate ca-pacity of these slags has also been computed and compared with sulfide capacity data available in the literature. The similarity in trends suggests the possibility of characterizing carbonate capacity as an alternative basicity index for fluoride-base slags. Slag-D2O equilibrium experi-ments are performed at 1400°C with different fluoride-base slags to determine water solubility at two different partial pressures of D2O, employing a new slag sampling technique. A novel isotope tracer detection technique is employed to analyze water in the slags. The water solubility data found show higher values than the previous literature data by an order of magnitude but show a linear relationship with the square root of water vapor partial pressure. The activity of hydroxide computed from the data is shown to be helpful in estimating water solubility in in-dustrial electroslag remelting (ESR) slags.

  11. Zinc recovery from spent ZnO catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hua-Ching; Lin, Chun-I.; Chen, Hsi-Kuei

    2004-02-01

    Zinc recovery from the spent zinc oxide catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate was studied using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spent zinc oxide catalyst was determined to be composed of 87.5 wt pct zinc oxide and 3.1 wt pct zinc sulfide. The results of X-ray diffractometry revealed that calcium carbonate decomposed to calcium oxide and carbon dioxide; zinc oxide and zinc sulfide were reduced to zinc vapor and carbon monoxide evolving from solid sample; and sulfur content was scavenged as calcium sulfide remained in the solid. Steps involved in this reaction system were summarized to explain the overall reaction. The experimental results of atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery can be increased by increasing either the sample height, the reaction temperature or the initial bulk density. Furthermore, they were found to increase with decrease in either the argon flow rate, the molar ratio of Zntotal/C, the molar ratio of Zntotal/CaCO3, the grain size of the spent catalyst, the agglomerate size of carbon, or the agglomerate size of calcium carbonate. Empirical expressions of the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery have been determined.

  12. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, T.; Mikami, E.

    1989-03-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  13. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1997-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  14. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1999-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  15. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1999-02-02

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  16. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1997-12-30

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  17. Formation of Copper Sulfide Artifacts During Electrolytic Dissolution of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jia; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Based on equilibrium considerations, copper sulfide is not expected to form in manganese-containing steel, yet previous workers reported finding copper sulfide in transmission electron microscope samples which had been prepared by electropolishing. It is proposed that copper sulfide can form during electrolytic dissolution because of the much greater stability of copper sulfide relative to manganese sulfide in contact with an electrolyte containing copper and manganese cations. This mechanism has been demonstrated with aluminum-killed steel samples.

  18. Calcium bioavailability from calcium fortified food products.

    PubMed

    Kohls, K

    1991-08-01

    The calcium balance of 12 presumed healthy human young adult subjects was assessed. Subjects consumed a constant laboratory-controlled diet supplemented with one of four calcium-fortified food products: orange juice (OJ), milk (M), experimental pasteurized processed cheese (T), soda (S), or a calcium carbonate plus vitamin D tablet (CC). Study length was 6 weeks with seven-day experimental periods (2-days allowed for adjustment with 5-days combined for purposes of analysis). All urine and fecal samples were collected by the subjects for the duration of the study. Blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. Urine and fecal calcium contents were determined. Blood samples were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase. Results of this study indicate a higher fecal calcium content (mg/day) when subjects consumed CC and T, and when subjects consumed self-selected diets, than when given S, M, or OJ. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly lower when subjects consumed OJ than when they consumed M, T, or their self-selected diets. A significantly larger positive calcium balance was demonstrated when subjects consumed OJ as compared to T. Fecal transmit time did not vary significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower when subjects consumed T than when they consumed self-selected diets. PMID:1765836

  19. Ridding Groundwater of Hydrogen Sulfide. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrane, Thomas G.

    1979-01-01

    This article is the first in a series reviewing the problems associated with hydrogen sulfide in drinking water sources. Discussion centers on identification of a cost-effective balance between aeration and chlorination treatment operations. (AS)

  20. Photooxidation of methyl sulfide, ethyl sulfide, and methanethiol

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.

    1984-06-01

    Products of sunlight-irradiated mixtures of oxides of nitrogen and alkyl sulfides (RSR, R = CH/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) and methanethiol (CH/sub 3/SH) in air include formaldehyde (R = CH/sub 3/), acetaldehyde and PAN (R = C/sub 2/H/sub 5/), sulfur dioxide, and alkyl nitrates (RONO/sub 2/) as well as particulate alkanesulfonic acids (RSO/sub 2/OH) and inorganic sulfate. The nature and yields of gaseous and particulate products are discussed in terms of OH-initiated reaction pathways, including C-S bond scission, and subsequent reactions of alkythiyl radicals (RS), including those leading to photolabile RSNO and stable RSNO/sub 2/ products for which indirect evidence is presented. SO/sub 2/ yields are found to vary according to the relative importance of the competing pathways RS + O/sub 2/ (a) and RS + NO/sub 2/ (b), for which a ratio k/sub b/ / k/sub a/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 6/ is derived from data for irradiated RSR-NO/sub x/, RSH-Cl/sub 2/, and RSH-Cl/sub 2/-NO/sub 2/ mixtures.

  1. Upper critical field of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical field of sintered and sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide Cu(x)Mo6S8 was measured and found to exceed the Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (1966) value for a type II superconductor characterized by dirty limit, weak isotropic electron phonon coupling, and no paramagnetic limiting. It is suggested that the enhancement results from anisotropy or clean limit or both. Other ternary molybdenum sulfides appear to show similar anomalies.

  2. Effect of Nitrate on Biogenic Sulfide Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenneman, Gary E.; McInerney, M. J.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of 59 mM nitrate inhibited biogenic sulfide production in dilute sewage sludge (10% [vol/vol]) amended with 20 mM sulfate and either acetate, glucose, or hydrogen as electron donors. Similar results were found when pond sediment or oil field brines served as the inoculum. Sulfide production was inhibited for periods of at least 6 months and was accompanied by the oxidation of resazurin from its colorless reduced state to its pink oxidized state. Lower amounts of nitrate (6 or 20 mM) and increased amounts of sewage sludge resulted in only transient inhibition of sulfide production. The addition of 156 mM sulfate to bottles with 59 mM nitrate and 10% (vol/vol) sewage sludge or pond sediment resulted in sulfide production. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were detected during periods where sulfide production was inhibited, whereas nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were below detectable levels at the time sulfide production began. The oxidation of resazurin was attributed to an increase in nitrous oxide which persisted in concentration of about 1.0 mM for up to 5 months. The numbers of sulfate-reducing organisms decreased from 106 CFU ml−1 sludge to less than detectable levels after prolonged incubation of oxidized bottles. The addition of 10 mM glucose to oxidized bottles after 14.5 weeks of incubation resulted in rereduction of the resazurin and subsequent sulfide production. The prolonged inhibition of sulfide production was attributed to an increase in oxidation-reduction potential due to biogenic production of nitrous oxide, which appeared to have a cytotoxic effect on sulfate-reducing populations. PMID:16347078

  3. The Search for Interstellar Sulfide Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The lifecycle of sulfur in the galaxy is poorly understood. Fe-sulfide grains are abundant in early solar system materials (e.g. meteorites and comets) and S is highly depleted from the gas phase in cold, dense molecular cloud environments. In stark contrast, sulfur is essentially undepleted from the gas phase in the diffuse interstellar medium, indicating that little sulfur is incorporated into solid grains in this environment. It is widely believed that sulfur is not a component of interstellar dust grains. This is a rather puzzling observation unless Fe-sulfides are not produced in significant quantities in stellar outflows, or their lifetime in the ISM is very short due to rapid destruction. Fe sulfide grains are ubiquitous in cometary samples where they are the dominant host of sulfur. The Fe-sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite; Fe(1-x)S) are common, both as discrete 0.5-10 micron-sized grains and as fine (5-10 nm) nanophase inclusions within amorphous silicate grains. Cometary dust particles contain high abundances of well-preserved presolar silicates and organic matter and we have suggested that they should contain presolar sulfides as well. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of abundant Fe-sulfides grains in dust around pre- and post-main sequence stars inferred from astronomical spectra showing a broad 23 micron IR feature due to FeS. Fe-sulfide grains also occur as inclusions in bona fide circumstellar amorphous silicate grains and as inclusions within deuterium-rich organic matter in cometary dust samples. Our irradiation experiments show that FeS is far more resistant to radiation damage than silicates. Consequently, we expect that Fe sulfide stardust should be as abundant as silicate stardust in solar system materials.

  4. Catalytic dehydroxylation of phenols. [Metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, W.J.M.

    1984-05-29

    Phenolic compounds are dehydroxylated in the vapor phase by contacting with a reducing atmosphere substantially comprising hydrogen sulfide as the reducing agent in the presence of a sulfur-tolerant metal sulfide catalyst. The additional presence of hydrogen gas helps to desulfurize the catalyst and maintain catalytic activity. The process is useful in the treatment of phenolic naphtha fractions present in coal liquids, produced by pyrolysis or direct coal liquefaction.

  5. Microbiological Leaching of Metallic Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Razzell, W. E.; Trussell, P. C.

    1963-01-01

    The percentage of chalcopyrite leached in percolators by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was dependent on the surface area of the ore but not on the amount. Typical examples of ore leaching, which demonstrate the role of the bacteria, are presented. In stationary fermentations, changes in KH2PO4 concentration above or below 0.1% decreased copper leaching as did reduction in the MgSO4·7H2O and increase in the (NH4)2SO4 concentration. Bacterial leaching of chalcopyrite was more effective than nonbiological leaching with ferric sulfate; ferric sulfate appeared to retard biological leaching, but this effect was likely caused by formation of an insoluble copper-iron complex. Ferrous sulfate and sodium chloride singly accentuated both bacterial and nonbiological leaching of chalcocite but jointly depressed bacterial action. Sodium chloride appeared to block bacterial iron oxidation without interfering with sulfide oxidation. Bacterial leaching of millerite, bornite, and chalcocite was greatest at pH 2.5. The economics of leaching a number of British Columbia ore bodies was discussed. PMID:16349627

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Gasotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are well established as messenger molecules throughout the body, gasotransmitters, based on striking alterations in mice lacking the appropriate biosynthetic enzymes. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is even more chemically reactive, but till recently there was little definitive evidence for its physiologic formation. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22), and Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE; EC 4.4.1.1), also known as cytathionase, can generate H2S from cyst(e)ine. Very recent studies with mice lacking these enzymes have established that CSE is responsible for H2S formation in the periphery, while in the brain CBS is the biosynthetic enzyme. Endothelial-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity is reduced 80% in the mesenteric artery of mice with deletion of CSE, establishing H2S as a major physiologic EDRF. H2S appears to signal predominantly by S-sulfhydrating cysteines in its target proteins, analogous to S-nitrosylation by NO. Whereas S-nitrosylation typically inhibits enzymes, S-sulfhydration activates them. S-nitrosylation basally affects 1–2% of its target proteins, while 10–25% of H2S target proteins are S-sulfhydrated. In summary, H2S appears to be a physiologic gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO. PMID:20067586

  7. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S is a signaling molecule without definite effect. The use of existing H2S donors is limited because of the instant release and short lifetime of H2S. Thus, translational medicine involving the sustained and controlled release of H2S is of great value for both scientific and clinical uses. H2S donation can be manipulated by different ways, including where H2S is given, how H2S is donated, or the specific structures of H2S-releasing drugs and H2S donor molecules. This review briefly summarizes recent progress in research on the physiological and pathological functions of H2S and H2S-releasing drugs, and suggests hope for future investigations. PMID:24096643

  8. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Villa-Gomez, D K; Cassidy, J; Keesman, K J; Sampaio, R; Lens, P N L

    2014-03-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing bioreactors. The sulfide was measured using a sulfide ion selective electrode (pS) and the values obtained were used to calculate proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller parameters. The experiments were performed in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with automated operation using the LabVIEW software version 2009(®). A rapid response and high sulfide increment was obtained through a stepwise increase in the CODin concentration, while a stepwise decrease to the HRT exhibited a slower response with smaller sulfide increment. Irrespective of the way the OLR was decreased, the pS response showed a time-varying behavior due to sulfide accumulation (HRT change) or utilization of substrate sources that were not accounted for (CODin change). The pS electrode response, however, showed to be informative for applications in sulfate reducing bioreactors. Nevertheless, the recorded pS values need to be corrected for pH variations and high sulfide concentrations (>200 mg/L). PMID:24361702

  9. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  10. Continuous measurement of dissolved sulfide in sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Sutherland-Stacey, L; Corrie, S; Neethling, A; Johnson, I; Gutierrez, O; Dexter, R; Yuan, Z; Keller, J; Hamilton, G

    2008-01-01

    Sulfides are particularly problematic in the sewage industry. Hydrogen sulfide causes corrosion of concrete infrastructure, is dangerous at high concentrations and is foul smelling at low concentrations. Despite the importance of sulfide monitoring there is no commercially available system to quantify sulfide in waste water. In this article we report on our use of an in situ spectrometer to quantify bisulfide in waste water and additional analysis with a pH probe to calculate total dissolved sulfide. Our results show it is possible to use existing commercially available and field proven sensors to measure sulfide to mg/l levels continuously with little operator intervention and no sample preparation. PMID:18309215

  11. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, Dean H.; Nelson, Art J.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness.

