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Sample records for features high mitotic

  1. High-frequency ultrasound analysis of post-mitotic arrest cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Maurice M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of cancer cell death would permit rapid feedback on treatment response. One technique showing such promise is quantitative ultrasound. High-frequency ultrasound spectral radiofrequency analysis was used to study cell death in breast cancer cell samples. Quantitative ultrasound parameters, including attenuation, spectral slope, spectral 0-MHz-intercept, midband fit, and fitted parameters displayed significant changes with paclitaxel-induced cell death, corresponding to observations of morphological changes seen in histology and electron microscopy. In particular, a decrease in spectral slope from 0.24±0.07 dB/MHz to 0.04±0.09 dB/MHz occurred over 24 hours of treatment time and was identified as an ultrasound parameter capable of differentiating post-mitotic arrest cell death from classical apoptosis. The formation of condensed chromatin aggregates of 1 micron or greater in size increased the number of intracellular scatterers, consistent with a hypothesis that nuclear material is a primary source of ultrasound scattering in dying cells. It was demonstrated that the midband fit quantitatively correlated to cell death index, with a Pearson R-squared value of 0.99 at p<0.01. These results suggest that high-frequency ultrasound can not only qualitatively assess the degree of cancer cell death, but may be used to quantify the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27226984

  2. High throughput screening of natural products for anti-mitotic effects in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, E; Badisa, R; Mack, N; Deiab, S; Soliman, K F A

    2014-06-01

    Some of the most effective anti-mitotic microtubule-binding agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxus brevifolia) were originally discovered through robust National Cancer Institute botanical screenings. In this study, a high-through put microarray format was utilized to screen 897 aqueous extracts of commonly used natural products (0.00015-0.5 mg/mL) relative to paclitaxel for anti-mitotic effects (independent of toxicity) on proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells. The data obtained showed that less than 1.34 % of the extracts tested showed inhibitory growth (IG50 ) properties <0.0183 mg/mL. The most potent anti-mitotics (independent of toxicity) were Mandrake root (Podophyllum peltatum), Truja twigs (Thuja occidentalis), Colorado desert mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens), Tou Gu Cao [symbol: see text] Speranskia herb (Speranskia tuberculata), Bentonite clay, Bunge root (Pulsatilla chinensis), Brucea fruit (Brucea javanica), Madder root (Rubia tinctorum), Gallnut of Chinese Sumac (Melaphis chinensis), Elecampane root (Inula Helenium), Yuan Zhi [symbol: see text] root (Polygala tenuifolia), Pagoda Tree fruit (Melia Toosendan), Stone root (Collinsonia Canadensis), and others such as American Witchhazel, Arjun, and Bladderwrack. The strongest tumoricidal herbs identified from amongst the subset evaluated for anti-mitotic properties were wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), beth root (Trillium Pendulum), and alkanet root (Lithospermum canescens). Additional data was obtained on a lesser-recognized herb: (S. tuberculata), which showed growth inhibition on BT-474 (human ductal breast carcinoma) and Ishikawa (human endometrial adenocarcinoma) cells with ability to block replicative DNA synthesis, leading to G2 arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, these findings present relative potency of anti-mitotic natural plants that are effective against human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell division. PMID:24105850

  3. High throughput screening of natural products for anti-mitotic effects in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, E; Badisa, R; Mack, N; Deiab, S; Soliman, KFA

    2013-01-01

    Some of the most effective anti-mitotic microtubule-binding agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxus brevifolia) were originally discovered through robust NCI botanical screenings. In this study, a high-through microarray format was utilized to screen 897 aqueous extracts of commonly used natural products (0.00015–0.5 mg/ml) relative to paclitaxel for anti-mitotic effects (independent of toxicity) on proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells. The data obtained showed that less than 1.34 % tested showed inhibitory growth (IG50) properties <0.0183 mg/ml. The most potent anti-mitotics (independent of toxicity) were Mandrake root (Podophyllum peltatum), Truja Twigs (Thuja occidentalis), Colorado desert mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens), Tou Gu Cao Speranskia Herb (Speranskia tuberculata), Bentonite Clay, Bunge Root (Pulsatilla chinensis), Brucea Fruit (Brucea javanica), Madder Root (Rubia tinctorum), Gallnut of Chinese Sumac (Melaphis chinensis), Elecampane Root (Inula Helenium), Yuan Zhi Root (Polygala tenuifolia), Pagoda Tree Fruit (Melia Toosendan), Stone Root (Collinsonia Canadensis) and others such as American Witchhazel, Arjun and Bladderwrack. The strongest tumoricidal herbs identified from amongst the subset evaluated for anti-mitotic properties were wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), beth-root (Trillium Pendulum) and alkanet-root (Lithospermum canescens). Additional data was obtained on a lesser-recognized herb: (Speranskia tuberculata) which showed growth inhibition on BT-474 (human ductal breast carcinoma) and Ishikawa (human endometrial adenocarcinoma) cells with ability to block replicative DNA synthesis leading to G2 arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, these findings present relative potency of natural anti-mitotic resources effective against human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell division. PMID:24105850

  4. Nup2 requires a highly divergent partner, NupA, to fulfill functions at nuclear pore complexes and the mitotic chromatin region

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Sarine; Suresh, Subbulakshmi; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) undergo dramatic changes during mitosis, which in vertebrates and Aspergillus nidulans involves movement of Nup2 from NPCs to the chromatin region to fulfill unknown functions. This transition is shown to require the Cdk1 mitotic kinase and be promoted prematurely by ectopic expression of the NIMA kinase. Nup2 localizes with a copurifying partner termed NupA, a highly divergent yet essential NPC protein. NupA and Nup2 locate throughout the chromatin region during prophase but during anaphase move to surround segregating DNA. NupA function is shown to involve targeting Nup2 to its interphase and mitotic locations. Deletion of either Nup2 or NupA causes identical mitotic defects that initiate a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC)–dependent mitotic delay and also cause defects in karyokinesis. These mitotic problems are not caused by overall defects in mitotic NPC disassembly–reassembly or general nuclear import. However, without Nup2 or NupA, although the SAC protein Mad1 locates to its mitotic locations, it fails to locate to NPCs normally in G1 after mitosis. Collectively the study provides new insight into the roles of Nup2 and NupA during mitosis and in a surveillance mechanism that regulates nucleokinesis when mitotic defects occur after SAC fulfillment. PMID:25540430

  5. Extremely high-dimensional feature selection via feature generating samplings.

    PubMed

    Li, Shutao; Wei, Dan

    2014-06-01

    To select informative features on extremely high-dimensional problems, in this paper, a sampling scheme is proposed to enhance the efficiency of recently developed feature generating machines (FGMs). Note that in FGMs O(mlogr) time complexity should be taken to order the features by their scores; the entire computational cost of feature ordering will become unbearable when m is very large, for example, m > 10(11) , where m is the feature dimensionality and r is the size of the selected feature subset. To solve this problem, in this paper, we propose a feature generating sampling method, which can reduce this computational complexity to O(Gslog(G)+G(G+log(G))) while preserving the most informative features in a feature buffer, where Gs is the maximum number of nonzero features for each instance and G is the buffer size. Moreover, we show that our proposed sampling scheme can be deemed as the birth-death process based on random processes theory, which guarantees to include most of the informative features for feature selections. Empirical studies on real-world datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed sampling method. PMID:23864272

  6. High diversity and widespread occurrence of mitotic spore mats in ectomycorrhizal Pezizales.

    PubMed

    Healy, R A; Smith, M E; Bonito, G M; Pfister, D H; Ge, Z-W; Guevara, G G; Williams, G; Stafford, K; Kumar, L; Lee, T; Hobart, C; Trappe, J; Vilgalys, R; McLaughlin, D J

    2013-03-01

    Fungal mitospores may function as dispersal units and/ or spermatia and thus play a role in distribution and/or mating of species that produce them. Mitospore production in ectomycorrhizal (EcM) Pezizales is rarely reported, but here we document mitospore production by a high diversity of EcM Pezizales on three continents, in both hemispheres. We sequenced the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial large subunit (LSU) nuclear rDNA from 292 spore mats (visible mitospore clumps) collected in Argentina, Chile, China, Mexico and the USA between 2009 and 2012. We collated spore mat ITS sequences with 105 fruit body and 47 EcM root sequences to generate operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Phylogenetic inferences were made through analyses of both molecular data sets. A total of 48 OTUs from spore mats represented six independent EcM Pezizales lineages and included truffles and cup fungi. Three clades of seven OTUs have no known meiospore stage. Mitospores failed to germinate on sterile media, or form ectomycorrhizas on Quercus, Pinus and Populus seedlings, consistent with a hypothesized role of spermatia. The broad geographic range, high frequency and phylogenetic diversity of spore mats produced by EcM Pezizales suggests that a mitospore stage is important for many species in this group in terms of mating, reproduction and/or dispersal. PMID:23205556

  7. Analysis of the mitotic exit control system using locked levels of stable mitotic cyclin.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, Benjamin J; Lu, Ying; Procko, Andrea L; Timney, Benjamin L; Cross, Frederick R

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) both promotes mitotic entry (spindle assembly and anaphase) and inhibits mitotic exit (spindle disassembly and cytokinesis), leading to an elegant quantitative hypothesis that a single cyclin oscillation can function as a ratchet to order these events. This ratchet is at the core of a published ODE model for the yeast cell cycle. However, the ratchet model requires appropriate cyclin dose-response thresholds. Here, we test the inhibition of mitotic exit in budding yeast using graded levels of stable mitotic cyclin (Clb2). In opposition to the ratchet model, stable levels of Clb2 introduced dose-dependent delays, rather than hard thresholds, that varied by mitotic exit event. The ensuing cell cycle was highly abnormal, suggesting a novel reason for cyclin degradation. Cdc14 phosphatase antagonizes Clb2-Cdk, and Cdc14 is released from inhibitory nucleolar sequestration independently of stable Clb2. Thus, Cdc14/Clb2 balance may be the appropriate variable for mitotic regulation. Although our results are inconsistent with the aforementioned ODE model, revision of the model to allow Cdc14/Clb2 balance to control mitotic exit corrects these discrepancies, providing theoretical support for our conclusions. PMID:19920813

  8. Continued Stabilization of the Nuclear Higher-Order Structure of Post-Mitotic Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alva-Medina, Janeth; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Dent, Myrna A. R.; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellular terminal differentiation (TD) correlates with a permanent exit from the cell cycle and so TD cells become stably post-mitotic. However, TD cells express the molecular machinery necessary for cell proliferation that can be reactivated by experimental manipulation, yet it has not been reported the stable proliferation of any type of reactivated TD cells. Neurons become post-mitotic after leaving the ventricular zone. When neurons are forced to reenter the cell cycle they invariably undergo cell death. Wider evidence indicates that the post-mitotic state cannot solely depend on gene products acting in trans, otherwise mutations in the corresponding genes may lead to reentry and completion of the cell cycle in TD cells, but this has not been observed. In the interphase, nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear nuclear matrix (NM). The DNA-NM interactions define a higher-order structure in the cell nucleus (NHOS). We have previously compared the NHOS of aged rat hepatocytes with that of early post-mitotic rat neurons and our results indicated that a very stable NHOS is a common feature of both senescent and post-mitotic cells in vivo. Principal Findings In the present work we compared the NHOS in rat neurons from different post-natal ages. Our results show that the trend towards further stabilization of the NHOS in neurons continues throughout post-natal life. This phenomenon occurs in absence of overt changes in the post-mitotic state and transcriptional activity of neurons, suggesting that it is independent of functional constraints. Conclusions Apparently the continued stabilization of the NHOS as a function of time is basically determined by thermodynamic and structural constraints. We discuss how the resulting highly stable NHOS of neurons may be the structural, non-genetic basis of their permanent and irreversible post-mitotic state. PMID:21731716

  9. Evaluation of Tumor Cell Proliferation by Ki-67 Expression and Mitotic Count in Lymph Node Metastases from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Sura; Wik, Elisabeth; Davidsen, Benedicte; Aas, Hans; Aas, Turid; Akslen, Lars A.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have addressed the risk of recurrence by assessing proliferation markers in lymph node metastasis from breast cancer. Here, we aimed to examine Ki-67 expression and mitotic count in lymph nodes in comparison with primary tumors. A cohort of node positive breast cancer (n = 168) was studied as a part of the prospective Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (1996–2009). The percentage of Ki-67 positivity was counted per 500 tumor cells in hot-spot areas (x630). Mitotic count was conducted in the most cellular and mitotic active areas in 10 high power fields (x400). Our results showed that Ki-67 and mitotic count were significantly correlated between primary tumor and lymph nodes (Spearman`s correlation 0. 56 and 0.46, respectively) and were associated with most of the histologic features of the primary tumor. Univariate survival analysis (log-rank test) showed that high Ki-67 and mitotic count in the primary tumor and lymph node metastasis significantly predicted risk of recurrence. In multivariate analysis, mitotic count in the lymph node metastasis was an independent predictor of tumor recurrence. In conclusion, proliferation markers in lymph node metastases significantly predicted disease free survival in node positive breast cancer. PMID:26954367

  10. Sources and Structures of Mitotic Crossovers That Arise When BLM Helicase Is Absent in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    LaFave, Matthew C.; Andersen, Sabrina L.; Stoffregen, Eric P.; Holsclaw, Julie K.; Kohl, Kathryn P.; Overton, Lewis J.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, has numerous functions that prevent mitotic crossovers. We used unique features of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate origins and properties of mitotic crossovers that occur when BLM is absent. Induction of lesions that block replication forks increased crossover frequencies, consistent with functions for BLM in responding to fork blockage. In contrast, treatment with hydroxyurea, which stalls forks, did not elevate crossovers, even though mutants lacking BLM are sensitive to killing by this agent. To learn about sources of spontaneous recombination, we mapped mitotic crossovers in mutants lacking BLM. In the male germline, irradiation-induced crossovers were distributed randomly across the euchromatin, but spontaneous crossovers were nonrandom. We suggest that regions of the genome with a high frequency of mitotic crossovers may be analogous to common fragile sites in the human genome. Interestingly, in the male germline there is a paucity of crossovers in the interval that spans the pericentric heterochromatin, but in the female germline this interval is more prone to crossing over. Finally, our system allowed us to recover pairs of reciprocal crossover chromosomes. Sequencing of these revealed the existence of gene conversion tracts and did not provide any evidence for mutations associated with crossovers. These findings provide important new insights into sources and structures of mitotic crossovers and functions of BLM helicase. PMID:24172129

  11. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  12. A Framework for Image-Based Classification of Mitotic Cells in Asynchronous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Scott D.; Newberg, Justin Y.; Szafran, Adam T.; Hall, Rebecca M.; Brinkley, Bill R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract High content screening (HCS) has emerged an important tool for drug discovery because it combines rich readouts of cellular responses in a single experiment. Inclusion of cell cycle analysis into HCS is essential to identify clinically suitable anticancer drugs that disrupt the aberrant mitotic activity of cells. One challenge for integration of cell cycle analysis into HCS is that cells must be chemically synchronized to specific phases, adding experimental complexity to high content screens. To address this issue, we have developed a rules-based method that utilizes mitotic phosphoprotein monoclonal 2 (MPM-2) marker and works consistently in different experimental conditions and in asynchronous populations. Further, the performance of the rules-based method is comparable to established machine learning approaches for classifying cell cycle data, indicating the robustness of the features we use in the framework. As such, we suggest the use of MPM-2 analysis and its associated expressive features for integration into HCS approaches. PMID:22084958

  13. Prognostic relevance of the mitotic count and the amount of viable tumour after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for primary, localised, high-grade soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, D; Werner, M; Pink, D; Traub, F; Schuler, M; Gosheger, G; Jobke, B; Reichardt, P; Tunn, P U

    2015-01-01

    Background: We sought to examine whether mitotic count (MC) and the amount of viable tumour (VT) following neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy (SC) for primary, localised, high-grade soft tissue sarcoma (STS) correlate with prognosis. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 57 patients who underwent SC involving a combination of an anthracycline and an alkylating agent, followed by surgical resection between 2001 and 2011. Results: The amount of VT after chemotherapy was significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) and event-free survival (EFS). Patients with <10% VT had a DSS of 94% at 5 years, compared with 61% for patients with ⩾10% VT (P=0.033); EFS was 75%, compared with 48% (P=0.030). Patients with an MC of ⩾20/10 high power fields (HPF) after chemotherapy had a significantly lower DSS (33% vs 84% at 5 years, P<0.001) and EFS (40% vs 63% at 5 years, P=0.019) than patients with an MC of <20/10 HPF. Conclusions: The MC and the amount of VT after neoadjuvant therapy for primary, localised, high-grade STS appear to correlate with prognosis. If these results are validated prospectively, then they could provide a rational for the design of neoadjuvant treatment modification/escalation studies, analogue to the EURAMOS-1 trial for bone sarcomas. PMID:25535732

  14. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  15. Mitotic Illegitimate Recombination Is a Mechanism for Novel Changes in High-Molecular-Weight Glutenin Subunits in Wheat-Rye Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhongwei; Liu, Dengcai; Zhang, Lianquan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Wenjie; Yan, Zehong; Zheng, Youliang; Zhang, Huaigang; Yen, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Wide hybrids can have novel traits or changed expression of a quantitative trait that their parents do not have. These phenomena have long been noticed, yet the mechanisms are poorly understood. High-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are seed storage proteins encoded by Glu-1 genes that only express in endosperm in wheat and its related species. Novel HMW-GS compositions have been observed in their hybrids. This research elucidated the molecular mechanisms by investigating the causative factors of novel HMW-GS changes in wheat-rye hybrids. HMW-GS compositions in the endosperm and their coding sequences in the leaves of F1 and F2 hybrids between wheat landrace Shinchunaga and rye landrace Qinling were investigated. Missing and/or additional novel HMW-GSs were observed in the endosperm of 0.5% of the 2078 F1 and 22% of 36 F2 hybrid seeds. The wildtype Glu-1Ax null allele was found to have 42 types of short repeat sequences of 3-60 bp long that appeared 2 to 100 times. It also has an in-frame stop codon in the central repetitive region. Analyzing cloned allele sequences of HMW-GS coding gene Glu-1 revealed that deletions involving the in-frame stop codon had happened, resulting in novel ∼1.8-kb Glu-1Ax alleles in some F1 and F2 plants. The cloned mutant Glu-1Ax alleles were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the HMW-GSs produced matched the novel HMW-GSs found in the hybrids. The differential changes between the endosperm and the plant of the same hybrids and the data of E. coli expression of the cloned deletion alleles both suggested that mitotic illegitimate recombination between two copies of a short repeat sequence had resulted in the deletions and thus the changed HMW-GS compositions. Our experiments have provided the first direct evidence to show that mitotic illegitimate recombination is a mechanism that produces novel phenotypes in wide hybrids. PMID:21887262

  16. Chemically diverse microtubule stabilizing agents initiate distinct mitotic defects and dysregulated expression of key mitotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Cristina C; Peng, Jiangnan; Johnson, Tyler A; Crews, Phillip; Mooberry, Susan L

    2013-04-15

    Microtubule stabilizers are some of the most successful drugs used in the treatment of adult solid tumors and yet the molecular events responsible for their antimitotic actions are not well defined. The mitotic events initiated by three structurally and biologically diverse microtubule stabilizers; taccalonolide AJ, laulimalide/fijianolide B and paclitaxel were studied. These microtubule stabilizers cause the formation of aberrant, but structurally distinct mitotic spindles leading to the hypothesis that they differentially affect mitotic signaling. Each microtubule stabilizer initiated different patterns of expression of key mitotic signaling proteins. Taccalonolide AJ causes centrosome separation and disjunction failure to a much greater extent than paclitaxel or laulimalide, which is consistent with the distinct defects in expression and activation of Plk1 and Eg5 caused by each stabilizer. Localization studies revealed that TPX2 and Aurora A are associated with each spindle aster formed by each stabilizer. This suggests a common mechanism of aster formation. However, taccalonolide AJ also causes pericentrin accumulation on every spindle aster. The presence of pericentrin at every spindle aster initiated by taccalonolide AJ might facilitate the maintenance and stability of the highly focused asters formed by this stabilizer. Laulimalide and paclitaxel cause completely different patterns of expression and activation of these proteins, as well as phenotypically different spindle phenotypes. Delineating how diverse microtubule stabilizers affect mitotic signaling pathways could identify key proteins involved in modulating sensitivity and resistance to the antimitotic actions of these compounds. PMID:23399639

  17. Wee-1 Kinase Inhibition Overcomes Cisplatin Resistance Associated with High-Risk TP53 Mutations in Head and Neck Cancer through Mitotic Arrest Followed by Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdullah A.; Monroe, Marcus M.; Ortega Alves, Marcus V.; Patel, Ameeta A.; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Fitzgerald, Alison L.; Neskey, David M.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Caulin, Carlos; Hsu, Teng-Kuei; McDonald, Thomas O.; Kimmel, Marek; Meyn, Raymond E.; Lichtarge, Olivier; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Although cisplatin has played a role in “standard-of-care” multimodality therapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), the rate of treatment failure remains particularly high for patients receiving cisplatin whose tumors have mutations in the TP53 gene. We found that cisplatin treatment of HNSCC cells with mutant TP53 leads to arrest of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, leading us to hypothesize that the wee-1 kinase inhibitor MK-1775 would abrogate the cisplatin-induced G2 block and thereby sensitize isogenic HNSCC cells with mutant TP53 or lacking p53 expression to cisplatin. We tested this hypothesis using clonogenic survival assays, flow cytometry, and in vivo tumor growth delay experiments with an orthotopic nude mouse model of oral tongue cancer. We also used a novel TP53 mutation classification scheme to identify which TP53 mutations are associated with limited tumor responses to cisplatin treatment. Clonogenic survival analyses indicate that nanomolar concentration of MK-1775 sensitizes HNSCC cells with high-risk mutant p53 to cisplatin. Consistent with its ability to chemosensitize, MK-1775 abrogated the cisplatin-induced G2 block in p53-defective cells leading to mitotic arrest associated with a senescence-like phenotype. Furthermore, MK-1775 enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin in vivo in tumors harboring TP53 mutations. These results indicate that HNSCC cells expressing high-risk p53 mutations are significantly sensitized to cisplatin therapy by the selective wee-1 kinase inhibitor, supporting the clinical evaluation of MK-1775 in combination with cisplatin for the treatment of patients with TP53 mutant HNSCC. PMID:25504633

  18. Isolation of Human Mitotic Protein Phosphatase Complexes: Identification of a Complex between Protein Phosphatase 1 and the RNA Helicase Ddx21

    PubMed Central

    De Wever, Veerle; Lloyd, David C.; Nasa, Isha; Nimick, Mhairi; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Gourlay, Robert; Morrice, Nick; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2012-01-01

    Metazoan mitosis requires remodelling of sub-cellular structures to ensure proper division of cellular and genetic material. Faults often lead to genomic instability, cell cycle arrests and disease onset. These key structural changes are under tight spatial-temporal and post-translational control, with crucial roles for reversible protein phosphorylation. The phosphoprotein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A are paramount for the timely execution of mitotic entry and exit but their interaction partners and substrates are still largely unresolved. High throughput, mass-spectrometry based studies have limited sensitivity for the detection of low-abundance and transient complexes, a typical feature of many protein phosphatase complexes. Moreover, the limited timeframe during which mitosis takes place reduces the likelihood of identifying mitotic phosphatase complexes in asynchronous cells. Hence, numerous mitotic protein phosphatase complexes still await identification. Here we present a strategy to enrich and identify serine/threonine protein phosphatase complexes at the mitotic spindle. We thus identified a nucleolar RNA helicase, Ddx21/Gu, as a novel, direct PP1 interactor. Furthermore, our results place PP1 within the toposome, a Topoisomerase II alpha (TOPOIIα) containing complex with a key role in mitotic chromatin regulation and cell cycle progression, possibly via regulated protein phosphorylation. This study provides a strategy for the identification of further mitotic PP1 partners and the unravelling of PP1 functions during mitosis. PMID:22761809

  19. Depletion of pre-mRNA splicing factor Cdc5L inhibits mitotic progression and triggers mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Mu, R; Wang, Y-B; Wu, M; Yang, Y; Song, W; Li, T; Zhang, W-N; Tan, B; Li, A-L; Wang, N; Xia, Q; Gong, W-L; Wang, C-G; Zhou, T; Guo, N; Sang, Z-H; Li, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing mitotic progression via targeted anti-mitotic therapy is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Therefore, the exploration and elucidation of molecular targets and pathways in mitosis are critical for the development of anti-mitotic drugs. Here, we show that cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L), a pre-mRNA splicing factor, is a regulator of mitotic progression. Depletion of Cdc5L causes dramatic mitotic arrest, chromosome misalignments and sustained activation of spindle assembly checkpoint, eventually leading to mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, these defects result from severe impairment of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and serious DNA damage. Genome-wide gene expression analysis reveals that Cdc5L modulates the expression of a set of genes involved in the mitosis and the DNA damage response. We further found that the pre-mRNA splicing efficiency of these genes were impaired when Cdc5L was knocked down. Interestingly, Cdc5L is highly expressed in cervical tumors and osteosarcoma. Finally, we demonstrate that downregulation of Cdc5L decreases the cell viability of related tumor cells. These results suggest that Cdc5L is a key regulator of mitotic progression and highlight the potential of Cdc5L as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24675469

  20. Depletion of pre-mRNA splicing factor Cdc5L inhibits mitotic progression and triggers mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Mu, R; Wang, Y-B; Wu, M; Yang, Y; Song, W; Li, T; Zhang, W-N; Tan, B; Li, A-L; Wang, N; Xia, Q; Gong, W-L; Wang, C-G; Zhou, T; Guo, N; Sang, Z-H; Li, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing mitotic progression via targeted anti-mitotic therapy is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Therefore, the exploration and elucidation of molecular targets and pathways in mitosis are critical for the development of anti-mitotic drugs. Here, we show that cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L), a pre-mRNA splicing factor, is a regulator of mitotic progression. Depletion of Cdc5L causes dramatic mitotic arrest, chromosome misalignments and sustained activation of spindle assembly checkpoint, eventually leading to mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, these defects result from severe impairment of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and serious DNA damage. Genome-wide gene expression analysis reveals that Cdc5L modulates the expression of a set of genes involved in the mitosis and the DNA damage response. We further found that the pre-mRNA splicing efficiency of these genes were impaired when Cdc5L was knocked down. Interestingly, Cdc5L is highly expressed in cervical tumors and osteosarcoma. Finally, we demonstrate that downregulation of Cdc5L decreases the cell viability of related tumor cells. These results suggest that Cdc5L is a key regulator of mitotic progression and highlight the potential of Cdc5L as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24675469

  1. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  2. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  3. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  4. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  5. Energy Conservation Featured in Illinois High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The William Fremd High School in Palatine, Illinois, scheduled to open in 1977, is being built with energy conservation uppermost in mind. In this system, 70 heat pumps will heat and cool 300,000 square feet of educational facilities. (Author/MLF)

  6. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220038

  7. High dimensional feature reduction via projection pursuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Luis; Landgrebe, David

    1994-01-01

    The recent development of more sophisticated remote sensing systems enables the measurement of radiation in many more spectral intervals than previously possible. An example of that technology is the AVIRIS system, which collects image data in 220 bands. As a result of this, new algorithms must be developed in order to analyze the more complex data effectively. Data in a high dimensional space presents a substantial challenge, since intuitive concepts valid in a 2-3 dimensional space to not necessarily apply in higher dimensional spaces. For example, high dimensional space is mostly empty. This results from the concentration of data in the corners of hypercubes. Other examples may be cited. Such observations suggest the need to project data to a subspace of a much lower dimension on a problem specific basis in such a manner that information is not lost. Projection Pursuit is a technique that will accomplish such a goal. Since it processes data in lower dimensions, it should avoid many of the difficulties of high dimensional spaces. In this paper, we begin the investigation of some of the properties of Projection Pursuit for this purpose.

