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Sample records for features high mitotic

  1. Profiling of ubiquitin-like modifications reveals features of mitotic control

    PubMed Central

    Merbl, Yifat; Refour, Phillipe; Patel, Hevan; Springer, Michael; Kirschner, Marc W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) protein modifications affect protein stability, activity and localization but we still lack broad understanding of the functions of Ubl modifications. We have profiled the protein targets of ubiquitin and six additional Ubls in mitosis using a functional assay that utilizes active mammalian cell extracts and protein microarrays and identified 1500 potential substrates; 100–200 protein targets were exclusive to each Ubl. The network structure is non-random, most targets mapping to a single Ubl. There are distinct molecular functions for each Ubl, suggesting divergent biological roles. Analysis of differential profiles between mitosis and G1 highlighted a previously under-appreciated role for the Ubl, FAT10, in mitotic regulation. In addition to its role as a resource for Ubl modifications, our study provides a systematic approach to analyze changes in posttranslational modifications at various cellular states. PMID:23452859

  2. Evaluation of associations between common variation in mitotic regulatory pathways and risk of overall and high grade breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristen N; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Cerhan, James; Vachon, Celine M; Olson, Janet E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-09-01

    Mitotic regulatory pathways insure proper timing of mitotic entry, sister chromatid cohesion and separation, and cytokinesis. Disruption of this process results in inappropriate chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, and appears to contribute to cancer. Specifically, disregulation and somatic mutation of mitotic regulators has been observed in human cancers, and overexpression of mitotic regulators is common in aggressive and late stage tumors. However, the role of germline variation in mitotic pathways and risk of cancer is not well understood. We tested 1,084 haplotype-tagging and functional variants from 164 genes in mitotic regulatory pathways in 791 Caucasian women with breast cancer and 843 healthy controls for association with risk of overall and high grade breast cancer. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 40 genes were associated (P < 0.05) with risk of breast cancer in a log-additive model. In addition, 60 SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with risk of high grade breast cancer. However, none of these associations were significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. In gene-level analyses, CDC25C, SCC1/RAD21, TLK2, and SMC6L1 were associated (P < 0.05) with overall breast cancer risk, CDC6, CDC27, SUMO3, RASSF1, KIF2, and CDC14A were associated with high grade breast cancer risk, and EIF3S10 and CDC25A were associated with both. Further investigation in breast and other cancers are needed to understand the influence of inherited variation in mitotic genes on tumor grade and cancer risk. PMID:21607584

  3. Evaluation of associations between common variation in mitotic regulatory pathways and risk of overall and high grade breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Cerhan, James; Vachon, Celine M.; Olson, Janet E.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic regulatory pathways ensure proper timing of mitotic entry, sister chromatid cohesion and separation, and cytokinesis. Disruption of this process results in inappropriate chromosome segregation and aneuploidy and appears to contribute to cancer. Specifically, disregulation and somatic mutation of mitotic regulators has been observed in human cancers, and overexpression of mitotic regulators is common in aggressive and late stage tumors. However, the role of germline variation in mitotic pathways and risk of cancer is not well understood. We tested 1,084 haplotype-tagging and functional variants from 164 genes in mitotic regulatory pathways in 791 Caucasian women with breast cancer and 843 healthy controls for association with risk of overall and high grade breast cancer. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 40 genes were associated (p<0.05) with risk of breast cancer in a log-additive model. In addition 60 SNPs were associated (p<0.05) with risk of high grade breast cancer. However, none of these associations were significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. In gene-level analyses, CDC25C, SCC1/RAD21, TLK2, and SMC6L1 were associated (p<0.05) with overall breast cancer risk, CDC6, CDC27, SUMO3, RASSF1, KIF2, and CDC14A were associated with high grade breast cancer risk, and EIF3S10 and CDC25A were associated with both. Further investigation in breast and other cancers are needed to understand the influence of inherited variation in mitotic genes on tumor grade and cancer risk. PMID:21607584

  4. Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos.

    PubMed

    Cluet, David; Stébé, Pierre-Nicolas; Riche, Soizic; Spichty, Martin; Delattre, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubule-based structure that elongates to accurately segregate chromosomes during anaphase. Its position within the cell also dictates the future cell cleavage plan, thereby determining daughter cell orientation within a tissue or cell fate adoption for polarized cells. Therefore, the mitotic spindle ensures at the same time proper cell division and developmental precision. Consequently, spindle dynamics is the matter of intensive research. Among the different cellular models that have been explored, the one-cell stage C. elegans embryo has been an essential and powerful system to dissect the molecular and biophysical basis of spindle elongation and positioning. Indeed, in this large and transparent cell, spindle poles (or centrosomes) can be easily detected from simple DIC microscopy by human eyes. To perform quantitative and high-throughput analysis of spindle motion, we developed a computer program ACT for Automated-Centrosome-Tracking from DIC movies of C. elegans embryos. We therefore offer an alternative to the image acquisition and processing of transgenic lines expressing fluorescent spindle markers. Consequently, experiments on large sets of cells can be performed with a simple setup using inexpensive microscopes. Moreover, analysis of any mutant or wild-type backgrounds is accessible because laborious rounds of crosses with transgenic lines become unnecessary. Last, our program allows spindle detection in other nematode species, offering the same quality of DIC images but for which techniques of transgenesis are not accessible. Thus, our program also opens the way towards a quantitative evolutionary approach of spindle dynamics. Overall, our computer program is a unique macro for the image- and movie-processing platform ImageJ. It is user-friendly and freely available under an open-source licence. ACT allows batch-wise analysis of large sets of mitosis events. Within 2 minutes, a single movie is processed and the accuracy of the automated tracking matches the precision of the human eye. PMID:24763198

  5. Toward automatic mitotic cell detection and segmentation in multispectral histopathological images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Mandal, Mrinal

    2014-03-01

    The count of mitotic cells is a critical factor in most cancer grading systems. Extracting the mitotic cell from the histopathological image is a very challenging task. In this paper, we propose an efficient technique for detecting and segmenting the mitotic cells in the high-resolution multispectral image. The proposed technique consists of three main modules: discriminative image generation, mitotic cell candidate detection and segmentation, and mitotic cell candidate classification. In the first module, a discriminative image is obtained by linear discriminant analysis using ten different spectral band images. A set of mitotic cell candidate regions is then detected and segmented by the Bayesian modeling and local-region threshold method. In the third module, a 226 dimension feature is extracted from the mitotic cell candidates and their surrounding regions. An imbalanced classification framework is then applied to perform the classification for the mitotic cell candidates in order to detect the real mitotic cells. The proposed technique has been evaluated on a publicly available dataset of 35 × 10 multispectral images, in which 224 mitotic cells are manually labeled by experts. The proposed technique is able to provide superior performance compared to the existing technique, 81.5% sensitivity rate and 33.9% precision rate in terms of detection performance, and 89.3% sensitivity rate and 87.5% precision rate in terms of segmentation performance. PMID:24608059

  6. Nup2 requires a highly divergent partner, NupA, to fulfill functions at nuclear pore complexes and the mitotic chromatin region

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Sarine; Suresh, Subbulakshmi; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) undergo dramatic changes during mitosis, which in vertebrates and Aspergillus nidulans involves movement of Nup2 from NPCs to the chromatin region to fulfill unknown functions. This transition is shown to require the Cdk1 mitotic kinase and be promoted prematurely by ectopic expression of the NIMA kinase. Nup2 localizes with a copurifying partner termed NupA, a highly divergent yet essential NPC protein. NupA and Nup2 locate throughout the chromatin region during prophase but during anaphase move to surround segregating DNA. NupA function is shown to involve targeting Nup2 to its interphase and mitotic locations. Deletion of either Nup2 or NupA causes identical mitotic defects that initiate a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC)–dependent mitotic delay and also cause defects in karyokinesis. These mitotic problems are not caused by overall defects in mitotic NPC disassembly–reassembly or general nuclear import. However, without Nup2 or NupA, although the SAC protein Mad1 locates to its mitotic locations, it fails to locate to NPCs normally in G1 after mitosis. Collectively the study provides new insight into the roles of Nup2 and NupA during mitosis and in a surveillance mechanism that regulates nucleokinesis when mitotic defects occur after SAC fulfillment. PMID:25540430

  7. High throughput screening of natural products for anti-mitotic effects in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, E; Badisa, R; Mack, N; Deiab, S; Soliman, K F A

    2014-06-01

    Some of the most effective anti-mitotic microtubule-binding agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxus brevifolia) were originally discovered through robust National Cancer Institute botanical screenings. In this study, a high-through put microarray format was utilized to screen 897 aqueous extracts of commonly used natural products (0.00015-0.5?mg/mL) relative to paclitaxel for anti-mitotic effects (independent of toxicity) on proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells. The data obtained showed that less than 1.34 % of the extracts tested showed inhibitory growth (IG50 ) properties <0.0183?mg/mL. The most potent anti-mitotics (independent of toxicity) were Mandrake root (Podophyllum peltatum), Truja twigs (Thuja occidentalis), Colorado desert mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens), Tou Gu Cao [symbol: see text] Speranskia herb (Speranskia tuberculata), Bentonite clay, Bunge root (Pulsatilla chinensis), Brucea fruit (Brucea javanica), Madder root (Rubia tinctorum), Gallnut of Chinese Sumac (Melaphis chinensis), Elecampane root (Inula Helenium), Yuan Zhi [symbol: see text] root (Polygala tenuifolia), Pagoda Tree fruit (Melia Toosendan), Stone root (Collinsonia Canadensis), and others such as American Witchhazel, Arjun, and Bladderwrack. The strongest tumoricidal herbs identified from amongst the subset evaluated for anti-mitotic properties were wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), beth root (Trillium Pendulum), and alkanet root (Lithospermum canescens). Additional data was obtained on a lesser-recognized herb: (S. tuberculata), which showed growth inhibition on BT-474 (human ductal breast carcinoma) and Ishikawa (human endometrial adenocarcinoma) cells with ability to block replicative DNA synthesis, leading to G2 arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, these findings present relative potency of anti-mitotic natural plants that are effective against human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell division. PMID:24105850

  8. High throughput screening of natural products for anti-mitotic effects in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, E; Badisa, R; Mack, N; Deiab, S; Soliman, KFA

    2013-01-01

    Some of the most effective anti-mitotic microtubule-binding agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxus brevifolia) were originally discovered through robust NCI botanical screenings. In this study, a high-through microarray format was utilized to screen 897 aqueous extracts of commonly used natural products (0.00015–0.5 mg/ml) relative to paclitaxel for anti-mitotic effects (independent of toxicity) on proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells. The data obtained showed that less than 1.34 % tested showed inhibitory growth (IG50) properties <0.0183 mg/ml. The most potent anti-mitotics (independent of toxicity) were Mandrake root (Podophyllum peltatum), Truja Twigs (Thuja occidentalis), Colorado desert mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens), Tou Gu Cao Speranskia Herb (Speranskia tuberculata), Bentonite Clay, Bunge Root (Pulsatilla chinensis), Brucea Fruit (Brucea javanica), Madder Root (Rubia tinctorum), Gallnut of Chinese Sumac (Melaphis chinensis), Elecampane Root (Inula Helenium), Yuan Zhi Root (Polygala tenuifolia), Pagoda Tree Fruit (Melia Toosendan), Stone Root (Collinsonia Canadensis) and others such as American Witchhazel, Arjun and Bladderwrack. The strongest tumoricidal herbs identified from amongst the subset evaluated for anti-mitotic properties were wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), beth-root (Trillium Pendulum) and alkanet-root (Lithospermum canescens). Additional data was obtained on a lesser-recognized herb: (Speranskia tuberculata) which showed growth inhibition on BT-474 (human ductal breast carcinoma) and Ishikawa (human endometrial adenocarcinoma) cells with ability to block replicative DNA synthesis leading to G2 arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, these findings present relative potency of natural anti-mitotic resources effective against human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell division. PMID:24105850

  9. Mitotic crisis

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Rachel William; Borowiec, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Mitotic DNA damage is a constant threat to genomic integrity, yet understanding of the cellular responses to this stress remain incomplete. Recent work by Anantha et al. (PNAS 2008; 105:12903–8) has found surprising evidence that RPA, the primary eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein, can stimulate the ability of cells to exit mitosis into a 2N G1 phase. Along with providing additional discussion of this study, we review evidence suggesting that DNA replication and repair factors can modulate mitotic transit by acting through Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) and the centrosome. “A crisis unmasks everyone.”—Mason Cooley, US aphorist. PMID:19176996

  10. The human mitotic kinesin KIF18A binds protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) through a highly conserved docking motif

    E-print Network

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

    in proliferating HeLa cells for the presence of motor proteins and identified the human mitotic kinesin-8 KIF18A, Canada a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 19 September 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords. This suggests an ancestral origin of PP1 recruitment to KIF18A and a strategic role in human mitotic cells. Ó

  11. Mitotic Functions of Kinesin-5

    PubMed Central

    Ferenz, Nick P.; Gable, Alyssa; Wadsworth, Pat

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, molecular motor proteins play essential roles in spindle assembly and function. The homotetrameric kinesin-5 motors in particular generate outward forces that establish and maintain spindle bipolarity and contribute to microtubule flux. Cell cycle dependent phosphorylation of kinesin-5 motors regulates their localization to the mitotic spindle. Analysis of live cells further shows that kinesin-5 motors are highly dynamic in the spindle. Understanding the interactions of kinesin-5 motors with microtubules and other spindle proteins is likely to broaden the documented roles of kinesin-5 motors during cell division. PMID:20109572

  12. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  13. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of proteins and their co-operation in establishing the final mitotic chromosome structure.

  14. Wee-1 Kinase Inhibition Overcomes Cisplatin Resistance Associated with High-Risk TP53 Mutations in Head and Neck Cancer through Mitotic Arrest Followed by Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdullah A.; Monroe, Marcus M.; Ortega Alves, Marcus V.; Patel, Ameeta A.; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Fitzgerald, Alison L.; Neskey, David M.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Caulin, Carlos; Hsu, Teng-Kuei; McDonald, Thomas O.; Kimmel, Marek; Meyn, Raymond E.; Lichtarge, Olivier; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Although cisplatin has played a role in “standard-of-care” multimodality therapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), the rate of treatment failure remains particularly high for patients receiving cisplatin whose tumors have mutations in the TP53 gene. We found that cisplatin treatment of HNSCC cells with mutant TP53 leads to arrest of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, leading us to hypothesize that the wee-1 kinase inhibitor MK-1775 would abrogate the cisplatin-induced G2 block and thereby sensitize isogenic HNSCC cells with mutant TP53 or lacking p53 expression to cisplatin. We tested this hypothesis using clonogenic survival assays, flow cytometry, and in vivo tumor growth delay experiments with an orthotopic nude mouse model of oral tongue cancer. We also used a novel TP53 mutation classification scheme to identify which TP53 mutations are associated with limited tumor responses to cisplatin treatment. Clonogenic survival analyses indicate that nanomolar concentration of MK-1775 sensitizes HNSCC cells with high-risk mutant p53 to cisplatin. Consistent with its ability to chemosensitize, MK-1775 abrogated the cisplatin-induced G2 block in p53-defective cells leading to mitotic arrest associated with a senescence-like phenotype. Furthermore, MK-1775 enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin in vivo in tumors harboring TP53 mutations. These results indicate that HNSCC cells expressing high-risk p53 mutations are significantly sensitized to cisplatin therapy by the selective wee-1 kinase inhibitor, supporting the clinical evaluation of MK-1775 in combination with cisplatin for the treatment of patients with TP53 mutant HNSCC. PMID:25504633

  15. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  16. Autoreducibility, Mitoticity, and Immunity Christian Glaer

    E-print Network

    Selman, Alan

    Autoreducibility, Mitoticity, and Immunity Christian Glaßer , Mitsunori Ogihara , A. Pavan , Alan L. Selman§ , Liyu Zhang¶ December 27, 2004 Abstract We show the following results regarding complete sets-one mitotic. · NEXP-complete sets are weakly many-one mitotic. · PSPACE-complete sets are weakly Turing-mitotic

  17. High-dimensional feature selection by feature-wise kernelized Lasso.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Makoto; Jitkrittum, Wittawat; Sigal, Leonid; Xing, Eric P; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of supervised feature selection is to find a subset of input features that are responsible for predicting output values. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) allows computationally efficient feature selection based on linear dependency between input features and output values. In this letter, we consider a feature-wise kernelized Lasso for capturing nonlinear input-output dependency. We first show that with particular choices of kernel functions, nonredundant features with strong statistical dependence on output values can be found in terms of kernel-based independence measures such as the Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion. We then show that the globally optimal solution can be efficiently computed; this makes the approach scalable to high-dimensional problems. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through feature selection experiments for classification and regression with thousands of features. PMID:24102126

  18. Mitotic Spindle Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Winey, Mark; Bloom, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitotic spindle in budding yeast is exemplified by its simplicity and elegance. Microtubules are nucleated from a crystalline array of proteins organized in the nuclear envelope, known as the spindle pole body in yeast (analogous to the centrosome in larger eukaryotes). The spindle has two classes of nuclear microtubules: kinetochore microtubules and interpolar microtubules. One kinetochore microtubule attaches to a single centromere on each chromosome, while approximately four interpolar microtubules emanate from each pole and interdigitate with interpolar microtubules from the opposite spindle to provide stability to the bipolar spindle. On the cytoplasmic face, two to three microtubules extend from the spindle pole toward the cell cortex. Processes requiring microtubule function are limited to spindles in mitosis and to spindle orientation and nuclear positioning in the cytoplasm. Microtubule function is regulated in large part via products of the 6 kinesin gene family and the 1 cytoplasmic dynein gene. A single bipolar kinesin (Cin8, class Kin-5), together with a depolymerase (Kip3, class Kin-8) or minus-end-directed kinesin (Kar3, class Kin-14), can support spindle function and cell viability. The remarkable feature of yeast cells is that they can survive with microtubules and genes for just two motor proteins, thus providing an unparalleled system to dissect microtubule and motor function within the spindle machine. PMID:22491889

  19. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  20. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  1. Feature Extraction from High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery using

    E-print Network

    Ding, Wandi

    of America 1. Introduction Feature extraction, in the context of remote sensing, can be defined as image extraction differs from traditional pixel-based remote sensing image classification algorithms in which each22 Feature Extraction from High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery using Evolutionary Computation

  2. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  3. Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2013-01-01

    The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

  4. Efficient Learning and Feature Selection in High Dimensional Regression 

    E-print Network

    Ting, Jo-Anne; D'Souza, Aaron; Vijayakumar, Sethu; Schaal, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for efficient learning and feature selection in high-dimensional regression problems. We arrive at this model through a modification of the standard regression model, enabling us to derive a ...

  5. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  6. Mitotic Kinases and p53 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Geun-Hyoung; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung Yim

    2012-01-01

    Mitosis is tightly regulated and any errors in this process often lead to aneuploidy, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Deregulation of mitotic kinases is significantly associated with improper cell division and aneuploidy. Because of their importance during mitosis and the relevance to cancer, mitotic kinase signaling has been extensively studied over the past few decades and, as a result, several mitotic kinase inhibitors have been developed. Despite promising preclinical results, targeting mitotic kinases for cancer therapy faces numerous challenges, including safety and patient selection issues. Therefore, there is an urgent need to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mitotic kinase signaling and its interactive network. Increasing evidence suggests that tumor suppressor p53 functions at the center of the mitotic kinase signaling network. In response to mitotic spindle damage, multiple mitotic kinases phosphorylate p53 to either activate or deactivate p53-mediated signaling. p53 can also regulate the expression and function of mitotic kinases, suggesting the existence of a network of mutual regulation, which can be positive or negative, between mitotic kinases and p53 signaling. Therefore, deciphering this regulatory network will provide knowledge to overcome current limitations of targeting mitotic kinases and further improve the results of targeted therapy. PMID:22852086

  7. Loops determine the mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    In mitosis, chromosomes undergo a condensation into highly compacted, rod-like objects. Many models have been put forward for the higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes including radial loop and hierarchical folding models. Additionally, mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes under different conditions were measured. However, the internal organization of mitotic chromosomes still remains unclear. Here we present a polymer model for mitotic chromosomes and show how chromatin loops play a major role for their mechanical properties. The key assumption of the model is the ability of the chromatin fibre to dynamically form loops with the help of binding proteins. Our results show that looping leads to a tight compaction and significantly increases the bending rigidity of chromosomes. Moreover, our qualitative prediction of the force elongation behaviour is close to experimental findings. This indicates that the internal structure of mitotic chromosomes is based on self-organization of the chromatin fibre. We also demonstrate how number and size of loops have a strong influence on the mechanical properties. We suggest that changes in the mechanical characteristics of chromosomes can be explained by an altered internal loop structure. YZ gratefully appreciates funding by the German National Academic Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and support by the Heidelberg Graduate School for Mathematical and Computational Methods in the Sciences (HGS MathComp).

  8. Exploring KM Features of High-Performance Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Wen

    2007-12-01

    For reacting to an increasingly rival business environment, many companies emphasize the importance of knowledge management (KM). It is a favorable way to explore and learn KM features of high-performance companies. However, finding out the critical KM features of high-performance companies is a qualitative analysis problem. To handle this kind of problem, the rough set approach is suitable because it is based on data-mining techniques to discover knowledge without rigorous statistical assumptions. Thus, this paper explored KM features of high-performance companies by using the rough set approach. The results show that high-performance companies stress the importance on both tacit and explicit knowledge, and consider that incentives and evaluations are the essentials to implementing KM.

  9. A mitotic function for the high-mobility group protein HMG20b regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Daniels, M J; Garnett, M J; Venkitaraman, A R

    2011-07-28

    The inactivation of BRCA2, a suppressor of breast, ovarian and other epithelial cancers, triggers instability in chromosome structure and number, which are thought to arise from defects in DNA recombination and mitotic cell division, respectively. Human BRCA2 controls DNA recombination via eight BRC repeats, evolutionarily conserved motifs of ?35 residues, that interact directly with the recombinase RAD51. How BRCA2 controls mitotic cell division is debated. Several studies by different groups report that BRCA2 deficiency affects cytokinesis. Moreover, its interaction with HMG20b, a protein of uncertain function containing a promiscuous DNA-binding domain and kinesin-like coiled coils, has been implicated in the G2-M transition. We show here that HMG20b depletion by RNA interference disturbs the completion of cell division, suggesting a novel function for HMG20b. In vitro, HMG20b binds directly to the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and exhibits the highest affinity for BRC5, a motif that binds poorly to RAD51. Conversely, the BRC4 repeat binds strongly to RAD51, but not to HMG20b. In vivo, BRC5 overexpression inhibits the BRCA2-HMG20b interaction, recapitulating defects in the completion of cell division provoked by HMG20b depletion. In contrast, BRC4 inhibits the BRCA2-RAD51 interaction and the assembly of RAD51 at sites of DNA damage, but not the completion of cell division. Our findings suggest that a novel function for HMG20b in cytokinesis is regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and separate this unexpected function for the BRC repeats from their known activity in DNA recombination. We propose that divergent tumor-suppressive pathways regulating chromosome segregation as well as chromosome structure may be governed by the conserved BRC motifs in BRCA2. PMID:21399666

  10. The Sparse MLE for Ultra-High-Dimensional Feature Screening

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Chen, Jiahua

    2014-01-01

    Feature selection is fundamental for modeling the high dimensional data, where the number of features can be huge and much larger than the sample size. Since the feature space is so large, many traditional procedures become numerically infeasible. It is hence essential to first remove most apparently non-influential features before any elaborative analysis. Recently, several procedures have been developed for this purpose, which include the sure-independent-screening (SIS) as a widely-used technique. To gain the computational efficiency, the SIS screens features based on their individual predicting power. In this paper, we propose a new screening method via the sparsity-restricted maximum likelihood estimator (SMLE). The new method naturally takes the joint effects of features in the screening process, which gives itself an edge to potentially outperform the existing methods. This conjecture is further supported by the simulation studies under a number of modeling settings. We show that the proposed method is screening consistent in the context of ultra-high-dimensional generalized linear models. PMID:25382886

  11. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  12. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  13. Origin of the high vlos feature in the Galactic bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Schönrich, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    We analyse a controlled N-body+smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of a growing disc galaxy within a non-growing, live dark halo. The disc is continuously fed with gas and star particles on near-circular orbits and develops a bar comparable in size to the one of the Milky Way (MW). We extract line-of-sight velocity vlos distributions from the model and compare it to data recently obtained from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey which show distinct high-velocity features around vlos ˜ 200 km s-1. With an APOGEE-like selection function, but without any scaling nor adjustment, we find vlos distributions very similar to those in APOGEE. The stars that make up the high vlos features at positive longitudes l are preferentially young bar stars (age ? ? 2-3 Gyr) which move away from us along the rear side of the bar. At negative l, we find the corresponding low vlos feature from stars moving towards us. At l > 10 deg, the highest vlos stars are a mixture of bar and background disc stars which complicates the interpretation of observations. The main peak in vlos is dominated by fore- and background stars. At a given time, ˜40-50 per cent of high vlos stars occupy x1-like orbits, but a significant fraction are on more complex orbits. The observed feature is likely due to a population of dynamically cool, young stars formed from gas just outside the bar and subsequently captured by the growing bar. The high vlos features disappear at high latitudes |b| ? 2 deg which explains the non-detection of such features in other surveys.

  14. Spectral feature design in high dimensional multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The High resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is designed to acquire images simultaneously in 192 spectral bands in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers wavelength region. It will make possible the collection of essentially continuous reflectance spectra at a spectral resolution sufficient to extract significantly enhanced amounts of information from return signals as compared to existing systems. The advantages of such high dimensional data come at a cost of increased system and data complexity. For example, since the finer the spectral resolution, the higher the data rate, it becomes impractical to design the sensor to be operated continuously. It is essential to find new ways to preprocess the data which reduce the data rate while at the same time maintaining the information content of the high dimensional signal produced. Four spectral feature design techniques are developed from the Weighted Karhunen-Loeve Transforms: (1) non-overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (2) overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (3) Walsh function approach; and (4) infinite clipped optimal function approach. The infinite clipped optimal function approach is chosen since the features are easiest to find and their classification performance is the best. After the preprocessed data has been received at the ground station, canonical analysis is further used to find the best set of features under the criterion that maximal class separability is achieved. Both 100 dimensional vegetation data and 200 dimensional soil data were used to test the spectral feature design system. It was shown that the infinite clipped versions of the first 16 optimal features had excellent classification performance. The overall probability of correct classification is over 90 percent while providing for a reduced downlink data rate by a factor of 10.

  15. The nucleoporin ALADIN regulates Aurora A localization to ensure robust mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhal, Sara; Ribeiro, Susana Abreu; Arocena, Miguel; Kasciukovic, Taciana; Temme, Achim; Koehler, Katrin; Huebner, Angela; Griffis, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the mitotic spindle is a complex process that requires massive cellular reorganization. Regulation by mitotic kinases controls this entire process. One of these mitotic controllers is Aurora A kinase, which is itself highly regulated. In this study, we show that the nuclear pore protein ALADIN is a novel spatial regulator of Aurora A. Without ALADIN, Aurora A spreads from centrosomes onto spindle microtubules, which affects the distribution of a subset of microtubule regulators and slows spindle assembly and chromosome alignment. ALADIN interacts with inactive Aurora A and is recruited to the spindle pole after Aurora A inhibition. Of interest, mutations in ALADIN cause triple A syndrome. We find that some of the mitotic phenotypes that we observe after ALADIN depletion also occur in cells from triple A syndrome patients, which raises the possibility that mitotic errors may underlie part of the etiology of this syndrome. PMID:26246606

  16. AMPK and PFKFB3 mediate glycolysis and survival in response to mitophagy during mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Doménech, Elena; Maestre, Carolina; Esteban-Martínez, Lorena; Partida, David; Pascual, Rosa; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Seco, Esther; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Pérez, Manuel; Megias, Diego; Allen, Katherine; López, Miguel; Saha, Asish K; Velasco, Guillermo; Rial, Eduardo; Méndez, Raúl; Boya, Patricia; Salazar-Roa, María; Malumbres, Marcos

    2015-10-01

    Blocking mitotic progression has been proposed as an attractive therapeutic strategy to impair proliferation of tumour cells. However, how cells survive during prolonged mitotic arrest is not well understood. We show here that survival during mitotic arrest is affected by the special energetic requirements of mitotic cells. Prolonged mitotic arrest results in mitophagy-dependent loss of mitochondria, accompanied by reduced ATP levels and the activation of AMPK. Oxidative respiration is replaced by glycolysis owing to AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of PFKFB3 and increased production of this protein as a consequence of mitotic-specific translational activation of its mRNA. Induction of autophagy or inhibition of AMPK or PFKFB3 results in enhanced cell death in mitosis and improves the anti-tumoral efficiency of microtubule poisons in breast cancer cells. Thus, survival of mitotic-arrested cells is limited by their metabolic requirements, a feature with potential implications in cancer therapies aimed to impair mitosis or metabolism in tumour cells. PMID:26322680

  17. Feature extraction and classification algorithms for high dimensional data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chulhee; Landgrebe, David

    1993-01-01

    Feature extraction and classification algorithms for high dimensional data are investigated. Developments with regard to sensors for Earth observation are moving in the direction of providing much higher dimensional multispectral imagery than is now possible. In analyzing such high dimensional data, processing time becomes an important factor. With large increases in dimensionality and the number of classes, processing time will increase significantly. To address this problem, a multistage classification scheme is proposed which reduces the processing time substantially by eliminating unlikely classes from further consideration at each stage. Several truncation criteria are developed and the relationship between thresholds and the error caused by the truncation is investigated. Next an approach to feature extraction for classification is proposed based directly on the decision boundaries. It is shown that all the features needed for classification can be extracted from decision boundaries. A characteristic of the proposed method arises by noting that only a portion of the decision boundary is effective in discriminating between classes, and the concept of the effective decision boundary is introduced. The proposed feature extraction algorithm has several desirable properties: it predicts the minimum number of features necessary to achieve the same classification accuracy as in the original space for a given pattern recognition problem; and it finds the necessary feature vectors. The proposed algorithm does not deteriorate under the circumstances of equal means or equal covariances as some previous algorithms do. In addition, the decision boundary feature extraction algorithm can be used both for parametric and non-parametric classifiers. Finally, some problems encountered in analyzing high dimensional data are studied and possible solutions are proposed. First, the increased importance of the second order statistics in analyzing high dimensional data is recognized. By investigating the characteristics of high dimensional data, the reason why the second order statistics must be taken into account in high dimensional data is suggested. Recognizing the importance of the second order statistics, there is a need to represent the second order statistics. A method to visualize statistics using a color code is proposed. By representing statistics using color coding, one can easily extract and compare the first and the second statistics.

  18. Axin localizes to mitotic spindles and centrosomes in mitotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Ki-Joon; Kim, Sewoon; Seo, Eunjeong; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2009-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In addition, numerous recent studies have shown that various Wnt signaling components are involved in mitosis and chromosomal instability. However, the role of Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, in mitosis has remained unclear. Using monoclonal antibodies against Axin, we found that Axin localizes to the centrosome and along mitotic spindles. This localization was suppressed by siRNA specific for Aurora A kinase and by Aurora kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, Axin over-expression altered the subcellular distribution of Plk1 and of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3{beta}) without producing any notable changes in cellular phenotype. In the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor, Axin over-expression induced the formation of cleavage furrow-like structures and of prominent astral microtubules lacking midbody formation in a subset of cells. Our results suggest that Axin modulates distribution of Axin-associated proteins such as Plk1 and GSK3{beta} in an expression level-dependent manner and these interactions affect the mitotic process, including cytokinesis under certain conditions, such as in the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor.

  19. Prospects & Overviews Meiotic versus mitotic recombination

    E-print Network

    Sekelsky, Jeff

    Prospects & Overviews Meiotic versus mitotic recombination: Two different routes for double. However, most non-crossover (NCO) recombinants generated during S. cerevisiae meiosis do not arise via for recombinational repair of DSBs that occur in mitotically- proliferating cells and that the synthesis

  20. The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) as a key orchestrator of orderly mitotic exit and cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Mayumi; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular network of orderly mitotic exit to re-establish a functional interphase nucleus is critical because disordered mitotic exit inevitably leads to genomic instability. In contrast to the mechanisms of the entrance to mitosis, however, little is known about what controls the orderly exit from mitosis, particularly in mammalian cells. The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which is composed of Aurora B, INCENP, Borealin and Survivin, is one of the most widely studied and highly conserved hetero-tetrameric complexes. The CPC orchestrates proper chromosome segregation with cytokinesis by targeting to specific locations at different stages of mitosis. Recent studies reveal that controlling CPC localization and Aurora B kinase activity also serves as a key surveillance mechanism for the orderly mitotic exit. This ensures the reformation of a functional interphase nucleus from condensed mitotic chromosomes by delaying mitotic exit and cytokinetic processes in response to defects in chromosome segregation. In this review, we will summarize the latest insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate CPC localization during mitotic exit and discuss how targeting Aurora B activity to different locations at different times impacts executing multiple mitotic exit events in order and recently proposed surveillance mechanisms. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential implication of deregulated Aurora B in inducing genomic damage and tumorigenesis with current efforts in targeting Aurora B activity for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25798441

  1. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein-protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  2. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein–protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  3. Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zebrowski, David C; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Wu, Chi-Chung; Piatkowski, Tanja; Becker, Robert; Leone, Marina; Hirth, Sofia; Ricciardi, Filomena; Falk, Nathalie; Giessl, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Braun, Thomas; Weidinger, Gilbert; Engel, Felix B

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart. PMID:26247711

  4. Animate shape features influence high-level animate categorization.

    PubMed

    Alaoui Soce, Abla; Long, Bria; Alvarez, George

    2015-09-01

    The distinction between animate and inanimate entities is fundamental at both the cognitive and neural levels (e.g. Mahon and Caramazza, 2009; Konkle & Caramazza, 2013). Previous work suggests that animate versus inanimate entities have consistent perceptual differences that can be extracted at early stages of perceptual processing (Long et al., in prep). Do these visual features feed-forward to activate high-level, conceptual representations? In Experiment 1, we developed a flanker interference task in which recognizable images of animals and objects influenced reaction time on a word categorization task. In Experiment 2, we used the same paradigm with textures that were unrecognizable at the basic-category level, but which preserved statistical features of the original images (by coercing white noise to match the low and mid-level statistics of animal and object images, Freeman & Simoncelli, 2011). On each trial, participants categorized a written word (e.g., 'FERRET') as either an 'animal' or an 'object'. Words were presented concurrently with a distractor image that was either congruent (e.g., a picture of a panda) or incongruent (e.g., a picture of a tractor) with the broad category of the word. With recognizable images (Experiment 1), participants were faster at categorizing the words as animal or object when the distractor image belonged to the same (versus the different) category (Congruent=735.33ms, Incongruent=762.14ms, F(1,15)=41.539, p< 0.001). With texture images (Experiment 2), participants were again significantly faster at categorizing words when the textures were from images that originally belonged to the same broad category (Congruent=728.76ms, Incongruent=744.12ms, F(1,15)=22.010, p< 0.001). The textures were unrecognizable at the basic level (average identifiability=3.5%), but with unlimited viewing time they could be classified as animate versus inanimate (d prime=1.01). These results suggest that animate versus inanimate entities differ in perceptual features, and that these features feed-forward to automatically activate the conceptual representations of animate and inanimate entities. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326847

  5. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-11-01

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. PMID:26310442

  6. High-Throughput Quantification of Phenotype Heterogeneity Using Statistical Features

    PubMed Central

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Tanougast, Camel

    2015-01-01

    Statistical features are widely used in radiology for tumor heterogeneity assessment using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique. In this paper, feature selection based on decision tree is examined to determine the relevant subset of glioblastoma (GBM) phenotypes in the statistical domain. To discriminate between active tumor (vAT) and edema/invasion (vE) phenotype, we selected the significant features using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with p value < 0.01. Then, we implemented the decision tree to define the optimal subset features of phenotype classifier. Naïve Bayes (NB), support vector machine (SVM), and decision tree (DT) classifier were considered to evaluate the performance of the feature based scheme in terms of its capability to discriminate vAT from vE. Whole nine features were statistically significant to classify the vAT from vE with p value < 0.01. Feature selection based on decision tree showed the best performance by the comparative study using full feature set. The feature selected showed that the two features Kurtosis and Skewness achieved a highest range value of 58.33–75.00% accuracy classifier and 73.88–92.50% AUC. This study demonstrated the ability of statistical features to provide a quantitative, individualized measurement of glioblastoma patient and assess the phenotype progression. PMID:26640485

  7. Radar-anomalous, high-altitude features on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, Duane O.; Butler, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    Over nearly all of the surface of Venus the reflectivity and emissivity at centimeter wavelengths are about 0.15 and 0.85 respectively. These values are consistent with moderately dense soils and rock populations, but the mean reflectivity is about a factor of 2 greater than that for the Moon and other terrestrial planets. Pettingill and Ford, using Pioneer Venus reflectivities and emissivities, found a number of anomalous features on Venus that showed much higher reflectivities and much lower emissivities with both values approaching 0.5. These include Maxwell Montes, a number of high regions in Aphrodite Terra and Beta Regio, and several isolated mountain peaks. Most of the features are at altitudes above the mean radius by 2 to 3 km or more. However, such features have been found in the Magellan data at low altitudes and the anomalies do not exist on all high structures, Maat Mons being the most outstanding example. A number of papers have been written that attempt to explain the phenomena in terms of the geochemistry balance of weathering effects on likely surface minerals. The geochemists have shown that the fundamentally basaltic surface would be stable at the temperatures and pressures of the mean radius in the form of magnetite, but would evolve to pyrite and/or pyrrhotite in the presence of sulfur-bearing compounds such as SO2. Pyrite will be stable at altitudes above 4 or 5 km on Venus. Although the geochemical arguments are rather compelling, it is vitally important to rationally look at other explanations for radar and radio emission measurements such as that presented by Tryka and Muhleman. The radar reflectivity values are retrieved from the raw Magellan backscatter measurements by fitting the Hagfors' radar scattering model in which a surface roughness parameters and a normal incidence electrical reflectivity are estimated. The assumptions of the theory behind the model must be considered carefully before the results can be believed. These include that the surface roughness exists only at horizontal scales large compared to the wavelength, the vertical deviations are gaussianly distributed, there is no shadowing, and that the reflection occurs at the interface of two homogeneous dielectric half-spaces. Probably all these conditions are violated at the anomalous features under discussion. The most important of these is the homogeneity of the near surface of Venus, particularly in highlands. Under the assumptions of the theory, all of the radio energy is reflected by the impedance jump at the very boundary. However, in heterogeneous soil some fraction of the illuminating energy is propagated into the soil and then scattered back out by impedance discontinuities such as rock, voids, and cracks. In light soils, the latter effect can overwhelm the scattering effects of the true surface and greatly enhance the backscatter power, suggesting a much higher value of an effective dielectric constant that would be estimated from Hagfors' model.

  8. Meiotic and Mitotic Recombination in Meiosis Kathryn P. Kohl* and Jeff Sekelsky*,,,1

    E-print Network

    Sekelsky, Jeff

    REVIEW Meiotic and Mitotic Recombination in Meiosis Kathryn P. Kohl* and Jeff Sekelsky*,,,1 evolved to incorporate special features unique to meiosis. MEIOSIS is essential to maintaining the proper replication with two rounds of cellular division, meiosis effectively halves the chromosome content

  9. Control of cell polarity and mitotic spindle positioning in animal cells

    E-print Network

    Ahringe, Julie

    Control of cell polarity and mitotic spindle positioning in animal cells Julie Ahringer Cell polarity is an essential feature of many animal cells. It is critical for epithelial formation and function the establishment of polarity and subsequent spindle positioning in many animal cells. Microtubules and conserved

  10. Toward a systems-level view of mitotic checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-03-01

    Reproduction and natural selection are the key elements of life. In order to reproduce, the genetic material must be doubled, separated and placed into two new daughter cells, each containing a complete set of chromosomes and organelles. In mitosis, transition from one process to the next is guided by intricate surveillance mechanisms, known as the mitotic checkpoints. Dis-regulation of cell division through checkpoint malfunction can lead to developmental defects and contribute to the development or progression of tumors. This review approaches two important mitotic checkpoints, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). The highly conserved spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) controls the onset of anaphase by preventing premature segregation of the sister chromatids of the duplicated genome, to the spindle poles. In contrast, the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensures that during asymmetric cell division mitotic exit does not occur until the spindle is properly aligned with the cell polarity axis. Although there are no known homologs, there is indication that functionally similar checkpoints exist also in animal cells. This review can be regarded as an "executable model", which could be easily translated into various quantitative concrete models like Petri nets, ODEs, PDEs, or stochastic particle simulations. It can also function as a base for developing quantitative models explaining the interplay of the various components and proteins controlling mitosis. PMID:25722206

  11. Mitotic toxicity, sister chromatid exchange, and rec assay of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, K; Yamaguchi, Y; Endo, G

    1992-07-01

    Genotoxicity of 10 pesticides (chlornitrofen, chlomethoxyfen, molinate, thiobencarb, simazine, simetryn, diazinon, iprofenfos, piperofos and oxadiazone) was studied by mitotic toxicity, sister chromatid exchange, and rec assay. The pesticides are detected frequently at high levels in the Yodo River water in Osaka, Japan, which is used for drinking water by thirteen million people. Mitotic toxicity was evaluated by mitotic index (MI) and second mitosis index (SI), using a Chinese hamster cell line V79. SI is the rate of twice divided metaphases in chromosome preparation for sister chromatid exchange. All the pesticides decreased the two indices dose-dependently. MI50 and SI50, the concentrations of pesticides which lowered the indices to 50% of the solvent control, was determined. The MI50 and SI50 of each pesticide were very similar, and the pesticides did not hinder cell division specifically. None of the pesticides induced more sister chromatid exchanges than 1.5 times the solvent control. Chlomethoxyfen and simazine induced sister chromatid exchanges significantly in V79 cells, but the dose dependencies were poor. Simetryn had rec effect and was concluded to have DNA damaging activity. PMID:1637192

  12. Nonnegative Mixed-Norm Convex Optimization for Mitotic Cell Detection in Phase Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Tong; Gao, Zan; Su, Yuting; Yang, Zhaoxuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonnegative mix-norm convex optimization method for mitotic cell detection. First, we apply an imaging model-based microscopy image segmentation method that exploits phase contrast optics to extract mitotic candidates in the input images. Then, a convex objective function regularized by mix-norm with nonnegative constraint is proposed to induce sparsity and consistence for discriminative representation of deformable objects in a sparse representation scheme. At last, a Support Vector Machine classifier is utilized for mitotic cell modeling and detection. This method can overcome the difficulty in feature formulation for deformable objects and is independent of tracking or temporal inference model. The comparison experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can produce competing results with the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:24348733

  13. Regulatory mechanisms that control mitotic kinesins.

    PubMed

    Yount, Amber L; Zong, Hailing; Walczak, Claire E

    2015-05-15

    During mitosis, the mitotic spindle is assembled to align chromosomes at the spindle equator in metaphase, and to separate the genetic material equally to daughter cells in anaphase. The spindle itself is a macromolecular machine composed of an array of dynamic microtubules and associated proteins that coordinate the diverse events of mitosis. Among the microtubule associated proteins are a plethora of molecular motor proteins that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to force production. These motors, including members of the kinesin superfamily, must function at the right time and in the right place to insure the fidelity of mitosis. Misregulation of mitotic motors in disease states, such as cancer, underlies their potential utility as targets for antitumor drug development and highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms for regulating their function. Here, we focus on recent progress about regulatory mechanisms that control the proper function of mitotic kinesins and highlight new findings that lay the path for future studies. PMID:25576382

  14. Mechanisms of mitotic cell death induced by chemotherapy-mediated G2 checkpoint abrogation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Celia; Hager, Christian; Bastians, Holger

    2007-01-01

    The novel concept of anticancer treatment termed "G(2) checkpoint abrogation" aims to target p53-deficient tumor cells and is currently explored in clinical trials. The anticancer drug UCN-01 is used to abrogate a DNA damage-induced G(2) cell cycle arrest leading to mitotic entry and subsequent cell death, which is poorly defined as "mitotic cell death" or "mitotic catastrophe." We show here that UCN-01 treatment results in a mitotic arrest that requires an active mitotic spindle checkpoint, involving the function of Mad2, Bub1, BubR1, Mps1, Aurora B, and survivin. During the mitotic arrest, hallmark parameters of the mitochondria-associated apoptosis pathway become activated. Interestingly, this apoptotic response requires the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2, suggesting a proapoptotic function for Mad2. However, although survivin and Aurora B are also required for the mitotic arrest, both proteins are part of an antiapoptotic pathway that restrains the UCN-01-induced apoptosis by promoting hyperphosphorylation of Bcl-2 and by inhibiting the activation of Bax. Consequently, inhibition of the antiapoptotic pathway by genetic ablation of survivin or by pharmacologic inhibitors of Aurora B or cyclin-dependent kinase 1 lead to a significant enhancement of apoptosis and therefore act synergistically with UCN-01. Thus, by defining the mechanism of cell death on G(2) checkpoint abrogation we show a highly improved strategy for an anticancer treatment by the combined use of UCN-01 with abrogators of the survivin/Aurora B-dependent antiapoptotic pathway that retains the selectivity for p53-defective cancer cells. PMID:17210716

  15. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  16. Evidence of Selection against Complex Mitotic-Origin Aneuploidy during Preimplantation Development

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Rajiv C.; Demko, Zachary P.; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-chromosome imbalances affect over half of early human embryos and are the leading cause of pregnancy loss. While these errors frequently arise in oocyte meiosis, many such whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting cleavage-stage embryos are the result of chromosome missegregation occurring during the initial mitotic cell divisions. The first wave of zygotic genome activation at the 4–8 cell stage results in the arrest of a large proportion of embryos, the vast majority of which contain whole-chromosome abnormalities. Thus, the full spectrum of meiotic and mitotic errors can only be detected by sampling after the initial cell divisions, but prior to this selective filter. Here, we apply 24-chromosome preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) to 28,052 single-cell day-3 blastomere biopsies and 18,387 multi-cell day-5 trophectoderm biopsies from 6,366 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. We precisely characterize the rates and patterns of whole-chromosome abnormalities at each developmental stage and distinguish errors of meiotic and mitotic origin without embryo disaggregation, based on informative chromosomal signatures. We show that mitotic errors frequently involve multiple chromosome losses that are not biased toward maternal or paternal homologs. This outcome is characteristic of spindle abnormalities and chaotic cell division detected in previous studies. In contrast to meiotic errors, our data also show that mitotic errors are not significantly associated with maternal age. PGS patients referred due to previous IVF failure had elevated rates of mitotic error, while patients referred due to recurrent pregnancy loss had elevated rates of meiotic error, controlling for maternal age. These results support the conclusion that mitotic error is the predominant mechanism contributing to pregnancy losses occurring prior to blastocyst formation. This high-resolution view of the full spectrum of whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting early embryos provides insight into the cytogenetic mechanisms underlying their formation and the consequences for human fertility. PMID:26491874

  17. Evidence of Selection against Complex Mitotic-Origin Aneuploidy during Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Rajiv C; Demko, Zachary P; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2015-10-01

    Whole-chromosome imbalances affect over half of early human embryos and are the leading cause of pregnancy loss. While these errors frequently arise in oocyte meiosis, many such whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting cleavage-stage embryos are the result of chromosome missegregation occurring during the initial mitotic cell divisions. The first wave of zygotic genome activation at the 4-8 cell stage results in the arrest of a large proportion of embryos, the vast majority of which contain whole-chromosome abnormalities. Thus, the full spectrum of meiotic and mitotic errors can only be detected by sampling after the initial cell divisions, but prior to this selective filter. Here, we apply 24-chromosome preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) to 28,052 single-cell day-3 blastomere biopsies and 18,387 multi-cell day-5 trophectoderm biopsies from 6,366 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. We precisely characterize the rates and patterns of whole-chromosome abnormalities at each developmental stage and distinguish errors of meiotic and mitotic origin without embryo disaggregation, based on informative chromosomal signatures. We show that mitotic errors frequently involve multiple chromosome losses that are not biased toward maternal or paternal homologs. This outcome is characteristic of spindle abnormalities and chaotic cell division detected in previous studies. In contrast to meiotic errors, our data also show that mitotic errors are not significantly associated with maternal age. PGS patients referred due to previous IVF failure had elevated rates of mitotic error, while patients referred due to recurrent pregnancy loss had elevated rates of meiotic error, controlling for maternal age. These results support the conclusion that mitotic error is the predominant mechanism contributing to pregnancy losses occurring prior to blastocyst formation. This high-resolution view of the full spectrum of whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting early embryos provides insight into the cytogenetic mechanisms underlying their formation and the consequences for human fertility. PMID:26491874

  18. Mitotic Stress and Chromosomal Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common motif in human cancer, and multiple therapeutic strategies are aimed to prevent tumor cell proliferation. Whereas most current therapies are designed to arrest cell cycle progression either in G1/S or in mitosis, new proposals include targeting the intrinsic chromosomal instability (CIN, an increased rate of gain or losses of chromosomes during cell division) or aneuploidy (a genomic composition that differs from diploid) that many tumor cells display. Why tumors cells are chromosomally unstable or aneuploid and what are the consequences of these alterations are not completely clear at present. Several mitotic regulators are overexpressed as a consequence of oncogenic alterations, and they are likely to alter the proper regulation of chromosome segregation in cancer cells. In this review, we propose the relevance of TPX2, a mitotic regulator involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, in oncogene-induced mitotic stress. This protein, as well as its partner Aurora-A, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and its deregulation may participate not only in chromosome numeric aberrations but also in other forms of genomic instability in cancer cells. PMID:23634259

  19. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Arun T Pores; Andrabi, Shaida; Cizmecioglu, Onur; Zhu, Cailei; Livingston, David M.; Higgins, Jonathan M.G; Schaffhausen, Brian S; Roberts, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST-expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, resulting in the activation of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC). Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed that, PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  20. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Pores Fernando, A T; Andrabi, S; Cizmecioglu, O; Zhu, C; Livingston, D M; Higgins, J M G; Schaffhausen, B S; Roberts, T M

    2015-05-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, thereby resulting in the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed, that PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  1. Alzheimer A? disrupts the mitotic spindle and directly inhibits mitotic microtubule motors

    PubMed Central

    Borysov, Sergiy I; Granic, Antoneta; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Walczak, Claire E

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy are greatly induced in Alzheimer disease and models thereof by mutant forms of the APP and PS proteins and by their product, the A? peptide. Here we employ human somatic cells and Xenopus egg extracts to show that A? impairs the assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. Mechanistically, these defects result from A?'s inhibition of mitotic motor kinesins, including Eg5, KIF4A and MCAK. In vitro studies show that oligomeric A? directly inhibits recombinant MCAK by a noncompetitive mechanism. In contrast, inhibition of Eg5 and KIF4A is competitive with respect to both ATP and microtubules, indicating that A? interferes with their interactions with the microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Consistently, increased levels of polymerized microtubules or of the microtubule stabilizing protein Tau significantly decrease the inhibitory effect of A? on Eg5 and KIF4A. Together, these results indicate that by disrupting the interaction between specific kinesins and microtubules and by exerting a direct inhibitory effect on the motor activity, excess A? deregulates the mechanical forces that govern the spindle and thereby leads to the generation of defective mitotic structures. The resulting defect in neurogenesis can account for the over 30% aneuploid/hyperploid, degeneration-prone neurons observed in Alzheimer disease brain. The finding of mitotic motors including Eg5 in mature post-mitotic neurons implies that their inhibition by A? may also disrupt neuronal function and plasticity. PMID:21566458

  2. Imaging the mitotic spindle by spinning disk microscopy in tobacco suspension cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takashi; Baskin, Tobias I

    2014-01-01

    Plants are valuable systems for analyzing the acentriolar mitotic spindle. We have developed methods for imaging the mitotic spindle in living tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension culture cells expressing GFP-?-tubulin. The methods allow the spindle to be observed in living cells at high spatial and temporal resolution and rely on water immersion objectives, spinning disk optics, and high-sensitivity cameras. Here, we describe these methods and provide step-by-step protocols for certain key steps. We also describe a method for application and removal of inhibitors. PMID:24633793

  3. Optical detection of random features for high security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haist, T.; Tiziani, H. J.