  12. Animal adaptations for tolerance and exploitation of poisonous sulfide.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, M K; Völkel, S

    1998-01-01

    Many aquatic animal species can survive sulfide exposure to some extent through oxidation of the sulfide, which results mainly in thiosulfate. In several species, sulfide oxidation is localized in the mitochondria and is accompanied by ATP synthesis. In addition, blood-based and intracellular compounds can augment sulfide oxidation. The formation of thiosulfate requires oxygen, which results in an increase in oxygen consumption of some species. If not all sulfide is detoxified, cytochrome C oxidase is inhibited. Under these conditions, a sulfide-dependent anaerobic energy metabolism commences. PMID:9558453

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  14. Stratospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) burden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloss, Corinna; Walker, Kaley A.; Deshler, Terry; von Hobe, Marc

    2015-04-01

    An estimation of the global stratospheric burden of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) calculated using satellite based measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) will be presented. OCS is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the atmosphere in the absence of volcanic eruptions. With a long lifetime of 2-6 years it reaches the stratosphere where it is photolyzed and the sulfur oxidized and condensed to aerosols, contributing to the stratospheric aerosol layer. The aerosol layer is the one factor of the middle-atmosphere with a direct impact on the Earth's climate by scattering incoming solar radiation back to space. Therefore it is crucial to understand and estimate the different processes and abundances of the species contributing to the aerosol layer. However, the exact amount of OCS in the stratosphere has not been quantified yet. A study on the OCS mixing ratio distribution based on ACE-FTS data has already been made by Barkley et al. (2008), also giving an estimation for the total atmospheric OCS mass. ACE-FTS is an infrared solar occultation spectrometer providing high- resolution profile observations since 2004. In the scope of this work the focus lies on the stratospheric OCS burden, calculated by integrating the ACE profiles. A global overview on the stratospheric OCS amount in the past and present based on the ACE data as well as a look at regional and seasonal variability will be given. Furthermore, the results of this work will be useful for further studies on OCS fluxes and lifetimes, and in quantifying the contribution of OCS to the global stratospheric sulfur burden. Barkley et al., 2008, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L14810.

  15. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  16. Mechanisms of action of hydrogen sulfide in relaxation of mouse distal colonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Van Colen, Inge; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2010-02-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) has been suggested as a gaseous neuromodulator in mammals. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse distal colon. The effect of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) on prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse distal colon was investigated. In addition, tension and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) in the mouse distal colon strips were measured simultaneously in the presence of NaHS. NaHS caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse distal colon strips. The NaHS-induced relaxation was not influenced by the K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, barium chloride and 4-aminopyridine. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by the nitric oxide inhibitor L-NAME, by the soluble guanylate cyclase respectively adenylate cyclase inhibitors ODQ and SQ 22536, by the nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The initiation of the NaHS-induced relaxation was accompanied by an increase in [Ca(2+)](cyt), but once the relaxation was maximal and sustained, no change in [Ca(2+)](cyt) was measured. This calcium desensitization is not related to the best known calcium desensitizing mechanism as the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A and the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We conclude that NaHS caused concentration-dependent relaxations in mouse distal colon not involving the major known K(+) channels and without a change in [Ca(2+)](cyt). This calcium desensitization is not related to inhibition of Rho-kinase or activation of MLCP. PMID:19919833

  17. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres for superior sodium-iron sulfide batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-Xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ∼ 545 mA h g(-1) over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g(-1)), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ∼ 438 Wh kg(-1). The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (∼ 170 nm) with porous carbon shells (∼ 30 nm) and extra void space (∼ 20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium-iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide-carbon composites. PMID:26507613

  18. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres for superior sodium-iron sulfide batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-Xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-10-01

    Sodium-metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ~545 mA h g-1 over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g-1), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ~438 Wh kg-1. The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (~170 nm) with porous carbon shells (~30 nm) and extra void space (~20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium-iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide-carbon composites.

  19. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  20. Preparation of silver-activated zinc sulfide thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, C.; Swindells, F. E.

    1968-01-01

    Silver improves luminescence and reduces contamination of zinc sulfide phosphors. The silver is added after the zinc sulfide phosphors are deposited in thin films by vapor evaporation, but before calcining, by immersion in a solution of silver salt.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide to the rescue in obstructive kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with far reaching effects on cell function. Studies show that depending on the context hydrogen sulfide can function as an ameliorative agent or as a mediator of kidney injury. PMID:24875544

  2. Mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide removal with steel making slag.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoi; Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Katayama, Misaki; Onoue, Takasumi

    2012-09-18

    In the present study, we experimentally investigated the removal of hydrogen sulfide using steel-making slag (SMS) and clarified the mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal with the SMS. The results proved that SMS is able to remove hydrogen sulfide dissolved in water, and the maximum removal amount of hydrogen sulfide per unit weight of the SMS for 8 days was estimated to be 37.5 mg S/g. The removal processes of hydrogen sulfide were not only adsorption onto the SMS, but oxidation and precipitation as sulfur. The chemical forms of sulfide adsorbed onto the SMS were estimated to be sulfur and manganese sulfide in the ratio of 81% and 19%, respectively. It is demonstrated here that the SMS is a promising material to remediate organically enriched coastal sediments in terms of removal of hydrogen sulfide. Furthermore, using SMS is expected to contribute to development of a recycling-oriented society. PMID:22894171

  3. Evolution of sulfide mineralization on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.G.; Fisher, D.S. )

    1990-08-30

    The presence of komatiitic igneous rocks on Marks, based on geochemical evidence from SNC meteorites and Viking X ray fluorescence analyses of the regolith, suggests that massive and disseminated iron sulfide mineralization occurs near the Martian surface. Analogies are drawn between possible ultramafic Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars and terrestrial pyrrhotite-pentlandite ore deposits associated with Archean komatiites formed during early crustal development on Earth. Partial melting of the mantle as a result of high radiogenic heat production then, extrusion of turbulent high-temperature ultramafic lavas, segregation of immiscible FeS melts during cooling, gravitational settling and fractional crystallization of sulfide minerals in magma chambers or lava flows produced massive and disseminated sulfide mineralization associated with terrestrial komatiites. Comparable processes probably occurred on Mars where, on account of the inferred higher Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio of the X ray mantle (estimated to contain {approximately}4.5 wt % S), iron-rich basaltic magmas were produced by partial melting at depths and temperatures exceeding 165 km and 1,400{degree}C, respectively. Adiabatic diapiric emplacement of these iron-rich, very low viscosity basaltic melts transported significant concentrations of dissolved sulfur as S{sup 2{minus}} and HS{sup {minus}} from the mantle. Ensuing sulfide mineralization may have been either thinly disseminated within ultramafic lavas erupting over large areas of Mars or concentrated locally at the base of structural depressions. Cumulate ore deposits several meters thick may occur at the base of intrusions or in near-surface magma chambers. The evidence for insignificant plate tectonic activity on Mars and minimal interactions of Martian mantle with crust, hydrosphere and atmosphere has restricted the evolution of sulfide ore deposits there.

  4. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-04-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). PMID:10753088

  5. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  6. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  7. Reviewing sulfidation corrosion—Yesterday and today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Norman S.

    1996-11-01

    At one time, sulfidation corrosion threatened to severely limit the use of gas turbines in marine applications, markedly reduce the life of industrial gas turbines, and affect the performance of aircraft engines. Today, gas turbine engines drive U.S. naval ships, produce electricity, and power aircraft. However, the problem of sulfidation corrosion has not disappeared. The rapid rate of degradation of airfoil materials in the presence of condensed sulfates is still a concern for gas turbine engines that operate in industrial and marine environments.

  8. Classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    It is suggested that the existing classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide be supplemented with an additional criterion: the characteristic of regular point systems (Wyckoff positions) including their type, number, and multiplicity. The consideration of the Wyckoff positions allowed the establishment of construction principles of known polytype series of different symmetries and the systematization (for the first time) of the polytypes with the same number of differently packed layers. the classification suggested for polytype structures of zinc sulfide is compact and provides a basis for creating search systems. The classification table obtained can also be used for numerous silicon carbide polytypes. 8 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Sol-gel processing of metal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, Vesha

    Metal sulfides were synthesised via a sol-gel process using various metal alkoxides and hydrogen sulfide in toluene. Colloidal gels were prepared from germanium ethoxide, germanium isopropoxide, zinc tert-butoxide and tungsten (VI) ethoxide, whereas colloidal powder was produced from tungsten (V) dichloride ethoxide. Special precautions were necessary to protect the reaction mixture from water contamination which produced metal oxides. Results indicated that the main source of water is the hydrogen sulfide gas. In addition, synthesis of metal sulfides from a mixture of metal oxide and sulfide was demonstrated by the example of monoclinic germanium disulfide. It was produced by reaction of the sol-gel product with sulfur. Heat treatment of the sol-gel product and sulfur yielded single phase GeSsb2. The sol-gel prepared materials and their heat treated products were characterized by various methods. A chemical kinetics study of the functional groups -OR, -SH and Ssp{2-} was carried out for the sol-gel processing of GeSsb2 from of hydrogen sulfide and two different alkoxides, germanium ethoxide and germanium isopropoxide. The study was performed for different concentrations of precursors at different molar ratios and temperatures. The results indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism was simplified under appropriate reaction conditions. Experimentally determined rate constants of thiolysis and condensations demonstrate that thiolysis is slow and that condensations are fast steps, regardless of the studied reaction conditions. A study of the temperature effect on the reaction rate constant shows that it increases with temperature in accord with both Arrhenius law and transition-state theory. Activation energies, Esba, and activation parameters DeltaSsp{ddagger}, DeltaHsp{ddagger} and DeltaGsp{ddagger}, were determined for thiolysis and condensation reactions. The potentiometric tiration method was used for quantitative determination of germanium sulfide and

  10. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  11. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  12. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  13. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformations and their influence on benthic-pelagic coupling remain largely unknown. Here we quantify changes in sediment geochemistry and solute fluxes at the sediment-water interface as e-SOx develops and declines over time in laboratory incubations of organic-rich sediments from a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin (Marine Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands). Our results show that e-SOx enhanced sediment O2 consumption and acidified subsurface sediment, resulting in the dissolution of calcium carbonate and iron sulfide minerals in deeper sediment horizons and the associated accumulation of dissolved iron, manganese, and calcium in porewater. Remobilized Fe diffusing upward was reoxidized at the sediment-water interface, producing an amorphous Fe oxide crust, while dissolved Fe diffusing downward was reprecipitated in the form of FeS as it encountered the free sulfide horizon. The development of e-SOx enhanced the diffusive release of dissolved Mn at the sediment-water interface, capped the phosphate efflux, generated a buildup of organic matter in surface sediments, and strongly stimulated the release of alkalinity from the sediment. About 75% of this alkalinity production was associated with net CaCO3 dissolution, while the remaining 25% was attributed to a pumping mechanism that transfers alkalinity from anodic H2S oxidation (an alkalinity sink) in deeper sediments to cathodic O2 reduction (an alkalinity source) near the sediment-water interface. The resulting sediment alkalinity

  14. Hydrotreating with catalysts comprising mixtures of an amorphous sulfide or trivalent chromium and microcrystallites of molybdenum sulfide or tungsten sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.J.; Ho, T.C.; Chianelli, R.R.; Steger, J.J.; Montagna, A.A.

    1989-03-14

    A process is described for hydrorefining a hydrocarbon feed to reduce the contents of nitrogen compounds and sulfur compounds in the feed which comprises contacting the feed at an elevated temperature of at least about 150/sup 0/C and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a mixture of (i) an amorphous sulfide of trivalent chromium and (ii) microcrystallities of a metal sulfide of a metal selected from the group consisting of Mo, W and mixture thereof, the contacting occurring for a time sufficient to hydrorefine at least a portion of the feed. The patent also describes a process for improving the oxidation stability of a nitrogen and sulfur containing lube oil feed which comprises contacting the feed at an elevated temperature of at least about 150/sup 0/C and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a mixture of (i) an amorphous sulfide of trivalent chromium and (ii) microcrystallities of metal sulfides of a metal selected from the group consisting of Mo, W and mixture thereof, the contacting occurring for a time sufficient to improve the oxidation stability of the lube oil feed.

  15. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle, probe... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section...

  16. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle, probe... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section...

  17. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle, probe... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section...