  8. Mitotically active microglandular hyperplasia of the cervix: a case series with implications for the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2014-09-01

    Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is a benign proliferation of endocervical glands with relatively uniform columnar or cuboidal nuclei, and rare to absent mitoses. Endometrial adenocarcinomas with mucinous differentiation or a microglandular pattern can closely mimic MGH, often resulting in a diagnostic dilemma in small biopsy specimens. Rare unusual morphologic features-mild to moderate nuclear atypia, solid or reticular growth pattern, hobnail and signet ring cells-have been previously reported in MGH. We present 9 cases of unusual, mitotically active-between 5 and 11 mitotic figures per 10 HPF-MGH, all of which presented as endocervical polyps and had morphologic features otherwise typical of MGH. The patients' age ranged between 35 and 56 yr, 2 patients were postmenopausal. High-risk human papillomavirus status was available in 7 patients, all of which were negative. The Ki-67 proliferation index ranged between 1% and 15%, and all cases were negative for p16, carcinoembryonic antigen, and vimentin immunostains. The clinical follow-up ranged from 3 to 76.2 mo, with a median of 40.7 mo, all patients were doing well without evidence of endocervical or endometrial malignancy. In summary, this case series documents the presence of rare cases of MGH demonstrating significant mitotic activity (up to 11/10 HPF) without a negative impact on the clinical prognosis. Mitotic activity alone should be interpreted with caution in small biopsy specimens with microglandular growth pattern. Immunohistochemical stains, especially p16, carcinoembryonic antigen, and vimentin, may be helpful-in addition to the patient's clinical history and human papillomavirus status to rule out endocervical or endometrial malignancy. PMID:25083971

  9. Forced mitotic entry of S-phase cells as a therapeutic strategy induced by inhibition of WEE1.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Marieke; Sharpe, Rachel; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Hurd, Melissa S; Shumway, Stuart D; Toniatti, Carlo; Ashworth, Alan; Turner, Nicholas C

    2012-06-01

    Inhibition of the protein kinase WEE1 synergizes with chemotherapy in preclinical models and WEE1 inhibitors are being explored as potential cancer therapies. Here, we investigate the mechanism that underlies this synergy. We show that WEE1 inhibition forces S-phase-arrested cells directly into mitosis without completing DNA synthesis, resulting in highly abnormal mitoses characterized by dispersed chromosomes and disorganized bipolar spindles, ultimately resulting in mitotic exit with gross micronuclei formation and apoptosis. This mechanism of cell death is shared by CHK1 inhibitors, and combined WEE1 and CHK1 inhibition forces mitotic entry from S-phase in the absence of chemotherapy. We show that p53/p21 inactivation combined with high expression of mitotic cyclins and EZH2 predispose to mitotic entry during S-phase with cells reliant on WEE1 to prevent premature cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1 activation. These features are characteristic of aggressive breast, and other, cancers for which WEE1 inhibitor combinations represent a promising targeted therapy. PMID:22628408

  10. FE Features in Highly Obscured AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan F.

    1999-01-01

    This final report is a summary of the combined study of ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) observations of NGC 7582 with archival ROSAT HRI (High Resolution Imager) and PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) data. These observations were important in that they established that X-ray emission in NGC 7582, the most narrow-line of NLXGs (narrow-line X-ray galaxies), is associated with an AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei). Thus implying that all NLXGs are obscured AGN, as has been hypothesized to explain the X-ray spectral background paradox.

  11. The S. pombe “cytokinesis” NDR kinase Sid2 activates Fin1 NIMA kinase to control mitotic commitment via Pom1/Wee1

    PubMed Central

    Grallert, Agnes; Connolly, Yvonne; Smith, Duncan L.; Simanis, Viesturs; Hagan, Iain M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic exit integrates the reversal of the phosphorylation events initiated by mitotic kinases with a controlled cytokinesis event that cleaves the cell in two. The Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) of budding yeast regulates both processes, while the fission yeast equivalent, the Septum Initiation Network (SIN), only controls the execution of cytokinesis. The components and architecture of the SIN and MEN are highly conserved1. It is currently assumed that the functions of the core SIN/MEN components are restricted to their characterised roles at the end of mitosis. We now show that the NDR kinase component of the fission yeast SIN, Sid2/Mob1, acts independently of the other known SIN components in G2 phase of the cell cycle to control the timing of mitotic commitment. Sid2/Mob1 promotes mitotic commitment by directly activating the NIMA related kinase Fin1. Fin1’s activation promotes its own destruction, thereby making Fin1 activation a transient feature of G2 phase. This spike of Fin1 activation modulates the activity of the Pom1/Cdr1/Cdr2 geometry network towards Wee1. PMID:22684255

  12. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  13. Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ~200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes. PMID:27145846

  14. Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2013-01-01

    The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

  15. EGF Induced Centrosome Separation Promotes Mitotic Progression and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R.; Isokane, Mayumi; Cosenza, Marco R.; Krämer, Alwin; Ellenberg, Jan; Fry, Andrew M.; Schiebel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Timely and accurate assembly of the mitotic spindle is critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and centrosome separation is a key step in this process. The timing of centrosome separation varies dramatically between cell types; however, the mechanisms responsible for these differences and its significance are unclear. Here, we show that activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling determines the timing of centrosome separation. Premature separation of centrosomes decreases the requirement for the major mitotic kinesin Eg5 for spindle assembly, accelerates mitosis and decreases the rate of chromosome missegregation. Importantly, EGF stimulation impacts upon centrosome separation and mitotic progression to different degrees in different cell lines. Cells with high EGFR levels fail to arrest in mitosis upon Eg5 inhibition. This has important implications for cancer therapy since cells with high centrosomal response to EGF are more susceptible to combinatorial inhibition of EGFR and Eg5. PMID:23643362

  16. Loops determine the mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    In mitosis, chromosomes undergo a condensation into highly compacted, rod-like objects. Many models have been put forward for the higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes including radial loop and hierarchical folding models. Additionally, mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes under different conditions were measured. However, the internal organization of mitotic chromosomes still remains unclear. Here we present a polymer model for mitotic chromosomes and show how chromatin loops play a major role for their mechanical properties. The key assumption of the model is the ability of the chromatin fibre to dynamically form loops with the help of binding proteins. Our results show that looping leads to a tight compaction and significantly increases the bending rigidity of chromosomes. Moreover, our qualitative prediction of the force elongation behaviour is close to experimental findings. This indicates that the internal structure of mitotic chromosomes is based on self-organization of the chromatin fibre. We also demonstrate how number and size of loops have a strong influence on the mechanical properties. We suggest that changes in the mechanical characteristics of chromosomes can be explained by an altered internal loop structure. YZ gratefully appreciates funding by the German National Academic Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and support by the Heidelberg Graduate School for Mathematical and Computational Methods in the Sciences (HGS MathComp).

  17. A mitotic function for the high-mobility group protein HMG20b regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Daniels, M J; Garnett, M J; Venkitaraman, A R

    2011-07-28

    The inactivation of BRCA2, a suppressor of breast, ovarian and other epithelial cancers, triggers instability in chromosome structure and number, which are thought to arise from defects in DNA recombination and mitotic cell division, respectively. Human BRCA2 controls DNA recombination via eight BRC repeats, evolutionarily conserved motifs of ∼35 residues, that interact directly with the recombinase RAD51. How BRCA2 controls mitotic cell division is debated. Several studies by different groups report that BRCA2 deficiency affects cytokinesis. Moreover, its interaction with HMG20b, a protein of uncertain function containing a promiscuous DNA-binding domain and kinesin-like coiled coils, has been implicated in the G2-M transition. We show here that HMG20b depletion by RNA interference disturbs the completion of cell division, suggesting a novel function for HMG20b. In vitro, HMG20b binds directly to the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and exhibits the highest affinity for BRC5, a motif that binds poorly to RAD51. Conversely, the BRC4 repeat binds strongly to RAD51, but not to HMG20b. In vivo, BRC5 overexpression inhibits the BRCA2-HMG20b interaction, recapitulating defects in the completion of cell division provoked by HMG20b depletion. In contrast, BRC4 inhibits the BRCA2-RAD51 interaction and the assembly of RAD51 at sites of DNA damage, but not the completion of cell division. Our findings suggest that a novel function for HMG20b in cytokinesis is regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and separate this unexpected function for the BRC repeats from their known activity in DNA recombination. We propose that divergent tumor-suppressive pathways regulating chromosome segregation as well as chromosome structure may be governed by the conserved BRC motifs in BRCA2. PMID:21399666

  18. Dynamical modeling of syncytial mitotic cycles in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Calzone, Laurence; Thieffry, Denis; Tyson, John J; Novak, Bela

    2007-01-01

    Immediately following fertilization, the fruit fly embryo undergoes 13 rapid, synchronous, syncytial nuclear division cycles driven by maternal genes and proteins. During these mitotic cycles, there are barely detectable oscillations in the total level of B-type cyclins. In this paper, we propose a dynamical model for the molecular events underlying these early nuclear division cycles in Drosophila. The model distinguishes nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of the embryo and permits exploration of a variety of rules for protein transport between the compartments. Numerical simulations reproduce the main features of wild-type mitotic cycles: patterns of protein accumulation and degradation, lengthening of later cycles, and arrest in interphase 14. The model is consistent with mutations that introduce subtle changes in the number of mitotic cycles before interphase arrest. Bifurcation analysis of the differential equations reveals the dependence of mitotic oscillations on cycle number, and how this dependence is altered by mutations. The model can be used to predict the phenotypes of novel mutations and effective ranges of the unmeasured rate constants and transport coefficients in the proposed mechanism. PMID:17667953

  19. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  20. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  1. Exploring KM Features of High-Performance Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Wen

    2007-12-01

    For reacting to an increasingly rival business environment, many companies emphasize the importance of knowledge management (KM). It is a favorable way to explore and learn KM features of high-performance companies. However, finding out the critical KM features of high-performance companies is a qualitative analysis problem. To handle this kind of problem, the rough set approach is suitable because it is based on data-mining techniques to discover knowledge without rigorous statistical assumptions. Thus, this paper explored KM features of high-performance companies by using the rough set approach. The results show that high-performance companies stress the importance on both tacit and explicit knowledge, and consider that incentives and evaluations are the essentials to implementing KM.

  2. Axin localizes to mitotic spindles and centrosomes in mitotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Ki-Joon; Kim, Sewoon; Seo, Eunjeong; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2009-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In addition, numerous recent studies have shown that various Wnt signaling components are involved in mitosis and chromosomal instability. However, the role of Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, in mitosis has remained unclear. Using monoclonal antibodies against Axin, we found that Axin localizes to the centrosome and along mitotic spindles. This localization was suppressed by siRNA specific for Aurora A kinase and by Aurora kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, Axin over-expression altered the subcellular distribution of Plk1 and of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3{beta}) without producing any notable changes in cellular phenotype. In the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor, Axin over-expression induced the formation of cleavage furrow-like structures and of prominent astral microtubules lacking midbody formation in a subset of cells. Our results suggest that Axin modulates distribution of Axin-associated proteins such as Plk1 and GSK3{beta} in an expression level-dependent manner and these interactions affect the mitotic process, including cytokinesis under certain conditions, such as in the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor.

  3. Origin of the high vlos feature in the Galactic bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Schönrich, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    We analyse a controlled N-body+smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of a growing disc galaxy within a non-growing, live dark halo. The disc is continuously fed with gas and star particles on near-circular orbits and develops a bar comparable in size to the one of the Milky Way (MW). We extract line-of-sight velocity vlos distributions from the model and compare it to data recently obtained from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey which show distinct high-velocity features around vlos ˜ 200 km s-1. With an APOGEE-like selection function, but without any scaling nor adjustment, we find vlos distributions very similar to those in APOGEE. The stars that make up the high vlos features at positive longitudes l are preferentially young bar stars (age τ ≲ 2-3 Gyr) which move away from us along the rear side of the bar. At negative l, we find the corresponding low vlos feature from stars moving towards us. At l > 10 deg, the highest vlos stars are a mixture of bar and background disc stars which complicates the interpretation of observations. The main peak in vlos is dominated by fore- and background stars. At a given time, ˜40-50 per cent of high vlos stars occupy x1-like orbits, but a significant fraction are on more complex orbits. The observed feature is likely due to a population of dynamically cool, young stars formed from gas just outside the bar and subsequently captured by the growing bar. The high vlos features disappear at high latitudes |b| ≳ 2 deg which explains the non-detection of such features in other surveys.

  4. Spectral feature design in high dimensional multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The High resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is designed to acquire images simultaneously in 192 spectral bands in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers wavelength region. It will make possible the collection of essentially continuous reflectance spectra at a spectral resolution sufficient to extract significantly enhanced amounts of information from return signals as compared to existing systems. The advantages of such high dimensional data come at a cost of increased system and data complexity. For example, since the finer the spectral resolution, the higher the data rate, it becomes impractical to design the sensor to be operated continuously. It is essential to find new ways to preprocess the data which reduce the data rate while at the same time maintaining the information content of the high dimensional signal produced. Four spectral feature design techniques are developed from the Weighted Karhunen-Loeve Transforms: (1) non-overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (2) overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (3) Walsh function approach; and (4) infinite clipped optimal function approach. The infinite clipped optimal function approach is chosen since the features are easiest to find and their classification performance is the best. After the preprocessed data has been received at the ground station, canonical analysis is further used to find the best set of features under the criterion that maximal class separability is achieved. Both 100 dimensional vegetation data and 200 dimensional soil data were used to test the spectral feature design system. It was shown that the infinite clipped versions of the first 16 optimal features had excellent classification performance. The overall probability of correct classification is over 90 percent while providing for a reduced downlink data rate by a factor of 10.

  5. Microelasticity of Single Mitotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael; Eroglu, Sertac; Chatenay, Didier; Marko, John F.; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2000-03-01

    The force-extension behavior of mitotic chromosomes from the newt TVI tumor cell line was studied using micropipette manipulation and force measuring techniques. Reversible, linear elastic response was observed for extensions up to 5 times the native length; the force required to double chromosome length was 1 nanonewton (nN). For further elongations, the linear response teminates at a force plateau of 15 nN and at an extension of 20x. Beyond this extension, the chromosome breaks at elongations between 20x and 70x. These results will be compared to the similar behavior of mitotic chromosomes from explanted newt cells (Poirier, Eroglu, Chatenay and Marko, Mol. Biol. Cell, in press). Also, the effect of biochemical modifications on the elasticity was studied. Ethidium Bromide, which binds to DNA, induces up to a 10 times increase in the Young's modulus. Anti-XCAP-E, which binds to a putative chromosome folding protein, induces up to a 2 times increase in the Young's modulus. Preliminary results on the dynamical relaxation of chromosomes will also be presented. Support of this research through a Biomedical Engineering Research Grant from The Whitaker Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. High-speed digital signal normalization for feature identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, J. A.; Meredith, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    A design approach for high speed normalization of digital signals was developed. A reciprocal look up table technique is employed, where a digital value is mapped to its reciprocal via a high speed memory. This reciprocal is then multiplied with an input signal to obtain the normalized result. Normalization improves considerably the accuracy of certain feature identification algorithms. By using the concept of pipelining the multispectral sensor data processing rate is limited only by the speed of the multiplier. The breadboard system was found to operate at an execution rate of five million normalizations per second. This design features high precision, a reduced hardware complexity, high flexibility, and expandability which are very important considerations for spaceborne applications. It also accomplishes a high speed normalization rate essential for real time data processing.

  7. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Bekier, Michael E.; Taylor, William R.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  8. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenbin; Arnst, Christopher; Tipton, Aaron R; Bekier, Michael E; Taylor, William R; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  9. Precommitment low-level Neurog3 expression defines a long-lived mitotic endocrine-biased progenitor pool that drives production of endocrine-committed cells.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Matthew E; Bankaitis, Eric D; Hipkens, Susan B; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W; Yang, Yu-Ping; Magnuson, Mark A; Wright, Christopher V E

    2016-08-15

    The current model for endocrine cell specification in the pancreas invokes high-level production of the transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Neurog3) in Sox9(+) bipotent epithelial cells as the trigger for endocrine commitment, cell cycle exit, and rapid delamination toward proto-islet clusters. This model posits a transient Neurog3 expression state and short epithelial residence period. We show, however, that a Neurog3(TA.LO) cell population, defined as Neurog3 transcriptionally active and Sox9(+) and often containing nonimmunodetectable Neurog3 protein, has a relatively high mitotic index and prolonged epithelial residency. We propose that this endocrine-biased mitotic progenitor state is functionally separated from a pro-ductal pool and endows them with long-term capacity to make endocrine fate-directed progeny. A novel BAC transgenic Neurog3 reporter detected two types of mitotic behavior in Sox9(+) Neurog3(TA.LO) progenitors, associated with progenitor pool maintenance or derivation of endocrine-committed Neurog3(HI) cells, respectively. Moreover, limiting Neurog3 expression dramatically increased the proportional representation of Sox9(+) Neurog3(TA.LO) progenitors, with a doubling of its mitotic index relative to normal Neurog3 expression, suggesting that low Neurog3 expression is a defining feature of this cycling endocrine-biased state. We propose that Sox9(+) Neurog3(TA.LO) endocrine-biased progenitors feed production of Neurog3(HI) endocrine-committed cells during pancreas organogenesis. PMID:27585590

  10. Feature extraction and classification algorithms for high dimensional data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chulhee; Landgrebe, David

    1993-01-01

    Feature extraction and classification algorithms for high dimensional data are investigated. Developments with regard to sensors for Earth observation are moving in the direction of providing much higher dimensional multispectral imagery than is now possible. In analyzing such high dimensional data, processing time becomes an important factor. With large increases in dimensionality and the number of classes, processing time will increase significantly. To address this problem, a multistage classification scheme is proposed which reduces the processing time substantially by eliminating unlikely classes from further consideration at each stage. Several truncation criteria are developed and the relationship between thresholds and the error caused by the truncation is investigated. Next an approach to feature extraction for classification is proposed based directly on the decision boundaries. It is shown that all the features needed for classification can be extracted from decision boundaries. A characteristic of the proposed method arises by noting that only a portion of the decision boundary is effective in discriminating between classes, and the concept of the effective decision boundary is introduced. The proposed feature extraction algorithm has several desirable properties: it predicts the minimum number of features necessary to achieve the same classification accuracy as in the original space for a given pattern recognition problem; and it finds the necessary feature vectors. The proposed algorithm does not deteriorate under the circumstances of equal means or equal covariances as some previous algorithms do. In addition, the decision boundary feature extraction algorithm can be used both for parametric and non-parametric classifiers. Finally, some problems encountered in analyzing high dimensional data are studied and possible solutions are proposed. First, the increased importance of the second order statistics in analyzing high dimensional data is recognized

  11. Feature tracking in high-resolution regional climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Neil R.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a suite of algorithms are presented which facilitate the identification and tracking of storm-indicative features, such as mean sea-level pressure minima, in high resolution regional climate data. The methods employ a hierarchical triangular mesh, which is tailored to the regional climate data by only subdividing triangles, from an initial icosahedron, within the domain of the data. The regional data is then regridded to this triangular mesh at each level of the grid, producing a compact representation of the data at numerous resolutions. Storm indicative features are detected by first subtracting the background field, represented by a low resolution version of the data, which occurs at a lower level in the mesh. Anomalies from this background field are detected, as feature objects, at a mesh level which corresponds to the spatial scale of the feature being detected and then refined to the highest mesh level. These feature objects are expanded to an outer contour and overlapping objects are merged. The centre points of these objects are tracked across timesteps by applying an optimisation scheme which uses five hierarchical rules. Objects are added to tracks based on the highest rule in the scheme they pass and, if two objects pass the same rule, the cost of adding the object to the track. An object exchange scheme ensures that adding an object to a track is locally optimal. An additional track optimisation phase is performed which exchanges segments between tracks and merges tracks to obtain a globally optimal track set. To validate the suite of algorithms they are applied to the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset and compared to other storm-indicative feature tracking algorithms.

  12. Centromeric barrier disruption leads to mitotic defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Terilyn L; Merrett, Stephanie L; Pun, Matthew J; Scott, Kristin C

    2014-04-01

    Centromeres are cis-acting chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore formation, enabling faithful chromosome segregation and preserving genome stability. The centromeres of most eukaryotic organisms are structurally complex, composed of nonoverlapping, structurally and functionally distinct chromatin subdomains, including the specialized core chromatin that underlies the kinetochore and pericentromeric heterochromatin. The genomic and epigenetic features that specify and preserve the adjacent chromatin subdomains critical to centromere identity are currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that chromatin barriers regulate this process in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Reduced fitness and mitotic chromosome segregation defects occur in strains that carry exogenous DNA inserted at centromere 1 chromatin barriers. Abnormal phenotypes are accompanied by changes in the structural integrity of both the centromeric core chromatin domain, containing the conserved CENP-A(Cnp1) protein, and the flanking pericentric heterochromatin domain. Barrier mutant cells can revert to wild-type growth and centromere structure at a high frequency after the spontaneous excision of integrated exogenous DNA. Our results reveal a previously undemonstrated role for chromatin barriers in chromosome segregation and in the prevention of genome instability. PMID:24531725

  13. Quantification of upland thermokarst features with high resolution remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belshe, E. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Grosse, G.

    2013-09-01

    Climate-induced changes to permafrost are altering high latitude landscapes in ways that could increase the vulnerability of the vast soil carbon pools of the region. Permafrost thaw is temporally dynamic and spatially heterogeneous because, in addition to the thickening of the active layer, localized thermokarst features form when ice-rich permafrost thaws and the ground subsides. Thermokarst produces a diversity of landforms and alters the physical environment in dynamic ways. To estimate potential changes to the carbon cycle it is imperative to quantify the size and distribution of thermokarst landforms. By performing a supervised classification on a high resolution IKONOS image, we detected and mapped small, irregular thermokarst features occurring within an upland watershed in discontinuous permafrost of Interior Alaska. We found that 12% of the Eight Mile Lake (EML) watershed has undergone thermokarst, predominantly in valleys where tussock tundra resides. About 35% of the 3.7 km2 tussock tundra class has likely transitioned to thermokarst. These landscape level changes created by permafrost thaw at EML have important implications for ecosystem carbon cycling because thermokarst features are forming in carbon-rich areas and are altering the hydrology in ways that increase seasonal thawing of the soil.

  14. Efficient Activation of Apoptotic Signaling during Mitotic Arrest with AK301

    PubMed Central

    Bleiler, Marina; Yeagley, Michelle; Wright, Dennis; Giardina, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic inhibitors are widely utilized chemotherapeutic agents that take advantage of mitotic defects in cancer cells. We have identified a novel class of piperazine-based mitotic inhibitors, of which AK301 is the most potent derivative identified to date (EC50 < 200 nM). Colon cancer cells arrested in mitosis with AK301 readily underwent a p53-dependent apoptosis following compound withdrawal and arrest release. This apoptotic response was significantly higher for AK301 than for other mitotic inhibitors tested (colchicine, vincristine, and BI 2536). AK301-treated cells exhibited a robust mitosis-associated DNA damage response, including ATM activation, γH2AX phosphorylation and p53 stabilization. The association between mitotic signaling and the DNA damage response was supported by the finding that Aurora B inhibition reduced the level of γH2AX staining. Confocal imaging of AK301-treated cells revealed multiple γ-tubulin microtubule organizing centers attached to microtubules, but with limited centrosome migration, raising the possibility that aberrant microtubule pulling may underlie DNA breakage. AK301 selectively targeted APC-mutant colonocytes and promoted TNF-induced apoptosis in p53-mutant colon cancer cells. Our findings indicate that AK301 induces a mitotic arrest state with a highly active DNA damage response. Together with a reversible arrest state, AK301 is a potent promoter of a mitosis-to-apoptosis transition that can target cancer cells with mitotic defects. PMID:27097159

  15. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein-protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  16. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein–protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  17. High resolution cloud feature tracking on Venus by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toigo, Anthony; Gierasch, Peter J.; Smith, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Venus cloud deck was monitored in February 1990 for 16 hours at 400 nanometers wavelength by the Galileo imaging system, with a spatial resolution of about 15 km and with image time separations as small as 10 minutes. Velocities are deduced by following the motion of small cloud features. In spite of the high temporal frequence is capable of being detected, no dynamical phenomena are apparent in the velocity data except the already well-known solar tides, possibly altered by the slow 4-day wave and the Hadley circulation. There is no evidence, to a level of approximately 4 m/s, of eddy or wavelike activity. The dominant size of sub-global scale albedo features is 200-500 km, and their contrast is approximately 5%. At low altitudes there are patches of blotchy, cell-like structures but at most locations the markings are streaky. The patterns are similar to those discovered by Mariner 10 and Pioneer Venus (M. J. S. Belton et al., 1976, W. B. Rossow et al., 1980). Scaling arguments are presented to argue that the mesoscale blotchy cell-like cloud patterns are caused by local dynamics driven in a shallow layer by differential absorption of sunlight. It is also argued that mesoscale albedo features are either streaky or cell-like simply depending on whether the horizontal shear of the large scale flow exceeds a certain critical value.

  18. The formation of discrete high velocity molecular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dyson, J. E.

    1987-10-01

    Clumps embedded in a flowing diffuse medium will be dissipated before ram pressure accelerates them substantially. Molecular hydrogen can be accelerated to high speeds by passing through a slow shock leading a shell at the edge of a wind-driven bubble if the density in the ambient medium drops rapidly enough to allow the shell to accelerate subsequently. The shell will be subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability which will drive transonic turbulence but will not initiate the formation of fragments having large density contrasts until the shell reaches sufficient speeds to become thermally unstable. The existence of high velocity discrete features in and the magnitude of the linewidth of the H2 emission from CRL 618 are explained with this acceleration mechanism. High velocity water masers may be formed in a similar fashion, but not Herbig-Haro objects.

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors disrupt the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint by targeting histone and nonhistone proteins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Brian; Brown, Mellissa

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic effects on cell functions, both in vivo and in vitro. One of the more dramatic effects of these drugs is their ability to disrupt normal mitotic division, which is a significant contributor to the anticancer properties of these drugs. The most important feature of the disrupted mitosis is that drug treatment overcomes the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint and drives mitotic slippage, but in a manner that triggers apoptosis. The mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect mitosis is now becoming clearer through the identification of a number of chromatin and nonchromatin protein targets that are critical to the regulation of normal mitotic progression and cell division. These proteins are directly regulated by acetylation and deacetylation, or in some cases indirectly through the acetylation of essential partner proteins. There appears to be little contribution from deacetylase inhibitor-induced transcriptional changes to the mitotic effects of these drugs. The overall mitotic phenotype of drug treatment appears to be the sum of these disrupted mechanisms. PMID:23088867

  20. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  1. Observing Mitotic Division and Dynamics in a Live Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Percival, Stefanie M; Parant, John M

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is critical for organismal growth and differentiation. The process is highly dynamic and requires ordered events to accomplish proper chromatin condensation, microtubule-kinetochore attachment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis in a small time frame. Errors in the delicate process can result in human disease, including birth defects and cancer. Traditional approaches investigating human mitotic disease states often rely on cell culture systems, which lack the natural physiology and developmental/tissue-specific context advantageous when studying human disease. This protocol overcomes many obstacles by providing a way to visualize, with high resolution, chromosome dynamics in a vertebrate system, the zebrafish. This protocol will detail an approach that can be used to obtain dynamic images of dividing cells, which include: in vitro transcription, zebrafish breeding/collecting, embryo embedding, and time-lapse imaging. Optimization and modifications of this protocol are also explored. Using H2A.F/Z-EGFP (labels chromatin) and mCherry-CAAX (labels cell membrane) mRNA-injected embryos, mitosis in AB wild-type, auroraB(hi1045) (,) and esco2(hi2865) mutant zebrafish is visualized. High resolution live imaging in zebrafish allows one to observe multiple mitoses to statistically quantify mitotic defects and timing of mitotic progression. In addition, observation of qualitative aspects that define improper mitotic processes (i.e., congression defects, missegregation of chromosomes, etc.) and improper chromosomal outcomes (i.e., aneuploidy, polyploidy, micronuclei, etc.) are observed. This assay can be applied to the observation of tissue differentiation/development and is amenable to the use of mutant zebrafish and pharmacological agents. Visualization of how defects in mitosis lead to cancer and developmental disorders will greatly enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:27501381

  2. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. PMID:26310442

  3. Features of photoconversion in highly efficient silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sachenko, A. V.; Shkrebtii, A. I.; Korkishko, R. M.; Kostylyov, V. P.; Kulish, N. R.; Sokolovskyi, I. O.