    1998-02-01

    Optical detection of random features in combination with digital signatures based on public key codes in order to recognize counterfeit objects will be discussed. Without applying expensive production techniques objects are protected against counterfeiting. Verification is done off-line by optical means without a central authority. The method is applied for protecting banknotes. Experimental results for this application are presented. The method is also applicable for identity verification of a credit- or chip-card holder.

  4. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe by disrupting centrosome regulation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Yuki; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3?) has been investigated as a therapeutic target for numerous human diseases including cancer because of their diverse cellular functions. Although GSK-3? inhibitors have been investigated as anticancer reagents, precise biological mechanisms remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of GSK-3? inhibitors on cancer cell lines and observed centrosome dysregulation which resulted in abnormal mitosis. Mitotic checkpoints sensed the mitotic abnormalities and induced apoptosis. For cells that were inherently resistant to apoptosis, cell death distinct from apoptosis was induced. After GSK-3? inhibitor treatment, these cells exhibited characteristic features of mitotic catastrophe, including distended and multivesiculated nuclei and inappropriate reductions in cyclin B1 expression. This suggested that mitotic catastrophe was an alternative mechanism in cells resistant to apoptosis. Although the role of GSK-3? in centrosomes has not yet been clarified, phosphorylated GSK-3? was localised in centrosomes. From these data, GSK-3? seems to regulate centrosome function. Thus, we propose that centrosome dysregulation is an important mechanism for the anticancer effects of GSK-3? inhibitors and that mitotic catastrophe serves as a safe-guard system to remove cells with any mitotic abnormalities induced by GSK-3? inhibition. PMID:26292722

  5. AN EVALUATION OF FEATURE LEARNING METHODS FOR HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGE CLASSIFICATION

    E-print Network

    Schindler, Konrad

    AN EVALUATION OF FEATURE LEARNING METHODS FOR HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGE CLASSIFICATION P. Tokarczyk*, J concentrate on the features. Several methods are evaluated which allow one to learn suitable features from unlabelled image data by analysing the image statistics. In a comparative study, we evaluate unsupervised

  6. Emission features in the spectrum of NGC 7027 near 3. 3 microns at very high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.P.; Moorhead, J.M.; Wehlau, W.H.; Maillard, J.P. CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris )

    1991-02-01

    A very high resolution spectrum is presented of the planetary nebula NGC 7027 over a 200/cm interval centered at 2950/cm, and the features found are described: (1) nebular continuum, (2) atomic recombination lines of H and He II, and (3) three broader emission features of uncertain origin. For the latter the first evidence is presented that the 3.46 micron feature and possibly the 3.40 micron feature are resolvable into a sequence of narrower features. The interpretation of the broader features is discussed in terms of the hypothesis of identification with emission by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 18 refs.

  7. Dietary flavonoid fisetin induces a forced exit from mitosis by targeting the mitotic spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Varis, Asta; Kukkonen, Anu M.; Toivonen, Pauliina; Halonen, Pasi K.; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Kallio, Marko J.

    2009-01-01

    Fisetin is a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits and wine at 2–160 ?g/g concentrations and an ingredient in nutritional supplements with much higher concentrations. The compound has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects as well as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity via its ability to act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation and free radical scavenger, respectively. Our cell-based high-throughput screen for small molecules that override chemically induced mitotic arrest identified fisetin as an antimitotic compound. Fisetin rapidly compromised microtubule drug-induced mitotic block in a proteasome-dependent manner in several human cell lines. Moreover, in unperturbed human cancer cells fisetin caused premature initiation of chromosome segregation and exit from mitosis without normal cytokinesis. To understand the molecular mechanism behind these mitotic errors, we analyzed the consequences of fisetin treatment on the localization and phoshorylation of several mitotic proteins. Aurora B, Bub1, BubR1 and Cenp-F rapidly lost their kinetochore/centromere localization and others became dephosphorylated upon addition of fisetin to the culture medium. Finally, we identified Aurora B kinase as a novel direct target of fisetin. The activity of Aurora B was significantly reduced by fisetin in vitro and in cells, an effect that can explain the observed forced mitotic exit, failure of cytokinesis and decreased cell viability. In conclusion, our data propose that fisetin perturbs spindle checkpoint signaling, which may contribute to the antiproliferative effects of the compound. PMID:19395653

  8. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  9. Concentrating on the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Paul S; Ladouceur, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-31

    In eukaryotes, the microtubule-based spindle drives chromosome segregation. In this issue, Schweizer et al. (2015; J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506107) find that the spindle area is demarcated by a semipermeable organelle barrier. Molecular crowding, which is microtubule independent, causes the enrichment and/or retention of crucial factors in the spindle region. Their results add an important new feature to the models of how this structure assembles and is regulated. PMID:26323687

  10. Feature correlation hypergraph: exploiting high-order potentials for multimodal recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Gao, Yue; Hong, Chaoqun; Feng, Yinfu; Zhu, Jianke; Cai, Deng

    2014-08-01

    In computer vision and multimedia analysis, it is common to use multiple features (or multimodal features) to represent an object. For example, to well characterize a natural scene image, we typically extract a set of visual features to represent its color, texture, and shape. However, it is challenging to integrate multimodal features optimally. Since they are usually high-order correlated, e.g., the histogram of gradient (HOG), bag of scale invariant feature transform descriptors, and wavelets are closely related because they collaboratively reflect the image texture. Nevertheless, the existing algorithms fail to capture the high-order correlation among multimodal features. To solve this problem, we present a new multimodal feature integration framework. Particularly, we first define a new measure to capture the high-order correlation among the multimodal features, which can be deemed as a direct extension of the previous binary correlation. Therefore, we construct a feature correlation hypergraph (FCH) to model the high-order relations among multimodal features. Finally, a clustering algorithm is performed on FCH to group the original multimodal features into a set of partitions. Moreover, a multiclass boosting strategy is developed to obtain a strong classifier by combining the weak classifiers learned from each partition. The experimental results on seven popular datasets show the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:24184790

  11. Unbiased feature selection in learning random forests for high-dimensional data.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Huang, Joshua Zhexue; Nguyen, Thuy Thi

    2015-01-01

    Random forests (RFs) have been widely used as a powerful classification method. However, with the randomization in both bagging samples and feature selection, the trees in the forest tend to select uninformative features for node splitting. This makes RFs have poor accuracy when working with high-dimensional data. Besides that, RFs have bias in the feature selection process where multivalued features are favored. Aiming at debiasing feature selection in RFs, we propose a new RF algorithm, called xRF, to select good features in learning RFs for high-dimensional data. We first remove the uninformative features using p-value assessment, and the subset of unbiased features is then selected based on some statistical measures. This feature subset is then partitioned into two subsets. A feature weighting sampling technique is used to sample features from these two subsets for building trees. This approach enables one to generate more accurate trees, while allowing one to reduce dimensionality and the amount of data needed for learning RFs. An extensive set of experiments has been conducted on 47 high-dimensional real-world datasets including image datasets. The experimental results have shown that RFs with the proposed approach outperformed the existing random forests in increasing the accuracy and the AUC measures. PMID:25879059

  12. Unbiased Feature Selection in Learning Random Forests for High-Dimensional Data

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Huang, Joshua Zhexue; Nguyen, Thuy Thi

    2015-01-01

    Random forests (RFs) have been widely used as a powerful classification method. However, with the randomization in both bagging samples and feature selection, the trees in the forest tend to select uninformative features for node splitting. This makes RFs have poor accuracy when working with high-dimensional data. Besides that, RFs have bias in the feature selection process where multivalued features are favored. Aiming at debiasing feature selection in RFs, we propose a new RF algorithm, called xRF, to select good features in learning RFs for high-dimensional data. We first remove the uninformative features using p-value assessment, and the subset of unbiased features is then selected based on some statistical measures. This feature subset is then partitioned into two subsets. A feature weighting sampling technique is used to sample features from these two subsets for building trees. This approach enables one to generate more accurate trees, while allowing one to reduce dimensionality and the amount of data needed for learning RFs. An extensive set of experiments has been conducted on 47 high-dimensional real-world datasets including image datasets. The experimental results have shown that RFs with the proposed approach outperformed the existing random forests in increasing the accuracy and the AUC measures. PMID:25879059

  13. Automatic microscopy for mitotic cell location.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, J.; Ranshaw, R.; Castle, J.; Wald, N.

    1972-01-01

    Advances are reported in the development of an automatic microscope with which to locate hematologic or other cells in mitosis for subsequent chromosome analysis. The system under development is designed to perform the functions of: slide scanning to locate metaphase cells; conversion of images of selected cells into binary form; and on-line computer analysis of the digitized image for significant cytogenetic data. Cell detection criteria are evaluated using a test sample of 100 mitotic cells and 100 artifacts.

  14. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  15. STEM High School Communities: Common and Differing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofel-Grehl, Colby; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Using observations and interviews, the researchers explore the experiences and perspectives of students, teachers, and administrators at six specialized high schools with a focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) as they pertain to the practices and structures affecting student outcomes. Four themes were found to be…

  16. Highly featured amorphous silicon nanorod arrays for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani-Amiri, Samaneh; Safiabadi Tali, Seied Ali; Azimi, Soheil; Sanaee, Zeinab; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin

    2014-11-10

    High aspect-ratio vertical structures of amorphous silicon have been realized using hydrogen-assisted low-density plasma reactive ion etching. Amorphous silicon layers with the thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 10??m were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Standard photolithography and nanosphere colloidal lithography were employed to realize ultra-small features of the amorphous silicon. The performance of the patterned amorphous silicon structures as a lithium-ion battery electrode was investigated using galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The patterned structures showed a superior Li-ion battery performance compared to planar amorphous silicon. Such structures are suitable for high current Li-ion battery applications such as electric vehicles.

  17. Unusual features in high statistics radar meteor studies at EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, Noah; Häggström, Ingemar; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Westman, Assar

    2010-01-01

    We describe results of an experiment conducted with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radars during three 8-h runs on consecutive nights in 2008 December aiming to detect and study the high-altitude meteor population along with the meteors detected at classical ~100-km altitudes. The experiment used coaxial ultra-high-frequency (UHF) and very high-frequency (VHF) radar beams pointed vertically to the zenith of Ramfjordmoen near Tromsø (Norway), and remote UHF receivers at Kiruna (Sweden) and Sodankylä (Finland) for tristatic observations of a very limited volume at an altitude of 170 km above the transmitter site. The EISCAT VHF radar detected during the 24-h period 22698 echoes identified as meteors. The number of UHF echoes in the same period was 2138, most detected also at VHF. Among the VHF meteors, 11 were detected at altitudes higher than 150 km. Of these, the record highest meteor was at 246.9 km. No high-altitude UHF echoes were detected, none was tristatic, and no echoes with a Doppler velocity above ~60 km s-1 were identified. Given the large number of echoes, which argues in favour of a highly significant characterization of the meteoroid population, we discuss the statistical properties of the detections and their possible physical nature. The average detection rate of VHF radar meteors was about 16 min-1. Comparing this high rate with that of the faintest optically detected meteors indicates that the radar detections originate from a meteoroid population that could be as optically faint as 13-14 mag. We did not observe a marked enhancement of the rates at the peak of the Geminid shower, confirming once again the proposal that most faint meteors, be these radar or optical, belong to the sporadic population and not to a specific shower. For a few meteors, our data show definite deceleration and possible fragmentation. A simple calculation indicates that one of the detected meteoroids was a submillimetre body that fragmented when the ram pressure reached about 0.5 pascal. This is much lower than the pressure that fragments brighter cometary meteors, which is at least two orders of magnitude higher.

  18. Optimal Feature Selection in High-Dimensional Discriminant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Mladen; Liu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We consider the high-dimensional discriminant analysis problem. For this problem, different methods have been proposed and justified by establishing exact convergence rates for the classification risk, as well as the ?2 convergence results to the discriminative rule. However, sharp theoretical analysis for the variable selection performance of these procedures have not been established, even though model interpretation is of fundamental importance in scientific data analysis. This paper bridges the gap by providing sharp sufficient conditions for consistent variable selection using the sparse discriminant analysis (Mai et al., 2012). Through careful analysis, we establish rates of convergence that are significantly faster than the best known results and admit an optimal scaling of the sample size n, dimensionality p, and sparsity level s in the high-dimensional setting. Sufficient conditions are complemented by the necessary information theoretic limits on the variable selection problem in the context of high-dimensional discriminant analysis. Exploiting a numerical equivalence result, our method also establish the optimal results for the ROAD estimator (Fan et al., 2012) and the sparse optimal scaling estimator (Clemmensen et al., 2011). Furthermore, we analyze an exhaustive search procedure, whose performance serves as a benchmark, and show that it is variable selection consistent under weaker conditions. Extensive simulations demonstrating the sharpness of the bounds are also provided. PMID:25620807

  19. Microtubule-dependent regulation of mitotic protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ling; Craney, Allison; Rape, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Accurate cell division depends on tightly regulated ubiquitylation events catalyzed by the anaphase-promoting complex. Among its many substrates, the APC/C triggers the degradation of proteins that stabilize the mitotic spindle, and loss or accumulation of such spindle assembly factors can result in aneuploidy and cancer. Although critical for cell division, it has remained poorly understood how the timing of spindle assembly factor degradation is established during mitosis. Here, we report that active spindle assembly factors are protected from APC/C-dependent degradation by microtubules. In contrast, those molecules that are not bound to microtubules are highly susceptible to proteolysis and turned over immediately after APC/C-activation. The correct timing of spindle assembly factor degradation, as achieved by this regulatory circuit, is required for accurate spindle structure and function. We propose that the localized stabilization of APC/C-substrates provides a mechanism for the selective disposal of cell cycle regulators that have fulfilled their mitotic roles. PMID:24462202

  20. Micalastic high-voltage insulation: Design features and experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, A.

    1981-12-01

    High-quality mica, carefully selected epoxy resins and a well-matched vacuum/pressure impregnation process determine the characteristics of the MICALASTIC insulation for large turbine-generators. Logical development and process manufacturing quality control have led to an insulation system of high quality and operating reliability. The first winding of a turbine-generator being impregnated and cured under vacuum with solvent-free synthetic resin in 1958 was designed for 10.5 kV rated voltage. Ever since, Siemens AG and Kraftwerk Union AG have used this type of insulation for all direct-cooled windings and also for an increasing number of indirect-cooled windings. At present, 240 turbine-generators with a total of more than 115,000 MVA output have been built. Since 1960, this insulation system has been registered for Siemens AG under the trade name MICALASTIC. The stator windings of the largest, single-shaft generators to date, rated 1560 MVA, 27 kV, has been built with MICALASTIC insulation.

  1. Clinical Risk Prediction by Exploring High-Order Feature Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is one important problem in medical informatics, and logistic regression is one of the most widely used approaches for clinical risk prediction. In many cases, the number of potential risk factors is fairly large and the actual set of factors that contribute to the risk is small. Therefore sparse logistic regression is proposed, which can not only predict the clinical risk but also identify the set of relevant risk factors. The inputs of logistic regression and sparse logistic regression are required to be in vector form. This limits the applicability of these models in the problems when the data cannot be naturally represented vectors (e.g., medical images are two-dimensional matrices). To handle the cases when the data are in the form of multi-dimensional arrays, we propose HOSLR: High-Order Sparse Logistic Regression, which can be viewed as a high order extension of sparse logistic regression. Instead of solving one classification vector as in conventional logistic regression, we solve for K classification vectors in HOSLR (K is the number of modes in the data). A block proximal descent approach is proposed to solve the problem and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally we validate the effectiveness of HOSLR on predicting the onset risk of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and heart failure. PMID:25954428

  2. Non-iridescent Transmissive Structural Color Filter Featuring Highly Efficient Transmission and High Excitation Purity

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructure based color filtering has been considered an attractive replacement for current colorant pigmentation in the display technologies, in view of its increased efficiencies, ease of fabrication and eco-friendliness. For such structural filtering, iridescence relevant to its angular dependency, which poses a detrimental barrier to the practical development of high performance display and sensing devices, should be mitigated. We report on a non-iridescent transmissive structural color filter, fabricated in a large area of 76.2 × 25.4?mm2, taking advantage of a stack of three etalon resonators in dielectric films based on a high-index cavity in amorphous silicon. The proposed filter features a high transmission above 80%, a high excitation purity of 0.93 and non-iridescence over a range of 160°, exhibiting no significant change in the center wavelength, dominant wavelength and excitation purity, which implies no change in hue and saturation of the output color. The proposed structure may find its potential applications to large-scale display and imaging sensor systems. PMID:24815530

  3. MELK is an oncogenic kinase essential for mitotic progression in basal-like breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubao; Lee, Young-Mi; Baitsch, Lukas; Huang, Alan; Xiang, Yi; Tong, Haoxuan; Lako, Ana; Von, Thanh; Choi, Christine; Lim, Elgene; Min, Junxia; Li, Li; Stegmeier, Frank; Schlegel, Robert; Eck, Michael J; Gray, Nathanael S; Mitchison, Timothy J; Zhao, Jean J

    2014-01-01

    Despite marked advances in breast cancer therapy, basal-like breast cancer (BBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer usually lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors, remains difficult to treat. In this study, we report the identification of MELK as a novel oncogenic kinase from an in vivo tumorigenesis screen using a kinome-wide open reading frames (ORFs) library. Analysis of clinical data reveals a high level of MELK overexpression in BBC, a feature that is largely dependent on FoxM1, a master mitotic transcription factor that is also found to be highly overexpressed in BBC. Ablation of MELK selectively impairs proliferation of basal-like, but not luminal breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, depletion of MELK in BBC cells induces caspase-dependent cell death, preceded by defective mitosis. Finally, we find that Melk is not required for mouse development and physiology. Together, these data indicate that MELK is a normally non-essential kinase, but is critical for BBC and thus represents a promising selective therapeutic target for the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01763.001 PMID:24844244

  4. A reconfigured pattern of MLL occupancy within mitotic chromatin promotes rapid transcriptional reactivation following mitotic exit

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, Gerd A.; Kadauke, Stephan; Wang, Eric; Lau, Alan W.; Zuber, Johannes; Chou, Margaret M.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) and its metazoan orthologs have been linked with the epigenetic maintenance of transcriptional activity. To identify mechanisms by which MLL might perpetuate active transcription in dividing cells, we investigated its role during M-phase of the cell cycle. Unlike other histone methyltransferases examined, MLL remained globally embedded within condensed mitotic chromosomes. Genome-wide location analysis revealed a rearranged pattern of MLL occupancy in mitosis compared with interphase, characterized by a strong preference for MLL to occupy genes in mitosis possessing the highest levels of interphase transcription. Knockdown experiments revealed that MLL is required for rapid post-mitotic reactivation of its mitotic target genes, suggesting a bookmarking function. MLL tethers Menin, RbBP5, and ASH2L to genes during mitosis, but is dispensable for preserving H3K4 methylation. These findings implicate mitotic retention as a novel component of MLL-based gene regulation which may facilitate inheritance of active gene expression states during cell division. PMID:20064463

  5. DEPDC1 is a novel cell cycle related gene that regulates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yan; Zhang, Chundong; Bu, Youquan; Zhang, Ying; He, Longxia; Li, Hongxia; Zhu, Huifang; Li, Yi; Lei, Yunlong; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    DEPDC1 is a recently identified novel tumor-related gene that is upregulated in several types of cancer and contributes to tumorigenesis. In this study, we have investigated the expression pattern and functional implications of DEPDC1 during cell cycle progression. Expression studies using synchronized cells demonstrated that DEPDC1 is highly expressed in the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Immunofluorescence assays showed that DEPDC1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus during interphase and is redistributed into the whole cell upon nuclear membrane breakdown in metaphase. Subsequently, siRNA-mediated knockdown of DEPDC1 caused a significant mitotic arrest. Moreover, knockdown of DEPDC1 resulted in remarkable mitotic defects such as abnormal multiple nuclei and multipolar spindle structures accompanied by the upregulation of the A20 gene as well as several cell cycle-related genes such as CCNB1 and CCNB2. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that this novel cancerous gene, DEPDC1, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of proper mitotic progression. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 413-418] PMID:25902835

  6. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku; Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku ; Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu; Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina; Jaakkola, Kimmo; Maeki-Jouppila, Jenni; Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku; Drug Discovery Graduate School, University of Turku ; Kallio, Lila; Kallio, Marko J.; Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku; Centre of Excellence for Translational Genome-Scale Biology, P.O. Box 106, Academy of Finland

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3 Prime ,5-dihydroxy-4 Prime ,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  7. Pioneering barren land: mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro

    2013-02-25

    Genome condensation during mitosis presents a chromatin landscape largely inaccessible to RNA polymerase II and most transcription factors. Caravaca et al. (2013) now report in Genes and Development that the pioneer transcription factor FOXA1 is retained at mitotic chromosomes, bookmarking the genome to enable gene expression reestablishment upon mitotic exit. PMID:23449470

  8. Comparison of the predictive power of beef surface wavelet texture features at high and low magnification.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Patrick; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Beef longissimus dorsi surface texture is an indicator used in predicting beef palatability by expert graders. Computer vision systems have previously used imaging at normal view to develop surface texture features with some success. Good models of beef overall acceptability using imaging at high magnification have been recently developed. As a comparison the same surface texture features were computed from the corresponding images at normal view and used to model overall acceptability. Both sets of texture features were also combined with muscle colour and marbling features and used to model overall acceptability. Models using texture features alone were more successful at normal modality. However colour and marbling features combined much better with texture features at high modality to yield the most accurate model of overall acceptability (r(2)=0.93). Accurate Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) models were computed at both modalities with and without inclusion of colour and marbling features. Addition of squared terms to the models failed to improve accuracy. PMID:20416713

  9. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    PubMed Central

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10?10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10?6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10?5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10?3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  10. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic positioning

    E-print Network

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. Proper position in the single-cell embryo of Caenorhabditis elegans is achieved initially by the migration and rotation of the pronuclear complex (PNC) and its two associated centrosomal arrays of microtubules (MTs). We present here the first systematic theoretical study of how these $O(1000)$ centrosomal microtubules (MTs) interact through the immersing cytoplasm, the cell periphery and PNC, and with each other, to achieve proper position. This study is made possible through our development of a highly efficient and parallelized computational framework that accounts explicitly for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) between the MTs, while also capturing their flexibility, dynamic instability, and interactions with molecular motors and boundaries. First, we show through direct simulation that previous estimates of the PNC drag coefficient, based on either ignoring or ...

  11. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating mitotic clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Merkestein, Myrte; Laber, Samantha; McMurray, Fiona; Andrew, Daniel; Sachse, Gregor; Sanderson, Jeremy; Li, Mengdi; Usher, Samuel; Sellayah, Dyan; Ashcroft, Frances M; Cox, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene plays a pivotal role in regulating body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that primary adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FTO overexpression (FTO-4) mice exhibit increased potential for adipogenic differentiation, while MEFs derived from FTO knockout (FTO-KO) mice show reduced adipogenesis. As predicted from these findings, fat pads from FTO-4 mice fed a high-fat diet show more numerous adipocytes. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion. The effect of FTO on adipogenesis appears to be mediated via enhanced expression of the pro-adipogenic short isoform of RUNX1T1, which enhanced adipocyte proliferation, and is increased in FTO-4 MEFs and reduced in FTO-KO MEFs. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insight into how upregulation of FTO leads to obesity. PMID:25881961

  12. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating mitotic clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Merkestein, Myrte; Laber, Samantha; McMurray, Fiona; Andrew, Daniel; Sachse, Gregor; Sanderson, Jeremy; Li, Mengdi; Usher, Samuel; Sellayah, Dyan; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene plays a pivotal role in regulating body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that primary adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FTO overexpression (FTO-4) mice exhibit increased potential for adipogenic differentiation, while MEFs derived from FTO knockout (FTO-KO) mice show reduced adipogenesis. As predicted from these findings, fat pads from FTO-4 mice fed a high-fat diet show more numerous adipocytes. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion. The effect of FTO on adipogenesis appears to be mediated via enhanced expression of the pro-adipogenic short isoform of RUNX1T1, which enhanced adipocyte proliferation, and is increased in FTO-4 MEFs and reduced in FTO-KO MEFs. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insight into how upregulation of FTO leads to obesity. PMID:25881961

  13. Rohitukine inhibits in vitro adipogenesis arresting mitotic clonal expansion and improves dyslipidemia in vivo[S

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Salil; Shankar, Kripa; Beg, Muheeb; Balaramnavar, Vishal M.; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Jagdale, Pankaj; Srivastava, Shishir; Chhonker, Yashpal S.; Lakshmi, Vijai; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Bhatta, Rabi Shankar; Saxena, Anil Kumar; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth

    2014-01-01

    We developed a common feature pharmacophore model using known antiadipogenic compounds (CFPMA). We identified rohitukine, a reported chromone anticancer alkaloid as a potential hit through in silico mapping of the in-house natural product library on CFPMA. Studies were designed to assess the antiadipogenic potential of rohitukine. Rohitukine was isolated from Dysoxylum binacteriferum Hook. to ?95% purity. As predicted by CFPMA, rohitukine was indeed found to be an antiadipogenic molecule. Rohitukine inhibited lipid accumulation and adipogenic differentiation in a concentration- and exposure-time-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 and C3H10T1/2 cells. Rohitukine downregulated expression of PPAR?, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ?, adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), FAS, and glucose transporter 4. It also suppressed mRNA expression of LPL, sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) 1c, FAS, and aP2, the downstream targets of PPAR?. Rohitukine arrests cells in S phase during mitotic clonal expansion. Rohitukine was bioavailable, and 25.7% of orally administered compound reached systemic circulation. We evaluated the effect of rohitukine on dyslipidemia induced by high-fat diet in the hamster model. Rohitukine increased hepatic expression of liver X receptor ? and decreased expression of SREBP-2 and associated targets. Rohitukine decreased hepatic and gonadal lipid accumulation and ameliorated dyslipidemia significantly. In summary, our strategy to identify a novel antiadipogenic molecule using CFPMA successfully resulted in identification of rohitukine, which confirmed antiadipogenic activity and also exhibited in vivo antidyslipidemic activity. PMID:24646949

  14. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L.

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  15. A new role for Rab GTPases during early mitotic stages.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanchaita; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A recent study revealed new roles for the Rab11 GTPase during mitosis. Rab11 is involved in recycling endosome localization to mitotic spindle poles via dynein-mediated transport. This process is in contrast to Golgi membranes, which disperse in mitosis and do not appear to directly contribute to mitotic functions. Rab11-depletion prevents recycling endosome organization at spindle poles, delays mitotic progression, and disrupts spindle pole protein recruitment, astral microtubule organization, and mitotic spindle orientation. However, Rab11 is not the only endocytic and/or trafficking protein that regulates mitotic progression. Clathrin and two small GTPases (Rab6A', Rab5) play key roles in spindle organization and function. In this commentary, we discuss the roles of all these canonical endocytic and membrane trafficking proteins during mitosis and speculate on possible cross-communication between them and their molecular pathways that ensure faithful progression through mitosis. PMID:24921241

  16. Identification of a mitotic death signature in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Eichhorn, Joshua M; Alford, Sarah E; Chambers, Timothy C

    2014-02-28

    This study examined the molecular mechanism of action of anti-mitotic drugs. The hypothesis was tested that death in mitosis occurs through sustained mitotic arrest with robust Cdk1 signaling causing complete phosphorylation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and conversely, that mitotic slippage is associated with incomplete phosphorylation of Mcl-1/Bcl-xL. The results, obtained from studying six different cancer cell lines, strongly support the hypothesis and identify for the first time a unique molecular signature for mitotic death. The findings represent an important advance in understanding anti-mitotic drug action and provide insight into cancer cell susceptibility to such drugs which has important clinical implications. PMID:24099917

  17. Hybrid feature detection and information accumulation using high-resolution LC-MS metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianwei; Park, Youngja; Li, Shuzhao; Jones, Dean P

    2013-03-01

    Feature detection is a critical step in the preprocessing of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics data. Currently, the predominant approach is to detect features using noise filters and peak shape models based on the data at hand alone. Databases of known metabolites and historical data contain information that could help boost the sensitivity of feature detection, especially for low-concentration metabolites. However, utilizing such information in targeted feature detection may cause large number of false positives because of the high levels of noise in LC-MS data. With high-resolution mass spectrometry such as liquid chromatograph-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS), high-confidence matching of peaks to known features is feasible. Here we describe a computational approach that serves two purposes. First it boosts feature detection sensitivity by using a hybrid procedure of both untargeted and targeted peak detection. New algorithms are designed to reduce the chance of false-positives by nonparametric local peak detection and filtering. Second, it can accumulate information on the concentration variation of metabolites over large number of samples, which can help find rare features and/or features with uncommon concentration in future studies. Information can be accumulated on features that are consistently found in real data even before their identities are found. We demonstrate the value of the approach in a proof-of-concept study. The method is implemented as part of the R package apLCMS at http://www.sph.emory.edu/apLCMS/ . PMID:23362826

  18. An unsupervised feature extraction method for high dimensional image data compaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghassemian, Hassan; Landgrebe, David

    1987-01-01

    A new on-line unsupervised feature extraction method for high-dimensional remotely sensed image data compaction is presented. This method can be utilized to solve the problem of data redundancy in scene representation by satellite-borne high resolution multispectral sensors. The algorithm first partitions the observation space into an exhaustive set of disjoint objects. Then, pixels that belong to an object are characterized by an object feature. Finally, the set of object features is used for data transmission and classification. The example results show that the performance with the compacted features provides a slight improvement in classification accuracy instead of any degradation. Also, the information extraction method does not need to be preceded by a data decompaction.

  19. Dataset from the global phosphoproteomic mapping of early mitotic exit in human cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael A; Parker, Benjamin L; Chaudhuri, Rima; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Hoffman, Nolan J; Watkins, D Neil; Daly, Roger J; James, David E; Burgess, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The presence or absence of a phosphorylation on a substrate at any particular point in time is a functional readout of the balance in activity between the regulatory kinase and the counteracting phosphatase. Understanding how stable or short-lived a phosphorylation site is required for fully appreciating the biological consequences of the phosphorylation. Our current understanding of kinases and their substrates is well established; however, the role phosphatases play is less understood. Therefore, we utilized a phosphatase dependent model of mitotic exit to identify potential substrates that are preferentially dephosphorylated. Using this method, we identified >16,000 phosphosites on >3300 unique proteins, and quantified the temporal phosphorylation changes that occur during early mitotic exit (McCloy et al., 2015 [1]). Furthermore, we annotated the majority of these phosphorylation sites with a high confidence upstream kinase using published, motif and prediction based methods. The results from this study have been deposited into the ProteomeXchange repository with identifier PXD001559. Here we provide additional analysis of this dataset; for each of the major mitotic kinases we identified motifs that correlated strongly with phosphorylation status. These motifs could be used to predict the stability of phosphorylated residues in proteins of interest, and help infer potential functional roles for uncharacterized phosphorylations. In addition, we provide validation at the single cell level that serine residues phosphorylated by Cdk are stable during phosphatase dependent mitotic exit. In summary, this unique dataset contains information on the temporal mitotic stability of thousands of phosphorylation sites regulated by dozens of kinases, and information on the potential preference that phosphatases have at both the protein and individual phosphosite level. The compellation of this data provides an invaluable resource for the wider research community. PMID:26425664

  20. High quality machine-robust image features: Identification in nonsmall cell lung cancer computed tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Luke A.; Krafft, Shane; Stingo, Francesco; Choi, Haesun; Martel, Mary K.; Kry, Stephen F.; Court, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: For nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, quantitative image features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images can be used to improve tumor diagnosis, staging, and response assessment. For these findings to be clinically applied, image features need to have high intra and intermachine reproducibility. The objective of this study is to identify CT image features that are reproducible, nonredundant, and informative across multiple machines. Methods: Noncontrast-enhanced, test-retest CT image pairs were obtained from 56 NSCLC patients imaged on three CT machines from two institutions. Two machines (“M1” and “M2”) used cine 4D-CT and one machine (“M3”) used breath-hold helical 3D-CT. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were semiautonomously segmented then pruned by removing voxels with CT numbers less than a prescribed Hounsfield unit (HU) cutoff. Three hundred and twenty eight quantitative image features were extracted from each pruned GTV based on its geometry, intensity histogram, absolute gradient image, co-occurrence matrix, and run-length matrix. For each machine, features with concordance correlation coefficient values greater than 0.90 were considered reproducible. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the Jaccard index (JI) were used to quantify reproducible feature set agreement between machines. Multimachine reproducible feature sets were created by taking the intersection of individual machine reproducible feature sets. Redundant features were removed through hierarchical clustering based on the average correlation between features across multiple machines. Results: For all image types, GTV pruning was found to negatively affect reproducibility (reported results use no HU cutoff). The reproducible feature percentage was highest for average images (M1 = 90.5%, M2 = 94.5%, M1?M2 = 86.3%), intermediate for end-exhale images (M1 = 75.0%, M2 = 71.0%, M1?M2 = 52.1%), and lowest for breath-hold images (M3 = 61.0%). Between M1 and M2, the reproducible feature sets generated from end-exhale images were relatively machine-sensitive (DSC = 0.71, JI = 0.55), and the reproducible feature sets generated from average images were relatively machine-insensitive (DSC = 0.90, JI = 0.87). Histograms of feature pair correlation distances indicated that feature redundancy was machine-sensitive and image type sensitive. After hierarchical clustering, 38 features, 28 features, and 33 features were found to be reproducible and nonredundant for M1?M2 (average images), M1?M2 (end-exhale images), and M3, respectively. When blinded to the presence of test-retest images, hierarchical clustering showed that the selected features were informative by correctly pairing 55 out of 56 test-retest images using only their reproducible, nonredundant feature set values. Conclusions: Image feature reproducibility and redundancy depended on both the CT machine and the CT image type. For each image type, the authors found a set of cross-machine reproducible, nonredundant, and informative image features that would be useful for future image-based models. Compared to end-exhale 4D-CT and breath-hold 3D-CT, average 4D-CT derived image features showed superior multimachine reproducibility and are the best candidates for clinical correlation. PMID:24320527

  1. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  2. Pores and ridges: high-resolution fingerprint matching using level 3 features.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Chen, Yi; Demirkus, Meltem

    2007-01-01

    Fingerprint friction ridge details are generally described in a hierarchical order at three different levels, namely, Level 1 (pattern), Level 2 (minutia points), and Level 3 (pores and ridge contours). Although latent print examiners frequently take advantage of Level 3 features to assist in identification, Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) currently rely only on Level 1 and Level 2 features. In fact, the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) standard of fingerprint resolution for AFIS is 500 pixels per inch (ppi), which is inadequate for capturing Level 3 features, such as pores. With the advances in fingerprint sensing technology, many sensors are now equipped with dual resolution (500 ppi/1,000 ppi) scanning capability. However, increasing the scan resolution alone does not necessarily provide any performance improvement in fingerprint matching, unless an extended feature set is utilized. As a result, a systematic study to determine how much performance gain one can achieve by introducing Level 3 features in AFIS is highly desired. We propose a hierarchical matching system that utilizes features at all the three levels extracted from 1,000 ppi fingerprint scans. Level 3 features, including pores and ridge contours, are automatically extracted using Gabor filters and wavelet transform and are locally matched using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Our experiments show that Level 3 features carry significant discriminatory information. There is a relative reduction of 20 percent in the equal error rate (EER) of the matching system when Level 3 features are employed in combination with Level 1 and 2 features. This significant performance gain is consistently observed across various quality fingerprint images. PMID:17108380

  3. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  4. Nuclear events of apoptosis in vitro in cell-free mitotic extracts: a model system for analysis of the active phase of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a cell-free system that induces the morphological transformations characteristic of apoptosis in isolated nuclei. The system uses extracts prepared from mitotic chicken hepatoma cells following a sequential S phase/M phase synchronization. When nuclei are added to these extracts, the chromatin becomes highly condensed into spherical domains that ultimately extrude through the nuclear envelope, forming apoptotic bodies. The process is highly synchronous, and the structural changes are completed within 60 min. Coincident with these morphological changes, the nuclear DNA is cleaved into a nucleosomal ladder. Both processes are inhibited by Zn2+, an inhibitor of apoptosis in intact cells. Nuclear lamina disassembly accompanies these structural changes in added nuclei, and we show that lamina disassembly is a characteristic feature of apoptosis in intact cells of mouse, human and chicken. This system may provide a powerful means of dissecting the biochemical mechanisms underlying the final stages of apoptosis. PMID:8408207

  5. Mitotically active cellular fibroma of ovary should be differentiated from fibrosarcoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Lin; Lin, Ming; Fan, Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    The clinicopathologic characteristic of mitotically active cellular fibroma is significantly different from the malignant behavior of ovarian fibrosarcoma. Therefore, it’s very important to differentiate mitotically active cellular fibroma from ovarian fibrosarcoma. We report a case in which a 39-year-old woman was found with an ovarian tumor measuring 105 × 71 × 47 mm. The tumor ruptured and adhered to the peritoneum. Microscopic examination showed densely cellular spindle-shaped tumor cells. The cellular atypia was mild. The Ki-67 proliferation index was approximately 10%. The patient remained free of tumor for more than 66 months without any adjuvant chemotherapy after operation. After reviewing the literature, we diagnosed this case as mitotically active cellular fibroma rather than ovarian fibrosarcoma. It is very important to differentiate these two tumors because of the marked differences in treatment modalities and prognosis between them. The ovarian fibrous tumors with mitotic figures ? 4 per 10 high-power fields but no severe nuclear atypia should be mostly diagnosed as mitotically active cellular fibroma of ovary. The correct diagnosis is the key to avoid excessive treatments. PMID:25550794

  6. A High Precision Feature Based on LBP and Gabor Theory for Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Yin, Shouyi; Ouyang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    How to describe an image accurately with the most useful information but at the same time the least useless information is a basic problem in the recognition field. In this paper, a novel and high precision feature called BG2D2LRP is proposed, accompanied with a corresponding face recognition system. The feature contains both static texture differences and dynamic contour trends. It is based on Gabor and LBP theory, operated by various kinds of transformations such as block, second derivative, direct orientation, layer and finally fusion in a particular way. Seven well-known face databases such as FRGC, AR, FERET and so on are used to evaluate the veracity and robustness of the proposed feature. A maximum improvement of 29.41% is achieved comparing with other methods. Besides, the ROC curve provides a satisfactory figure. Those experimental results strongly demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the new feature and method. PMID:23552103

  7. Distinct clinicopathological features of NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene variants in solitary fibrous tumor with emphasis on the acquisition of highly malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Keisuke; Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Hara, Kieko; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Takagi, Tatsuya; Mitani, Keiko; Kaneko, Kazuo; Yao, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    The impact of NGFI-A binding protein 2 (NAB2)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) fusion on the biological behavior and the mechanism of acquisition of malignant phenotype in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is not well understood. We examined variations of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene in 40 cases of SFT using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues and secondary genetic alterations of tumor protein p53 (TP53),, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, ? polypeptide (PDGFRB), and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoters. These gene variations were compared with the clinicopathological features. The 2-year and 5-year disease-free survival rates (DFSRs) were 91% and 83%, respectively. All 40 samples demonstrated nuclear staining for STAT6, including CD34-negative cases. Moreover, p53-positive staining was associated with a lower DFSR and was significantly associated with higher Ki-67 label index, higher mitotic rate (mitosis, >4/high-power field), and the presence of nuclear atypia/pleomorphism. NAB2-STAT6 fusions were detected in all of the cases; the NAB2 exon 4-STAT6 exon 2, the most common genotype, appeared in 18 cases, which was associated with thoracic tumor location and the less aggressive phenotype. In contrast, tumors with NAB2 exon 6-STAT6 exon 16/18 demonstrated an aggressive phenotype. Mutations in TP53 and PDGFRB were detected in 2 and 3 cases respectively, and these occurred in a mutually exclusive fashion. TERT promoter hot spot mutations were observed in 5 cases, which were associated with shorter DFSR. Two dedifferentiated SFT cases harbored both TP53 and TERT promoter mutations. TP53 mutations, which result in its overexpression, in combination with TERT promoter mutations seem to play an important role in the dedifferentiation process. PMID:25582503

  8. Physical limits on kinesin-5-mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kelsey M; Tubman, Emily S; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O'Toole, Eileen T; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J

    2015-11-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro-tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end-tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 ?m). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1?), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3?) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5-mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to this limit, which may explain why it has the smallest known mitotic spindle that still manifests the classic congression architecture. PMID:26354423

  9. Application of high-dimensional feature selection: evaluation for genomic prediction in man

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, M. L.; Pong-Wong, R.; Spiliopoulou, A.; Hayward, C.; Rudan, I.; Campbell, H.; Wright, A. F.; Wilson, J. F.; Agakov, F.; Navarro, P.; Haley, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of five feature selection approaches on the performance of a mixed model (G-BLUP) and a Bayesian (Bayes C) prediction method. We predicted height, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and body mass index (BMI) within 2,186 Croatian and into 810 UK individuals using genome-wide SNP data. Using all SNP information Bayes C and G-BLUP had similar predictive performance across all traits within the Croatian data, and for the highly polygenic traits height and BMI when predicting into the UK data. Bayes C outperformed G-BLUP in the prediction of HDL, which is influenced by loci of moderate size, in the UK data. Supervised feature selection of a SNP subset in the G-BLUP framework provided a flexible, generalisable and computationally efficient alternative to Bayes C; but careful evaluation of predictive performance is required when supervised feature selection has been used. PMID:25988841

  10. Shruthi B. V. Rajesh Title: Extracting Gully Erosion features from High Resolution Imagery Using Object

    E-print Network

    Shruthi B. V. Rajesh Title: Extracting Gully Erosion features from High Resolution Imagery Using Object Oriented Analysis Level: PhD Description of work: Gully erosion is responsible for a substantialD research at ESA in March 2008. My research topic is focused on improvising gully erosion prediction using

  11. Low and High-Level Visual Feature Based Apple Detection from Multi-modal Images

    E-print Network

    Wachs, Juan

    1 Low and High-Level Visual Feature Based Apple Detection from Multi-modal Images J. P. Wachs1 , H discusses the development of a machine vision system, capable of recognizing occluded green apples within a tree canopy. This involves the detection of "green" apples within scenes of "green leaves", shadow

  12. Immersion Scatterometry for Improved Feature Resolution and High Speed Acquisition of Resist Profiles

    E-print Network

    Terry, Fred L.

    Immersion Scatterometry for Improved Feature Resolution and High Speed Acquisition of Resist the results of a simulation study on the use of scatterometry in an immersion mode both to improve resolution profiles vs. time and a rigorous couple wave algorithm (RCWA) simulator (modified to include the immersion

  13. Control of the mitotic exit network during meiosis

    E-print Network

    Attner, Michelle Andrea

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is an essential GTPase signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis in budding yeast. We show here that during meiosis, the MEN is dispensable for exit from meiosis I but contributes to ...

  14. Cell Size Modulates Oscillation, Positioning and Length of Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindle is the main subcellular structure that accomplishes the chromosome segregation between daughter cells during cell division. However, how mitotic spindles sense and control their size, position and movement inside the cell still remains unclear. In this paper, we focus on the size effects of mitotic spindles, i.e., how cell size controls various interesting phenomena in the metaphase, such as oscillation, positioning and size limit of mitotic spindles. We systematically studied the frequency doubling phenomenon during chromosome oscillation and found that cell size can regulate the period and amplitude of chromosome oscillation. We found that the relaxation time of the positioning process increases exponentially with cell size. We also showed that the stabler microtubule-kinetochore attachments alone can directly lead to an upper limit of spindle size. Our work not only explains the existing experimental observations, but also provides some interesting predictions that can be verified or rejected by further experiments. PMID:26015263

  15. CDK control of mitotic progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Rahal, Rami S

    2008-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are best known for their essential functions in triggering entry into M-phase, where they have established roles in nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, and Golgi ...

  16. Identification of novel regulators of mitotic exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    D'Aquino, Katharine E

    2006-01-01

    The division of a eukaryotic cell into two daughter cells is controlled by cyclin dependent kinase (CDK). Entry into mitosis is promoted by the activity of CDK complexed with mitotic cyclins. Upon faithful segregation of ...

  17. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  18. Targeting the Mitotic Catastrophe Signaling Pathway in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mc Gee, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, as defined in 2012 by the International Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death, is a bona fide intrinsic oncosuppressive mechanism that senses mitotic failure and responds by driving a cell to an irreversible antiproliferative fate of death or senescence. Thus, failed mitotic catastrophe can promote the unrestrained growth of defective cells, thereby representing a major gateway to tumour development. Furthermore, the activation of mitotic catastrophe offers significant therapeutic advantage which has been exploited in the action of conventional and targeted anticancer agents. Yet, despite its importance in tumour prevention and treatment, the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe is not well understood. A better understanding of the signals that determine cell fate following failed or defective mitosis will reveal new opportunities to selectively target and enhance the programme for therapeutic benefit and reveal biomarkers to predict patient response. This review is focused on the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe induction and signalling and highlights current strategies to exploit the process in cancer therapy. PMID:26491220

  19. Micromechanical-biochemical studies of mitotic chromosome elasticity and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael Guy

    The structure of mitotic chromosomes was studied by combining micromechanical force measurements with microfluidic biochemical exposures. Our method is to use glass micropipettes attached to either end of a single chromosome to do mechanical experiments in the extracellular buffer. A third pipette can be used to locally 'spray' reactants so as to carry out dynamical mechanical-chemical experiments. The following elastic properties of mitotic chromosomes are found: Young's modulus, Y = 300 Pa; Poisson ratio, sigma = 0.1; Bending rigidity, B = 1 x 10 -22 J·m; Internal viscosity, eta' = 100 kg/m·sec; Volume fraction, ? = 0.7; Extensions of less than 3 times the relaxed length are linear and reversible; Extensions beyond 30 fold exhibit a force plateau at 15 nN and convert the chromosome to a disperse ghost-like state with little change in chromatin structure; Mitotic chromosomes are relatively isotropic; dsDNA cuts of at least every 3 kb cause the a mitotic chromosomes to fall apart; dsDNA cuts less frequently than every 50 kb do not affect mitotic chromosome structure. These results lead to the conclusion that mitotic chromosomes are a network crosslinked every 50 kb between which chromatin is fold by chromatin folding proteins, which are likely to be condensins.