  18. The effect of sulfide inhibition on the ANAMMOX process.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ren-Cun; Yang, Guang-Feng; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ma, Chun; Yu, Jin-Jin; Xing, Bao-Shan

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process to treat wastewaters containing sulfide was studied in this work. Serum bottles were used as experimental containers in batch tests to analyze the short-term response of the ANAMMOX process under sulfide stress. The IC(50) of sulfide-S for ANAMMOX biomass was substrates-dependent and was calculated to be 264 mg L(-1) at an initial total nitrogen level of 200 mg L(-1) (molar ratio of ammonium and nitrite was 1:1). The long-term effects and the performance recovery under sulfide stress were continuously monitored and evaluated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. The performance of the ANAMMOX system was halved at an sulfide-S level of 32 mg L(-1) within 13 days; however, the nitrogen removal rate (NRR) decreased by only 17.2% within 18 days at an sulfide-S concentration of 40 mg L(-1) after long-time acclimatization of sludge in the presence of sulfide. The ANAMMOX performance recovered under sulfide-S level of 8 mg L(-1) with a steady NRR increasing speed, linear relationship between the NRR and operation time. The synchronic reduce in the specific ANAMMOX activity and the biomass extended the apparent doubling time of the nitrogen removal capacity and decreased biomass growth rate. PMID:23273856

  19. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  20. The diagenesis of carbohydrates by hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1983-08-01

    Carbohydrates react with hydrogen sulfide under low temperature (100° to 200°C) yielding a variety of organosulfur compounds including thiophenes, thiols, sulfides and sulfones. A polymer is also produced, whose elemental composition is within the range of natural coals. When reductive dehydration is carried out in the presence of hydrocarbon, organosulfur compounds are formed in the carbon number range of the hydrocarbon used. In these processes, an active hydrogen transfer catalyst is produced which facilitates the passage of hydrogen between normal paraffins and saccharide units, distributing sulfur between these two families primarily in the form of thiophene rings. The simplicity of these systems - H 2S, carbohydrates, H 2O, hydrocarbon - and the facility of the chemistry would suggest that the carbohydrates and hydrogen sulfide may be important agents in the diagenetic processes leading to petroleum and coal. Carbohydrate reduction by hydrogen sulfide may constitute an important route through which certain organosulfur compounds found in petroleum and coal entered these materials in early diagenesis.

  1. REACTION PROCESSES OF ARSENIC IN SULFIDIC SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic in the environment is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Arsenic in aerobic environments is predominantly arsenate, however under reducing conditions arsenite species dominate. In anoxic or sulfidic environments thioarsenite ((As(OH)x(SH)yz-) species alon...

  2. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  3. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  4. Sulfide as a signaling molecule in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is already recognized as an important signaling molecule in mammalian systems, and emerging data suggest that H2S is a signaling molecule just as important as nitric oxide (NO) and H2O2 in plants. Although sulfide is generated in chloroplasts and mitochondria, it is present predominantly in the charged HS- form due to the basic pH inside both organelles, thus requiring an active transporter, which is yet to be identified, to be released. In Arabidopsis, we found that the cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1 is involved in the degradation of cysteine, and therefore responsible for the generation of H2S in this cellular compartment. DES1 deficiency leads to the induction of autophagy. Moreover, we have demonstrated that sulfide in particular exerts a general effect on autophagy through negative regulation, in a way unrelated to nutrient deficiency. The mechanisms of H2S action and its molecular targets are largely unknown, although in animal systems, protein S-sulfhydration has been proposed as a mechanism for sulfide-mediated signaling. PMID:23328265

  5. New Sulfide Derivatives of Vegetable Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils containing sulfide group were synthesized using a UV initiated thiol-ene reaction. The reaction involved addition of butyl thiol to the double bonds of the vegetable oil without the presence of a solvent. The effects of temperature, reaction time, type of vegetable oil, thiol to veg...

  6. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  7. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide. 7... well-control techniques to prevent formation fracturing in an open hole within the pressure limits of... designed consistent with the anticipated depth, conditions of the hole, and reservoir environment to...

  8. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population. PMID:25862324

  9. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  10. Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.

    1985-05-21

    An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

  11. Oxygen Demand of Fresh and Stored Sulfide Solutions and Sulfide-Rich Constructed Wetland Effluent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carolyn; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the contribution of hydrogen sulfide to biological oxygen demand (BOD5) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater effluents, and documented the effect of storage times and conditions on the BOD5 and COD of pH-adjusted sodium sulfide solutions as well as graywater wetland effluent. Initial COD measurements of sulfide solutions were 84-89% of the theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD), 1.996 mg O2/mg S, whereas unseeded BOD5 measurements were 55-77%. For sulfide solutions, all storage conditions led to declines of >15% (COD, BOD5), and >31% (sulfide). For wetland effluent, storage without headspace was effective in reducing COD losses (3.7%), compared to storage with headspace (17%), and affected changes in turbidity, UVA-254 and pH. The results suggest that storage times and conditions should be controlled and reported when reporting BOD5 and COD of sulfide-rich samples. Wetland models representing sulfate reduction as a method of COD removal may need to be reconsidered. PMID:26237688

  12. Survival of the fittest: phosphorus burial in the sulfidic deep Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraal, Peter; Dijkstra, Nikki; Behrends, Thilo; Slomp, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Black Sea is characterized by permanently anoxic and sulfidic deep waters. Studies of the mechanisms of P burial in such a setting can be used to improve our understanding of P cycling in modern coastal systems undergoing eutrophication and ancient oceans during periods of anoxia in Earth's past. Here, we present phosphorus and iron (Fe) pools as determined in surface sediments along a transect from oxic shallow waters to sulfidic deep waters in the northwestern Black Sea, using a combination of bulk chemical analyses and micro-scale X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS). We show that under oxic bottom water conditions, ferric iron oxides (Fe(III)ox) in surficial sediment efficiently scavenge dissolved phosphate from pore waters. Under these conditions, Fe(III)ox-bound P constitutes the main P pool at the sediment surface, but rapidly declines with depth in the sediment due to anoxic diagenesis. The transition from shallow (oxic) to deep (sulfidic) waters along the depth transect is reflected in a slight increase in the fraction of organic P. We also show evidence for authigenic calcium phosphate formation under sulfidic conditions at relatively low dissolved PO4 concentrations. Furthermore, we provide spectroscopic evidence for the presence of Fe(II)-Mn(II)-Mg-P minerals in sediments of the sulfidic deep basin. We hypothesize that these minerals are formed as a result of input of Fe(III)ox-P from shallower waters and subsequent transformation in either the water column or sediment. This finding suggests an unexpected strength of Fe-P shuttling from the shelf to the deep basin. While the presence of Fe-P species in such a highly sulfidic environment is remarkable, further analysis suggests that this P pool may not be quantitatively significant. In fact, our results indicate that some of the P that is interpreted as Fe-bound P based on chemical extraction may in fact be Ca-associated PO4 consisting of a combination of fish debris

  13. New treatment for sulfide-laden tannery waste

    SciTech Connect

    Berberich, S.

    1984-02-01

    A new treatment for tannery wastes containing toxic sulfide has been developed using anaerobic microorganisms that thrive alongside sulfide compounds. The new system, using an anaerobic reactor, transforms sulfide-laden tannery wastes into inert matter, methane, and material (including sulfide) readily digested in an aerobic polishing step. An industrial scale-up of the anaerobic reactor could digest between 60-70% of tannery pollutants. The new treatment offers leather tanneries and other industries that generate high-sulfide waste a cheaper way to meet federal water pollution guidelines.

  14. Study of the mechanism of the hydrogen sulfide/dolomite reaction. Final report for the period July 1976-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Rogan, F.H.; Yen, J.H.; Huang, C.S.; Spencer, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The kinetics and structural changes of the basic reactions - half-calcination, sulfidation and carbonation - involved in the cyclic use of dolomite for hot-gas desulfurization were investigated over wide ranges of experimental conditions including the origin of dolomite, pellet size and method of pretreatment. Kinetic data were collected for samples of spherical pellets in a high-temperature/high-pressure thermogravimetric analysis system specifically designed and constructed for this study. Solid-phase structures at various stages of each reaction were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, nitrogen adsorption, and mercury porosimetry. Based on the kinetic and structural data for each reaction, models were developed and mathematically formulated. Agreement between model and experiment in all cases is generally good. Cyclic experiments of the sulfidation of half-calcined dolomite and the carbonation of sulfided dolomite were also performed. The adsorption capacity of dolomite for hydrogen sulfide was found to decrease at first and remain approximately constant upon continued cycling. However, a 75% utilization of calcium atoms in the dolomite was shown to be possible under certain selected conditions. 33 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-01

    Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pHIEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, CS in the solution declined from 1000 × 10-6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10-6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S2- and CO32- ions.

  16. Sulfidization and magnetization above hydrocarbon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.L.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Tuttle, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Geochemical and rock magnetic studies of strata over Cement oil field (Anadarko basin, Oklahoma), Simpson oil field (North Slope basin, Alaska), and the Edwards deep gas trend, south Texas coastal plain, document changes in original magnetizations caused by postdepositional iron sulfide minerals that are, or may be, related to hydrocarbon seepage. At Cement, ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 7}S{sub 8}) formed with pyrite and marcasite in Permian red beds. The Fe-S minerals contain isotopically heavy, abiogenic sulfur derived from thermal degradation of petroleum and (or) isotopically light sulfur derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria fed by leaking hydrocarbons. At Simpson, ferrimagnetic greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}) dominates magnetizations in Upper Cretaceous nonmarine beds that contain biodegraded oil. Sulfur isotopic data are consistent with, but do not prove, a genetic link between the greigite ({delta}{sup 34}S {gt} +20 per mil) and seepage. In middle Tertiary sandstones of southeast Texas, pyrite and marcasite formed when abiogenic H{sub 2}S migrated upward from deep reservoirs, or when H{sub 2}S was produced at shallow depths by bacteria that utilized organic material dissolved in migrating water from depth. The sulfide minerals replaced detrital magnetite to result in a systematic decrease in magnetic susceptibility toward faults that connect deep petroleum reservoirs to shallow sandstone. The authors results show that abiologic and biologic mechanisms can generate magnetic sulfide minerals in some sulfidic zones of hydrocarbon seepage. The magnetizations in such zones are diminished most commonly by replacement of detrital magnetic minerals with nonmagnetic sulfide minerals or are unchanged if such detrital minerals were originally absent.

  17. Analog Experiments on Sulfide Foams in Magmatic Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, A. M.; Dahn, D.; Zavala, K.

    2009-05-01

    Metal sulfides form as an immiscible phase from silicate magmas. Dynamic mingling and unmingling of the two phases is important for the development of economic deposits: mingling promotes enrichment of the sulfide in valuable metals, and subsequent unmingling generates massive sulfide. Analog experiments were carried out to investigate mingling processes in immiscible systems, using oil, water and small beads to represent magma, sulfide liquid and silicate crystals. Stirring or injection led to the formation of a foam of analog sulfide droplets within an analog silicate framework. We propose that the partial collapse of such a foam explains massive sulfide lenses at the Voisey's Bay magmatic sulfide deposit, and that crystallization of silicate crystals in the remaining foam walls generates 'net-textured' ores. In the experiments, solid particles had a profound effect on unmingling: analog sulfide droplets were stably contained within analog crystal-rich magma and did not coalesce. We therefore suggest that 'net' and 'leopard' textures in disseminated sulfides indicate mingling of sulfide with crystal-poor magma, whereas isolated disseminated patches of sulfide indicate mingling with a crystal-rich magma.

  18. Effect of sulfide on growth of marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Schreier, Harold J

    2014-04-01

    Severe hypoxia leads to excess production of hydrogen sulfide in marine environments. In this study, we examined the effect of sulfide on growth of four facultative anaerobic marine bacteria in minimal media under anaerobic conditions. The Gram-negative chemolithoautotrophic Marinobacter sp. tolerated sulfide concentrations up to 0.60 mM, with doubling and lag times increasing as a function of increasing sulfide concentration but with no change in maximum culture yields; growth did not occur at 1.2 mM sulfide. Similar results were obtained for the metabolically diverse Gram-negative denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri, except that growth occurred at 1.2 mM and culture yields at 0.60 and 1.2 mM sulfide were approximately 10-fold lower than at sulfide concentrations between 0 and 0.30 mM. Increases in doubling and lag times accompanied by an overall 10-fold decrease in maximum culture yields were found for the Gram-negative chemoheterotrophic Vibrio sp. at all sulfide concentrations tested. In contrast, growth of a Gram-positive chemoheterotrophic Bacillus sp. was resistant to all sulfide concentrations tested (0.15-1.2 mM). Our results highlight the variable responses of marine bacteria to sulfide and provide some insight into shifts that may occur in microbial community structure and diversity as a consequence of changes in sulfide levels that are the result of hypoxia. PMID:24609188

  19. Microbial oxidation of mixtures of methylmercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, A; Kolhatkar, R; Sublette, K L; Beitle, R

    1998-01-01

    Refinery spent-sulfidic caustic, containing only inorganic sulfides, has previously been shown to be amenable to biotreatment with Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F with complete oxidation of sulfides to sulfate. However, many spent caustics contain mercaptans that cannot be metabolized by this strict autotroph. An aerobic enrichment culture was developed from mixed Thiobacilli and activated sludge that was capable of simultaneous oxidation of inorganic sulfide and mercaptans using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methylmercaptan (MeSH) gas feeds used to simulate the inorganic and organic sulfur of a spent-sulfidic caustic. The enrichment culture was also capable of biotreatment of an actual mercaptan-containing, spent-sulfidic caustic but at lower rates than predicted by operation on MeSH and H2S fed to the culture in the gas phase, indicating that the caustic contained other inhibitory components. PMID:18576062

  20. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... level based on scientific research evidence. Adequate Intake (AI): This level is established when there is not ... enough calcium from the foods they eat. Infants (AI) 0 to 6 months: 200 milligrams per day ( ...