    2015-02-15

    The photoconversion efficiency η in highly efficient silicon-based solar cells (SCs) is analyzed depending on the total surface-recombination rate S{sub s} on illuminated and rear surfaces. Solar cells based on silicon p-n junctions and α-Si:H or α-SiC:H-Si heterojunctions (so-called HIT structures) are considered in a unified approach. It is shown that a common feature of these SCs is an increased open-circuit voltage V{sub oc} associated with an additional contribution of the rear surface. Within an approach based on analysis of the physical features of photoconversion in SCs, taking into account the main recombination mechanisms, including Shockley-Read-Hall recombination, radiative recombination, surface recombination, recombination in the space-charge region, and band-to-band Auger recombination, expressions for the photoconversion efficiency of such SCs are obtained. The developed theory is compared with experiments, including those for SCs with record parameters, e.g., η = 25% and 24.7% for SCs with a p-n junction for HIT structures, respectively, under AM1.5 conditions. By comparing theory and experiment, the values of S{sub s} achieved as a result of recombination-loss minimization by various methods are determined. The results of calculations of the maximum possible value η{sub max} in silicon SCs are compared with the data of other papers. Good agreement is observed.

  4. Practical multi-featured perfect absorber utilizing high conductivity silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Bıyıklı, Necmi; Topallı, Kağan; Okyay, Ali K.

    2016-03-01

    We designed all-silicon, multi-featured band-selective perfect absorbing surfaces based on CMOS compatible processes. The center wavelength of the band-selective absorber can be varied between 2 and 22 μm while a bandwidth as high as 2.5 μm is demonstrated. We used a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer which consists of n-type silicon (Si) device layer, silicon dioxide (SiO2) as buried oxide layer, and n-type Si handle layer. The center wavelength and bandwidth can be tuned by adjusting the conductivity of the Si device and handle layers as well as the thicknesses of the device and buried oxide layers. We demonstrate proof-of-concept absorber surfaces experimentally. Such absorber surfaces are easy to microfabricate because the absorbers do not require elaborate microfabrication steps such as patterning. Due to the structural simplicity, low-cost fabrication, wide spectrum range of operation, and band properties of the perfect absorber, the proposed multi-featured perfect absorber surfaces are promising for many applications. These include sensing devices, surface enhanced infrared absorption applications, solar cells, meta-materials, frequency selective sensors and modulators.

  5. Mitotic noncoding RNA processing promotes kinetochore and spindle assembly in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Heald, Rebecca; Strzelecka, Magdalena

    2016-07-18

    Transcription at the centromere of chromosomes plays an important role in kinetochore assembly in many eukaryotes, and noncoding RNAs contribute to activation of the mitotic kinase Aurora B. However, little is known about how mitotic RNA processing contributes to spindle assembly. We found that inhibition of transcription initiation or RNA splicing, but not translation, leads to spindle defects in Xenopus egg extracts. Spliceosome inhibition resulted in the accumulation of high molecular weight centromeric transcripts, concomitant with decreased recruitment of the centromere and kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, and NDC80 to mitotic chromosomes. In addition, blocking transcript synthesis or processing during mitosis caused accumulation of MCAK, a microtubule depolymerase, on the spindle, indicating misregulation of Aurora B. These findings suggest that co-transcriptional recruitment of the RNA processing machinery to nascent mitotic transcripts is an important step in kinetochore and spindle assembly and challenge the idea that RNA processing is globally repressed during mitosis. PMID:27402954

  6. Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zebrowski, David C; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Wu, Chi-Chung; Piatkowski, Tanja; Becker, Robert; Leone, Marina; Hirth, Sofia; Ricciardi, Filomena; Falk, Nathalie; Giessl, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Braun, Thomas; Weidinger, Gilbert; Engel, Felix B

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart. PMID:26247711

  7. Mitotic regulation by NIMA-related kinases

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Laura; Blot, Joelle; Fry, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The NIMA-related kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle control. The founding member of this family, the NIMA kinase of Aspergillus nidulans, as well as the fission yeast homologue Fin1, contribute to multiple aspects of mitotic progression including the timing of mitotic entry, chromatin condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. Mammals contain a large family of eleven NIMA-related kinases, named Nek1 to Nek11. Of these, there is now substantial evidence that Nek2, Nek6, Nek7 and Nek9 also regulate mitotic events. At least three of these kinases, as well as NIMA and Fin1, have been localized to the microtubule organizing centre of their respective species, namely the centrosome or spindle pole body. Here, they have important functions in microtubule organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Other Nek kinases have been proposed to play microtubule-dependent roles in non-dividing cells, most notably in regulating the axonemal microtubules of cilia and flagella. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NIMA-related kinases make a significant contribution to the orchestration of mitotic progression and thereby protect cells from chromosome instability. Furthermore, we highlight their potential as novel chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:17727698

  8. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  9. High-Throughput Quantification of Phenotype Heterogeneity Using Statistical Features

    PubMed Central

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Tanougast, Camel

    2015-01-01

    Statistical features are widely used in radiology for tumor heterogeneity assessment using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique. In this paper, feature selection based on decision tree is examined to determine the relevant subset of glioblastoma (GBM) phenotypes in the statistical domain. To discriminate between active tumor (vAT) and edema/invasion (vE) phenotype, we selected the significant features using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with p value < 0.01. Then, we implemented the decision tree to define the optimal subset features of phenotype classifier. Naïve Bayes (NB), support vector machine (SVM), and decision tree (DT) classifier were considered to evaluate the performance of the feature based scheme in terms of its capability to discriminate vAT from vE. Whole nine features were statistically significant to classify the vAT from vE with p value < 0.01. Feature selection based on decision tree showed the best performance by the comparative study using full feature set. The feature selected showed that the two features Kurtosis and Skewness achieved a highest range value of 58.33–75.00% accuracy classifier and 73.88–92.50% AUC. This study demonstrated the ability of statistical features to provide a quantitative, individualized measurement of glioblastoma patient and assess the phenotype progression. PMID:26640485

  10. Toward a systems-level view of mitotic checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-03-01

    Reproduction and natural selection are the key elements of life. In order to reproduce, the genetic material must be doubled, separated and placed into two new daughter cells, each containing a complete set of chromosomes and organelles. In mitosis, transition from one process to the next is guided by intricate surveillance mechanisms, known as the mitotic checkpoints. Dis-regulation of cell division through checkpoint malfunction can lead to developmental defects and contribute to the development or progression of tumors. This review approaches two important mitotic checkpoints, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). The highly conserved spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) controls the onset of anaphase by preventing premature segregation of the sister chromatids of the duplicated genome, to the spindle poles. In contrast, the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensures that during asymmetric cell division mitotic exit does not occur until the spindle is properly aligned with the cell polarity axis. Although there are no known homologs, there is indication that functionally similar checkpoints exist also in animal cells. This review can be regarded as an "executable model", which could be easily translated into various quantitative concrete models like Petri nets, ODEs, PDEs, or stochastic particle simulations. It can also function as a base for developing quantitative models explaining the interplay of the various components and proteins controlling mitosis. PMID:25722206

  11. Radar-anomalous, high-altitude features on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, Duane O.; Butler, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    Over nearly all of the surface of Venus the reflectivity and emissivity at centimeter wavelengths are about 0.15 and 0.85 respectively. These values are consistent with moderately dense soils and rock populations, but the mean reflectivity is about a factor of 2 greater than that for the Moon and other terrestrial planets. Pettingill and Ford, using Pioneer Venus reflectivities and emissivities, found a number of anomalous features on Venus that showed much higher reflectivities and much lower emissivities with both values approaching 0.5. These include Maxwell Montes, a number of high regions in Aphrodite Terra and Beta Regio, and several isolated mountain peaks. Most of the features are at altitudes above the mean radius by 2 to 3 km or more. However, such features have been found in the Magellan data at low altitudes and the anomalies do not exist on all high structures, Maat Mons being the most outstanding example. A number of papers have been written that attempt to explain the phenomena in terms of the geochemistry balance of weathering effects on likely surface minerals. The geochemists have shown that the fundamentally basaltic surface would be stable at the temperatures and pressures of the mean radius in the form of magnetite, but would evolve to pyrite and/or pyrrhotite in the presence of sulfur-bearing compounds such as SO2. Pyrite will be stable at altitudes above 4 or 5 km on Venus. Although the geochemical arguments are rather compelling, it is vitally important to rationally look at other explanations for radar and radio emission measurements such as that presented by Tryka and Muhleman. The radar reflectivity values are retrieved from the raw Magellan backscatter measurements by fitting the Hagfors' radar scattering model in which a surface roughness parameters and a normal incidence electrical reflectivity are estimated. The assumptions of the theory behind the model must be considered carefully before the results can be believed. These include

  12. Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution LIDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Danny L.

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed "mDn", is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mD n method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  13. The STARD9/Kif16a Kinesin Associates With Mitotic Microtubules and Regulates Spindle Pole Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge Z.; Summers, Matthew K.; Peterson, David; Brauer, Matthew J.; Lee, James; Senese, Silvia; Gholkar, Ankur A.; Lo, Yu-Chen; Lei, Xingye; Jung, Kenneth; Anderson, David C.; Davis, David P.; Belmont, Lisa; Jackson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY During cell division cells form the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, a highly specialized and dynamic structure that mediates proper chromosome transmission to daughter cells. Cancer cells can show perturbed mitotic spindles and an approach in cancer treatment has been to trigger cell killing by targeting microtubule dynamics or spindle assembly. To identify and characterize proteins necessary for spindle assembly, and potential antimitotic targets, we performed a proteomic and genetic analysis of 592 mitotic microtubule co-purifying proteins (MMCPs). Screening for regulators that affect both mitosis and apoptosis, we report the identification and characterization of STARD9, a kinesin-3 family member, which localizes to centrosomes and stabilizes the pericentriolar material (PCM). STARD9-depleted cells have fragmented PCM, form multipolar spindles, activate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), arrest in mitosis, and undergo apoptosis. Interestingly, STARD9-depletion synergizes with the chemotherapeutic agent taxol to increase mitotic death, demonstrating that STARD9 is a mitotic kinesin and a potential anti-mitotic target. PMID:22153075

  14. Robust linear regression model of Ki-67 for mitotic rate in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    KEMMERLING, RALF; WEYLAND, DENIS; KIESSLICH, TOBIAS; ILLIG, ROMANA; KLIESER, ECKHARD; JÄGER, TARKAN; DIETZE, OTTO; NEUREITER, DANIEL

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) by tumor size, lymph node and metastasis status is crucially affected by mitotic activity. To date, no studies have quantitatively compared mitotic activity in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained tissue sections with immunohistochemical markers, such as phosphohistone H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67. According to the TNM guidelines, the mitotic count on H&E sections and immunohistochemical PHH3-stained slides has been assessed per 50 high-power fields of 154 specimens of clinically documented GIST cases. The Ki-67-associated proliferation rate was evaluated on three digitalized hot spots using image analysis. The H&E-based mitotic rate was found to correlate significantly better with Ki-67-assessed proliferation activity than with PHH3-assessed proliferation activity (r=0.780; P<0.01). A linear regression model (analysis of variance; P<0.001) allowed reliable predictions of the H&E-associated mitoses based on the Ki-67 expression alone. Additionally, the Ki-67-associated proliferation revealed a higher and significant impact on the recurrence and metastasis rate of the GIST cases than by the classical H&E-based mitotic rate. The results of the present study indicated that the mitotic rate may be reliably and time-efficiently estimated by immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 using only three hot spots. PMID:24527082

  15. Highly Nonrandom Features of Synaptic Connectivity in Local Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    How different is local cortical circuitry from a random network? To answer this question, we probed synaptic connections with several hundred simultaneous quadruple whole-cell recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the rat visual cortex. Analysis of this dataset revealed several nonrandom features in synaptic connectivity. We confirmed previous reports that bidirectional connections are more common than expected in a random network. We found that several highly clustered three-neuron connectivity patterns are overrepresented, suggesting that connections tend to cluster together. We also analyzed synaptic connection strength as defined by the peak excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude. We found that the distribution of synaptic connection strength differs significantly from the Poisson distribution and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution. Such a distribution has a heavier tail and implies that synaptic weight is concentrated among few synaptic connections. In addition, the strengths of synaptic connections sharing pre- or postsynaptic neurons are correlated, implying that strong connections are even more clustered than the weak ones. Therefore, the local cortical network structure can be viewed as a skeleton of stronger connections in a sea of weaker ones. Such a skeleton is likely to play an important role in network dynamics and should be investigated further. PMID:15737062

  16. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  17. Mitotic Stress and Chromosomal Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common motif in human cancer, and multiple therapeutic strategies are aimed to prevent tumor cell proliferation. Whereas most current therapies are designed to arrest cell cycle progression either in G1/S or in mitosis, new proposals include targeting the intrinsic chromosomal instability (CIN, an increased rate of gain or losses of chromosomes during cell division) or aneuploidy (a genomic composition that differs from diploid) that many tumor cells display. Why tumors cells are chromosomally unstable or aneuploid and what are the consequences of these alterations are not completely clear at present. Several mitotic regulators are overexpressed as a consequence of oncogenic alterations, and they are likely to alter the proper regulation of chromosome segregation in cancer cells. In this review, we propose the relevance of TPX2, a mitotic regulator involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, in oncogene-induced mitotic stress. This protein, as well as its partner Aurora-A, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and its deregulation may participate not only in chromosome numeric aberrations but also in other forms of genomic instability in cancer cells. PMID:23634259

  18. A high performance parallel computing architecture for robust image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renyan; Liu, Leibo; Wei, Shaojun

    2014-03-01

    A design of parallel architecture for image feature detection and description is proposed in this article. The major component of this architecture is a 2D cellular network composed of simple reprogrammable processors, enabling the Hessian Blob Detector and Haar Response Calculation, which are the most computing-intensive stage of the Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithm. Combining this 2D cellular network and dedicated hardware for SURF descriptors, this architecture achieves real-time image feature detection with minimal software in the host processor. A prototype FPGA implementation of the proposed architecture achieves 1318.9 GOPS general pixel processing @ 100 MHz clock and achieves up to 118 fps in VGA (640 × 480) image feature detection. The proposed architecture is stand-alone and scalable so it is easy to be migrated into VLSI implementation.

  19. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Pores Fernando, A T; Andrabi, S; Cizmecioglu, O; Zhu, C; Livingston, D M; Higgins, J M G; Schaffhausen, B S; Roberts, T M

    2015-05-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, thereby resulting in the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed, that PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  20. Evidence of Selection against Complex Mitotic-Origin Aneuploidy during Preimplantation Development

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Rajiv C.; Demko, Zachary P.; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-chromosome imbalances affect over half of early human embryos and are the leading cause of pregnancy loss. While these errors frequently arise in oocyte meiosis, many such whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting cleavage-stage embryos are the result of chromosome missegregation occurring during the initial mitotic cell divisions. The first wave of zygotic genome activation at the 4–8 cell stage results in the arrest of a large proportion of embryos, the vast majority of which contain whole-chromosome abnormalities. Thus, the full spectrum of meiotic and mitotic errors can only be detected by sampling after the initial cell divisions, but prior to this selective filter. Here, we apply 24-chromosome preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) to 28,052 single-cell day-3 blastomere biopsies and 18,387 multi-cell day-5 trophectoderm biopsies from 6,366 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. We precisely characterize the rates and patterns of whole-chromosome abnormalities at each developmental stage and distinguish errors of meiotic and mitotic origin without embryo disaggregation, based on informative chromosomal signatures. We show that mitotic errors frequently involve multiple chromosome losses that are not biased toward maternal or paternal homologs. This outcome is characteristic of spindle abnormalities and chaotic cell division detected in previous studies. In contrast to meiotic errors, our data also show that mitotic errors are not significantly associated with maternal age. PGS patients referred due to previous IVF failure had elevated rates of mitotic error, while patients referred due to recurrent pregnancy loss had elevated rates of meiotic error, controlling for maternal age. These results support the conclusion that mitotic error is the predominant mechanism contributing to pregnancy losses occurring prior to blastocyst formation. This high-resolution view of the full spectrum of whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting early embryos provides insight

  1. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  2. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  3. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  4. Orthologues of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome Coactivators Cdc20p and Cdh1p Are Important for Mitotic Progression and Morphogenesis in Candida albicans ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsini; Glory, Amandeep; Bachewich, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The conserved anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) system mediates protein degradation during mitotic progression. Conserved coactivators Cdc20p and Cdh1p regulate the APC/C during early to late mitosis and G1 phase. Candida albicans is an important fungal pathogen of humans, and it forms highly polarized cells when mitosis is blocked through depletion of the polo-like kinase Cdc5p or other treatments. However, the mechanisms governing mitotic progression and associated polarized growth in the pathogen are poorly understood. In order to gain insights into these processes, we characterized C. albicans orthologues of Cdc20p and Cdh1p. Cdc20p-depleted cells were blocked in early or late mitosis with elevated levels of Cdc5p and the mitotic cyclin Clb2p, suggesting that Cdc20p is essential and has some conserved functions during mitosis. However, the yeast cells formed highly polarized buds in contrast to the large doublets of S. cerevisiae cdc20 mutants, implying a distinct role in morphogenesis. In comparison, cdh1Δ/cdh1Δ cells were viable but showed enrichment of Clb2p and Cdc5p, suggesting that Cdh1p may influence mitotic exit. The cdh1Δ/cdh1Δ phenotype was pleiotropic, consisting of normal or enlarged yeast, pseudohyphae, and some elongated buds, whereas S. cerevisiae cdh1Δ yeast cells were reduced in size. Thus, C. albicans Cdh1p may have some distinct functions. Finally, absence of Cdh1p or Cdc20p had a minor or no effect on hyphal development, respectively. Overall, the results suggest that Cdc20p and Cdh1p may be APC/C activators that are important for mitosis but also morphogenesis in C. albicans. Their novel features imply additional variations in function and underscore rewiring in the emerging mitotic regulatory networks of the pathogen. PMID:21398510

  5. Automatic microscopy for mitotic cell location.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, J.; Ranshaw, R.; Castle, J.; Wald, N.

    1972-01-01

    Advances are reported in the development of an automatic microscope with which to locate hematologic or other cells in mitosis for subsequent chromosome analysis. The system under development is designed to perform the functions of: slide scanning to locate metaphase cells; conversion of images of selected cells into binary form; and on-line computer analysis of the digitized image for significant cytogenetic data. Cell detection criteria are evaluated using a test sample of 100 mitotic cells and 100 artifacts.

  6. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  7. Nuclear Chk1 prevents premature mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Makoto; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Makoto; Kiyono, Tohru; Goshima, Naoki; Inagaki, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Chk1 inhibits the premature activation of the cyclin-B1-Cdk1. However, it remains controversial whether Chk1 inhibits Cdk1 in the centrosome or in the nucleus before the G2-M transition. In this study, we examined the specificity of the mouse monoclonal anti-Chk1 antibody DCS-310, with which the centrosome was stained. Conditional Chk1 knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts reduced nuclear but not centrosomal staining with DCS-310. In Chk1(+/myc) human colon adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells, Chk1 was detected in the nucleus but not in the centrosome using an anti-Myc antibody. Through the combination of protein array and RNAi technologies, we identified Ccdc-151 as a protein that crossreacted with DCS-310 on the centrosome. Mitotic entry was delayed by expression of the Chk1 mutant that localized in the nucleus, although forced immobilization of Chk1 to the centrosome had little impact on the timing of mitotic entry. These results suggest that nuclear but not centrosomal Chk1 contributes to correct timing of mitotic entry. PMID:21628425

  8. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe by disrupting centrosome regulation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Yuki; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) has been investigated as a therapeutic target for numerous human diseases including cancer because of their diverse cellular functions. Although GSK-3β inhibitors have been investigated as anticancer reagents, precise biological mechanisms remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of GSK-3β inhibitors on cancer cell lines and observed centrosome dysregulation which resulted in abnormal mitosis. Mitotic checkpoints sensed the mitotic abnormalities and induced apoptosis. For cells that were inherently resistant to apoptosis, cell death distinct from apoptosis was induced. After GSK-3β inhibitor treatment, these cells exhibited characteristic features of mitotic catastrophe, including distended and multivesiculated nuclei and inappropriate reductions in cyclin B1 expression. This suggested that mitotic catastrophe was an alternative mechanism in cells resistant to apoptosis. Although the role of GSK-3β in centrosomes has not yet been clarified, phosphorylated GSK-3β was localised in centrosomes. From these data, GSK-3β seems to regulate centrosome function. Thus, we propose that centrosome dysregulation is an important mechanism for the anticancer effects of GSK-3β inhibitors and that mitotic catastrophe serves as a safe-guard system to remove cells with any mitotic abnormalities induced by GSK-3β inhibition. PMID:26292722

  9. Dietary flavonoid fisetin induces a forced exit from mitosis by targeting the mitotic spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Varis, Asta; Kukkonen, Anu M.; Toivonen, Pauliina; Halonen, Pasi K.; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Kallio, Marko J.

    2009-01-01

    Fisetin is a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits and wine at 2–160 μg/g concentrations and an ingredient in nutritional supplements with much higher concentrations. The compound has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects as well as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity via its ability to act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation and free radical scavenger, respectively. Our cell-based high-throughput screen for small molecules that override chemically induced mitotic arrest identified fisetin as an antimitotic compound. Fisetin rapidly compromised microtubule drug-induced mitotic block in a proteasome-dependent manner in several human cell lines. Moreover, in unperturbed human cancer cells fisetin caused premature initiation of chromosome segregation and exit from mitosis without normal cytokinesis. To understand the molecular mechanism behind these mitotic errors, we analyzed the consequences of fisetin treatment on the localization and phoshorylation of several mitotic proteins. Aurora B, Bub1, BubR1 and Cenp-F rapidly lost their kinetochore/centromere localization and others became dephosphorylated upon addition of fisetin to the culture medium. Finally, we identified Aurora B kinase as a novel direct target of fisetin. The activity of Aurora B was significantly reduced by fisetin in vitro and in cells, an effect that can explain the observed forced mitotic exit, failure of cytokinesis and decreased cell viability. In conclusion, our data propose that fisetin perturbs spindle checkpoint signaling, which may contribute to the antiproliferative effects of the compound. PMID:19395653

  10. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P H; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2015-04-20

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  11. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  12. Ki-67 acts as a biological surfactant to disperse mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cuylen, Sara; Blaukopf, Claudia; Politi, Antonio Z; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Neumann, Beate; Poser, Ina; Ellenberg, Jan; Hyman, Anthony A; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2016-07-14

    Eukaryotic genomes are partitioned into chromosomes that form compact and spatially well-separated mechanical bodies during mitosis. This enables chromosomes to move independently of each other for segregation of precisely one copy of the genome to each of the nascent daughter cells. Despite insights into the spatial organization of mitotic chromosomes and the discovery of proteins at the chromosome surface, the molecular and biophysical bases of mitotic chromosome structural individuality have remained unclear. Here we report that the proliferation marker protein Ki-67 (encoded by the MKI67 gene), a component of the mitotic chromosome periphery, prevents chromosomes from collapsing into a single chromatin mass after nuclear envelope disassembly, thus enabling independent chromosome motility and efficient interactions with the mitotic spindle. The chromosome separation function of human Ki-67 is not confined within a specific protein domain, but correlates with size and net charge of truncation mutants that apparently lack secondary structure. This suggests that Ki-67 forms a steric and electrostatic charge barrier, similar to surface-active agents (surfactants) that disperse particles or phase-separated liquid droplets in solvents. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed a high surface density of Ki-67 and dual-colour labelling of both protein termini revealed an extended molecular conformation, indicating brush-like arrangements that are characteristic of polymeric surfactants. Our study thus elucidates a biomechanical role of the mitotic chromosome periphery in mammalian cells and suggests that natural proteins can function as surfactants in intracellular compartmentalization. PMID:27362226

  13. A study of directional instability during mitotic chromosome movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Ajit P.

    ionization of all the valence electrons. Highly reproducible features on the nanometer size-scale indicate that the valence electron density is the central factor determining the critical intensity, implying that high precision can be maintained in a wide range of solids. Along with the new understanding optical breakdown, this technique will find potential applications in diverse fields ranging from MEMS fabrication to nano-fluidics, as well as cellular nanosurgery.

  14. Emission features in the spectrum of NGC 7027 near 3. 3 microns at very high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.P.; Moorhead, J.M.; Wehlau, W.H.; Maillard, J.P. CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris )

    1991-02-01

    A very high resolution spectrum is presented of the planetary nebula NGC 7027 over a 200/cm interval centered at 2950/cm, and the features found are described: (1) nebular continuum, (2) atomic recombination lines of H and He II, and (3) three broader emission features of uncertain origin. For the latter the first evidence is presented that the 3.46 micron feature and possibly the 3.40 micron feature are resolvable into a sequence of narrower features. The interpretation of the broader features is discussed in terms of the hypothesis of identification with emission by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 18 refs.

  15. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  16. Detecting Key Structural Features within Highly Recombined Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, John E; McGregor, Karen F; Bessen, Debra E

    2007-01-01

    Many microorganisms exhibit high levels of intragenic recombination following horizontal gene transfer events. Furthermore, many microbial genes are subject to strong diversifying selection as part of the pathogenic process. A multiple sequence alignment is an essential starting point for many of the tools that provide fundamental insights on gene structure and evolution, such as phylogenetics; however, an accurate alignment is not always possible to attain. In this study, a new analytic approach was developed in order to better quantify the genetic organization of highly diversified genes whose alleles do not align. This BLAST-based method, denoted BLAST Miner, employs an iterative process that places short segments of highly similar sequence into discrete datasets that are designated “modules.” The relative positions of modules along the length of the genes, and their frequency of occurrence, are used to identify sequence duplications, insertions, and rearrangements. Partial alleles of sof from Streptococcus pyogenes, encoding a surface protein under host immune selection, were analyzed for module content. High-frequency Modules 6 and 13 were identified and examined in depth. Nucleotide sequences corresponding to both modules contain numerous duplications and inverted repeats, whereby many codons form palindromic pairs. Combined with evidence for a strong codon usage bias, data suggest that Module 6 and 13 sequences are under selection to preserve their nucleic acid secondary structure. The concentration of overlapping tandem and inverted repeats within a small region of DNA is highly suggestive of a mechanistic role for Module 6 and 13 sequences in promoting aberrant recombination. Analysis of pbp2X alleles from Streptococcus pneumoniae, encoding cell wall enzymes that confer antibiotic resistance, supports the broad applicability of this tool in deciphering the genetic organization of highly recombined genes. BLAST Miner shares with phylogenetics the

  17. Small Molecule Approach to Study the Function of Mitotic Kinesins.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Kastl, Johanna; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily are critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and the formation of the two daughter cells during meiotic and mitotic M-phase. Of the 45 human kinesins, roughly a dozen are involved in the assembly of the bipolar spindle, alignment of chromosomes at the spindle equator, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. The functions of kinesins in these processes are highly diverse and include the transport of cargo molecules, sliding and bundling of microtubules, and regulation of microtubule dynamics. In light of this multitude of diverse functions and the complex functional interplay of different kinesins during M-phase, it is not surprising that one of the greatest challenges in cell biology is the functional dissection of individual motor proteins. Reversible and fast acting small molecules are powerful tools to accomplish this challenge. However, the validity of conclusions drawn from small molecule studies strictly depends on compound specificity. In this chapter, we present methods for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of a motor protein of interest. In particular, we focus on a protein-based large throughput screen to identify inhibitors of the ATPase activity of kinesins. Furthermore, we provide protocols and guidelines for secondary screens to validate hits and select for specific inhibitors. PMID:27193856

  18. Differential Mitotic Stability of Yeast Disomes Derived from Triploid Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas; Doctor, John S.; Feuersanger, Jeane H.; Doolittle, Mark M.