  20. Targeting the Mitotic Catastrophe Signaling Pathway in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mc Gee, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, as defined in 2012 by the International Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death, is a bona fide intrinsic oncosuppressive mechanism that senses mitotic failure and responds by driving a cell to an irreversible antiproliferative fate of death or senescence. Thus, failed mitotic catastrophe can promote the unrestrained growth of defective cells, thereby representing a major gateway to tumour development. Furthermore, the activation of mitotic catastrophe offers significant therapeutic advantage which has been exploited in the action of conventional and targeted anticancer agents. Yet, despite its importance in tumour prevention and treatment, the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe is not well understood. A better understanding of the signals that determine cell fate following failed or defective mitosis will reveal new opportunities to selectively target and enhance the programme for therapeutic benefit and reveal biomarkers to predict patient response. This review is focused on the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe induction and signalling and highlights current strategies to exploit the process in cancer therapy. PMID:26491220

  1. High-resolution FTIR imaging of colon tissues for elucidation of individual cellular and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Lloyd, Gavin Rhys; Shepherd, Neil; Stone, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Novel technologies that could complement current histopathology based cancer diagnostic methods are under examination. In this endeavour mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging is a promising candidate that can provide valuable bio-molecular information from unstained cells and tissues in a rapid and a non-destructive manner. With this imaging technique, the biochemical information obtained from smaller areas of the tissues can be of clinical significance and hence the measured pixel size. Until recently it was difficult to obtain spectral data from pixels below around 5 microns square. High NA objectives have been utilised to reduce the ideal diffraction limit, enabling for the first time elucidation of subcellular features. In this context, the ability of high-resolution imaging, obtained using novel high-magnification optics retro-fitted onto a bench top FTIR imaging system, to characterise histopathological features in colonic tissues has been tested. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded colon tissues from three different pathologies were imaged directly using the conventional and the high-magnification imaging set-ups. To circumvent chemical de-paraffinization protocols, an extended multiplicative signal correction (EMSC) based electronic de-paraffinization was carried out on all the infrared images. Multivariate analysis of the high-magnification infrared imaging data showed a detailed information of the histological features of the colon tissue in comparison to conventional imaging. Furthermore, high-magnification imaging has enabled a label-free characterization of the mucin rich goblet cell features in an unprecedented manner. The current study demonstrates the applicability of high-magnification FTIR imaging to characterise complex tissues on a smaller scale that could be of clinical significance. PMID:26549223

  2. Mechanism and Regulation of Kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  3. DNA methylation profiles in primary cutaneous melanomas are associated with clinically significant pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nancy E; Slater, Nathaniel A; Edmiston, Sharon N; Zhou, Xin; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Groben, Pamela A; Carson, Craig C; Hao, Honglin; Parrish, Eloise; Moschos, Stergios J; Berwick, Marianne; Ollila, David W; Conway, Kathleen

    2014-11-01

    DNA methylation studies have elucidated a methylation signature distinguishing primary melanomas from benign nevi and provided new insights about genes that may be important in melanoma development. However, it is unclear whether methylation differences among primary melanomas are related to tumor pathologic features with known clinical significance. We utilized the Illumina GoldenGate Cancer Panel array to investigate the methylation profiles of 47 primary cutaneous melanomas. Arraywide methylation patterns revealed a positive association of methylation with Breslow thickness and mutated BRAF, a negative association with mitotic rate, and a weak association with ulceration. Hierarchical clustering on CpG sites exhibiting the most variable methylation (n = 235) divided the melanoma samples into three clusters, including a highly methylated cluster that was positively associated with Breslow thickness and an intermediately methylated cluster associated with Breslow thickness and mitotic rate. Our findings provide support for the existence of methylation-defined subsets in melanomas with increased methylation associated with Breslow thickness. PMID:24986547

  4. High order beam features and fitting quadrupole scan data to particle code model.

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, W. P.; Garnett, R. W.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Qiang, J.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; Ryne, Robert; Schneider, J. D.; Smith, H. V.; Young, L. M.; Schulze, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Quadrupole scans in the HEBT of the 6.7 MeV LEDA RFQ were analyzed to characterize the RFQ output beam. In previous work, profiles measured by the wire scanner were fit to models (beam parameterizations and HEBT simulations) to determine the transverse Courant-Snyder parameters {alpha}, {beta}, and {epsilon} at the RFQ exit. Unfortunately, at the larger quadrupole settings, the measured profiles showed features that were not present in any of our simulations. Here we describe our latest analysis, which resulted in very good fits by using an improved model for the RFQ output beam. The model beam was generated by the RFQ simulation code TOUTATIS. In our fitting code, this beam was distorted by linear transformations that changed the Courant-Snyder parameters to whatever values were required by the nonlinear optimizer while preserving the high-order features of the phase-space distribution. No new physics in the HEBT was required to explain our quad-scan results, just an improved initial beam. High-order features in the RFQ output beam apparently make a significant difference in behavior downstream of the RFQ. While this result gives us increased confidence in our codes, we still have a mystery: exactly what high-order features in the beam are responsible for the the strange behavior downstream. Understanding this phenomenon may be helpful to understanding our halo-experiment data. We have begun to study this by comparing higher-order moments of the TOUTATIS distribution with other distributions.

  5. A comprehensive analysis of earthquake damage patterns using high dimensional model representation feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta?kin Kaya, Gül?en

    2013-10-01

    Recently, earthquake damage assessment using satellite images has been a very popular ongoing research direction. Especially with the availability of very high resolution (VHR) satellite images, a quite detailed damage map based on building scale has been produced, and various studies have also been conducted in the literature. As the spatial resolution of satellite images increases, distinguishability of damage patterns becomes more cruel especially in case of using only the spectral information during classification. In order to overcome this difficulty, textural information needs to be involved to the classification to improve the visual quality and reliability of damage map. There are many kinds of textural information which can be derived from VHR satellite images depending on the algorithm used. However, extraction of textural information and evaluation of them have been generally a time consuming process especially for the large areas affected from the earthquake due to the size of VHR image. Therefore, in order to provide a quick damage map, the most useful features describing damage patterns needs to be known in advance as well as the redundant features. In this study, a very high resolution satellite image after Iran, Bam earthquake was used to identify the earthquake damage. Not only the spectral information, textural information was also used during the classification. For textural information, second order Haralick features were extracted from the panchromatic image for the area of interest using gray level co-occurrence matrix with different size of windows and directions. In addition to using spatial features in classification, the most useful features representing the damage characteristic were selected with a novel feature selection method based on high dimensional model representation (HDMR) giving sensitivity of each feature during classification. The method called HDMR was recently proposed as an efficient tool to capture the input-output relationships in high-dimensional systems for many problems in science and engineering. The HDMR method is developed to improve the efficiency of the deducing high dimensional behaviors. The method is formed by a particular organization of low dimensional component functions, in which each function is the contribution of one or more input variables to the output variables.

  6. Extracting features buried within high density atom probe point cloud data through simplicial homology.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Kaluskar, Kaustubh; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Feature extraction from Atom Probe Tomography (APT) data is usually performed by repeatedly delineating iso-concentration surfaces of a chemical component of the sample material at different values of concentration threshold, until the user visually determines a satisfactory result in line with prior knowledge. However, this approach allows for important features, buried within the sample, to be visually obscured by the high density and volume (~10(7) atoms) of APT data. This work provides a data driven methodology to objectively determine the appropriate concentration threshold for classifying different phases, such as precipitates, by mapping the topology of the APT data set using a concept from algebraic topology termed persistent simplicial homology. A case study of Sc precipitates in an Al-Mg-Sc alloy is presented demonstrating the power of this technique to capture features, such as precise demarcation of Sc clusters and Al segregation at the cluster boundaries, not easily available by routine visual adjustment. PMID:25959554

  7. A PLANETARY LENSING FEATURE IN CAUSTIC-CROSSING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Uk E-mail: kyuha@kasi.re.kr E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2012-05-20

    Current microlensing follow-up observations focus on high-magnification events because of the high efficiency of planet detection. However, central perturbations of high-magnification events caused by a planet can also be produced by a very close or a very wide binary companion, and the two kinds of central perturbations are not generally distinguished without time consuming detailed modeling (a planet-binary degeneracy). Hence, it is important to resolve the planet-binary degeneracy that occurs in high-magnification events. In this paper, we investigate caustic-crossing high-magnification events caused by a planet and a wide binary companion. From this investigation, we find that because of the different magnification excess patterns inside the central caustics induced by the planet and the binary companion, the light curves of the caustic-crossing planetary-lensing events exhibit a feature that is discriminated from those of the caustic-crossing binary-lensing events, and the feature can be used to immediately distinguish between the planetary and binary companions. The planetary-lensing feature appears in the interpeak region between the two peaks of the caustic-crossings. The structure of the interpeak region for the planetary-lensing events is smooth and convex or boxy, whereas the structure for the binary-lensing events is smooth and concave. We also investigate the effect of a finite background source star on the planetary-lensing feature in the caustic-crossing high-magnification events. From this, we find that the convex-shaped interpeak structure appears in a certain range that changes with the mass ratio of the planet to the planet-hosting star.

  8. Uranus' Persistent Patterns and Features from High-SNR Imaging in 2012-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Patrick M.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B.; Marcus, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    Since 2012, Uranus has been the subject of an observing campaign utilizing high signal-to-noise imaging techniques at Keck Observatory (Fry et al. 2012, Astron. J. 143, 150-161). High quality observing conditions on four observing runs of consecutive nights allowed longitudinally-complete coverage of the atmosphere over a period of two years (Sromovsky et al. 2015, Icarus 258, 192-223). Global mosaic maps made from images acquired on successive nights in August 2012, November 2012, August 2013, and August 2014, show persistent patterns, and six easily distinguished long-lived cloud features, which we were able to track for long periods that ranged from 5 months to over two years. Two at similar latitudes are associated with dark spots, and move with the atmospheric zonal flow close to the location of their associated dark spot instead of following the flow at the latitude of the bright features. These features retained their morphologies and drift rates in spite of several close interactions. A second pair of features at similar latitudes also survived several close approaches. Several of the long-lived features also exhibited equatorward drifts and latitudinal oscillations. Also persistent are a remarkable near-equatorial wave feature and global zonal band structure. We will present imagery, maps, and analyses of these phenomena.PMF and LAS acknowledge support from NASA Planetary Astronomy Program; PMF and LAS acknowledge funding and technical support from W. M. Keck Observatory. We thank those of Hawaiian ancestry on whose sacred mountain we are privileged to be guests. Without their generous hospitality none of our groundbased observations would have been possible.

  9. High-Velocity Features of Calcium and Silicon in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G H; Wheeler, J Craig; Barna, Barnabas; Szalai, Tamas; Mulligan, Brian; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    "High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We f...

  10. High-resolution face verification using pore-scale facial features.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhou, Huiling; Lam, Kin-Man

    2015-08-01

    Face recognition methods, which usually represent face images using holistic or local facial features, rely heavily on alignment. Their performances also suffer a severe degradation under variations in expressions or poses, especially when there is one gallery per subject only. With the easy access to high-resolution (HR) face images nowadays, some HR face databases have recently been developed. However, few studies have tackled the use of HR information for face recognition or verification. In this paper, we propose a pose-invariant face-verification method, which is robust to alignment errors, using the HR information based on pore-scale facial features. A new keypoint descriptor, namely, pore-Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-Scale Invariant Feature Transform (PPCASIFT)-adapted from PCA-SIFT-is devised for the extraction of a compact set of distinctive pore-scale facial features. Having matched the pore-scale features of two-face regions, an effective robust-fitting scheme is proposed for the face-verification task. Experiments show that, with one frontal-view gallery only per subject, our proposed method outperforms a number of standard verification methods, and can achieve excellent accuracy even the faces are under large variations in expression and pose. PMID:25781876

  11. Mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Yoshioka, T; Saio, M; Banno, Y; Nagaoka, H; Okano, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, which refers to cell death or its prologue triggered by aberrant mitosis, can be induced by a heterogeneous group of stimuli, including chromosome damage or perturbation of the mitotic apparatus. We investigated the mechanism of mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. We transfected cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 with siRNAs targeting Aurora A, ninein, TOG, TACC3, ?-tubulin, or pericentriolar material-1, and monitored the effects on cell death. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, TOG, and TACC3 led to cell death, regardless of p53 status. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, and TOG, led to aberrant spindle formation and subsequent cell death, which was accompanied by several features of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation and Annexin V binding in HeLa cells. During this process, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 was detected, but cleavage of caspase-8 was not. Cell death, monitored by time-lapse imaging, occurred during both interphase and M phase. In cells depleted of a centrosomal protein (Aurora A, ninein, or TOG), the rate of cell death was higher if the cells were cotransfected with siRNA against BubR1 or Mad2 than if they were transfected with siRNA against Bub1 or a control siRNA. These results suggest that metaphase arrest is necessary for the mitotic catastrophe and cell death caused by depletion of centrosomal proteins. Knockdown of centrosomal proteins led to increased phosphorylation of Chk2. Enhanced p-Chk2 localization was also observed at the centrosome in cells arrested in M phase, as well as in the nuclei of dying cells. Cotransfection of siRNAs against Chk2, in combination with depletion of a centrosomal protein, decreased the amount of cell death. Thus, Chk2 activity is indispensable for apoptosis after mitotic catastrophe induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. PMID:23598415

  12. High-Velocity Features: a ubiquitous property of Type Ia SNe

    E-print Network

    Mazzali, P A; Altavilla, G; Blanc, G; Cappellaro, E; Elias-Rosa, N; Garavini, G; Goobar, A; Harutyunyan, A; Kotak, R; Leibundgut, B; Lundqvist, P; Mattila, S; Méndez, J; Nobili, S; Pain, R; Pastorello, A; Patat, F; Pignata, G; Podsiadlowski, P; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Salvo, M; Schmidt, B P; Sollerman, J; Stanishev, V; Stehle, M; Tout, C; Turatto, M; Hillebrandt, W; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence of high-velocity features such as those seen in the near-maximum spectra of some Type Ia Supernovae (eg SN 2000cx) has been searched for in the available SNIa spectra observed earlier than one week before B maximum. Recent observational efforts have doubled the number of SNeIa with very early spectra. Remarkably, all SNeIa with early data (7 in our RTN sample and 10 from other programmes) show signs of such features, to a greater or lesser degree, in CaII IR, and some also in SiII 6255A line. High-velocity features may be interpreted as abundance or density enhancements. Abundance enhancements would imply an outer region dominated by Si and Ca. Density enhancements may result from the sweeping up of circumstellar material by the highest velocity SN ejecta. In this scenario, the high incidence of HVFs suggests that a thick disc and/or a high-density companion wind surrounds the exploding white dwarf, as may be the case in Single Degenerate systems. Large-scale angular fluctuations in the radial densit...

  13. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM. The CHM or the normalized DSM represents the absolute height of all aboveground urban features relative to the ground. After normalization, the elevation value of a point indicates the height from the ground to the point. The above-ground points were used for tree feature and building footprint extraction. In individual tree extraction, first and last return point clouds were used along with the bare earth and building footprint models discussed above. In this study, scene dependent extraction criteria were employed to improve the 3D feature extraction process. LiDAR-based refining/ filtering techniques used for bare earth layer extraction were crucial for improving the subsequent 3D features (tree and building) feature extraction. The PAN-sharpened WV-2 image (with 0.5 m spatial resolution) was used to assess the accuracy of LiDAR-based 3D feature extraction. Our analysis provided an accuracy of 98 % for tree feature extraction and 96 % for building feature extraction from LiDAR data. This study could extract total of 15143 tree features using CHM method, out of which total of 14841 were visually interpreted on PAN-sharpened WV-2 image data. The extracted tree features included both shadowed (total 13830) and non-shadowed (total 1011). We note that CHM method could overestimate total of 302 tree features, which were not observed on the WV-2 image. One of the potential sources for tree feature overestimation was observed in case of those tree features which were adjacent to buildings. In case of building feature extraction, the algorithm could extract total of 6117 building features which were interpreted on WV-2 image, even capturing buildings under the trees (total 605) and buildings under shadow (total 112). Overestimation of tree and building features was observed to be limiting factor in 3D feature extraction process. This is due to the incorrect filtering of point cloud in these areas. One of the potential sources of overestimation was the man-made structures, including skyscrapers and bridges, which were confounded and extracted as buildings. This can be

  14. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  15. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex.1 Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion2 and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell.3 Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis.   In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial.4 Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division.5 In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  16. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  17. Synergistic Blockade of Mitotic Exit by Two Chemical Inhibitors of the APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Sackton, Katharine L.; Dimova, Nevena; Zeng, Xing; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Mengmeng; Sackton, Timothy B.; Meaders, Johnathan; Pfaff, Kathleen L.; Sigoillot, Frederic; Yu, Hongtao; Luo, Xuelian; King, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein machines are multi-subunit protein complexes that orchestrate highly regulated biochemical tasks. An example is the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a thirteen-subunit ubiquitin ligase that initiates the metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit by targeting proteins such as securin and cyclin B1 for ubiquitin-dependent destruction by the proteasome1,2. Because blocking mitotic exit is an effective approach for inducing tumor cell death3,4, the APC/C represents a potential novel target for cancer therapy. APC/C activation in mitosis requires binding of Cdc205, which forms a co-receptor with the APC/C to recognize substrates containing a Destruction box (D-box)6-14. Here we demonstrate that we can synergistically inhibit APC/C-dependent proteolysis and mitotic exit by simultaneously disrupting two protein-protein interactions within the APC/C-Cdc20-substrate ternary complex. We identified a small molecule, called apcin (APC inhibitor), which binds to Cdc20 and competitively inhibits the ubiquitylation of D-box-containing substrates. Analysis of the crystal structure of the apcin-Cdc20 complex suggests that apcin occupies the D-box-binding pocket on the side face of the WD40-domain. The ability of apcin to block mitotic exit is synergistically amplified by co-addition of tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME), a small molecule that blocks the APC/C-Cdc20 interaction15,16. This work suggests that simultaneous disruption of multiple, weak protein-protein interactions is an effective approach for inactivating a protein machine. PMID:25156254

  18. Roles of different pools of the mitotic checkpoint complex and the mechanisms of their disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis. When the checkpoint is turned on, the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The mechanisms of the assembly of MCC when the checkpoint is turned on, and of its disassembly when the checkpoint is inactivated, are not sufficiently understood. Previous reports indicated that APC/C-mediated polyubiquitylation of Cdc20 in MCC is required for the dissociation of APC/C-associated MCC, but not of free MCC. The pool of free MCC is disassembled by an ATP-dependent process stimulated by the Mad2-binding protein p31comet. It remained unknown whether free MCC is the precursor or the dissociation product of APC/C-bound MCC. By characterizing the mechanisms of the disassembly of APC/C-bound MCC in a purified system, we find that it cannot be the source of free MCC, because it is bound at high affinity and is released only in ubiquitylated or partially disassembled forms. By the use of a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs that reproduces the mitotic checkpoint, we show that MCC can be assembled in the absence of APC/C in a checkpoint-dependent manner. We propose that when the checkpoint is turned on, free MCC is the precursor of APC/C-bound MCC. When the mitotic checkpoint is extinguished, both APC/C-bound and free MCC pools have to be disassembled to release APC/C from inhibition. PMID:23754430

  19. Mutational Analysis of Meiotic and Mitotic Centromere Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cumberledge, Susan; Carbon, John

    1987-01-01

    A centromere (CEN) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of approximately 150 bp of DNA and contains 3 conserved sequence elements: a high A + T region 78-86 bp in length (element II), flanked on the left by a conserved 8-bp element I sequence (PuTCACPuTG), and on the right by a conserved 25-bp element III sequence. We have carried out a structure-function analysis of the element I and II regions of CEN3 by constructing mutations in these sequences and subsequently determining their effect on mitotic and meiotic chromosome segregation. We have also examined the mitotic and meiotic segregation behavior of ARS plasmids containing the structurally altered CEN3 sequences. Replacing the periodic tracts of A residues within element II with random A + T sequences of equal length increases the frequency of mitotic chromosome nondisjunction only 4-fold; whereas, reducing the A + T content of element II while preserving the length results in a 40-fold increase in the frequence of chromosome nondisjunction. Structural alterations in the element II region that do not decrease the overall length have little effect on the meiotic segregation behavior of the altered chromosomes. Centromeres containing a deletion of element I or a portion of element II retain considerable mitotic activity, yet plasmids carrying these same mutations segregate randomly during meiosis I, indicating these sequences to be essential for maintaining attachment of the replicated sister chromatids during the first meiotic division. The presence of an intact element I sequence properly spaced from the element III region is absolutely essential for proper meiotic function of the centromere. PMID:3311877

  20. Inhibition of Src kinases by a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor causes mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Moasser, M M; Srethapakdi, M; Sachar, K S; Kraker, A J; Rosen, N

    1999-12-15

    src kinase activity is elevated in some human tumors, including breast and colon cancers. The precise cellular function of the src family kinases is not clearly understood, but they appear to be involved in numerous signaling pathways. We studied the effects of PD173955, a novel src family-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cancer cell lines and found that it has significant antiproliferative activity due to a potent arrest of mitotic progression. The mitotic block occurs after chromosome condensation in prophase, before spindle assembly and without loss of cyclin A and B kinase activities. This effect is seen in cancer cell lines of all types with low or high activities of src kinases as well as in untransformed cell lines. In MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells, this drug produces a rapid inhibition of cellular src and yes kinase activities as well as suppression of the mitotic hyperactivity of these kinases. This compound defines a novel class of antimitotic drugs that work through inhibition of src kinases and possibly other protein kinases that are required for progression through the initial phases of mitosis. PMID:10626805

  1. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. )

    1988-06-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  2. Pharmacological inactivation of CHK1 and WEE1 induces mitotic catastrophe in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Man, Wing Yu; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a rare but highly invasive cancer. As radiotherapy is the primary treatment for NPC, this offers a rationale to investigate if uncoupling the DNA damage responses can sensitize this cancer type. The G2 DNA damage checkpoint is controlled by a cascade of protein kinases: ATM/ATR, which phosphorylates CHK1/CHK2, which in turn phosphorylates WEE1. A number of small molecule inhibitors have been developed against these kinases as potential therapeutic agents. Here we demonstrated that compare to that in immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells, ATR, CHK1, and WEE1 were overexpressed in NPC cell lines. Inhibitors of these kinases were unable to promote extensive mitotic catastrophe in ionizing radiation-treated NPC cells, indicating that they are not very effective radiosensitizer for this cancer. In the absence of prior irradiation, however, mitotic catastrophe could be induced with inhibitors against CHK1 (AZD7762) or WEE1 (MK-1775). NPC cells were more sensitive to WEE1 inactivation than nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Targeting CHK1 and WEE1 together induced more extensive mitotic catastrophe than the individual components alone. Taken together, our results show that NPC cells depend on CHK1 and WEE1 activity for growth and that inhibitors of these kinases may serve as potential therapeutics for NPC. PMID:26025928

  3. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3? untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models. PMID:25628360

  4. Study of Dynamic Features of Surface Plasma in High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Teng; Gao, Xiangdong; Katayama, Seiji; Jin, Xiaoli

    2012-03-01

    High-speed photography was used to obtain the dynamic changes in the surface plasma during a high-power disk laser welding process. A color space clustering algorithm to extract the edge information of the surface plasma region was developed in order to improve the accuracy of image processing. With a comparative analysis of the plasma features, i.e., area and height, and the characteristics of the welded seam, the relationship between the surface plasma and the stability of the laser welding process was characterized, which provides a basic understanding for the real-time monitoring of laser welding.

  5. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  6. Angiomyofibroblastoma of the vulva: a mitotically active variant?

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Y; Shinkoh, Y; Inai, K

    1998-04-01

    A case of angiomyofibroblastoma in a 48-year-old woman is reported. The tumor occurred as a left vulval mass and was treated by simple excision. It was located in the subcutaneous tissue of the left vulva and was well circumscribed, measuring 2.8 x 2.7 x 2.5 cm. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of hypocellular and cellular areas with well-developed small vessels. Spindle or polygonal cells were arranged with perivascular accentuation in an edematous or fibrocollagenous background. Some spindle-shaped or polygonal stromal cells were also arranged in epithelioid nests. In some areas, mitoses were frequent (maximum 3/10 high-power field). Immunohistochemically, the stromal cells were positive for vimentin and desmin, but negative for alpha-smooth muscle actin, S-100, neurofilament, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, CD31 and CD34. The average labeling index of Ki-67 in stromal cells was 3.1%. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that the stromal cells adhered with primitive junctions and contained intermediate filaments with no focal density in the cytoplasm. These findings were consistent with angiomyofibroblastoma, although previously reported cases did not show so many mitoses. Therefore, this case was suggested to be a mitotically active variant. PMID:9648158

  7. Development of a virtual probe tip with an application to high aspect ratio microscale features

    SciTech Connect

    Bauza, Marcin B.; Hocken, Robert J.; Smith, Stuart T.; Woody, Shane C.

    2005-09-15

    Nondestructive measurement of microscale features remains a challenging metrology problem. For example, to assess a high aspect ratio small hole it is currently common to cut a cross section and measure the features of interest using an atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, or scanning electron microscope. Typically, these metrology tools may be suitable for surface finish measurement but often lack the capability for dimensional metrology. The aim of this article is to discuss the development of a high aspect-ratio microscale probe for measurement of microscale features. A 700:1 high aspect ratio probe shank is fabricated with a 7 {mu}m diameter, and attached at one end to an oscillator. The oscillator produces a standing wave in the oscillating probe shank as opposed to conventional probes that use a microscale sphere on the end of a comparatively rigid shank. As a result of the standing wave formed in steady state vibration, the free end of the shank generates an amplitude of oscillation greater than the probe shank diameter. Thus, the probe does not require a spherical ball to serve as the contact point and simply uses the contact diameter of the free end of the vibrating shank. This methodology is referred to as a virtual probe tip. The virtual probe tip in conjunction with a nanopositioning scanner is used to measure surface profile measurements over traverse lengths of 130 {mu}m. In this article, results from profiles of a 500 nm step height and a ruby sphere of diameter 1 mm are presented. Experiments in this article indicate the ability to repeatedly resolve surface features of less than 5 nm while maintaining bandwidths greater than 1 kHz. Furthermore, adhesion problems often encountered with micrometer scaled probes were not observed during profile measurements with this virtual probe.

  8. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Cedric J; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J; Stewart, Martin P

    2015-09-01

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback-controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (?5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50-100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement. PMID:26305930

  9. Robust mitotic entry is ensured by a latching switch

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Chloe; Zhang, Tongli; Potapova, Tamara; Malumbres, Marcos; Novák, Béla

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell cycle events are driven by Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and by their counter-acting phosphatases. Activation of the Cdk1:Cyclin B complex during mitotic entry is controlled by the Wee1/Myt1 inhibitory kinases and by Cdc25 activatory phosphatase, which are themselves regulated by Cdk1:Cyclin B within two positive circuits. Impairing these two feedbacks with chemical inhibitors induces a transient entry into M phase referred to as mitotic collapse. The pathology of mitotic collapse reveals that the positive circuits play a significant role in maintaining the M phase state. To better understand the function of these feedback loops during G2/M transition, we propose a simple model for mitotic entry in mammalian cells including spatial control over Greatwall kinase phosphorylation. After parameter calibration, the model is able to recapture the complex and non-intuitive molecular dynamics reported by Potapova et al. (Potapova et al., 2011). Moreover, it predicts the temporal patterns of other mitotic regulators which have not yet been experimentally tested and suggests a general design principle of cell cycle control: latching switches buffer the cellular stresses which accompany cell cycle processes to ensure that the transitions are smooth and robust. PMID:24143279

  10. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Cedric J.; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.; Stewart, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback–controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (?5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50–100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement. PMID:26305930

  11. High-resolution digital elevation models of the Flade Iceblink feature in NE Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. J.; Juntunen, T.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We produce a time series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) to examine the recent evolution of an 8.7 km2 sub-glacial lake collapse feature near the southern summit of the 8500 km2 Flade Isblink Ice Cap (FIIC) in northeastern Greenland [Figure 1]. Visible imagery from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicates the collapse occurred between August 16th and September 6th, 2011 at the site of a recurring moulin. DEMs are extracted using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline for the period between June 2012 and late 2013 from 0.5 m resolution along-track stereo image pairs available via the NGA commercial imagery program. The DEMs are compared to a 1996 ERS InSAR derived DEM [Palmer et al., 2010], and to a contemporary airborne laser altimeter swath flown by NASA Icebridge in mid-April 2013 to derive the volume of the feature and the uncertainties on the high-resolution DEMs. The 'mitten' shaped feature is bounded by crevasses on three sides, with a shallow ramp to the south. It is ~70 m deep, 3.7 km north-to-south and 3 km east-to-west and has a volume of ~0.3 km3. Ice penetrating radar from a nearby Icebridge mission in May 2011, indicates the ice is approximately 550 m thick and that the bed is very flat and smooth about 1 km to the southeast of the feature. The nearby bed topography, local geology and lack of recorded seismicity in the area indicate it is unlikely that the feature is the result of either subglacial volcanic activity or the collapse of a limestone karst feature below the ice cap - the neighboring Princess Elizabeth Alps are composed of 420 Ma Caledonide fold belt gneisses. The presence of recurring supraglacial meltwater streams and drainage into the feature, its rapid formation and its steep sided nature instead suggest that it formed during the rapid drainage of a sub-glacial lake - which is, as far as we are aware, the first recorded instance of such an occurrence in Greenland. Meltwater observed using 250 m resolution MODIS imagery during the extensive melt seasons of both 2010 and 2011 flows northwards into the area of the feature before disappearing - presumably down a Moulin. We use RACMO2 to provide rough estimates of the volumes involved. We monitor the elevation of the floor of the feature to see if the subglacial lake is refilling and provide gross, low-resolution estimates of hydraulic head and drainage path calculations for the region. Flade Iceblink feature from IceBridge. Michael Studdinger/NASA mike.willis@cornell.edu Flade Ice Blink as taken by Michael Studdinger/NASA

  12. Feature extraction and classification of clouds in high resolution panchromatic satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharghi, Elan

    The development of sophisticated remote sensing sensors is rapidly increasing, and the vast amount of satellite imagery collected is too much to be analyzed manually by a human image analyst. It has become necessary for a tool to be developed to automate the job of an image analyst. This tool would need to intelligently detect and classify objects of interest through computer vision algorithms. Existing software called the Rapid Image Exploitation Resource (RAPIER®) was designed by engineers at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC PAC) to perform exactly this function. This software automatically searches for anomalies in the ocean and reports the detections as a possible ship object. However, if the image contains a high percentage of cloud coverage, a high number of false positives are triggered by the clouds. The focus of this thesis is to explore various feature extraction and classification methods to accurately distinguish clouds from ship objects. An examination of a texture analysis method, line detection using the Hough transform, and edge detection using wavelets are explored as possible feature extraction methods. The features are then supplied to a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) or Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Parameter options for these classifiers are explored and the optimal parameters are determined.

  13. High-velocity features of calcium and silicon in the spectra of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Vinkó, József; Marion, G. H.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Barna, Barnabás; Szalai, Tamás; Mulligan, Brian W.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2015-08-01

    `High-velocity features' (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km s-1) velocities than typical `photospheric-velocity features' (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e. bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ˜9000-15 000 km s-1 near B-band maximum brightness). In this work, we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The data set used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the `Phillips relation'. A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterize possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II ?6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We find that while HVFs of Ca II are regularly observed (except in underluminous SNe Ia, where they are never found), HVFs of Si II ?6355 are significantly rarer, and they tend to exist at the earliest epochs and mostly in objects with large photospheric velocities. It is also shown that stronger HVFs of Si II ?6355 are found in objects that lack C II absorption at early times and that have red ultraviolet/optical colours near maximum brightness. These results lead to a self-consistent connection between the presence and strength of HVFs of Si II ?6355 and many other mutually correlated SN Ia observables, including photospheric velocity.

  14. Automated Identification of River Hydromorphological Features Using UAV High Resolution Aerial Imagery.

    PubMed

    Casado, Monica Rivas; Gonzalez, Rocio Ballesteros; Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Veal, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    European legislation is driving the development of methods for river ecosystem protection in light of concerns over water quality and ecology. Key to their success is the accurate and rapid characterisation of physical features (i.e., hydromorphology) along the river. Image pattern recognition techniques have been successfully used for this purpose. The reliability of the methodology depends on both the quality of the aerial imagery and the pattern recognition technique used. Recent studies have proved the potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to increase the quality of the imagery by capturing high resolution photography. Similarly, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been shown to be a high precision tool for automated recognition of environmental patterns. This paper presents a UAV based framework for the identification of hydromorphological features from high resolution RGB aerial imagery using a novel classification technique based on ANNs. The framework is developed for a 1.4 km river reach along the river Dee in Wales, United Kingdom. For this purpose, a Falcon 8 octocopter was used to gather 2.5 cm resolution imagery. The results show that the accuracy of the framework is above 81%, performing particularly well at recognising vegetation. These results leverage the use of UAVs for environmental policy implementation and demonstrate the potential of ANNs and RGB imagery for high precision river monitoring and river management. PMID:26556355

  15. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss – in light of these recent insights – the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  16. MYC Is a Major Determinant of Mitotic Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Topham, Caroline; Tighe, Anthony; Ly, Peter; Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Nelson, Louisa; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Huels, David; Littler, Samantha; Schandl, Claudia; Sun, Ying; Bechi, Beatrice; Procter, David J.; Sansom, Owen J.; Cleveland, Don W.; Taylor, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Taxol and other antimitotic agents are frontline chemotherapy agents but the mechanisms responsible for patient benefit remain unclear. Following a genome-wide siRNA screen, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor Myc as a taxol sensitizer. Using time-lapse imaging to correlate mitotic behavior with cell fate, we show that Myc sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers and agents that accelerate mitotic progression. Myc achieves this by upregulating a cluster of redundant pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins and suppressing pro-survival Bcl-xL. Gene expression analysis of breast cancers indicates that taxane responses correlate positively with Myc and negatively with Bcl-xL. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-xL restores apoptosis in Myc-deficient cells. These results open up opportunities for biomarkers and combination therapies that could enhance traditional and second-generation antimitotic agents. PMID:26175417

  17. Mechanisms and Regulation of Mitotic Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Homology-dependent exchange of genetic information between DNA molecules has a profound impact on the maintenance of genome integrity by facilitating error-free DNA repair, replication, and chromosome segregation during cell division as well as programmed cell developmental events. This chapter will focus on homologous mitotic recombination in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is an important link between mitotic and meiotic recombination (covered in the forthcoming chapter by Hunter et al. 2015) and many of the functions are evolutionarily conserved. Here we will discuss several models that have been proposed to explain the mechanism of mitotic recombination, the genes and proteins involved in various pathways, the genetic and physical assays used to discover and study these genes, and the roles of many of these proteins inside the cell. PMID:25381364

  18. Detection and Mapping of Sedimentary Features on Alluvial Fans Using High-Resolution Overhead Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Moersch, J. E.; Whisner, S.

    2008-12-01

    In this study we evaluate the utility of thermal imagery for revealing geomorphic features and evidence of sedimentary processes on the surfaces of alluvial fans. Prior studies of alluvial fans have made extensive use of visible imagery and traditional field-based mapping techniques to identify surface geomorphic features and sedimentary processes. Here we present a comparison of features mapped using thermal images acquired from the ground, a light aircraft (altitude ~5000 ft, resolution ~2 m/pixel) and ASTER satellite imagery (resolution 90 m/pixel), to a preexisting ground-based map of features on an example alluvial fan in Owens Valley, California. Thermal images from a light aircraft were acquired at several times of day to determine how the surface temperatures of the alluvial fan rise and fall throughout a diurnal cycle. We have also acquired thermal images of the same fan from the ground at 5 minute intervals over the course of a full diurnal cycle. ASTER thermal data also covers the Owens Valley, and was used to determine if this technique can be used from orbit at significantly lower resolution (90 m/pixel). In an arid climate with low vegetation cover, the temperature of a surface at any given time of day is a complex function of many parameters, including slope, azimuth, composition, degree of induration, and grain size. By analyzing the temperatures on the surface of an alluvial fan with comparable slopes, azimuth, and composition, we make estimates of the relative particle size or degree of induration. We utilize the fact that several sedimentary processes acting on the surface of alluvial fans sort particles by size. For example, both debris flow and channelized flow processes can form linear features of large and small clasts. Therefore, thermal imagery could be expected to reveal evidence of these processes at the surfaces of alluvial fans in the form of spatial patterns of surface thermal properties. Process-related sedimentary features, such as clast-rich and clast-poor debris flows, debris-flow levees, and the change in particle size at the toe of the fan are all clearly revealed in the aerial thermal images of the Dolomite Fan in Owens Valley, California. The locations of these features in the thermal imagery match the locations of the features as mapped using traditional ground-based field sedimentology techniques by Blair and McPherson (1998). All debris flows that are exposed at the fan surface are evident in the aerial thermal imagery, including those that have been heavily weathered and are difficult to observe in visible aerial or orbital imagery. ASTER satellite thermal image data does not show the same sedimentary features as our aerial thermal images, presumably due to the significantly poorer spatial resolution of the satellite data. Our aerial thermal imagery suggests that higher resolution satellite data from a future satellite experiment could be used to detect sedimentary processes on alluvial fans anywhere on Earth. High resolution thermal imagery from above can be used to provide preliminary reconnaissance of an alluvial fan, suggest what processes have most recently acted on the surface of the fan, and to prioritize sites for detailed study on the ground. Future work will expand our database of alluvial fans and the list of process-related surface features that can be identified with thermal imagery.

  19. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Platani, Melpomeni; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-07-01

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. PMID:26124292

  20. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without ?-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  1. Environmental epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and somatic epigenetic mitotic stability.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K

    2011-07-01

    The majority of environmental factors can not modify DNA sequence, but can influence the epigenome. The mitotic stability of the epigenome and ability of environmental epigenetics to influence phenotypic variation and disease, suggests environmental epigenetics will have a critical role in disease etiology and biological areas such as evolutionary biology. The current review presents the molecular basis of how environment can promote stable epigenomes and modified phenotypes, and distinguishes the difference between epigenetic transgenerational inheritance through the germ line versus somatic cell mitotic stability. PMID:21637037

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption?

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 ?g/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 ?g/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter cells. Disruption of the centrosome is common in many solid tumors including lung cancer. The resulting aneuploidy is an early event in the progression of many cancers, suggesting that it may play a role in both tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These results suggest caution should be used in the handling and processing of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22178868

  3. Aurora-A-Dependent Control of TACC3 Influences the Rate of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nimesh; Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle; Pfuhl, Mark; Gergely, Fanni; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The essential mammalian gene TACC3 is frequently mutated and amplified in cancers and its fusion products exhibit oncogenic activity in glioblastomas. TACC3 functions in mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. In particular, phosphorylation on S558 by the mitotic kinase, Aurora-A, promotes spindle recruitment of TACC3 and triggers the formation of a complex with ch-TOG-clathrin that crosslinks and stabilises kinetochore microtubules. Here we map the Aurora-A-binding interface in TACC3 and show that TACC3 potently activates Aurora-A through a domain centered on F525. Vertebrate cells carrying homozygous F525A mutation in the endogenous TACC3 loci exhibit defects in TACC3 function, namely perturbed localization, reduced phosphorylation and weakened interaction with clathrin. The most striking feature of the F525A cells however is a marked shortening of mitosis, at least in part due to rapid spindle assembly. F525A cells do not exhibit chromosome missegregation, indicating that they undergo fast yet apparently faithful mitosis. By contrast, mutating the phosphorylation site S558 to alanine in TACC3 causes aneuploidy without a significant change in mitotic duration. Our work has therefore defined a regulatory role for the Aurora-A-TACC3 interaction beyond the act of phosphorylation at S558. We propose that the regulatory relationship between Aurora-A and TACC3 enables the transition from the microtubule-polymerase activity of TACC3-ch-TOG to the microtubule-crosslinking activity of TACC3-ch-TOG-clathrin complexes as mitosis progresses. Aurora-A-dependent control of TACC3 could determine the balance between these activities, thereby influencing not only spindle length and stability but also the speed of spindle formation with vital consequences for chromosome alignment and segregation. PMID:26134678

  4. Dynamics and inherent safety features of small modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the dynamics and inherent safety features of various modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. This work was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's HTGR Safety Research program. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) have sponsored studies of several modular HTGR concepts, each having it own unique advantageous economic and inherent safety features. The DOE design team has recently choses a 350-MW(t) annular core with prismatic, graphite matrix fuel for its reference plant. The various safety features of this plant and of the pebble-bed core designs similar to those currently being developed and operated in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are described. A varity of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced circulation of the helium primary coolant, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of normal and backup heat sinks were studied and are discussed. Results demonstrate that each concept can withstand an uncontrolled heatup accident without reaching excessive peak fuel temperatures. Comparisons of calculated and measured response for a loss of forced circulation test on the FRG reactor, AVR, are also presented. 10 refs.

  5. Rapid, complete and large-scale generation of post-mitotic neurons from the human LUHMES cell line.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Diana; Pöltl, Dominik; Genewsky, Andreas; Weng, Matthias; Waldmann, Tanja; Schildknecht, Stefan; Leist, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    We characterized phenotype and function of a fetal human mesencephalic cell line (LUHMES, Lund human mesencephalic) as neuronal model system. Neurodevelopmental profiling of the proliferation stage (d0, day 0) of these conditionally-immortalized cells revealed neuronal features, expressed simultaneously with some early neuroblast and stem cell markers. An optimized 2-step differentiation procedure, triggered by shut-down of the myc transgene, resulted in uniformly post-mitotic neurons within 5 days (d5). This was associated with down-regulation of some precursor markers and further up-regulation of neuronal genes. Neurite network formation involved the outgrowth of 1-2, often > 500 ?m long projections. They showed dynamic growth cone behavior, as evidenced by time-lapse imaging of stably GFP-over-expressing cells. Voltage-dependent sodium channels and spontaneous electrical activity of LUHMES continuously increased from d0 to d11, while levels of synaptic markers reached their maximum on d5. The developmental expression patterns of most genes and of the dopamine uptake- and release-machinery appeared to be intrinsically predetermined, as the differentiation proceeded similarly when external factors such as dibutyryl-cAMP and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor were omitted. Only tyrosine hydroxylase required the continuous presence of cAMP. In conclusion, LUHMES are a robust neuronal model with adaptable phenotype and high value for neurodevelopmental studies, disease modeling and neuropharmacology. PMID:21434924

  6. DESIGN SAFETY FEATURES OF THE BNL HIGH-TEMPERATURE COMBUSTION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    GINSBERG,T.; CICCARELLI,G.; BOCCIO,J.

    2000-06-11

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was used to perform hydrogen deflagration and detonation experiments at temperatures to 650 K. Safety features that were designed to ensure safe and reliable operation of the experimental program are described. Deflagration and detonation experiments have been conducted using mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam. Detonation cell size measurements were made as a function of mixture composition and thermodynamic gas conditions. Deflagration-to-detonation transition experiments were also conducted. Results of the experimental program are presented, and implications with respect to hydrogen safety are discussed.

  7. Targeting mitotic exit with hyperthermia or APC/C inhibition to increase paclitaxel efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Giovinazzi, Serena; Bellapu, Dhruv; Morozov, Viacheslav M; Ishov, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule-poisoning drugs, such as Paclitaxel (or Taxol, PTX), are powerful and commonly used anti-neoplastic agents for the treatment of several malignancies. PTX triggers cell death, mainly through a mitotic arrest following the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Cells treated with PTX slowly slip from this mitotic block and die by mitotic catastrophe. However, cancer cells can acquire or are intrinsically resistant to this drug, posing one of the main obstacles for PTX clinical effectiveness. In order to override PTX resistance and increase its efficacy, we investigated both the enhancement of mitotic slippage and the block of mitotic exit. To test these opposing strategies, we used physiological hyperthermia (HT) to force exit from PTX-induced mitotic block and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) inhibitor, proTAME, to block mitotic exit. We observed that application of HT on PTX-treated cells forced mitotic slippage, as shown by the rapid decline of cyclin B levels and by microscopy analysis. Similarly, HT induced mitotic exit in cells blocked in mitosis by other antimitotic drugs, such as Nocodazole and the Aurora A inhibitor MLN8054, indicating a common effect of HT on mitotic cells. On the other hand, proTAME prevented mitotic exit of PTX and MLN8054 arrested cells, prolonged mitosis, and induced apoptosis. In addition, we showed that proTAME prevented HT-mediated mitotic exit, indicating that stress-induced APC/C activation is necessary for HT-induced mitotic slippage. Finally, HT significantly increased PTX cytotoxicity, regardless of cancer cells’ sensitivity to PTX, and this activity was superior to the combination of PTX with pro-TAME. Our data suggested that forced mitotic exit of cells arrested in mitosis by anti-mitotic drugs, such as PTX, can be a more successful anticancer strategy than blocking mitotic exit by inactivation of the APC/C. PMID:23907120

  8. Cyclic development of igneous features and their relationship to high-temperature hydrothermal features in the Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carten, R.B.; Geraghty, E.P.; Walker, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit was formed by the superposition of coupled alteration and mineralization events, of varying intensity and size, that were associated with each of at least 11 intrusions. Deposition of molybdenite was accompanied by time-equivalent silicic and potassic alteration. High-temperature alteration and mineralization are spatially and temporally linked to the crystallization of compositionally zoned magma in the apex of stocks. Differences in hydrothermal features associated with each intrusion (e.g., mass of ore, orientation and type of veins, density of veins, and intensity of alteration) correlate with differences in primary igneous features (e.g., composition, texture, morphology, and size). The systematic relations between hydrothermal and magmatic features suggest that primary magma compositions, including volatile contents, largely control the geometry, volume, level of emplacement, and mechanisms of crystallization of stocks. These elements in turn govern the orientations and densities of fractures, which ultimately determine the distribution patterns of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. -from Authors

  9. 14-3-3s controls mitotic translation to facilitate cytokinesis

    E-print Network

    is unknown. Here we report a previously unknown function for 14-3-3s as a regulator of mitotic translation how aberrant mitotic translation in the absence of 14-3-3s impairs mitotic exit to generate binucleate dependence. U2OS cells were synchronized by a double thymidine block, and lysates were prepared at various

  10. Mitotic Spindle Proteomics in Chinese Hamster Ovary Mary Kate Bonner1

    E-print Network

    Skop, Ahna

    Mitotic Spindle Proteomics in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Mary Kate Bonner1 , Daniel S. Poole1 events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells A, Yates JR III, et al. (2011) Mitotic Spindle Proteomics in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells. PLoS ONE 6

  11. Wavelet feature extraction for reliable discrimination between high explosive and chemical/biological artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi V.; Bass, Henry E.; Chambers, Jim

    2005-03-01

    Feature extraction methods based on the discrete wavelet transform and multiresolution analysis are used to develop a robust classification algorithm that reliably discriminates between conventional and simulated chemical/biological artillery rounds via acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because high explosive warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over large areas, therefore employing a slower burning, less intense explosive to mix and spread their contents. The ensuing blast waves are readily characterized by variations in the corresponding peak pressure and rise time of the blast, differences in the ratio of positive pressure amplitude to the negative amplitude, and variations in the overall duration of the resulting waveform. Unique attributes can also be identified that depend upon the properties of the gun tube, projectile speed at the muzzle, and the explosive burn rates of the warhead. In this work, the discrete wavelet transform is used to extract the predominant components of these characteristics from air burst signatures at ranges exceeding 2km. Highly reliable discrimination is achieved with a feedforward neural network classifier trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of wavelet coefficients and higher frequency details found within different levels of the multiresolution decomposition.