  1. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous section Overview 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of ... Foods and Vitamins 3 of 4 sections Take Action: Vitamin D Get enough vitamin D. Vitamin D ...

  2. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  3. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  4. Selective chemical dissolution of sulfides: An evaluation of six methods applicable to assaying sulfide-bound nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klock, P.R.; Czamanske, G.K.; Foose, M.; Pesek, J.

    1986-01-01

    Six analytical techniques for the selective chemical dissolution of sulfides are compared with the purpose of defining the best method for accurately determining the concentration of sulfide-bound nickel. Synthesized sulfide phases of known elemental content, mixed with well-analyzed silicates, were used to determine the relative and absolute efficiency, based on Ni and Mg recovery, of the techniques. Tested leach-methods purported to dissolve sulfide from silicate phases include: brominated water, brominated water-carbon tetrachloride, nitric-hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate, bromine-methanol and hydrogen peroxide-ascorbic acid. Only the hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate method did not prove adequate in dissolving the sulfide phases. The remaining five methods dissolved the sulfide phases, but the indicated amount of attack on the silicate portion ranged from 3% to 100%. The bromine-methanol method is recommended for assaying sulfide-Ni deposits when Ni is also present in silicate phases. ?? 1986.

  5. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    The speciation of arsenic in natural sulfidic geothermal waters was studied using chemical analyses and thermodynamic aqueous speciation calculations. Samples were collected in three geothermal systems in Iceland, having contrasting H2S concentrations in the reservoir (high vs. low). The sampled waters contained 7-116 ppb As and <0.01-77.6 ppm H2S with pH of 8.56-9.60. The analytical setup used for the determination of arsenic species (Ion Chromatography-Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, IC-HG-AFS) was field-deployed and the samples analyzed within ∼5 min of sampling in order to prevent changes upon storage, which were shown to be considerable regardless of the sample storage method used. Nine aqueous arsenic species were detected, among others arsenite (HnAsO3n-3), thioarsenite (HnAsS3n-3), arsenate (HnAsO4n-3), monothioarsenate (HnAsSO3n-3), dithioarsenate (HnAsS2O2n-3), trithioarsenate (HnAsS3O) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAsS4n-3). The results of the measured aqueous arsenic speciation in the natural geothermal waters and comparison with thermodynamic calculations reveal that the predominant factors determining the species distribution are sulfide concentration and pH. In alkaline waters with low sulfide concentrations the predominant species are AsIII oxyanions. This can be seen in samples from a liquid-only well, tapping water that is H2S-poor and free of oxygen. At intermediate sulfide concentration AsIII and AsV thio species become important and predominate at high sulfide concentration, as seen in two-phase well waters, which have high H2S concentrations in the reservoir. Upon oxidation, for instance due to mixing of the reservoir fluid with oxygenated water upon ascent to the surface, AsV oxyanions form, as well as AsV thio complexes if the sulfide concentration is intermediate to high. This oxidation process can be seen in samples from hot springs in the Geysir geothermal area. While the thermodynamic modeling allows for a first

  6. Slow sulfide donor GYY4137 differentiates NG108-15 neuronal cells through different intracellular transporters than dbcAMP.

    PubMed

    Kubickova, J; Hudecova, S; Csaderova, L; Soltysova, A; Lichvarova, L; Lencesova, L; Babula, P; Krizanova, O

    2016-06-14

    Cellular differentiation is the process, by which a cell changes from one cell type to another, preferentially to the more specialized one. Calcium fluxes play an important role in this action. Differentiated NG108-15 or PC12 cells serve as models for studying neuronal pathways. NG108-15 cell line is a reliable model of cholinergic neuronal cells. These cells differentiate to a neuronal phenotype due to the dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) treatment. We have shown that a slow sulfide donor - GYY4137 - can also act as a differentiating factor in NG108-15 cell line. Calcium is an unavoidable ion required in NG108-15 cell differentiation by both, dbcAMP and GYY4137, since cultivation in EGTA completely prevented differentiation of these cells. In this work we focused primarily on the role of reticular calcium in the process of NG108-15 cell differentiation. We have found that dbcAMP and also GYY4137 decreased reticular calcium concentration by different mechanisms. GYY4137 caused a rapid decrease in type 2 sarco/endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA2) mRNA and protein, which results in lower calcium levels in the endoplasmic reticulum compared to the control, untreated group. The dbcAMP revealed rapid increase in expression of the type 3 IP3 receptor, which participates in a calcium clearance from the endoplasmic reticulum. These results point to the important role of reticular calcium in a NG108-15 cell differentiation. PMID:27038748

  7. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments. PMID:26030258

  8. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    PubMed Central

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments. PMID:26030258

  9. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by sulfidated nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Rajajayavel, Sai Rajasekar C; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-01

    Direct injection of reactive nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) is considered to be a promising approach for remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated organic pollutants. In this study we show that the extent of sulfidation of NZVI enhances the rate of dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) compared to that by unamended NZVI, and the enhancement depends on the Fe/S molar ratio. Experiments where TCE was reacted with NZVI sulfidated to different extents (Fe/S molar ratios 0.62-66) showed that the surface-area normalized first-order TCE degradation rate constant increased up to 40 folds compared to non-sulfidated NZVI. Fe/S ratios in the range of 12-25 provided the highest TCE dechlorination rates, and rates decreased at both higher and lower Fe/S. In contrast, sulfidated NZVI exposed to water in the absence of TCE showed significantly lower hydrogen evolution rate (2.75 μmol L(-1) h(-1)) compared to that by an unamended NZVI (6.92 μmol L(-1) h(-1)), indicating that sulfidation of NZVI suppressed corrosion reactions with water. Sulfide (HS(-)) ions reacted rapidly with NZVI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed formation of a surface layer of FeS and FeS2. We propose that more electrons are preferentially conducted from sulfidated NZVI than from unamended NZVI to TCE, likely because of greater binding of TCE on the reactive sites of the iron sulfide outer layer. Resuspending sulfidated NZVI in sulfide-free or sulfide containing solutions altered the TCE degradation rate constants because of changes in the FeS layer thickness. Sulfidated NZVI maintained its high reactivity in the presence of multiple mono and divalent ions and with polyelectrolyte coatings. Thus, sulfide ions in groundwater can significantly alter NZVI reactivity. PMID:25935369

  10. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  11. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  12. Absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghawas, H.A.; Ruiz-Ibanez, G.; Sandall, O.C. )

    1988-01-01

    The absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was studied over a range of temperatures and MDEA concentrations. MDEA is commonly used for selective absorption of hydrogen sulfide in the presence of carbon dioxide. However, sulfur in the form of COS may also be present and it is necessary that estimates of absorption rates of this compound be made. The objective of this study is to determine the physiochemical properties needed to predict COS absorption rates in aqueous MDEA. Free gas solubility and the diffusivity of COS in MDEA solutions were measured over the temperature range 15 to 40{sup 0}C for MDEA concentrations up to 30 weight per cent using the nitrous oxide analogy method. Solubilities were measured volumetrically in an equilibrium cell and diffusivities were measured using a laminar liquid jet absorber. The kinetics of the reaction between COS and MDEA were studied by measuring absorption rates in a single wetted-sphere absorber.

  13. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Richard T; Wallschläger, Dirk; Ford, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH)30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH)30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  14. Sulfide stress corrosion cracking of line pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kimuro, M.; Totsuka, N.; Kurisu, T.; Amano, K.; Matsuyama, J.; Nakai, Y. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper reports the sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSC) behavior of line pipe steel investigated using the SSC test method in NACE Standard TMO177-77, Testing of Metals for Resistance to Sulfide Stress Cracking at Ambient Temperatures. SSC of base metal can be classified into two types, depending on microstructures. In ferrite-perlite steel, the first crack initiates parallel to the pipe surface and propagates perpendicularly to the axis of stress. In ferrite-bainite steel or low C-bainite steel, the crack initiates at the interface between the bainite particle and the ferrite. With decreasing carbon content, the threshold stress of SSC ({sigma}{sub th}) increases, but in low-carbon steel, the {sigma}{sub th} value of weld seam is lower than that of base metal. SSC of weld seams occurs at the softening zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) about 2 to 4 mm away from the fusion line.

  15. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  16. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  17. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  19. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    SciTech Connect

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs-a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  1. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  2. Modelling of calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, Lazaro Juan

    This work is a contribution to a large scale joint experimental and theoretical effort to understand the biological properties of silicon doped calcium phosphates undertaken by Queen's University and Millenium Biologix Corp. We have modeled calcium phosphates and silicon doped calcium phosphates in close relation to experiment in order to study possible location of silicon in the lattice. Density functional theory has been used to study the structural and dynamical properties of small systems of calcium phosphates to gain preliminary information on phosphates and the performance of the theoretical methods. The same methods were used to investigate structural and electronic properties of larger scale calcium phosphate systems, while a classical shell model was developed to investigate the dynamical properties of such large and complex systems. In the context of the shell model a method was devised to calculate the dynamical matrix corrected for the long range Coulomb interaction in the long wave length limit. It was necessary also to develop a theoretical expression for the dielectric function in the context of the shell model. Infrared spectra and thermal parameters were calculated based on these methods. We also propose some directions for future research.

  3. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  4. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  5. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. PMID:25270045

  6. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  7. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  8. Ca Isotope Fractionation During Gypsum Precipitation in a Sulfidic Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantle, M. S.; Macalady, J. L.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2009-12-01

    In sulfidic caves, limestone dissolution above the water table is assocated with sulfuric acid corrosion and attendant precipitation of CaSO4 crusts. Since sulfuric acid is produced by microbially-mediated sulfide oxidation, such systems present unique opportunities to study the effects of microbial processes on Ca isotope systematics. The current study presents preliminary measurements of the Ca isotopic composition of gypsum, calcite, and water samples collected in and around Grotta Bella cave in the Frasassi cave system (central Italy). The environment sampled in this limestone-hosted cave is situated close to flowing sulfidic groundwater (air [H2S]meas ~3 ppm) and is actively forming gypsum in close association with microbial communities ("snottites") dominated by Acidithiobacillus sp [1]. The pH ranges from >2.3 in gypsum crust accumulating on the cave walls to 0-2 at the surface of snottites, while pH in waters sampled outside the cave is between 7 and 8. The current rate of limestone dissolution is ~0.15 mmol CaCO3/cm2/a [2]. This study reports the Ca isotopic composition (δ44Ca, rel. to bulk Earth) of stream and seep water, limestone, and gypsum samples in and around Grotta Bella. Calcium isotopes were measured on a Finnigan Triton TI thermal ionization mass spectrometer at GEOMAR using a 43Ca-48Ca double spike. Field-acidified stream waters and dissolved gypsum were chromatographically purified using MCI Gel (Biorad) while bulk limestone samples were dissolved in nitric acid and loaded onto single Re filaments without additional purification. The δ44Ca values of stream waters and springs are relatively restricted (~0.2‰) and generally the same as bulk limestone. Actively-precipitating CaSO4 minerals, however, show a range of δ44Ca values from limestone-like to values almost 1‰ lighter than corresponding wallrock. Decreasing δ44Ca values in these gypsum minerals correspond to gradients in pH and mineral grain size. The smallest gypsum grains

  9. Fracture toughness of calcium-modified ultrahigh-strength 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki

    1990-10-01

    Commercial and low-sulfur 4340 steels have been studied to determine the effect of calcium treatment on modifying the morphology of nonmetallic inclusions and plane-strain fracture toughness ( K IC ) of the ultrahigh-strength, low-alloy steels at commercial heat level. The significant conclusions are as follows: (1) for the low-sulfur 4340 steel, the addition of calcium in the molten steel gave rise to the formation of finely distributed, spherical, calcium-sulfide (CaS) inclusions with a mean diameter of 1.3 μm; (2) in comparing the calcium-modified 4340 steel with commercial 4340 steel, the calcium-modified steel not only had an improved K IC by about 25 MPa•m1/2 in the longitudinal (L) orientation and by about 30 MPa • m1/2 in the transverse (T) orientation, but also had increased fracture ductility and Charpy impact energy at similar strength levels; and (3) for the commercial 4340 steel, the calcium treatment was not very effective in modifying the morphology of the inclusions on improving the mechanical properties of the steel. The beneficial effect of calcium modification coupled with low sulfur content on the K Ic is briefly discussed in terms of a crack extension model involving the formation of voids at the inclusion sites and their growth and eventual linking-up through the rupture of the intervening ligaments by localized shear.