    1981-01-01

    The frequencies of recovered disomy among the meiotic segregants of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) triploids were assessed under conditions in which all 17 yeast chromosomes were monitored simultaneously. The studies employed inbred triploids, in which all homologous centromeres were identical by descent, and single haploid testers carrying genetic markers for all 17 linkage groups. The principal results include: (1) Ascospores from triploid meiosis germinate at frequencies comparable to those from normal diploids, but most fail to produce visible colonies due to the growth-retarding effects of high multiple disomy. (2) The probability of disome formation during triploid meiosis is the same for all chromosomes; disomy for any given chromosome does not exclude simultaneous disomy for any other chromosome. (3) The 17 yeast chromosomes fall into three frequency classes in terms of disome recovery. The results support the idea that multiply disomic meiotic segregants of the triploid experience repeated, nonrandom, post-germination mitotic chromosome losses (N+1→N) and that the observed variations in individual disome recovery are wholly attributable to inherent differences in disome mitotic stability. PMID:7035289

  19. STEM High School Communities: Common and Differing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofel-Grehl, Colby; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Using observations and interviews, the researchers explore the experiences and perspectives of students, teachers, and administrators at six specialized high schools with a focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) as they pertain to the practices and structures affecting student outcomes. Four themes were found to be…

  20. The effects of testosterone and oestrogen on gonadectomised and intact male rat anterior pituitary mitotic and apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Nolan, L A; Levy, A

    2006-03-01

    We have used a direct, non-immunochemical and highly accurate method to quantify the effects of testosterone and oestrogen on mitotic and apoptotic activity in the young, male rat anterior pituitary in vivo. Surgical gonadectomy resulted in a 3-fold increase in mitotic activity by the fourth post-operative day, which returned gradually to levels seen in intact animals over the subsequent 3-4 weeks. Both a single dose of Sustanon, a mixture of long-acting testosterone esters in arachis oil, and the same dose divided over 7 days (starting 6 days after gonadectomy), initially suppressed mitotic activity to levels seen in intact animals, but was associated after 48-96 h with a wave of increased mitotic activity. The latter was blocked by co-administration of Sustanon with the non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole and was not seen when the non-aromatisable androgen dihydrotestosterone was substituted for Sustanon. Oestrogen alone in gonadectomised and intact rats produced a marked increase in mitosis as expected. With the exception of a transient increase in response to a single high-dose injection of Sustanon in gonadectomised animals, apoptotic activity was unaffected by all of the above. This study suggests that pituitary mitotic activity is tonically inhibited by gonadal hormone production (at least in the short term) in adult male rats. The study also suggests that supraphysiological testosterone treatment -- while unable to reduce anterior pituitary mitotic activity in untreated, intact animals --suppresses the early increase in mitotic activity induced by gonadectomy. Oestrogen, either exogenous or generated locally by aromatisation, stimulates anterior pituitary mitotic activity in a time-dependent manner. PMID:16522719

  1. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  2. Clinical Risk Prediction by Exploring High-Order Feature Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is one important problem in medical informatics, and logistic regression is one of the most widely used approaches for clinical risk prediction. In many cases, the number of potential risk factors is fairly large and the actual set of factors that contribute to the risk is small. Therefore sparse logistic regression is proposed, which can not only predict the clinical risk but also identify the set of relevant risk factors. The inputs of logistic regression and sparse logistic regression are required to be in vector form. This limits the applicability of these models in the problems when the data cannot be naturally represented vectors (e.g., medical images are two-dimensional matrices). To handle the cases when the data are in the form of multi-dimensional arrays, we propose HOSLR: High-Order Sparse Logistic Regression, which can be viewed as a high order extension of sparse logistic regression. Instead of solving one classification vector as in conventional logistic regression, we solve for K classification vectors in HOSLR (K is the number of modes in the data). A block proximal descent approach is proposed to solve the problem and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally we validate the effectiveness of HOSLR on predicting the onset risk of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and heart failure. PMID:25954428

  3. Micalastic high-voltage insulation: Design features and experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, A.

    1981-12-01

    High-quality mica, carefully selected epoxy resins and a well-matched vacuum/pressure impregnation process determine the characteristics of the MICALASTIC insulation for large turbine-generators. Logical development and process manufacturing quality control have led to an insulation system of high quality and operating reliability. The first winding of a turbine-generator being impregnated and cured under vacuum with solvent-free synthetic resin in 1958 was designed for 10.5 kV rated voltage. Ever since, Siemens AG and Kraftwerk Union AG have used this type of insulation for all direct-cooled windings and also for an increasing number of indirect-cooled windings. At present, 240 turbine-generators with a total of more than 115,000 MVA output have been built. Since 1960, this insulation system has been registered for Siemens AG under the trade name MICALASTIC. The stator windings of the largest, single-shaft generators to date, rated 1560 MVA, 27 kV, has been built with MICALASTIC insulation.

  4. Correlation of histopathologic features of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with the oncotype DX DCIS score.

    PubMed

    Knopfelmacher, Adriana; Fox, Jana; Lo, Yungtai; Shapiro, Nella; Fineberg, Susan

    2015-09-01

    The Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay for ductal carcinoma in situ is used to determine local recurrence risk in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ. The results help select patients with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ who could forgo radiation therapy after conservative surgery. The genes assessed include five proliferation genes, progesterone receptor (PR), and GSTM-1. Our objective was to determine if PR, mitotic counting, or any other pathologic feature of ductal carcinoma in situ could predict the Oncotype DX DCIS Score. We identified 46 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ with a Oncotype DX DCIS Score. In addition to information obtained from routine pathology, we counted mitotic figures in the ductal carcinoma in situ and noted presence of dense chronic inflammatory infiltrate surrounding ductal carcinoma in situ. We found that PR ≥ 90% (P = 0.004), mitotic count ≤ 1 (P = 0.045), estrogen receptor ≥ 90% (P = 0.046), and low nuclear grade (P < 0.0001) were associated with a low score. Dense chronic inflammation surrounding ductal carcinoma in situ was associated with a high score (P = 0.034).All 13 cases with PR ≥ 90%, ≤ 1 mitotic figure and absence of dense chronic inflammation around ductal carcinoma in situ had a low score (100% specificity). A low score was not observed in any case with at least two of the following--negative PR, >1 mitotic figure, and/or presence of dense chronic inflammation around ductal carcinoma in situ (100% specificity). Our study suggests using a combination of PR (≥ 90% vs negative) with mitotic count in ductal carcinoma in situ (≤ 1 vs >1) and dense chronic inflammation around ductal carcinoma in situ one could predict the Oncotype DX DCIS score. Mitotic counting and evaluation of immune response might provide prognostic information in ductal carcinoma in situ. PMID:26111975

  5. Miniaturization of mitotic index cell-based assay using "wall-less" plate technology.

    PubMed

    Le Guezennec, Xavier; Phong, Mark; Nor, Liyana; Kim, Namyong

    2014-03-01

    The use of microscopic imaging for the accurate assessment of cells in mitosis is hampered by the round morphology of mitotic cells, which renders them poorly adherent and highly susceptible to loss during the washing stage of cell-based assays. Here, to circumvent these limitations, we make use of DropArray, a recent technology that allows high retention of weakly adherent cells and suspension cells. DropArray offers the competitive advantage of maintaining the classic high throughput format of microtiter plates while reducing classic microwell volume by up to 90% by using a drop format. Here, we present a mitotic index cell-based assay using the mitosis marker phospho histone H3 at serine 10 on a DropArray 384-well plate format. Dose-response curve analysis of the mitotic index assay with an antimitotic drug (docetaxel) on DropArray is presented that shows an effective dosage compared to previous established results similar to those obtained with conventional microtiter plates. The mitotic index assay with DropArray showed a Z-factor >0.6. Our results validate DropArray as a suitable platform for high throughput screening for compounds affecting mitosis or the cell cycle. PMID:24611478

  6. Pair normalized channel feature and statistics-based learning for high-performance pedestrian detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Bobo; Wang, Guijin; Ruan, Zhiwei; Lin, Xinggang; Meng, Long

    2012-07-01

    High-performance pedestrian detection with good accuracy and fast speed is an important yet challenging task in computer vision. We design a novel feature named pair normalized channel feature (PNCF), which simultaneously combines and normalizes two channel features in image channels, achieving a highly discriminative power and computational efficiency. PNCF applies to both gradient channels and color channels so that shape and appearance information are described and integrated in the same feature. To efficiently explore the formidably large PNCF feature space, we propose a statistics-based feature learning method to select a small number of potentially discriminative candidate features, which are fed into the boosting algorithm. In addition, channel compression and a hybrid pyramid are employed to speed up the multiscale detection. Experiments illustrate the effectiveness of PNCF and its learning method. Our proposed detector outperforms the state-of-the-art on several benchmark datasets in both detection accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Unbiased Feature Selection in Learning Random Forests for High-Dimensional Data

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Huang, Joshua Zhexue; Nguyen, Thuy Thi

    2015-01-01

    Random forests (RFs) have been widely used as a powerful classification method. However, with the randomization in both bagging samples and feature selection, the trees in the forest tend to select uninformative features for node splitting. This makes RFs have poor accuracy when working with high-dimensional data. Besides that, RFs have bias in the feature selection process where multivalued features are favored. Aiming at debiasing feature selection in RFs, we propose a new RF algorithm, called xRF, to select good features in learning RFs for high-dimensional data. We first remove the uninformative features using p-value assessment, and the subset of unbiased features is then selected based on some statistical measures. This feature subset is then partitioned into two subsets. A feature weighting sampling technique is used to sample features from these two subsets for building trees. This approach enables one to generate more accurate trees, while allowing one to reduce dimensionality and the amount of data needed for learning RFs. An extensive set of experiments has been conducted on 47 high-dimensional real-world datasets including image datasets. The experimental results have shown that RFs with the proposed approach outperformed the existing random forests in increasing the accuracy and the AUC measures. PMID:25879059

  8. Post-slippage multinucleation renders cytotoxic variation in anti-mitotic drugs that target the microtubules or mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanting; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    One common cancer chemotherapeutic strategy is to perturb cell division with anti-mitotic drugs. Paclitaxel, the classic microtubule-targeting anti-mitotic drug, so far still outperforms the newer, more spindle-specific anti-mitotics in the clinic, but the underlying cellular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study we identified post-slippage multinucleation, which triggered extensive DNA damage and apoptosis after drug-induced mitotic slippage, contributes to the extra cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in comparison to the spindle-targeting drug, Kinesin-5 inhibitor. Based on quantitative single-cell microscopy assays, we showed that attenuation of the degree of post-slippage multinucleation significantly reduced DNA damage and apoptosis in response to paclitaxel, and that post-slippage apoptosis was likely mediated by the p53-dependent DNA damage response pathway. Paclitaxel appeared to act as a double-edge sword, capable of killing proliferating cancer cells both during mitotic arrest and after mitotic slippage by inducing DNA damage. Our results thus suggest that to predict drug response to paclitaxel and anti-mitotics in general, 2 distinct sets of bio-markers, which regulate mitotic and post-slippage cytotoxicity, respectively, may need to be considered. Our findings provide important new insight not only for elucidating the cytotoxic mechanisms of paclitaxel, but also for understanding the variable efficacy of different anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics. PMID:24694730

  9. Highly featured amorphous silicon nanorod arrays for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani-Amiri, Samaneh; Safiabadi Tali, Seied Ali; Azimi, Soheil; Sanaee, Zeinab; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin

    2014-11-10

    High aspect-ratio vertical structures of amorphous silicon have been realized using hydrogen-assisted low-density plasma reactive ion etching. Amorphous silicon layers with the thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Standard photolithography and nanosphere colloidal lithography were employed to realize ultra-small features of the amorphous silicon. The performance of the patterned amorphous silicon structures as a lithium-ion battery electrode was investigated using galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The patterned structures showed a superior Li-ion battery performance compared to planar amorphous silicon. Such structures are suitable for high current Li-ion battery applications such as electric vehicles.

  10. Induction of mitotic aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Kappas, A.

    1993-12-31

    Genetic tests for induction of mitotic aneuploidy in lower eukarotes used mainly the fungal systems of Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There are several differences between the two systems such as the greater tolerance for aneuploidy and the fertility of triploids in S. cerevisiae, the stability of diploids and the selective advantage of haploids over diploids in Aspergillus and the mycelial growth of Aspergillus. On the other hand several similarities also exist between the two systems such as the general instability and varying growth rate of disomics and the random loss of extra chromosomes which produces more competitive types or the most frequent recovery of certain specific aneuploids. In using lower eukaryotes as test systems for the identification of aneugens several points should be considered which concern the relevance of such systems to higher organisms, the ability to identify primary aneuploidy and distinguish this from events, such as chromosomal breaks, which lead to secondary aneuploidy and the ability to obtain repeatable results. Within the framework of an EEC comparative study for evaluating assays for aneuploidy, a number of chemicals were assayed in A. nidulans for mitotic instability due to malsegregation of chromosomes at cell division.

  11. Compact Representation of High-Dimensional Feature Vectors for Large-Scale Image Recognition and Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wu, Jianxin; Cai, Jianfei

    2016-05-01

    In large-scale visual recognition and image retrieval tasks, feature vectors, such as Fisher vector (FV) or the vector of locally aggregated descriptors (VLAD), have achieved state-of-the-art results. However, the combination of the large numbers of examples and high-dimensional vectors necessitates dimensionality reduction, in order to reduce its storage and CPU costs to a reasonable range. In spite of the popularity of various feature compression methods, this paper shows that the feature (dimension) selection is a better choice for high-dimensional FV/VLAD than the feature (dimension) compression methods, e.g., product quantization. We show that strong correlation among the feature dimensions in the FV and the VLAD may not exist, which renders feature selection a natural choice. We also show that, many dimensions in FV/VLAD are noise. Throwing them away using feature selection is better than compressing them and useful dimensions altogether using feature compression methods. To choose features, we propose an efficient importance sorting algorithm considering both the supervised and unsupervised cases, for visual recognition and image retrieval, respectively. Combining with the 1-bit quantization, feature selection has achieved both higher accuracy and less computational cost than feature compression methods, such as product quantization, on the FV and the VLAD image representations. PMID:27046897

  12. Non-iridescent Transmissive Structural Color Filter Featuring Highly Efficient Transmission and High Excitation Purity

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructure based color filtering has been considered an attractive replacement for current colorant pigmentation in the display technologies, in view of its increased efficiencies, ease of fabrication and eco-friendliness. For such structural filtering, iridescence relevant to its angular dependency, which poses a detrimental barrier to the practical development of high performance display and sensing devices, should be mitigated. We report on a non-iridescent transmissive structural color filter, fabricated in a large area of 76.2 × 25.4 mm2, taking advantage of a stack of three etalon resonators in dielectric films based on a high-index cavity in amorphous silicon. The proposed filter features a high transmission above 80%, a high excitation purity of 0.93 and non-iridescence over a range of 160°, exhibiting no significant change in the center wavelength, dominant wavelength and excitation purity, which implies no change in hue and saturation of the output color. The proposed structure may find its potential applications to large-scale display and imaging sensor systems. PMID:24815530

  13. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L.

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  14. Identification of a mitotic death signature in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Eichhorn, Joshua M; Alford, Sarah E; Chambers, Timothy C

    2014-02-28

    This study examined the molecular mechanism of action of anti-mitotic drugs. The hypothesis was tested that death in mitosis occurs through sustained mitotic arrest with robust Cdk1 signaling causing complete phosphorylation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and conversely, that mitotic slippage is associated with incomplete phosphorylation of Mcl-1/Bcl-xL. The results, obtained from studying six different cancer cell lines, strongly support the hypothesis and identify for the first time a unique molecular signature for mitotic death. The findings represent an important advance in understanding anti-mitotic drug action and provide insight into cancer cell susceptibility to such drugs which has important clinical implications. PMID:24099917

  15. MELK is an oncogenic kinase essential for mitotic progression in basal-like breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubao; Lee, Young-Mi; Baitsch, Lukas; Huang, Alan; Xiang, Yi; Tong, Haoxuan; Lako, Ana; Von, Thanh; Choi, Christine; Lim, Elgene; Min, Junxia; Li, Li; Stegmeier, Frank; Schlegel, Robert; Eck, Michael J; Gray, Nathanael S; Mitchison, Timothy J; Zhao, Jean J

    2014-01-01

    Despite marked advances in breast cancer therapy, basal-like breast cancer (BBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer usually lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors, remains difficult to treat. In this study, we report the identification of MELK as a novel oncogenic kinase from an in vivo tumorigenesis screen using a kinome-wide open reading frames (ORFs) library. Analysis of clinical data reveals a high level of MELK overexpression in BBC, a feature that is largely dependent on FoxM1, a master mitotic transcription factor that is also found to be highly overexpressed in BBC. Ablation of MELK selectively impairs proliferation of basal-like, but not luminal breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, depletion of MELK in BBC cells induces caspase-dependent cell death, preceded by defective mitosis. Finally, we find that Melk is not required for mouse development and physiology. Together, these data indicate that MELK is a normally non-essential kinase, but is critical for BBC and thus represents a promising selective therapeutic target for the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01763.001 PMID:24844244

  16. MELK is an oncogenic kinase essential for mitotic progression in basal-like breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yubao; Lee, Young-Mi; Baitsch, Lukas; Huang, Alan; Xiang, Yi; Tong, Haoxuan; Lako, Ana; Von, Thanh; Choi, Christine; Lim, Elgene; Min, Junxia; Li, Li; Stegmeier, Frank; Schlegel, Robert; Eck, Michael J; Gray, Nathanael S; Mitchison, Timothy J; Zhao, Jean J

    2014-01-01

    Despite marked advances in breast cancer therapy, basal-like breast cancer (BBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer usually lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors, remains difficult to treat. In this study, we report the identification of MELK as a novel oncogenic kinase from an in vivo tumorigenesis screen using a kinome-wide open reading frames (ORFs) library. Analysis of clinical data reveals a high level of MELK overexpression in BBC, a feature that is largely dependent on FoxM1, a master mitotic transcription factor that is also found to be highly overexpressed in BBC. Ablation of MELK selectively impairs proliferation of basal-like, but not luminal breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, depletion of MELK in BBC cells induces caspase-dependent cell death, preceded by defective mitosis. Finally, we find that Melk is not required for mouse development and physiology. Together, these data indicate that MELK is a normally non-essential kinase, but is critical for BBC and thus represents a promising selective therapeutic target for the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01763.001. PMID:24844244

  17. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating mitotic clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Merkestein, Myrte; Laber, Samantha; McMurray, Fiona; Andrew, Daniel; Sachse, Gregor; Sanderson, Jeremy; Li, Mengdi; Usher, Samuel; Sellayah, Dyan; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene plays a pivotal role in regulating body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that primary adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FTO overexpression (FTO-4) mice exhibit increased potential for adipogenic differentiation, while MEFs derived from FTO knockout (FTO-KO) mice show reduced adipogenesis. As predicted from these findings, fat pads from FTO-4 mice fed a high-fat diet show more numerous adipocytes. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion. The effect of FTO on adipogenesis appears to be mediated via enhanced expression of the pro-adipogenic short isoform of RUNX1T1, which enhanced adipocyte proliferation, and is increased in FTO-4 MEFs and reduced in FTO-KO MEFs. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insight into how upregulation of FTO leads to obesity. PMID:25881961

  18. Identification of consensus motifs associated with mitotic recombination and clinical characteristics in patients with paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yasufumi; Higashimoto, Ken; Oka, Takehiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Jozaki, Kosuke; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Kawahara, Kozo; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Matsuo, Muneaki; Nishioka, Kenichi; Joh, Keiichiro; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2016-04-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) is defined as the inheritance of both homologs of a given genomic region from only one parent. The majority of UPD includes an entire chromosome. However, the extent of UPD is sometimes limited to a subchromosomal region (segmental UPD). Mosaic paternal UPD (pUPD) of chromosome 11 is found in approximately 20% of patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and almost all pUPDs are segmental isodisomic pUPDs resulting from mitotic recombination at an early embryonic stage. A mechanism initiating a DNA double strand break (DSB) within 11p has been predicted to lead to segmental pUPD. However, no consensus motif has yet been found. Here, we analyzed 32 BWS patients with pUPD by SNP array and searched for consensus motifs. We identified four consensus motifs frequently appearing within breakpoint regions of segmental pUPD. These motifs were found in another nine BWS patients with pUPD. In addition, the seven motifs found in meiotic recombination hot spots could not be found within pUPD breakpoint regions. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, a marker of DSB initiation, could not be found either. These findings suggest that the mechanism(s) of mitotic recombination leading to segmental pUPD are different from that of meiotic recombination. Furthermore, we found seven patients with paternal uniparental diploidy (PUD) mosaicism. Comparison of clinical features between segmental pUPDs and PUDs showed that developmental disability and cardiac abnormalities were additional characteristic features of PUD mosaicism, along with high risk of tumor development. We also found that macroglossia was characteristic of segmental pUPD mosaicism. PMID:26908620

  19. Phosphohistone H3 expression correlates with manual mitotic counts and aids in identification of "hot spots" in fibroepithelial tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Paula S; Shin, Sandra J; Liu, Yifang; Chen, Zhengming; D'Alfonso, Timothy M

    2016-03-01

    Classification of mammary fibroepithelial tumors (FETs) relies on assessment of mitotic activity, among other histopathologic parameters. Routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) mitotic counts can be subjective and time consuming. Difficulty may arise in identifying "true" mitoses for a variety of reasons. Phosphorylation of histone H3 protein (PHH3) is correlated with mitotic chromatin condensation. The utility of PHH3 immunohistochemical staining to identify mitoses has been demonstrated in multiple organ systems. In this study, we examined the utility of PHH3 in assessing mitotic activity in FETs and compared PHH3- with H&E-determined mitotic counts. PHH3-stained mitoses were readily identifiable at ×10 magnification and allowed for rapid identification of mitotic "hot spots." Median mitotic counts/10 high-power fields for fibroadenoma, benign phyllodes tumor, borderline phyllodes tumor (BlnPT), and malignant phyllodes tumor (MPT) were 0, 0.5, 4.25, and 9, respectively on H&E, and 0, 0.75, 4.5, and 8, respectively for PHH3. Among all FETs, there was a strong positive correlation between H&E- and PHH3-determined mitotic counts (r=0.91, P<.001). Using PHH3, 2 cases would be reclassified, both from BlnPT to MPT. PHH3-determined counts correlated with H&E-determined counts in FETs. Using PHH3, a small number of cases were reclassified from BlnPT to MPT, for which treatment is similar. Although H&E-determined counts remain the criterion standard for assessing mitotic activity in FETs, PHH3 may be a useful adjunctive tool in some cases and is helpful in identifying mitotic hot spots. PMID:26826415

  20. Force and Length in the Mitotic Spindle

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Sophie; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembles to a steady-state length at metaphase through the integrated action of molecular mechanisms that generate and respond to mechanical forces. While molecular mechanisms that produce force have been described, our understanding of how they integrate with each other, and with the assembly-disassembly mechanisms that regulate length, is poor. We review current understanding of the basic architecture and dynamics of the metaphase spindle, and some of the elementary force producing mechanisms. We then discuss models for force integration, and spindle length determination. We also emphasize key missing data that notably includes absolute values of forces, and how they vary as a function of position, within the spindle. PMID:19906577

  1. The putative oncogene CEP72 inhibits the mitotic function of BRCA1 and induces chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Lüddecke, S; Ertych, N; Stenzinger, A; Weichert, W; Beissbarth, T; Dyczkowski, J; Gaedcke, J; Valerius, O; Braus, G H; Kschischo, M; Bastians, H

    2016-05-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor-suppressor gene associated with, but not restricted to, breast and ovarian cancer and implicated in various biological functions. During mitosis, BRCA1 and its positive regulator Chk2 are localized at centrosomes and are required for the regulation of microtubule plus end assembly, thereby ensuring faithful mitosis and numerical chromosome stability. However, the function of BRCA1 during mitosis has not been defined mechanistically. To gain insights into the mitotic role of BRCA1 in regulating microtubule assembly, we systematically identified proteins interacting with BRCA1 during mitosis and found the centrosomal protein Cep72 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein. CEP72 is frequently upregulated in colorectal cancer tissues and overexpression of CEP72 mirrors the consequences of BRCA1 loss during mitosis. In detail, the overexpression of CEP72 causes an increase in microtubule plus end assembly, abnormal mitotic spindle formation and the induction of chromosomal instability. Moreover, we show that high levels of Cep72 counteract Chk2 as a positive regulator of BRCA1 to ensure proper mitotic microtubule assembly. Thus, CEP72 represents a putative oncogene in colorectal cancer that might negatively regulate the mitotic function of BRCA1 to ensure chromosomal stability. PMID:26300001

  2. Direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes from canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Morais, C S D; Affonso, P R A M; Bitencourt, J A; Wenceslau, A A

    2015-01-01

    Currently, mammary neoplasms in female canines are a serious problem in veterinary clinics. In addition, the canine species is an excellent disease model for human oncology because of the biological and genetic similarities between the species. Cytogenetics has allowed further study of the characterization of neoplasms in canines. We hypothesized that the use of a direct preparation protocol for mitotic chromosome analysis would provide a simple and low cost protocol for use in all laboratories. The objective of this method is to display in a few hours of dividing cells just like the time of collection since cell division in tissue can be obtained. Ten female canines with the spontaneous occurrence of mammary neoplasia were used to test a pioneering direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes. The excised breast tumor tissue fragments were subjected to the protocol consisting of treatment with colchicine, treatment with hypotonic solution, and fixation. Mitotic chromosomes were absent in cell suspensions of only two samples among the 10 materials analyzed, based on the analysis of five blades for each preparation obtained. So, the cell suspension obtained allowed for the observation of eight tissue samples viable for cytogenetic analysis, five of which had excellent numbers of mitotic chromosomes. However, the technique was unsuccessful in producing high-quality cell suspensions because of inadequate condensation and scattering of chromosomes. While adjustments to methodological procedures are needed, this protocol represents a low cost and simplified method to study the cytogenetics of canine tumors. PMID:26782592

  3. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu; Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina; Jaakkola, Kimmo; Maeki-Jouppila, Jenni; Kallio, Lila; Kallio, Marko J.

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3 Prime ,5-dihydroxy-4 Prime ,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  4. A selective stain for mitotic figures, particularly in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Fraser, F J

    1982-07-01

    A selective stain for mitotic figures is valuable where autoradiographic counting is not required, especially in the developing brain. Most work in this field has been based on conventional nuclear stains which do not differentiate mitotic figures from resting cells by color. Hematoxylin, Feulgen, gallocyanin and Nissl methods have been used particularly. The method described uses a modified Bouin fixative, followed by hydrolysis in 1 N HCl. Mitotic figures are selectively stained using crystal violet, with nuclear fast red as the counterstain for resting cells. The method has been tested using material from postnatal and fetal sheep, guinea pig and rat. Using paraffin mounted serial sections it is applicable to all organs. The method was very successful on developing rat brain, particularly for detail and quantitative estimation in the early stages of prenatal development, which was of primary interest. Nucleated cells of the erythrocytic series, keratin and what appear to be mast cells were found to stain. When nuclear counting or cell recognition were required these did not cause any difficulty, except in prenatal liver. The highly selective method presented stains mitotic figures, in all tissue tested, an intense blue against a background of red resting cells. PMID:6183796

  5. Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowski, David C; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Wu, Chi-Chung; Piatkowski, Tanja; Becker, Robert; Leone, Marina; Hirth, Sofia; Ricciardi, Filomena; Falk, Nathalie; Giessl, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Braun, Thomas; Weidinger, Gilbert; Engel, Felix B

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05563.001 PMID:26247711

  6. A Late Mitotic Regulatory Network Controlling Cyclin Destruction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jaspersen, Sue L.; Charles, Julia F.; Tinker-Kulberg, Rachel L.; Morgan, David O.