  12. Physiological and genomic features of highly alkaliphilic hydrogen-utilizing Betaproteobacteria from a continental serpentinizing site

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shino; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Schipper, Kira; van der Velde, Suzanne; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Wu, Angela; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tenney, Aaron; Meng, XianYing; Morrill, Penny L.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Muyzer, Gerard; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Serpentinization, or the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks, results in challenging environments for life in continental sites due to the combination of extremely high pH, low salinity and lack of obvious electron acceptors and carbon sources. Nevertheless, certain Betaproteobacteria have been frequently observed in such environments. Here we describe physiological and genomic features of three related Betaproteobacterial strains isolated from highly alkaline (pH 11.6) serpentinizing springs at The Cedars, California. All three strains are obligate alkaliphiles with an optimum for growth at pH 11 and are capable of autotrophic growth with hydrogen, calcium carbonate and oxygen. The three strains exhibit differences, however, regarding the utilization of organic carbon and electron acceptors. Their global distribution and physiological, genomic and transcriptomic characteristics indicate that the strains are adapted to the alkaline and calcium-rich environments represented by the terrestrial serpentinizing ecosystems. We propose placing these strains in a new genus ‘Serpentinomonas’. PMID:24845058

  13. High-Precision Image Aided Inertial Navigation with Known Features: Observability Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiping; Wang, Li; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Min; Hu, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    A high-precision image-aided inertial navigation system (INS) is proposed as an alternative to the carrier-phase-based differential Global Navigation Satellite Systems (CDGNSSs) when satellite-based navigation systems are unavailable. In this paper, the image/INS integrated algorithm is modeled by a tightly-coupled iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF). Tightly-coupled integration ensures that the integrated system is reliable, even if few known feature points (i.e., less than three) are observed in the images. A new global observability analysis of this tightly-coupled integration is presented to guarantee that the system is observable under the necessary conditions. The analysis conclusions were verified by simulations and field tests. The field tests also indicate that high-precision position (centimeter-level) and attitude (half-degree-level)-integrated solutions can be achieved in a global reference. PMID:25330046

  14. EEG oscillations entrain their phase to high-level features of speech sound.

    PubMed

    Zoefel, Benedikt; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Phase entrainment of neural oscillations, the brain's adjustment to rhythmic stimulation, is a central component in recent theories of speech comprehension: the alignment between brain oscillations and speech sound improves speech intelligibility. However, phase entrainment to everyday speech sound could also be explained by oscillations passively following the low-level periodicities (e.g., in sound amplitude and spectral content) of auditory stimulation-and not by an adjustment to the speech rhythm per se. Recently, using novel speech/noise mixture stimuli, we have shown that behavioral performance can entrain to speech sound even when high-level features (including phonetic information) are not accompanied by fluctuations in sound amplitude and spectral content. In the present study, we report that neural phase entrainment might underlie our behavioral findings. We observed phase-locking between electroencephalogram (EEG) and speech sound in response not only to original (unprocessed) speech but also to our constructed "high-level" speech/noise mixture stimuli. Phase entrainment to original speech and speech/noise sound did not differ in the degree of entrainment, but rather in the actual phase difference between EEG signal and sound. Phase entrainment was not abolished when speech/noise stimuli were presented in reverse (which disrupts semantic processing), indicating that acoustic (rather than linguistic) high-level features play a major role in the observed neural entrainment. Our results provide further evidence for phase entrainment as a potential mechanism underlying speech processing and segmentation, and for the involvement of high-level processes in the adjustment to the rhythm of speech. PMID:26341026

  15. C. elegans condensin promotes mitotic chromosome architecture, centromere

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Barbara

    Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3204, USA Chromosome segregation and X-chromosome with different protein partners. To repress gene expression, MIX-1 acts in an X-chromosome complex that resemblesC. elegans condensin promotes mitotic chromosome architecture, centromere organization, and sister

  16. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind ?-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores ?-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  17. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind ?-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores ?-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  18. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    SciTech Connect

    Levakhina, Y. M.; Mueller, J.; Buzug, T. M.; Duschka, R. L.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical tomosynthesis artifacts produced by high-attenuation features. The proposed algorithm assigns weighting coefficients automatically and no segmentation or tissue-classification steps are required. The algorithm can be included into various iterative reconstruction algorithms with an additive updating strategy. It can also be extended to computed tomography case with the complete set of angular data.

  19. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic positioning

    E-print Network

    Ehssan Nazockdast; Abtin Rahimian; Daniel Needleman; Michael Shelley

    2015-11-08

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. Proper position in the single-cell embryo of Caenorhabditis elegans is achieved initially by the migration and rotation of the pronuclear complex (PNC) and its two associated centrosomal arrays of microtubules (MTs). We present here the first systematic theoretical study of how these $O(1000)$ centrosomal microtubules (MTs) interact through the immersing cytoplasm, the cell periphery and PNC, and with each other, to achieve proper position. This study is made possible through our development of a highly efficient and parallelized computational framework that accounts explicitly for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) between the MTs, while also capturing their flexibility, dynamic instability, and interactions with molecular motors and boundaries. First, we show through direct simulation that previous estimates of the PNC drag coefficient, based on either ignoring or partially including HIs, lead to misprediction of the active forces and time-scales of migration. We then directly study the dynamics of PNC migration under various force-transduction models, including the pushing or pulling of MTs at the cortex, and the pulling of MTs by cytoplasmically-bound force generators. While achieving proper position and orientation on physiologically reasonable time-scales does not uniquely choose a model, we find that each model produces a different signature in its induced cytoplasmic flow and MT conformations. We suggest then that cytoplasmic flows and MT conformations can be used to differentiate between mechanisms and to determine their contribution to the migration process.

  20. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, R K; Contopoulou, R; Schild, D

    1981-01-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near-haploid chromosome numbers. Images PMID:7029545

  1. The features of ac magnetic susceptibility in thin superconducting films with a high critical current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chornomorets, M. P.; Kovalchuk, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    The features of ac magnetic susceptibility appearing in thin superconducting films with a high critical current were investigated for the first time. These features were found in some films of YBa2Cu3O7-? in magnetic-field and temperature dependencies of the ac susceptibility in the form of Z-like step for the real component, ?m'(H) or ?m'(T), and V-like dip for the imaginary component, ?m?(H) or ?m?(T), where the index m indicates measurements at a maximum of the polar diagram ?''(?') ("maximum of losses"). Out of the maximum of losses the effect is also observed and its value depends on the depth of entrance and exit of vortices. It is suggested that the effect is caused by dependencies of the critical current and flux creep on a magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility for a thin disk was calculated approximately using modified Clem-Sanchez formulas, in which a dependence of the critical current density on the applied field, jc(H), was introduced. The calculations based on the real dependence jc(H) in the films studied and with a simplest account for the flux creep allowed to obtain the dependencies ?m'(H) and ?m?(H), qualitatively similar to experimental, including the Z- and V-features at a large critical current. It is shown that for these samples the Clem-Sanchez relations between the critical current density, on the one hand, and components of the ac magnetic susceptibility and also the amplitude of the ac field at the maximum of losses, on the other hand, are violated.

  2. Cytotoxic effects of cylindrospermopsin in mitotic and non-mitotic Vicia faba cells.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Riba, Milán; Vasas, Gábor; Beyer, Dániel; M-Hamvas, Márta; Hajdu, Gréta; Tándor, Ildikó; Máthé, Csaba

    2015-02-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a cyanobacterial toxin known as a eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitor. We aimed to study its effects on growth, stress responses and mitosis of a eukaryotic model, Vicia faba (broad bean). Growth responses depended on exposure time (3 or 6d), cyanotoxin concentration, culture conditions (dark or continuous light) and V. faba cultivar ("Standard" or "ARC Egypt Cross"). At 6d of exposure, CYN had a transient stimulatory effect on root system growth, roots being possibly capable of detoxification. The toxin induced nucleus fragmentation, blebbing and chromosomal breaks indicating double stranded DNA breaks and programmed cell death. Root necrotic tissue was observed at 0.1-20 ?g mL(-1) CYN that probably impeded toxin uptake into vascular tissue. Growth and cell death processes observed were general stress responses. In lateral root tip meristems, lower CYN concentrations (0.01-0.1 ?g mL(-1)) induced the stimulation of mitosis and distinct mitotic phases, irrespective of culture conditions or the cultivar used. Higher cyanotoxin concentrations inhibited mitosis. Short-term exposure of hydroxylurea-synchronized roots to 5 ?g mL(-1) CYN induced delay of mitosis that might have been related to a delay of de novo protein synthesis. CYN induced the formation of double, split and asymmetric preprophase bands (PPBs), in parallel with the alteration of cell division planes, related to the interference of cyanotoxin with protein synthesis, thus it was a plant- and CYN specific alteration. PMID:25016338

  3. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (localised nodular tenosynovitis): clinicopathological features of 71 cases

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, H; Salter, D; Al-Nafussi, A

    2001-01-01

    Aims/Background—Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is regarded as the most common neoplasm of the hand that can recur after excision. The objective of this study was to review a series of cases in our department and to determine any clinical or pathological features that might predict the likelihood of recurrence. Methods—Clinical data, obtained from pathology request forms and in patient notes, along with the gross and microscopic appearances of 71 cases of GCTTS were evaluated. Results—Clinical features and pathological features identified were similar to those of previous studies. In comparison with previous studies a higher mitotic count (range, 1–21 mitoses/10 high power fields (HPF); mean, 5/10 HPF) was noted in all cases, irrespective of recurrence and numerous apoptotic bodies (up to 30/10 HPF), mainly formed from osteoclast-like giant cells, were present. Conclusions—GCTTS is a relatively rare soft tissue tumour of uncertain histiogenesis. Mitotic and apoptotic figures are a common feature and do not indicate clinical behaviour. Complete local excision is the treatment of choice. Key Words: giant cell tumour tendon sheath • apoptosis • osteoclasts PMID:11328844

  4. A Small Mission Featuring an Imaging X-ray Polarimeter with High Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Baldini, Luca; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; Costa, Enrico; Dissley, Richard; Elsner, Ronald; Fabiani, Sergio; Matt, Giorgio; Minuti, Massimo; Mulieri, Fabio; O'Dell, Steve; Pinchera, Michelle; Ramsey, Brian; Rubini, Alda; Sgro, Carmelo; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed description of a small mission capable of obtaining high precision and meaningful measurement of the X-ray polarization of a variety of different classes of cosmic X-ray sources. Compared to other ideas that have been suggested this experiment has demonstrated in the laboratory a number of extremely important features relevant to the ultimate selection of such a mission by a funding agency. The most important of these questions are: 1) Have you demonstrated the sensitivity to a polarized beam at the energies of interest (i.e. the energies which represent the majority (not the minority) of detected photons from the X-ray source of interest? 2) Have you demonstrated that the device's sensitivity to an unpolarized beam is really negligible and/or quantified the impact of any systematic effects upon actual measurements? We present our answers to these questions backed up by laboratory measurements and give an overview of the mission.

  5. Spectrally resolved spatiotemporal features of quantum paths in high-order-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lixin; Lan, Pengfei; Zhang, Qingbin; Zhai, Chunyang; Wang, Feng; Shi, Wenjing; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally disentangle the contributions of different quantum paths in high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) from the spectrally and spatially resolved harmonic spectra. By adjusting the laser intensity and focusing position, we simultaneously observe the spectrum splitting, frequency shift, and intensity-dependent modulation of harmonic yields both for the short and long paths. Based on the simulations, we discriminate the physical mechanisms of the intensity-dependent modulation of HHG due to the quantum path interference and macroscopic interference effects. Moreover, it is shown that the atomic dipole phases of different quantum paths are encoded in the frequency shift. In turn, it enables us to retrieve the atomic dipole phases and the temporal chirps of different quantum paths from the measured harmonic spectra. This result gives an informative mapping of spatiotemporal and spectral features of quantum paths in HHG.

  6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors: Design Features, Potential and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Methnani, Mabrouk

    2006-07-01

    Over a period spanning more than half-a century, the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design has evolved from early experimental prototypes with single-coating fuel to more recent modular designs featuring TRISO fuel and a Brayton cycle gas turbine design, promising enhanced safety and improved economics. In this paper, the current status of the technology is reviewed, starting with a brief introduction and a descriptive history of the evolving design. This is followed by an overview of the special fuel and core design aspects, including core physics, thermal-hydraulics, reactivity control and fuelling schemes. An overview of safety performance is also presented, followed by an outline of the various power conversion unit layouts, the Brayton cycle main characteristics and the potential process heat applications of this particular design. A brief overview of the challenges facing HTGR designs and the status of research and development work is also presented. (authors)

  7. Leakage Reduction Effect by Multiple Cracking Feature of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuhiro; Natsuka, Isamu; Ishii, Masayuki

    In a kind of concrete canal, repair materials are applied for recovery of the deteriorated functions. However, due to the re-cracking of the repair material caused by the fluctuations of the crack width, there is a great possibility that the functional deterioration reoccurs after the repair. In this research, High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composite (HPFRCC), which has multiple cracking feature, was evaluated as a repair material to prevent the functional deterioration after the repair. HPFRCC and mortar specimens were cracked and examined by permeability test. As a result, it was clarified that the leakage from the HPFRCC specimen was very little compared with the leakage from the mortar specimen. Moreover, it was confirmed that the leakage from the narrow cracks were gradually decreased.

  8. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-10-15

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au{sub 8}Al{sub 3} formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Mitotic RNA Polymerase II Reveals Novel Interactors and Association With Proteins Dysfunctional in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Möller, André; Xie, Sheila Q.; Hosp, Fabian; Lang, Benjamin; Phatnani, Hemali P.; James, Sonya; Ramirez, Francisco; Collin, Gayle B.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Babu, M. Madan; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Selbach, Matthias; Pombo, Ana

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcribes protein-coding genes in eukaryotes and interacts with factors involved in chromatin remodeling, transcriptional activation, elongation, and RNA processing. Here, we present the isolation of native RNAPII complexes using mild extraction conditions and immunoaffinity purification. RNAPII complexes were extracted from mitotic cells, where they exist dissociated from chromatin. The proteomic content of native complexes in total and size-fractionated extracts was determined using highly sensitive LC-MS/MS. Protein associations with RNAPII were validated by high-resolution immunolocalization experiments in both mitotic cells and in interphase nuclei. Functional assays of transcriptional activity were performed after siRNA-mediated knockdown. We identify >400 RNAPII associated proteins in mitosis, among these previously uncharacterized proteins for which we show roles in transcriptional elongation. We also identify, as novel functional RNAPII interactors, two proteins involved in human disease, ALMS1 and TFG, emphasizing the importance of gene regulation for normal development and physiology. PMID:22199231

  10. Proteins related to the spindle and checkpoint mitotic emphasize the different pathogenesis of hypoplastic MDS.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Fabiola Fernandes; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; Ribeiro Junior, Howard Lopes; Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; Magalhaes, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2014-02-01

    Some studies show that alterations in expression of proteins related to mitotic spindle (AURORAS KINASE A and B) and mitotic checkpoint (CDC20 and MAD2L1) are involved in chromosomal instability and tumor progression in various solid and hematologic malignancies. This study aimed to evaluate these genes in MDS patients. The cytogenetics analysis was carried out by G-banding, AURKA and AURKB amplification was performed using FISH, and AURKA, AURKB, CDC20 and MAD2L1 gene expression was performed by qRT-PCR in 61 samples of bone marrow from MDS patients. AURKA gene amplification was observed in 10% of the cases, which also showed higher expression levels than the control group (p=0.038). Patients with normo/hypercellular BM presented significantly higher expression levels than hypocellular BM patients, but normo and hypercellular BM groups did not differ. After logistic regression analysis, our results showed that HIGH expression levels were associated with increased risk of developing normo/hypercellular MDS. It also indicated that age is associated with AURKA, CDC20 and MAD2L1 HIGH expression levels. The distinct expression of hypocellular patients emphasizes the prognostic importance of cellularity to MDS. The amplification/high expression of AURKA suggests that the increased expression of this gene may be related to the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:24314588

  11. A monoclonal antibody specific for prophase phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 1: a readout for early mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Segré, Chiara V; Senese, Silvia; Loponte, Sara; Santaguida, Stefano; Soffientini, Paolo; Grigorean, Gabriela; Cinquanta, Mario; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are modification enzymes that regulate a plethora of biological processes. HDAC1, a crucial epigenetic modifier, is deregulated in cancer and subjected to a variety of post-translational modifications. Here, we describe the generation of a new monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes a novel highly dynamic prophase phosphorylation of serine 406-HDAC1, providing a powerful tool for detecting early mitotic cells. PMID:26467746

  12. Extraction of Airport Features from High Resolution Satellite Imagery for Design and Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Chris; Qiu, You-Liang; Jensen, John R.; Schill, Steven R.; Floyd, Mike

    2001-01-01

    The LPA Group, consisting of 17 offices located throughout the eastern and central United States is an architectural, engineering and planning firm specializing in the development of Airports, Roads and Bridges. The primary focus of this ARC project is concerned with assisting their aviation specialists who work in the areas of Airport Planning, Airfield Design, Landside Design, Terminal Building Planning and design, and various other construction services. The LPA Group wanted to test the utility of high-resolution commercial satellite imagery for the purpose of extracting airport elevation features in the glide path areas surrounding the Columbia Metropolitan Airport. By incorporating remote sensing techniques into their airport planning process, LPA wanted to investigate whether or not it is possible to save time and money while achieving the equivalent accuracy as traditional planning methods. The Affiliate Research Center (ARC) at the University of South Carolina investigated the use of remotely sensed imagery for the extraction of feature elevations in the glide path zone. A stereo pair of IKONOS panchromatic satellite images, which has a spatial resolution of 1 x 1 m, was used to determine elevations of aviation obstructions such as buildings, trees, towers and fence-lines. A validation dataset was provided by the LPA Group to assess the accuracy of the measurements derived from the IKONOS imagery. The initial goal of this project was to test the utility of IKONOS imagery in feature extraction using ERDAS Stereo Analyst. This goal was never achieved due to problems with ERDAS software support of the IKONOS sensor model and the unavailability of imperative sensor model information from Space Imaging. The obstacles encountered in this project pertaining to ERDAS Stereo Analyst and IKONOS imagery will be reviewed in more detail later in this report. As a result of the technical difficulties with Stereo Analyst, ERDAS OrthoBASE was used to derive aviation obstruction measurements for this project. After collecting ancillary data such as GPS locations, South Carolina Geodetic Survey and Aero Dynamics ground survey points to set up the OrthoBASE Block File, measurements were taken of the various glide path obstructions and compared to the validation dataset. This process yielded the following conclusions: The IKONOS stereo model in conjunction with Imagine OrthoBASE can provide The LPA Group with a fast and cost efficient method for assessing aviation obstructions. Also, by creating our own stereo model we achieved any accuracy better currently available commercial products.

  13. Application Prospects and Microstructural Features in Laser-Induced Rapidly Solidified High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ye; He, Yi-Zhu; Wu, Ji-Li; Yue, T. M.; Guo, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Recently, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) have attracted much interest in the materials community, as they offer massive opportunities to observe new phenomena, explore new structure, and develop new materials. Particularly, it is attractive to prepare high-performance HEA coatings by laser-induced rapid solidification, which can be formed on the surface of components and parts in a variety of sizes and shapes with a lower cost in comparison with those bulk material fabrication methods. From the technical point of view, laser-induced rapid solidification could hamper the compositional segregation, improve the solubility in solid-solution phases, and lead to the strengthening effect by the grain refinement. This article reviews the recent work on the typical microstructural features and the mechanical and chemical properties in laser-induced rapidly solidified HEAs, and these data are compared with conventional Co- and Ni-based alloy coatings. The article concludes with suggestions for future research and development in HEAs, from considerations of their characteristic properties.

  14. An efficient realtime video compression algorithm with high feature preserving capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jawad, Naseer; Ehlers, Johan; Jassim, Sabah

    2006-05-01

    Mobile Phones and other hand held devices are constrained in their memory and computational power, and yet new generations of theses devices provide access to the web-based services and are equipped with digital cameras that make them more attractive to users. These added capabilities are expected to help incorporate such devices into the global communication system. In order to take advantage of these capabilities, there are desperate need for highly efficient algorithms including real-time image and video processing and transmission. This paper is concerned with high quality video compression for constrained mobile devices. We attempt to tweak a wavelet-based feature-preserving image compression technique that we have developed recently, so as to make it suitable for implementation on mobile phones and PDA's. The earlier version of the compression algorithm exploits the statistical properties of the multi-resolution wavelet-transformed images. The main modification is based on the observation that in many cases the statistical parameters of wavelet subbands of adjacent video frames do not differ significantly. We shall investigate the possibility of re-using codebooks for a sequence of adjacent frames without having adverse effect on image quality if any. Such an approach results in significant bandwidth and processing-time savings. The performance of this scheme will be tested in comparison to other video compression methods. Such a scheme is expected to be of use in security applications such as transmission of biometric data for a server-based verification.

  15. Evidence for high-level feature encoding and persistent memory during auditory stream segregation.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, David M; Snyder, Joel S

    2015-12-01

    A test sequence of alternating low-frequency (A) and high-frequency (B) tones in a repeating ". . . ABAB . . ." pattern is more likely to be heard as 2 segregated streams of tones when it is preceded by an isofrequency inducer sequence whose frequency matches either the A- or B-tone frequency (e.g., ". . . BBBB . . .") of the test, a phenomenon referred to as stream biasing. Low-level processes such as stimulus-selective adaptation of frequency-tuned neurons within early auditory processing stages have been thought by some to mediate stream biasing; however, the current study tested for the involvement of higher level processes. Inducers whose frequency matched neither the A- nor B-tone frequency (e.g., ". . . CCCC . . .") sometimes facilitated stream biasing. Stream biasing was also sensitive to complex features of the inducer sequence, namely whether the rhythmic pattern of the inducer matched the rhythm of the ABAB test. Stream biasing occurred even when an 8-s silent interval separated the inducer and test sequences, a time span longer than previously recognized (Beauvois & Meddis, 1997). These results suggest the involvement of persistent activation of high-level representations that affect perception. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26375631

  16. High surface porosity as the origin of emissivity features in asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Delbo, M.; King, P. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Olofsson, J.; Lamy, P.; Cipriani, F.; Binzel, R. P.; Marchis, F.; Merín, B.; Tamanai, A.

    2012-11-01

    Emission features in the mid-IR domain (7-25 ?m) are quite ubiquitous among large asteroids and therefore offer the potential to uncover their surface composition. However, when comparing these spectra with the actual laboratory spectra of both minerals and meteorites, they do not necessarily match. Here, and in a companion paper by King et al. (in preparation, 2012), we show that by modifying the sample preparation - typically by suspending meteorite and/or mineral powder (<30 ?m) in IR-transparent KBr (potassium bromide) powder - we are able to reproduce the spectral behavior of those main-belt asteroids with emissivity features. This resulting good match between KBr-diluted meteorite spectra and asteroid spectra suggests an important surface porosity (>90%) for the first millimeter for our asteroid sample. It therefore appears that mid-IR emission spectra of asteroids do not only carry information about their surface composition but they can also help us constraining their surface structure (under-dense versus compact surface structure), as suggested by Emery et al. (Emery, J.P., Cruikshank, D.P., van Cleve, J. [2006]. Icarus 182, 496-512) in the case of the Jupiter Trojans. The large surface porosity inferred from the mid-IR spectra of certain asteroids is also implied by two other independent measurements, namely their thermal inertia and their radar albedo. We further clarified how much compositional information can be retrieved from the mid-IR range by focusing our analysis on a single object, 624 Hektor. We showed that the mid-IR range provides critical constraints (i) on its origin and of that of the red Trojans that we locate in the formation regions of the comets, and (ii) on the primordial composition of the dust present in the outer region (>10 AU) of the Solar System’s protoplanetary disk. Future investigations should focus on finding the mechanism responsible for creating such high surface porosity.

  17. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  18. The Mitotic Exit Network: new turns on old pathways.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Manuel; Barral, Yves

    2014-03-01

    In budding yeast, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) is a signaling pathway known to drive cells out of mitosis and promote the faithful division of cells. The MEN triggers inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), the master regulator of mitosis, and the onset of cytokinesis after segregation of the daughter nuclei. The current model of the MEN suggests that MEN activity is restricted to late anaphase and coordinated with proper alignment of the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) with the division axis. However, recent evidence suggests that MEN activity may function earlier in mitosis, prompting re-evaluation of the current model. Here we attempt to integrate this recent progress into the current view of mitotic exit. PMID:24594661

  19. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  20. Excess of miRNA-378a-5p perturbs mitotic fidelity and correlates with breast cancer tumourigenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Winsel, S; Mäki-Jouppila, J; Tambe, M; Aure, M R; Pruikkonen, S; Salmela, A-L; Halonen, T; Leivonen, S-K; Kallio, L; Børresen-Dale, A-L; Kallio, M J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Optimal expression and proper function of key mitotic proteins facilitate control and repair processes that aim to prevent loss or gain of chromosomes, a hallmark of cancer. Altered expression of small regulatory microRNAs is associated with tumourigenesis and metastasis but the impact on mitotic signalling has remained unclear. Methods: Cell-based high-throughput screen identified miR-378a-5p as a mitosis perturbing microRNA. Transient transfections, immunofluorescence, western blotting, time-lapse microscopy, FISH and reporter assays were used to characterise the mitotic anomalies by excess miR-378a-5p. Analysis of microRNA profiles in breast tumours was performed. Results: Overexpression of miR-378a-5p induced numerical chromosome changes in cells and abrogated taxol-induced mitotic block via premature inactivation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Moreover, excess miR-378a-5p triggered receptor tyrosine kinase–MAP kinase pathway signalling, and was associated with suppression of Aurora B kinase. In breast cancer in vivo, we found that high miR-378a-5p levels correlate with the most aggressive, poorly differentiated forms of cancer. Interpretation: Downregulation of Aurora B by excess miR-378a-5p can explain the observed microtubule drug resistance and increased chromosomal imbalance in the microRNA-overexpressing cells. The results suggest that breast tumours may deploy high miR-378a-5p levels to gain growth advantage and antagonise taxane therapy. PMID:25268374

  1. Cbx2 stably associates with mitotic chromosomes via a PRC2- or PRC1-independent mechanism and is needed for recruiting PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Kokotovic, Marko; Phiel, Christopher J.; Ren, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic transcriptional factors that repress key developmental regulators and maintain cellular identity through mitosis via a poorly understood mechanism. Using quantitative live-cell imaging in mouse ES cells and tumor cells, we demonstrate that, although Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 proteins (Cbx-family proteins, Ring1b, Mel18, and Phc1) exhibit variable capacities of association with mitotic chromosomes, Cbx2 overwhelmingly binds to mitotic chromosomes. The recruitment of Cbx2 to mitotic chromosomes is independent of PRC1 or PRC2, and Cbx2 is needed to recruit PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes. Quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis indicates that PRC1 proteins rapidly exchange at interphasic chromatin. On entry into mitosis, Cbx2, Ring1b, Mel18, and Phc1 proteins become immobilized at mitotic chromosomes, whereas other Cbx-family proteins dynamically bind to mitotic chromosomes. Depletion of PRC1 or PRC2 protein has no effect on the immobilization of Cbx2 on mitotic chromosomes. We find that the N-terminus of Cbx2 is needed for its recruitment to mitotic chromosomes, whereas the C-terminus is required for its immobilization. Thus these results provide fundamental insights into the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. PMID:25232004

  2. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced ?-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  3. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  4. Role of senescence and mitotic catastrophe in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Senescence and mitotic catastrophe (MC) are two distinct crucial non-apoptotic mechanisms, often triggered in cancer cells and tissues in response to anti-cancer drugs. Chemotherapeuticals and myriad other factors induce cell eradication via these routes. While senescence drives the cells to a state of quiescence, MC drives the cells towards death during the course of mitosis. The senescent phenotype distinguishes tumor cells that survived drug exposure but lost the ability to form colonies from those that recover and proliferate after treatment. Although senescent cells do not proliferate, they are metabolically active and may secrete proteins with potential tumor-promoting activities. The other anti-proliferative response of tumor cells is MC that is a form of cell death that results from abnormal mitosis and leads to the formation of interphase cells with multiple micronuclei. Different classes of cytotoxic agents induce MC, but the pathways of abnormal mitosis differ depending on the nature of the inducer and the status of cell-cycle checkpoints. In this review, we compare the two pathways and mention that they are activated to curb the growth of tumors. Altogether, we have highlighted the possibilities of the use of senescence targeting drugs, mitotic kinases and anti-mitotic agents in fabricating novel strategies in cancer control. PMID:20205872

  5. The overlooked greatwall: a new perspective on mitotic control

    PubMed Central

    Glover, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the dual specificity protein phosphatase, Cdc25, in activating the cyclin-dependent kinase-cyclin B complex (Cdk1-CycB) by overcoming the inhibitory Wee1 kinase is a long-established principle for mitotic entry. Recently, however, evidence has emerged of a regulatory network that facilitates Cdk1-CycB activity by inhibiting the form of protein phosphatase 2A having a B55 regulatory subunit (PP2A-B55). Here, I review the genetic and biochemical evidence for Greatwall kinase and its substrate Endosulphine as the key components of this previously obscure regulatory network. Not only is the inhibition of PP2A-B55 by phospho-endosulphine required to prevent dephosphorylation of Cdk1-CycB substrates until mitotic exit, but it is also required to promote Cdc25 activity and inhibit Wee1 at mitotic entry. I discuss how these alternating states of preferential PP2A-B55 or Cdk1-CycB activity can have an impact upon the regulation of Polo kinase and its ability to bind different partner proteins as mitosis progresses. PMID:22754657

  6. Mitotic Figure Recognition: Agreement among Pathologists and Computerized Detector

    PubMed Central

    Malon, Christopher; Brachtel, Elena; Cosatto, Eric; Graf, Hans Peter; Kurata, Atsushi; Kuroda, Masahiko; Meyer, John S.; Saito, Akira; Wu, Shulin; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prognostic importance of mitotic count as one of the components of the Bloom – Richardson grade [3], several studies ([2, 9, 10]) have found that pathologists’ agreement on the mitotic grade is fairly modest. Collecting a set of more than 4,200 candidate mitotic figures, we evaluate pathologists' agreement on individual figures, and train a computerized system for mitosis detection, comparing its performance to the classifications of three pathologists. The system’s and the pathologists’ classifications are based on evaluation of digital micrographs of hematoxylin and eosin stained breast tissue. On figures where the majority of pathologists agree on a classification, we compare the performance of the trained system to that of the individual pathologists. We find that the level of agreement of the pathologists ranges from slight to moderate, with strong biases, and that the system performs competitively in rating the ground truth set. This study is a step towards automatic mitosis count to accelerate a pathologist's work and improve reproducibility. PMID:21965283

  7. Unconventional Functions of Mitotic Kinases in Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hascoet, Pauline; Chesnel, Franck; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors exhibit a variety of genetic alterations, including point mutations, translocations, gene amplifications and deletions, as well as aneuploid chromosome numbers. For carcinomas, aneuploidy is associated with poor patient outcome for a large variety of tumor types, including breast, colon, and renal cell carcinoma. The Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous carcinoma consisting of different histologic types. The clear renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype and represents 85% of the RCC. Central to the biology of the ccRCC is the loss of function of the Von Hippel–Lindau gene, but is also associated with genetic instability that could be caused by abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint and may involve the Aurora kinases, which regulate centrosome maturation. Aneuploidy can also result from the loss of cell–cell adhesion and apical–basal cell polarity that also may be regulated by the mitotic kinases (polo-like kinase 1, casein kinase 2, doublecortin-like kinase 1, and Aurora kinases). In this review, we describe the “non-mitotic” unconventional functions of these kinases in renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26579493

  8. Feature selection for neural network based defect classification of ceramic components using high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kesharaju, Manasa; Nagarajah, Romesh

    2015-09-01

    The motivation for this research stems from a need for providing a non-destructive testing method capable of detecting and locating any defects and microstructural variations within armour ceramic components before issuing them to the soldiers who rely on them for their survival. The development of an automated ultrasonic inspection based classification system would make possible the checking of each ceramic component and immediately alert the operator about the presence of defects. Generally, in many classification problems a choice of features or dimensionality reduction is significant and simultaneously very difficult, as a substantial computational effort is required to evaluate possible feature subsets. In this research, a combination of artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms are used to optimize the feature subset used in classification of various defects in reaction-sintered silicon carbide ceramic components. Initially wavelet based feature extraction is implemented from the region of interest. An Artificial Neural Network classifier is employed to evaluate the performance of these features. Genetic Algorithm based feature selection is performed. Principal Component Analysis is a popular technique used for feature selection and is compared with the genetic algorithm based technique in terms of classification accuracy and selection of optimal number of features. The experimental results confirm that features identified by Principal Component Analysis lead to improved performance in terms of classification percentage with 96% than Genetic algorithm with 94%. PMID:26081920

  9. Sparse Proteomics Analysis -a compressed sensing-based approach for feature selection and classification of high-dimensional proteomics mass

    E-print Network

    Kutyniok, Gitta

    Sparse Proteomics Analysis - a compressed sensing-based approach for feature selection and classification of high-dimensional proteomics mass spectrometry data Tim OF Conrad1,* , Martin Genzel2 , Nada-throughput proteomics techniques, such as mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches, produce very high-dimensional data

  10. Physical Education in Urban High School Class Settings: Features and Correlations between Teaching Behaviors and Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Howard Z.; Leung, Raymond; Liu, Wenhao; Hipscher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the features and correlations between teaching behaviors and learning activities in urban high school physical education (PE) class settings using direct instruction model. Participants were sixteen urban high school PE teachers and their students. Results indicated that the teachers spent their class times on the major…

  11. Cascaded ensemble of convolutional neural networks and handcrafted features for mitosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e. undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). While handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely unsupervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal to attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. In this paper, we present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing performance by leveraging the disconnected feature sets. Evaluation on the public ICPR12 mitosis dataset that has 226 mitoses annotated on 35 High Power Fields (HPF, x400 magnification) by several pathologists and 15 testing HPFs yielded an F-measure of 0.7345. Apart from this being the second best performance ever recorded for this MITOS dataset, our approach is faster and requires fewer computing resources compared to extant methods, making this feasible for clinical use.

  12. Microdevice having interior cavity with high aspect ratio surface features and associated methods of manufacture and use

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A microdevice having interior cavity with high aspect ratio features and ultrasmooth surfaces, and associated method of manufacture and use is described. An LIGA-produced shaped bit is used to contour polish the surface of a sacrificial mandrel. The contoured sacrificial mandrel is subsequently coated with a structural material and the mandrel removed to produce microdevices having micrometer-sized surface features and sub-micrometer RMS surface roughness.

  13. An improved high order texture features extraction method with application to pathological diagnosis of colon lesions for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Huafeng; Han, Fangfang; Zhu, Wei; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Differentiation of colon lesions according to underlying pathology, e.g., neoplastic and non-neoplastic, is of fundamental importance for patient management. Image intensity based textural features have been recognized as a useful biomarker for the differentiation task. In this paper, we introduce high order texture features, beyond the intensity, such as gradient and curvature, for that task. Based on the Haralick texture analysis method, we introduce a virtual pathological method to explore the utility of texture features from high order differentiations, i.e., gradient and curvature, of the image intensity distribution. The texture features were validated on database consisting of 148 colon lesions, of which 35 are non-neoplastic lesions, using the random forest classifier and the merit of area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics. The results show that after applying the high order features, the AUC was improved from 0.8069 to 0.8544 in differentiating non-neoplastic lesion from neoplastic ones, e.g., hyperplastic polyps from tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The experimental results demonstrated that texture features from the higher order images can significantly improve the classification accuracy in pathological differentiation of colorectal lesions. The gain in differentiation capability shall increase the potential of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening by not only detecting polyps but also classifying them from optimal polyp management for the best outcome in personalized medicine.

  14. Etching of Silicon in HBr Plasmas for High Aspect Ratio Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, M.; Mathad, G. S.; Ranade, R.

    2002-01-01

    Etching in semiconductor processing typically involves using halides because of the relatively fast rates. Bromine containing plasmas can generate high aspect ratio trenches, desirable for DRAM and MEMS applications, with relatively straight sidewalk We present scanning electron microscope images for silicon-etched trenches in a HBr plasma. Using a feature profile simulation, we show that the removal yield parameter, or number of neutrals removed per incident ion due to all processes (sputtering, spontaneous desorption, etc.), dictates the profile shape. We find that the profile becomes pinched off when the removal yield is a constant, with a maximum aspect ratio (AR) of about 5 to 1 (depth to height). When the removal yield decreases with increasing ion angle, the etch rate increases at the comers and the trench bottom broadens. The profiles have ARs of over 9:1 for yields that vary with ion angle. To match the experimentally observed etched time of 250 s for an AR of 9:1 with a trench width of 0.135 microns, we find that the neutral flux must be 3.336 x 10(exp 17)sq cm/s.

  15. Multi-feature statistical nonrigid registration using high-dimensional generalized information measures.

    PubMed

    Hamrouni, Sameh; Rougon, Nicolas; Prêteux, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration methods based on the optimization of information-theoretic measures provide versatile solutions for robustly aligning mono-modal data with nonlinear variations and multi-modal data in radiology. Whereas mutual information and its variations arise as a first choice, generalized information measures offer relevant alternatives in specific clinical contexts, Their usual application setting is the alignement of image pairs by statistically matching scalar random variables (generally, greylevel distributions), handled via their probability densities. In this paper, we address the issue of estimating and optimizing generalized information measures over high-dimensional state spaces to derive multi-feature statistical nonrigid registration models. Specifically, we introduce novel consistent and asymptotically unbiaised kappa nearest neighbors estimators of alpha-informations, and study their variational optimization over finite and infinite dimensional smooth transform spaces. The resulting theoretical framework provides a well-posed and computationally efficient alternative to entropic graph techniques. Its performances are assessed on two cardiological applications: measuring myocardial deformations in tagged MRI, and compensating cardio-thoracic motions in perfusion MRI. PMID:22003658

  16. The Salience of Lower-Order Features in Highly Self-Similar Wallpaper Groups.

    PubMed

    Vedak, Shivam; Gilmore, Rick; Kohler, Peter; Liu, Yanxi; Norcia, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Symmetric visual patterns arise frequently in natural images and human cultural artifacts. All 2-D symmetric patterns that tile the plane represent one of 17 "wallpapers" -- combinations of the fundamental symmetries of rotation, translation, glide reflection and reflection. Most research on human perception has focused on two-fold reflection. Here we examine how human observers classify patterns with varying combinations of the fundamental symmetries. Clarke et al. (2011) found that five of the seventeen wallpaper groups (P1, P3M1, P31M, P6, and P6M) had a high degree of self-similarity. We presented adult participants (n=11) with twenty spatial-frequency-normalized exemplars from each of the five highly self-similar wallpaper groups. Each exemplar was generated from a seed region containing random grayscale noise, which was then replicated, rotated, reflected, and translated according to the pattern of regularity reflected in each wallpaper group. Observers were instructed to sort the exemplars into as many subsets as they wished based on any criteria they saw appropriate. We used the Jaccard index to measure the degree to which observers sorted exemplars from the wallpaper patterns into consistent categories. Observers found consistent patterns of self-similarity between the wallpaper groups, p< .001. P1 exemplars were judged to be more self-similar than than the other groups, p< .001, and P6M exemplars were judged to be more self-similar than P6, p< .001. The findings suggest that mirror and translational symmetry influence unconstrained observer judgments about pattern regularity. Visual inspection of the subsets generated by observers suggested that the presence of salient secondary features (i.e. emergent global geometric structures such as striations, grid patterns, and characteristic shapes) influences the detection of self-similarity in wallpaper patterns. The results contribute to an emerging understanding of how group theory may shed light on human and machine pattern detection. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326527

  17. The Mitotic Checkpoint Complex binds a second CDC20 to inhibit active APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Daisuke; Pines, Jonathon

    2014-01-01

    The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) maintains genomic stability by delaying chromosome segregation until the last chromosome has attached to the mitotic spindle. The SAC prevents the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase from recognising Cyclin B and securin by catalysing the incorporation of the APC/C co-activator, CDC20, into a complex called the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC). The SAC works through unattached kinetochores generating a diffusible ‘wait anaphase’ signal1,2 that inhibits the APC/C in the cytoplasm, but the nature of this signal remains a key unsolved problem. Moreover, the SAC and the APC/C are highly responsive to each other: the APC/C quickly targets Cyclin B and securin once all the chromosomes attach in metaphase, but is rapidly inhibited should kinetochore attachment be perturbed3,4. How this is achieved is also unknown. Here, we show that the MCC can inhibit a second CDC20 that has already bound and activated the APC/C. We show how the MCC inhibits active APC/C and that this is essential for the SAC. Moreover, this mechanism can prevent anaphase in the absence of kinetochore signalling. Thus, we propose that the diffusible ‘wait anaphase’ signal could be the MCC itself, and explain how reactivating the SAC can rapidly inhibit active APC/C. PMID:25383541

  18. Outcrossing, mitotic recombination, and life-history trade-offs shape genome evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Magwene, Paul M; Kay?kç?, Ömür; Granek, Joshua A; Reininga, Jennifer M; Scholl, Zackary; Murray, Debra

    2011-02-01

    We carried out a population genomic survey of Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid isolates and find that many budding yeast strains have high levels of genomic heterozygosity, much of which is likely due to outcrossing. We demonstrate that variation in heterozygosity among strains is correlated with a life-history trade-off that involves how readily yeast switch from asexual to sexual reproduction under nutrient stress. This trade-off is reflected in a negative relationship between sporulation efficiency and pseudohyphal development and correlates with variation in the expression of RME1, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects on meiosis and filamentous growth. Selection for alternate life-history strategies in natural versus human-associated environments likely contributes to differential maintenance of genomic heterozygosity through its effect on the frequency that yeast lineages experience sexual cycles and hence the opportunity for inbreeding. In addition to elevated levels of heterozygosity, many strains exhibit large genomic regions of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), suggesting that mitotic recombination has a significant impact on genetic variation in this species. This study provides new insights into the roles that both outcrossing and mitotic recombination play in shaping the genome architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study also provides a unique case where stark differences in the genomic distribution of genetic variation among individuals of the same species can be largely explained by a life-history trade-off. PMID:21245305

  19. Mitotic disturbances and micronucleus induction in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblast cells caused by asbestos fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Dopp, E; Saedler, J; Stopper, H; Weiss, D G; Schiffmann, D

    1995-01-01

    Asbestos and other mineral fibers have long been known to induce lung cancer and mesothelioma. However, the primary mechanisms of fiber-induced carcinogenesis still remain unclear. We investigated the occurrence of mitotic disturbances induced by asbestos (amosite, crocidolite, chrysotile) in an in vitro approach using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblast cells. The following endpoints were investigated: micronucleus formation as a result of mitotic disturbances and characterization of the induced micronucleus population by kinetochore staining and visualization of the spindle apparatus. Supravital UV-microscopy was used to analyze changes in interphase chromatin structure, impaired chromatid separation, and blocked cytokinesis. All three asbestos fiber types induced a high frequency of micronucleus formation in SHE cells (> 200/2000 cells) in a dose-dependent manner (0.1-5.0 micrograms/cm2), with a maximum between 48 hr and 66 hr exposure time. At higher concentrations (more than 5.0 micrograms/cm2) the micronucleus formation decreased again as a result of increased toxicity. Kinetochore staining of micronuclei revealed that 48 +/- 2% of asbestos-induced micronuclei reacted positively with CREST (antikinetochore) serum. Furthermore, spindle apparatus deformations occurred in cells with disturbed metaphases and anaphases, while the spindle fiber morphology appeared unchanged. Our results show that asbestos fibers may cause both loss and breakage of chromosomes in the absence of direct interaction with spindle fibers. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 3. E Figure 3. F PMID:7768228

  20. Hsp72 is targeted to the mitotic spindle by Nek6 to promote K-fiber assembly and mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Laura; Sampson, Josephina; Richards, Mark W.; Knebel, Axel; Roth, Daniel; Hood, Fiona E.; Straube, Anne; Royle, Stephen J.; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70 proteins represent a family of chaperones that regulate cellular homeostasis and are required for cancer cell survival. However, their function and regulation in mitosis remain unknown. In this paper, we show that the major inducible cytoplasmic Hsp70 isoform, Hsp72, is required for assembly of a robust bipolar spindle capable of efficient chromosome congression. Mechanistically, Hsp72 associates with the K-fiber–stabilizing proteins, ch-TOG and TACC3, and promotes their interaction with each other and recruitment to spindle microtubules (MTs). Targeting of Hsp72 to the mitotic spindle is dependent on phosphorylation at Thr-66 within its nucleotide-binding domain by the Nek6 kinase. Phosphorylated Hsp72 concentrates on spindle poles and sites of MT–kinetochore attachment. A phosphomimetic Hsp72 mutant rescued defects in K-fiber assembly, ch-TOG/TACC3 recruitment and mitotic progression that also resulted from Nek6 depletion. We therefore propose that Nek6 facilitates association of Hsp72 with the mitotic spindle, where it promotes stable K-fiber assembly through recruitment of the ch-TOG–TACC3 complex. PMID:25940345

  1. Influence of the circadian rhythm in cell division on radiation-induced mitotic delay in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, N.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mitotic delay is described as a classical response to radiation; however, circadian rhythmicity in cell division in vivo has not been considered by many authors. The present study investigated the relation between fluctuations reported as mitotic delay and recovery in vivo and circadian oscillations in mitotic index in mouse corneal epithelium. One aspect involved single doses (approximately 600 rad) given to mice at different circadian stages. The normal circadian rhythm in cell division was never obliterated. Inhibition of mitosis was evident but unpredictable, ranging from 6 to 15 hr after irradiation. Recovery was evident only during the daily increase in mitotic index of controls. The classical interpretation of recovery from mitotic delay may be in an in vitro phenomenon not reflecting in vivo responses, which are apparently strongly circadian stage dependent. The second portion of the study demonstrated a dose-response effect on length of mitotic delay and, to a lesser extent, degree of recovery.

  2. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals coupling between mitotic apoptosis and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Martínez, Laura A; Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Warrington, Ross; Li, Bing; Wei, Shuguang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Roth, Michael G; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    The antimitotic anti-cancer drugs, including taxol, perturb spindle dynamics, and induce prolonged, spindle checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest in cancer cells. These cells then either undergo apoptosis triggered by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway or exit mitosis without proper cell division in an adaptation pathway. Using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in taxol-treated HeLa cells, we systematically identify components of the mitotic apoptosis and adaptation pathways. We show that the Mad2 inhibitor p31comet actively promotes mitotic adaptation through cyclin B1 degradation and has a minor separate function in suppressing apoptosis. Conversely, the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member, Noxa, is a critical initiator of mitotic cell death. Unexpectedly, the upstream components of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 contribute to mitotic adaption. Our results reveal crosstalk between the apoptosis and adaptation pathways during mitotic arrest. PMID:25024437

  3. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the performance by leveraging the disconnected feature sets. Evaluation on the public ICPR12 mitosis dataset that has 226 mitoses annotated on 35 HPFs (400× magnification) by several pathologists and 15 testing HPFs yielded an F-measure of 0.7345. Our approach is accurate, fast, and requires fewer computing resources compared to existent methods, making this feasible for clinical use. PMID:26158062

  4. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the performance by leveraging the disconnected feature sets. Evaluation on the public ICPR12 mitosis dataset that has 226 mitoses annotated on 35 HPFs ([Formula: see text] magnification) by several pathologists and 15 testing HPFs yielded an [Formula: see text]-measure of 0.7345. Our approach is accurate, fast, and requires fewer computing resources compared to existent methods, making this feasible for clinical use. PMID:26158062

  5. Cloud field classification based upon high spatial resolution textural features. I - Gray level co-occurrence matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R. M.; Sengupta, S. K.; Chen, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Stratocumulus, cumulus, and cirrus clouds were identified on the basis of cloud textural features which were derived from a single high-resolution Landsat MSS NIR channel using a stepwise linear discriminant analysis. It is shown that, using this method, it is possible to distinguish high cirrus clouds from low clouds with high accuracy on the basis of spatial brightness patterns. The largest probability of misclassification is associated with confusion between the stratocumulus breakup regions and the fair-weather cumulus.

  6. Enhancement of spontaneous mitotic recombination by the meiotic mutant spo11-1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Bruschi, C.V.; Esposito, M.S.

    1983-12-01

    Both nonreciprocal and reciprocal mitotic recombination are enhanced by the recessive mutant spo11-1, which was previously shown to affect meiosis by decreasing recombination and increasing nondisjunction. The mitotic effects are not distributed equally in all chromosomal regions. The genotypes of mitotic recombinants in spo11-1/spo11-1 diploid cells provide further evidence that widely spaced chromosomal markers undergo coincident conversion in mitosis.

  7. Ewing Sarcoma Protein Ewsr1 Maintains Mitotic Integrity and Proneural Cell Survival in the Zebrafish Embryo

    E-print Network

    Azuma, Mizuki; Embree, Lisa J.; Sabaawy, Hatem; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2007-10-03

    Mitotic Integrity and Proneural Cell Survival in the Zebrafish Embryo Mizuki Azuma*, Lisa J. Embree, Hatem Sabaawy, Dennis D. Hickstein Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National... mitotic integrity and proneural cell survival in early zebrafish development. Citation: Azuma M, Embree LJ, Sabaawy H, Hickstein DD (2007) Ewing Sarcoma Protein Ewsr1 Maintains Mitotic Integrity and Proneural Cell Survival in the Zebrafish Embryo. PLoS ONE...

  8. A Genome Scale Screen for Mutants with Delayed Exit from Mitosis: Ire1-Independent Induction of Autophagy Integrates ER Homeostasis into Mitotic Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Ghavidel, Ata; Baxi, Kunal; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Arnason, Terra G.; Kislinger, Thomas; Carvalho, Carlos E.; Harkness, Troy A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating eukaryotic cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions before irreversibly exiting mitosis. Yet pathways that normally limit the number of cell divisions remain poorly characterized. Here we describe a screen of a collection of 3762 single gene mutants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, accounting for 2/3 of annotated yeast ORFs, to search for mutants that undergo an atypically high number of cell divisions. Many of the potential longevity genes map to cellular processes not previously implicated in mitotic senescence, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms governing mitotic exit may be broader than currently anticipated. We focused on an ER-Golgi gene cluster isolated in this screen to determine how these ubiquitous organelles integrate into mitotic longevity. We report that a chronic increase in ER protein load signals an expansion in the assembly of autophagosomes in an Ire1-independent manner, accelerates trafficking of high molecular weight protein aggregates from the cytoplasm to the vacuoles, and leads to a profound enhancement of daughter cell production. We demonstrate that this catabolic network is evolutionarily conserved, as it also extends reproductive lifespan in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our data provide evidence that catabolism of protein aggregates, a natural byproduct of high protein synthesis and turn over in dividing cells, is among the drivers of mitotic longevity in eukaryotes. PMID:26247883

  9. High albedo dune features suggest past dune migration and possible geochemical cementation of aeolian sediments on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Emilie; Bourke, Mary C.; Allemand, Pascal; Quantin, Cathy

    2011-04-01

    High albedo features are identified in association with barchan dunes in an equatorial inter-crater dune field on Mars using images from the MRO mission. This paper describes the morphometric properties of these features and their association with the present barchan dune field. We propose that these features are cemented aeolian deposits that form at the foot of the dune avalanche face. A possible terrestrial analog exists at White Sands National Monument, in south-central New Mexico, USA. The presence of these features suggests past episodes of dune migration in inter-crater dunefields and liquid water in the near sub-surface in sufficient quantity to cause the cementation of aeolian dune sediment.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 inhibitor RO3306 promotes mitotic slippage in paclitaxel-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Qiu, P; Lai, X; He, P; Wu, Y; Du, B; Tan, Y

    2013-09-20

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver neoplasm and current systemic chemotherapy are mostly ineffective. Paclitaxel (PTX) has a?clinically significant effect on many malignant tumors. Cells treated with PTX undergo reversible mitotic arrest and although high doses can cause side effects it may also induce apoptosis. We investigated the effect of a?sequential combination of PTX and RO3306, a?cyclin-dependent kinase 1 inhibitor, on the hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. The sequential drug treatment protocol involved the addition of PTX (0.2 µmol/L) for 18 h?followed by RO3306 (2 µmol/L) for a?further 6 h. Cell viability and proliferation were measured using tetrazolium dye (MTT) and colony formation assay. Cell cycle profiles were established by flow cytometry. The expression level of protein was examined by immunoblotting. We observed a?synergistic effect of PTX and RO3306 treatment on cell growth and proliferation as well as an increased proportion of cells in sub-G1 phase. Expression levels of cyclin B, cyclin E?and phosphorylated Histone H3 demonstrated that RO3306 enhanced apoptosis in PTX treated cells by mitotic slippage. Our data suggested that the combination of PTX and RO3306 may be an effective therapeutic combination for the treatment of liver cancer. Keywords: paclitaxel; RO3306; apoptosis; mitotic slippage; HepG2 cells. PMID:24050548

  11. High-Resolution Seismic Investigation of a Surface Collapse Feature at Weeks Island Salt Dome, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. D.; Xia, J.; Harding, R. S.; Steeples, D. W.