  10. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  11. Gold Sulfide Nanoclusters: A Unique Core-in-cage Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Walter, Michael; Dai, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    By using a DFT-based basin-hopping method, we found putative global minima for three gold sulfide nanoclusters, observed in mass spectrometry, that all show a symmetric core-in-cage structure: a metallic Au core inside a cage with S as vertices and Au at the edges. This core-in-cage structure is distinct from bulk gold sulfide. This work fills the knowledge gap regarding the structure of gold sulfide nanoclusters of {approx}1 nm.

  12. [Mitochondria, calcium homeostasis and calcium signaling].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, I B

    2016-03-01

    Са2+ is a very important and versatile intracellular signal which controls numerous biochemical and physiological (pathophysiological) processes in the cell. Good evidence exists that mitochondria are sensors, decoders and regulators of calcium signaling. Precise regulation of calcium signaling in the cell involves numerous molecular targets, which induce and decode changes of Са2+ concentrations in the cell (pumps, channels, Са2+-binding proteins, Са2+-dependent enzymes, localized in the cytoplasm and organelles). Mitochondrial Са2+ uniporter accumulates excess of Са2+ in mitochondria, while Na+/Са2+- and H+/Са2+-antiporters extrude Са2+ in the cytoplasm. Mitochondrial Са2+ overloading results in formation of mitochondria permeability transition pores which play an important role in cell death under many pathological conditions. Mitochondria regulate Са2+ homeostasis and control important cellular functions such as metabolism, proliferation, survival. Identification of cellular and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters and understanding their functional mechanisms open up new prospects for their using as therapeutic targets. PMID:27420625

  13. Calcium and olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Winegar, B D; Rosick, E R; Schafer, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Inorganic cations, organic calcium antagonists, and calmodulin antagonists were applied to olfactory epithelia of frogs (Rana pipiens) while recording electroolfactogram (EOG) responses. 2. Inorganic cations inhibited EOGs in a rank order, reflecting their calcium channel blocking potency: La3+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Al3+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mg2+. Barium ion significantly enhanced EOGs immediately following application. 3. Diltiazem and verapamil produced dose-dependent EOG inhibition. 4. Calmodulin antagonists inhibited EOGs without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. PMID:2904344

  14. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-01

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission

  15. Sulfide clean-up of solutions from heavy metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kislinskaya, G.E.; Kozachek, N.N.; Krasnova, G.M.; Shenk, N.I.

    1982-09-20

    The object of the present research was to determine the conditions for thorough clean-up of solutions from cadmium or mercury contamination by use of iron sulfide. Results indicated that the shape of the dependence of the degree of extraction of copper with iron sulfide on the pH value is analogous to the curve for cadmium; that is, copper, like cadmium, is precipitated by chemical reaction. In distinction from cadmium and copper, mercury is extracted by iron sulfide both in acid and also in neutral solutions, that is, it is possible to attain a direct ion exchange by reaction. At high pH values, only small amounts of iron go into solution, therefore FeS can be used very rationally for the extraction of both small (about 1 mg/liter), and also of large (about 1 mg/liter) amounts of mercury from solutions, which are nearly neutral. By adding sodium sulfide and a flocculant, one can accelerate the process of mercury precipitation, and also reduce the solution of iron sulfide. In the present case, iron sulfide plays the role of a substrate for the crystallization of mercury sulfide, since in dilute solutions the latter forms poorly filterable colloidal solutions. Thus when one uses fused iron sulfide with addition of sodium sulfide, a high degree of mercury extraction is attained, and the spent sorbent is filtered well.

  16. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  17. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  18. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  19. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... 130 Waffle 80 g 47 Meat, fish and eggs Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Egg 50 g 27 Red meat 120 g 7 ... foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Quiche (cheese, eggs) 200 g 212 Omelette with cheese 120 g ...

  20. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  1. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  2. Calcium and phosphorus fluxes during hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate.

    PubMed

    Hou, S H; Zhao, J; Ellman, C F; Hu, J; Griffin, Z; Spiegel, D M; Bourdeau, J E

    1991-08-01

    We evaluated the acute effects of varying dialysate calcium concentration on plasma concentrations and dialyzer fluxes of calcium and phosphorus in adult hemodialysis patients. Seven individuals with stable end-stage renal failure were dialyzed 4 hours, three times weekly. The effects of dialysates containing 1.75, 1.25, or 0.75 mmol/L (70.1, 50.1, or 30.1 mg/L) of calcium were compared. Each patient was studied once at each bath calcium concentration. Compared with the predialysis mean value of 2.27 mmol/L (9.1 mg/dL), plasma total calcium concentration increased, remained constant, or decreased with the 1.75-, 1.25-, or 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysates, respectively. The 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysate did not cause signs or symptoms of hypocalcemia (and the plasma calcium concentration did not fall below 1.80 mmol/L [7.2 mg/dL]). Plasma phosphorus concentrations decreased equally from a predialysis mean value of 2.16 mmol/L (6.7 mg/dL), regardless of the dialysate calcium concentration. After 4 hours of treatment with the three different dialysates, the cumulative calcium fluxes were significantly different. With 1.75 mmol/L calcium, mean bodily calcium accumulation was 21.9 mmol (879 mg). With 1.25 mmol/L, there was no net calcium flux. With 0.75 mmol/L, mean patient calcium loss was 5.8 mmol (231 mg). Mean phosphorus removal after 4 hours was 32.5 mmol (1,006 mg) and was unaffected by dialysate calcium concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1867178

  3. Evidence supporting biologically mediated sulfide oxidation in hot spring ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The sulfide concentration of fluids in hydrothermal ecosystems is one of several factors determining the transition to microbial photosynthesis (Cox et al., 2011, Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351). To investigate the loss of sulfide in Yellowstone hot spring systems, measurements of total dissolved sulfide with respect to time were made in incubation experiments conducted on 0.2-micron filtered (killed controls) vs. unfiltered hot spring water at locations with three different pH:sulfide combinations (pH 2.5 with 50 μM sulfide, 5.2 with 5.6 μM sulfide, and 8.3 with 86 μM sulfide). At the higher pH values, the experiments yielded similar rates of sulfide loss in filtered and unfiltered water of approximately 0.8 (pH 5.2) and 7.6 nmol sulfide L-1s-1 (pH 8.3). At the acidic spring, the unfiltered water lost sulfide at a rate 1.6 times that of the filtered water (8.2 vs. 5 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). These results suggest that the pelagic biomass at the pH 5.2 and 8.3 springs may not affect sulfide loss, whereas in the pH 2.5 spring there appears to be an effect. In addition, the incubation of filamentous biomass with unfiltered water increased the rate of sulfide loss by approximately two-fold at a pH of 2.5 (59 vs. 31 nmol L-1s-1; Cox et al., 2011), five-fold at a pH of 5.2 (3.9 vs. 0.8 nmol sulfide L-1s-1), and barely increased the rate of sulfide loss at a pH of 8.3 (9.1 vs. 8.4 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). Sulfide is predominately present as HS- at a pH of 8.3, which may not be taken up as easily by microorganisms as the H2S (aq) that dominates sulfide speciation at pH 2.5 and 5.2. That the loss of sulfide at acidic pH is due to biotic rather than abiotic factors is further supported by studies with whole mat samples that show greater sulfide consumption than killed controls (D'Imperio et al., 2008, AEM 74, 5802-5808). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the majority of sulfide oxidation occurs in the filamentous biomass of hot spring ecosystems, although

  4. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate intakes of vitamin D and calcium are essential preventative measures and essential components of any therapeutic regimen for osteoporosis. Vitamin D is also important for the prevention of falls. Current evidence suggests that a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml) or higher ...

  5. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sarcoidosis • Hormone disorders, such as overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) • A genetic condition called familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia • Kidney ... topics: www.hormone.org (search for PHPT, calcium, hyperthyroidism, or osteoporosis) • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of Health-NIH): ...

  6. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  7. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  8. Calcium biofortification of crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than half of the world's population is deficient in calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), or zinc (Zn). The consumption of plants, directly or via livestock, containing inadequate concentrations of particular minerals causes these deficiencies. Agronomic and geneti...

  9. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  10. Mitochondrial adaptations to utilize hydrogen sulfide for energy and signaling.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kenneth R

    2012-10-01

    Sulfur is a versatile molecule with oxidation states ranging from -2 to +6. From the beginning, sulfur has been inexorably entwined with the evolution of organisms. Reduced sulfur, prevalent in the prebiotic Earth and supplied from interstellar sources, was an integral component of early life as it could provide energy through oxidization, even in a weakly oxidizing environment, and it spontaneously reacted with iron to form iron-sulfur clusters that became the earliest biological catalysts and structural components of cells. The ability to cycle sulfur between reduced and oxidized states may have been key in the great endosymbiotic event that incorporated a sulfide-oxidizing α-protobacteria into a host sulfide-reducing Archea, resulting in the eukaryotic cell. As eukaryotes slowly adapted from a sulfidic and anoxic (euxinic) world to one that was highly oxidizing, numerous mechanisms developed to deal with increasing oxidants; namely, oxygen, and decreasing sulfide. Because there is rarely any reduced sulfur in the present-day environment, sulfur was historically ignored by biologists, except for an occasional report of sulfide toxicity. Twenty-five years ago, it became evident that the organisms in sulfide-rich environments could synthesize ATP from sulfide, 10 years later came the realization that animals might use sulfide as a signaling molecule, and only within the last 4 years did it become apparent that even mammals could derive energy from sulfide generated in the gastrointestinal tract. It has also become evident that, even in the present-day oxic environment, cells can exploit the redox chemistry of sulfide, most notably as a physiological transducer of oxygen availability. This review will examine how the legacy of sulfide metabolism has shaped natural selection and how some of these ancient biochemical pathways are still employed by modern-day eukaryotes. PMID:22430869

  11. Surface reactivity of pyrite and related sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Riley; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrite, FeS 2, commonly referred to as "Fool's gold" is the most common sulfide in the Earth's surface region. Not only is the mineral ubiquitous, but the reactivity of pyrite is of central importance in a devastating environmental issue known as acid mine drainage (AMD) and in beneficial commercial processes such as mineral benefaction, which can range from the desulfurization of coal to the isolation of copper or gold ores. Pyrite has even been postulated to be a key constituent of a prebiotic iron-sulfur world existing at the high pressure and temperature conditions common to hydrothermal vents at the oceanic floor. The development of an atomic level picture of the structure and reactivity of pyrite is paramount to understanding the chemistry of this mineral in these wide-ranging environments. This contribution focuses on research carried out over the past three decades that has used modern surface science tools to understand the reactivity of pyrite surfaces. An understanding of the reactivity of the pyrite surfaces has benefited from studies using a wide range of experimental techniques that range from vacuum-based experiments utilizing electron and photon spectroscopies, and probe microscopy to in situ studies using infra-red spectroscopy. Synchrotron-based techniques that include photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy have played a large role in both these environments. These techniques have perhaps been the most useful in establishing the structure of the pristine pyrite surface. Related iron sulfides are also briefly introduced in this review including pyrrhotite (Fe xS 1- x) and the dimorph of pyrite, marcasite. The surface reactivity of these sulfides exhibit both similarities and differences to pyrite, and help to bring forward the unique activity of pyrite in both environmentally and technologically important conditions.

  12. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  13. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  14. Studies of in-situ calcium-based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; O'Donnell, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in gasification systems and to evaluate or develop kinetic models applicable to the commercial design of such systems. Both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed combustion systems (partial gasification) will be investigated, as well as subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced. More specifically, the objectives are to: Develop data on kinetics of in-situ desulfurization reactions; study the effect of calcium on the kinetics of carbon conversion rate; study kinetics of oxidation of CaS to CaSO[sup 4]; Develop and identify viable techniques to stabilize CaS; and, carry out further development work on most promising method and determine its commercial economics.