    1998-01-01

    Exit from mitosis requires the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase–cyclin complexes, primarily by ubiquitin-dependent cyclin proteolysis. Cyclin destruction is regulated by a ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, members of a large class of late mitotic mutants, including cdc15, cdc5, cdc14, dbf2, and tem1, arrest in anaphase with a phenotype similar to that of cells expressing nondegradable forms of mitotic cyclins. We addressed the possibility that the products of these genes are components of a regulatory network that governs cyclin proteolysis. We identified a complex array of genetic interactions among these mutants and found that the growth defect in most of the mutants is suppressed by overexpression of SPO12, YAK1, and SIC1 and is exacerbated by overproduction of the mitotic cyclin Clb2. When arrested in late mitosis, the mutants exhibit a defect in cyclin-specific APC activity that is accompanied by high Clb2 levels and low levels of the anaphase inhibitor Pds1. Mutant cells arrested in G1 contain normal APC activity. We conclude that Cdc15, Cdc5, Cdc14, Dbf2, and Tem1 cooperate in the activation of the APC in late mitosis but are not required for maintenance of that activity in G1. PMID:9763445

  7. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  8. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    PubMed Central

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  9. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Andrulis, Irene L; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A; Fasching, Peter A; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Martens, John W M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hopper, John L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M; Giles, Graham G; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2014-11-15

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  10. Features of merchant ship in high-resolution spaceborne SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Weigen; Yang, Jingsong; Fu, Bin

    2006-10-01

    Ship features in high-resolution spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery has crucial significance for ship classification from satellite. In this paper, we discuss the features of merchant Ships including oil tanker, container ship and bulk carrier in SAR imagery, which is comprised of geometrical feature, scattering feature, tonnage information with Radar Cross Section (RCS) and wake. The study show that the ship lengths measured from SAR imagery has a good correlation with the real lengths, but the correlation of ship beam is worse. Ship scattering feature has positive correlation with the ship structure, which maybe is a feature to distinguish container ship from other vessels. A new equation about ship length and its displacement in tons is presented in this paper. The relation suggested by Skolnik M.I between ship tonnage and RCS is tested but not validated. We also validate the means of extracting ship speed by ship turbulence wake in SAR imagery.

  11. Dataset from the global phosphoproteomic mapping of early mitotic exit in human cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael A; Parker, Benjamin L; Chaudhuri, Rima; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Hoffman, Nolan J; Watkins, D Neil; Daly, Roger J; James, David E; Burgess, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The presence or absence of a phosphorylation on a substrate at any particular point in time is a functional readout of the balance in activity between the regulatory kinase and the counteracting phosphatase. Understanding how stable or short-lived a phosphorylation site is required for fully appreciating the biological consequences of the phosphorylation. Our current understanding of kinases and their substrates is well established; however, the role phosphatases play is less understood. Therefore, we utilized a phosphatase dependent model of mitotic exit to identify potential substrates that are preferentially dephosphorylated. Using this method, we identified >16,000 phosphosites on >3300 unique proteins, and quantified the temporal phosphorylation changes that occur during early mitotic exit (McCloy et al., 2015 [1]). Furthermore, we annotated the majority of these phosphorylation sites with a high confidence upstream kinase using published, motif and prediction based methods. The results from this study have been deposited into the ProteomeXchange repository with identifier PXD001559. Here we provide additional analysis of this dataset; for each of the major mitotic kinases we identified motifs that correlated strongly with phosphorylation status. These motifs could be used to predict the stability of phosphorylated residues in proteins of interest, and help infer potential functional roles for uncharacterized phosphorylations. In addition, we provide validation at the single cell level that serine residues phosphorylated by Cdk are stable during phosphatase dependent mitotic exit. In summary, this unique dataset contains information on the temporal mitotic stability of thousands of phosphorylation sites regulated by dozens of kinases, and information on the potential preference that phosphatases have at both the protein and individual phosphosite level. The compellation of this data provides an invaluable resource for the wider research community. PMID

  12. Comparison of the predictive power of beef surface wavelet texture features at high and low magnification.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Patrick; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Beef longissimus dorsi surface texture is an indicator used in predicting beef palatability by expert graders. Computer vision systems have previously used imaging at normal view to develop surface texture features with some success. Good models of beef overall acceptability using imaging at high magnification have been recently developed. As a comparison the same surface texture features were computed from the corresponding images at normal view and used to model overall acceptability. Both sets of texture features were also combined with muscle colour and marbling features and used to model overall acceptability. Models using texture features alone were more successful at normal modality. However colour and marbling features combined much better with texture features at high modality to yield the most accurate model of overall acceptability (r(2)=0.93). Accurate Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) models were computed at both modalities with and without inclusion of colour and marbling features. Addition of squared terms to the models failed to improve accuracy. PMID:20416713

  13. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen interacts with bromodomain protein Brd4 on host mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    You, Jianxin; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Denis, Gerald V; Harrington, William J; Ballestas, Mary E; Kaye, Kenneth M; Howley, Peter M

    2006-09-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is required for viral episome maintenance in host cells during latent infection. Two regions of the protein have been implicated in tethering LANA/viral episomes to the host mitotic chromosomes, and LANA chromosome-binding sites are subjects of high interest. Because previous studies had identified bromodomain protein Brd4 as the mitotic chromosome anchor for the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein, which tethers the viral episomes to host mitotic chromosomes (J. You, J. L. Croyle, A. Nishimura, K. Ozato, and P. M. Howley, Cell 117:349-360, 2004, and J. You, M. R. Schweiger, and P. M. Howley, J. Virol. 79:14956-14961, 2005), we examined whether KSHV LANA interacts with Brd4. We found that LANA binds Brd4 in vivo and in vitro and that the binding is mediated by a direct protein-protein interaction between the ET (extraterminal) domain of Brd4 and a carboxyl-terminal region of LANA previously implicated in chromosome binding. Brd4 associates with mitotic chromosomes throughout mitosis and demonstrates a strong colocalization with LANA and the KSHV episomes on host mitotic chromosomes. Although another bromodomain protein, RING3/Brd2, binds to LANA in a similar fashion in vitro, it is largely excluded from the mitotic chromosomes in KSHV-uninfected cells and is partially recruited to the chromosomes in KSHV-infected cells. These data identify Brd4 as an interacting protein for the carboxyl terminus of LANA on mitotic chromosomes and suggest distinct functional roles for the two bromodomain proteins RING3/Brd2 and Brd4 in LANA binding. Additionally, because Brd4 has recently been shown to have a role in transcription, we examined whether Brd4 can regulate the CDK2 promoter, which can be transactivated by LANA. PMID:16940503

  14. Dissociation of gemcitabine chemosensitization by CHK1 inhibition from cell cycle checkpoint abrogation and aberrant mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Parsels, Leslie A; Tanska, Daria M; Parsels, Joshua D; Zabludoff, Sonya D; Cuneo, Kyle C; Lawrence, Theodore S; Maybaum, Jonathan; Morgan, Meredith A

    2016-03-01

    In order to determine the relative contribution of checkpoint abrogation and subsequent aberrant mitotic entry to gemcitabine chemosensitization by CHK1 inhibition, we established a model utilizing the CDK inhibitors roscovitine or purvalanol A to re-establish cell cycle arrest and prevent aberrant mitotic entry in pancreatic cancer cells treated with gemcitabine and the CHK inhibitor AZD7762. In this study, we report that the extent of aberrant mitotic entry, as determined by flow cytometry for the mitotic marker phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10), did not reflect the relative sensitivities of pancreatic cancer cell lines to gemcitabine chemosensitization by AZD7762. In addition, re-establishing gemcitabine-induced cell cycle arrest either pharmacologically, with roscovitine or purvalanol A, or genetically, with cyclin B1 siRNA, did not inhibit chemosensitization uniformly across the cell lines. Furthermore, we found that AZD7762 augmented high-intensity γH2AX signaling in gemcitabine-treated cells, suggesting the presence of replication stress when CHK1 is inhibited. Finally, the ability of roscovitine to prevent chemosensitization correlated with its ability to inhibit AZD7762-induced high-intensity γH2AX, but not aberrant pHH3, suggesting that the effects of AZD7762 on DNA replication or repair rather than aberrant mitotic entry determine gemcitabine chemosensitization in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26890478

  15. USP9X stabilizes XIAP to regulate mitotic cell death and chemoresistance in aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Engel, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Slawska, Jolanta; Jacobs, Laura; Ahangarian Abhari, Behnaz; Altmann, Bettina; Kurutz, Julia; Rathakrishnan, Abirami; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Brunner, Andrä; Targosz, Bianca-Sabrina; Loewecke, Felicia; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Ueffing, Marius; Fulda, Simone; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Trümper, Lorenz; Klapper, Wolfram; Keller, Ulrich; Jost, Philipp J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Bassermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintains genome stability and marks an important target for antineoplastic therapies. However, it has remained unclear how cells execute cell fate decisions under conditions of SAC-induced mitotic arrest. Here, we identify USP9X as the mitotic deubiquitinase of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and demonstrate that deubiquitylation and stabilization of XIAP by USP9X lead to increased resistance toward mitotic spindle poisons. We find that primary human aggressive B-cell lymphoma samples exhibit high USP9X expression that correlate with XIAP overexpression. We show that high USP9X/XIAP expression is associated with shorter event-free survival in patients treated with spindle poison-containing chemotherapy. Accordingly, aggressive B-cell lymphoma lines with USP9X and associated XIAP overexpression exhibit increased chemoresistance, reversed by specific inhibition of either USP9X or XIAP. Moreover, knockdown of USP9X or XIAP significantly delays lymphoma development and increases sensitivity to spindle poisons in a murine Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Together, we specify the USP9X-XIAP axis as a regulator of the mitotic cell fate decision and propose that USP9X and XIAP are potential prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27317434

  16. Comparative diagnostic and prognostic performances of the hematoxylin-eosin and phospho-histone H3 mitotic count and Ki-67 index in adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Molinaro, Luca; Volante, Marco; Ventura, Laura; Righi, Luisella; Bolla, Stefania; Terzolo, Massimo; Sapino, Anna; Papotti, Mauro G

    2014-09-01

    Mitotic count on hematoxylin and eosin slides is a fundamental morphological criterion in the diagnosis and grading of adrenocortical carcinoma in any scoring system employed. Moreover, it is the unique term strongly associated with patient's prognosis. Phospho-histone H3 is a mitosis-specific antibody, which was already proven to facilitate mitotic count in melanoma and other tumors. Therefore, a study was designed to assess the diagnostic and prognostic role of phospho-histone H3 in 52 adrenocortical carcinomas, comparing manual and computerized count to standard manual hematoxylin- and eosin-based method and Ki-67 index. Manual hematoxylin and eosin and phospho-histone H3 mitotic counts were highly correlated (r=0.9077, P<0.0001), better than computer-assisted phospho-histone H3 evaluations, and had an excellent inter-observer reproducibility at Bland-Altman analysis. Three of 15 cases having <5 mitotic figures per 50 high-power fields by standard count on hematoxylin and eosin gained the mitotic figure point of Weiss Score after a manual count on phospho-histone H3 slides. Traditional mitotic count confirmed to be a strong predictor of overall survival (P=0.0043), better than phospho-histone H3-based evaluation (P=0.051), but not as strong as the Ki-67 index (P<0.0001). The latter further segregated adrenocortical carcinomas into three prognostic groups, stratifying cases by low (<20%), intermediate (20-50%), and high (>50%) Ki-67 values. We conclude that (a) phospho-histone H3 staining is a useful diagnostic complementary tool to standard hematoxylin and eosin mitotic count, enabling optimal mitotic figure evaluation (including atypical mitotic figures) even in adrenocortical carcinomas with a low mitotic index and with a very high reproducibility; (b) Ki-67 proved to be the best prognostic indicator of overall survival, being superior to the mitotic index, irrespective of the method (standard on hematoxylin and eosin or phospho-histone H3-based) used to count

  17. Local-Learning-Based Feature Selection for High-Dimensional Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yijun; Todorovic, Sinisa; Goodison, Steve

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers feature selection for data classification in the presence of a huge number of irrelevant features. We propose a new feature-selection algorithm that addresses several major issues with prior work, including problems with algorithm implementation, computational complexity, and solution accuracy. The key idea is to decompose an arbitrarily complex nonlinear problem into a set of locally linear ones through local learning, and then learn feature relevance globally within the large margin framework. The proposed algorithm is based on well-established machine learning and numerical analysis techniques, without making any assumptions about the underlying data distribution. It is capable of processing many thousands of features within minutes on a personal computer while maintaining a very high accuracy that is nearly insensitive to a growing number of irrelevant features. Theoretical analyses of the algorithm’s sample complexity suggest that the algorithm has a logarithmical sample complexity with respect to the number of features. Experiments on 11 synthetic and real-world data sets demonstrate the viability of our formulation of the feature-selection problem for supervised learning and the effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:20634556

  18. On Efficient Feature Ranking Methods for High-Throughput Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Liang, Wei; Peng, Lihong; Peng, Li; Hanyurwimfura, Damien; Li, Zejun; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Efficient mining of high-throughput data has become one of the popular themes in the big data era. Existing biology-related feature ranking methods mainly focus on statistical and annotation information. In this study, two efficient feature ranking methods are presented. Multi-target regression and graph embedding are incorporated in an optimization framework, and feature ranking is achieved by introducing structured sparsity norm. Unlike existing methods, the presented methods have two advantages: (1) the feature subset simultaneously account for global margin information as well as locality manifold information. Consequently, both global and locality information are considered. (2) Features are selected by batch rather than individually in the algorithm framework. Thus, the interactions between features are considered and the optimal feature subset can be guaranteed. In addition, this study presents a theoretical justification. Empirical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the two algorithms in comparison with some state-of-the-art feature ranking methods through a set of real-world gene expression data sets. PMID:26684461

  19. Mitotic Diversity in Homeostatic Human Interfollicular Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Nöske, Katharina; Stark, Hans-Jürgen; Nevaril, Leonard; Berning, Manuel; Langbein, Lutz; Goyal, Ashish; Diederichs, Sven; Boukamp, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of skin research, regulation of proliferation and homeostasis in human epidermis is still insufficiently understood. To address the role of mitoses in tissue regulation, we utilized human long-term skin equivalents and systematically assessed mitoses during early epidermal development and long-term epidermal regeneration. We now demonstrate four different orientations: (1) horizontal, i.e., parallel to the basement membrane (BM) and suggestive of symmetric divisions; (2) oblique with an angle of 45°–70°; or (3) perpendicular, suggestive of asymmetric division. In addition, we demonstrate a fourth substantial fraction of suprabasal mitoses, many of which are committed to differentiation (Keratin K10-positive). As verified also for normal human skin, this spatial mitotic organization is part of the regulatory program of human epidermal tissue homeostasis. As a potential marker for asymmetric division, we investigated for Numb and found that it was evenly spread in almost all undifferentiated keratinocytes, but indeed asymmetrically distributed in some mitoses and particularly frequent under differentiation-repressing low-calcium conditions. Numb deletion (stable knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9), however, did not affect proliferation, neither in a three-day follow up study by life cell imaging nor during a 14-day culture period, suggesting that Numb is not essential for the general control of keratinocyte division. PMID:26828486

  20. Physical limits on kinesin-5–mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Kelsey M.; Tubman, Emily S.; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro­tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end–tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5–mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to

  1. Physical limits on kinesin-5-mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kelsey M; Tubman, Emily S; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O'Toole, Eileen T; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J

    2015-11-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro-tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end-tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5-mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to this

  2. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  3. Targeting the Mitotic Catastrophe Signaling Pathway in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mc Gee, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, as defined in 2012 by the International Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death, is a bona fide intrinsic oncosuppressive mechanism that senses mitotic failure and responds by driving a cell to an irreversible antiproliferative fate of death or senescence. Thus, failed mitotic catastrophe can promote the unrestrained growth of defective cells, thereby representing a major gateway to tumour development. Furthermore, the activation of mitotic catastrophe offers significant therapeutic advantage which has been exploited in the action of conventional and targeted anticancer agents. Yet, despite its importance in tumour prevention and treatment, the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe is not well understood. A better understanding of the signals that determine cell fate following failed or defective mitosis will reveal new opportunities to selectively target and enhance the programme for therapeutic benefit and reveal biomarkers to predict patient response. This review is focused on the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe induction and signalling and highlights current strategies to exploit the process in cancer therapy. PMID:26491220

  4. Sharing of mitotic pre-ribosomal particles between daughter cells.

    PubMed

    Sirri, Valentina; Jourdan, Nathalie; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle; Roussel, Pascal

    2016-04-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental multistep process initiated by the synthesis of 90S pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleoli of higher eukaryotes. Even though synthesis of ribosomes stops during mitosis while nucleoli disappear, mitotic pre-ribosomal particles persist as observed in pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) during telophase. To further understand the relationship between the nucleolus and the PNBs, the presence and the fate of the mitotic pre-ribosomal particles during cell division were investigated. We demonstrate that the recently synthesized 45S precursor ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) as well as the 32S and 30S pre-rRNAs are maintained during mitosis and associated with the chromosome periphery together with pre-rRNA processing factors. Maturation of the mitotic pre-ribosomal particles, as assessed by the stability of the mitotic pre-rRNAs, is transiently arrested during mitosis by a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1-cyclin-B-dependent mechanism and can be restored by CDK inhibitor treatments. At the M-G1 transition, the resumption of mitotic pre-rRNA processing in PNBs does not induce the disappearance of PNBs; this only occurs when functional nucleoli reform. Strikingly, during their maturation process, mitotic pre-rRNAs localize in reforming nucleoli. PMID:26929073

  5. Micromechanical-biochemical studies of mitotic chromosome elasticity and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael Guy

    The structure of mitotic chromosomes was studied by combining micromechanical force measurements with microfluidic biochemical exposures. Our method is to use glass micropipettes attached to either end of a single chromosome to do mechanical experiments in the extracellular buffer. A third pipette can be used to locally 'spray' reactants so as to carry out dynamical mechanical-chemical experiments. The following elastic properties of mitotic chromosomes are found: Young's modulus, Y = 300 Pa; Poisson ratio, sigma = 0.1; Bending rigidity, B = 1 x 10 -22 J·m; Internal viscosity, eta' = 100 kg/m·sec; Volume fraction, ϕ = 0.7; Extensions of less than 3 times the relaxed length are linear and reversible; Extensions beyond 30 fold exhibit a force plateau at 15 nN and convert the chromosome to a disperse ghost-like state with little change in chromatin structure; Mitotic chromosomes are relatively isotropic; dsDNA cuts of at least every 3 kb cause the a mitotic chromosomes to fall apart; dsDNA cuts less frequently than every 50 kb do not affect mitotic chromosome structure. These results lead to the conclusion that mitotic chromosomes are a network crosslinked every 50 kb between which chromatin is fold by chromatin folding proteins, which are likely to be condensins.

  6. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  7. Pores and ridges: high-resolution fingerprint matching using level 3 features.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Chen, Yi; Demirkus, Meltem

    2007-01-01

    Fingerprint friction ridge details are generally described in a hierarchical order at three different levels, namely, Level 1 (pattern), Level 2 (minutia points), and Level 3 (pores and ridge contours). Although latent print examiners frequently take advantage of Level 3 features to assist in identification, Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) currently rely only on Level 1 and Level 2 features. In fact, the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) standard of fingerprint resolution for AFIS is 500 pixels per inch (ppi), which is inadequate for capturing Level 3 features, such as pores. With the advances in fingerprint sensing technology, many sensors are now equipped with dual resolution (500 ppi/1,000 ppi) scanning capability. However, increasing the scan resolution alone does not necessarily provide any performance improvement in fingerprint matching, unless an extended feature set is utilized. As a result, a systematic study to determine how much performance gain one can achieve by introducing Level 3 features in AFIS is highly desired. We propose a hierarchical matching system that utilizes features at all the three levels extracted from 1,000 ppi fingerprint scans. Level 3 features, including pores and ridge contours, are automatically extracted using Gabor filters and wavelet transform and are locally matched using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Our experiments show that Level 3 features carry significant discriminatory information. There is a relative reduction of 20 percent in the equal error rate (EER) of the matching system when Level 3 features are employed in combination with Level 1 and 2 features. This significant performance gain is consistently observed across various quality fingerprint images. PMID:17108380

  8. Inhibition of Bcl-xL sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers, but not mitotic drivers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Nelson, Louisa; Tighe, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate in response to an aberrant mitosis is governed by two competing networks: the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. The mechanistic interplay between these two networks is obscured by functional redundancy and the ability of cells to die either in mitosis or in the subsequent interphase. By coupling time-lapse microscopy with selective pharmacological agents, we systematically probe pro-survival Bcl-xL in response to various mitotic perturbations. Concentration matrices show that BH3-mimetic-mediated inhibition of Bcl-xL synergises with perturbations that induce an SAC-mediated mitotic block, including drugs that dampen microtubule dynamics, and inhibitors targeting kinesins and kinases required for spindle assembly. By contrast, Bcl-xL inhibition does not synergize with drugs which drive cells through an aberrant mitosis by overriding the SAC. This differential effect, which is explained by compensatory Mcl-1 function, provides opportunities for patient stratification and combination treatments in the context of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27512141

  9. A high precision feature based on LBP and Gabor theory for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Yin, Shouyi; Ouyang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    How to describe an image accurately with the most useful information but at the same time the least useless information is a basic problem in the recognition field. In this paper, a novel and high precision feature called BG2D2LRP is proposed, accompanied with a corresponding face recognition system. The feature contains both static texture differences and dynamic contour trends. It is based on Gabor and LBP theory, operated by various kinds of transformations such as block, second derivative, direct orientation, layer and finally fusion in a particular way. Seven well-known face databases such as FRGC, AR, FERET and so on are used to evaluate the veracity and robustness of the proposed feature. A maximum improvement of 29.41% is achieved comparing with other methods. Besides, the ROC curve provides a satisfactory figure. Those experimental results strongly demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the new feature and method. PMID:23552103

  10. Destruction of the CDC28/CLB mitotic kinase is not required for the metaphase to anaphase transition in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Surana, U; Amon, A; Dowzer, C; McGrew, J; Byers, B; Nasmyth, K

    1993-01-01

    It is widely assumed that degradation of mitotic cyclins causes a decrease in mitotic cdc2/CDC28 kinase activity and thereby triggers the metaphase to anaphase transition. Two observations made on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are inconsistent with this scenario: (i) anaphase occurs in the presence of high levels of kinase in cdc15 mutants and (ii) overproduction of a B-type mitotic cyclin causes arrest not in metaphase as previously reported but in telophase. Kinase destruction is therefore implicated in the exit from mitosis rather than the entry into anaphase. The behaviour of esp1 mutants shows in addition that kinase destruction can occur in the absence of anaphase completion. The execution of anaphase and the destruction of CDC28 kinase activity therefore appear to take place independently of one another. Images PMID:8491189

  11. Fabrication of a high-resolution roll for gravure printing of 2μm features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau, Gerd; Kitsomboonloha, Rungrot; Subramanian, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution features are key to achieve high performance printed electronics devices such as transistors. Gravure printing is very promising to achieve high resolution in combination with high printing speeds on the order of 1m/s. High-speed gravure has recently been shown to print high resolution features down to linewidths and spacing of 2μm. Whilst this was a tremendous improvement over previous reports, these results had been obtained using silicon printing plates. These silicon printing plates are fabricated using microfabrication techniques which offer several advantages over traditional metal gravure cylinders where the features are defined by techniques such as stylus engraving, laser engraving or etching. This offers much greater precision and design freedom in terms of feature size, surface roughness, cell placement and cell shape. However, rigid silicon printing plates cannot be used in a roll-to-roll printing process that would truly enable low-cost printed electronics. Here we demonstrate for the first time a gravure printing roll that combines the precision of silicon printing plates with the form factor of a metal cylinder. The fabrication process starts with a silicon master whose pattern is replicated by polymer molding. The actual metal printing plate is then built up on the polymer negative of the pattern by a combination of electroless and electroplating. After separation of the polymer and the metal, the metal printing plate can be mounted on a magnetic roll for printing. Printing of highly scaled 2μm features is demonstrated. Different metal surfaces were explored to optimize printing performance and wear during printing.

  12. Feature selection from high resolution remote sensing data for biotope mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindel, M.; Hese, S.; Berger, C.; Schmullius, C.

    2011-09-01

    Mapping of Landscape Protection Areas with regard to user requirements for detailed land cover and biotope classes has been limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of Earth observation data. The synergistic use of new generation optical and SAR data may overcome these limitations. The presented work is part of the ENVILAND-2 project, which focuses on the complementary use of RapidEye and TerraSAR-X data to derive land cover and biotope classes as needed by the Environmental Agencies. The goal is to semi-automatically update the corresponding maps by utilising more Earth observation data and less field work derived information. Properties of both sensors are used including the red edge band of the RapidEye system and the high spatial and temporal resolution TerraSAR-X data.The main part of this work concentrates on the process of feature selection. Based upon multi-temporal optical and SAR data various features like textural measurements, spectral features and vegetation indices can be computed. The resulting information stacks can easily exceed hundreds of layers. The goal of this work is to reduce these information layers to get a set of decorrelated features for the classification of biotope types. The first step is to evaluate possible features. Followed by a feature extraction and pre-processing. The pre-processing contains outlier removal and feature normalization. The next step describes the process of feature selection and is divided into two parts. The first part is a regression analysis to remove redundant information. The second part constitutes the class separability analysis. For the remaining features and for every class combination present in the study area different separability measurements like divergence or Jeffries-Matusita distance are computed. As result there is a set of features for every class providing the highest class separability values. As the final step an evaluation is performed to estimate how much features for a class are

  13. Mechanism and regulation of kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  14. Mechanism and Regulation of Kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  15. Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data for Features Extraction of High Accuracy Driving Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Dong, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    High Accuracy Driving Maps (HADMs) are the core component of Intelligent Drive Assistant Systems (IDAS), which can effectively reduce the traffic accidents due to human error and provide more comfortable driving experiences. Vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. This paper proposes a novel method to extract road features (e.g., road surfaces, road boundaries, road markings, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, vehicles and so on) for HADMs in highway environment. Quantitative evaluations show that the proposed algorithm attains an average precision and recall in terms of 90.6% and 91.2% in extracting road features. Results demonstrate the efficiencies and feasibilities of the proposed method for extraction of road features for HADMs.