    2005-05-01

    Seismic imaging techniques delineated the subsurface expression of an active sinkhole above a former salt mine at Weeks Island, Louisiana, which was used at the time by the U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve. (The Weeks Island salt dome is no longer part of the Reserve.) The sinkhole, which at the time of the survey was approximately 12 m wide and 11 m deep, is directly over the edge of the upper storage chamber and approximately 60 m above the top of the salt dome. Surface seismic reflections imaged a dramatic bowl-shaped depression in a 28-m-deep reflector spatially consistent with the sinkhole. Two reflections (28 m and 60 m) on multichannel VSP data represent the only velocity and/or density contrasts detected above the top of the salt dome. The 28-m reflector identified on both VSP and surface seismic reflection data is at a depth consistent with the piezometric surface. Considering the high measured permeability and relative geometric severity of the reflection geometry, it is questionable whether this drape in the 28-m reflection is consistent with the water table. Localized velocity variations could account for some of the apparent geometry. The 60-m salt reflection, evident on VSP, can be interpreted on selected processed surface seismic shot gathers, but is difficult to confidently and consistently identify on stacked sections. The sinkhole lies along a northeast-trending acoustic lineament, possibly related to or associated with salt dissolution. The acoustic expression of the sinkhole suggests a localized, predominantly vertical feature. No evidence was discovered to confidently ascertain the mechanism responsible for exposing the salt to unsaturated meteoric water.

  12. Working hard for recovery: mitotic kinases in the DNA damage checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in mitosis is tightly regulated via a group of protein kinases. Activation of these mitotic kinases is inhibited by the DNA damage checkpoint that arrests the cell cycle in interphase and prevents mitotic entry. Interestingly, it has been shown that the DNA damage checkpoint is feedback regulated by several mitotic kinases. These kinases are reactivated from checkpoint arrest to deactivate the checkpoint and restart cell cycle progression, thereby allowing the cell to recover from the DNA damage checkpoint. The emerging role of mitotic kinases in the DNA damage pathway provides important insights into cancer progression and treatment. PMID:23618492

  13. Necessary and sufficient conditions for high-dimensional salient feature subset recovery

    E-print Network

    Tan, Vincent Yan Fu

    We consider recovering the salient feature subset for distinguishing between two probability models from i.i.d. samples. Identifying the salient set improves discrimination performance and reduces complexity. The focus in ...

  14. Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for High-Dimensional Salient Feature Subset Recovery

    E-print Network

    Willsky, Alan S.

    are not. 106 measurements of possibly relevant features (e.g. genetic, envi- ronmental, physiological -- the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (http://www.maas.org.uk/). The correct identification and subsequent

  15. A hybrid feature extraction selection approach for high-dimensional non-Gaussian data clustering.

    PubMed

    Boutemedjet, Sabri; Bouguila, Nizar; Ziou, Djemel

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents an unsupervised approach for feature selection and extraction in mixtures of generalized Dirichlet (GD) distributions. Our method defines a new mixture model that is able to extract independent and non-Gaussian features without loss of accuracy. The proposed model is learned using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm by minimizing the message length of the data set. Experimental results show the merits of the proposed methodology in the categorization of object images. PMID:19542577

  16. Static features in real-time recognition of isolated vowels at high pitch.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aníbal J S

    2007-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatic identification of vowels uttered in isolation by female and child speakers. In this case, the magnitude spectrum of voiced vowels is sparsely sampled since only frequencies at integer multiples of F0 are significant. This impacts negatively on the performance of vowel identification techniques that either ignore pitch or rely on global shape models. A new pitch-dependent approach to vowel identification is proposed that emerges from the concept of timbre and that defines perceptual spectral clusters (PSC) of harmonic partials. A representative set of static PSC-related features are estimated and their performance is evaluated in automatic classification tests using the Mahalanobis distance. Linear prediction features and Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) coefficients are used as a reference and a database of five (Portuguese) natural vowel sounds uttered by 44 speakers (including 27 child speakers) is used for training and testing the Gaussian models. Results indicate that perceptual spectral cluster (PSC) features perform better than plain linear prediction features, but perform slightly worse than MFCC features. However, PSC features have the potential to take full advantage of the pitch structure of voiced vowels, namely in the analysis of concurrent voices, or by using pitch as a normalization parameter. PMID:17902873

  17. A high-frequency Doppler feature in the power spectra of simulated GRMHD black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Wellons, Sarah; Zhu, Yucong; Narayan, Ramesh; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2014-04-20

    Black hole binaries exhibit a wide range of variability phenomena, from large-scale state changes to broadband noise and quasi-periodic oscillations, but the physical nature of much of this variability is poorly understood. We examine the variability properties of three GRMHD simulations of thin accretion disks around black holes of varying spin, producing light curves and power spectra as would be seen by observers. We find that the simulated power spectra show a broad feature at high frequency, which increases in amplitude with the inclination of the observer. We show that this high-frequency feature is a product of the Doppler effect and that its location is a function of the mass and spin of the black hole. This Doppler feature demonstrates that power spectral properties of the accretion disk can be tied to, and potentially used to determine, physical properties of the black hole.

  18. Identification of the oncogenic kinase TOPK/PBK as a master mitotic regulator of C2H2 zinc finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rizkallah, Raed; Batsomboon, Paratchata; Dudley, Gregory B.; Hurt, Myra M.

    2015-01-01

    TOPK/PBK is an oncogenic kinase upregulated in most human cancers and its high expression correlates with poor prognosis. TOPK is known to be activated by Cdk1 and needed for mitotic cell division; however, its mitotic functions are not yet fully understood. In this study, we show that TOPK plays a global mitotic role by simultaneously regulating hundreds of DNA binding proteins. C2H2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) constitute the largest family of human proteins. All C2H2 ZFPs contain a highly conserved linker sequence joining their multi-zinc finger domains. We have previously shown that phosphorylation of this conserved motif serves as a global mechanism for the coordinate dissociation of C2H2 ZFPs from condensing chromatin, during mitosis. Here, using a panel of kinase inhibitors, we identified K252a as a potent inhibitor of mitotic ZFP linker phosphorylation. We generated a biotinylated form of K252a and used it to purify candidate kinases. From these candidates we identified TOPK/PBK, in vitro and in vivo, as the master ZFP linker kinase. Furthermore, we show precise temporal correlation between TOPK activating phosphorylation by Cdk1 and linker phosphorylation in mitosis. The identification of this fundamental role of TOPK underscores its significance as a promising novel target of cancer therapeutics. PMID:25575812

  19. Mitochondrial genome regulates mitotic fidelity by maintaining centrosomal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Brahmbhatt, Meera; Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree CG; Ramarathinam, Sujatha; Ogden, Angela; Cheng, Alice; Singh, Keshav K; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes direct spindle morphogenesis to assemble a bipolar mitotic apparatus to enable error-free chromosome segregation and preclude chromosomal instability (CIN). Amplified centrosomes, a hallmark of cancer cells, set the stage for CIN, which underlies malignant transformation and evolution of aggressive phenotypes. Several studies report CIN and a tumorigenic and/or aggressive transformation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted cells. Although several nuclear-encoded proteins are implicated in centrosome duplication and spindle organization, the involvement of mtDNA encoded proteins in centrosome amplification (CA) remains elusive. Here we show that disruption of mitochondrial function by depletion of mtDNA induces robust CA and mitotic aberrations in osteosarcoma cells. We found that overexpression of Aurora A, Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), and Cyclin E was associated with emergence of amplified centrosomes. Supernumerary centrosomes in rho0 (mtDNA-depleted) cells resulted in multipolar mitoses bearing “real” centrosomes with paired centrioles at the multiple poles. This abnormal phenotype was recapitulated by inhibition of respiratory complex I in parental cells, suggesting a role for electron transport chain (ETC) in maintaining numeral centrosomal homeostasis. Furthermore, rho0 cells displayed a decreased proliferative capacity owing to a G2/M arrest. Downregulation of nuclear-encoded p53 in rho0 cells underscores the importance of mitochondrial and nuclear genome crosstalk and may perhaps underlie the observed mitotic aberrations. By contrast, repletion of wild-type mtDNA in rho0 cells (cybrid) demonstrated a much lesser extent of CA and spindle multipolarity, suggesting partial restoration of centrosomal homeostasis. Our study provides compelling evidence to implicate the role of mitochondria in regulation of centrosome duplication, spindle architecture, and spindle pole integrity. PMID:24799670

  20. Callous-Unemotional Features, Behavioral Inhibition, and Parenting: Independent Predictors of Aggression in a High-Risk Preschool Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimonis, Eva R.; Frick, Paul J.; Boris, Neil W.; Smyke, Anna T.; Cornell, Amy H.; Farrell, Jamie M.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    A behaviorally-uninhibited temperament, callous-unemotional (CU) features, and harsh parenting have been associated with specific patterns of aggressive behavior in older children and adolescents. We tested the additive and interactive effects of these factors in predicting different types of aggressive behavior in a high-risk preschool sample.…

  1. Built-up Areas Extraction in High Resolution SAR Imagery based on the method of Multiple Feature Weighted Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, J. X.; Zhao, Z.; Ma, A. D.

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar in the application of remote sensing technology is becoming more and more widely because of its all-time and all-weather operation, feature extraction research in high resolution SAR image has become a hot topic of concern. In particular, with the continuous improvement of airborne SAR image resolution, image texture information become more abundant. It's of great significance to classification and extraction. In this paper, a novel method for built-up areas extraction using both statistical and structural features is proposed according to the built-up texture features. First of all, statistical texture features and structural features are respectively extracted by classical method of gray level co-occurrence matrix and method of variogram function, and the direction information is considered in this process. Next, feature weights are calculated innovatively according to the Bhattacharyya distance. Then, all features are weighted fusion. At last, the fused image is classified with K-means classification method and the built-up areas are extracted after post classification process. The proposed method has been tested by domestic airborne P band polarization SAR images, at the same time, two groups of experiments based on the method of statistical texture and the method of structural texture were carried out respectively. On the basis of qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis based on the built-up area selected artificially is enforced, in the relatively simple experimentation area, detection rate is more than 90%, in the relatively complex experimentation area, detection rate is also higher than the other two methods. In the study-area, the results show that this method can effectively and accurately extract built-up areas in high resolution airborne SAR imagery.

  2. Phosphatidylserine colocalizes with epichromatin in interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Prudovsky, Igor; Vary, Calvin P.H.; Markaki, Yolanda; Olins, Ada L.; Olins, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Cycling eukaryotic cells rapidly re-establish the nuclear envelope and internal architecture following mitosis. Studies with a specific anti-nucleosome antibody recently demonstrated that the surface (“epichromatin”) of interphase and mitotic chromatin possesses a unique and conserved conformation, suggesting a role in postmitotic nuclear reformation. Here we present evidence showing that the anionic glycerophospholipid phosphatidylserine is specifically located in epichromatin throughout the cell cycle and is associated with nucleosome core histones. This suggests that chromatin bound phosphatidylserine may function as a nucleation site for the binding of ER and re-establishment of the nuclear envelope. PMID:22555604

  3. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) ? subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  4. Microtubule Dynamics and Oscillating State for Mitotic Spindle

    E-print Network

    Safura Rashid-Shomali; Ali Najafi

    2010-05-18

    We present a physical mechanism that can cause the mitotic spindle to oscillate. The driving force for this mechanism emerges from the polymerization of astral microtubules interacting with the cell cortex. We show that Brownian ratchet model for growing microtubules reaching the cell cortex, mediate an effective mass to the spindle body and therefore force it to oscillate. We compare the predictions of this mechanism with the previous mechanisms which were based on the effects of motor proteins. Finally we combine the effects of microtubules polymerization and motor proteins, and present the detailed phase diagram for possible oscillating states.

  5. Regulation of sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ge; Yu, HongTao

    2015-11-01

    Orderly execution of two critical events during the cell cycle--DNA replication and chromosome segregation--ensures the stable transmission of genetic materials. The cohesin complex physically connects sister chromatids during DNA replication in a process termed sister chromatid cohesion. Timely establishment and dissolution of sister chromatid cohesion is a prerequisite for accurate chromosome segregation, and is tight regulated by the cell cycle machinery and cohesin-associated proteins. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the molecular understanding of sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle. PMID:26511516

  6. Supplementary Material for "Conditional Random Fields with High-Order Features for Sequence

    E-print Network

    Lee, Wee Sun

    yj = O 8 xj = . yj = O 9 yj-2yj-1yj = LOL Table 1: List of features. Table 2 shows the sum of the weights for features with the same label pattern at each position. t\\z P O L LOL 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 the following 5 label sequences as (pi , y): { L, PL, OL, LL, LOL}. x(6, L) = x(5, )p x(6, L) + x(5, P)p x(6, PL

  7. Incremental high pressure torsion as a novel severe plastic deformation process: Processing features and application to copper

    PubMed Central

    Hohenwarter, A.

    2015-01-01

    High pressure torsion is known as one of the most popular severe plastic deformation processes. However, it has certain size limitations, especially regarding the thickness of the processed samples. In this contribution incremental high pressure torsion is introduced as a novel severe plastic deformation process. This further development of conventional high pressure torsion is capable of delivering specimens having an extraordinarily high aspect-ratio of thickness to diameter. The features of this process combined with a case-study on a pure copper specimen with a deformed diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 40 mm is presented. PMID:25892850

  8. High-grade gliomas in children.

    PubMed

    Cage, Tene A; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Gupta, Nalin

    2012-07-01

    High-grade gliomas (HGGs) are malignant tumors and typically include glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma subtypes. Brainstem gliomas and ependymomas are separate entities with respect to clinical presentation, treatment, prognosis, and outcome in comparison with supratentorial HGGs. In children, these tumors account for 3% to 7% of newly diagnosed brain tumors and 20% of all diagnoses of pediatric supratentorial brain tumors. These neoplasms are highly proliferative and mitotically active and of glial origin. This article reviews clinical, diagnostic, and pathologic features of HGG and current treatments and potential future therapies specific to pediatric patients with HGGs. PMID:22748663

  9. An Educational System to Help Students Assess Website Features and Identify High-Risk Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajiyama, Tomoko; Echizen, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose an effective educational system to help students assess Web site risk by providing an environment in which students can better understand a Web site's features and determine the risks of accessing the Web site for themselves. Design/methodology/approach: The authors have enhanced a prototype…

  10. Feature Shape and Elevation Based Road Classification and Extraction on High Spatial

    E-print Network

    Carbonara, Joaquin

    of spatial features on the remote sensed images. We focus on the road network classification and extraction unique characteristic of elongation. Researches of automatic extraction of roads from digital images has; 2) image segmentation, classification, and extraction; 3) vectorization and reconstruction; and 4

  11. Analyzing fine-scale wetland composition using high resolution imagery and texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szantoi, Zoltan; Escobedo, Francisco; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Smith, Scot; Pearlstine, Leonard

    2013-08-01

    In order to monitor natural and anthropogenic disturbance effects to wetland ecosystems, it is necessary to employ both accurate and rapid mapping of wet graminoid/sedge communities. Thus, it is desirable to utilize automated classification algorithms so that the monitoring can be done regularly and in an efficient manner. This study developed a classification and accuracy assessment method for wetland mapping of at-risk plant communities in marl prairie and marsh areas of the Everglades National Park. Maximum likelihood (ML) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were tested using 30.5 cm aerial imagery, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), first and second order texture features and ancillary data. Additionally, appropriate window sizes for different texture features were estimated using semivariogram analysis. Findings show that the addition of NDVI and texture features increased classification accuracy from 66.2% using the ML classifier (spectral bands only) to 83.71% using the SVM classifier (spectral bands, NDVI and first order texture features).

  12. Quadratic Optimization to Identify Highly Heritable Quantitative Traits from Complex Phenotypic Features

    E-print Network

    Chandy, John A.

    Features Jiangwen Sun Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Connecticut Storrs, CT, USA javon@engr.uconn.edu Jinbo Bi Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA kranzler_h@mail.trc.upenn.edu ABSTRACT Identifying genetic variation

  13. Cardinality as a highly descriptive feature in myoelectric pattern recognition for decoding motor volition

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max

    2015-01-01

    Accurate descriptors of muscular activity play an important role in clinical practice and rehabilitation research. Such descriptors are features of myoelectric signals extracted from sliding time windows. A wide variety of myoelectric features have been used as inputs to pattern recognition algorithms that aim to decode motor volition. The output of these algorithms can then be used to control limb prostheses, exoskeletons, and rehabilitation therapies. In the present study, cardinality is introduced and compared with traditional time-domain (Hudgins' set) and other recently proposed myoelectric features (for example, rough entropy). Cardinality was found to consistently outperform other features, including those that are more sophisticated and computationally expensive, despite variations in sampling frequency, time window length, contraction dynamics, type, and number of movements (single or simultaneous), and classification algorithms. Provided that the signal resolution is kept between 12 and 14 bits, cardinality improves myoelectric pattern recognition for the prediction of motion volition. This technology is instrumental for the rehabilitation of amputees and patients with motor impairments where myoelectric signals are viable. All code and data used in this work is available online within BioPatRec. PMID:26578873

  14. Cardinality as a highly descriptive feature in myoelectric pattern recognition for decoding motor volition.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max

    2015-01-01

    Accurate descriptors of muscular activity play an important role in clinical practice and rehabilitation research. Such descriptors are features of myoelectric signals extracted from sliding time windows. A wide variety of myoelectric features have been used as inputs to pattern recognition algorithms that aim to decode motor volition. The output of these algorithms can then be used to control limb prostheses, exoskeletons, and rehabilitation therapies. In the present study, cardinality is introduced and compared with traditional time-domain (Hudgins' set) and other recently proposed myoelectric features (for example, rough entropy). Cardinality was found to consistently outperform other features, including those that are more sophisticated and computationally expensive, despite variations in sampling frequency, time window length, contraction dynamics, type, and number of movements (single or simultaneous), and classification algorithms. Provided that the signal resolution is kept between 12 and 14 bits, cardinality improves myoelectric pattern recognition for the prediction of motion volition. This technology is instrumental for the rehabilitation of amputees and patients with motor impairments where myoelectric signals are viable. All code and data used in this work is available online within BioPatRec. PMID:26578873

  15. Cytometric and histopathologic features of tumors detected in a randomized mammography screening program: correlation and relative prognostic influence.

    PubMed

    Hatschek, T; Gröntoft, O; Fagerberg, G; Stål, O; Sullivan, S; Carstensen, J; Nordenskjöld, B

    1990-05-01

    Cytometric determination of S-phase fraction and ploidy type was performed on 430 tumors detected within a randomized trial of mammographic screening. The results were compared to several histopathologic features. A high S-phase fraction was estimated in tumors with a high grade of malignancy and other histopathologic findings related to rapid tumor progression, including lack of tubule formation, a high mitotic index, marked nuclear pleomorphism, multifocal cancer growth, tumor emboli in lymphatic and blood vessels, tumor necrosis, and inflammatory reaction. DNA aneuploidy was correlated with a high malignancy grade, frequent mitoses, a high degree of nuclear pleomorphism, vascular invasion, necrosis, and the presence of noninvasive ductal carcinoma. Both cytometric variables were inversely related to the degree of elastosis. Positive nodes, large tumor size, DNA aneuploidy, a high S-phase fraction, high grade of malignancy, lack of tubule formation, as well as high mitotic index and pleomorphism, presence of multifocal cancer, and vascular invasion, predicted a significantly shorter distant recurrence-free interval after a median follow-up time of 46.6 months. Elastosis and the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors indicated favorable prognosis. In the multivariate analysis, only lymph node status, tumor size, S-phase fraction, and multifocal growth pattern had independent prognostic value. PMID:2196942

  16. Plk1-Dependent Recruitment of c-Tubulin Complexes to Mitotic Centrosomes Involves Multiple PCM Components

    E-print Network

    Stearns, Tim

    Plk1-Dependent Recruitment of c-Tubulin Complexes to Mitotic Centrosomes Involves Multiple PCM complexes containing c-tubulin, which are present in the cytoplasm and associate with the centrosome and with the mitotic spindle. We have previously shown that these interactions require the c- tubulin targeting factor

  17. DEVELOPING PHYLOGENIES FOR INTEGRATING MITOTIC FUNGI IN THE HYPOCREALES AND DIAPORTHALES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent comprehensive studies of the Hypocreales and Diaporthales using both morphological and molecular characters present the opportunity to integrate the mitotic fungi and to evaluate character evolution of both teleomorphic and anamorphic states. The majority of plant-associated fungi are mitotic...

  18. Autoreducibility, Mitoticity, and Immunity Christian Glaer # , Mitsunori Ogihara + , A. Pavan # , Alan L. Selman , Liyu Zhang

    E-print Network

    Selman, Alan

    # , Alan L. Selman § , Liyu Zhang ¶ December 27, 2004 Abstract We show the following results regarding­complete languages are m­mitotic. . If there is a tally language in NP # coNP -P, then, for every # > 0, NPAutoreducibility, Mitoticity, and Immunity Christian Glaßer # , Mitsunori Ogihara + , A. Pavan

  19. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Cobo, J.M.; Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R.

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  20. Mitotic catenation is monitored and resolved by a PKC?-regulated pathway.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Nicola; Pike, Tanya; Zicha, Daniel; Collinson, Lucy; Parker, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Exit from mitosis is controlled by silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). It is important that preceding exit, all sister chromatid pairs are correctly bioriented, and that residual catenation is resolved, permitting complete sister chromatid separation in the ensuing anaphase. Here we determine that the metaphase response to catenation in mammalian cells operates through PKC?. The PKC?-controlled pathway regulates exit from the SAC only when mitotic cells are challenged by retained catenation and this delayed exit is characterized by BubR1-high and Mad2-low kinetochores. In addition, we show that this pathway is necessary to facilitate resolution of retained catenanes in mitosis. When delayed by catenation in mitosis, inhibition of PKC? results in premature entry into anaphase with PICH-positive strands and chromosome bridging. These findings demonstrate the importance of PKC?-mediated regulation in protection from loss of chromosome integrity in cells failing to resolve catenation in G2. PMID:25483024

  1. Mitotic catenation is monitored and resolved by a PKC?-regulated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brownlow, Nicola; Pike, Tanya; Zicha, Daniel; Collinson, Lucy; Parker, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Exit from mitosis is controlled by silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). It is important that preceding exit, all sister chromatid pairs are correctly bioriented, and that residual catenation is resolved, permitting complete sister chromatid separation in the ensuing anaphase. Here we determine that the metaphase response to catenation in mammalian cells operates through PKC?. The PKC?-controlled pathway regulates exit from the SAC only when mitotic cells are challenged by retained catenation and this delayed exit is characterized by BubR1-high and Mad2-low kinetochores. In addition, we show that this pathway is necessary to facilitate resolution of retained catenanes in mitosis. When delayed by catenation in mitosis, inhibition of PKC? results in premature entry into anaphase with PICH-positive strands and chromosome bridging. These findings demonstrate the importance of PKC?-mediated regulation in protection from loss of chromosome integrity in cells failing to resolve catenation in G2. PMID:25483024

  2. Preparing a cell for nuclear envelope breakdown: Spatio-temporal control of phosphorylation during mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Malumbres, Marcos

    2014-08-01

    Chromosome segregation requires the ordered separation of the newly replicated chromosomes between the two daughter cells. In most cells, this requires nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly during mitotic entry and its reformation at mitotic exit. Nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) results in the mixture of two cellular compartments. This process is controlled through phosphorylation of multiple targets by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-cyclin B complexes as well as other mitotic enzymes. Experimental evidence also suggests that nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of critical cell cycle regulators such as Cdk1-cyclin B complexes or Greatwall, a kinase responsible for the inactivation of PP2A phosphatases, plays a major role in maintaining the boost of mitotic phosphorylation thus preventing the potential mitotic collapse derived from NEB. These data suggest the relevance of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport not only to communicate cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments during interphase, but also to prepare cells for the mixture of these two compartments during mitosis. PMID:24889070

  3. Acrylamide effects on kinesin-related proteins of the mitotic/meiotic spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, Dale W. . E-mail: dsickles@mcg.edu; Sperry, Ann O. . E-mail: sperrya@ecu.edu; Testino, Angie; Friedman, Marvin

    2007-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) motor protein kinesin is a vital component of cells and organs expressing acrylamide (ACR) toxicity. As a mechanism of its potential carcinogenicity, we determined whether kinesins involved in cell division are inhibited by ACR similar to neuronal kinesin [Sickles, D.W., Brady, S.T., Testino, A.R., Friedman, M.A., and Wrenn, R.A. (1996). Direct effect of the neurotoxicant acrylamide on kinesin-based microtubule motility. Journal of Neuroscience Research 46, 7-17.] Kinesin-related genes were isolated from rat testes [Navolanic, P.M., and Sperry, A.O. (2000). Identification of isoforms of a mitotic motor in mammalian spermatogenesis. Biology of Reproduction 62, 1360-1369.], their kinesin-like proteins expressed in bacteria using recombinant DNA techniques and the effects of ACR, glycidamide (GLY) and propionamide (a non-neurotoxic metabolite) on the function of two of the identified kinesin motors were tested. KIFC5A MT bundling activity, required for mitotic spindle formation, was measured in an MT-binding assay. Both ACR and GLY caused a similar concentration-dependent reduction in the binding of MT; concentrations of 100 {mu}M ACR or GLY reduced its activity by 60%. KRP2 MT disassembling activity was assayed using the quantity of tubulin disassembled from taxol-stabilized MT. Both ACR and GLY inhibited KRP2-induced MT disassembly. GLY was substantially more potent; significant reductions of 60% were achieved by 500 {mu}M, a comparable inhibition by ACR required a 5 mM concentration. Propionamide had no significant effect on either kinesin, except KRP2 at 10 mM. This is the first report of ACR inhibition of a mitotic/meiotic motor protein. ACR (or GLY) inhibition of kinesin may be an alternative mechanism to DNA adduction in the production of cell division defects and potential carcinogenicity. We conclude that ACR may act on multiple kinesin family members and produce toxicities in organs highly dependent on microtubule-based functions.

  4. Absorption features in the 3 micron spectra of highly obscured objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert G.; Sellgren, Kris; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    1989-01-01

    Using the IRTF cooled-grating spectrometer moderate resolution 2.4 to 3.8 micron spectra of a selection of IR protostars and one object located behind the Taurus dark cloud were obtained. Two examples of the spectra are presented. It is clear that the absorption near 3.07 micron is dominated by H2O ice and a comparison between the spectra and a simple H2O ice model allows a temperature estimate for the hottest ice-coated grains in these sources. Higher resolution observations showed no indication of the absorption due to the N-H stretching vibration of NH3 near 2.963 micron. The most plausible explanation for the 3.3 and 3.45 micron features appears to be absorption by the mixture of hydrocarbons, although they cannot be identified with features already attributed to hydrocarbons in the ISM, reflection nebulae and Comets. However these features appear the same for all sources in the sample, including Elias 16, thus implying a very similar mixture of molecules in each source.

  5. Unilateral hypoplastic kidney - a novel highly penetrant feature of familial juvenile hyperuricaemic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial juvenile hyperuricaemic nephropathy is a rare inherited nephropathy with genetic heterogeneity. Categorised by genetic defect, mutations in uromodulin (UMOD), renin (REN) and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1? (HNF-1?) genes as well as linkage to chromosome 2p22.1-21 have previously been identified. Knowledge of the genetics of this phenotype has provided important clues to developmental pathways in the kidney. Case presentation We report a novel phenotype, with the typical features of hyperuricemia and renal deterioration, but with the additional unexpected feature of unilateral renal hypoplasia. Mutation analyses of the existing known genes and genetic loci were negative indicating a new monogenic cause. Interestingly two cousins of the index case did not share the latter feature, suggesting a modifier gene effect. Conclusion Unilateral renal hypo/aplasia is usually sporadic and relatively common, with no genetic cause to date identified. This reported pedigree reveals the possibility that a new, unknown renal developmental gene may be implicated in the FJHN phenotype. PMID:24886545

  6. High performance organic integrated device with ultraviolet photodetective and electroluminescent properties consisting of a charge-transfer-featured naphthalimide derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hanyu; Wang, Xu; Yu, Junsheng E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn; Zhou, Jie; Lu, Zhiyun E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-08-11

    A high performance organic integrated device (OID) with ultraviolet photodetective and electroluminescent (EL) properties was fabricated by using a charge-transfer-featured naphthalimide derivative of 6-(3,5-bis-[9-(4-t-butylphenyl)-9H-carbazol-3-yl]-phenoxy)-2- (4-t-butylphenyl)-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3-dione (CzPhONI) as the active layer. The results showed that the OID had a high detectivity of 1.5?×?10{sup 11} Jones at ?3?V under the UV-350?nm illumination with an intensity of 0.6 mW/cm{sup 2}, and yielded an exciplex EL light emission with a maximum brightness of 1437?cd/m{sup 2}. Based on the energy band diagram, both the charge transfer feature of CzPhONI and matched energy level alignment were responsible for the dual ultraviolet photodetective and EL functions of OID.

  7. The Inner Nuclear Membrane Protein Src1 Is Required for Stable Post-Mitotic Progression into G1 in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    How membranes and associated proteins of the nuclear envelope (NE) are assembled specifically and inclusively around segregated genomes during exit from mitosis is incompletely understood. Inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins play key roles by providing links between DNA and the NE. In this study we have investigated the highly conserved INM protein Src1 in Aspergillus nidulans and have uncovered a novel cell cycle response during post mitotic formation of G1 nuclei. Live cell imaging indicates Src1 could have roles during mitotic exit as it preferentially locates to the NE abscission points during nucleokinesis and to the NE surrounding forming daughter G1 nuclei. Deletion analysis further supported this idea revealing that although Src1 is not required for interphase progression or mitosis it is required for stable post-mitotic G1 nuclear formation. This conclusion is based upon the observation that in the absence of Src1 newly formed G1 nuclei are structurally unstable and immediately undergo architectural modifications typical of mitosis. These changes include NPC modifications that stop nuclear transport as well as disassembly of nucleoli. More intriguingly, the newly generated G1 nuclei then cycle between mitotic- and interphase-like states. The findings indicate that defects in post-mitotic G1 nuclear formation caused by lack of Src1 promote repeated failed attempts to generate stable G1 nuclei. To explain this unexpected phenotype we suggest a type of regulation that promotes repetition of defective cell cycle transitions rather than preventing progression past the defective cell cycle transition. We suggest the term “reboot regulation” to define this mode of cell cycle regulation. The findings are discussed in relationship to recent studies showing the Cdk1 master oscillator can entrain subservient oscillators that when uncoupled cause cell cycle transitions to be repeated. PMID:26147902

  8. Two different mitotic checkpoint inhibitors of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome antagonize the action of the activator Cdc20

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Braunstein, Ilana; Ganoth, Dvora; Teichner, Adar; Hittle, James C.; Yen, Tim J.; Hershko, Avram

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint system ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation by preventing the completion of mitosis in the presence of any misaligned chromosome. When activated, it blocks the initiation of anaphase by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Little is known about the biochemical mechanisms by which this system inhibits APC/C, except for the existence of a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibitor of APC/C composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 associated with the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3. We have been studying the mechanisms of the mitotic checkpoint system in extracts that reproduce its downstream events. We found that inhibitory factors are associated with APC/C in the checkpoint-arrested state, which can be recovered from immunoprecipitates. Only a part of the inhibitory activity was caused by MCC [Braunstein I, Miniowitz S, Moshe Y, Hershko A (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:4870–4875]. Here, we show that during exit from checkpoint, rapid disassembly of MCC takes place while APC/C is still inactive. This observation suggested the possible involvement of multiple factors in the regulation of APC/C by the mitotic checkpoint. We have separated a previously unknown inhibitor of APC/C from MCC. This inhibitor, called mitotic checkpoint factor 2 (MCF2), is associated with APC/C only in the checkpoint-arrested state. The inhibition of APC/C by both MCF2 and MCC was decreased at high concentrations of Cdc20. We propose that both MCF2 and MCC inhibit APC/C by antagonizing Cdc20, possibly by interaction with the Cdc20-binding site of APC/C. PMID:18591651

  9. High-resolution multibeam mapping and submersible surveys of topographic features in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickerson, E.L.; Schmahl, G.P.; Weaver, D.C.; Gardner, J.V.

    2003-01-01

    The Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) and the USGS Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project mapped about 2000 km2 of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf during June 2002, using a Kongsberg Simrad EM1000 multibeam echosounder. Mapping focused on select topographic highs thave hae been idetnnfied as biological features warranting protection from oil and gas activities by the Minerals Management Service (MMS). The base maps will be used for all future ROV and submersible missions.

  10. The Luminous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features: Applications to High Redshift Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Heath V.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, significant work has been applied to calibrating emission from the ultra-violet, nebular emission lines, far-infrared, X-ray and radio as tracers of the star-formation rate (SFR) in distant galaxies. Understanding the exact rate of star-formation and how it evolves with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. The co-evolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion is one of the key problems in galaxy formation theory. But, many of these SFR indicators are influenced by SMBH accretion in galaxies and result in unreliable SFRs. Utilizing the luminous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, I provide a new robust SFR calibration using the luminosity emitted from the PAHs at 6.2?m, 7.7?m and 11.3?m to solve this. The PAH features emit strongly in the mid-infrared (mid-IR; 5-25?m) mitigating dust extinction, containing on average 5-10% of the total IR luminosity in galaxies. I use a sample of 105 star-forming galaxies covering a range of total IR luminosity, LIR = L(8-1000?m) = 109 - 1012 L? and redshift 0 < z < 0.4, with mid-IR spectroscopy from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and data covering other SFR indicators (H? emission and rest-frame 24?m continuum emission). The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the H? luminosity (corrected for attenuation using the mono-chromatic rest-frame 24?m emission), with a tight scatter of <0.15 dex. The scatter is comparable to that between SFRs derived from the Pa? and dust-corrected H? emission lines. We present a case study in advance of JWST, which will be capable of measuring SFRs (from 8?m rest-frame photometry, i.e. PAHs) in distant galaxies (z ? 2) with JWST/MIRI to SFRs as low as ~10 M?yr-1, because the PAH features are so bright. We use Spitzer/IRS observations of PAH features in lensed star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 3 to demonstrate the utility of the PAHs to derive SFRs that agree with those available from Pa?. This new SFR indicator will be useful for probing the peak of the SFR density in the universe (1 < z < 3) and for studying the co-evolution of star-formation and supermassive blackhole accretion contemporaneously in a galaxy.

  11. Very high resolution Earth observation features for monitoring plant and animal community structure across multiple spatial scales in protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairota, Paola; Cafarelli, Barbara; Labadessa, Rocco; Lovergine, Francesco; Tarantino, Cristina; Lucas, Richard M.; Nagendra, Harini; Didham, Raphael K.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the status and future trends in biodiversity can be prohibitively expensive using ground-based surveys. Consequently, significant effort is being invested in the use of satellite remote sensing to represent aspects of the proximate mechanisms (e.g., resource availability) that can be related to biodiversity surrogates (BS) such as species community descriptors. We explored the potential of very high resolution (VHR) satellite Earth observation (EO) features as proxies for habitat structural attributes that influence spatial variation in habitat quality and biodiversity change. In a semi-natural grassland mosaic of conservation concern in southern Italy, we employed a hierarchical nested sampling strategy to collect field and VHR-EO data across three spatial extent levels (landscape, patch and plot). Species incidence and abundance data were collected at the plot level for plant, insect and bird functional groups. Spectral and textural VHR-EO image features were derived from a Worldview-2 image. Three window sizes (grains) were tested for analysis and computation of textural features, guided by the perception limits of different organisms. The modelled relationships between VHR-EO features and BS responses differed across scales, suggesting that landscape, patch and plot levels are respectively most appropriate when dealing with birds, plants and insects. This research demonstrates the potential of VHR-EO for biodiversity mapping and habitat modelling, and highlights the importance of identifying the appropriate scale of analysis for specific taxonomic groups of interest. Further, textural features are important in the modelling of functional group-specific indices which represent BS in high conservation value habitat types, and provide a more direct link to species interaction networks and ecosystem functioning, than provided by traditional taxonomic diversity indices.

  12. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-? precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic A?; and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration). Cognitive and biochemical studies confirm the negative consequences of a high LH:sex steroid ratio on dendritic spine density and human cognitive performance. Prospective epidemiological and clinical evidence in humans supports the premise that rebalancing the ratio of circulating gonadotropins:sex steroids reduces the incidence of AD. Together, these data support endocrine dyscrasia and the subsequent loss of cell cycle control as an important etiological event in the development of neurodegenerative diseases including AD, stroke and Parkinson's disease. PMID:26188949

  13. Partial inhibition of Cdk1 in G2 phase overrides the SAC and decouples mitotic events

    PubMed Central

    McCloy, Rachael A; Rogers, Samuel; Caldon, C Elizabeth; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna; Burgess, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Entry and progression through mitosis has traditionally been linked directly to the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). In this study we utilized low doses of the Cdk1-specific inhibitor, RO3306 from early G2 phase onwards. Addition of low doses of RO3306 in G2 phase induced minor chromosome congression and segregation defects. In contrast, mild doses of RO3306 during G2 phase resulted in cells entering an aberrant mitosis, with cells fragmenting centrosomes and failing to fully disassemble the nuclear envelope. Cells often underwent cytokinesis and metaphase simultaneously, despite the presence of an active spindle assembly checkpoint, which prevented degradation of cyclin B1 and securin, resulting in the random partitioning of whole chromosomes. This highly aberrant mitosis produced a significant increase in the proportion of viable polyploid cells present up to 3 days post-treatment. Furthermore, cells treated with medium doses of RO3306 were only able to reach the threshold of Cdk1 substrate phosphorylation required to initiate nuclear envelope breakdown, but failed to reach the levels of phosphorylation required to correctly complete pro-metaphase. Treatment with low doses of Okadaic acid, which primarily inhibits PP2A, rescued the mitotic defects and increased the number of cells that completed a normal mitosis. This supports the current model that PP2A is the primary phosphatase that counterbalances the activity of Cdk1 during mitosis. Taken together these results show that continuous and subtle disruption of Cdk1 activity from G2 phase onwards has deleterious consequences on mitotic progression by disrupting the balance between Cdk1 and PP2A. PMID:24626186

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae spindle pole body duplication gene MPS1 is part of a mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    M-phase checkpoints inhibit cell division when mitotic spindle function is perturbed. Here we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS1 gene product, an essential protein kinase required for spindle pole body (SPB) duplication (Winey et al., 1991; Lauze et al., 1995), is also required for M-phase check-point function. In cdc31-2 and mps2-1 mutants, conditional failure of SPB duplication results in cell cycle arrest with high p34CDC28 kinase activity that depends on the presence of the wild-type MAD1 checkpoint gene, consistent with checkpoint arrest of mitosis. In contrast, mps1 mutant cells fail to duplicate their SPBs and do not arrest division at 37 degrees C, exhibiting a normal cycle of p34CDC28 kinase activity despite the presence of a monopolar spindle. Double mutant cdc31-2, mps1-1 cells also fail to arrest mitosis at 37 degrees C, despite having SPB structures similar to cdc31-2 single mutants as determined by EM analysis. Arrest of mitosis upon microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole is also conditionally absent in mps1 strains. This is observed in mps1 cells synchronized in S phase with hydroxyurea before exposure to nocodazole, indicating that failure of checkpoint function in mps1 cells is independent of SPB duplication failure. In contrast, hydroxyurea arrest and a number of other cdc mutant arrest phenotypes are unaffected by mps1 alleles. We propose that the essential MPS1 protein kinase functions both in SPB duplication and in a mitotic checkpoint monitoring spindle integrity. PMID:8567717

  15. Asynchronous Event-Based Multikernel Algorithm for High-Speed Visual Features Tracking.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Meyer, Cédric; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Filliat, David; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a number of new methods for visual tracking using the output of an event-based asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor. It allows the tracking of multiple visual features in real time, achieving an update rate of several hundred kilohertz on a standard desktop PC. The approach has been specially adapted to take advantage of the event-driven properties of these sensors by combining both spatial and temporal correlations of events in an asynchronous iterative framework. Various kernels, such as Gaussian, Gabor, combinations of Gabor functions, and arbitrary user-defined kernels, are used to track features from incoming events. The trackers described in this paper are capable of handling variations in position, scale, and orientation through the use of multiple pools of trackers. This approach avoids the N(2) operations per event associated with conventional kernel-based convolution operations with N × N kernels. The tracking performance was evaluated experimentally for each type of kernel in order to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed solution. PMID:25248193

  16. Plasma and process characterization of high power magnetron physical vapor deposition with integrated plasma equipment-feature profile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Stout, Phillip J.; Ventzek, Peter L. G.

    2003-01-01

    High power magnetron physical vapor deposition (HPM-PVD) has recently emerged for metal deposition into deep submicron features in state of the art integrated circuit fabrication. However, the plasma characteristics and process mechanism are not well known. An integrated plasma equipment-feature profile modeling infrastructure has therefore been developed for HPM-PVD deposition, and it has been applied to simulating copper seed deposition with an Ar background gas for damascene metalization. The equipment scale model is based on the hybrid plasma equipment model [M. Grapperhaus et al., J. Appl. Phys. 83, 35 (1998); J. Lu and M. J. Kushner, ibid., 89, 878 (2001)], which couples a three-dimensional Monte Carlo sputtering module within a two-dimensional fluid model. The plasma kinetics of thermalized, athermal, and ionized metals and the contributions of these species in feature deposition are resolved. A Monte Carlo technique is used to derive the angular distribution of athermal metals. Simulations show that in typical HPM-PVD processing, Ar+ is the dominant ionized species driving sputtering. Athermal metal neutrals are the dominant deposition precursors due to the operation at high target power and low pressure. The angular distribution of athermals is off axis and more focused than thermal neutrals. The athermal characteristics favor sufficient and uniform deposition on the sidewall of the feature, which is the critical area in small feature filling. In addition, athermals lead to a thick bottom coverage. An appreciable fraction (~10%) of the metals incident to the wafer are ionized. The ionized metals also contribute to bottom deposition in the absence of sputtering. We have studied the impact of process and equipment parameters on HPM-PVD. Simulations show that target power impacts both plasma ionization and target sputtering. The Ar+ ion density increases nearly linearly with target power, different from the behavior of typical ionized PVD processing. The total metal flux to the wafer increases with target power due to enhanced target sputtering. However, the ionization fraction of the total flux decreases due in part to the increased diffusion loss of charged species. Wafer bias power controls ion energy, and it has a negligible impact on plasma ionization and deposition flux composition. Feature simulations show the redistribution of deposited metals within a feature when wafer resputtering is promoted at sufficient bias power. Target-wafer spacing (TWS) impacts the total ionization and metal flux to the wafer. The Ar+ density and deposition rate decrease with increasing TWS due to increased surface loss. Simulations suggest that reducing the TWS results in more efficient usage of target source.