  15. Studies of in-situ calcium-based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; O`Donnell, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The overall objective of the project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in gasification systems and to evaluate or develop kinetic models applicable to the commercial design of such systems. Both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed combustion systems (partial gasification) will be investigated, as well as subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced. More specifically, the objectives are to: Develop data on kinetics of in-situ desulfurization reactions; study the effect of calcium on the kinetics of carbon conversion rate; study kinetics of oxidation of CaS to CaSO{sup 4}; Develop and identify viable techniques to stabilize CaS; and, carry out further development work on most promising method and determine its commercial economics.

  16. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications. PMID:27194953

  17. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon , Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) showmore » that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.« less

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells.

    PubMed

    Toso, Daniel B; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P; Zhou, Z Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications. PMID:27194953

  19. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  20. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  1. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  2. Alternatives to Sulfide Dehairing: Use of Oxidative Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dehairing of cattle hides with sodium sulfide generates large quantities of waste that are of environmental concern as they have a large biological and chemical oxygen demand. Additionally, sodium sulfide is a potential workplace hazard. We had worked with industry to develop a rapid dehairing...

  3. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the metal sulfide concentrate may generate toxic or flammable gases, the appropriate gas detection equipment...

  4. Normal state properties of the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    By making a large number of normal state and superconducting properties measurements, all on the same ternary molybdenum sulfide samples, we obtain values for Fermi surface and superconducting parameters. From these we conclude that sputtered ternary molybdenum sulfides are not completely in the dirty superconductor limit, and that they are d-band metals with a high electron carrier density.

  5. Calcium/metal sulfide battery development program. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, D. L.; Roche, M. F.; Preto, S. K.; Ross, L. E.; Otto, N. C.; Martino, F. J.

    1981-03-01

    A Ca-Al-Si/FeS/sub 2/ cell has been developed and has exhibited reasonably stable capacity through 3200 h of operation. This system is expected to be capable of meeting the ultimate performance goals (i.e., 160 W.h/kg) of this development program. Further tests of this cell system in the coming year will better define its ultimate performance capabilities.

  6. Results of the TTF-TCNQ and the calcium carbonate crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1992-01-01

    Experiment A0139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and TTF-TCNQ. Although temperature data was lost, the experimental program had been working since the valves in all containers had been opened. All four experiments produced crystals of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals will be presented. Comparisons will be made with our previous space solution growth experiments. The TTF-TCNQ crystals are no longer of the highest interest, so this activity has been terminated in favor of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate crystallizations.

  7. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  8. Physical and microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas; Gallucci, Emanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    The microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in dam concrete were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in both dam concrete samples and laboratory concrete. The results show that iron sulfide inclusions with a diameter of a few micrometers in the aggregates are reactive and appear to generate expansion first in the aggregates and consequently in the cement paste. The expansion from the iron sulfides is a consequence of the increase in volume of the reaction products formed. The types of iron sulfide present in the aggregate, mainly pyrrhotite (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), show similar reaction behavior in the aggregates. The released sulfate can lead to a secondary ettringite formation in the concrete matrix, but the degradation associated with this appears to be minor. The reaction of the iron sulfides was found to be very slow even when laboratory samples were exposed to elevated temperatures.

  9. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  10. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  11. Nutrition in calcium nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease with a complex pathogenesis due to genetic and environmental factors. The importance of social and health effects of nephrolithiasis is further highlighted by the strong tendency to relapse of the disease. Long-term prospective studies show a peak of disease recurrence within 2–3 years since onset, 40-50% of patients have a recurrence after 5 years and more than 50-60% after 10 years. International nutritional studies demonstrated that nutritional habits are relevant in therapy and prevention approaches of nephrolithiasis. Water, right intake of calcium, low intake of sodium, high levels of urinary citrate are certainly important for the primary and secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis. In this review is discussed how the correction of nutritional mistakes can reduce the incidence of recurrent nephrolithiasis. PMID:23634702

  12. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    DOEpatents

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  13. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  14. Complexometric Determination of Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) complexes with numerous mineral ions, including calcium and magnesium. This reaction can be used to determine the amount of these minerals in a sample by a complexometric titration. Endpoints in the titration are detected using indicators that change color when they complex with mineral ions. Calmagite and eriochrome black T (EBT) are such indicators that change from blue to pink when they complex with calcium and magnesium. In the titration of a mineral-containing solution with EDTA, the solution turns from pink to blue at the endpoint with either indicator. The pH affects a complexometric EDTA titration in several ways, and must be carefully controlled. A major application of EDTA titration is testing the hardness of water, for which the method described is an official one (Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, Method 2340C; AOAC Method 920.196).

  15. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  16. Prebiotics and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    A prebiotic substance has been defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. Therefore, compared to probiotics, which introduce exogenous bacteria into the colonic microflora, a prebiotic aims at stimulating the growth of one or a limited number of the potentially health-promoting indigenous micro-organisms, thus modulating the composition of the natural ecosystem. In recent years, increasing attention has been focussed on the possible beneficial effects of prebiotics, such as enhanced resistance to invading pathogens, improved bowel function, anti-colon cancer properties, lipid lowering action, improved calcium bioavailability, amongst others. The objective of this review is to critically assess the available data on the effects of prebiotics on calcium bioavailability, and place it in the context of human physiology and, when possible, explain the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The review will also try to highlight future areas of research that may help in the evaluation of prebiotics as potential ingredients for functional foods aimed at enhancing calcium bioavailability and protecting against osteoporosis. PMID:12691259

  17. Synthesis and characterization of calcium and iron co-doped lanthanum silicate oxyapatites by sol-gel process for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao Guo; Jiang, San Ping; Li, Yun Yong

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanum silicate oxyapatites with and without calcium (Ca) and iron (Fe) doping, La10Si5FeO26.5 (LSFO) and La9.5Ca0.5Si5.5Fe0.5O26.5 (LCSFO), are synthesized by sol-gel process (SGP) and solid state reaction process (SSP). The phase formation, microstructure and conductivities of LSFO and LCSFO oxyapatites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) and complex impedance analysis. The morphologies of LCSFO oxyapatite nanoparticles synthesized by SGP were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermal and decomposition properties of the LCSFO gel were analyzed by simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA). The results show that the phase formation of LCSFO synthesized by SGP occurs at temperatures as low as 750 °C, significantly lower than ∼1500 °C required for LCSFO synthesized by SSP. Co-doping of Ca and Fe significantly improves the densification, sinterability and oxide-ion conductivity of lanthanum silicate oxyapatites. The best results were obtained on LCSFO synthesized by SGP, achieving oxide-ion conductivity of 2.08 × 10-2 S cm-1 at 800 °C, which is higher than 5.68 × 10-3 S cm-1 and 1.04 × 10-2 S cm-1 for LSFO and LCSFO synthesized by SSP, respectively, under the identical test conditions.

  18. Copper sulfide solid-state electrolytic memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Liang

    Copper sulfide thin films with electrical switching and memory effect were grown using a chemical vapor reaction apparatus. The formation of copper sulfide film undergoes a process which includes nucleation, growth of nucleation, coalescence into continuous film, and film thickening. The initial phase of the sulfide growth was reaction limited followed by a diffusion limited phase involving out-diffusion of copper. The thin film tends to nucleate and grow at energy favorable sites such as twinning boundary. Sulfidation of polycrystalline copper results in formation of voids at the interface between the copper and its sulfide. (111) copper has the highest sulfidation rate followed by (100) and (110) copper planes. Moreover, the sulfidation rate near the microfabricated plug edge was found to be faster than the rate at the center of the plug. A mechanism based on competing sulfidation sites due to the geometry difference between the plugs' center and their edge is presented to explain this phenomenon. We show for the first time that field-assisted solid-electrolyte copper sulfide thin film device can function as a switch by reversing the voltage polarity between copper and inert metal electrodes through a copper-sulfide layer in planar and vertical structures. The copper oxide at the top of copper sulfide greatly increased the turn-on voltage. The turn-on voltage depends linearly on the film thickness. Copper sulfide devices in micrometer dimension were microfabricated using IC compatible techniques and characterized showing the same switching effect. Electrode contact area effect on switching performance was investigated in term of turn-on voltage, turn-off voltage, on-state resistance and off-state resistance. Four-point resistance measurement unit, Hall Effect and transfer length measurement were also fabricated together with copper sulfide switching devices and they were studied in order to determine the CuxS carrier type, carrier concentration, film resistivity

  19. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  20. Hydrogen sulfide selectivity with carbonyl sulfide removal to less than PPM levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, T.R.; Pearce, R.L.; Foster, W.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in market conditions and plant operating economics require examination of traditional processes and operating practices in gas treating applications for upgrading to more stringent standards of efficiency in order to remain competitive while returning a satisfactory operating profit margin to the company. Anticipated reduction in solvent usage, improvements in Claus sulfur recovery unit performance and lower energy costs induced Ashland's Catlettsburg refinery to convert its entire sulfur removal system from monoethanolamine to methyldiethanolamine. One of the seven product streams being treated required extremely low carbonyl sulfide specifications. When the initial converted operations evidenced a need to improve the carbonyl sulfide removal, GAS/SPEC Tech Service produced an innovative solution which allowed for efficient operation which still achieved these objectives.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum sulfide thin films using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Soumyadeep; Sarkar, Shaibal K.; Mahuli, Neha

    2015-01-15

    Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide are used to deposit aluminum sulfide thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature ranging from 100 to 200 °C. Growth rate of 1.3 Å per ALD cycle is achieved by in-situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is found that the growth rate per ALD cycle is highly dependent on the purging time between the two precursors. Increased purge time results in higher growth rate. Surface limited chemistry during each ALD half cycle is studied by in-situ Fourier transformed infrared vibration spectroscopy. Time of flight secondary ion-mass spectroscopy measurement is used to confirm elemental composition of the deposited films.

  2. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  3. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchen; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhu, David Z; Shi, Hanchang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards, and requires expensive programs for its prevention. The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments. The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments. The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated. The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment. The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide) ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions of efficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss. The optimal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems. PMID:25597685

  4. Stabilization of mercury-containing wastes using sulfide.

    PubMed

    Piao, Haishan; Bishop, Paul L

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of our studies on mercury stabilization using sulfide. Primary stabilization variables such as stabilization pH and sulfide/mercury molar ratio were tested. Mercury stabilization effectiveness was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the constant pH leaching tests. The influence of interfering ions on mercury immobilization was also tested. The experimental results indicate that the sulfide-induced treatment technology is an effective way to minimize mercury leaching. It was found that the most effective mercury stabilization occurs at pH 6 combined with a sulfide/mercury molar ratio of 1. The combined use of increased dosage of sulfide and ferrous ions ([S]/[Hg]=2 and [Fe]/[Hg]=3 at pH=6) can significantly reduce interferences by chloride and/or phosphate during sulfide-induced mercury immobilization. The sulfide-treated waste stabilization efficiency reached 98%, even with exposure of the wastes to high pH leachants. PMID:16099084

  5. Solubility of hydrogen sulfide in n-methylpyrrolidone

    SciTech Connect

    Yarym-Agaev, N.L.; Matvienko, V.G.; Povalyaeva, N.V.

    1980-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen sulfide in N-methylpyrrolidone was investigated over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The dynamic variant of the gravimetric method was used at hydrogen sulfide pressures equal to or below atmospheric, and the static variant at higher pressures. In the dynamic variant of the gravimetric method hydrogen sulfide is passed through a known amount of solvent until saturation is reached, and the amount of gas dissolved is found from the weight increase. This method is particularly convenient in studies of highly soluble gases when the solvent has a low vapor pressure. If the vapor pressure of the solvent exceeded this value a correction for entrainment of solvent vapor by undissolved gas was applied. The study showed that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in N-methylpyrrolidone rose steeply with increase of pressure and decrease of temperature and that it can be used as an effective absorbent of hydrogen sulfide in highly sulfurous natural gas. Since the solubility of hydrogen sulfide under atmospheric pressure is fairly high even at elevated temperatures, effective regeneration of N-methylpyrrolidone is possible by a combination of heating and blowing with an inert gas or by application of vacuum for removal of the hydrogen sulfide.