  16. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution. PMID:26769847

  17. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence. PMID:26208522

  18. Picropodophyllin causes mitotic arrest and catastrophe by depolymerizing microtubules via Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Waraky, Ahmed; Akopyan, Karen; Parrow, Vendela; Strömberg, Thomas; Axelson, Magnus; Abrahmsén, Lars; Lindqvist, Arne; Larsson, Olle; Aleem, Eiman

    2014-01-01

    Picropodophyllin (PPP) is an anticancer drug undergoing clinical development in NSCLC. PPP has been shown to suppress IGF-1R signaling and to induce a G2/M cell cycle phase arrest but the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study identified an IGF-1-independent mechanism of PPP leading to pro-metaphase arrest. The mitotic block was induced in human cancer cell lines and in an A549 xenograft mouse but did not occur in normal hepatocytes/mouse tissues. Cell cycle arrest by PPP occurred in vitro and in vivo accompanied by prominent CDK1 activation, and was IGF-1R-independent since it occurred also in IGF-1R-depleted and null cells. The tumor cells were not arrested in G2/M but in mitosis. Centrosome separation was prevented during mitotic entry, resulting in a monopolar mitotic spindle with subsequent prometaphase-arrest, independent of Plk1/Aurora A or Eg5, and leading to cell features of mitotic catastrophe. PPP also increased soluble tubulin and decreased spindle-associated tubulin within minutes, indicating that it interfered with microtubule dynamics. These results provide a novel IGF-1R-independent mechanism of antitumor effects of PPP. PMID:25268741

  19. Cold-treated centrosome: isolation of centrosomes from mitotic sea urchin eggs, production of an anticentrosomal antibody, and novel ultrastructural imaging.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Coffe, C; Coffe, G; Schatten, H; Mazia, D; Schatten, G

    1996-01-01

    A novel isolation of centrosomes is described and it was used to both generate a centrosome-specific monoclonal antibody and to image with high-resolution low-voltage scanning electron microscopy the surface details of the isolated centrosome. At first mitotic prometaphase, sea urchin zygotes are chilled on ice overnight. While most of the microtubules disassemble, the mitotic centrosomes collapse into aggregated masses. These centrosomes have been isolated, and used to generate a monoclonal antibody, designated 4D2, which is reactive with interphase and mitotic centrosomes. 4D2 staining of centrosomes is similar, but not identical, to that of other centrosomal antibodies like Ah6 and 5051. Centrosomal material is detected as a compact sphere after cold treatment; upon recovery the sphere expands and undergoes the shape changes previously described [Mazia et al., 1987: J. Cell Biol. 105:206a] to eventually reorganize a normal mitotic apparatus. PMID:8674139

  20. A phospho/methyl switch at histone H3 regulates TFIID association with mitotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Varier, Radhika A; Outchkourov, Nikolay S; de Graaf, Petra; van Schaik, Frederik M A; Ensing, Henk Jan L; Wang, Fangwei; Higgins, Jonathan M G; Kops, Geert J P L; Timmers, HTh Marc

    2010-01-01

    Histone methylation patterns are correlated with eukaryotic gene transcription. High-affinity binding of the plant homeodomain (PHD) of TFIID subunit TAF3 to trimethylated lysine-4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3) is involved in promoter recruitment of this basal transcription factor. Here, we show that for transcription activation the PHD of TAF3 can be replaced by PHDs of other high-affinity H3K4me3 binders. Interestingly, H3K4me3 binding of TFIID and the TAF3-PHD is decreased by phosphorylation of the adjacent threonine residue (H3T3), which coincides with mitotic inhibition of transcription. Ectopic expression of the H3T3 kinase haspin repressed TAF3-mediated transcription of endogenous and of reporter genes and decreased TFIID association with chromatin. Conversely, immunofluorescence and live-cell microscopy studies showed an increased association of TFIID with mitotic chromosomes upon haspin knockdown. Based on our observations, we propose that a histone H3 phospho–methyl switch regulates TFIID-mediated transcription during mitotic progression of the cell cycle. PMID:20953165

  1. Dyskerin Localizes to the Mitotic Apparatus and Is Required for Orderly Mitosis in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alawi, Faizan; Lin, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Dyskerin is a highly conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein with established roles in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biogenesis, telomerase and telomere maintenance and precursor rRNA processing. Telomerase is functional during S phase and the bulk of rRNA maturation occurs during G1 and S phases; both processes are inactivated during mitosis. Yet, we show that during the course of cell cycle progression, human dyskerin expression peaks during G2/M in parallel with the upregulation of pro-mitotic factors. Dyskerin redistributed from the nucleolus in interphase cells to the perichromosomal region during prometaphase, metaphase and anaphase. With continued anaphase progression, dyskerin also localized to the cytoplasm within the mid-pole region. Loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion promoted G2/M accumulation and this was accompanied by an increased mitotic index and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Live cell imaging further revealed an array of mitotic defects including delayed prometaphase progression, a significantly increased incidence of multi-polar spindles, and anaphase bridges culminating in micronucleus formation. Together, these findings suggest that dyskerin is a highly dynamic protein throughout the cell cycle and increases the repertoire of fundamental cellular processes that are disrupted by absence of its normal function. PMID:24303026

  2. Scalable High-Performance Image Registration Framework by Unsupervised Deep Feature Representations Learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guorong; Kim, Minjeong; Wang, Qian; Munsell, Brent C; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-07-01

    Feature selection is a critical step in deformable image registration. In particular, selecting the most discriminative features that accurately and concisely describe complex morphological patterns in image patches improves correspondence detection, which in turn improves image registration accuracy. Furthermore, since more and more imaging modalities are being invented to better identify morphological changes in medical imaging data, the development of deformable image registration method that scales well to new image modalities or new image applications with little to no human intervention would have a significant impact on the medical image analysis community. To address these concerns, a learning-based image registration framework is proposed that uses deep learning to discover compact and highly discriminative features upon observed imaging data. Specifically, the proposed feature selection method uses a convolutional stacked autoencoder to identify intrinsic deep feature representations in image patches. Since deep learning is an unsupervised learning method, no ground truth label knowledge is required. This makes the proposed feature selection method more flexible to new imaging modalities since feature representations can be directly learned from the observed imaging data in a very short amount of time. Using the LONI and ADNI imaging datasets, image registration performance was compared to two existing state-of-the-art deformable image registration methods that use handcrafted features. To demonstrate the scalability of the proposed image registration framework, image registration experiments were conducted on 7.0-T brain MR images. In all experiments, the results showed that the new image registration framework consistently demonstrated more accurate registration results when compared to state of the art. PMID:26552069

  3. Scalable High Performance Image Registration Framework by Unsupervised Deep Feature Representations Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guorong; Kim, Minjeong; Wang, Qian; Munsell, Brent C.

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection is a critical step in deformable image registration. In particular, selecting the most discriminative features that accurately and concisely describe complex morphological patterns in image patches improves correspondence detection, which in turn improves image registration accuracy. Furthermore, since more and more imaging modalities are being invented to better identify morphological changes in medical imaging data,, the development of deformable image registration method that scales well to new image modalities or new image applications with little to no human intervention would have a significant impact on the medical image analysis community. To address these concerns, a learning-based image registration framework is proposed that uses deep learning to discover compact and highly discriminative features upon observed imaging data. Specifically, the proposed feature selection method uses a convolutional stacked auto-encoder to identify intrinsic deep feature representations in image patches. Since deep learning is an unsupervised learning method, no ground truth label knowledge is required. This makes the proposed feature selection method more flexible to new imaging modalities since feature representations can be directly learned from the observed imaging data in a very short amount of time. Using the LONI and ADNI imaging datasets, image registration performance was compared to two existing state-of-the-art deformable image registration methods that use handcrafted features. To demonstrate the scalability of the proposed image registration framework image registration experiments were conducted on 7.0-tesla brain MR images. In all experiments, the results showed the new image registration framework consistently demonstrated more accurate registration results when compared to state-of-the-art. PMID:26552069

  4. Mitotic-Chromosome-Based Physical Mapping of the Culex quinquefasciatus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Naumenko, Anastasia N.; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Kinney, Nicholas A.; Kokhanenko, Alina A.; deBruyn, Becky S.; Lovin, Diane D.; Stegniy, Vladimir N.; Severson, David W.; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Sharakhova, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    The genome assembly of southern house mosquito Cx. quinquefasciatus is represented by a high number of supercontigs with no order or orientation on the chromosomes. Although cytogenetic maps for the polytene chromosomes of this mosquito have been developed, their utilization for the genome mapping remains difficult because of the low number of high-quality spreads in chromosome preparations. Therefore, a simple and robust mitotic-chromosome-based approach for the genome mapping of Cx. quinquefasciatus still needs to be developed. In this study, we performed physical mapping of 37 genomic supercontigs using fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic chromosomes from imaginal discs of 4th instar larvae. The genetic linkage map nomenclature was adopted for the chromosome numbering based on the direct positioning of 58 markers that were previously genetically mapped. The smallest, largest, and intermediate chromosomes were numbered as 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For idiogram development, we analyzed and described in detail the morphology and proportions of the mitotic chromosomes. Chromosomes were subdivided into 19 divisions and 72 bands of four different intensities. These idiograms were used for mapping the genomic supercontigs/genetic markers. We also determined the presence of length polymorphism in the q arm of sex-determining chromosome 1 in Cx. quinquefasciatus related to the size of ribosomal locus. Our physical mapping and previous genetic linkage mapping resulted in the chromosomal assignment of 13% of the total genome assembly to the chromosome bands. We provided the first detailed description, nomenclature, and idiograms for the mitotic chromosomes of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Further application of the approach developed in this study will help to improve the quality of the southern house mosquito genome. PMID:25768920

  5. Access, Participation, and Supports: The Defining Features of High-Quality Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buysse, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes current knowledge about early childhood inclusion, summarizing research and the DEC/NAEYC joint position statement on inclusion. The article also describes effective or promising educational practices that promote access, participation, and supports--the defining features of high-quality inclusion. Future efforts to improve…

  6. Assessing Teaching Practicum Reflections: Distinguishing Discourse Features of the "High" and "Low" Grade Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Jasmine

    2008-01-01

    Using reflective journals to promote learning has been a common practice in the teaching profession. How learners present reflections in what are judged to be high-quality reflective writing remains under-researched. This paper explores the discourse features of teaching practicum reflective reports written by six pre-service student teachers of…

  7. Assessing Motor Skills as a Differentiating Feature between High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Maria R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if motor skills could be used as a differentiating feature between Asperger's Disorder (AD) and High Functioning (HFA) in children under the age of 9 years, 0 months, in order to provide additional information regarding the usefulness and validity of distinguishing these two disorders. There is…

  8. Mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Yoshioka, T; Saio, M; Banno, Y; Nagaoka, H; Okano, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, which refers to cell death or its prologue triggered by aberrant mitosis, can be induced by a heterogeneous group of stimuli, including chromosome damage or perturbation of the mitotic apparatus. We investigated the mechanism of mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. We transfected cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 with siRNAs targeting Aurora A, ninein, TOG, TACC3, γ-tubulin, or pericentriolar material-1, and monitored the effects on cell death. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, TOG, and TACC3 led to cell death, regardless of p53 status. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, and TOG, led to aberrant spindle formation and subsequent cell death, which was accompanied by several features of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation and Annexin V binding in HeLa cells. During this process, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 was detected, but cleavage of caspase-8 was not. Cell death, monitored by time-lapse imaging, occurred during both interphase and M phase. In cells depleted of a centrosomal protein (Aurora A, ninein, or TOG), the rate of cell death was higher if the cells were cotransfected with siRNA against BubR1 or Mad2 than if they were transfected with siRNA against Bub1 or a control siRNA. These results suggest that metaphase arrest is necessary for the mitotic catastrophe and cell death caused by depletion of centrosomal proteins. Knockdown of centrosomal proteins led to increased phosphorylation of Chk2. Enhanced p-Chk2 localization was also observed at the centrosome in cells arrested in M phase, as well as in the nuclei of dying cells. Cotransfection of siRNAs against Chk2, in combination with depletion of a centrosomal protein, decreased the amount of cell death. Thus, Chk2 activity is indispensable for apoptosis after mitotic catastrophe induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization

  9. Tectonic Features in the Equatorial Lowlands of Mercury Viewed at High Incidence Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Watters, T. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial distribution of tectonic features on Mercury, although not fully understood, is related to the stress regime and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere during the time that the features formed and remained active. Lobate scarps and high-relief ridges, compressional features that generally have ~1 km of relief and are hundreds of kilometers long, were identified on Mercury from images acquired during the Mariner 10 and MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) flybys. Images taken from orbit during the primary MESSENGER mission, with full coverage of the surface, confirmed that these scarps and ridges appear to be concentrated in three broad, north-south bands. Images at high incidence angles, collected since April 2012 during the MESSENGER extended mission, provide a more complete picture of the spatial extent and orientations of these features, and of their relationship to neighboring landforms. Digital elevation models, from laser altimetry and stereo imaging, additionally allow for comparisons between tectonic landforms and elevation and for measurements of slope and relief across individual features. Scarps and ridges are found at a wide range of elevations on Mercury. The greatest concentration of such features in an equatorial lowland setting is in an area (40°N-40°S, 220°-270°E) that is within one of the three north-south bands of tectonic features. Within this area, the 48 previously mapped features generally do not display preferred orientations or a consistent relationship to topography. Of these scarps, 47 were identified in flyby images and one in orbital images. Three follow the rim of Beethoven basin (10°-30°S, 225-245°E, ~600 km diameter), likely having formed along earlier zones of weakness in the crust created during formation of the basin. From recent images taken at high incidence angles, which currently have ~75% coverage in this equatorial lowland area, we are able to identify only seven

  10. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  11. Robust mitotic entry is ensured by a latching switch

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Chloe; Zhang, Tongli; Potapova, Tamara; Malumbres, Marcos; Novák, Béla

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell cycle events are driven by Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and by their counter-acting phosphatases. Activation of the Cdk1:Cyclin B complex during mitotic entry is controlled by the Wee1/Myt1 inhibitory kinases and by Cdc25 activatory phosphatase, which are themselves regulated by Cdk1:Cyclin B within two positive circuits. Impairing these two feedbacks with chemical inhibitors induces a transient entry into M phase referred to as mitotic collapse. The pathology of mitotic collapse reveals that the positive circuits play a significant role in maintaining the M phase state. To better understand the function of these feedback loops during G2/M transition, we propose a simple model for mitotic entry in mammalian cells including spatial control over Greatwall kinase phosphorylation. After parameter calibration, the model is able to recapture the complex and non-intuitive molecular dynamics reported by Potapova et al. (Potapova et al., 2011). Moreover, it predicts the temporal patterns of other mitotic regulators which have not yet been experimentally tested and suggests a general design principle of cell cycle control: latching switches buffer the cellular stresses which accompany cell cycle processes to ensure that the transitions are smooth and robust. PMID:24143279

  12. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Cedric J.; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.; Stewart, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback–controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (∼5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50–100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement. PMID:26305930

  13. Mitotic Chromosome Loss in a Disomic Haploid of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D. A.; Fogel, S.; Lusnak, K.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments designed to characterize the incidence of mitotic chromosome loss in a yeast disomic haploid were performed. The selective methods employed utilize the non-mating property of strains disomic for linkage group III and heterozygous at the mating type locus. The principal findings are: (1) The frequency of spontaneous chromosome loss in the disome is of the order 10-4 per cell; this value approximates the frequency in the same population of spontaneous mitotic exchange resulting in homozygosity at the mating type locus. (2) The recovered diploids are pure clones, and thus represent unique events in the disomic haploid. (3) Of the euploid chromosomes recovered after events leading to chromosome loss, approximately 90% retain the parental marker configuration expected from segregation alone; however, the remainder are recombinant for marker genes, and are the result of mitotic exchanges in the disome, especially in regions near the centromere. The recombinant proportion significantly exceeds that expected if chromosome loss and mitotic exchange in the disome were independent events. The data are consistent with a model proposing mitotic nondisjunction as the event responsible for chromosome loss in the disomic haploid. PMID:1092597

  14. Sub-population analysis based on temporal features of high content images

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background High content screening techniques are increasingly used to understand the regulation and progression of cell motility. The demand of new platforms, coupled with availability of terabytes of data has challenged the traditional technique of identifying cell populations by manual methods and resulted in development of high-dimensional analytical methods. Results In this paper, we present sub-populations analysis of cells at the tissue level by using dynamic features of the cells. We used active contour without edges for segmentation of cells, which preserves the cell morphology, and autoregressive modeling to model cell trajectories. The sub-populations were obtained by clustering static, dynamic and a combination of both features. We were able to identify three unique sub-populations in combined clustering. Conclusion We report a novel method to identify sub-populations using kinetic features and demonstrate that these features improve sub-population analysis at the tissue level. These advances will facilitate the application of high content screening data analysis to new and complex biological problems. PMID:19958514

  15. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  16. High-resolution FTIR imaging of colon tissues for elucidation of individual cellular and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Lloyd, Gavin Rhys; Shepherd, Neil; Stone, Nick

    2016-01-21

    Novel technologies that could complement current histopathology based cancer diagnostic methods are under examination. In this endeavour mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging is a promising candidate that can provide valuable bio-molecular information from unstained cells and tissues in a rapid and a non-destructive manner. With this imaging technique, the biochemical information obtained from smaller areas of the tissues can be of clinical significance and hence the measured pixel size. Until recently it was difficult to obtain spectral data from pixels below around 5 microns square. High NA objectives have been utilised to reduce the ideal diffraction limit, enabling for the first time elucidation of subcellular features. In this context, the ability of high-resolution imaging, obtained using novel high-magnification optics retro-fitted onto a bench top FTIR imaging system, to characterise histopathological features in colonic tissues has been tested. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded colon tissues from three different pathologies were imaged directly using the conventional and the high-magnification imaging set-ups. To circumvent chemical de-paraffinization protocols, an extended multiplicative signal correction (EMSC) based electronic de-paraffinization was carried out on all the infrared images. Multivariate analysis of the high-magnification infrared imaging data showed a detailed information of the histological features of the colon tissue in comparison to conventional imaging. Furthermore, high-magnification imaging has enabled a label-free characterization of the mucin rich goblet cell features in an unprecedented manner. The current study demonstrates the applicability of high-magnification FTIR imaging to characterise complex tissues on a smaller scale that could be of clinical significance. PMID:26549223

  17. Roles of different pools of the mitotic checkpoint complex and the mechanisms of their disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis. When the checkpoint is turned on, the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The mechanisms of the assembly of MCC when the checkpoint is turned on, and of its disassembly when the checkpoint is inactivated, are not sufficiently understood. Previous reports indicated that APC/C-mediated polyubiquitylation of Cdc20 in MCC is required for the dissociation of APC/C-associated MCC, but not of free MCC. The pool of free MCC is disassembled by an ATP-dependent process stimulated by the Mad2-binding protein p31comet. It remained unknown whether free MCC is the precursor or the dissociation product of APC/C-bound MCC. By characterizing the mechanisms of the disassembly of APC/C-bound MCC in a purified system, we find that it cannot be the source of free MCC, because it is bound at high affinity and is released only in ubiquitylated or partially disassembled forms. By the use of a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs that reproduces the mitotic checkpoint, we show that MCC can be assembled in the absence of APC/C in a checkpoint-dependent manner. We propose that when the checkpoint is turned on, free MCC is the precursor of APC/C-bound MCC. When the mitotic checkpoint is extinguished, both APC/C-bound and free MCC pools have to be disassembled to release APC/C from inhibition. PMID:23754430

  18. Synergistic Blockade of Mitotic Exit by Two Chemical Inhibitors of the APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Sackton, Katharine L.; Dimova, Nevena; Zeng, Xing; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Mengmeng; Sackton, Timothy B.; Meaders, Johnathan; Pfaff, Kathleen L.; Sigoillot, Frederic; Yu, Hongtao; Luo, Xuelian; King, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein machines are multi-subunit protein complexes that orchestrate highly regulated biochemical tasks. An example is the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a thirteen-subunit ubiquitin ligase that initiates the metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit by targeting proteins such as securin and cyclin B1 for ubiquitin-dependent destruction by the proteasome1,2. Because blocking mitotic exit is an effective approach for inducing tumor cell death3,4, the APC/C represents a potential novel target for cancer therapy. APC/C activation in mitosis requires binding of Cdc205, which forms a co-receptor with the APC/C to recognize substrates containing a Destruction box (D-box)6-14. Here we demonstrate that we can synergistically inhibit APC/C-dependent proteolysis and mitotic exit by simultaneously disrupting two protein-protein interactions within the APC/C-Cdc20-substrate ternary complex. We identified a small molecule, called apcin (APC inhibitor), which binds to Cdc20 and competitively inhibits the ubiquitylation of D-box-containing substrates. Analysis of the crystal structure of the apcin-Cdc20 complex suggests that apcin occupies the D-box-binding pocket on the side face of the WD40-domain. The ability of apcin to block mitotic exit is synergistically amplified by co-addition of tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME), a small molecule that blocks the APC/C-Cdc20 interaction15,16. This work suggests that simultaneous disruption of multiple, weak protein-protein interactions is an effective approach for inactivating a protein machine. PMID:25156254

  19. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  20. A comprehensive analysis of earthquake damage patterns using high dimensional model representation feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşkin Kaya, Gülşen

    2013-10-01

    Recently, earthquake damage assessment using satellite images has been a very popular ongoing research direction. Especially with the availability of very high resolution (VHR) satellite images, a quite detailed damage map based on building scale has been produced, and various studies have also been conducted in the literature. As the spatial resolution of satellite images increases, distinguishability of damage patterns becomes more cruel especially in case of using only the spectral information during classification. In order to overcome this difficulty, textural information needs to be involved to the classification to improve the visual quality and reliability of damage map. There are many kinds of textural information which can be derived from VHR satellite images depending on the algorithm used. However, extraction of textural information and evaluation of them have been generally a time consuming process especially for the large areas affected from the earthquake due to the size of VHR image. Therefore, in order to provide a quick damage map, the most useful features describing damage patterns needs to be known in advance as well as the redundant features. In this study, a very high resolution satellite image after Iran, Bam earthquake was used to identify the earthquake damage. Not only the spectral information, textural information was also used during the classification. For textural information, second order Haralick features were extracted from the panchromatic image for the area of interest using gray level co-occurrence matrix with different size of windows and directions. In addition to using spatial features in classification, the most useful features representing the damage characteristic were selected with a novel feature selection method based on high dimensional model representation (HDMR) giving sensitivity of each feature during classification. The method called HDMR was recently proposed as an efficient tool to capture the input

  1. Pharmacological inactivation of CHK1 and WEE1 induces mitotic catastrophe in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mak, Joyce P Y; Man, Wing Yu; Chow, Jeremy P H; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2015-08-28

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a rare but highly invasive cancer. As radiotherapy is the primary treatment for NPC, this offers a rationale to investigate if uncoupling the DNA damage responses can sensitize this cancer type. The G2 DNA damage checkpoint is controlled by a cascade of protein kinases: ATM/ATR, which phosphorylates CHK1/CHK2, which in turn phosphorylates WEE1. A number of small molecule inhibitors have been developed against these kinases as potential therapeutic agents. Here we demonstrated that compare to that in immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells, ATR, CHK1, and WEE1 were overexpressed in NPC cell lines. Inhibitors of these kinases were unable to promote extensive mitotic catastrophe in ionizing radiation-treated NPC cells, indicating that they are not very effective radiosensitizer for this cancer. In the absence of prior irradiation, however, mitotic catastrophe could be induced with inhibitors against CHK1 (AZD7762) or WEE1 (MK-1775). NPC cells were more sensitive to WEE1 inactivation than nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Targeting CHK1 and WEE1 together induced more extensive mitotic catastrophe than the individual components alone. Taken together, our results show that NPC cells depend on CHK1 and WEE1 activity for growth and that inhibitors of these kinases may serve as potential therapeutics for NPC. PMID:26025928

  2. Pharmacological inactivation of CHK1 and WEE1 induces mitotic catastrophe in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Man, Wing Yu; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a rare but highly invasive cancer. As radiotherapy is the primary treatment for NPC, this offers a rationale to investigate if uncoupling the DNA damage responses can sensitize this cancer type. The G2 DNA damage checkpoint is controlled by a cascade of protein kinases: ATM/ATR, which phosphorylates CHK1/CHK2, which in turn phosphorylates WEE1. A number of small molecule inhibitors have been developed against these kinases as potential therapeutic agents. Here we demonstrated that compare to that in immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells, ATR, CHK1, and WEE1 were overexpressed in NPC cell lines. Inhibitors of these kinases were unable to promote extensive mitotic catastrophe in ionizing radiation-treated NPC cells, indicating that they are not very effective radiosensitizer for this cancer. In the absence of prior irradiation, however, mitotic catastrophe could be induced with inhibitors against CHK1 (AZD7762) or WEE1 (MK-1775). NPC cells were more sensitive to WEE1 inactivation than nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Targeting CHK1 and WEE1 together induced more extensive mitotic catastrophe than the individual components alone. Taken together, our results show that NPC cells depend on CHK1 and WEE1 activity for growth and that inhibitors of these kinases may serve as potential therapeutics for NPC. PMID:26025928

  3. APC2 and Axin promote mitotic fidelity by facilitating centrosome separation and cytoskeletal regulation.

    PubMed

    Poulton, John S; Mu, Frank W; Roberts, David M; Peifer, Mark

    2013-10-01

    To ensure the accurate transmission of genetic material, chromosome segregation must occur with extremely high fidelity. Segregation errors lead to chromosomal instability (CIN), with deleterious consequences. Mutations in the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) initiate most colon cancers and have also been suggested to promote disease progression through increased CIN, but the mechanistic role of APC in preventing CIN remains controversial. Using fly embryos as a model, we investigated the role of APC proteins in CIN. Our findings suggest that APC2 loss leads to increased rates of chromosome segregation error. This occurs through a cascade of events beginning with incomplete centrosome separation leading to failure to inhibit formation of ectopic cleavage furrows, which result in mitotic defects and DNA damage. We test several hypotheses related to the mechanism of action of APC2, revealing that APC2 functions at the embryonic cortex with several protein partners, including Axin, to promote mitotic fidelity. Our in vivo data demonstrate that APC2 protects genome stability by modulating mitotic fidelity through regulation of the cytoskeleton. PMID:24026117

  4. Transcriptional response to stress in the dynamic chromatin environment of cycling and mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Vihervaara, Anniina; Sergelius, Christian; Vasara, Jenni; Blom, Malin A. H.; Elsing, Alexandra N.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock factors (HSFs) are the master regulators of transcription under protein-damaging conditions, acting in an environment where the overall transcription is silenced. We determined the genomewide transcriptional program that is rapidly provoked by HSF1 and HSF2 under acute stress in human cells. Our results revealed the molecular mechanisms that maintain cellular homeostasis, including HSF1-driven induction of polyubiquitin genes, as well as HSF1- and HSF2-mediated expression patterns of cochaperones, transcriptional regulators, and signaling molecules. We characterized the genomewide transcriptional response to stress also in mitotic cells where the chromatin is tightly compacted. We found a radically limited binding and transactivating capacity of HSF1, leaving mitotic cells highly susceptible to proteotoxicity. In contrast, HSF2 occupied hundreds of loci in the mitotic cells and localized to the condensed chromatin also in meiosis. These results highlight the importance of the cell cycle phase in transcriptional responses and identify the specific mechanisms for HSF1 and HSF2 in transcriptional orchestration. Moreover, we propose that HSF2 is an epigenetic regulator directing transcription throughout cell cycle progression. PMID:23959860

  5. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic spindle positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Rahimian, Abtin; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. We use dynamic simulations to study the cytoplasmic flows generated by three possible active forcing mechanisms involved in positioning of the mitotic spindle in the first cell division of C.elegans embryo namely cortical pulling, cortical pushing, and cytoplasmic pulling mechanisms. The numerical platform we have developed for simulating cytoskeletal assemblies is the first to incorporate the interactions between the fibers and other intracellular bodies with the cytoplasmic fluid, while also accounting for their polymerization, and interactions with motor proteins. The hydrodynamic interactions are computed using boundary integral methods in Stokes flow coupled with highly efficient fast summation techniques that reduce the computational cost to scale linearly with the number of fibers and other bodies. We show that although all three force transduction mechanisms predict proper positioning and orientation of the mitotic spindle, each model produces a different signature in its induced cytoplasmic flow and MT conformation. We suggest that cytoplasmic flows and MT conformation can be used to differentiate between these mechanisms.

  6. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. )

    1988-06-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  7. Disruption of IFT Complex A Causes Cystic Kidneys without Mitotic Spindle Misorientation

    PubMed Central

    Jonassen, Julie A.; SanAgustin, Jovenal; Baker, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes A and B build and maintain primary cilia. In the mouse, kidney-specific or hypomorphic mutant alleles of IFT complex B genes cause polycystic kidneys, but the influence of IFT complex A proteins on renal development is not well understood. In the present study, we found that HoxB7-Cre–driven deletion of the complex A gene Ift140 from collecting ducts disrupted, but did not completely prevent, cilia assembly. Mutant kidneys developed collecting duct cysts by postnatal day 5, with rapid cystic expansion and renal dysfunction by day 15 and little remaining parenchymal tissue by day 20. In contrast to many models of polycystic kidney disease, precystic Ift140-deleted collecting ducts showed normal centrosomal positioning and no misorientation of the mitotic spindle axis, suggesting that disruption of oriented cell division is not a prerequisite to cyst formation in these kidneys. Precystic collecting ducts had an increased mitotic index, suggesting that cell proliferation may drive cyst expansion even with normal orientation of the mitotic spindle. In addition, we observed significant increases in expression of canonical Wnt pathway genes and mediators of Hedgehog and tissue fibrosis in highly cystic, but not precystic, kidneys. Taken together, these studies indicate that loss of Ift140 causes pronounced renal cystic disease and suggest that abnormalities in several different pathways may influence cyst progression. PMID:22282595

  8. Uranus' Persistent Patterns and Features from High-SNR Imaging in 2012-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Patrick M.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B.; Marcus, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    Since 2012, Uranus has been the subject of an observing campaign utilizing high signal-to-noise imaging techniques at Keck Observatory (Fry et al. 2012, Astron. J. 143, 150-161). High quality observing conditions on four observing runs of consecutive nights allowed longitudinally-complete coverage of the atmosphere over a period of two years (Sromovsky et al. 2015, Icarus 258, 192-223). Global mosaic maps made from images acquired on successive nights in August 2012, November 2012, August 2013, and August 2014, show persistent patterns, and six easily distinguished long-lived cloud features, which we were able to track for long periods that ranged from 5 months to over two years. Two at similar latitudes are associated with dark spots, and move with the atmospheric zonal flow close to the location of their associated dark spot instead of following the flow at the latitude of the bright features. These features retained their morphologies and drift rates in spite of several close interactions. A second pair of features at similar latitudes also survived several close approaches. Several of the long-lived features also exhibited equatorward drifts and latitudinal oscillations. Also persistent are a remarkable near-equatorial wave feature and global zonal band structure. We will present imagery, maps, and analyses of these phenomena.PMF and LAS acknowledge support from NASA Planetary Astronomy Program; PMF and LAS acknowledge funding and technical support from W. M. Keck Observatory. We thank those of Hawaiian ancestry on whose sacred mountain we are privileged to be guests. Without their generous hospitality none of our groundbased observations would have been possible.