  17. Feature extraction Feature extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Feature extraction #12;Feature extraction ! · Image interpretation: extract information from images · but the desired information may not be explicit in the raw observed pixel intensities · Transform image to make (hyperspectral sensors) Meteosat thermal IR channel hyperspectral "image cube" #12;Raw intensities ! · Pros

  18. Feature extraction Feature extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Feature extraction #12;Feature extraction · Image interpretation: extract information from images · but the desired information may not be explicit in the raw observed pixel intensities · Transform image to make (hyperspectral sensors) Meteosat thermal IR channel hyperspectral "image cube" #12;Raw intensities · Pros

  19. Phosphorylation of Xenopus p31(comet) potentiates mitotic checkpoint exit.

    PubMed

    Mo, Min; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Dasso, Mary

    2015-12-17

    p31(comet) plays an important role in spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) silencing. However, how p31(comet)'s activity is regulated remains unclear. Here we show that the timing of M-phase exit in Xenopus egg extracts (XEEs) depends upon SAC activity, even under conditions that are permissive for spindle assembly. p31(comet) antagonizes the SAC, promoting XEE progression into anaphase after spindles are fully formed. We further show that mitotic p31(comet) phosphorylation by Inhibitor of nuclear factor ?-B kinase-? (IKK-?) enhances this role in SAC silencing. Together, our findings implicate IKK-? in the control of anaphase timing in XEE through p31(comet) activation and SAC downregulation. PMID:25892037

  20. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  1. Mitotic Exit and Separation of Mother and Daughter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Productive cell proliferation involves efficient and accurate splitting of the dividing cell into two separate entities. This orderly process reflects coordination of diverse cytological events by regulatory systems that drive the cell from mitosis into G1. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, separation of mother and daughter cells involves coordinated actomyosin ring contraction and septum synthesis, followed by septum destruction. These events occur in precise and rapid sequence once chromosomes are segregated and are linked with spindle organization and mitotic progress by intricate cell cycle control machinery. Additionally, critical parts of the mother/daughter separation process are asymmetric, reflecting a form of fate specification that occurs in every cell division. This chapter describes central events of budding yeast cell separation, as well as the control pathways that integrate them and link them with the cell cycle. PMID:23212898

  2. Induction of mitotic catastrophe by PKC inhibition in Nf1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shen, Ling; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Chen, Changyan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of tumor suppressor Nf1 gene deregulate Ras-mediated signaling, which confers the predisposition for developing benign or malignant tumors. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) was shown to be in synergy with aberrant Ras for the induction of apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. However, it has not been investigated whether loss of PKC is lethal for Nf1-deficient cells. In this study, using HMG (3-hydroxy-3-methylgutaryl, a PKC inhibitor), we demonstrate that the inhibition of PKC by HMG treatment triggered a persistently mitotic arrest, resulting in the occurrence of mitotic catastrophe in Nf1-deficient ST8814 cells. However, the introduction of the Nf1 effective domain gene into ST8814 cells abolished this mitotic crisis. In addition, HMG injection significantly attenuated the growth of the xenografted ST8814 tumors. Moreover, Chk1 was phosphorylated, accompanied with the persistent increase of cyclin B1 expression in HMG-treated ST8814 cells. The knockdown of Chk1 by the siRNA prevented the Nf1-deficient cells from undergoing HMG-mediated mitotic arrest as well as mitotic catastrophe. Thus, our data suggested that the suppression of PKC activates the Chk1-mediated mitotic exit checkpoint in Nf1-deficient cells, leading to the induction of apoptosis via mitotic catastrophe. Collectively, the study indicates that targeting PKC may be a potential option for developing new strategies to treat Nf1-deficiency-related diseases. PMID:25483185

  3. Closed MAD2 (C-MAD2) is selectively incorporated into the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC)

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R; Tipton, Michael; Yen, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint is a specialized signal transduction pathway that monitors kinetochore-microtubule attachment to achieve faithful chromosome segregation. MAD2 is an evolutionarily conserved mitotic checkpoint protein that exists in open (O) and closed (C) conformations. The increase of intracellular C-MAD2 level during mitosis, through O?C-MAD2 conversion as catalyzed by unattached kinetochores, is a critical signaling event for the mitotic checkpoint. However, it remains controversial whether MAD2 is an integral component of the effector of the mitotic checkpoint—the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). We show here that endogenous human MCC is assembled by first forming a BUBR1:BUB3:CDC20 complex in G2 and then selectively incorporating C-MAD2 during mitosis. Nevertheless, MCC can be induced to form in G1/S cells by expressing a C-conformation locked MAD2 mutant, indicating intracellular level of C-MAD2 as a major limiting factor for MCC assembly. In addition, a recombinant MCC containing C-MAD2 exhibits effective inhibitory activity toward APC/C isolated from mitotic HeLa cells, while a recombinant BUBR1:BUB3:CDC20 ternary complex is ineffective at comparable concentrations despite association with APC/C. These results help establish a direct connection between a major signal transducer (C-MAD2) and the potent effector (MCC) of the mitotic checkpoint, and provide novel insights into protein-protein interactions during assembly of a functional MCC. PMID:22037211

  4. Cdk1 Inactivation Terminates Mitotic Checkpoint Surveillance and Stabilizes Kinetochore Attachments in Anaphase

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Novelle, María Dolores; Sansregret, Laurent; Dick, Amalie E.; Smith, Christopher A.; McAinsh, Andrew D.; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Petronczki, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summary Two mechanisms safeguard the bipolar attachment of chromosomes in mitosis. A correction mechanism destabilizes erroneous attachments that do not generate tension across sister kinetochores [1]. In response to unattached kinetochores, the mitotic checkpoint delays anaphase onset by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/CCdc20) [2]. Upon satisfaction of both pathways, the APC/CCdc20 elicits the degradation of securin and cyclin B [3]. This liberates separase triggering sister chromatid disjunction and inactivates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) causing mitotic exit. How eukaryotic cells avoid the engagement of attachment monitoring mechanisms when sister chromatids split and tension is lost at anaphase is poorly understood [4]. Here we show that Cdk1 inactivation disables mitotic checkpoint surveillance at anaphase onset in human cells. Preventing cyclin B1 proteolysis at the time of sister chromatid disjunction destabilizes kinetochore-microtubule attachments and triggers the engagement of the mitotic checkpoint. As a consequence, mitotic checkpoint proteins accumulate at anaphase kinetochores, the APC/CCdc20 is inhibited, and securin reaccumulates. Conversely, acute pharmacological inhibition of Cdk1 abrogates the engagement and maintenance of the mitotic checkpoint upon microtubule depolymerization. We propose that the simultaneous destruction of securin and cyclin B elicited by the APC/CCdc20 couples chromosome segregation to the dissolution of attachment monitoring mechanisms during mitotic exit. PMID:24583019

  5. Cdk1 inactivation terminates mitotic checkpoint surveillance and stabilizes kinetochore attachments in anaphase.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Novelle, María Dolores; Sansregret, Laurent; Dick, Amalie E; Smith, Christopher A; McAinsh, Andrew D; Gerlich, Daniel W; Petronczki, Mark

    2014-03-17

    Two mechanisms safeguard the bipolar attachment of chromosomes in mitosis. A correction mechanism destabilizes erroneous attachments that do not generate tension across sister kinetochores [1]. In response to unattached kinetochores, the mitotic checkpoint delays anaphase onset by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C(Cdc20)) [2]. Upon satisfaction of both pathways, the APC/C(Cdc20) elicits the degradation of securin and cyclin B [3]. This liberates separase triggering sister chromatid disjunction and inactivates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) causing mitotic exit. How eukaryotic cells avoid the engagement of attachment monitoring mechanisms when sister chromatids split and tension is lost at anaphase is poorly understood [4]. Here we show that Cdk1 inactivation disables mitotic checkpoint surveillance at anaphase onset in human cells. Preventing cyclin B1 proteolysis at the time of sister chromatid disjunction destabilizes kinetochore-microtubule attachments and triggers the engagement of the mitotic checkpoint. As a consequence, mitotic checkpoint proteins accumulate at anaphase kinetochores, the APC/C(Cdc20) is inhibited, and securin reaccumulates. Conversely, acute pharmacological inhibition of Cdk1 abrogates the engagement and maintenance of the mitotic checkpoint upon microtubule depolymerization. We propose that the simultaneous destruction of securin and cyclin B elicited by the APC/C(Cdc20) couples chromosome segregation to the dissolution of attachment monitoring mechanisms during mitotic exit. PMID:24583019

  6. A THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF MITOTIC SPINDLE EQUILIBRIUM AT ACTIVE METAPHASE

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The mitotic apparatus of first-division metaphase eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus drobachiensis was observed by means of polarization microscopy under controlled temperature conditions. Eggs were fertilized and grown at two temperature extremes in order to produce two different sizes of available spindle pool. Slow division time allowed successive samples of such cells to be observed at the same point in metaphase but at different equilibrium temperatures, yielding curves of metaphase equilibrium birefringence vs. observational temperature. Using the plateau value of birefringence at higher temperatures as a measure of total available spindle pool and the observed birefringence at lower temperatures as a measure of polymerized material at equilibrium, the spindle protein association was evaluated according to the method of Inoué. Both pool conditions produced linear van't Hoff functions. Analysis of these functions yielded enthalpy and entropy changes of +55–65 kcal/mol and +197–233 entropy units (eu), respectively. These values for active mitotic metaphase are quite comparable to those obtained by Inoué and co-workers for arrested meiotic metaphase cells. When other equilibrium treatments were considered, the best fit to the experimental data was still that of Inoué, a treatment which theoretically involves first-order polymerization and dissociation kinetics. Treatment of metaphase cells with D2O by direct immersion drove the equilibrium to completion regardless of temperature, attaining or exceeding a birefringence value equal to the cell's characteristic pool size; perfusion with D2O appeared to erase the original temperature-determined pool size differences for the two growth conditions, attaining a maximum value characteristic of the larger pool condition. These data confirm Inoué's earlier contention that D2O treatment can modify the available spindle pool. PMID:4734864

  7. A defect of Kap104 alleviates the requirement of mitotic exit network gene functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Kazuhide; Toh-e, Akio

    2002-01-01

    A subgroup of the karyopherin beta (also called importin beta) protein that includes budding yeast Kap104 and human transportin/karyopherin beta2 is reported to function as a receptor for the transport of mRNA-binding proteins into the nucleus. We identified KAP104 as a responsible gene for a suppressor mutation of cdc15-2. We found that the kap104-E604K mutation suppressed the temperature-sensitive growth of cdc15-2 cells by promoting the exit from mitosis and suppressed the temperature sensitivity of various mitotic-exit mutations. The cytokinesis defect of these mitotic-exit mutants was not suppressed by kap104-E604K. Furthermore, the kap104-E604K mutation delays entry into DNA synthesis even at a permissive temperature. In cdc15-2 kap104-E604K cells, SWI5 and SIC1, but not CDH1, became essential at a high temperature, suggesting that the kap104-E604K mutation promotes mitotic exit via the Swi5-Sic1 pathway. Interestingly, SPO12, which is involved in the release of Cdc14 from the nucleolus during early anaphase, also became essential in cdc15-2 kap104-E604K cells at a high temperature. The kap104-E604K mutation caused a partial delocalization of Cdc14 from the nucleolus during interphase. This delocalization of Cdc14 was suppressed by the deletion of SPO12. These results suggest that a mutation in Kap104 stimulates exit from mitosis through the activation of Cdc14 and implies a novel role for Kap104 in cell-cycle progression in budding yeast. PMID:12524331

  8. Features of >130 Gamma-Ray Bursts at high energy: towards the 2nd Fermi LAT GRB catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola; Fermi LAT collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-energy emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts is a formidable probe for extreme physics, calling for highly relativistic sources with very large Lorentz factors. Despite the advancements prompted by observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, as well as other observatories, many questions remain open, especially on radiative processes and mechanisms. We present here the most extensive search for GRBs at high energies performed so far, featuring a detection efficiency more than 50% better than previous works, and returning more than 130 detections. With this sample size, much larger than the 35 detections presented in the first Fermi/LAT GRB catalog, we are able to assess the characteristics of the population of GRBs at high energy with unprecedented sensitivity. We will review the preliminary results of this work, as well as their interpretation.

  9. Using high level dialogue information for dialogue act recognition using prosodic features

    E-print Network

    Wright, Helen; Poesio, Massimo; Isard, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    We look at the effect of using high level discourse knowledge in dialogue act type detection. We also look at ways this knowledge can be used for improving language modelling and intonation modelling of utterance types. ...

  10. Concentration of elements in mitotic chromatin as measured by x-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Unfixed frozen-dried and uncoated tissue sections of the mouse duodenum were placed on carbon planchets and analyzed in a scanning electron microscope fitted with energy dispersive X-ray equipment. Computer analysis of the X-ray spectra allowed elemental microanalysis of the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitotic chromatin regions in the cryptal and villus enterocytes. The peak to continuum ratio of S, Cl, K, and Ca were higher in mitotic chromatin than any of the other sites measured. The redistribution of Ca at mitosis is postulated to help explain both chromosome condensation and assembly of the mitotic spindle apparatus. PMID:856831

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy to Study Mechanics of Living Mitotic Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Hyman, Anthony A.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    While biochemical pathways within mitotic cells have been intensively studied, the mechanics of dividing cells is only poorly understood. In our recent report, an experimental system combining fluorescence and atomic force microscopy was set up to study dynamics of mitotic rounding of mammalian cells. We show that cells have a rounding pressure that increases upon mitotic entry. Using specific inhibitors or perturbations, we revealed biological processes required for force generation that underpin the cell rounding shape change during mitosis. The significance of the finding and an outlook are discussed.

  12. Clinical Features of Obstructive Sleep Apnea That Determine Its High Prevalence in Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hyun Jin; Cho, Yang-Je; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Da Hee; Kim, Ha Yan; Choi, Ji In; Lee, Jeung-Gweon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Resistant hypertension (HTN) occurs in 15-20% of treated hypertensive patients, and 70-80% of resistant hypertensive patients have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The characteristics of resistant HTN that predispose patients to OSA have not been reported. Therefore, we aimed to determine the clinical, laboratory, and polysomnographic features of resistant HTN that are significantly associated with OSA. Materials and Methods Hypertensive patients (n=475) who underwent portable polysomnography were enrolled. The patients were categorized into controlled (n=410) and resistant HTN (n=65) groups. The risk factors for the occurrence of OSA in controlled and resistant hypertensive patients were compared, and independent risk factors that are associated with OSA were analyzed. Results Out of 475 patients, 359 (75.6%) were diagnosed with OSA. The prevalence of OSA in resistant HTN was 87.7%, which was significantly higher than that in controlled HTN (73.7%). Age, body mass index, neck circumference, waist circumference, and hip circumference were significantly higher in OSA. However, stepwise multivariate analyses revealed that resistant HTN was not an independent risk factor of OSA. Conclusion The higher prevalence and severity of OSA in resistant HTN may be due to the association of risk factors that are common to both conditions. PMID:26256968

  13. HIGH-pT Features of z-SCALING at Rhic and Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, M. V.; Zborovsky, I.; Dedovich, T. G.

    2008-09-01

    Experimental data on inclusive cross sections of jet, direct photon, and high-pT hadron production in pp/bar pp and AA collisions are analyzed in the framework of z-scaling. The analysis is performed with data obtained at ISR, Sbar ppS, RHIC, and Tevatron. Scaling properties of z-presentation of the inclusive spectra are verified. Physical interpretation of the variable z and the scaling function ?(z) is discussed. We argue that general principles of self-similarity, locality, and fractality reflect the structure of the colliding objects, interaction of their constituents, and particle formation at small scales. The obtained results suggest that the z-scaling may be used as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena beyond Standard Model in hadron and nucleus collisions at high transverse momentum and high multiplicity at U70, RHIC, Tevatron, and LHC.

  14. High-Definition Optical Coherence Tomography Features of Primary Vitreoretinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Forooghian, Farzin; Merkur, Andrew B.; White, Valerie A.; Shen, Defen; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma is a high-grade in-traocular malignancy that presents as a vitritis with creamy subretinal lesions. In cases where the vitritis is dense, the characteristic subretinal lesions can be dif-ficult to see on clinical examination. Novel high-definition imaging techniques that allow for deeper penetration through opaque media could have diagnostic utility in such cases. The authors present a case of a patient who presented with a dense vitritis that precluded visualization of fundus details. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography using high-definition raster imaging demonstrated subretinal deposits along with outer retinal atrophy. These findings were suggestive of primary vitreoretinal lymphoma and prompted diagnostic vitrectomy. Pathological examination of the vitreous specimen confirmed the diagnosis of primary vitreoretinal lymphoma. PMID:21956854

  15. Extraction of Features from High-resolution 3D LiDaR Point-cloud Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, P.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Cowgill, E. S.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Hering-Bertram, M.; Hagen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne and tripod-based LiDaR scans are capable of producing new insight into geologic features by providing high-quality 3D measurements of the landscape. High-resolution LiDaR is a promising method for studying slip on faults, erosion, and other landscape-altering processes. LiDaR scans can produce up to several billion individual point returns associated with the reflection of a laser from natural and engineered surfaces; these point clouds are typically used to derive a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM). Currently, there exist only few methods that can support the analysis of the data at full resolution and in the natural 3D perspective in which it was collected by working directly with the points. We are developing new algorithms for extracting features from LiDaR scans, and present method for determining the local curvature of a LiDaR data set, working directly with the individual point returns of a scan. Computing the curvature enables us to rapidly and automatically identify key features such as ridge-lines, stream beds, and edges of terraces. We fit polynomial surface patches via a moving least squares (MLS) approach to local point neighborhoods, determining curvature values for each point. The size of the local point neighborhood is defined by a user. Since both terrestrial and airborne LiDaR scans suffer from high noise, we apply additional pre- and post-processing smoothing steps to eliminate unwanted features. LiDaR data also captures objects like buildings and trees complicating greatly the task of extracting reliable curvature values. Hence, we use a stochastic approach to determine whether a point can be reliably used to estimate curvature or not. Additionally, we have developed a graph-based approach to establish connectivities among points that correspond to regions of high curvature. The result is an explicit description of ridge-lines, for example. We have applied our method to the raw point cloud data collected as part of the GeoEarthScope B-4 project on a section of the San Andreas Fault (Segment SA09). This section provides an excellent test site for our method as it exposes the fault clearly, contains few extraneous structures, and exhibits multiple dry stream-beds that have been off-set by motion on the fault.

  16. Binding of Multiple Features in Memory by High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Dermot M.; Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Gardiner, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished episodic memory and diminished use of semantic information to aid recall by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both thought to result from diminished relational binding of elements of complex stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we asked high-functioning adults with ASD and typical comparison participants to study grids in…

  17. Theories and Practices of Environmental Education in Quebec High Schools: Main Features of a Critical Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauve, Lucie; Boutard, Armel; Begin, Rachel; Orellana, Isabel

    This paper reports on research about professional development programs in environmental education for high school teachers in Quebec (Canada). A diagnostic research study was conducted to attempt to answer two questions: (1) what is the current status of environmental education in this sector of formal education?; and (2) how is environmental…

  18. Collecting Inexpensive High Resolution Aerial and Stereo Images of Small- to Mid-Scale Geomorphic and Tectonic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, R. J.; White, W. S.; Willis, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    Methods for collecting accurate, mm- to cm-scale stereoscopic aerial imagery of both small- and mid-scale geomorphic features are developed for a one-time cost of under $1500. High resolution aerial images are valuable for documenting and analyzing small- to mid-scale geomorphic and tectonic features. However, collecting images of mid-scale features such as landslides, rock glaciers, fault scarps, and cinder cones is expensive and makes studies that rely on high resolution repeat imagery prohibitive for undergraduate geology departments with limited budgets. In addition to cost, collecting images of smaller scale geomorphic features such as gravel bars is often impeded by overhanging vegetation or other features in the immediate environment that make impractical the collection of aerial images using standard airborne techniques. The methods provide high resolution stereo photos suitable for image processing and stereographic analysis; the images are potentially suitable for change analyses, velocity tracking, and construction of lidar-resolution digital elevation models. We developed two techniques. The technique suitable for small-scale features (such as gravel bars) utilizes two Nikon D3000 digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras attached to a system of poles that suspends the cameras at a height of 4 meters with a variable camera separation of 0.6 to 0.9 m. The poles are oriented such that they do not appear in the photographs. The cameras are simultaneously remotely activated to collect stereo pairs at a resolution of 64 pixels/cm2 (pixel length is 1.2 mm). Ground control on the images is provided by pegs placed 5 meters apart, GPS positioning, and a meter-stick included in each photograph. Initial photo data gathered of a gravel bar on the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River, north of Rexburg, Idaho is sharp and readily segmented using the MatLab-based CLASTS image processing algorithm. The technique developed for imaging mid-scale features (such as cinder cones) consists of a tethered weather balloon with a gimbal that keeps the camera oriented vertically. A single DSLR camera is suspended at an elevation of approximately 45 m. The camera is operated via a radio-controlled apparatus that enables the user to view the area being photographed prior to activating the shutter. The balloon is physically moved to capture the second image of the stereo pair. Resolution of the images is 3600 pixels/m2 (pixel length is 1.6 cm). The techniques demonstrate that collecting high-resolution stereographic aerial photographs can be accomplished on a limited budget. The techniques and equipment will be used to collect repeat images for several multi-year studies, including monitoring gravel bar evolution, vector tracking of landslide and rock glacier motion, and monitoring fault scarp and cinder cone degradation.

  19. The Luminous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features: Applications to High Redshift Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Heath; Papovich, Casey

    2015-08-01

    We provide a new robust star-formation rate (SFR) calibration using the luminosity from polycyclic aromatic hydrogen (PAH) molecules. The PAH features emit strongly in the mid-infrared (mid-IR; 3-19?m), mitigating dust extinction, and they are very luminous, containing 5-10% of the total IR luminosity in galaxies. We derive the calibration of the PAH luminosity as a SFR indicator using a sample of 105 star-forming galaxies covering a range of total IR luminosity, LIR = L(8-1000?m) = 109 - 1012 L? and redshift 0 < z < 0.6. The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the dust-corrected H? luminosity (using the sum of the H? and rest-frame 24?m luminosity from Kennicutt et al. 2009), with tight scatter of ~0.15 dex, comparable to the scatter in the dust-corrected H? SFRs and Pa? SFRs. We show this relation is sensitive to galaxy metallicity, where the PAH luminosity of galaxies with Z < 0.7 Z? departs from the linear SFR relationship but in a behaved manor. We derive for this a correction to galaxies below solar metallicity. As a case study for observations with JWST, we apply the PAH SFR calibration to a sample of lensed galaxies at 1 < z < 3 with Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) data, and we demonstrate the utility of PAHs to derive SFRs as accurate as those available from any other indicator. This new SFR indicator will be useful for probing the peak of the SFR density of the universe (1 < z < 3) and for studying the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive blackhole accretion contemporaneously in a galaxy.

  20. Epidemiological features of pertussis resurgence based on community populations with high vaccination coverage in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Zhu, T; Gao, C; Gao, Z; Liu, Y; Ding, Y; Sun, J; Guo, L; Liu, P; Chen, D; Wang, L; Wu, S; Zhang, Y

    2015-07-01

    Active symptom surveillance was applied to three selected communities ( 160,147 persons) in Tianjin from 2010 to 2012. We examined 1089 individuals showing pertussis-like symptoms, of which 1022 nasopharyngeal specimens were tested for pertussis by polymerase chain reaction and 802 sera for anti-pertussis toxin antibodies. Of the total cases tested, 113 were confirmed, and their demographic, clinical, and vaccination-related data were collected. The annual incidence was 23.52 cases/100,000 persons among communities, which was 16.22 times that obtained via hospital reports for the same period (P < 0.001). The actual incidence in the 15-69 years age group was most significantly underestimated by hospitals, given that it was 43.08 times that of the reported hospital rate. Among the cases aged <15 years, 84.5% were individuals who had been fully vaccinated. The misdiagnosis rate was as high as 94.69%, and only 5.31% of the confirmed pertussis cases were properly diagnosed as pertussis at their first medical visit. Pertussis incidence in China has been severely underestimated and this was in part due to a high misdiagnosis rate. Adolescents and adults have become new high-risk populations. Future work should focus on reinforcing immunization programmes, especially among adolescents and adults. PMID:25286969

  1. Label-free cell cycle analysis for high-throughput imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Thomas; Hennig, Holger; Summers, Huw D; Theis, Fabian J; Cerveira, Joana; Patterson, James O; Davies, Derek; Filby, Andrew; Carpenter, Anne E; Rees, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry combines the high-throughput capabilities of conventional flow cytometry with single-cell imaging. Here we demonstrate label-free prediction of DNA content and quantification of the mitotic cell cycle phases by applying supervised machine learning to morphological features extracted from brightfield and the typically ignored darkfield images of cells from an imaging flow cytometer. This method facilitates non-destructive monitoring of cells avoiding potentially confounding effects of fluorescent stains while maximizing available fluorescence channels. The method is effective in cell cycle analysis for mammalian cells, both fixed and live, and accurately assesses the impact of a cell cycle mitotic phase blocking agent. As the same method is effective in predicting the DNA content of fission yeast, it is likely to have a broad application to other cell types. PMID:26739115

  2. Modulation of mitotic progression and cell cycle checkpoints by phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions

    E-print Network

    Lowery, Drew M

    2007-01-01

    Alteration of mitotic gene function has recently been discovered to play a key role in tumor formation and cancer progression through the induction of chromosomal aberrations and genomic instability. Polo-like-kinase-1 is ...

  3. Dimerization of TRAF-interacting protein (TRAIP) regulates the mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Park, I Seul; Jo, Ku-Sung; Won, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Hongtae

    2015-08-01

    The homo- or hetero-dimerization of proteins plays critical roles in the mitotic progression. The TRAF-interacting protein (TRAIP) is crucial in early mitotic progression and chromosome alignment defects in the metaphase. The TRAIP is a 469 amino acid protein, including the Really Interesting New Gene (RING), coiled-coil (CC), and leucine zipper (LZ) domain. In general, the CC or LZ domain containing proteins forms homo- or hetero-dimerization to achieve its activity. In this study, a number of TRAIP mutants were used to define the TRAIP molecular domains responsible for its homo-dimerization. A co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the TRAIP forms homo-dimerization through the CC domain. The cells, expressing the CC domain-deleted mutant that could not form a homo-dimer, increased the mitotic index and promoted mitotic progression. PMID:26093298

  4. The NOXA–MCL1–BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  5. Regulation and functions of Cdc14 in mitotic exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Tomson, Brett N

    2009-01-01

    In order to ensure the accurate formation of two daughter cells from one parental cell, the series of events that comprise the mitotic cell division cycle must be carefully regulated. Much of this regulation affects the ...

  6. Very compact, high-stability electrostatic actuator featuring contact-free self-limiting displacement

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Samuel L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A compact electrostatic actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator utilizes stationary and moveable electrodes, with the stationary electrodes being formed on a substrate and the moveable electrodes being supported above the substrate on a frame. The frame provides a rigid structure which allows the electrostatic actuator to be operated at high voltages (up to 190 Volts) to provide a relatively large actuation force compared to conventional electrostatic comb actuators which are much larger in size. For operation at its maximum displacement, the electrostatic actuator is relatively insensitive to the exact value of the applied voltage and provides a self-limiting displacement.

  7. Effects of polyamines and polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors on mitotic activity of Allium cepa root tips.

    PubMed

    Unal, Meral; Palavan-Unsal, Narcin; Tufekci, M A

    2008-03-01

    The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of exogenous polyamines (PAs), putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), spermine (Spm) and PA biosynthetic inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), cyclohexilamine (CHA), methylglioxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) were investigated in the root meristems of Allium cepa L. The reduction of mitotic index and the induction of chromosomal aberrations such as bridges, stickiness, c-mitotic anaphases, micronuclei, endoredupliction by PAs and PA biosynthetic inhibitors were observed and these were used as evidence of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. PMID:18401948

  8. Breast cancer mitosis detection in histopathological images with spatial feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albayrak, Abdülkadir; Bilgin, Gökhan

    2013-12-01

    In this work, cellular mitosis detection in histopathological images has been investigated. Mitosis detection is very expensive and time consuming process. Development of digital imaging in pathology has enabled reasonable and effective solution to this problem. Segmentation of digital images provides easier analysis of cell structures in histopathological data. To differentiate normal and mitotic cells in histopathological images, feature extraction step is very crucial step for the system accuracy. A mitotic cell has more distinctive textural dissimilarities than the other normal cells. Hence, it is important to incorporate spatial information in feature extraction or in post-processing steps. As a main part of this study, Haralick texture descriptor has been proposed with different spatial window sizes in RGB and La*b* color spaces. So, spatial dependencies of normal and mitotic cellular pixels can be evaluated within different pixel neighborhoods. Extracted features are compared with various sample sizes by Support Vector Machines using k-fold cross validation method. According to the represented results, it has been shown that separation accuracy on mitotic and non-mitotic cellular pixels gets better with the increasing size of spatial window.

  9. Unique Features of High-Density Lipoproteins in the Japanese: In Population and in Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Despite its gradual increase in the past several decades, the prevalence of atherosclerotic vascular disease is low in Japan. This is largely attributed to difference in lifestyle, especially food and dietary habits, and it may be reflected in certain clinical parameters. Plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, a strong counter risk for atherosclerosis, are indeed high among the Japanese. Accordingly, lower HDL seems to contribute more to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) than an increase in non-HDL lipoproteins at a population level in Japan. Interestingly, average HDL levels in Japan have increased further in the past two decades, and are markedly higher than in Western populations. The reasons and consequences for public health of this increase are still unknown. Simulation for the efficacy of raising HDL cholesterol predicts a decrease in CHD of 70% in Japan, greater than the extent by reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol predicted by simulation or achieved in a statin trial. On the other hand, a substantial portion of hyperalphalipoproteinemic population in Japan is accounted for by genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which is also commonly unique in East Asian populations. It is still controversial whether CETP mutations are antiatherogenic. Hepatic Schistosomiasis is proposed as a potential screening factor for historic accumulation of CETP deficiency in East Asia. PMID:25849946

  10. Quantitative analysis of anthropogenic relief features: automated mapping of charcoal kiln sites from high-resolution ALS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anna; Takla, Melanie; Nicolay, Alexander; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution digital elevation data from airborne laser scanning (ALS) allow for identification and mapping of so far unknown small-scale relief features that are hidden by forest cover. Especially as a result of historic land use, small anthropogenic landforms can occur, e.g., remains of charcoal kilns on sites that were used for charcoal production or ridge and furrow systems in former farmland areas. Mapping such relief features and analyzing their spatial distribution patterns can help to understand past land-use systems and their effects on landscapes. To efficiently detect and quantify small-scale relief features from high-resolution DEMs for larger areas, (semi-) automated mapping routines are required. In order to describe the number and spatial distribution of historic charcoal kiln sites in the area around Cottbus, Germany, we developed a GIS-based routine for the detection and mapping of kiln remnants from ALS elevation models with a resolution of 1 or 2 meters. The method is based on a template matching algorithm, using a combination of morphometric parameters, and is implemented within ArcGIS. The mapping results could be validated against a comprehensive database of kiln sites and diameters recorded from archaeological excavations in the forefield of the opencast mine Jänschwalde and from manual digitization of kiln remnants from Shaded Relief maps for the Jänschwalder Heide and the Tauersche Forst, north of Cottbus. A considerably high number of charcoal kiln sites could be detected in ALS data, and the diameters of the identified charcoal kilns are remarkable large in the area. For the Jänschwalder Heide, more than 5000 kiln sites in an area of 32 km2 were detected by manual digitization, with 1355 kiln sites that are wider than 12 m. These relatively large kiln sites could be mapped with detection rates that are close to those of manual digitization using the automated mapping routine. Detection quality was improved by the combination of several morphometric parameters used for template matching, as compared to a mapping based on elevation values only. In comparison to manual digitization, a combination of the described detection routine and a manual removal of falsely detected sites can considerably facilitate the mapping and distribution analysis of kiln sites or other small-scale relief features.

  11. Control of mitotic and meiotic centriole duplication by the Plk4-related kinase ZYG-1

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nathaniel; Perez, Dahlia E.; Song, Mi Hye; Liu, Yan; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Caron, Cathy; Kemphues, Kenneth J.; O'Connell, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    Centriole duplication is of crucial importance during both mitotic and male meiotic divisions, but it is currently not known whether this process is regulated differently during the two modes of division. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the kinase ZYG-1 plays an essential role in both mitotic and meiotic centriole duplication. We have found that the C-terminus of ZYG-1 is necessary and sufficient for targeting to centrosomes and is important for differentiating mitotic and meiotic centriole duplication. Small truncations of the C-terminus dramatically lower the level of ZYG-1 at mitotic centrosomes but have little effect on the level of ZYG-1 at meiotic centrosomes. Interestingly, truncation of ZYG-1 blocks centrosome duplication in the mitotic cycle but leads to centrosome amplification in the meiotic cycle. Meiotic centriole amplification appears to result from the overduplication of centrioles during meiosis I and leads to the formation of multipolar meiosis II spindles. The extra centrioles also disrupt spermatogenesis by inducing the formation of supernumerary fertilization-competent spermatids that contain abnormal numbers of chromosomes and centrioles. Our data reveal differences in the regulation of mitotic and meiotic centrosome duplication, particularly with regard to ZYG-1 activity, and reveal an important role for centrosomes in spermatid formation. PMID:20144993

  12. MASTL is the human orthologue of Greatwall kinase that facilitates mitotic entry, anaphase and cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Voets, Erik; Wolthuis, Rob M F

    2010-09-01

    Greatwall (Gwl) was originally discovered in Drosophila as an essential kinase for correct chromosome condensation and mitotic progression. In Xenopus, Gwl may influence the positive-feedback loop that directs cyclin B1-Cdk1 activation and the mitotic state by inhibiting the phosphatase PP 2A. Here, we describe the human orthologue of Gwl called microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL). We found that MASTL localizes to the nucleus in interphase and re-localizes in part to centrosomes in mitosis, when it is active. Cells strongly depleted of MASTL by RNAi delay in G(2) phase and reveal slow chromosome condensation. MASTL RNAi cells that enter and progress through mitosis often fail to completely separate their sister chromatids in anaphase. This causes chromatin to be trapped in the cleavage furrow, which may lead to the formation of 4N G(1) cells by cytokinesis failure. Further, our experiments indicate that MASTL supports the phosphorylation state of mitotic phospho-proteins downstream of cyclin B1-Cdk1, including the APC/C. Cyclin B1 destruction is incomplete when mitotic cells that are strongly depleted of MASTL exit mitosis. We propose that MASTL enhances cyclin B1-Cdk1-dependent mitotic phosphorylation events, directing mitotic entry, anaphase and cytokinesis in human cells. PMID:20818157

  13. Sli15INCENP Dephosphorylation Prevents Mitotic Checkpoint Reengagement Due to Loss of Tension at Anaphase Onset

    PubMed Central

    Mirchenko, Lesia; Uhlmann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mitotic checkpoint, also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint, delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes have reached bipolar tension on the mitotic spindle [1–3]. Once this is achieved, the protease separase is activated to cleave the chromosomal cohesin complex, thereby triggering anaphase. Cohesin cleavage releases tension between sister chromatids, but why the mitotic checkpoint now remains silent is poorly understood. Here, using budding yeast as a model, we show that loss of sister chromatid cohesion at anaphase onset would engage the mitotic checkpoint if this was not prevented by concomitant separase-dependent activation of the Cdc14 phosphatase. Cdc14, in turn, inactivates the mitotic checkpoint by dephosphorylating Sli15INCENP, a subunit of the conserved Aurora B kinase complex that forms part of the proposed chromosomal tension sensor. Dephosphorylation-dependent relocation of Sli15INCENP from centromeres to the central spindle during anaphase is seen in organisms from yeast to human [4–8]. Our results suggest that Sli15INCENP dephosphorylation is part of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that prevents the mitotic checkpoint from reengaging when tension between sister chromatids is lost at anaphase onset. PMID:20619650

  14. p53 activates G1 checkpoint following DNA damage by doxorubicin during transient mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Recovery from DNA damage is critical for cell survival. The serious damage is not able to be repaired during checkpoint and finally induces cell death to prevent abnormal cell growth. In this study, we demonstrated that 8N-DNA contents are accumulated via re-replication during prolonged recovery period containing serious DNA damage in mitotic cells. During the incubation for recovery, a mitotic delay and initiation of an abnormal interphase without cytokinesis were detected. Whereas a failure of cytokinesis occurred in cells with no relation with p53/p21, re-replication is an anomalous phenomenon in the mitotic DNA damage response in p53/p21 negative cells. Cells with wild-type p53 are accumulated just prior to the initiation of DNA replication through a G1 checkpoint after mitotic DNA damage, even though p53 does not interrupt pre-RC assembly. Finally, these cells undergo cell death by apoptosis. These data suggest that p53 activates G1 checkpoint in response to mitotic DNA damage. Without p53, cells with mitotic DNA damage undergo re-replication leading to accumulation of damage PMID:25605022

  15. Dual function microtubule- and mitochondria-associated proteins mediate mitotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leyuan; Xie, Rui; Yang, Chaofeng; McKeehan, Wallace L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Survival and evolution of aneuploid cells after an asymmetric segregation of chromosomes at mitosis may be the common initiating event and underlying cause of the genetic diversity and adaptability of cancers. We hypothesize that mechanisms exist to detect impending aneuploidy and prevent it before completion of an aberrant mitosis. Methods The distribution of isoforms of C19ORF5, an interactive partner with mitochondria-associated LRPPRC and tumor suppressor RASSF1A, state of spindle microtubules and mitochondrial aggregation was analyzed in synchronized mitotic cells and cells stalled in mitosis after treatment with paclitaxel. Results C19ORF5 distributed broadly across the mitotic spindle and reversibly accumulated during reversible mitotic arrest. Prolonged stabilization of microtubules caused an accumulation of a C19ORF5 product with dual MAP and MtAP properties that caused irreversible aggregation of mitochondria and death of mitotic cells. Conclusion Dual function microtubule-associated (MAP) and mitochondria-associated (MtAP) proteins generated by prolonged mitotic arrest trigger mitochondrial-induced mitotic cell death. This is a potential mechanism to prevent minimal survivable aneuploidy resulting from an aberrant cell division and cancers in general at their earliest common origin. PMID:19759419

  16. Transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation perpendicular to the long axis of high aspect ratio features

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, R. B.; Anciso, A.; Jones, P. J.; Glenn, A. L.; Williams, B. L.; Sridhar, S.; Arshad, S.

    2009-11-15

    A new variation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen preparation is introduced. By thinning a tall high aspect ratio structure perpendicular to the long dimension (i.e., from the side) rather than from perpendicular to the short dimension (either the top or the bottom), it is possible to obtain a more uniformly thin TEM specimen over the entire long dimension of the structure. This article will describe the rational for this variation in specimen preparation. The necessary modifications of four different specimen preparation methods (in situ lift-out, traditional H-bar, ex situ lift-out, and tripod polishing) will be discussed and images of specimens obtained by both of these first two methods will be shown. Additional potential advantages and other applications of this specimen preparation method will be covered.

  17. DE/ISIS conjunction comparisons of high-latitude electron density features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Benson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the ISIS-1 and -2 topside sounder measurements of electron number density, N(e), with the in situ ion and N(e) measurements by the Langmuir probe aboard the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) during four high-latitude ISIS/DE magnetic field-aligned conjunctions. The ISIS-derived N(e) values, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, were found to agree with the Langmuir probe measurements to within about 30 percent over a density range of more than two decades on three of the four comparisons; the fourth comparison which included data with strong N(e) irregularities, showed a difference of 60 percent.

  18. DE/ISIS conjunction comparisons of high-latitude electron density features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Benson, Robert F.

    1988-06-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the ISIS-1 and -2 topside sounder measurements of electron number density, N(e), with the in situ ion and N(e) measurements by the Langmuir probe aboard the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) during four high-latitude ISIS/DE magnetic field-aligned conjunctions. The ISIS-derived N(e) values, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, were found to agree with the Langmuir probe measurements to within about 30 percent over a density range of more than two decades on three of the four comparisons; the fourth comparison which included data with strong N(e) irregularities, showed a difference of 60 percent.

  19. A cosmic ray super high multicore family event. 1: Experiment and general features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    Information on the fragmentation region in super high energy hadronic interactions can be obtained through the observations of gamma-ray families produced by cosmic rays. Gamma-ray families with the sum of E sub gamma or 1000 TeV are receiving increasing interests in emulsion chamber experiments. There exist some complications caused by the superposition of nuclear and electromagnetic cascades and the uncertainty in the nature of the primary particles. These complications usually make the conclusions drawn from various interesting phenomena observed in family events not so definite. An interesting family event KO E19, which is likely to have suffered only very slight disturbances is described. It was found in the Mt. Kambala emulsion chamber experiment. The production height of the event is determined to be H=(70 + or - 30)m and some conclusions are given.

  20. High-risk angina patient. Identification by clinical features, hospital course, electrocardiography and technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.G.; Lyons, K.P.; Aronow, W.S.; Stinson, P.J.; Kuperus, J.; Waters, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated 193 consecutive unstable angina patients by clinical features, hospital course and electrocardiography. All patients were managed medically. Of the 193 patients, 150 (78%) had a technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) myocardial scintigram after hospitalization. Of these, 49 (33%) had positive scintigrams. At a follow-up of 24.9 +/- 10.8 months after hospitalization, 16 of 49 patients (33%) with positive scintigrams died from cardiac causes, compared with six of 101 patients (6%) with negative scintigrams (p less than 0.001). Of 49 patients with positive scintigrams, 11 (22%) had had nonfatal myocardial infarction at follow-up, compared with seven of 101 patients (7%) with negative scintigrams (p less than 0.01). Age, duration of clinical coronary artery disease, continuing angina during hospitalization, ischemic ECG, cardiomegaly and a history of heart failure also correlated with cardiac death at follow-up. Ischemic ECG and a history of angina with a crescendo pattern also correlated with nonfatal infarction at follow-up. Patients with continuing angina, an ischemic ECG and a positive scintigram constituted a high-risk unstable angina subgroup with a survival rate of 58% at 6 months, 47% at 12 months and 42% at 24 and 36 months. We conclude that the assessment of clinical features, hospital course, ECG and Tc-PYP scintigraphy may be useful in identifying high-risk unstable angina patients.

  1. High-risk angina patient: identification by clinical features, hospital course, electrocardiography, and technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.G.; Lyons, K.P.; Aronow, W.S.; Stinson, P.J.; Kuperus, J.; Waters, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated 193 consecutive unstable angina patients by clinical features, hospital course and electrocardiography. All patients were managed medically. Of the 193 patients, 150 (78%) had a technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) myocardial scintigram after hospitalization. Of these, 49 (33%) had positive scintigrams. At a follow-up of 24.9 +- 10.8 months after hospitalization, 16 of 49 patients (33%) with positive scintigrams died from cardiac causes, compared with six of 101 patients (6%) with negative scintigrams (p < 0.001). Of 49 patients with positive scintigrams, 11 (22%) had had nonfatal myocardial infarction at follow-up, compared with seven of 101 patients (7%) with negative scintigrams (p < 0.01). Age, duration of clinical coronary artery disease, continuing angina during hospitalization, ischemic ECG, cardiomegaly and a history of heart failure also correlated with cardiac death at follow-up. Ischemic ECG and a history of angina with a crescendo pattern also correlated with nonfatal infarction at follow-up. Patients with continuing angina, an ischemic ECG and a positive scintigram constituted a high-risk unstable angina subgroup, with a survival rate of 58% at 6 months, 47% at 12 months and 42% at 24 and 36 months. We conclude that the assessment of clinical features, hospital course, ECG and Tc-PYP scintigraphy may be useful in identifying high-risk unstable angina patients.

  2. Why do granites stand out as high elevation features of the landscape ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, J.; Murray, K. E.; Reiners, P. W.; Simon-Labric, T.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a simple mechanism to explain why granitic igneous intrusions, despite being denser than the rocks they usually intrude, stand out as topographic highs in the landscape. This mechanism is predicted to be far more important than hardness or erodibility variations in many cases. We derived a very simple expression for the relationship between isostatically-driven surface uplift and erosion rates as a function of surface rock density that implies that the denser the surface rocks the faster the isostatic rebound. Using a surface process model coupled to a flexural isostatic model, we show how variations in surface rock density may result in substantial differential isostatic rebound and thus surface uplift rate and topography. We demonstrate that the contribution of this isostatic effect can be distinguished from that arising from the stronger resistance of denser rocks to erosion by estimating the enhanced rate of erosion predicted by our theory through variations in cooling ages from low temperature thermochonometers. We illustrate our proposition through a large number of examples where variations in surface rock density may have led to differential uplift and topography, including various granitic intrusions, but also the exhumation of denser rocks such as basaltic intrusions or gneiss domes or the emergence of continental areas from below sea level at the transition between the subduction and collision phases at active plate margins. Predicted steady-state surface topography in an area intruded by four dense granites that appear as topographic highs. Note that the granites have the same resistance to erosion than the surrounding rocks; they are denser.

  3. Pathobiological features of a novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Se Mi; Choi, Eun-Ji; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Shim, Woo-Sub; Kim, Si-Wook; Mo, In-Pil; Bae, Yeonji; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young Ki

    2014-01-01

    The endemicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) viruses in Asia has led to the generation of reassortant H5 strains with novel gene constellations. A newly emerged HPAI A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks in the Republic of Korea in 2014. Because newly emerging high-pathogenicity H5 viruses continue to pose public health risks, it is imperative that their pathobiological properties be examined. Here, we characterized A/mallard duck/Korea/W452/2014 (MDk/W452(H5N8)), a representative virus, and evaluated its pathogenic and pandemic potential in various animal models. We found that MDk/W452(H5N8), which originated from the reassortment of wild bird viruses harbored by migratory waterfowl in eastern China, replicated systemically and was lethal in chickens, but appeared to be attenuated, albeit efficiently transmitted, in ducks. Despite predominant attachment to avian-like virus receptors, MDk/W452(H5N8) also exhibited detectable human virus-like receptor binding and replicated in human respiratory tract tissues. In mice, MDk/W452(H5N8) was moderately pathogenic and had limited tissue tropism relative to previous HPAI A(H5N1) viruses. It also induced moderate nasal wash titers in inoculated ferrets; additionally, it was recovered in extrapulmonary tissues and one of three direct-contact ferrets seroconverted without shedding. Moreover, domesticated cats appeared to be more susceptible than dogs to virus infection. With their potential to become established in ducks, continued circulation of A(H5N8) viruses could alter the genetic evolution of pre-existing avian poultry strains. Overall, detailed virological investigation remains a necessity given the capacity of H5 viruses to evolve to cause human illness with few changes in the viral genome. PMID:26038499

  4. Pathobiological features of a novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Se Mi; Choi, Eun-Ji; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Shim, Woo-Sub; Kim, Si-Wook; Mo, In-Pil; Bae, Yeonji; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young Ki

    2014-10-01

    The endemicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) viruses in Asia has led to the generation of reassortant H5 strains with novel gene constellations. A newly emerged HPAI A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks in the Republic of Korea in 2014. Because newly emerging high-pathogenicity H5 viruses continue to pose public health risks, it is imperative that their pathobiological properties be examined. Here, we characterized A/mallard duck/Korea/W452/2014 (MDk/W452(H5N8)), a representative virus, and evaluated its pathogenic and pandemic potential in various animal models. We found that MDk/W452(H5N8), which originated from the reassortment of wild bird viruses harbored by migratory waterfowl in eastern China, replicated systemically and was lethal in chickens, but appeared to be attenuated, albeit efficiently transmitted, in ducks. Despite predominant attachment to avian-like virus receptors, MDk/W452(H5N8) also exhibited detectable human virus-like receptor binding and replicated in human respiratory tract tissues. In mice, MDk/W452(H5N8) was moderately pathogenic and had limited tissue tropism relative to previous HPAI A(H5N1) viruses. It also induced moderate nasal wash titers in inoculated ferrets; additionally, it was recovered in extrapulmonary tissues and one of three direct-contact ferrets seroconverted without shedding. Moreover, domesticated cats appeared to be more susceptible than dogs to virus infection. With their potential to become established in ducks, continued circulation of A(H5N8) viruses could alter the genetic evolution of pre-existing avian poultry strains. Overall, detailed virological investigation remains a necessity given the capacity of H5 viruses to evolve to cause human illness with few changes in the viral genome. PMID:26038499

  5. High-Resolution PFPE-based Molding Techniques for Nanofabrication of High-Pattern Density, Sub-20 nm Features: A Fundamental Materials Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Stuart S.; Retterer, Scott; Lopez, Rene; Ruiz, Ricardo; Samulski, Edward T.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2010-04-14

    Several perfluoropolyether (PFPE)-based elastomers for high-resolution replica molding applications are explored. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface tension values (<25 mN/m). Using large area (>4 in.{sup 2}) master templates, we experimentally show the relationship between mold resolution and material properties such as modulus and surface tension for materials used in this study. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus PFPE tetramethacrylate (TMA) composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nanograting structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  6. The FlyCatwalk: A High-Throughput Feature-Based Sorting System for Artificial Selection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Vasco; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Fry, Steven N.; Hafen, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful tool for investigating complex traits. Artificial selection can be applied for a specific trait and the resulting phenotypically divergent populations pool-sequenced to identify alleles that occur at substantially different frequencies in the extreme populations. To maximize the proportion of loci that are causal to the phenotype among all enriched loci, population size and number of replicates need to be high. These requirements have, in fact, limited evolution studies in higher organisms, where the time investment required for phenotyping is often prohibitive for large-scale studies. Animal size is a highly multigenic trait that remains poorly understood, and an experimental evolution approach may thus aid in gaining new insights into the genetic basis of this trait. To this end, we developed the FlyCatwalk, a fully automated, high-throughput system to sort live fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) based on morphometric traits. With the FlyCatwalk, we can detect gender and quantify body and wing morphology parameters at a four-old higher throughput compared with manual processing. The phenotyping results acquired using the FlyCatwalk correlate well with those obtained using the standard manual procedure. We demonstrate that an automated, high-throughput, feature-based sorting system is able to avoid previous limitations in population size and replicate numbers. Our approach can likewise be applied for a variety of traits and experimental settings that require high-throughput phenotyping. PMID:25556112

  7. Vibrational Features of Water at the Low-Density/High-Density Liquid Structural Transformations

    E-print Network

    Khusnutdinoff, Ramil M

    2011-01-01

    A structural transformation in water upon compression was recently observed at the temperature $T=277$~K in the vicinity of the pressure $p \\approx 2\\;000$~Atm [R.M. Khusnutdinoff, A.V. Mokshin, J. Non-Cryst. Solids \\textbf{357}, 1677 (2011)]. It was found that the transformations are related with the principal structural changes within the first two coordination shells as well as the deformation of the hydrogen-bond network. In this work we study in details the influence of these structural transformations on the vibrational molecular dynamics of water by means of molecular dynamics simulations on the basis of the model Amoeba potential ($T=290$~K, $p=1.0 \\div 10\\;000$~Atm). The equation of state and the isothermal compressibility are found for the considered ($p$,$T$)-range. The vibrational density of states extracted for $THz$-frequency range manifests the two distinct modes, where the high-frequency mode is independent on pressure whereas the low-frequency one has the strong, non-monotonic pressure-depend...

  8. Features of oxide layer formation in high-aspect slot structures by means of MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, Yuri V.; Kuchumov, Boris ?.; Kruchinin, Vladimir N.; Spesivtsev, Evgeni V.; Golovnev, Igor F.; Igumenov, Igor ?.

    2015-03-01

    Processes were studied concerning the deposition of Hf and Mg oxide layers in the slot structures with the aspect ratio values from 30 to 500 by means of a pulsed MOCVD technique with a discrete components dosing. For assembling the slot structures, different combinations of materials have been used such as Si/Si, Si/glass, glass/chromium patterned glass, and Si/chromium patterned glass. The layers were characterized by means of XRD, XPS, and SEM methods. The thickness profiles of deposited films were measured using a high spatial resolution laser ellipsometry. It has been demonstrated that the radial distribution profiles of the thickness are determined by the process temperature, the aspect ratio value and the type of precursor. In contrast to HfO2 the layers of MgO with decreasing process temperature demonstrate change in the shape of layer profile distribution from a bowl-like shape to a dome-like one, with an increase of the film thickness at the center of the substrate. An image transfer process in the slot structure wherein one of the glass substrates is chromium-patterned has been studied within a wide range of experimental parameters. In order to describe these effects there has been a hybrid model proposed involving a combination of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods. All the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  9. High-precision, automated integration of multiple isothermal titration calorimetric thermograms: new features of NITPIC.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Thomas H; Brautigam, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a standard and widely available tool to measure the thermodynamic parameters of macromolecular associations. Modern applications of the method, including global analysis and drug screening, require the acquisition of multiple sets of data; sometimes these data sets number in the hundreds. Therefore, there is a need for quick, precise, and automated means to process the data, particularly at the first step of data analysis, which is commonly the integration of the raw data to yield an interpretable isotherm. Herein, we describe enhancements to an algorithm that previously has been shown to provide an automated, unbiased, and high-precision means to integrate ITC data. These improvements allow for the speedy and precise serial integration of an unlimited number of ITC data sets, and they have been implemented in the freeware program NITPIC, version 1.1.0. We present a comprehensive comparison of the performance of this software against an older version of NITPIC and a current version of Origin, which is commonly used for integration. The new methods recapitulate the excellent performance of the previous versions of NITPIC while speeding it up substantially, and their precision is significantly better than that of Origin. This new version of NITPIC is therefore well suited to the serial integration of many ITC data sets. PMID:25524420

  10. Features of High-Temperature Calibration of W/Re Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanovskiy, A.; Edler, F.; Fischer, J.; Oleynikov, P.; Zaytsev, P.; Pokhodun, A.