  6. [Oxidation of sulfide minerals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, P T; Chebotarev, G M; Kovalenko, E V; Volkov, Iu A

    1981-01-01

    Samples of natural pyrites and sphalerites were subjected to the action of the mineral medium 9K with 1 g of Fe3+ per litre in the presence and in the absence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, and incubated at 28 degrees C under the stationary conditions for 30 days. The chemical composition of the solutions was studied after leaching as well as changes of the surfaces of monoliths. The deepest etching of surfaces with the formation of crusts and films of jarosite, limonite and goslarite occurs upon the combined action of bacteria and Fe3+ in regions of a fine-zonal structure enriched with an isomorphous arsenic admixture which are characterized by a defective weak structure. The pyrite and sphalerite from Charmitan with a higher arsenic and iron content were leached more than the pyrite and sphalerite from Kurgashincan. This was also corroborated by chemical analyses of leaching solutions and by monometric studies of crushed sulfide samples. PMID:7219212

  7. Dibenzyl Sulfide Metabolism by White Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Wong, Eddie T.; Dettman, Heather; Gray, Murray R.; Pickard, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial metabolism of organosulfur compounds is of interest in the petroleum industry for in-field viscosity reduction and desulfurization. Here, dibenzyl sulfide (DBS) metabolism in white rot fungi was studied. Trametes trogii UAMH 8156, Trametes hirsuta UAMH 8165, Phanerochaete chrysosporium ATCC 24725, Trametes versicolor IFO 30340 (formerly Coriolus sp.), and Tyromyces palustris IFO 30339 all oxidized DBS to dibenzyl sulfoxide prior to oxidation to dibenzyl sulfone. The cytochrome P-450 inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole eliminated dibenzyl sulfoxide oxidation. Laccase activity (0.15 U/ml) was detected in the Trametes cultures, and concentrated culture supernatant and pure laccase catalyzed DBS oxidation to dibenzyl sulfoxide more efficiently in the presence of 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) than in its absence. These data suggest that the first oxidation step is catalyzed by extracellular enzymes but that subsequent metabolism is cytochrome P-450 mediated. PMID:12571066

  8. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  9. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  11. Hydrogen sulfide exposure in an adult male

    PubMed Central

    Doujaiji, Bassam; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is responsible for many incidents of occupational toxic exposure, especially in the petroleum industry. The clinical effects of H2S depend on its concentration and the duration of exposure. H2S is immediately fatal when concentrations are over 500-1000 parts per million (ppm) but exposure to lower concentrations, such as 10-500 ppm, can cause various respiratory symptoms that range from rhinitis to acute respiratory failure. H2S may also affect multiple organs, causing temporary or permanent derangements in the nervous, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, and hematological systems. We present a case of occupational exposure to H2S leading to multi-organ involvement, acute respiratory failure, organizing pneumonia, and shock resembling acute sepsis. The patient also developed mild obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:20103963

  12. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  13. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  14. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  16. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  17. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  18. Chemical foundations of hydrogen sulfide biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R

    2013-11-30

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  19. Lanthanum sulfides as high temperature thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Matsuda, S.; Raag, V.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoelectric property measurements have been made for the nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides, LaS(R) with R in the range 1.33-1.50. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities increase with temperature from 200 to 1100 C. Power factors (defined as Seebeck coefficient squared divided by electrical resistivity) generally increase both as the temperature is increased and as the compound composition is varied from LaS(1.48) to LaS(1.35). The power factor values combined with estimates of thermal conductivities for LaS(1.38) and LaS(1.4) yield figures of merit greater than 0.0005 at 1000 C.

  20. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet. PMID:25095643

  1. Surface passivation of lead sulfide nanocrystals with low electron affinity metals: photoluminescence and photovoltaic performance.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Mirfasih, Mohammad Hassan; Hasanzadeh, Soheil; Aashuri, Hossein; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2016-04-28

    During the last decade, solution-processed colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted significant attention for low-cost fabrication of optoelectronic devices. In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) CQDs were synthesized via the hot injection method and the effect of doping elements with low electron affinity, including cadmium, calcium and zinc, on the passivation of trap states was investigated. A red-shift in the luminescence emission was observed by doping through passivation of lead dangling bonds. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements showed that the lifetime of charged carriers was significantly enhanced by cadmium doping (∼80%) which is quite noticeable compared with calcium- and zinc-doped nanocrystals. External quantum efficiency measurements on thin solid films (∼300 nm) prepared by spin coating supported improved lifetime of carriers through passivation of mid-gap trap states. In order to show the potential application of the doping process, bulk heterojunction CQD solar cells were fabricated. It was found that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was improved up to ∼40%; the highest improvement was observed with the Cd treatment. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the effect of doping on the density of states. The results showed that doping with low electron affinity metals effectively reduced the deep trap states of PbS QDs. PMID:27075607

  2. MODIFICATION OF METHODS 9030 AND 9031 FOR THE ANALYSIS OF SULFIDE BY SPECIFIC ION ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two OSW SW-846 methods (Method 9030 and 9031) used for the determination of sulfide have been modified to include the use of sulfide specific ion electrodes (SIE). urrently in both methods sulfide is converted to hydrogen sulfide and distilled into a scrubber solution for subsequ...

  3. Calcium Kinetics During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Wastney, Meryl E.; OBrien, Kimberly O.; Lane, Helen W.

    1999-01-01

    Bone loss is one of the most detrimental effects of space flight, threatening to limit the duration of human space missions. The ability to understand and counteract this loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after extended-duration missions. The hypotheses to be tested in this project are that space flight alters calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism, and that calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism will return to baseline within days to weeks of return to Earth. These hypotheses will be evidenced by elevated rates of bone mineral resorption and decreased bone mineral deposition, decreased absorption of dietary calcium, altered calcitropic endocrine profiles, elevated excretion of calcium in urine and feces, and elevated excretion of markers of bone resorption. The second hypothesis will be evidenced by return of indices of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism to preflight levels within days to weeks of return to Earth. Studies will be conducted on International Space Station astronauts before, during, and after extended-duration flights. Measurements of calcium kinetics, bone mass, and endocrine/biochemical markers of bone and calcium homeostasis will be conducted. Kinetic studies utilizing dual isotope tracer kinetic studies and mathematical modeling techniques will allow for determination of bone calcium deposition, bone calcium resorption, dietary calcium absorption and calcium excretion (both urinary and endogenous fecal excretion). These studies will build upon preliminary work conducted on the Russian Mir space station. The results from this project will be critical for clarifying how microgravity affects bone and calcium homeostasis, and will provide an important control point for assessment of countermeasure efficacy. These results are expected to aid in developing countermeasures for bone loss, both for space crews and for individuals on Earth who have metabolic bone diseases.

  4. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A.

    2015-12-15

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH{sub 3} phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH{sub 2}, are calculated for the pressure interval 100–225 GPa. It is found that the I4/mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH{sub 3} phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH{sub 2} phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH{sub 2} and SH{sub 3}) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  5. Integrated thin film cadmium sulfide solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Abbott, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication and tests of flexible integrated thin-film cadmium sulfide solar cells and modules are discussed. The development of low cost and high production rate methods for interconnecting cells into large solar arrays is described. Chromium thin films were applied extensively in the deposited cell structures as a means to: (1) achieve high adherence between the cadmium sulfide films and the vacuum-metallized copper substrates, (2) obtain an ohmic contact to the cadmium sulfide films, and (3) improve the adherence of gold films as grids or contact areas.

  6. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L.; Gorski, Anthony J.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  7. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1993-05-18

    A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  8. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  9. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  10. Mechanisms of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2003-02-01

    Calcium is absorbed in the mammalian small intestine by two general mechanisms: a transcellular active transport process, located largely in the duodenum and upper jejunum; and a paracellular, passive process that functions throughout the length of the intestine. The transcellular process involves three major steps: entry across the brush border, mediated by a molecular structure termed CaT1, intracellular diffusion, mediated largely by the cytosolic calcium-binding protein (calbindinD(9k) or CaBP); and extrusion, mediated largely by the CaATPase. Chyme travels down the intestinal lumen in approximately 3 h, spending only minutes in the duodenum, but over 2 h in the distal half of the small intestine. When calcium intake is low, transcellular calcium transport accounts for a substantial fraction of the absorbed calcium. When calcium intake is high, transcellular transport accounts for only a minor portion of the absorbed calcium, because of the short sojourn time and because CaT1 and CaBP, both rate-limiting, are downregulated when calcium intake is high. Biosynthesis of CaBP is fully and CaT1 function is approximately 90% vitamin D-dependent. At high calcium intakes CaT1 and CaBP are downregulated because 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the active vitamin D metabolite, is downregulated. PMID:12520541

  11. Calcium channel blockers and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Eckert, A

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative dementia is mainly caused by Alzheimer's disease and/or cerebrovascular abnormalities. Disturbance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis is central to the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, enhanced calcium load may be brought about by extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β. Recent studies suggest that soluble forms facilitate influx through calcium-conducting ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Calcium channel blockade attenuates amyloid-β-induced neuronal decline in vitro and is neuroprotective in animal models. Vascular dementia, on the other hand, is caused by cerebral hypoperfusion and may benefit from calcium channel blockade due to relaxation of the cerebral vasculature. Several calcium channel blockers have been tested in clinical trials of dementia and the outcome is heterogeneous. Nimodipine as well as nilvadipine prevent cognitive decline in some trials, whereas other calcium channel blockers failed. In trials with a positive outcome, BP reduction did not seem to play a role in preventing dementia, indicating a direct protecting effect on neurons. An optimization of calcium channel blockers for the treatment of dementia may involve an increase of selectivity for presynaptic calcium channels and an improvement of the affinity to the inactivated state. Novel low molecular weight compounds suitable for proof-of-concept studies are now available. PMID:23638877

  12. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  13. Enhanced Mantle Conductivity from Sulfides beneath the Sierra Nevada?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    A region of enhanced mantle conductivity (0.03-0.1 S/m) beneath the southern Sierra Nevada, where elevations of over 4000 m are found, has been attributed previously to 3-5% basaltic melt (Park et al., 1996) and to a mix of basaltic and sulfide melt (Ducea and Park, 2000). Because the sulfide melt is assumed to have similar conductivities to its solid counterpart (10,000 S/m), very small amounts (< 0.1%) of sulfide are needed in order to reduce the bulk conductivity from matrix values of about 0.003 S/m or even that of the matrix-basalt melt mix to the values observed. Basaltic melt percentages of less than 1% are needed in the presence of ~0.1% sulfide melt in order to match the observed mantle values. Xenoliths from the Holocene basalts in the Big Pine Volcanic Field contain 0.06-0.4% sulfide, so the estimated values are reasonable. Given the lack of evidence for volumetrically extensive, young (< 10 Ma) basaltic volcanism, calculated residence times of approximately 100 Ka for 3-5% partial melt, the short (about 300 Ka) times needed to develop connected pathways for the basalt, and the young extension of the adjacent Basin and Range province, a mixed melt with both basalt and sulfides seems more reasonable. This conclusion presupposes that the sulfide melt is somehow interconnected in the mantle. Models in which the matrix, the basaltic melt, and the sulfide melt each form interconnected, interlaced networks leads to much higher predictions of mantle conductivity; the sulfide melt fraction must be discontinuous in order to lower bulk conductivity. Petrological studies of sulfide-silicate systems confirm this conclusion; sulfide melts form isolated blebs on the surfaces of olivine within interconnected basaltic melt channels (Holzheid et al., 2000). Simple series-parallel models of ~1% continuous basaltic melt and ~0.01% discontinuous sulfide melt provide bulk conductivities comparable to the observed mantle values. More complicated equivalent media and Hashin

  14. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Calcium alginate is prepared...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL- racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate ((C9H16NO5)2Ca, CAS Reg. No. of the D... calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium pantothenate is prepared synthetically...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  20. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  1. Catalytic reduction of CO with hydrogen sulfide. 4. Temperature-programmed desorption of methanethiol on anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.D.; White, J.M.; Ratcliffe, C.T.

    1986-07-03

    The interaction of methanethiol with anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile was studied by temperature-programmed desorption. Dissociative adsorption occurs on rutile but is insignificant on anatase. Decomposition products are dominated by H/sub 2/ on rutile and by CH/sub 4/ on sulfided rutile. In both cases desorption occurs between 500 and 775 K. The 5- and 4-coordinate sites on the (110) face of rutile are proposed as the active sites for decomposition. The dominance of methane on a sulfided surface is attributed to the relatively large supply of highly mobile surface hydrogen atoms.

  2. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  3. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  4. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  5. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  6. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for...

  7. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmott, D.D.; Wetteland, C.; Stimac, J.; Larocque, A.C.L.; Brearley, A.

    2003-08-26

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques.

  8. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools.

  9. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  10. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  11. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and “Analysis for Dichlorobenzene in Ryton... percent by weight of finished resin. (2) Minimum inherent viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3)...

  12. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  13. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  14. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  15. Crystallinity of Fe-Ni Sulfides in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Ohsumi, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Le, L.

    2008-03-01

    We examine the crystallinity and crystal structures of Fe-Ni sulfides in five carbonaceous chondrites - Acfer 094 (CM2), Tagish Lake (C2 ungrouped), Kaidun C1, Bali (CV2/3 oxidized), and Efremovka (CV3 reduced).

  16. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfide in wastewaters discharged by plants operating in all subcategories except the hair save or pulp... by plants operating in the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory (subpart...

  17. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfide in wastewaters discharged by plants operating in all subcategories except the hair save or pulp... by plants operating in the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory (subpart...