  9. A PLANETARY LENSING FEATURE IN CAUSTIC-CROSSING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Uk E-mail: kyuha@kasi.re.kr E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2012-05-20

    Current microlensing follow-up observations focus on high-magnification events because of the high efficiency of planet detection. However, central perturbations of high-magnification events caused by a planet can also be produced by a very close or a very wide binary companion, and the two kinds of central perturbations are not generally distinguished without time consuming detailed modeling (a planet-binary degeneracy). Hence, it is important to resolve the planet-binary degeneracy that occurs in high-magnification events. In this paper, we investigate caustic-crossing high-magnification events caused by a planet and a wide binary companion. From this investigation, we find that because of the different magnification excess patterns inside the central caustics induced by the planet and the binary companion, the light curves of the caustic-crossing planetary-lensing events exhibit a feature that is discriminated from those of the caustic-crossing binary-lensing events, and the feature can be used to immediately distinguish between the planetary and binary companions. The planetary-lensing feature appears in the interpeak region between the two peaks of the caustic-crossings. The structure of the interpeak region for the planetary-lensing events is smooth and convex or boxy, whereas the structure for the binary-lensing events is smooth and concave. We also investigate the effect of a finite background source star on the planetary-lensing feature in the caustic-crossing high-magnification events. From this, we find that the convex-shaped interpeak structure appears in a certain range that changes with the mass ratio of the planet to the planet-hosting star.

  10. MYC Is a Major Determinant of Mitotic Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Topham, Caroline; Tighe, Anthony; Ly, Peter; Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Nelson, Louisa; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Huels, David; Littler, Samantha; Schandl, Claudia; Sun, Ying; Bechi, Beatrice; Procter, David J.; Sansom, Owen J.; Cleveland, Don W.; Taylor, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Taxol and other antimitotic agents are frontline chemotherapy agents but the mechanisms responsible for patient benefit remain unclear. Following a genome-wide siRNA screen, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor Myc as a taxol sensitizer. Using time-lapse imaging to correlate mitotic behavior with cell fate, we show that Myc sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers and agents that accelerate mitotic progression. Myc achieves this by upregulating a cluster of redundant pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins and suppressing pro-survival Bcl-xL. Gene expression analysis of breast cancers indicates that taxane responses correlate positively with Myc and negatively with Bcl-xL. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-xL restores apoptosis in Myc-deficient cells. These results open up opportunities for biomarkers and combination therapies that could enhance traditional and second-generation antimitotic agents. PMID:26175417

  11. MYC Is a Major Determinant of Mitotic Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Topham, Caroline; Tighe, Anthony; Ly, Peter; Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Nelson, Louisa; Ridgway, Rachel A; Huels, David; Littler, Samantha; Schandl, Claudia; Sun, Ying; Bechi, Beatrice; Procter, David J; Sansom, Owen J; Cleveland, Don W; Taylor, Stephen S

    2015-07-13

    Taxol and other antimitotic agents are frontline chemotherapy agents but the mechanisms responsible for patient benefit remain unclear. Following a genome-wide siRNA screen, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor Myc as a taxol sensitizer. Using time-lapse imaging to correlate mitotic behavior with cell fate, we show that Myc sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers and agents that accelerate mitotic progression. Myc achieves this by upregulating a cluster of redundant pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins and suppressing pro-survival Bcl-xL. Gene expression analysis of breast cancers indicates that taxane responses correlate positively with Myc and negatively with Bcl-xL. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-xL restores apoptosis in Myc-deficient cells. These results open up opportunities for biomarkers and combination therapies that could enhance traditional and second-generation antimitotic agents. PMID:26175417

  12. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss – in light of these recent insights – the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  13. A requirement for epsin in mitotic membrane and spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a sophisticated membrane system to facilitate diverse functions. Whereas much is known about the nature of membrane systems in interphase, the organization and function of the mitotic membrane system are less well understood. In this study, we show that epsin, an endocytic adapter protein, regulates mitotic membrane morphology and spindle integrity in HeLa cells. Using epsin that harbors point mutations in the epsin NH2-terminal homology domain and spindle assembly assays in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we show that epsin-induced membrane curvature is required for proper spindle morphogenesis, independent of its function in endocytosis during interphase. Although several other membrane-interacting proteins, including clathrin, AP2, autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia, and GRASP65, are implicated in the regulation of mitosis, whether they participate through regulation of membrane organization is unclear. Our study of epsin provides evidence that mitotic membrane organization influences spindle integrity. PMID:19704019

  14. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  15. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  16. Genetic algorithm-based feature selection in high-resolution NMR spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Myong K.; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has provided a new means for detection and recognition of metabolic changes in biological systems in response to pathophysiological stimuli and to the intake of toxins or nutrition. To identify meaningful patterns from NMR spectra, various statistical pattern recognition methods have been applied to reduce their complexity and uncover implicit metabolic patterns. In this paper, we present a genetic algorithm (GA)-based feature selection method to determine major metabolite features to play a significant role in discrimination of samples among different conditions in high-resolution NMR spectra. In addition, an orthogonal signal filter was employed as a preprocessor of NMR spectra in order to remove any unwanted variation of the data that is unrelated to the discrimination of different conditions. The results of k-nearest neighbors and the partial least squares discriminant analysis of the experimental NMR spectra from human plasma showed the potential advantage of the features obtained from GA-based feature selection combined with an orthogonal signal filter. PMID:21472035

  17. Detection of Harbours from High Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery via Saliency Analysis and Feature Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yetianjian; Pan, Li; Wang, Dagang; Kang, Yifei

    2016-06-01

    Harbours are very important objects in civil and military fields. To detect them from high resolution remote sensing imagery is important in various fields and also a challenging task. Traditional methods of detecting harbours mainly focus on the segmentation of water and land and the manual selection of knowledge. They do not make enough use of other features of remote sensing imagery and often fail to describe the harbours completely. In order to improve the detection, a new method is proposed. First, the image is transformed to Hue, Saturation, Value (HSV) colour space and saliency analysis is processed via the generation and enhancement of the co-occurrence histogram to help detect and locate the regions of interest (ROIs) that is salient and may be parts of the harbour. Next, SIFT features are extracted and feature learning is processed to help represent the ROIs. Then, by using classified feature of the harbour, a classifier is trained and used to check the ROIs to find whether they belong to the harbour. Finally, if the ROIs belong to the harbour, a minimum bounding rectangle is formed to include all the harbour ROIs and detect and locate the harbour. The experiment on high resolution remote sensing imagery shows that the proposed method performs better than other methods in precision of classifying ROIs and accuracy of completely detecting and locating harbours.

  18. Rohitukine inhibits in vitro adipogenesis arresting mitotic clonal expansion and improves dyslipidemia in vivo[S

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Salil; Shankar, Kripa; Beg, Muheeb; Balaramnavar, Vishal M.; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Jagdale, Pankaj; Srivastava, Shishir; Chhonker, Yashpal S.; Lakshmi, Vijai; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Bhatta, Rabi Shankar; Saxena, Anil Kumar; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth

    2014-01-01

    We developed a common feature pharmacophore model using known antiadipogenic compounds (CFPMA). We identified rohitukine, a reported chromone anticancer alkaloid as a potential hit through in silico mapping of the in-house natural product library on CFPMA. Studies were designed to assess the antiadipogenic potential of rohitukine. Rohitukine was isolated from Dysoxylum binacteriferum Hook. to ⬧95% purity. As predicted by CFPMA, rohitukine was indeed found to be an antiadipogenic molecule. Rohitukine inhibited lipid accumulation and adipogenic differentiation in a concentration- and exposure-time-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 and C3H10T1/2 cells. Rohitukine downregulated expression of PPARγ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), FAS, and glucose transporter 4. It also suppressed mRNA expression of LPL, sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) 1c, FAS, and aP2, the downstream targets of PPARγ. Rohitukine arrests cells in S phase during mitotic clonal expansion. Rohitukine was bioavailable, and 25.7% of orally administered compound reached systemic circulation. We evaluated the effect of rohitukine on dyslipidemia induced by high-fat diet in the hamster model. Rohitukine increased hepatic expression of liver X receptor α and decreased expression of SREBP-2 and associated targets. Rohitukine decreased hepatic and gonadal lipid accumulation and ameliorated dyslipidemia significantly. In summary, our strategy to identify a novel antiadipogenic molecule using CFPMA successfully resulted in identification of rohitukine, which confirmed antiadipogenic activity and also exhibited in vivo antidyslipidemic activity. PMID:24646949

  19. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127-22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra (see accompanying posters by Gull, Vieira, and Danks). The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-1 above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30x30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2x0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic miniumum in 2003.

  20. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter

  2. Unbiased Prediction and Feature Selection in High-Dimensional Survival Regression

    PubMed Central

    Laimighofer, Michael; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With widespread availability of omics profiling techniques, the analysis and interpretation of high-dimensional omics data, for example, for biomarkers, is becoming an increasingly important part of clinical medicine because such datasets constitute a promising resource for predicting survival outcomes. However, early experience has shown that biomarkers often generalize poorly. Thus, it is crucial that models are not overfitted and give accurate results with new data. In addition, reliable detection of multivariate biomarkers with high predictive power (feature selection) is of particular interest in clinical settings. We present an approach that addresses both aspects in high-dimensional survival models. Within a nested cross-validation (CV), we fit a survival model, evaluate a dataset in an unbiased fashion, and select features with the best predictive power by applying a weighted combination of CV runs. We evaluate our approach using simulated toy data, as well as three breast cancer datasets, to predict the survival of breast cancer patients after treatment. In all datasets, we achieve more reliable estimation of predictive power for unseen cases and better predictive performance compared to the standard CoxLasso model. Taken together, we present a comprehensive and flexible framework for survival models, including performance estimation, final feature selection, and final model construction. The proposed algorithm is implemented in an open source R package (SurvRank) available on CRAN. PMID:26894327

  3. Fabrication of Pt nanowires with a diffraction-unlimited feature size by high-threshold lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li E-mail: wangz@cust.edu.cn Zhang, Ziang; Yu, Miao; Song, Zhengxun; Weng, Zhankun; Wang, Zuobin E-mail: wangz@cust.edu.cn Li, Wenjun; Wang, Dapeng; Zhao, Le; Peng, Kuiqing E-mail: wangz@cust.edu.cn

    2015-09-28

    Although the nanoscale world can already be observed at a diffraction-unlimited resolution using far-field optical microscopy, to make the step from microscopy to lithography still requires a suitable photoresist material system. In this letter, we consider the threshold to be a region with a width characterized by the extreme feature size obtained using a Gaussian beam spot. By narrowing such a region through improvement of the threshold sensitization to intensity in a high-threshold material system, the minimal feature size becomes smaller. By using platinum as the negative photoresist, we demonstrate that high-threshold lithography can be used to fabricate nanowire arrays with a scalable resolution along the axial direction of the linewidth from the micro- to the nanoscale using a nanosecond-pulsed laser source with a wavelength λ{sub 0} = 1064 nm. The minimal feature size is only several nanometers (sub λ{sub 0}/100). Compared with conventional polymer resist lithography, the advantages of high-threshold lithography are sharper pinpoints of laser intensity triggering the threshold response and also higher robustness allowing for large area exposure by a less-expensive nanosecond-pulsed laser.

  4. Unbiased Prediction and Feature Selection in High-Dimensional Survival Regression.

    PubMed

    Laimighofer, Michael; Krumsiek, Jan; Buettner, Florian; Theis, Fabian J

    2016-04-01

    With widespread availability of omics profiling techniques, the analysis and interpretation of high-dimensional omics data, for example, for biomarkers, is becoming an increasingly important part of clinical medicine because such datasets constitute a promising resource for predicting survival outcomes. However, early experience has shown that biomarkers often generalize poorly. Thus, it is crucial that models are not overfitted and give accurate results with new data. In addition, reliable detection of multivariate biomarkers with high predictive power (feature selection) is of particular interest in clinical settings. We present an approach that addresses both aspects in high-dimensional survival models. Within a nested cross-validation (CV), we fit a survival model, evaluate a dataset in an unbiased fashion, and select features with the best predictive power by applying a weighted combination of CV runs. We evaluate our approach using simulated toy data, as well as three breast cancer datasets, to predict the survival of breast cancer patients after treatment. In all datasets, we achieve more reliable estimation of predictive power for unseen cases and better predictive performance compared to the standard CoxLasso model. Taken together, we present a comprehensive and flexible framework for survival models, including performance estimation, final feature selection, and final model construction. The proposed algorithm is implemented in an open source R package (SurvRank) available on CRAN. PMID:26894327

  5. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3′ untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models. PMID:25628360

  6. Feature Augmentation via Nonparametrics and Selection (FANS) in High-Dimensional Classification

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yang; Jiang, Jiancheng; Tong, Xin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a high dimensional classification method that involves nonparametric feature augmentation. Knowing that marginal density ratios are the most powerful univariate classifiers, we use the ratio estimates to transform the original feature measurements. Subsequently, penalized logistic regression is invoked, taking as input the newly transformed or augmented features. This procedure trains models equipped with local complexity and global simplicity, thereby avoiding the curse of dimensionality while creating a flexible nonlinear decision boundary. The resulting method is called Feature Augmentation via Nonparametrics and Selection (FANS). We motivate FANS by generalizing the Naive Bayes model, writing the log ratio of joint densities as a linear combination of those of marginal densities. It is related to generalized additive models, but has better interpretability and computability. Risk bounds are developed for FANS. In numerical analysis, FANS is compared with competing methods, so as to provide a guideline on its best application domain. Real data analysis demonstrates that FANS performs very competitively on benchmark email spam and gene expression data sets. Moreover, FANS is implemented by an extremely fast algorithm through parallel computing. PMID:27185970

  7. High-resolution digital elevation models of the Flade Iceblink feature in NE Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. J.; Juntunen, T.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We produce a time series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) to examine the recent evolution of an 8.7 km2 sub-glacial lake collapse feature near the southern summit of the 8500 km2 Flade Isblink Ice Cap (FIIC) in northeastern Greenland [Figure 1]. Visible imagery from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicates the collapse occurred between August 16th and September 6th, 2011 at the site of a recurring moulin. DEMs are extracted using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline for the period between June 2012 and late 2013 from 0.5 m resolution along-track stereo image pairs available via the NGA commercial imagery program. The DEMs are compared to a 1996 ERS InSAR derived DEM [Palmer et al., 2010], and to a contemporary airborne laser altimeter swath flown by NASA Icebridge in mid-April 2013 to derive the volume of the feature and the uncertainties on the high-resolution DEMs. The 'mitten' shaped feature is bounded by crevasses on three sides, with a shallow ramp to the south. It is ~70 m deep, 3.7 km north-to-south and 3 km east-to-west and has a volume of ~0.3 km3. Ice penetrating radar from a nearby Icebridge mission in May 2011, indicates the ice is approximately 550 m thick and that the bed is very flat and smooth about 1 km to the southeast of the feature. The nearby bed topography, local geology and lack of recorded seismicity in the area indicate it is unlikely that the feature is the result of either subglacial volcanic activity or the collapse of a limestone karst feature below the ice cap - the neighboring Princess Elizabeth Alps are composed of 420 Ma Caledonide fold belt gneisses. The presence of recurring supraglacial meltwater streams and drainage into the feature, its rapid formation and its steep sided nature instead suggest that it formed during the rapid drainage of a sub-glacial lake - which is, as far as we are aware, the first recorded instance of such an occurrence in Greenland. Meltwater observed using 250 m

  8. Aurora-A-Dependent Control of TACC3 Influences the Rate of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nimesh; Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle; Pfuhl, Mark; Gergely, Fanni; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The essential mammalian gene TACC3 is frequently mutated and amplified in cancers and its fusion products exhibit oncogenic activity in glioblastomas. TACC3 functions in mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. In particular, phosphorylation on S558 by the mitotic kinase, Aurora-A, promotes spindle recruitment of TACC3 and triggers the formation of a complex with ch-TOG-clathrin that crosslinks and stabilises kinetochore microtubules. Here we map the Aurora-A-binding interface in TACC3 and show that TACC3 potently activates Aurora-A through a domain centered on F525. Vertebrate cells carrying homozygous F525A mutation in the endogenous TACC3 loci exhibit defects in TACC3 function, namely perturbed localization, reduced phosphorylation and weakened interaction with clathrin. The most striking feature of the F525A cells however is a marked shortening of mitosis, at least in part due to rapid spindle assembly. F525A cells do not exhibit chromosome missegregation, indicating that they undergo fast yet apparently faithful mitosis. By contrast, mutating the phosphorylation site S558 to alanine in TACC3 causes aneuploidy without a significant change in mitotic duration. Our work has therefore defined a regulatory role for the Aurora-A-TACC3 interaction beyond the act of phosphorylation at S558. We propose that the regulatory relationship between Aurora-A and TACC3 enables the transition from the microtubule-polymerase activity of TACC3-ch-TOG to the microtubule-crosslinking activity of TACC3-ch-TOG-clathrin complexes as mitosis progresses. Aurora-A-dependent control of TACC3 could determine the balance between these activities, thereby influencing not only spindle length and stability but also the speed of spindle formation with vital consequences for chromosome alignment and segregation. PMID:26134678

  9. Feature extraction and classification of clouds in high resolution panchromatic satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharghi, Elan

    The development of sophisticated remote sensing sensors is rapidly increasing, and the vast amount of satellite imagery collected is too much to be analyzed manually by a human image analyst. It has become necessary for a tool to be developed to automate the job of an image analyst. This tool would need to intelligently detect and classify objects of interest through computer vision algorithms. Existing software called the Rapid Image Exploitation Resource (RAPIER®) was designed by engineers at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC PAC) to perform exactly this function. This software automatically searches for anomalies in the ocean and reports the detections as a possible ship object. However, if the image contains a high percentage of cloud coverage, a high number of false positives are triggered by the clouds. The focus of this thesis is to explore various feature extraction and classification methods to accurately distinguish clouds from ship objects. An examination of a texture analysis method, line detection using the Hough transform, and edge detection using wavelets are explored as possible feature extraction methods. The features are then supplied to a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) or Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Parameter options for these classifiers are explored and the optimal parameters are determined.

  10. Reconstitution of Basic Mitotic Spindles in Spherical Emulsion Droplets.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Roth, Sophie; Groenendijk, Celebrity F; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle assembly, positioning and orientation depend on the combined forces generated by microtubule dynamics, microtubule motor proteins and cross-linkers. Growing microtubules can generate pushing forces, while depolymerizing microtubules can convert the energy from microtubule shrinkage into pulling forces, when attached, for example, to cortical dynein or chromosomes. In addition, motor proteins and diffusible cross-linkers within the spindle contribute to spindle architecture by connecting and sliding anti-parallel microtubules. In vivo, it has proven difficult to unravel the relative contribution of individual players to the overall balance of forces. Here we present the methods that we recently developed in our efforts to reconstitute basic mitotic spindles bottom-up in vitro. Using microfluidic techniques, centrosomes and tubulin are encapsulated in water-in-oil emulsion droplets, leading to the formation of geometrically confined (double) microtubule asters. By additionally introducing cortically anchored dynein, plus-end directed microtubule motors and diffusible cross-linkers, this system is used to reconstitute spindle-like structures. The methods presented here provide a starting point for reconstitution of more complete mitotic spindles, allowing for a detailed study of the contribution of each individual component, and for obtaining an integrated quantitative view of the force-balance within the mitotic spindle. PMID:27584979

  11. Cep192 and the generation of the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ferreria, Maria Ana; Sharp, David J

    2008-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms used to generate sufficient microtubule polymer mass to drive the assembly and function of the mitotic spindle remain a matter of great interest. As the primary microtubule nucleating structures in somatic animal cells, centrosomes have been assumed to figure prominently in spindle assembly. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a dramatic increase in size and microtubule nucleating capacity, termed maturation, which is likely a key event in mitotic spindle formation. Interestingly, however, spindles can still form in the absence of centrosomes calling into question the specific mitotic role of these organelles. Recent work has shown that the human centrosomal protein, Cep192, is required for both centrosome maturation and spindle assembly thus providing a molecular link between these two processes. In this article, we propose that Cep192 does so by forming a scaffolding on which proteins involved in microtubule nucleation are sequestered and become active in mitotic cells. Normally, this activity is largely confined to centrosomes but in their absence continues to function but is dispersed to other sites within the cell. PMID:18469523

  12. A mitotic transcriptional switch in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verdeguer, Francisco; Corre, Stephanie Le; Fischer, Evelyne; Callens, Celine; Garbay, Serge; Doyen, Antonia; Igarashi, Peter; Terzi, Fabiola; Pontoglio, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β(HNF-1β) is a transcription factor required for the expression of several renal cystic genes and whose prenatal deletion leads to polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1. We show here that inactivation of Hnf1b from postnatal day 10 onward does not elicit cystic dilations in tubules after their proliferative morphogenetic elongation is over. Cystogenic resistance is intrinsically linked to the quiescent state of cells. In fact, when Hnf1b deficient quiescent cells are forced to proliferate by an ischemiareperfusion injury, they give rise to cysts, owing to loss of oriented cell division. Remarkably, in quiescent cells, the transcription of crucial cystogenic target genes is maintained even in the absence of HNF-1β. However, their expression is lost as soon as cells proliferate and the chromatin of target genes acquires heterochromatin marks. These results unveil a previously undescribed aspect of gene regulation. It is well established that transcription is shut off during the mitotic condensation of chromatin2,3. We propose that transcription factors such as HNF-1β might be involved in reprogramming gene expression after transcriptional silencing is induced by mitotic chromatin condensation. Notably, HNF-1β remains associated with the mitotically condensed chromosomal barrels. This association suggests that HNF-1β is a bookmarking factor that is necessary for reopening the chromatin of target genes after mitotic silencing. PMID:19966811

  13. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  14. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  15. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A. Arockia

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. PMID:26124292

  16. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  17. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Platani, Melpomeni; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-07-01

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. PMID:26124292

  18. High-resolution spectra of the 3.29 micron interstellar emission feature - A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Sellgren, K.; Smith, R. G.; Nagata, T.; Sakata, A.; Nakada, Y.

    1991-01-01

    High spectral resolution observations of the 3.29-micron interstellar emission feature show two types of profiles. Type 1 has a central wavelength of 3.289-micron and is observed in extended objects such as planetary nebulae and H II regions. Type 2 has a central wavelength of 3.296 microns and is observed around a small number of stellar sources. Type 2 has a full width at half-maximum of 0.020 micron; Type 1 has a broader FWHM, perhaps as much as 0.042 micron, but this is uncertain because of contamination by Pf(delta) emission. These profiles are tabulated for comparison to laboratory data. It is found that no proposed identification for the 3.29-micron emission feature definitely matches the observational spectra, although amorphous aromatic materials and heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons tend to fit the best.

  19. Functional connectivity classification of autism identifies highly predictive brain features but falls short of biomarker standards

    PubMed Central

    Plitt, Mark; Barnes, Kelly Anne; Martin, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are diagnosed based on early-manifesting clinical symptoms, including markedly impaired social communication. We assessed the viability of resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) connectivity measures as diagnostic biomarkers for ASD and investigated which connectivity features are predictive of a diagnosis. Methods Rs-fMRI scans from 59 high functioning males with ASD and 59 age- and IQ-matched typically developing (TD) males were used to build a series of machine learning classifiers. Classification features were obtained using 3 sets of brain regions. Another set of classifiers was built from participants' scores on behavioral metrics. An additional age and IQ-matched cohort of 178 individuals (89 ASD; 89 TD) from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) open-access dataset (http://fcon_1000.projects.nitrc.org/indi/abide/) were included for replication. Results High classification accuracy was achieved through several rs-fMRI methods (peak accuracy 76.67%). However, classification via behavioral measures consistently surpassed rs-fMRI classifiers (peak accuracy 95.19%). The class probability estimates, P(ASD|fMRI data), from brain-based classifiers significantly correlated with scores on a measure of social functioning, the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), as did the most informative features from 2 of the 3 sets of brain-based features. The most informative connections predominantly originated from regions strongly associated with social functioning. Conclusions While individuals can be classified as having ASD with statistically significant accuracy from their rs-fMRI scans alone, this method falls short of biomarker standards. Classification methods provided further evidence that ASD functional connectivity is characterized by dysfunction of large-scale functional networks, particularly those involved in social information processing. PMID:25685703

  20. Cytotoxic effects of cylindrospermopsin in mitotic and non-mitotic Vicia faba cells.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Riba, Milán; Vasas, Gábor; Beyer, Dániel; M-Hamvas, Márta; Hajdu, Gréta; Tándor, Ildikó; Máthé, Csaba

    2015-02-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a cyanobacterial toxin known as a eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitor. We aimed to study its effects on growth, stress responses and mitosis of a eukaryotic model, Vicia faba (broad bean). Growth responses depended on exposure time (3 or 6d), cyanotoxin concentration, culture conditions (dark or continuous light) and V. faba cultivar ("Standard" or "ARC Egypt Cross"). At 6d of exposure, CYN had a transient stimulatory effect on root system growth, roots being possibly capable of detoxification. The toxin induced nucleus fragmentation, blebbing and chromosomal breaks indicating double stranded DNA breaks and programmed cell death. Root necrotic tissue was observed at 0.1-20 μg mL(-1) CYN that probably impeded toxin uptake into vascular tissue. Growth and cell death processes observed were general stress responses. In lateral root tip meristems, lower CYN concentrations (0.01-0.1 μg mL(-1)) induced the stimulation of mitosis and distinct mitotic phases, irrespective of culture conditions or the cultivar used. Higher cyanotoxin concentrations inhibited mitosis. Short-term exposure of hydroxylurea-synchronized roots to 5 μg mL(-1) CYN induced delay of mitosis that might have been related to a delay of de novo protein synthesis. CYN induced the formation of double, split and asymmetric preprophase bands (PPBs), in parallel with the alteration of cell division planes, related to the interference of cyanotoxin with protein synthesis, thus it was a plant- and CYN specific alteration. PMID:25016338

  1. Automated Identification of River Hydromorphological Features Using UAV High Resolution Aerial Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Rivas Casado, Monica; Ballesteros Gonzalez, Rocio; Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Veal, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    European legislation is driving the development of methods for river ecosystem protection in light of concerns over water quality and ecology. Key to their success is the accurate and rapid characterisation of physical features (i.e., hydromorphology) along the river. Image pattern recognition techniques have been successfully used for this purpose. The reliability of the methodology depends on both the quality of the aerial imagery and the pattern recognition technique used. Recent studies have proved the potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to increase the quality of the imagery by capturing high resolution photography. Similarly, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been shown to be a high precision tool for automated recognition of environmental patterns. This paper presents a UAV based framework for the identification of hydromorphological features from high resolution RGB aerial imagery using a novel classification technique based on ANNs. The framework is developed for a 1.4 km river reach along the river Dee in Wales, United Kingdom. For this purpose, a Falcon 8 octocopter was used to gather 2.5 cm resolution imagery. The results show that the accuracy of the framework is above 81%, performing particularly well at recognising vegetation. These results leverage the use of UAVs for environmental policy implementation and demonstrate the potential of ANNs and RGB imagery for high precision river monitoring and river management. PMID:26556355

  2. Automated Identification of River Hydromorphological Features Using UAV High Resolution Aerial Imagery.

    PubMed

    Casado, Monica Rivas; Gonzalez, Rocio Ballesteros; Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Veal, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    European legislation is driving the development of methods for river ecosystem protection in light of concerns over water quality and ecology. Key to their success is the accurate and rapid characterisation of physical features (i.e., hydromorphology) along the river. Image pattern recognition techniques have been successfully used for this purpose. The reliability of the methodology depends on both the quality of the aerial imagery and the pattern recognition technique used. Recent studies have proved the potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to increase the quality of the imagery by capturing high resolution photography. Similarly, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been shown to be a high precision tool for automated recognition of environmental patterns. This paper presents a UAV based framework for the identification of hydromorphological features from high resolution RGB aerial imagery using a novel classification technique based on ANNs. The framework is developed for a 1.4 km river reach along the river Dee in Wales, United Kingdom. For this purpose, a Falcon 8 octocopter was used to gather 2.5 cm resolution imagery. The results show that the accuracy of the framework is above 81%, performing particularly well at recognising vegetation. These results leverage the use of UAVs for environmental policy implementation and demonstrate the potential of ANNs and RGB imagery for high precision river monitoring and river management. PMID:26556355

  3. Canine lymphomas: association of classification type, disease stage, tumor subtype, mitotic rate, and treatment with survival.