    2015-03-01

    Investigations of Type A (W-5 %Re/W-20 %Re) thermocouples were performed at several laboratories to validate their reference function before its standardization in the new issue of the international standard IEC 60584. The Type A thermocouples investigated were equipped with sealed protection tubes made of sapphire which were filled with an inert gas (argon). The investigations at Russian laboratories were performed mainly in carbon-free high-temperature furnaces. The calibration results obtained in the temperature range (600 to 1850) in the carbon-free environment were within % tolerance limits and confirmed the suitability of Type A thermocouples for industrial applications. In contrast, the Type A thermocouple 89/95-P investigated at PTB (Germany) was exposed to a carbon environment when annealed at and when it was calibrated at metal-carbon eutectic (Me-C) fixed points. Measurements made at Me-C fixed points did not deviate from the reference function by more than about 6 K at the first stage when temperatures were below . However, the inhomogeneity of the thermoelements increased continuously after the calibration at the Me-C eutectic fixed points. The additional measurements at the peritectic fixed point () resulted in a continuous emf drift to deviations from the reference function of about (100 to 150) which corresponds to a temperature equivalent of about (9 to 14) K. The thermoelectric stability and homogeneity of the thermocouple 89/95-P during these investigations was checked by repeated measurements at the freezing point of copper ().

  11. Quark pair production in high energy pA collisions: General features

    E-print Network

    Hirotsugu Fujii; Francois Gelis; Raju Venugopalan

    2006-03-14

    A consistent treatment of both multiple scattering and small x quantum evolution effects on pair production in high energy pA collisions is feasible in the framework of the Color Glass Condensate (hep-ph/0402257). We first discuss the properties of quark pair production in the classical effective theory where only multiple scattering effects are included. Explicit results are given for pair production as a function of the invariant mass of pairs, the pair momenta, the atomic mass number A and the quark mass. We relate the logarithms that appear in our formulation of pair production to logarithms that appear in the limit of collinear factorization in QCD. Violations of kT factorization and medium modifications, as represented by the Cronin effect, are also investigated. We next consider how small x quantum evolution (shadowing) effects modify the results for pair production. In particular, we provide results for the rapidity distribution of pairs and the dependence of the Cronin effect on rapidity. We discuss the dependence of our results on the initial conditions for small x evolution and comment on its implications for pair production at RHIC and the LHC.

  12. A dynamic, mitotic-like mechanism for bacterial chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Michael A; Waldor, Matthew K

    2006-12-01

    The mechanisms that mediate chromosome segregation in bacteria are poorly understood. Despite evidence of dynamic movement of chromosome regions, to date, mitotic-like mechanisms that act on the bacterial chromosome have not been demonstrated. Here we provide evidence that the Vibrio cholerae ParAI and ParBI proteins are components of an apparatus that pulls the origin region of the large V. cholerae chromosome to the cell pole and anchors it there. ParBI interacts with a conserved origin-proximal, centromere-like site (parSI) that, following chromosome replication, segregates asymmetrically from one pole to the other. While segregating, parSI stretches far away from neighboring chromosomal loci. ParAI forms a dynamic band that extends from the pole to the segregating ParBI/parSI complex. Movement of ParBI/parSI across the cell occurs in concert with ParAI retraction. Deletion of parAI disrupts proper origin localization and segregation dynamics, and parSI no longer separates from nearby regions. These data suggest that ParAI forms a dynamic structure that pulls the ParBI-bound chromosome to the pole in a process analogous to anaphase of eukaryotic mitosis. PMID:17158745

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 inhibitor RO3306 promotes mitotic slippage in paclitaxel-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Qiu, P; Lai, X; He, P; Wu, Y; Du, B; Tan, Y

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver neoplasm and current systemic chemotherapy are mostly ineffective. Paclitaxel (PTX) has a clinically significant effect on many malignant tumors. Cells treated with PTX undergo reversible mitotic arrest and although high doses can cause side effects it may also induce apoptosis. We investigated the effect of a sequential combination of PTX and RO3306, a cyclin-dependent kinase 1 inhibitor, on the hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. The sequential drug treatment protocol involved the addition of PTX (0.2 µmol/L) for 18 h followed by RO3306 (2 µmol/L) for a further 6 h. Cell viability and proliferation were measured using tetrazolium dye (MTT) and colony formation assay. Cell cycle profiles were established by flow cytometry. The expression level of protein was examined by immunoblotting. We observed a synergistic effect of PTX and RO3306 treatment on cell growth and proliferation as well as an increased proportion of cells in sub-G1 phase. Expression levels of cyclin B, cyclin E and phosphorylated Histone H3 demonstrated that RO3306 enhanced apoptosis in PTX treated cells by mitotic slippage. Our data suggested that the combination of PTX and RO3306 may be an effective therapeutic combination for the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:24195507

  14. Sonic hedgehog-expressing basal cells are general post-mitotic precursors of functional taste receptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Hirohito; Scott, Jennifer K.; Harada, Shuitsu; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Taste buds contain ~60 elongate cells and several basal cells. Elongate cells comprise three functional taste cell types: I - glial cells, II - bitter/sweet/umami receptor cells, and III - sour detectors. Although taste cells are continuously renewed, lineage relationships among cell types are ill-defined. Basal cells have been proposed as taste bud stem cells, a subset of which express Sonic hedgehog (Shh). However, Shh+ basal cells turnover rapidly suggesting that Shh+ cells are precursors of some or all taste cell types. Results To fate map Shh-expressing cells, mice carrying ShhCreERT2 and a high (CAG-CAT-EGFP) or low (R26RLacZ) efficiency reporter allele were given tamoxifen to activate Cre in Shh+ cells. Using R26RLacZ, lineage-labeled cells occur singly within buds, supporting a post-mitotic state for Shh+ cells. Using either reporter, we show that Shh+ cells differentiate into all three taste cell types, in proportions reflecting cell type ratios in taste buds (I > II > III). Conclusions Shh+ cells are not stem cells, but are post-mitotic, immediate precursors of taste cells. Shh+ cells differentiate into each of the three taste cell types, and the choice of a specific taste cell fate is regulated to maintain the proper ratio within buds. PMID:24590958

  15. Targeting cannabinoid receptor-2 pathway by phenylacetylamide suppresses the proliferation of human myeloma cells through mitotic dysregulation and cytoskeleton disruption.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rentian; Tong, Qin; Xie, Zhaojun; Cheng, Haizi; Wang, Lirong; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Roodman, G David; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) is expressed dominantly in the immune system, especially on plasma cells. Cannabinergic ligands with CB2 selectivity emerge as a class of promising agents to treat CB2-expressing malignancies without psychotropic concerns. In this study, we found that CB2 but not CB1 was highly expressed in human multiple myeloma (MM) and primary CD138+ cells. A novel inverse agonist of CB2, phenylacetylamide but not CB1 inverse agonist SR141716, inhibited the proliferation of human MM cells (IC50 : 0.62?2.5??M) mediated by apoptosis induction, but exhibited minor cytotoxic effects on human normal mononuclear cells. CB2 gene silencing or pharmacological antagonism markedly attenuated phenylacetylamide's anti-MM effects. Phenylacetylamide triggered the expression of C/EBP homologous protein at the early treatment stage, followed by death receptor-5 upregulation, caspase activation, and ?-actin/tubulin degradation. Cell cycle related protein cdc25C and mitotic regulator Aurora A kinase were inactivated by phenylacetylamide treatment, leading to an increase in the ratio inactive/active cdc2 kinase. As a result, phosphorylation of CDK substrates was decreased, and the MM cell mitotic division was largely blocked by treatment. Importantly, phenylacetylamide could overcome the chemoresistance of MM cells against dexamethasone or melphalan. Thus, targeting CB2 may represent an attractive approach to treat cancers of immune origin. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25640641

  16. Local changes of work function near rough features on Cu surfaces operated under high external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Djurabekova, Flyura Ruzibaev, Avaz; Parviainen, Stefan; Holmström, Eero; Hakala, Mikko

    2013-12-28

    Metal surfaces operated under high electric fields produce sparks even if they are held in ultra high vacuum. In spite of extensive research on the topic of vacuum arcs, the mystery of vacuum arc origin still remains unresolved. The indications that the sparking rates depend on the material motivate the research on surface response to extremely high external electric fields. In this work by means of density-functional theory calculations we analyze the redistribution of electron density on (100) Cu surfaces due to self-adatoms and in presence of high electric fields from ?1?V/nm up to ?2?V/nm (?1 to ?2 GV/m, respectively). We also calculate the partial charge induced by the external field on a single adatom and a cluster of two adatoms in order to obtain reliable information on charge redistribution on surface atoms, which can serve as a benchmarking quantity for the assessment of the electric field effects on metal surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the modifications of work function around rough surface features, such as step edges and self-adatoms.

  17. Identifying Chinese Microblog Users With High Suicide Probability Using Internet-Based Profile and Linguistic Features: Classification Model

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Li; Hao, Bibo; Cheng, Qijin; Yip, Paul SF

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional offline assessment of suicide probability is time consuming and difficult in convincing at-risk individuals to participate. Identifying individuals with high suicide probability through online social media has an advantage in its efficiency and potential to reach out to hidden individuals, yet little research has been focused on this specific field. Objective The objective of this study was to apply two classification models, Simple Logistic Regression (SLR) and Random Forest (RF), to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of identifying high suicide possibility microblog users in China through profile and linguistic features extracted from Internet-based data. Methods There were nine hundred and nine Chinese microblog users that completed an Internet survey, and those scoring one SD above the mean of the total Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) score, as well as one SD above the mean in each of the four subscale scores in the participant sample were labeled as high-risk individuals, respectively. Profile and linguistic features were fed into two machine learning algorithms (SLR and RF) to train the model that aims to identify high-risk individuals in general suicide probability and in its four dimensions. Models were trained and then tested by 5-fold cross validation; in which both training set and test set were generated under the stratified random sampling rule from the whole sample. There were three classic performance metrics (Precision, Recall, F1 measure) and a specifically defined metric “Screening Efficiency” that were adopted to evaluate model effectiveness. Results Classification performance was generally matched between SLR and RF. Given the best performance of the classification models, we were able to retrieve over 70% of the labeled high-risk individuals in overall suicide probability as well as in the four dimensions. Screening Efficiency of most models varied from 1/4 to 1/2. Precision of the models was generally below 30%. Conclusions Individuals in China with high suicide probability are recognizable by profile and text-based information from microblogs. Although there is still much space to improve the performance of classification models in the future, this study may shed light on preliminary screening of risky individuals via machine learning algorithms, which can work side-by-side with expert scrutiny to increase efficiency in large-scale-surveillance of suicide probability from online social media. PMID:26543921

  18. Functions of crystallins in and out of lens: Roles in elongated and post-mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Slingsby, Christine; Wistow, Graeme J.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate lens evolved to collect light and focus it onto the retina. In development, the lens grows through massive elongation of epithelial cells possibly recapitulating the evolutionary origins of the lens. The refractive index of the lens is largely dependent on high concentrations of soluble proteins called crystallins. All vertebrate lenses share a common set of crystallins from two superfamilies (although other lineage specific crystallins exist). The ?-crystallins are small heat shock proteins while the ?- and ?-crystallins belong to a superfamily that contains structural proteins of uncertain function. The crystallins are expressed at very high levels in lens but are also found at lower levels in other cells, particularly in retina and brain. All these proteins have plausible connections to maintenance of cytoplasmic order and chaperoning of the complex molecular machines involved in the architecture and function of cells, particularly elongated and post-mitotic cells. They may represent a suite of proteins that help maintain homeostasis in such cells that are at risk from stress or from the accumulated insults of aging. PMID:24582830

  19. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  20. JMLR: Workshop and Conference Proceedings 25:269284, 2012 Asian Conference on Machine Learning On Using Nearly-Independent Feature Families for High

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    On Using Nearly-Independent Feature Families for High Precision and Confidence Omid Madani madani@google.com Manfred Georg mgeorg@google.com David A. Ross dross@google.com Google Inc., Mountain View, CA 94043, USA

  1. Inhibitory factors associated with anaphase-promoting complex/cylosome in mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Ilana; Miniowitz, Shirly; Moshe, Yakir; Hershko, Avram

    2007-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate chromosome segregation by preventing anaphase initiation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. It affects the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets inhibitors of anaphase initiation for degradation. The mechanisms by which this system regulates APC/C remain obscure. Some models propose that the system promotes sequestration of the APC/C activator Cdc20 by binding to the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1. A different model suggests that a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Cdc20, and Mad2 inhibits APC/C in mitotic checkpoint [Sudakin V, Chan GKT, Yen TJ (2001) J Cell Biol 154:925–936]. We examined this problem by using extracts from nocodazole-arrested cells that reproduce some downstream events of the mitotic checkpoint system, such as lag kinetics of the degradation of APC/C substrate. Incubation of extracts with adenosine-5?-(?-thio)triphosphate (ATP[?S]) stabilized the checkpoint-arrested state, apparently by stable thiophosphorylation of some proteins. By immunoprecipitation of APC/C from stably checkpoint-arrested extracts, followed by elution with increased salt concentration, we isolated inhibitory factors associated with APC/C. A part of the inhibitory material consists of Cdc20 associated with BubR1 and Mad2, and is thus similar to MCC. Contrary to the original MCC hypothesis, we find that MCC disassembles upon exit from the mitotic checkpoint. Thus, the requirement of the mitotic checkpoint system for the binding of Mad2 and BubR1 to Cdc20 may be for the assembly of the inhibitory complex rather than for Cdc20 sequestration. PMID:17360335

  2. Tubulin and calmodulin. Effects of microtubule and microfilament inhibitors on localization in the mitotic apparatus

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the distribution of calmodulin in the mitotic apparatus of rat kangaroo PtK2 and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The distribution of calmodulin in PtK2 cells was compared to the distribution of tubulin, also as revealed by indirect immunofluorescence. During mitosis, calmodulin was found to be a dynamic component of the mitotic apparatus. Calmodulin first appeared in association with the forming mitotic apparatus during midprophase. In metaphase and anaphase, calmodulin was found between the spindle poles and the chromosomes. While tubulin was found in the interzonal region throughout anaphase, calmodulin appeared in the interzone region only at late anaphase. The interzonal calmodulin of late anaphase condensed during telophase into two small regions, one on each side of the midbody. Calmodulin was not detected in the cleavage furrow. In view of the differences in the localization of calmodulin, tubulin, and actin in the mitotic apparatus, experiments were designed to determine the effects of various antimitotic drugs on calmodulin localization. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin microfilaments, had no apparent effect on calmodulin or tubulin localization in the mitotic apparatus of CHO cells. Microtubule inhibitors, such as colcemid and N2O, altered the appearance of tubulin- and calmodulin-specific fluorescence in mitotic CHO cells. Cold temperature (0 degrees C) altered tubulin- specific fluorescence of metaphase PtK2 cells but did not alter calmodulin-specific fluorescence. From these studies, it is concluded that calmodulin is more closely associated with the kinetichore-to-pole microtubules than other components of the mitotic apparatus. PMID:379022

  3. High sensitivity optical fiber temperature sensor based on the temperature cross-sensitivity feature of RI-sensitive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Hu, Manli; Rong, Qiangzhou; Du, Yanying; Yang, Hangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    Considerable part of optical fiber refractive index (RI) sensors suffer from the drawback of cross-sensitivity to temperature because of the thermo-optic effect of materials. In this paper, we propose a straightforward method to utilize the temperature cross-sensitivity feature of an optical fiber RI-sensitive device and thus got a high sensitivity temperature sensor. The sensor consists of a single mode fiber-multimode fiber core(MMFC)-single mode fiber structural refractometer encapsulated into a deionized water-filled cylindrical aluminum alloy shell. Benefiting from the larger thermo-optic coefficient difference between water and MMFC compared with the general cladding and core, the wavelength of transmitted spectrum presents enhanced shift when the ambient temperature change and thus get a higher temperature sensitivity. Experimental results show that the enhanced temperature sensitivity is about 358 pm/°C, which is almost 30 times that of the inherent temperature sensitivity.

  4. Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Has a Role in Normal Physiology which Impacts Clinical Utility.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricardo; Blasina, Alessandra; Hallin, Jill F; Hu, Wenyue; Rymer, Isha; Fan, Jeffery; Hoffman, Robert L; Murphy, Sean; Marx, Matthew; Yanochko, Gina; Trajkovic, Dusko; Dinh, Dac; Timofeevski, Sergei; Zhu, Zhou; Sun, Peiquing; Lappin, Patrick B; Murray, Brion W

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint intervention is an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer when applied to patients predisposed to respond and the treatment is well-tolerated. A critical cell cycle process that could be targeted is the mitotic checkpoint (spindle assembly checkpoint) which governs the metaphase-to-anaphase transition and insures proper chromosomal segregation. The mitotic checkpoint kinase Mps1 was selected to explore whether enhancement in genomic instability is a viable therapeutic strategy. The basal-a subset of triple-negative breast cancer was chosen as a model system because it has a higher incidence of chromosomal instability and Mps1 expression is up-regulated. Depletion of Mps1 reduces tumor cell viability relative to normal cells. Highly selective, extremely potent Mps1 kinase inhibitors were created to investigate the roles of Mps1 catalytic activity in tumor cells and normal physiology (PF-7006, PF-3837; Ki<0.5 nM; cellular IC50 2-6 nM). Treatment of tumor cells in vitro with PF-7006 modulates expected Mps1-dependent biology as demonstrated by molecular and phenotypic measures (reduced pHH3-Ser10 levels, shorter duration of mitosis, micro-nucleation, and apoptosis). Tumor-bearing mice treated with PF-7006 exhibit tumor growth inhibition concomitant with pharmacodynamic modulation of a downstream biomarker (pHH3-Ser10). Unfortunately, efficacy only occurs at drug exposures that cause dose-limiting body weight loss, gastrointestinal toxicities, and neutropenia. Mps1 inhibitor toxicities may be mitigated by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest in Rb1-competent cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Using an isogenic cellular model system, PF-7006 is shown to be selectively cytotoxic to Rb1-deficient cells relative to Rb1-competent cells (also a measure of kinase selectivity). Human bone marrow cells pretreated with palbociclib have decreased PF-7006-dependent apoptosis relative to cells without palbociclib pretreatment. Collectively, this study raises a concern that single agent therapies inhibiting Mps1 will not be well-tolerated clinically but may be when combined with a selective CDK4/6 drug. PMID:26398286

  5. Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Has a Role in Normal Physiology which Impacts Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ricardo; Blasina, Alessandra; Hallin, Jill F.; Hu, Wenyue; Rymer, Isha; Fan, Jeffery; Hoffman, Robert L.; Murphy, Sean; Marx, Matthew; Yanochko, Gina; Trajkovic, Dusko; Dinh, Dac; Timofeevski, Sergei; Zhu, Zhou; Sun, Peiquing; Lappin, Patrick B.; Murray, Brion W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint intervention is an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer when applied to patients predisposed to respond and the treatment is well-tolerated. A critical cell cycle process that could be targeted is the mitotic checkpoint (spindle assembly checkpoint) which governs the metaphase-to-anaphase transition and insures proper chromosomal segregation. The mitotic checkpoint kinase Mps1 was selected to explore whether enhancement in genomic instability is a viable therapeutic strategy. The basal-a subset of triple-negative breast cancer was chosen as a model system because it has a higher incidence of chromosomal instability and Mps1 expression is up-regulated. Depletion of Mps1 reduces tumor cell viability relative to normal cells. Highly selective, extremely potent Mps1 kinase inhibitors were created to investigate the roles of Mps1 catalytic activity in tumor cells and normal physiology (PF-7006, PF-3837; Ki<0.5 nM; cellular IC50 2–6 nM). Treatment of tumor cells in vitro with PF-7006 modulates expected Mps1-dependent biology as demonstrated by molecular and phenotypic measures (reduced pHH3-Ser10 levels, shorter duration of mitosis, micro-nucleation, and apoptosis). Tumor-bearing mice treated with PF-7006 exhibit tumor growth inhibition concomitant with pharmacodynamic modulation of a downstream biomarker (pHH3-Ser10). Unfortunately, efficacy only occurs at drug exposures that cause dose-limiting body weight loss, gastrointestinal toxicities, and neutropenia. Mps1 inhibitor toxicities may be mitigated by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest in Rb1-competent cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Using an isogenic cellular model system, PF-7006 is shown to be selectively cytotoxic to Rb1-deficient cells relative to Rb1-competent cells (also a measure of kinase selectivity). Human bone marrow cells pretreated with palbociclib have decreased PF-7006-dependent apoptosis relative to cells without palbociclib pretreatment. Collectively, this study raises a concern that single agent therapies inhibiting Mps1 will not be well-tolerated clinically but may be when combined with a selective CDK4/6 drug. PMID:26398286

  6. Analogues to features and processes of a high-level radioactive waste repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Stuckless, John S.; with a Foreword by Abraham Van Luik, U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-01-01

    Natural analogues are defined for this report as naturally occurring or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have taken place over time periods of decades to millennia and on spatial scales as much as tens of kilometers. Analogues provide an important temporal and spatial dimension that cannot be tested by laboratory or field-scale experiments. Analogues provide one of the multiple lines of evidence intended to increase confidence in the safe geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Although the work in this report was completed specifically for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste under the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the applicability of the science, analyses, and interpretations is not limited to a specific site. Natural and anthropogenic analogues have provided and can continue to provide value in understanding features and processes of importance across a wide variety of topics in addressing the challenges of geologic isolation of radioactive waste and also as a contribution to scientific investigations unrelated to waste disposal. Isolation of radioactive waste at a mined geologic repository would be through a combination of natural features and engineered barriers. In this report we examine analogues to many of the various components of the Yucca Mountain system, including the preservation of materials in unsaturated environments, flow of water through unsaturated volcanic tuff, seepage into repository drifts, repository drift stability, stability and alteration of waste forms and components of the engineered barrier system, and transport of radionuclides through unsaturated and saturated rock zones.

  7. Control of high oceanic features and subduction channel on earthquake ruptures along the Chile-Peru subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Carrizo, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the earthquake rupture behavior along the Chile-Peru subduction zone in terms of the buoyancy of the subducting high oceanic features (HOF's), and the effect of the interplay between HOF and subduction channel thickness on the degree of interplate coupling. We show a strong relation between subduction of HOF's and earthquake rupture segments along the Chile-Peru margin, elucidating how these subducting features play a key role in seismic segmentation. Within this context, the extra increase of normal stress at the subduction interface is strongly controlled by the buoyancy of HOF's which is likely caused by crustal thickening and mantle serpentinization beneath hotspot ridges and fracture zones, respectively. Buoyancy of HOF's provide an increase in normal stress estimated to be as high as 10-50 MPa. This significant increase of normal stress will enhance seismic coupling across the subduction interface and hence will affect the seismicity. In particular, several large earthquakes (Mw ? 7.5) have occurred in regions characterized by subduction of HOF's including fracture zones (e.g., Nazca, Challenger and Mocha), hotspot ridges (e.g., Nazca, Iquique, and Juan Fernández) and the active Nazca-Antarctic spreading center. For instance, the giant 1960 earthquake (Mw = 9.5) is coincident with the linear projections of the Mocha Fracture Zone and the buoyant Chile Rise, while the active seismic gap of north Chile spatially correlates with the subduction of the Iquique Ridge. Further comparison of rupture characteristics of large underthrusting earthquakes and the locations of subducting features provide evidence that HOF's control earthquake rupture acting as both asperities and barriers. This dual behavior can be partially controlled by the subduction channel thickness. A thick subduction channel smooths the degree of coupling caused by the subducted HOF which allows lateral earthquake rupture propagation. This may explain why the 1960 rupture propagates through six major fracture zones, and ceased near the Mocha Fracture Zone in the north and at the Chile Rise in the south (regions characterized by a thin subduction channel). In addition, the thin subduction channel (north of the Juan Fernández Ridge) reflects a heterogeneous frictional behavior of the subduction interface which appears to be mainly controlled by the subduction of HOF's.

  8. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-07-14

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300?K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300?K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65?GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  9. High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding techniques for nanofabrication of high pattern density sub-20 nm features: A fundamental materials approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Stuart S; Samulski, Edward; Lopez, Renee; Ruiz, Ricardo; DeSimone, Joseph; Retterer, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Described herein is the development and investigation of PFPE-based elastomers for high resolution replica molding applications. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface energies (<25 mN/m). Using practically relevant large area master templates, we show that the resolution of the molds is strongly dependant upon the elastomeric mold modulus. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nano-grating structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  10. Non-anti-mitotic concentrations of taxol reduce breast cancer cell invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Truong-An; Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sebastien; Besson, Pierre; White, Edward; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-02-06

    Taxol is widely used in breast cancer chemotherapy. Its effects are primarily attributed to its anti-mitotic activity. Microtubule perturbators also exert antimetastatic activities which cannot be explained solely by the inhibition of proliferation. Voltage-dependent sodium channels (Na{sub V}) are abnormally expressed in the highly metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and not in MDA-MB-468 cell line. Inhibiting Na{sub V} activity with tetrodotoxin is responsible for an approximately 0.4-fold reduction of MDA-MB-231 cell invasiveness. In this study, we focused on the effect of a single, 2-h application of 10 nM taxol on the two cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468. At this concentration, taxol had no effect on proliferation after 7 days and on migration in any cell line. However it led to a 40% reduction of transwell invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. There was no additive effect when taxol and tetrodotoxin were simultaneously applied. Na{sub V} activity, as assessed by patch-clamp, indicates that it was changed by taxol pre-treatment. We conclude that taxol can exert anti-tumoral activities, in cells expressing Na{sub V}, at low doses that have no effect on cell proliferation. This effect might be due to a modulation of signalling pathways involving sodium channels.

  11. The prognostic relevance of the mitotic activity index in axillary lymph node-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, Jan J; van der Palen, Job; Brinkhuis, Mariël; Nortier, Johan W R; Struikmans, Henk

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to look at the mitotic activity index (MAI) as a prognostic factor in a prospective population-based cohort of lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer patients. Analyses were based on 2,048 breast-conserving therapies in 1,971 patients, node-negative, and without any form of adjuvant systemic therapy with long-term follow-up. The 15-year distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for women ?55 years was 88.3 % for low MAI values (?12) versus 73.4 % for high MAI values (>12); (HR 2.8; 95 % CI 1.8-4.4; p < 0.001). Multivariate analyses for DMFS showed significance for MAI. For MAI and Bloom-Richardson grading, by performing a likelihood ratio test, we showed the statistical significance for both. For women >55-years, the MAI was not an independent significant factor. We also confirmed the above findings for disease-specific survival. When multi-gene assays are not available, the MAI remains a robust prognostic marker in women younger than 55 years of age with early node-negative breast cancer. PMID:25526926

  12. Erroneous Silencing of the Mitotic Checkpoint by Aberrant Spindle Pole-Kinetochore Coordination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    To segregate chromosomes during cell division, microtubules that form the bipolar spindle attach to and pull on paired chromosome kinetochores. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is activated at unattached and misattached kinetochores to prevent further mitotic progression. The SAC is silenced after all the kinetochores establish proper and stable attachment to the spindle. Robust timing of SAC silencing after the last kinetochore-spindle attachment herein dictates the fidelity of chromosome segregation. Chromosome missegregation is rare in typical somatic cell mitosis, but frequent in cancer cell mitosis and in meiosis I of mammalian oocytes. In the latter cases, SAC is normally activated in response to disruptions of kinetochore-spindle attachments, suggesting that frequent chromosome missegregation ensues from faulty SAC silencing. In-depth understanding of how SAC silencing malfunctions in these cases is yet missing, but is believed to hold promise for treatment of cancer and prevention of human miscarriage and birth defects. We previously established a spatiotemporal model that, to the best of our knowledge, explained the robustness of SAC silencing in normal mitosis for the first time. In this article, we take advantage of the whole-cell perspective of the spatiotemporal model to identify possible causes of chromosome missegregation out of the distinct features of spindle assembly exhibited by cancer cells and mammalian oocytes. The model results explain why multipolar spindle could inhibit SAC silencing and spindle pole clustering could promote it-albeit accompanied by more kinetochore attachment errors. The model also eliminates geometric factors as the cause for nonrobust SAC silencing in oocyte meiosis, and instead, suggests atypical kinetochore-spindle attachment in meiosis as a potential culprit. Overall, the model shows that abnormal spindle-pole formation and its aberrant coordination with atypical kinetochore-spindle attachments could compromise the robustness of SAC silencing. Our model highlights systems-level coupling between kinetochore-spindle attachment and spindle-pole formation in SAC silencing. PMID:26636952

  13. Global Analysis of CPEBs Reveals Sequential and Non-Redundant Functions in Mitotic Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Giangarrà, Valeria; Igea, Ana; Castellazzi, Chiara Lara; Bava, Felice-Alessio; Mendez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    CPEB (Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding) proteins are a family of four RNA-binding proteins that regulate the translation of maternal mRNAs controlling meiotic cell cycle progression. But CPEBs are not limited to the transcriptionally silent germline; they are also expressed, in various combinations, in somatic cells, yet their role in regulation of mitosis-related gene expression is largely unknown. Deregulation of CPEB1 and CPEB4 have been linked to tumor development. However, a systematic analysis addressing their requirements for the temporal regulation of mitotic gene expression has yet to be performed. This study addresses the requirements of each of the four CPEBs for mitotic phase transitions, with a particular focus on cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational regulation. We demonstrate that CPEB3 is the only member dispensable for mitotic cell division, whereas the other three members, CPEB1, 2, and 4, are essential to successful mitotic cell division. Thus, CPEB1 is required for prophase entry, CPEB2 for metaphase and CPEB4 for cytokinesis. These three CPEBs have sequential non-redundant functions that promote the phase-specific polyadenylation and translational activation of CPE-regulated transcripts in the mitotic cell cycle. PMID:26398195

  14. A computational model for the formation of lamin-B mitotic spindle envelope and matrix

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changji; Channels, Wilbur E.; Zheng, Yixian; Iglesias, Pablo A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports show that, after nuclear envelope breakdown, lamin-B, a component of the nuclear lamina in interphase, localizes around the mitotic spindle as a membranous network. How this process occurs, however, and how it influences mitotic spindle morphogenesis is unclear. Here, we develop a computational model based on a continuum description to represent the abundance and location of various molecular species involved during mitosis, and use the model to test a number of hypotheses regarding the formation of the mitotic matrix. Our model illustrates that freely diffusible nuclear proteins can be captured and transported to the spindle poles by minus-end-directed microtubule (MT) motors. Moreover, simulations show that these proteins can be used to build a shell-like region that envelopes the mitotic spindle, which helps to improve the focusing of the mitotic spindle by spatially restricting MT polymerization and limiting the effective diffusion of the free MTs. Simulations also confirm that spatially dependent regulation of the spindle network through the Ran system improves spindle focusing and morphology. Our results agree with experimental observations that lamin-B reorganizes around the spindle and helps to maintain spindle morphology. PMID:24904732

  15. Splicing function of mitotic regulators links R-loop-mediated DNA damage to tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yihan; Zheng, Xiaobin; Chen, Haiyang; Guo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Hao; He, Xiaonan; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-04-27

    Although studies suggest that perturbing mitotic progression leads to DNA damage and p53 activation, which in turn lead to either cell apoptosis or senescence, it remains unclear how mitotic defects trigger p53 activation. We show that BuGZ and Bub3, which are two mitotic regulators localized in the interphase nucleus, interact with the splicing machinery and are required for pre-mRNA splicing. Similar to inhibition of RNA splicing by pladienolide B, depletion of either BuGZ or Bub3 led to increased formation of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which led to DNA damage and p53 activation in both human tumor cells and primary cells. Thus, R-loop-mediated DNA damage and p53 activation offer a mechanistic explanation for apoptosis of cancer cells and senescence of primary cells upon disruption of the dual-function mitotic regulators. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the full range of functions of mitotic regulators to develop antitumor drugs. PMID:25918225

  16. Phosphorylation–dephosphorylation cycle of HP1? governs accurate mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1? (HP1?), a bona fide factor of silent chromatin, is required for establishing as well as maintaining the higher-order chromatin structure in eukaryotes. HP1? is decorated with several post-translational modifications, and many of these are critical for its cellular functions. HP1? is heavily phosphorylated; however, its physiological relevance had remained to be completely understood. We have recently demonstrated that human HP1? is a mitotic target for NDR kinase, and the phosphorylation at the hinge region of HP1? at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle is crucial for mitotic progression and Sgo1 loading at mitotic centromeres (Chakraborty et al., 2014). We now demonstrate that the dephosphorylation of HP1? within its hinge domain occurs during mitosis, specifically soon after prometaphase. In the absence of the hinge-specific HP1? phosphorylation, either as a consequence of depleting NDR1 or in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable HP1? mutant, the cells arrest in prometaphase with several mitotic defects. In this study we show that NDR1-depleted cells expressing hinge-specific phosphomimetic HP1? mutant rescues the prometaphase arrest but displays defects in mitotic exit, suggesting that the dephosphorylation of HP1? is required for the completion of cytokinesis. Taken together, our results reveal that the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation cycle of HP1? orchestrates accurate progression of cells through mitosis. PMID:24786771

  17. The KASH protein Kms2 coordinates mitotic remodeling of the spindle pole body.

    PubMed

    Wälde, Sarah; King, Megan C

    2014-08-15

    Defects in the biogenesis of the spindle pole body (SPB), the yeast centrosome equivalent, can lead to monopolar spindles and mitotic catastrophe. The KASH domain protein Kms2 and the SUN domain protein Sad1 colocalize within the nuclear envelope at the site of SPB attachment during interphase and at the spindle poles during mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that Kms2 interacts with the essential SPB components Cut12 and Pcp1 and the Polo kinase Plo1. Depletion of Kms2 delays mitotic entry and leads to defects in the insertion of the SPB into the nuclear envelope, disrupting stable bipolar spindle formation. These effects are mediated in part by a delay in the recruitment of Plo1 to the SPB at mitotic entry. Plo1 activity supports mitotic SPB remodeling by driving a burst of incorporation of Cut12 and Pcp1. Thus, a fission yeast SUN-KASH complex plays an important role in supporting the remodeling of the SPB at mitotic entry. PMID:24963130

  18. Effect of tumor promoters on ultraviolet light-induced mutation and mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, B.A.; Hannan, M.A.; Haynes, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that mitotic recombination is involved in tumor promotion. On this basis, one might expect tumor promoters to be recombinagenic. D7 is a diploid strain of yeast in which both mutation and mitotic recombination can be measured. We have used this strain to assay the known tumor promoters, iodacetate, anthralin, and 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, and the cocarcinogen, catechol, for mutagenicity, recombinagenicity, and the ability to enhance ultraviolet light (UV)-induced genetic events. In the absence of preirradiation with UV, iodoacetate was found to be recombinagenic whereas catechol was mutagenic; however, in both cases, the effects were small. Iodoacetate, anthralin, and catechol potentiated UV-induced mitotic crossing-over, aberrant colony formation, and mutation, while catechol also increased UV-induced gene conversion. We were unable to detect any mutagenic or recombinagenic effect of 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in either whole cells or spheroplasts. Our results do not indicate any consistent correlation between tumor-promoting activity and the ability of an agent to induce mitotic recombination in yeast. However, the ability to potentiate UV-induced mutation and mitotic recombination may reflect the cocarcinogenic activity of certain promoters.

  19. Aurora B prevents delayed DNA replication and premature mitotic exit by repressing p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Trakala, Marianna; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; Heeschen, Christopher; Malumbres, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Aurora kinase B is a critical component of the chromosomal passenger complex, which is involved in the regulation of microtubule-kinetochore attachments and cytokinesis. By using conditional knockout cells and chemical inhibition, we show here that inactivation of Aurora B results in delayed G1/S transition and premature mitotic exit. Aurora B deficiency results in delayed DNA replication in cultured fibroblasts as well as liver cells after hepatectomy. This is accompanied by increased transcription of the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Lack of Aurora B does not prevent mitotic entry but results in a premature exit from prometaphase in the presence of increased p21Cip1-Cdk1 inactive complexes. Aurora B-null cells display reduced degradation of cyclin B1, suggesting the presence of phenomenon known as adaptation to the mitotic checkpoint, previously described in yeast. Elimination of p21Cip1 rescues Cdk1 activity and prevents premature mitotic exit in Aurora B-deficient cells. These results suggest that Aurora B represses p21Cip1, preventing delayed DNA replication, Cdk inhibition and premature mitotic exit. The upregulation of p21Cip1 observed after inhibition of Aurora B may have important implications in cell cycle progression, tetraploidy, senescence or cancer therapy. PMID:23428904

  20. Mechanisms and Regulation of the Mitotic Inheritance of the Golgi Complex

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Carmen; Colanzi, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Golgi complex is structured in the form of a continuous membranous system composed of stacks connected by tubular bridges: the “Golgi ribbon.” At the onset of mitosis, the Golgi complex undergoes a multi-step fragmentation process that is required for its correct partition into the dividing cells. Importantly, inhibition of Golgi disassembly results in cell-cycle arrest at the G2 stage, which indicates that accurate inheritance of the Golgi complex is monitored by a “Golgi mitotic checkpoint.” Moreover, mitotic Golgi disassembly correlates with the release of a set of Golgi-localized proteins that acquire specific functions during mitosis, such as mitotic spindle formation and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Most of these events are regulated by small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families. Here, we review recent studies that are revealing the fundamental mechanisms, the molecular players, and the biological significance of mitotic inheritance of the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. We also briefly comment on how Golgi partitioning is coordinated with mitotic progression.

  1. LIS1 controls mitosis and mitotic spindle organization via the LIS1-NDEL1-dynein complex.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyang Mi; Youn, Yong Ha; Pemble, Hayley; Yingling, Jessica; Wittmann, Torsten; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-15

    Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are responsible for the human neuronal migration disorder lissencephaly. Mitotic functions of LIS1 have been suggested from many organisms throughout evolution. However, the cellular functions of LIS1 at distinct intracellular compartments such as the centrosome and the cell cortex have not been well defined especially during mitotic cell division. Here, we used detailed cellular approaches and time-lapse live cell imaging of mitosis from Lis1 mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts to reveal critical roles of LIS1 in mitotic spindle regulation. We found that LIS1 is required for the tight control of chromosome congression and segregation to dictate kinetochore-microtubule (MT) interactions and anaphase progression. In addition, LIS1 is essential for the establishment of mitotic spindle pole integrity by maintaining normal centrosome number. Moreover, LIS1 plays crucial roles in mitotic spindle orientation by increasing the density of astral MT plus-end movements toward the cell cortex, which enhances cortical targeting of LIS1-dynein complex. Overexpression of NDEL1-dynein and MT stabilization rescues spindle orientation defects in Lis1 mutants, demonstrating that mouse LIS1 acts via the LIS1-NDEL1-dynein complex to regulate astral MT plus-ends dynamics and establish proper contacts of MTs with the cell cortex to ensure precise cell division. PMID:24030547

  2. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. PMID:26406118

  3. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  4. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

  5. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monty, J. P.; Allen, J. J.; Lien, K.; Chong, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of `superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements.

  6. Prevalence and clinical features of Thought-Perception-Sensitivity Symptoms: results from a community survey of Korean high school students.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam-In; Park, Tae-Won; Yang, Jong-Chul; Oh, Keun-Young; Shim, Shi-Ha; Chung, Young-Chul

    2012-08-15

    Epidemiologic research indicates that psychosis and depression most frequently develop during adolescence. Hence, an efficient strategy for improving youth mental health would be to focus on detection of early-stage psychosis and depression in adolescence. In this study, 1461 high school students were surveyed using self-report scales. Students who scored equal to or above the cut-off value on any of the scales and who agreed to a further examination proceeded to a second assessment, using the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia and Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States along with self-reporting scales. The estimated prevalence of adolescents at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis and of depression-spectrum disorders was 1.26 and 3.69% respectively. Compared with the normal group, experiences of bullying, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts were significantly higher in these two groups; the subjects at UHR for psychosis were found to have significantly lower academic performance and lower ratings on SCRS; and submissive behavior was more prevalent in the depression-spectrum group. Our results reveal several clinical features of adolescents at UHR for psychosis and with depression-spectrum disorder and underscore the importance of accurate assessment of and early appropriate care for these adolescents. PMID:22475525

  7. Temporal bone histopathological features of a worker who received high doses of radiation in a criticality accident: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Kimitaka; Maeshima, Arafumi; Tsuzuku, Toshihiro; Kondo, Kenji; Morizono, Tetsuo

    2011-04-01

    In 1999, three workers received high doses of radiation in a small Japanese plant while they were preparing fuel for an experimental reactor. This criticality accident at melting point was caused by the addition of too much uranium enriched to a relatively high level, causing a 'criticality' (a limited uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction), which continued intermittently for 20 h. The three workers concerned were hospitalized, two in a critical condition. The first worker died 12 weeks later, and the second worker 7 months later. The third worker is in a healthy condition. We report on the temporal bone histopathological features of the second worker. Our temporal bone study revealed: 1) the large loss of bone marrow tissue with a small number of myelocytes remaining in the mastoid bone and the abundance of fatty tissue in the mastoid bone, 2) inflammation of the mucosal layer of the middle ear and the mastoid air cells, 3) mild degeneration of the spiral ganglions and the sensory hair cells of the cochlea, 4) mild degenerative changes of sensory hair cells of the semicircular canals and otolith organs, and 5) vestibular ganglions and geniculate ganglions were well preserved. PMID:21162658

  8. The Silicon and Calcium High-velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xulin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., Si ii 5972 and Si ii 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., ?m15(B) ? 1.4 {mag}), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in rapidly expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia that have slower Si ii 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., VSimax). Moreover, SNe Ia with both stronger HVFs at early phases and larger VSimax are found to have noticeably redder B-V colors and to occur preferentially in the inner regions of their host galaxies, while those with stronger HVFs but smaller VSimax show opposite tendencies, suggesting that these two subclasses have different explosion environments and their HVFs may have different origins. We further examine the relationships between the absorption features of Si ii 6355 and Ca ii IR lines, and find that their photospheric components are well correlated in velocity and strength but that the corresponding HVFs show larger scatter. These results cannot be explained with ionization and/or thermal processes alone, and different mechanisms are required for the creation of HVF-forming regions in SNe Ia.

  9. The impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) on the clinical features of HIV - related oral lesions in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effects of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical presentations of HIV related oral lesions (HIV-ROLs) in an adult Nigerian population. Methods A 5 month prospective study on HAART naïve HIV positive adults recruited into the HAART program of an AIDS referral centre. HIV-ROLs were diagnosed clinically by the EEC Clearinghouse on oral problems related to HIV infection. Baseline clinical features of HIV-ROLs was documented by clinical photographs using SONY® 5.2 M Cybershot digital camera. Post HAART monthly review was conducted using clinical photographs. Results A total of 142 patients were seen. Age range was 19 - 75 years. Mean age was 35.6 ± 10.5 (SD). Eighty (56.3%) were females. Prevalence of HIV-ROLs was 43.7%. Oral candidiasis (22.4%) was the most prevalent HIV-ROL. 114 (83.2%) patients had clinical AIDS at presentation (CDC 1993). 89.4% were placed on Tenofovir/Emtricitabine +`Nevirapine, 9.9% on Tenofovir/Emtricitabine + Efavirenz. There was strong decline in the clinical features of oral candidiasis from a month of commencing HAART. Oral hairy leukoplakia was slow in responding to HAART. Parotid gland enlargement, melanotic hyperpigmentation and Kaposi's sarcoma were more persistent and had slower response to HAART. There was no clinical change noticed in linear gingival erythema. Conclusion HAART has different clinical effects on HIV related oral lesions depending on the size, duration of treatment and etiology of the lesions. HIV-ROLs of fungal origin have the fastest response to HAART. These lesions alongside immunologic parameters can be used as indicators of success or failure of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:20579347

  10. Cell fate after mitotic arrest in different tumor cells is determined by the balance between slippage and apoptotic threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Galán-Malo, Patricia; Vela, Laura; Gonzalo, Oscar; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Gracia-Fleta, Lucía; Naval, Javier; Marzo, Isabel

    2012-02-01

    Microtubule poisons and other anti-mitotic drugs induce tumor death but the molecular events linking mitotic arrest to cell death are still not fully understood. We have analyzed cell fate after mitotic arrest produced by the microtubule-destabilizing drug vincristine in a panel of human tumor cell lines showing different response to vincristine. In Jurkat, RPMI 8226 and HeLa cells, apoptosis was triggered shortly after vincristine-induced mitotic arrest. However, A549 cells, which express a great amount of Bcl-x{sub L} and undetectable amounts of Bak, underwent mitotic slippage prior to cell death. However, when Bcl-x{sub L} gene was silenced in A549 cells, vincristine induced apoptosis during mitotic arrest. Another different behavior was found in MiaPaca2 cells, where vincristine caused death by mitotic catastrophe that switched to apoptosis when cyclin B1 degradation was prevented by proteasome inhibition. Overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} or silencing Bax and Bak expression delayed the onset of apoptosis in Jurkat and RPMI 8226 cells, enabling mitotic slippage and endoreduplication. In HeLa cells, overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} switched cell death from apoptosis to mitotic catastrophe. Mcl-1 offered limited protection to vincristine-induced cell death and Mcl-1 degradation was not essential for vincristine-induced death. All these results, taken together, indicate that the Bcl-x{sub L}/Bak ratio and the ability to degrade cyclin B1 determine cell fate after mitotic arrest in the different tumor cell types. Highlights: ? Vincristine induces cell death by apoptosis or mitotic catastrophe. ? Apoptosis-proficient cells die by apoptosis during mitosis upon vincristine treatment. ? p53wt apoptosis-deficient cells undergo apoptosis from a G1-like tetraploid state. ? p53mt apoptosis-deficient cells can survive and divide giving rise to 8N cells.

  11. Gastric cancer with high-level microsatellite instability: target gene mutations, clinicopathologic features, and long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Falchetti, Mario; Saieva, Calogero; Lupi, Ramona; Masala, Giovanna; Rizzolo, Piera; Zanna, Ines; Ceccarelli, Ketty; Sera, Francesco; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Nesi, Gabriella; Palli, Domenico; Ottini, Laura

    2008-06-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide, and although the incidence has decreased in Western countries, specific high-risk areas are present in Italy. Gastric cancer with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) represents a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathologic features. We examined clinicopathologic associations and long-term survival in a series of 159 gastric cancer cases from a high-risk population in Tuscany (central Italy). MSI-H was associated with antral location of the tumor (P = .001), intestinal type according to Lauren classification (P = .002), expanding type according to Ming classification (P = .0001), and mucinous histologic type according to the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer classification (P = .002). In addition, MSI-H was strongly associated with a higher survival at 15 years (P = .01) and with loss of hMLH1 expression, evaluated by immunohistochemistry (P = .001). Multivariate analyses showed a significant association between the absence of hMLH1 reactivity and the expanding tumor type (P = .002). We also investigated the MSI-H-related genetic changes by analyzing coding repeats within target genes involved in pathways that control cell growth (TGFbetaRII, IGFIIR, RIZ, TCF4, DP2), apoptosis (BAX, BCL10, FAS, CASPASE5, APAF1), and DNA repair genes (hMSH6, hMSH3, MED1, RAD50, BLM, ATR, BRCA2, MRE11). Gastric cancer cases with MSI-H were found to accumulate heterozygous mutations affecting multiple molecular pathways and multiple genes within each pathway. Intriguingly, in this subset, TGFbetaRII mutations appeared to be inversely related to BLM mutations (P = .006), whereas RAD50 mutation carriers showed significantly reduced survival (P = .03). PMID:18440592

  12. Moscatilin Induces Apoptosis and Mitotic Catastrophe in Human Esophageal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative from the orchid Dendrobium loddigesii, has been shown to possess anticancer activity. We examined the effect of moscatilin on human esophageal cancer cells, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells and its possible mechanisms. Moscatilin suppressed the growth of both the histological cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were observed following moscatilin treatment. The population of cells in the sub-G1 phase and polyploidy phase significantly increased after treatment. Immunofluorescence revealed multipolar mitosis and subsequent multinucleation in moscatilin-treated cells, indicating the development of mitotic catastrophe. Western blot showed a marked increase in expressions of polo-like kinase 1 and cyclin B1 after exposure to moscatilin. In conclusion, moscatilin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal SCC- and ADC-derived cell lines, indicating that moscatilin has broad potential against esophageal cancer. PMID:24074296

  13. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement.