  18. [Activity of hydrogen sulfide production enzymes in kidneys of rats].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, A V; Pentiuk, O O

    2009-01-01

    An experimental research of activity and kinetic descriptions of enzymes participating in formation of hydrogen sulfide in the kidney of rats has been carried out. It was established that cystein, homocystein and thiosulphate are the basic substrates for hydrogen sulfide synthesis. The higest activity for hydrogen sulfide production belongs to thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cysteine aminotransferase, less activity is characteristic of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathio-nine gamma-lyase. The highest affinity to substrate is registered for thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. It is discovered that the substrate inhibition is typical of all hydrogen sulfide formation enzymes, although this characteristic is the most expressed thiosulfat-dithiolsulfurtransferase. PMID:20387629

  19. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine.

    PubMed

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools. PMID:27247020

  20. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools. PMID:27247020

  1. A New Preparation Method of Ultrafine Particles of Metallic Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Saito, Yoshio; Fujita, Kazuo

    1987-12-01

    Ultrafine particles of metallic sulfides have been produced by the reaction of metal and sulfur vapor. The sulfur vapor was prepared by evaporating sulfur powder from a quartz boat using the atmospheric temperature of either the heated metal or boat. Electron microscopic observation of the particles of Mo3S4 and PbS has shown them to be typical examples of the produced sulfides.

  2. Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Muruska, H. Paul; Sansregret, Joseph L.; Young, Archie R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

  3. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui Zhu, Huaiyong; Shi, Jeffrey; Parkinson, Gordon; Lu, G.Q.

    2007-03-15

    The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

  4. Sulfide catalysts for reducing SO2 to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2001-01-01

    A highly efficient sulfide catalyst for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur, which maximizes the selectivity of elemental sulfur over byproducts and has a high conversion efficiency. Various feed stream contaminants, such as water vapor are well tolerated. Additionally, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen sulfides can be employed as the reducing gases while maintaining high conversion efficiency. This allows a much wider range of uses and higher level of feed stream contaminants than prior art catalysts.

  5. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    PubMed Central

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  6. Recent developments in intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2009-02-01

    Calcium absorption proceeds by transcellular and paracellular flux, with the latter accounting for most absorbed calcium when calcium intake is adequate. Vitamin D helps regulate transcellular calcium transport by increasing calcium uptake via a luminal calcium channel and by inducing the cytosolic calcium transporting protein, calbindinD(9k). Recent studies utilizing knockout mice have challenged the functional importance of the channel and calbindin. To integrate the new findings with many previous studies, the function of the two molecules must be evaluated in the calcium transport and economy of mice. When calcium intake is high, transcellular calcium transport contributes little to total calcium absorption. Therefore, increasing calcium intake seems the most effective nutritional approach to ensure adequate absorption and prevent bone loss. PMID:19178653

  7. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing features ... maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are given ...

  8. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  9. Calcium transporters: From fields to the table

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium transporters regulate calcium fluxes within cells. Plants, like all organisms, contain channels, pumps, and exchangers to carefully modulate intracellular calcium levels. This review presents a summary of the recent advances in cloning and characterizing of these transporters and highlight...

  10. Calcium impregnation of coal enriched in CO.sub.2 using high-pressure techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Gavalas, George R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Methods are described for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate by utilizing an aqueous phase ionic reaction between calcium acetate, calcium hydroxide, and water with CO.sub.2 contained within the coal. The coal is enriched in CO.sub.2 by contacting it with CO.sub.2 at high pressure, in either a continuous or pulsed mode. The inclusion of CO.sub.2 in the coal during the process does not involve evacuating the coal and subsequently absorbing CO.sub.2 onto the coal as in prior methods. Rather, the coal is treated with carbon dioxide at high pressure in a practical and viable approach. The impregnation of coal by calcium compounds not only reduces sulfur emissions by effectively tying up the sulfur as calcium sulfide or sulfate, but also increases the gasification or combustion rate. The invention also encompasses the use of other Group IIA elements, as well as the coal products resulting from the methods of treatment described.

  11. Major Minerals - Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus are essential elements critically important for the function of the musculoskeletal system, including the formation and transduction of energy and the maintenance of healthy bone. The major calcium concern for physically active healthy middle-aged adults is to consu...

  12. Calcium Intake: A Lifelong Proposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amschler, Denise H.

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the current problem of low calcium intake in the United States among all age groups, the role of calcium in the formation and maintenance of bone mass, and major factors influencing absorption. Osteoporosis is discussed, and current recommendations for Recommended Dietary allowance are provided. (Author/MT)

  13. Electrochemical cell with calcium anode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Hosmer, Pamela K.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1979-01-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a calcium anode and a suitable cathode in an alkaline electrolyte consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of an hydroxide and a chloride. Specifically disclosed is a mechanically rechargeable calcium/air fuel cell with an aqueous NaOH/NaCl electrolyte.

  14. Bioavailability and stability of mercury sulfide in Armuchee (USA) soil

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Su, Yi; Monts, David L.; Waggoner, Charles A.; Matta, Frank B.

    2007-07-01

    Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate mercury-contaminated DOE sites. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the ecosystem. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide in an Armuchee (eastern US ) soil. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of mercury sulfide by various extractants. The results show that mercury sulfide in contaminated Armuchee soil was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. After planting, soil mercury sulfide is more easily dissolved by both 4 M and 12 M nitric acid than pure mercury sulfide reagent. Dissolution kinetics of soil mercury sulfide and pure chemical reagent by nitric acid are different. Mercury release by EDTA from HgS-contaminated soil increased with time of reaction and soil mercury level. Chelating chemicals increase the solubility and bioavailability of mercury in HgS-contaminated soil. (authors)

  15. Sulfide as a soil phytotoxin—a review

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Leon P. M.; Govers, Laura L.; Janssen, Inge C. J. M.; Geurts, Jeroen J. M.; Van der Welle, Marlies E. W.; Van Katwijk, Marieke M.; Van der Heide, Tjisse; Roelofs, Jan G. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In wetland soils and underwater sediments of marine, brackish and freshwater systems, the strong phytotoxin sulfide may accumulate as a result of microbial reduction of sulfate during anaerobiosis, its level depending on prevailing edaphic conditions. In this review, we compare an extensive body of literature on phytotoxic effects of this reduced sulfur compound in different ecosystem types, and review the effects of sulfide at multiple ecosystem levels: the ecophysiological functioning of individual plants, plant-microbe associations, and community effects including competition and facilitation interactions. Recent publications on multi-species interactions in the rhizosphere show even more complex mechanisms explaining sulfide resistance. It is concluded that sulfide is a potent phytotoxin, profoundly affecting plant fitness and ecosystem functioning in the full range of wetland types including coastal systems, and at several levels. Traditional toxicity testing including hydroponic approaches generally neglect rhizospheric effects, which makes it difficult to extrapolate results to real ecosystem processes. To explain the differential effects of sulfide at the different organizational levels, profound knowledge about the biogeochemical, plant physiological and ecological rhizosphere processes is vital. This information is even more important, as anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into freshwater ecosystems and organic loads into freshwater and marine systems are still much higher than natural levels, and are steeply increasing in Asia. In addition, higher temperatures as a result of global climate change may lead to higher sulfide production rates in shallow waters. PMID:23885259

  16. Sulfide inhibition of and metabolism by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter; Marshall, Doug C; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Mike T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a classic cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, is also an in vitro oxidase substrate and an in vivo candidate hormonal ('gasotransmitter') species affecting sleep and hibernation. H2S, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) share some common features. All are low-molecular-mass physiological effectors and also oxidase inhibitors, capable of binding more than one enzyme site, and each is an oxidizable 'substrate'. The oxidase oxidizes CO to CO2, NO to nitrite and sulfide to probable persulfide species. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in an aerobic steady state with ascorbate and cytochrome c is rapidly inhibited by sulfide in a biphasic manner. At least two successive inhibited species are involved, probably partially reduced. The oxidized enzyme, in the absence of turnover, occurs in at least two forms: the 'pulsed' and 'resting' states. The pulsed form reacts aerobically with sulfide to form two intermediates, 'P' and 'F', otherwise involved in the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme. Sulfide can directly reduce the oxygen-reactive a3CuB binuclear centre in the pulsed state. The resting enzyme does not undergo such a step, but only a very slow one-electron reduction of the electron-transferring haem a. In final reactivation phases, both the steady-state inhibition of catalysis and the accumulation of P and F states are reversed by slow sulfide oxidation. A model for this complex reaction pattern is presented. PMID:24059525

  17. Nitrite as an antidote for acute hydrogen sulfide intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.F.; Bradbury, C.M.; Connors, A.J.; Donini, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    The detoxification of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) by a heme catalyzed oxidation was examined as part of an on-going study of H/sub 2/S toxicity. Interlocking O/sub 2/ absorption and sulfide depletion data indicate that both oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin are effective catalytic agents. Although the latter is more efficacious, the life time of excess sulfide in the presence of oxygen and either of the above is of the order of minutes. It has also been established that the formation of methemoglobin following nitrite administration occurs preferentially under oxygen poor conditions. Under an atmospheric or oxygen enriched environment, which favors sulfide depletion, the nitrite retards sulfide oxidation. Thus nitrite as an antidote for acute H/sub 2/S intoxication can only be effective within the first few minutes after the exposure, at which time resuscitation and/or ventilation of the victim is likely to produce conditions in which the nitrite actually slows sulfide removal.

  18. Metal Sulfides as Sensing Materials for Chemoresistive Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gaiardo, Andrea; Fabbri, Barbara; Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Giberti, Alessio; Gherardi, Sandro; Vanzetti, Lia; Malagù, Cesare; Zonta, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at a broad overview of the results obtained with metal-sulfide materials in the field of chemoresistive gas sensing. Indeed, despite the well-known electrical, optical, structural and morphological features previously described in the literature, metal sulfides present lack of investigation for gas sensing applications, a field in which the metal oxides still maintain a leading role owing to their high sensitivity, low cost, small dimensions and simple integration, in spite of the wide assortment of sensing materials. However, despite their great advantages, metal oxides have shown significant drawbacks, which have led to the search for new materials for gas sensing devices. In this work, Cadmium Sulfide and Tin (IV) Sulfide were investigated as functional materials for thick-film chemoresistive gas-sensors fabrication and they were tested both in thermo- and in photo-activation modes. Furthermore, electrical characterization was carried out in order to verify their gas sensing properties and material stability, by comparing the results obtained with metal sulfides to those obtained by using their metal-oxides counterparts. The results highlighted the possibility to use metal sulfides as a novel class of sensing materials, owing to their selectivity to specific compounds, stability, and the possibility to operate at room temperature. PMID:26927120

  19. Trace element-sulfide mineral association in eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.M.

    1989-03-01

    Eastern oil shales including the Chattanooga Shale in Tennessee and the various other time-equivalent black shales in the central portion of the United States represent a major source of hydrocarbons. A primary concern for the development of eastern oil shale and all fossil fuels is the high concentration of sulfide minerals and associated with these materials. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate trace elements in sulfide minerals from a Chattanooga Shale core from central Tennessee and (2) establish mineral residence and stratigraphic distribution of selected trace elements. Previous researchers have suggested the residency of the trace elements As, Cu, Cd, Pb, Mo, Ni, and Zn as being sulfide minerals, either as separate distinct phases, inclusions, or isomorphous substitution. The most significant contribution derived from the present study is the direct observation and association of selected trace and minor elements with sulfide minerals. Rather than an indirect or inferred trace element- sulfide mineral association, sulfide mineral phases were isolated allowing the morphology and composition to be directly evaluated. 9 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Metal Sulfides as Sensing Materials for Chemoresistive Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gaiardo, Andrea; Fabbri, Barbara; Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Giberti, Alessio; Gherardi, Sandro; Vanzetti, Lia; Malagù, Cesare; Zonta, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at a broad overview of the results obtained with metal-sulfide materials in the field of chemoresistive gas sensing. Indeed, despite the well-known electrical, optical, structural and morphological features previously described in the literature, metal sulfides present lack of investigation for gas sensing applications, a field in which the metal oxides still maintain a leading role owing to their high sensitivity, low cost, small dimensions and simple integration, in spite of the wide assortment of sensing materials. However, despite their great advantages, metal oxides have shown significant drawbacks, which have led to the search for new materials for gas sensing devices. In this work, Cadmium Sulfide and Tin (IV) Sulfide were investigated as functional materials for thick-film chemoresistive gas-sensors fabrication and they were tested both in thermo- and in photo-activation modes. Furthermore, electrical characterization was carried out in order to verify their gas sensing properties and material stability, by comparing the results obtained with metal sulfides to those obtained by using their metal-oxides counterparts. The results highlighted the possibility to use metal sulfides as a novel class of sensing materials, owing to their selectivity to specific compounds, stability, and the possibility to operate at room temperature. PMID:26927120