    PubMed

    Valli, V E; Kass, P H; San Myint, M; Scott, F

    2013-09-01

    Canine lymphoma is the neoplasm most often treated by chemotherapy, yet there are few data to correlate response to therapy with its different subtypes. This study is based on biopsy specimens from 992 dogs for which lymphoma was the clinical diagnosis. All cases were phenotyped by immunohistochemistry for CD3 and CD79alpha. Cases with histiocytic proliferation were evaluated immunohistochemically for CD18. Clonality was verified in 12 cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Survival (event time) data and complete survival information (cause of death or time to last follow-up) were available on 456 dogs. Additional covariate information when available included size, age, sex, phenotype, stage and grade of lymphoma, mitotic index, and treatment protocol. Because of the many subtypes of B- and T-cell lymphoma, the cases were grouped into 7 diagnostic categories: (1) benign hyperplasia; (2) low-grade B-cell; (3) high-grade B- and T-cell; (4) low-grade T-cell; (5) centroblastic large B-cell of all mitotic grades (subdivided by clinical stage); (6) immunoblastic large B-cell of all mitotic grades, and (7) high-grade peripheral T-cell. Grouping was determined by histological grade (based on mitotic rate/400× field, with low-grade 0-5, intermediate 6-10, and high-grade >10) and stage for survival function estimation. No association with survival was found for size (based on breed of dog) or sex. All diagnostic categories of indolent or low-grade type had low mitotic rates, whereas those with clinically high grades had high mitotic rates. The diagnostic category with the most cases was centroblastic large B-cell lymphoma. Compared with dogs in this largest represented group of lymphomas, dogs with high-grade lymphomas had significantly higher mortality rates, and dogs with low-grade T-cell lymphomas had significantly lower mortality rates. Treatments for high-, intermediate-, and low-grade lymphomas were divided into 4 groups: absence of treatment, chemotherapy with or

  4. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brunner, Michael R.; Davidson, Iain F.; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/CCDC20 activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/CCDC20 activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/CCDC20 activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  5. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  6. Ki-67 proliferation index but not mitotic thresholds integrates the molecular prognostic stratification of lower grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Duregon, Eleonora; Bertero, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Soffietti, Riccardo; Rudà, Roberta; Trevisan, Morena; Papotti, Mauro; Ventura, Laura; Senetta, Rebecca; Cassoni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Despite several molecular signatures for “lower grade diffuse gliomas” (LGG) have been identified, WHO grade still remains a cornerstone of treatment guidelines. Mitotic count bears a crucial role in its definition, although limited by the poor reproducibility of standard Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) evaluation. Phospho-histone-H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67 have been proposed as alternative assays of cellular proliferation. Therefore in the present series of 141 LGG, the molecular characterization (namely IDH status, 1p/19q co-deletion and MGMT promoter methylation) was integrated with the tumor “proliferative trait” (conventional H&E or PHH3-guided mitotic count and Ki-67 index) in term of prognosis definition. Exclusively high PHH3 and Ki-67 values were predictor of poor prognosis (log rank test, P = 0.0281 for PHH3 and P = 0.032 for Ki-67), unlike standard mitotic count. Based on Cox proportional hazard regression analyses, among all clinical (age), pathological (PHH3 and Ki-67) and molecular variables (IDH, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT methylation) with a prognostic relevance at univariate survival analysis, only IDH expression (P = 0.001) and Ki-67 proliferation index (P = 0.027) proved to be independent prognostic factors. In addition, stratifying by IDH expression status, high Ki-67 retained its prognostic relevance uniquely in the IDH negative patient (P = 0.029) doubling their risk of death (hazard ratio = 2.27). Overall, PHH3 immunostaining is the sole reliable method with a prognostic value to highlight mitotic figures in LGG. Ki-67 proliferation index exceeds PHH3 mitotic count as a predictor of patient's prognosis, and should be integrated with molecular markers in a comprehensive grading system for LGG. PMID:27049832

  7. Ki-67 proliferation index but not mitotic thresholds integrates the molecular prognostic stratification of lower grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Bertero, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Soffietti, Riccardo; Rudà, Roberta; Trevisan, Morena; Papotti, Mauro; Ventura, Laura; Senetta, Rebecca; Cassoni, Paola

    2016-04-19

    Despite several molecular signatures for "lower grade diffuse gliomas" (LGG) have been identified, WHO grade still remains a cornerstone of treatment guidelines. Mitotic count bears a crucial role in its definition, although limited by the poor reproducibility of standard Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) evaluation. Phospho-histone-H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67 have been proposed as alternative assays of cellular proliferation. Therefore in the present series of 141 LGG, the molecular characterization (namely IDH status, 1p/19q co-deletion and MGMT promoter methylation) was integrated with the tumor "proliferative trait" (conventional H&E or PHH3-guided mitotic count and Ki-67 index) in term of prognosis definition. Exclusively high PHH3 and Ki-67 values were predictor of poor prognosis (log rank test, P = 0.0281 for PHH3 and P = 0.032 for Ki-67), unlike standard mitotic count. Based on Cox proportional hazard regression analyses, among all clinical (age), pathological (PHH3 and Ki-67) and molecular variables (IDH, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT methylation) with a prognostic relevance at univariate survival analysis, only IDH expression (P = 0.001) and Ki-67 proliferation index (P = 0.027) proved to be independent prognostic factors. In addition, stratifying by IDH expression status, high Ki-67 retained its prognostic relevance uniquely in the IDH negative patient (P = 0.029) doubling their risk of death (hazard ratio = 2.27). Overall, PHH3 immunostaining is the sole reliable method with a prognostic value to highlight mitotic figures in LGG. Ki-67 proliferation index exceeds PHH3 mitotic count as a predictor of patient's prognosis, and should be integrated with molecular markers in a comprehensive grading system for LGG. PMID:27049832

  8. Use of Quick bird Very High Resolution data for mapping linear erosion features in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desprats, J. F.; Raclot, D.; Cerdan, O.; Garcin, M.; Le Bissonnais, Y.

    2009-04-01

    High resolution remote sensing data (SPOT) are usually used to define information required for Environmental modelling such as land use. Quick Bird images were there acquired in order to evaluate the possibilities to extract linear erosion features usually observed on field like rills or gullies. This field work is often difficult and punctual in time and space. The objective of this study was therefore to test erosion features extraction, either directly using a commercial software (ENVI) or a software developed by the French Space Agency (ORFEO tool box), or by visual interpretation. The study area is located in the Lebna catchment in Tunisia, which is one of the three test sites of the MESOEROS21 project that aims to study the impact of climate change on soil erosion at different scales, from the whole Mediterranean basin to the small catchment (some km²). All of the lineaments present on the image were mapped and labelled according to a defined typology (roads, tracks, stabilized gullies by vegetation, active gullies, major rills, rills …). These extractions were compared with a set of field observations including length and shape of linear features caused by erosion. The final step is the validation of runoff and erosion modelling of the catchment using field data, erosion parameters interpreted and automatically extracted from Quick Bird.

  9. Dynamics and inherent safety features of small modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the dynamics and inherent safety features of various modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. This work was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's HTGR Safety Research program. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) have sponsored studies of several modular HTGR concepts, each having it own unique advantageous economic and inherent safety features. The DOE design team has recently choses a 350-MW(t) annular core with prismatic, graphite matrix fuel for its reference plant. The various safety features of this plant and of the pebble-bed core designs similar to those currently being developed and operated in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are described. A varity of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced circulation of the helium primary coolant, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of normal and backup heat sinks were studied and are discussed. Results demonstrate that each concept can withstand an uncontrolled heatup accident without reaching excessive peak fuel temperatures. Comparisons of calculated and measured response for a loss of forced circulation test on the FRG reactor, AVR, are also presented. 10 refs.

  10. Classification of high resolution imagery based on fusion of multiscale texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiu; Liu, Huiping; Lv, Ying; Xue, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    In high resolution data classification process, combining texture features with spectral bands can effectively improve the classification accuracy. However, the window size which is difficult to choose is regarded as an important factor influencing overall classification accuracy in textural classification and current approaches to image texture analysis only depend on a single moving window which ignores different scale features of various land cover types. In this paper, we propose a new method based on the fusion of multiscale texture features to overcome these problems. The main steps in new method include the classification of fixed window size spectral/textural images from 3×3 to 15×15 and comparison of all the posterior possibility values for every pixel, as a result the biggest probability value is given to the pixel and the pixel belongs to a certain land cover type automatically. The proposed approach is tested on University of Pavia ROSIS data. The results indicate that the new method improve the classification accuracy compared to results of methods based on fixed window size textural classification.

  11. Statistical features of the high-latitude ionospheric convection structure associated with enhanced solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lyons, L. R.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Frissell, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    While the IMF and solar wind dynamic pressure almost certainly play larger roles under most conditions, evidence has been recently found that Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) wave power in the solar wind has an additional substantial effect on the strength of convection within the polar caps, and on the nightside within both the aurora ionosphere and the plasma sheet. An initial study shows that the convection flows under enhanced solar wind fluctuations often appear to be more structured, with localized strong vortical features, than the convection under steady solar wind conditions. In this work, we statistically examine characteristic features of the ionospheric convection structure in terms of vortex patterns and how they are related to the convection enhancements during periods of enhanced solar wind fluctuations. Specifically, we examine whether enhanced solar wind ULF power will drive localized turbulence within enhanced convection cells while it increases convection strength at the same time. The results of this study will provide evidence for how solar wind ULF fluctuations can contribute to the solar wind energy transfer to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. To determine the features of 2-D convection structure, we analyze the large-scale global convection maps derived from the SuperDARN observations with extensive radar echo coverage over a large portion of the high latitude ionosphere. Wind and ACE data are used for examination of solar wind and IMF conditions.

  12. Rapid, complete and large-scale generation of post-mitotic neurons from the human LUHMES cell line.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Diana; Pöltl, Dominik; Genewsky, Andreas; Weng, Matthias; Waldmann, Tanja; Schildknecht, Stefan; Leist, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    We characterized phenotype and function of a fetal human mesencephalic cell line (LUHMES, Lund human mesencephalic) as neuronal model system. Neurodevelopmental profiling of the proliferation stage (d0, day 0) of these conditionally-immortalized cells revealed neuronal features, expressed simultaneously with some early neuroblast and stem cell markers. An optimized 2-step differentiation procedure, triggered by shut-down of the myc transgene, resulted in uniformly post-mitotic neurons within 5 days (d5). This was associated with down-regulation of some precursor markers and further up-regulation of neuronal genes. Neurite network formation involved the outgrowth of 1-2, often > 500 μm long projections. They showed dynamic growth cone behavior, as evidenced by time-lapse imaging of stably GFP-over-expressing cells. Voltage-dependent sodium channels and spontaneous electrical activity of LUHMES continuously increased from d0 to d11, while levels of synaptic markers reached their maximum on d5. The developmental expression patterns of most genes and of the dopamine uptake- and release-machinery appeared to be intrinsically predetermined, as the differentiation proceeded similarly when external factors such as dibutyryl-cAMP and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor were omitted. Only tyrosine hydroxylase required the continuous presence of cAMP. In conclusion, LUHMES are a robust neuronal model with adaptable phenotype and high value for neurodevelopmental studies, disease modeling and neuropharmacology. PMID:21434924

  13. High-throughput screening for thermoelectric sulphides by using crystal structure features as descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruizhi; Du, Baoli; Chen, Kan; Reece, Mike; Materials Research Insititute Team

    With the increasing computational power and reliable databases, high-throughput screening is playing a more and more important role in the search of new thermoelectric materials. Rather than the well established density functional theory (DFT) calculation based methods, we propose an alternative approach to screen for new TE materials: using crystal structural features as 'descriptors'. We show that a non-distorted transition metal sulphide polyhedral network can be a good descriptor for high power factor according to crystal filed theory. By using Cu/S containing compounds as an example, 1600+ Cu/S containing entries in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) were screened, and of those 84 phases are identified as promising thermoelectric materials. The screening results are validated by both electronic structure calculations and experimental results from the literature. We also fabricated some new compounds to test our screening results. Another advantage of using crystal structure features as descriptors is that we can easily establish structural relationships between the identified phases. Based on this, two material design approaches are discussed: 1) High-pressure synthesis of metastable phase; 2) In-situ 2-phase composites with coherent interface. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowship of the European Community Human Potential Program.

  14. DESIGN SAFETY FEATURES OF THE BNL HIGH-TEMPERATURE COMBUSTION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    GINSBERG,T.; CICCARELLI,G.; BOCCIO,J.

    2000-06-11

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was used to perform hydrogen deflagration and detonation experiments at temperatures to 650 K. Safety features that were designed to ensure safe and reliable operation of the experimental program are described. Deflagration and detonation experiments have been conducted using mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam. Detonation cell size measurements were made as a function of mixture composition and thermodynamic gas conditions. Deflagration-to-detonation transition experiments were also conducted. Results of the experimental program are presented, and implications with respect to hydrogen safety are discussed.

  15. Cyclic development of igneous features and their relationship to high-temperature hydrothermal features in the Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carten, R.B.; Geraghty, E.P.; Walker, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit was formed by the superposition of coupled alteration and mineralization events, of varying intensity and size, that were associated with each of at least 11 intrusions. Deposition of molybdenite was accompanied by time-equivalent silicic and potassic alteration. High-temperature alteration and mineralization are spatially and temporally linked to the crystallization of compositionally zoned magma in the apex of stocks. Differences in hydrothermal features associated with each intrusion (e.g., mass of ore, orientation and type of veins, density of veins, and intensity of alteration) correlate with differences in primary igneous features (e.g., composition, texture, morphology, and size). The systematic relations between hydrothermal and magmatic features suggest that primary magma compositions, including volatile contents, largely control the geometry, volume, level of emplacement, and mechanisms of crystallization of stocks. These elements in turn govern the orientations and densities of fractures, which ultimately determine the distribution patterns of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. -from Authors

  16. Apoptosis Resistance and PKC Signaling: Distinguishing Features of High and Low Metastatic Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Ren, Ling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Eleswarapu, Ananth; Khanna, Chand

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of the process of metastasis is widely recognized. We report herein on a recurrent feature of high compared to low metastatic cells that is linked to their ability to survive early after their arrival at secondary sites. Using novel fluorescent-based imaging strategies that assess tumor cell interaction with the lung microenvironment, we have determined that most high and low metastatic cells can be distinguished within 6 hours of their arrival in the lung and further that this difference is defined by the ability of high metastatic cells to resist apoptosis at the secondary site. Despite the complexity of the metastatic cascade, the performance of cells during this critical window is highly defining of their metastatic proclivity. To explore mechanisms, we next evaluated biochemical pathways that may be linked to this survival phenotype in highly metastatic cells. Interestingly, we found no association between the Akt survival pathway and this metastatic phenotype. Of all pathways examined, only protein kinase C (PKC) activation was significantly linked to survival of highly metastatic cells. These data provide a conceptual understanding of a defining difference between high and low metastatic cells. The connection to PKC activation may provide a biologic rationale for the use of PKC inhibition in the prevention of metastatic progression. PMID:22496624

  17. RHAMM Promotes Interphase Microtubule Instability and Mitotic Spindle Integrity through MEK1/ERK1/2 Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Tolg, Cornelia; Hamilton, Sara R.; Morningstar, Lyndsey; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, S.; Esguerra, Kenneth V.; Telmer, Patrick G.; Luyt, Len G.; Harrison, Rene; McCarthy, James B.; Turley, Eva A.

    2010-01-01

    An oncogenic form of RHAMM (receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, mouse, amino acids 163–794 termed RHAMMΔ163) is a cell surface hyaluronan receptor and mitotic spindle protein that is highly expressed in aggressive human cancers. Its regulation of mitotic spindle integrity is thought to contribute to tumor progression, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not previously been defined. Here, we report that intracellular RHAMMΔ163 modifies the stability of interphase and mitotic spindle microtubules through ERK1/2 activity. RHAMM−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit strongly acetylated interphase microtubules, multi-pole mitotic spindles, aberrant chromosome segregation, and inappropriate cytokinesis during mitosis. These defects are rescued by either expression of RHAMM or mutant active MEK1. Mutational analyses show that RHAMMΔ163 binds to α- and β-tubulin protein via a carboxyl-terminal leucine zipper, but in vitro analyses indicate this interaction does not directly contribute to tubulin polymerization/stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays reveal complexes of RHAMMΔ163, ERK1/2-MEK1, and α- and β-tubulin and demonstrate direct binding of RHAMMΔ163 to ERK1 via a D-site motif. In vitro kinase analyses, expression of mutant RHAMMΔ163 defective in ERK1 binding in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and blocking MEK1 activity collectively confirm that the effect of RHAMMΔ163 on interphase and mitotic spindle microtubules is mediated by ERK1/2 activity. Our results suggest a model wherein intracellular RHAMMΔ163 functions as an adaptor protein to control microtubule polymerization during interphase and mitosis as a result of localizing ERK1/2-MEK1 complexes to their tubulin-associated substrates. PMID:20558733

  18. Frameshift mutations at two hotspots in vasopressin transcripts in post-mitotic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A; van der Kleij, A A; Sonnemans, M A; Burbach, J P; van Leeuwen, F W

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in DNA underlie carcinogenesis, inherited pathology, and aging and are generally thought to be introduced during meiosis and mitosis. Here we report that in post-mitotic neurons specific frameshift mutations occur at high frequency. These mutations were identified in vasopressin transcripts in magnocellular neurons of the homozygous Brattleboro rat and predominantly consist of a GA deletion in GAGAG motifs. Immunocytochemistry provides evidence for similar events in wild-type rats. However, the diseased state of the Brattleboro rat, resulting in a permanent activation of vasopressin neurons, enhanced the mutational rate. These data reveal hitherto unrecognized somatic mutations in nondividing neurons. Images PMID:8016115

  19. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, R.K.; Contopoulou, R.; Schild, D.

    1981-09-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near haploid chromosome numbers.

  20. Scene Classfication Based on the Semantic-Feature Fusion Fully Sparse Topic Model for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiqi; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Topic modeling has been an increasingly mature method to bridge the semantic gap between the low-level features and high-level semantic information. However, with more and more high spatial resolution (HSR) images to deal with, conventional probabilistic topic model (PTM) usually presents the images with a dense semantic representation. This consumes more time and requires more storage space. In addition, due to the complex spectral and spatial information, a combination of multiple complementary features is proved to be an effective strategy to improve the performance for HSR image scene classification. But it should be noticed that how the distinct features are fused to fully describe the challenging HSR images, which is a critical factor for scene classification. In this paper, a semantic-feature fusion fully sparse topic model (SFF-FSTM) is proposed for HSR imagery scene classification. In SFF-FSTM, three heterogeneous features - the mean and standard deviation based spectral feature, wavelet based texture feature, and dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) based structural feature are effectively fused at the latent semantic level. The combination of multiple semantic-feature fusion strategy and sparse based FSTM is able to provide adequate feature representations, and can achieve comparable performance with limited training samples. Experimental results on the UC Merced dataset and Google dataset of SIRI-WHU demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of scene classification compared with other scene classification methods for HSR imagery.

  1. Water Extraction in High Resolution Remote Sensing Image Based on Hierarchical Spectrum and Shape Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bangyu; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Fanjiang

    2014-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of water extraction from high resolution remote sensing images (including R, G, B, and NIR channels), which draws considerable attention in recent years. Previous work on water extraction mainly faced two difficulties. 1) It is difficult to obtain accurate position of water boundary because of using low resolution images. 2) Like all other image based object classification problems, the phenomena of "different objects same image" or "different images same object" affects the water extraction. Shadow of elevated objects (e.g. buildings, bridges, towers and trees) scattered in the remote sensing image is a typical noise objects for water extraction. In many cases, it is difficult to discriminate between water and shadow in a remote sensing image, especially in the urban region. We propose a water extraction method with two hierarchies: the statistical feature of spectral characteristic based on image segmentation and the shape feature based on shadow removing. In the first hierarchy, the Statistical Region Merging (SRM) algorithm is adopted for image segmentation. The SRM includes two key steps: one is sorting adjacent regions according to a pre-ascertained sort function, and the other one is merging adjacent regions based on a pre-ascertained merging predicate. The sort step is done one time during the whole processing without considering changes caused by merging which may cause imprecise results. Therefore, we modify the SRM with dynamic sort processing, which conducts sorting step repetitively when there is large adjacent region changes after doing merging. To achieve robust segmentation, we apply the merging region with six features (four remote sensing image bands, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), and Normalized Saturation-value Difference Index (NSVDI)). All these features contribute to segment image into region of object. NDWI and NSVDI are discriminate between water and some shadows. In the second hierarchy, we adopt

  2. High-precision image aided inertial navigation with known features: observability analysis and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiping; Wang, Li; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Min; Hu, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    A high-precision image-aided inertial navigation system (INS) is proposed as an alternative to the carrier-phase-based differential Global Navigation Satellite Systems (CDGNSSs) when satellite-based navigation systems are unavailable. In this paper, the image/INS integrated algorithm is modeled by a tightly-coupled iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF). Tightly-coupled integration ensures that the integrated system is reliable, even if few known feature points (i.e., less than three) are observed in the images. A new global observability analysis of this tightly-coupled integration is presented to guarantee that the system is observable under the necessary conditions. The analysis conclusions were verified by simulations and field tests. The field tests also indicate that high-precision position (centimeter-level) and attitude (half-degree-level)-integrated solutions can be achieved in a global reference. PMID:25330046

  3. Physiological and genomic features of highly alkaliphilic hydrogen-utilizing Betaproteobacteria from a continental serpentinizing site

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shino; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Schipper, Kira; van der Velde, Suzanne; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Wu, Angela; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tenney, Aaron; Meng, XianYing; Morrill, Penny L.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Muyzer, Gerard; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Serpentinization, or the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks, results in challenging environments for life in continental sites due to the combination of extremely high pH, low salinity and lack of obvious electron acceptors and carbon sources. Nevertheless, certain Betaproteobacteria have been frequently observed in such environments. Here we describe physiological and genomic features of three related Betaproteobacterial strains isolated from highly alkaline (pH 11.6) serpentinizing springs at The Cedars, California. All three strains are obligate alkaliphiles with an optimum for growth at pH 11 and are capable of autotrophic growth with hydrogen, calcium carbonate and oxygen. The three strains exhibit differences, however, regarding the utilization of organic carbon and electron acceptors. Their global distribution and physiological, genomic and transcriptomic characteristics indicate that the strains are adapted to the alkaline and calcium-rich environments represented by the terrestrial serpentinizing ecosystems. We propose placing these strains in a new genus ‘Serpentinomonas’. PMID:24845058

  4. High-Precision Image Aided Inertial Navigation with Known Features: Observability Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiping; Wang, Li; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Min; Hu, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    A high-precision image-aided inertial navigation system (INS) is proposed as an alternative to the carrier-phase-based differential Global Navigation Satellite Systems (CDGNSSs) when satellite-based navigation systems are unavailable. In this paper, the image/INS integrated algorithm is modeled by a tightly-coupled iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF). Tightly-coupled integration ensures that the integrated system is reliable, even if few known feature points (i.e., less than three) are observed in the images. A new global observability analysis of this tightly-coupled integration is presented to guarantee that the system is observable under the necessary conditions. The analysis conclusions were verified by simulations and field tests. The field tests also indicate that high-precision position (centimeter-level) and attitude (half-degree-level)-integrated solutions can be achieved in a global reference. PMID:25330046

  5. New fabrication methodology for fine-feature high-aspect-ratio structures made from high-Z materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Upendra D.; Orwig, Larry E.; Clark, David; Appleby, Michael

    1999-08-01

    Radiological imagin relies heavily on collimators to achieve diagnostic x-ray images. These collimating structures are required due to the lack of efficient x-ray reflectors or refractors needed to make lenses or mirrors. In order to achieve higher resolution x-ray images, finer collimator geometries are needed. The two critical parameters that define the fineness of a collimator are the length of the collimator structure and the aperture size. Current collimator fabrication technology provides structures with coarse cell sizes, which require long structural lengths, to achieve image optimization. Finer collimator geometries would help reduce the overall length of collimating structures. Tecomet, of Woburn, MA has developed a new technology to fabricate fine-featured, high aspect ratio structures made from high Z materials. These collimating structures have been made from tungsten with aspect ratios above 50:1 and geometry features less than 20 microns. This technology has enabled advancements in the design of x-ray coded apertures. This has opened the door to new ideas for x-ray imaging. Optimization coders, made from tungsten, can now be designed and fabricated to achieve very high angular resolution. Significant reduction in weight is realized due to the reduction in collimator thickness. The collimators made using these fabrication methods also provide greater long-term structural stability compared to collimators used in diagnostic x-ray imaging using lead.

  6. Implications of mitotic and meiotic irregularities in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lima, D C; Braz, G T; Dos Reis, G B; Techio, V H; Davide, L C; de F B Abreu, A

    2016-01-01

    The common bean has great social and economic importance in Brazil and is the subject of a high number of publications, especially in the fields of genetics and breeding. Breeding programs aim to increase grain yield; however, mitosis and meiosis represent under explored research areas that have a direct impact on grain yield. Therefore, the study of cell division could be another tool available to bean geneticists and breeders. The aim of this study was to investigate irregularities occurring during the cell cycle and meiosis in common bean. The common bean cultivar used was BRSMG Talismã, which owing to its high yield and grain quality is recommended for cultivation in Brazil. We classified the interphase nuclei, estimated the mitotic and meiotic index, grain pollen viability, and percentage of abnormalities in both processes. The mitotic index was 4.1%, the interphase nucleus was non-reticulated, and 19% of dividing somatic cells showed abnormal behavior. Meiosis also presented irregularities resulting in a meiotic index of 44.6%. Viability of pollen grains was 94.3%. These results indicate that the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã possesses repair mechanisms that compensate for changes by producing a large number of pollen grains. Another important strategy adopted by bean plants to ensure stability is the elimination of abnormal cells by apoptosis. As the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã is recommended for cultivation because of its good agronomic performance, it can be concluded that mitotic and meiotic irregularities have no negative influence on its grain quality and yield. PMID:27323072

  7. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    SciTech Connect

    Levakhina, Y. M.; Mueller, J.; Buzug, T. M.; Duschka, R. L.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical

  8. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  9. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation in response to improper kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20. The outer kinetochore acts as a catalyst for MCC production through the recruitment and proper positioning of checkpoint proteins and recently there has been remarkable progress in understanding how this is achieved. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore–checkpoint protein interactions and inhibition of the anaphase promoting complex by the MCC. PMID:27308407

  10. DNA profiles in mitotic cells from gastric adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, C. A.; Kato, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative DNA measurements were done in mitotic figures from 17 gastric adenomas having slight (3 cases), moderate (8 cases), or severe dysplasia (3 cases) or foci of invasive adenocarcinoma (3 cases). Values higher than for normal diploid control cells (2c) or their estimated tetraploid values (4c) were found to increase gradually from slight dysplasia to invasive adenocarcinoma through moderate and severe dysplasia. While none of the adenomas having slight or moderate dysplasia demonstrated aneuploid mitoses (ie, values higher than 5c), 1% of the mitoses in severe dysplasia and 27% of those with invasive adenocarcinoma had values higher than 5c. The present results thus suggest that aneuploid mitotic figures may help to recognize those gastric adenomas having invasive growth. Images Figure 1 PMID:3348355