    PubMed

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P; Cattin, Cedric J; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  14. p12 tethers the murine leukemia virus pre-integration complex to mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Elis, Efrat; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Prizan-Ravid, Adi; Laham-Karam, Nihay; Bacharach, Eran

    2012-12-01

    The p12 protein of the murine leukemia virus (MLV) is a constituent of the pre-integration complex (PIC) but its function in this complex remains unknown. We developed an imaging system to monitor MLV PIC trafficking in live cells. This allowed the visualization of PIC docking to mitotic chromosomes and its release upon exit from mitosis. Docking occurred concomitantly with nuclear envelope breakdown and was impaired for PICs of viruses with lethal p12 mutations. Insertion of a heterologous chromatin binding module into p12 of one of these mutants restored PICs attachment to the chromosomes and partially rescued virus replication. Capsid dissociated from wild type PICs in mitotic cells but remained associated with PICs harboring tethering-negative p12 mutants. Altogether, these results explain, in part, MLV restriction to dividing cells and reveal a role for p12 as a factor that tethers MLV PIC to mitotic chromosomes. PMID:23300449

  15. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. PMID:26527278

  16. In vitro cytogenetic assays for the detection of mitotic aneuploidy by particulate pollutants.

    PubMed

    Hadnagy, W; Seemayer, N H

    1991-01-01

    The ability of particulate pollutants to act on the mitotic cell division process and to induce aneuploidy in V79 cell cultures has been investigated. Extracts of airborne particulates and particulate car exhaust caused mitotic arrest connected with a dose-dependent increase in the incidence of initial and full C-metaphases. Furthermore, numerical chromosome alterations such as hyperdiploidy and polyploidy in subsequent cell divisions were induced with increasing concentrations. These findings indicate that particulate pollutants from the ambient air and from car exhaust contain potent spindle poisons with the ability to produce mitotic aneuploidy in mammalian cells. The significance of these results is that induced aneuploidy by particulate pollutants represents a genetic and somatic risk to exposed populations. PMID:20732066

  17. A nontranscriptional role for Oct4 in the regulation of mitotic entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Deibler, Richard W.; Lerou, Paul H.; Ballabeni, Andrea; Heffner, Garrett C.; Cahan, Patrick; Unternaehrer, Juli J.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Daley, George Q.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid progression through the cell cycle and a very short G1 phase are defining characteristics of embryonic stem cells. This distinct cell cycle is driven by a positive feedback loop involving Rb inactivation and reduced oscillations of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. In this setting, we inquired how ES cells avoid the potentially deleterious consequences of premature mitotic entry. We found that the pluripotency transcription factor Oct4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4) plays an unappreciated role in the ES cell cycle by forming a complex with cyclin–Cdk1 and inhibiting Cdk1 activation. Ectopic expression of Oct4 or a mutant lacking transcriptional activity recapitulated delayed mitotic entry in HeLa cells. Reduction of Oct4 levels in ES cells accelerated G2 progression, which led to increased chromosomal missegregation and apoptosis. Our data demonstrate an unexpected nontranscriptional function of Oct4 in the regulation of mitotic entry. PMID:25324523

  18. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Verbakel, Werner; Carmeliet, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase NuSAP-chromatin interaction suggests additional functions for NuSAP, as recently identified for other nuclear spindle assembly factors with a role in gene expression or DNA damage response.

  19. Identification of nuclear beta II protein kinase C as a mitotic lamin kinase.

    PubMed

    Goss, V L; Hocevar, B A; Thompson, L J; Stratton, C A; Burns, D J; Fields, A P

    1994-07-22

    Multisite phosphorylation of the nuclear lamins is thought to regulate the process of mitotic nuclear envelope breakdown in vivo. Here we investigate the involvement of two proposed human mitotic lamin kinases, beta II protein kinase C (PKC) and p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase, in human lamin B1 phosphorylation in vitro and in intact cells. We find that both kinases can phosphorylate purified soluble lamin B at similar rates. However, beta II PKC phosphorylates interphase nuclear envelope lamin B at more than 200 times the rate of human p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase. beta II PKC-mediated phosphorylation of lamin B is confined to two sites, Ser395 and Ser405, within the carboxyl-terminal domain, whereas human p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase phosphorylates a single site, Ser23, in the amino-terminal domain. A second potential p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase site within the carboxyl-terminal domain, Ser393, is not phosphorylated by human p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase. However, invertebrate p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase from sea star exhibits a different specificity, phosphorylating both amino- and carboxyl-terminal sites. Mitotic human lamin B from intact cells is phosphorylated predominantly in its carboxyl-terminal domain. Comparative tryptic phosphopeptide mapping demonstrates that the beta II PKC site, Ser405, is a prominent target of mitotic lamin B phosphorylation in vivo. beta II PKC translocates to the nucleus during the G2/M phase of cell cycle concomitant with phosphorylation of Ser405, indicating a physiologic role for nuclear beta II PKC activation in mitotic lamin B phosphorylation in vivo. The presence of phosphorylation sites within the carboxyl-terminal domain of mitotic lamin B which are not phosphorylated by either beta II PKC or p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase suggests the involvement of other lamin kinase(s) in G2/M phase lamin B phosphorylation. PMID:8034666

  20. Mitotic arrest-associated apoptosis induced by sodium arsenite in A375 melanoma cells is BUBR1-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, Samuel C.; Taylor, B. Frazier; States, J. Christopher

    2008-08-15

    A375 human malignant melanoma cells undergo mitotic arrest-associated apoptosis when treated with pharmacological concentrations of sodium arsenite, a chemotherapeutic for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Our previous studies indicated that decreased arsenite sensitivity correlated with reduced mitotic spindle checkpoint function and reduced expression of the checkpoint protein BUBR1. In the current study, arsenite induced securin and cyclin B stabilization, BUBR1 phosphorylation, and spindle checkpoint activation. Arsenite also increased activating cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) Thr{sup 161} phosphorylation but decreased inhibitory Tyr15 phosphorylation. Mitotic arrest resulted in apoptosis as indicated by colocalization of mitotic phospho-Histone H3 with active caspase 3. Apoptosis was associated with BCL-2 Ser70 phosphorylation. Inhibition of CDK1 with roscovitine in arsenite-treated mitotic cells inhibited spindle checkpoint maintenance as inferred from reduced BUBR1 phosphorylation, reduced cyclin B expression, and diminution of mitotic index. Roscovitine also reduced BCL-2 Ser70 phosphorylation and protected against apoptosis, suggesting mitotic arrest caused by hyperactivation of CDK1 directly or indirectly leads to BCL-2 phosphorylation and apoptosis. In addition, suppression of BUBR1 with siRNA prevented arsenite-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic's chemotherapeutic action and indicate a functional spindle checkpoint may be required for arsenic-sensitivity.

  1. Mitotic behavior in root tips of Brachiaria genotypes with meiotic chromosome elimination during microsporogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felismino, M F; Silva, N; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2008-01-01

    Three accessions of Brachiaria brizantha, three of B. humidicola, and two interspecific hybrids between B. ruziziensis and B. brizantha were analyzed with regard to their mitotic behavior in root tips. All these genotypes revealed chromosome elimination or lack of chromosome affinity in previous analyses of microsporogenesis. Analyses of root tips showed a normal mitotic division in all accessions and hybrids, reinforcing the notion that the genetic control of meiosis is totally independent of that of mitosis. The implications of these findings for the Brachiaria breeding program are discussed. PMID:18551399

  2. The Silicon and Calcium High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Xulin; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., SiII 5972 and SiII 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., dm15(B)<1.4 mag), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. (2014) for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in fast-expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that the Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia having slower SiII 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., Vsi). This difference can be due to that the HVFs in fast-expanding SNe Ia usually disappear more rapidly and are easily blended with the photospheric components when approaching the maximum light. Mor...

  3. Mapping epibenthic assemblages and their relations to sedimentary features in shallow-water, high-energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, John D.; Shimeta, Jeff; Zimmer, Cheryl Ann; Traykovski, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of spatial relationships among benthic biota and sedimentary features in shallow-water (<30 m) high-energy environments has been severely limited by sampling technology. We describe and report tests of a SCUBA-diving mapping method specifically for this region. Underwater acoustic location is used to achieve meter-scale resolution over kilometer-scale regions of the sea floor. A triad of acoustic transponders is bottom-mounted at known positions, 300-500 m apart. Transported by underwater personal vehicles, SCUBA-divers map the bed using hand-held acoustic receivers that record ranges to the transponders. The mean error of acoustic fixes was 2.4±1.2 m in a 0.5 km×1.0 km test area. Dense assemblages of epibenthic animals were mapped relative to sediment texture and bedforms off the exposed south coast of Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts, USA. Surveys one month apart within a 0.6 km×0.6 km area (8-12 m depth) revealed 100-m-scale patches of the tube worm Spiophanes bombyx (?30,000 m -2) in fine sand and of the sand dollar Echinarachnius parma (?55 m -2) in coarse sand. Raised mud patches that, together with fine sand, occurred in two shore-perpendicular belts are likely exposed, ancient marsh deposits. Depth gradients of sand-ripple geometry indicated that ripples in deeper areas were not in equilibrium with wave conditions monitored during surveys; i.e., they were relict ripples. Thus, sand dollars in some areas may have had >1 month to rework surficial sands since their transformation by physical processes. Linear regressions of ripple characteristics against sand dollar or tube worm densities were not significant, although such relationships would be highly dependent on temporal scale. The survey method described here can be used at more frequent intervals to explore such interactions between epibenthic animals and sediment-transport dynamics.

  4. [The Change Detection of High Spatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Based on OB-HMAD Algorithm and Spectral Features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yun-hao; Jiang, Wei-guo

    2015-06-01

    The high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has abundant detailed information of earth surface, and the multi-temporal change detection for the high resolution remotely sensed imagery can realize the variations of geographical unit. In terms of the high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, the traditional remote sensing change detection algorithms have obvious defects. In this paper, learning from the object-based image analysis idea, we proposed a semi-automatic threshold selection algorithm named OB-HMAD (object-based-hybrid-MAD), on the basis of object-based image analysis and multivariate alternative detection algorithm (MAD), which used the spectral features of remotely sensed imagery into the field of object-based change detection. Additionally, OB-HMAD algorithm has been compared with other the threshold segmentation algorithms by the change detection experiment. Firstly, we obtained the image object by the multi-solution segmentation algorithm. Secondly, we got the object-based difference image object using MAD and minimum noise fraction rotation (MNF) for improving the SNR of the image object. Then, the change objects or area are classified using histogram curvature analysis (HCA) method for the semi-automatic threshold selection, which determined the threshold by calculated the maximum value of curvature of the histogram, so the HCA algorithm has better automation than other threshold segmentation algorithms. Finally, the change detection results are validated using confusion matrix with the field sample data. Worldview-2 imagery of 2012 and 2013 in case study of Beijing were used to validate the proposed OB-HMAD algorithm. The experiment results indicated that OB-HMAD algorithm which integrated the multi-channel spectral information could be effectively used in multi-temporal high resolution remotely sensed imagery change detection, and it has basically solved the "salt and pepper" problem which always exists in the pixel-based change detection, and has mitigated the impact of building shadows and geometric registration error, and has improved the overall accuracy and kappa coefficient than other change detection algorithm, but it has more undetected error. By compared with the SNR of image object, we know that the MNF transformation could effectively improve to concentrate the change information. PMID:26601395

  5. Active YAP promotes pancreatic cancer cell motility, invasion and tumorigenesis in a mitotic phosphorylation-dependent manner through LPAR3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuping; Zhang, Lin; Purohit, Vinee; Shukla, Surendra K; Chen, Xingcheng; Yu, Fang; Fu, Kai; Chen, Yuanhong; Solheim, Joyce; Singh, Pankaj K; Song, Wei; Dong, Jixin

    2015-11-01

    The transcriptional co-activator Yes-associated protein, YAP, is a main effector in the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. We recently defined a mechanism for positive regulation of YAP through CDK1-mediated mitotic phosphorylation. Here, we show that active YAP promotes pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth in a mitotic phosphorylation-dependent manner. Mitotic phosphorylation is essential for YAP-driven tumorigenesis in animals. YAP reduction significantly impairs cell migration and invasion. Immunohistochemistry shows significant upregulation and nuclear localization of YAP in metastases when compared with primary tumors and normal tissue in human. Mitotic phosphorylation of YAP controls a unique transcriptional program in pancreatic cells. Expression profiles reveal LPAR3 (lysophosphatidic acid receptor 3) as a mediator for mitotic phosphorylation-driven pancreatic cell motility and invasion. Together, this work identifies YAP as a novel regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, invasion and metastasis, and as a potential therapeutic target for invasive pancreatic cancer. PMID:26440309

  6. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-08-14

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  7. VLSI processor with a configurable processing element array for balanced feature extraction in high-resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongbo; Shibata, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    A VLSI processor employing a configurable processing element array (PEA) is developed for a newly proposed balanced feature extraction algorithm. In the algorithm, the input image is divided into square regions and the number of features is determined by noise effect analysis in each region. Regions of different sizes are used according to the resolutions and contents of input images. Therefore, inside the PEA, processing elements are hierarchically grouped for feature extraction in regions of different sizes. A proof-of-concept chip is fabricated using a 0.18 µm CMOS technology with a 32 × 32 PEA. From measurement results, a speed of 7.5 kfps is achieved for feature extraction in 128 × 128 pixel regions when operating the chip at 45 MHz, and a speed of 55 fps is also achieved for feature extraction in 1920 × 1080 pixel images.

  8. High resolution mapping of offshore and onshore glaciogenic features in metamorphic bedrock terrain, Melville Bay, northwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Francis; Gyllencreutz, Richard; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Mayer, Larry; Egilsson, Arnar; Thorsteinsson, Tómas; Jakobsson, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Geomorphological studies of previously glaciated landscapes are important to understand how ice sheets and glaciers respond to rapidly changing climate. Melville Bay, in northwestern Greenland, contains some of the most sensitive but least studied ice sheet sectors in the northern hemisphere, where the bathymetric knowledge previously was restricted to a few sparsely distributed single beam echo soundings. We present here the results of high-resolution, geomorphological mapping of the offshore and onshore landscapes in Melville Bay using multibeam sonar and satellite data, at 5- and 10-m resolutions respectively. The results show a similar areally-scoured bedrock-dominated landscape with a glacially modified cnoc-and-lochan morphology on the inner shelf (150-500 m depth) and on the nearby exposed coast. This is manifested by the presence of U-shaped troughs, moutonée-type elongated landforms, stoss-and-lee forms, and streamlined features. The submarine landscape shows features that are characteristic of bedrock in folded, faulted, and weathered metamorphic terrain, and, to a lesser extent, glacially molded bedforms; while coastal landforms exhibit higher relief, irregular-shaped basins, and more subdued fracture valleys. Although generally similar, the onshore and offshore landscapes contain examples of distinctly different landform patterns, which are interpreted to reflect a longer exposure to long-term deep weathering as well as to more recent periglacial weathering processes on land. The spatial variability in the distribution of landforms across the landscape in both study areas is mostly attributed to differences in lithological properties of the bedrock. The lack of sediment cover on the inner shelf is likely a result of a capacity for sediment erosion and removal by the West Greenland Current flowing northward over the area in combination with limited sediment supply from long sea ice-cover seasons. The distribution and orientation of the landforms in the offshore part indicate ice movement toward the NW, and suggests that this area acted as a tributary or onset region for the major paleo ice stream that formed the present day Melville Bay Trough.

  9. Induced rates of mitotic crossing over and possible mitotic gene conversion per wing anlage cell in Drosophila melanogaster by X rays and fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ayaki, T.; Fujikawa, K.; Ryo, H.; Itoh, T.; Kondo, S. )

    1990-09-01

    As a model for chromosome aberrations, radiation-induced mitotic recombination of mwh and flr genes in Drosophila melanogaster strain (mwh +/+ flr) was quantitatively studied. Fission neutrons were five to six times more effective than X rays per unit dose in producing either crossover-mwh/flr twins and mwh singles-or flr singles, indicating that common processes are involved in the production of crossover and flr singles. The X-ray-induced rate/wing anlage cell/Gy for flr singles was 1 X 10(-5), whereas that of crossover was 2 x 10(-4); the former and the latter rate are of the same order of magnitude as those of gene conversion and crossover in yeast, respectively. Thus, we conclude that proximal-marker flr singles induced in the transheterozygote are gene convertants. Using the model based on yeast that recombination events result from repair of double-strand breaks or gaps, we propose that mitotic recombination in the fly is a secondary result of recombinational DNA repair. Evidence for recombinational misrepair in the fly is given. The relative ratio of radiation-induced mitotic crossover to spontaneous meiotic crossover is one order of magnitude higher in the fly than in yeast and humans.

  10. Myxopapillary ependymoma: Lesser known cytomorphologic features.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Monisha; Rautela, Archna; Nain, Manupriya

    2015-01-01

    Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a rare and distinctive tumor which occurs in the sacrococcygeal area of young adults and children, often intradural in location. Histopathologic features have been well-described in the literature whereas cytological findings have been sporadically reported by various authors mainly as case reports. We report the features of a primary sacrococcygeal MPE on aspirate cytology in a 45-year-old female. Cytology smears displayed a papillary pattern with the presence of fibrovascular cores, rimmed by cuboidal to columnar cells sending fibrillary cytoplasmic processes forming pseudorosettes along with the presence of hyaline globules, and myxoid material. Intranuclear inclusions, nuclear grooves, cytologic atypia or mitotic activity was not evident, in this case. MPEs need to be differentiated from the other tumors occurring in this location which may also show myxoid material and papillary fronds. Hence, the recognition of the characteristic cytologic features plays an important role in establishing a preoperative diagnosis. PMID:25948946

  11. Myxopapillary ependymoma: Lesser known cytomorphologic features

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Monisha; Rautela, Archna; Nain, Manupriya

    2015-01-01

    Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a rare and distinctive tumor which occurs in the sacrococcygeal area of young adults and children, often intradural in location. Histopathologic features have been well-described in the literature whereas cytological findings have been sporadically reported by various authors mainly as case reports. We report the features of a primary sacrococcygeal MPE on aspirate cytology in a 45-year-old female. Cytology smears displayed a papillary pattern with the presence of fibrovascular cores, rimmed by cuboidal to columnar cells sending fibrillary cytoplasmic processes forming pseudorosettes along with the presence of hyaline globules, and myxoid material. Intranuclear inclusions, nuclear grooves, cytologic atypia or mitotic activity was not evident, in this case. MPEs need to be differentiated from the other tumors occurring in this location which may also show myxoid material and papillary fronds. Hence, the recognition of the characteristic cytologic features plays an important role in establishing a preoperative diagnosis. PMID:25948946

  12. Association of Mitotic Regulation Pathway Polymorphisms with Pancreatic Cancer Risk and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Bamlet, William R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitosis is a highly regulated process that serves to ensure the fidelity of cell division. Disruption of mitotic regulators leading to aneuploidy and polyploidy is commonly observed in cancer cells. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulators of mitosis may promote chromosome mis-segregation and influence pancreatic cancer and/or survival. Methods Thirty four SNPs, previously associated with breast cancer risk, from 33 genes involved in regulation of mitosis, were investigated for associations with pancreatic cancer risk in 1,143 Caucasian patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 1,097 unaffected controls from the Mayo Clinic. Associations with survival from pancreatic cancer were also assessed using 1,030 pancreatic cancer cases with known outcome. Results Two SNPs in the APC (rs2431238) and NIN (rs10145182) loci, out of 34 examined, were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p=0.035 and p=0.038, respectively). Further analyses of individuals categorized by smoking and BMI identified several SNPs displaying significant associations (p<0.05) with pancreatic cancer risk, including APC rs2431238 in individuals with high body mass index (BMI?30) (p=0.031) and NIN rs10145182 in ever smokers (p=0.01). In addition, survival analyses detected significant associations between SNPs in EIF3S10 and overall survival (p=0.009), SNPs from five genes and survival in resected cancer cases (p<0.05), and SNPs from two other genes (p<0.05) and survival of locally advanced cancer cases. Conclusion Common variation in genes encoding regulators of mitosis may independently influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility and survival. PMID:20056645

  13. Clinical Factors Associated with High-risk Carotid Plaque Features as Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Established Vascular Disease (From the AIM-HIGH Study)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Hippe, Daniel S.; Sun, Jie; Balu, Niranjan; Isquith, Daniel A.; Crouse, John R.; Anderson, Todd; Huston, John; Polissar, Nayak; O’Brien, Kevin; Yuan, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Association between clinical factors and high-risk plaque features such as thin or ruptured cap, intra-plaque hemorrhage (IPH), presence of Lipid Rich Necrotic Core (LRNC) and increased LRNC volume as assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was examined in patients with established vascular disease in AIM-HIGH. A total of 214 subjects underwent carotid MRI and had acceptable image quality for assessment of plaque burden, tissue contents and MRI-modified AHA lesion type by a Core Lab. We found that 77% of subjects had carotid plaques, 52% had lipid-containing plaques, and 11% had advanced, AHA type-VI lesions with possible surface defect, IPH or mural thrombus. Type-VI lesions were associated with older age (OR=2.6 per 5 years increase, p<0.001). After adjusting for age, these lesions were associated with history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=4.1, p=0.01), higher levels of Lipoprotein(a) (OR=2.0 per 1 SD increase, p=0.02) and larger %wall volume (%WV; OR=4.6 per 1 SD increase, p<0.001), but, were negatively associated with metabolic syndrome (OR=0.2, p=0.02). Presence of LRNC was associated with male gender (OR=3.2, p=0.02) and %WV (OR=3.8 per 1 SD, p<0.001), but, was negatively associated with diabetes (OR=0.4, p=0.02) and HDL-C levels (OR=0.7 per 1 SD, p=0.02). Increased %LRNC was associated with %WV (regression coefficient=0.36, p<0.001) and negatively associated with ApoA1 levels (regression coefficient=?0.20, p=0.03). In conclusions, older age, male gender, history of cerebrovascular disease, larger plaque burden, higher Lp(a), and lower HDL-C or ApoA1 have statistically significant associations with high-risk plaque features. Metabolic syndrome and diabetes showed negative associations in this population. PMID:25245415

  14. The very high rotators in the late-B and early-A stars: Shell stars with Si IV and C IV features the case of HD 119921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freireferrero, R.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Grady, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Study of several stars in the late B and early A spectral types shows that very high rotators are associated with shell characteristics (sometimes not detected at all in the visible spectra) and also with C IV and some Si IV spectral absorption features which can be explained by circumstellar phenomena superimposed over stellar metallic blends. These particularities are evidenced by comparison with other spectra of low and high rotators in the same spectral range. HD 119921, a star with similar characteristics to the other ones of the sample, is given special attention. A possible scenario is suggested to explain the observed superionization features.

  15. High mountain soils and periglacial features at the Torres del Paine, National Park Torres del Paine, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senra, Eduardo; Schaefer, Carlos; Simas, Felipe; Gjorup, Davi

    2015-04-01

    The Torres del Paine National Park (TPNP) is located on the southern limit of the Andean Southern Ice Field, part of the Magallanes and Antartica Chilena region, in the province of Ultima Esperanza. The TPNP has a very heterogeneous climate due to orographic influence and wet air masses from the Pacific. The geology is basically Cretaceous metasedimentary rocks and Miocene granitic plutons and batholiths. We studied the main soils and geoenvironments of Mt Ferrier mountain and its surroundings, based on soils , landforms and vegetation aspects. The geoenvironmental stratification was based on the combined variation and integration of pedo-litho-geomorphological features with the vegetation. WE used detailed geological maps, a DEM and slope maps and WorlView II satellite images. Fifteen soils profiles were sampled and classified according to Soil Taxonomy (2010) at all genovironments, ranging from 50 m a.s.l to the at high plateau just below the permanent snowline, under periglacial conditions (~1004m asl). Three soil temperature and moisture monitoring sites were set, allowing for 24 consecutive months (2011 to 2013). Seven geoenvironments were identified with distinct soil and landform characteristics, all with a similar geological substrate. The landform and vegetation have a strong connection with the landscape dynamic, controlling erosional and depositional processes, resulting from glacier advances and retreats in the Late Quaternary. Wind blown materials is widespread, in the form of loess material, accumulating in the higher parts of the landscape. On the other hand, accumulation of organic matter in the water-saturated depressions is common in all altitudes. Generally the soils are acidic and dystrophic, with little exceptions. The following geoenvironments were identified: Periglacial Tundra, Loess slopes, Talus and scarpmentd, Fluvio-glacial terraces, Fluvio-lacustrine plains, Moraines and Paleodunes. The regional pedology show the occurrence of five soil orders (Soil Taxonomy, 2010): Histosols, Mollisols, Inceptsols, Entisols and Andisols.

  16. Mitotic repression of RNA polymerase II transcription is accompanied by release of transcription elongation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, G G; Spencer, C A

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear RNA synthesis is repressed during the mitotic phase of each cell cycle. Although total RNA synthesis remains low throughout mitosis, the degree of RNA polymerase II transcription repression on specific genes has not been examined. In addition, it is not known whether mitotic repression of RNA polymerase II transcription is due to polymerase pausing or ejection of transcription elongation complexes from mitotic chromosomes. In this study, we show that RNA polymerase II transcription is repressed in mammalian cells on a number of specific gene regions during mitosis. We also show that the majority of RNA polymerase II transcription elongation complexes are physically excluded from mitotic chromosomes between late prophase and late telophase. Despite generalized transcription repression and stripping of RNA polymerase II complexes from DNA, arrested RNA polymerase II ternary complexes appear to remain on some gene regions during mitosis. The cyclic repression of transcription and ejection of RNA polymerase II transcription elongation complexes may help regulate the transcriptional events that control cell cycle progression and differentiation. PMID:9315637

  17. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kathryn M; Hoffmann, George R

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, beta-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv(+) revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state. PMID:17156798

  18. Bimodal activation of BubR1 by Bub3 sustains mitotic checkpoint signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joo Seok; Vitre, Benjamin; Fachinetti, Daniele; Cleveland, Don W.

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint) prevents premature anaphase onset through generation of an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase APC/C, whose ubiquitination of cyclin B and securin targets them for degradation. Combining in vitro reconstitution and cell-based assays, we now identify dual mechanisms through which Bub3 promotes mitotic checkpoint signaling. Bub3 enhances signaling at unattached kinetochores not only by facilitating binding of BubR1 but also by enhancing Cdc20 recruitment to kinetochores mediated by BubR1’s internal Cdc20 binding site. Downstream of kinetochore-produced complexes, Bub3 promotes binding of BubR1’s conserved, amino terminal Cdc20 binding domain to a site in Cdc20 that becomes exposed by initial Mad2 binding. This latter Bub3-stimulated event generates the final mitotic checkpoint complex of Bub3–BubR1–Cdc20 that selectively inhibits ubiquitination of securin and cyclin B by APC/CCdc20. Thus, Bub3 promotes two distinct BubR1-Cdc20 interactions, involving each of the two Cdc20 binding sites of BubR1 and acting at unattached kinetochores or cytoplasmically, respectively, to facilitate production of the mitotic checkpoint inhibitor. PMID:25246557

  19. Learning-based mitotic cell detection in histopathological images Christoph Sommer

    E-print Network

    Hamprecht, Fred A.

    and prognosis of cancer development. An important parameter for tumor prognosis is the number of mitotic cells workflow for au- tomated mitosis detection in breast cancer. From an initial training set a pixel by International Conference for Pattern Recognition 2012 contest on Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histological

  20. Keratin binding to 14-3-3 proteins modulates keratin filaments and hepatocyte mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Nam-On; Michie, Sara; Resurreccion, Evelyn Z.; Broome, Rosemary L.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2002-01-01

    Keratin polypeptides 8 and 18 (K8/18) are the major intermediate filament proteins of simple-type epithelia. K18 Ser-33 phosphorylation regulates its binding to 14-3-3 proteins during mitosis. We studied the significance of keratin binding to 14-3-3 in transgenic mice that overexpress wild-type or Ser-33?Ala (S33A) K18. In S33A but not wild-type K18-overexpressing mice, pancreatic acinar cell keratin filaments retracted from the basal nuclear region and became apically concentrated. In contrast, K18 S33A had a minimal effect on hepatocyte keratin filament organization. Partial hepatectomy of K18-S33A-overexpressing mice did not affect liver regeneration but caused limited mitotic arrest, accumulation of abnormal mitotic figures, dramatic fragmentation of hepatocyte keratin filaments, with retention of a speckled 14-3-3? mitotic cell nuclear-staining pattern that usually becomes diffuse during mitosis. Hence, K18 Ser-33 phosphorylation regulates keratin filament organization in simple-type epithelia in vivo. Keratin binding to 14-3-3 may partially modulate hepatocyte mitotic progression, in association with nuclear redistribution of 14-3-3 proteins during mitosis. PMID:11917136

  1. Keratin binding to 14-3-3 proteins modulates keratin filaments and hepatocyte mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nam-On; Michie, Sara; Resurreccion, Evelyn Z; Broome, Rosemary L; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-04-01

    Keratin polypeptides 8 and 18 (K8/18) are the major intermediate filament proteins of simple-type epithelia. K18 Ser-33 phosphorylation regulates its binding to 14-3-3 proteins during mitosis. We studied the significance of keratin binding to 14-3-3 in transgenic mice that overexpress wild-type or Ser-33-->Ala (S33A) K18. In S33A but not wild-type K18-overexpressing mice, pancreatic acinar cell keratin filaments retracted from the basal nuclear region and became apically concentrated. In contrast, K18 S33A had a minimal effect on hepatocyte keratin filament organization. Partial hepatectomy of K18-S33A-overexpressing mice did not affect liver regeneration but caused limited mitotic arrest, accumulation of abnormal mitotic figures, dramatic fragmentation of hepatocyte keratin filaments, with retention of a speckled 14-3-3zeta mitotic cell nuclear-staining pattern that usually becomes diffuse during mitosis. Hence, K18 Ser-33 phosphorylation regulates keratin filament organization in simple-type epithelia in vivo. Keratin binding to 14-3-3 may partially modulate hepatocyte mitotic progression, in association with nuclear redistribution of 14-3-3 proteins during mitosis. PMID:11917136

  2. Monastrol, a Prototype Anti-Cancer Drug That Inhibits a Mitotic Kinesin, Induces

    E-print Network

    Baas, Peter W.

    Monastrol, a Prototype Anti-Cancer Drug That Inhibits a Mitotic Kinesin, Induces Rapid Bursts of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Terminally postmitotic neurons continue to express many of the kinesin-related proteins known to configure microtubules during mitosis. Drugs that inhibit these kinesins are being

  3. Greatwall is essential to prevent mitotic collapse after nuclear envelope breakdown in mammals.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Sanz-Castillo, Belén; Gan, Pei Pei; Sanz-Flores, María; Trakala, Marianna; Ruiz-Torres, Miguel; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna; Malumbres, Marcos

    2013-10-22

    Greatwall is a protein kinase involved in the inhibition of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A)-B55 complexes to maintain the mitotic state. Although its biochemical activity has been deeply characterized in Xenopus, its specific relevance during the progression of mitosis is not fully understood. By using a conditional knockout of the mouse ortholog, Mastl, we show here that mammalian Greatwall is essential for mouse embryonic development and cell cycle progression. Yet, Greatwall-null cells enter into mitosis with normal kinetics. However, these cells display mitotic collapse after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) characterized by defective chromosome condensation and prometaphase arrest. Intriguingly, Greatwall is exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a CRM1-dependent manner before NEB. This export occurs after the nuclear import of cyclin B-Cdk1 complexes, requires the kinase activity of Greatwall, and is mediated by Cdk-, but not Polo-like kinase 1-dependent phosphorylation. The mitotic collapse observed in Greatwall-deficient cells is partially rescued after concomitant depletion of B55 regulatory subunits, which are mostly cytoplasmic before NEB. These data suggest that Greatwall is an essential protein in mammals required to prevent mitotic collapse after NEB. PMID:24101512

  4. Greatwall is essential to prevent mitotic collapse after nuclear envelope breakdown in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Sanz-Castillo, Belén; Gan, Pei Pei; Sanz-Flores, María; Trakala, Marianna; Ruiz-Torres, Miguel; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna; Malumbres, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Greatwall is a protein kinase involved in the inhibition of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A)-B55 complexes to maintain the mitotic state. Although its biochemical activity has been deeply characterized in Xenopus, its specific relevance during the progression of mitosis is not fully understood. By using a conditional knockout of the mouse ortholog, Mastl, we show here that mammalian Greatwall is essential for mouse embryonic development and cell cycle progression. Yet, Greatwall-null cells enter into mitosis with normal kinetics. However, these cells display mitotic collapse after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) characterized by defective chromosome condensation and prometaphase arrest. Intriguingly, Greatwall is exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a CRM1-dependent manner before NEB. This export occurs after the nuclear import of cyclin B–Cdk1 complexes, requires the kinase activity of Greatwall, and is mediated by Cdk-, but not Polo-like kinase 1-dependent phosphorylation. The mitotic collapse observed in Greatwall-deficient cells is partially rescued after concomitant depletion of B55 regulatory subunits, which are mostly cytoplasmic before NEB. These data suggest that Greatwall is an essential protein in mammals required to prevent mitotic collapse after NEB. PMID:24101512

  5. Regulation of Mitotic Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cytokinesis by Integrin-Linked Kinase in Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manju; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Baljinder; Cox, Michael E.; Mills, Julia

    2014-01-01

    During cell division integrin-linked kinase (ILK) has been shown to regulate microtubule dynamics and centrosome clustering, processes involved in cell cycle progression, and malignant transformation. In this study, we examine the effects of downregulating ILK on mitotic function in human retinoblastoma cell lines. These retinal cancer cells, caused by the loss of function of two gene alleles (Rb1) that encode the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor, have elevated expression of ILK. Here we show that inhibition of ILK activity results in a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear area and multinucleated cells. Moreover, inhibition of ILK activity and expression increased the accumulation of multinucleated cells over time. In these cells, aberrant cytokinesis and karyokinesis correlate with altered mitotic spindle organization, decreased levels of cortical F-actin and centrosome de-clustering. Centrosome de-clustering, induced by ILK siRNA, was rescued in FLAG-ILK expressing Y79 cells as compared to those expressing FLAG-tag alone. Inhibition of ILK increased the proportion of cells exhibiting mitotic spindles and caused a significant G2/M arrest as early as 24 hours after exposure to QLT-0267. Live cell analysis indicate ILK downregulation causes an increase in multipolar anaphases and failed cytokinesis (bipolar and multipolar) of viable cells. These studies extend those indicating a critical function for ILK in mitotic cytoskeletal organization and describe a novel role for ILK in cytokinesis of Rb deficient cells. PMID:24911651

  6. Involvement of CNOT3 in mitotic progression through inhibition of MAD1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Kikuguchi, Chisato; Morita, Masahiro; Shimodaira, Tetsuhiro; Tokai-Nishizumi, Noriko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ohsugi, Miho; Suzuki, Toru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Cell Signal Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0412

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 depletion increases the mitotic index. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 inhibits the expression of MAD1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 destabilizes the MAD1 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAD1 knockdown attenuates the CNOT3 depletion-induced mitotic arrest. -- Abstract: The stability of mRNA influences the dynamics of gene expression. The CCR4-NOT complex, the major deadenylase in mammalian cells, shortens the mRNA poly(A) tail and contributes to the destabilization of mRNAs. The CCR4-NOT complex plays pivotal roles in various physiological functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Here, we show that CNOT3, a subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex, is involved in the regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex also plays a part in the regulation of mitosis. CNOT3 depletion increases the population of mitotic-arrested cells and specifically increases the expression of MAD1 mRNA and its protein product that plays a part in the spindle assembly checkpoint. We showed that CNOT3 depletion stabilizes the MAD1 mRNA, and that MAD1 knockdown attenuates the CNOT3 depletion-induced increase of the mitotic index. Basing on these observations, we propose that CNOT3 is involved in the regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint through its ability to regulate the stability of MAD1 mRNA.

  7. Mitotic progression becomes irreversible in prometaphase and collapses when Wee1 and Cdc25 are inhibited

    PubMed Central

    Potapova, Tamara A.; Sivakumar, Sushama; Flynn, Jennifer N.; Li, Rong; Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis requires precise coordination of multiple global reorganizations of the nucleus and cytoplasm. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is the primary upstream kinase that directs mitotic progression by phosphorylation of a large number of substrate proteins. Cdk1 activation reaches the peak level due to positive feedback mechanisms. By inhibiting Cdk chemically, we showed that, in prometaphase, when Cdk1 substrates approach the peak of their phosphorylation, cells become capable of proper M-to-G1 transition. We interfered with the molecular components of the Cdk1-activating feedback system through use of chemical inhibitors of Wee1 and Myt1 kinases and Cdc25 phosphatases. Inhibition of Wee1 and Myt1 at the end of the S phase led to rapid Cdk1 activation and morphologically normal mitotic entry, even in the absence of G2. Dampening Cdc25 phosphatases simultaneously with Wee1 and Myt1 inhibition prevented Cdk1/cyclin B kinase activation and full substrate phosphorylation and induced a mitotic “collapse,” a terminal state characterized by the dephosphorylation of mitotic substrates without cyclin B proteolysis. This was blocked by the PP1/PP2A phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid. These findings suggest that the positive feedback in Cdk activation serves to overcome the activity of Cdk-opposing phosphatases and thus sustains forward progression in mitosis. PMID:21325631

  8. Immune profile and mitotic index of metastatic melanoma lesions enhance clinical staging in

    E-print Network

    Lonardi, Stefano

    Immune profile and mitotic index of metastatic melanoma lesions enhance clinical staging rates for metastatic melanoma are generally very poor, some patients can survive for prolonged periods Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, and its incidence is on the rise (1­3). Treatment options

  9. MISP is a novel Plk1 substrate required for proper spindle orientation and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mei; Settele, Florian; Kotak, Sachin; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ehret, Lena; Ponting, Chris P; Gönczy, Pierre; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2013-03-18

    Precise positioning of the mitotic spindle determines the correct cell division axis and is crucial for organism development. Spindle positioning is mediated through a cortical machinery by capturing astral microtubules, thereby generating pushing/pulling forces at the cell cortex. However, the molecular link between these two structures remains elusive. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized protein, MISP (C19orf21), as a substrate of Plk1 that is required for correct mitotic spindle positioning. MISP is an actin-associated protein throughout the cell cycle. MISP depletion led to an impaired metaphase-to-anaphase transition, which depended on phosphorylation by Plk1. Loss of MISP induced mitotic defects including spindle misorientation accompanied by shortened astral microtubules. Furthermore, we find that MISP formed a complex with and regulated the cortical distribution of the +TIP binding protein p150(glued), a subunit of the dynein-dynactin complex. We propose that Plk1 phosphorylates MISP, thus stabilizing cortical and astral microtubule attachments required for proper mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:23509069

  10. RanGTP and CLASP1 cooperate to position the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen L; Heald, Rebecca; Weis, Karsten

    2013-08-01

    Accurate positioning of the mitotic spindle is critical to ensure proper distribution of chromosomes during cell division. The small GTPase Ran, which regulates a variety of processes throughout the cell cycle, including interphase nucleocytoplasmic transport and mitotic spindle assembly, was recently shown to also control spindle alignment. Ran is required for the correct cortical localization of LGN and nuclear-mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), proteins that generate pulling forces on astral microtubules (MTs) through cytoplasmic dynein. Here we use importazole, a small-molecule inhibitor of RanGTP/importin-? function, to study the role of Ran in spindle positioning in human cells. We find that importazole treatment results in defects in astral MT dynamics, as well as in mislocalization of LGN and NuMA, leading to misoriented spindles. Of interest, importazole-induced spindle-centering defects can be rescued by nocodazole treatment, which depolymerizes astral MTs, or by overexpression of CLASP1, which does not restore proper LGN and NuMA localization but stabilizes astral MT interactions with the cortex. Together our data suggest a model for mitotic spindle positioning in which RanGTP and CLASP1 cooperate to align the spindle along the long axis of the dividing cell. PMID:23783028

  11. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Yoo, Hae Yong; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  12. Mitotic phosphorylation of VCIP135 blocks p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Totsukawa, Go; Matsuo, Ayaka; Kubota, Ayano; Taguchi, Yuya; Kondo, Hisao

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •VCIP135 is mitotically phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2. •Phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97ATPase. •The phosphorylation of VCIP135 inhibits p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 and p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 result in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 and the p97/p37 pathways, respectively [11,14]. In this study, we show another mechanism of mitotic inhibition of p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. We clarified that VCIP135, an essential factor in both p97 membrane fusion pathways, is phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2 at mitosis and that this phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97. An in vitro Golgi reassembly assay revealed that VCIP135(T760E, S767E), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, caused no cisternal regrowth. Our results indicate that the phosphorylation of VCIP135 on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 inhibits p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion at mitosis.

  13. Interaction between Poly(ADP-ribose) and NuMA Contributes to Mitotic Spindle Pole Assembly

    E-print Network

    Coughlin, M.

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr), made by PARP-5a/tankyrase-1, localizes to the poles of mitotic spindles and is required for bipolar spindle assembly, but its molecular function in the spindle is poorly understood. To investigate ...

  14. Effects of ovariectomy on estrogen uptake capacity, mitotic index and morphology of immunocytochemically-identified gonadotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective of these studies was to examine the effects of ovariectomy on the pituitary gonadotrope population in the rat. Several parameters were examined including morphology, mitotic index and ability of individual cells to concentrate estrogen. Adult, female rats which had been ovariectomized 3, 14, or 50 previously, were injected with /sup 3/H-estradiol (i.v.) and killed 1 hour later. Pituitaries were excised and immediately hemisected (mid-sagittal cut). Trunk blood was collected for subsequent radioimmunoassay of serum LH levels to assess the activity of the pituitary gonadotropes. Frozen pituitaries were sectioned and processed for dry-mount autoradiography. Estrogen uptake capacity of gonadotropes increased with time after ovariectomy. This increase was not seen in male rats after castration. Hemi-pituitaries were sectioned (1 ..mu..m) and analyzed for the number of mitotic figures per mm/sup 2/ and dividing cells were characterized as to their hormonal content. Ovariectomy induced an increase in the mitotic index of the pituitary gland. Furthermore, a majority of the mitotic futures seen in the ovariectomized rat were found in cells containing LH-immunoreactivity. Electron microscopic examination of dividing gonadotropes revealed that these cells contained large amounts of vesiculated endoplasmic reticumum typical of post-castration gonadotropes.

  15. Spontaneous Mitotic Recombination in Yeast: The Hyper-Recombinational Rem1 Mutations Are Alleles of the Rad3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Montelone, B. A.; Hoekstra, M. F.; Malone, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for UV excision-repair and is essential for cell viability. We have identified the rem1 mutations (enhanced spontaneous mitotic recombination and mutation) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as alleles of RAD3 by genetic mapping, complementation with the cloned wild-type gene, and DNA hybridization. The high levels of spontaneous mitotic gene conversion, crossing over, and mutation conferred upon cells by the rem1 mutations are distinct from the effects of all other alleles of RAD3. We present preliminary data on the localization of the rem1 mutations within the RAD3 gene. The interaction of the rem1 mutant alleles with a number of radiation-sensitive mutations is also different than the interactions reported for previously described (UV-sensitive) alleles of RAD3. Double mutants of rem1 and a defect in the recombination-repair pathway are inviable, while double mutants containing UV-sensitive alleles of RAD3 are viable. The data presented here demonstrate that: (1) rem1 strains containing additional mutations in other excision-repair genes do not exhibit elevated gene conversion; (2) triple mutants containing rem1 and mutations in both excision-repair and recombination-repair are viable; (3) such triple mutants containing rad52 have reduced levels of gene conversion but wild-type frequencies of crossing over. We have interpreted these observations in a model to explain the effects of rem1. Consistent with the predictions of the model, we find that the size of DNA from rem1 strains, as measured by neutral sucrose gradients, is smaller than wild type. PMID:2840336

  16. Bayesian analysis of X-ray jet features of the high redshift quasar jets observed with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Kashyap, Vinay; Stein, Nathan; Cheung, Chi C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray emission of powerful quasar jets may be a result of the inverse Compton (IC) process in which the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons gain energy by interactions with the jet's relativistic electrons. However, there is no definite evidence that IC/CMB process is responsible for the observed X-ray emission of large scale jets. A step toward understanding the X-ray emission process is to study the Radio and X-ray morphologies of the jet. Results from Chandra X-ray and multi-frequency VLA imaging observations of a sample of 11 high- redshift (z > 2) quasars with kilo-parsec scale radio jets are reported. The sample consists of a set of four z ? 3.6 flat-spectrum radio quasars, and seven intermediate redshift (z = 2.1 - 2.9) quasars comprised of four sources with integrated steep radio spectra and three with flat radio spectra.We implement a Bayesian image analysis program, Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) , to analyze jet features in the X-ray images of the high redshift quasars. Out of the 36 regions where knots are visible in the radio jets, nine showed detectable X-ray emission. Significant detections are based on the upper bound p-value test based on LIRA simulations. The X-ray and radio properties of this sample combined are examined and compared to lower-redshift samples.This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and the Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution, and by NASA Contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the CXC in the application packages CIAO, ChIPS, and Sherpa. Work is also supported by the Chandra grant GO4-15099X.

  17. The diagnosis value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for thyroid malignancy without highly suspicious features on conventional ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo-Ji; Lu, Feng; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Guo, Le-Hang; Li, Dan-Dan; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in identifying malignancy in nodules that do not appear highly suspicious on conventional ultrasound (US). Methods: 330 pathologically confirmed thyroid nodules (40 malignant and 290 benign; mean size, 22.0±11.6 mm) not suspicious of malignancy on conventional US in 330 patients (mean age 52.8±11.7 years) underwent ARFI elastography before surgery. ARFI elastography included qualitative ARFI-induced strain elastography (SE) and quantitative point shear wave elastography (p-SWE). ARFI-induced SE image was assessed by SE score, while p-SWE was denoted with shear wave velocity (SWV, m/s). The diagnostic performance of four criteria sets was evaluated: criteria set 1 (ARFI-induced SE), criteria set 2 (p-SWE), criteria set 3 (either set 1 or 2), criteria set 4 (both set 1 and 2). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: SE score ?4 was more frequently found in malignant nodules (32/40) than in benign nodules (30/290, P<0.001). The mean SWV of malignant nodules (3.64±2.23 m/s) was significantly higher than that of benign nodules (2.02±0.69 m/s) (P<0.001). ARFI-induced SE (set 1) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 89.7% (260/290) with a cut-off point of SE score ?4; p-SWE (set 2) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 57.9% (168/290) with a cut-off point of SWV ?2.15 m/s. When ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were combined, set 3 had the highest sensitivity (92.5%, 37/40) while set 4 had the highest specificity (95.2%, 276/290). Conclusion: ARFI elastography can be used for differential diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules without highly suspicious features on US. The combination of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE leads to improved sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26629025

  18. Inhibition of the basal and oestradiol-stimulated mitotic activity of primary spermatogonia by melatonin in the testis of the frog, Rana esculenta, in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    d'Istria, M; Palmiero, C; Serino, I; Izzo, G; Minucci, S

    2003-07-01

    Melatonin has a direct inhibitory effect on the basal and oestradiol-stimulated mitotic activity of primary spermatogonia in the testis of the frog, Rana esculenta. In this study oestradiol was used to induce spermatogonial proliferation to verify the anti-proliferative effect of melatonin. The colchicine metaphase arrest technique was used. The results obtained from in vivo experiments confirm that oestradiol increases the mitotic index of primary spermatogonia and, for the first time, indicate that melatonin has an inhibitory role on the proliferation of primary spermatogonia in the frog testis. Similar results were obtained from testes of melatonin-injected frogs that were exposed to oestradiol in vitro; in fact spermatogonia were unresponsive to hormonal stimulation. In addition, in short-term cultured testes, melatonin (at physiological concentration) interferes with the effects of oestradiol on spermatogonial proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that melatonin exerts the inhibitory effect directly via its local action on the frog gonads. Morphological observation after in vivo or in vitro melatonin treatments indicates that Leydig cells display degenerative features, whereas in adjacent germinal tubules, Sertoli cells show heterochromatic nuclei. These results indicate that melatonin may act on Leydig cells and confirm that there is a paracrine interaction between interstitial and germinal compartments. The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, that melatonin may be directly involved in the inhibitory control of spermatogonial proliferation in the testis of the frog, R. esculenta. PMID:12814350

  19. Relationship between morphological features and kinetic patterns of enhancement of the dynamic breast magnetic resonance imaging and clinico-pathological and biological factors in invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of breast cancer and its clinicopathological and biological factors. Methods Dynamic MRI parameters of 68 invasive breast carcinomas were investigated. We also analyzed microvessel density (MVD), estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and expression of p53, HER2, ki67, VEGFR-1 and 2. Results Homogeneous enhancement was significantly associated with smaller tumor size (T1: < 2 cm) (p = 0.015). Tumors with irregular or spiculated margins had a significantly higher MVD than tumors with smooth margins (p = 0.038). Tumors showing a maximum enhancement peak at two minutes, or longer, after injecting the contrast, had a significantly higher MVD count than those which reached this point sooner (p = 0.012). The percentage of tumors with vascular invasion or high mitotic index was significantly higher among those showing a low percentage (? 150%) of maximum enhancement before two minutes than among those ones showing a high percentage (>150%) of enhancement rate (p = 0.016 and p = 0.03, respectively). However, there was a significant and positive association between the mitotic index and the peak of maximum intensity (p = 0.036). Peritumor inflammation was significantly associated with washout curve type III (p = 0.042). Conclusions Variations in the early phase of dynamic MRI seem to be associated with parameters indicatives of tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. PMID:20064215

  20. Fluorescent antibody localization of myosin in the cytoplasm, cleavage furrow, and mitotic spindle of human cells

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    We have studied the distribution of myosin molecules in human cells using myosin-specific antibody coupled with fluorescent dyes. Rabbits were immunized with platelet myosin or myosin rod. They produced antisera which precipitated only myosin among all the components in crude platelet extracts. From these antisera we isolated immunoglobulin- G (IgG) and conjugated it with tetramethylrhodamine or fluorescein. We separated IgG with 2-5 fluorochromes per molecule from both under- and over-conjugated IgG by ion exchange chromatography and used it to stain acetone-treated cells. The following controls established the specificity of the staining patterns: (a) staining with labeled preimmune IgG; (b) staining with labeled immune IgG adsorbed with purified myosin; (c) staining with labeled immune IgG mixed with either unlabeled preimmune or immune serum; and (d) staining with labeled antibody purified by affinity chromatography. In blood smears, only the cytoplasm of platelets and leukocytes stained. In spread Enson and HeLa cells, stress fibers stained strongly in closely spaced 0.5 mum spots. The cytoplasm stained uniformly in those cells presumed to be motile before acetone treatment. In dividing HeLa cells there was a high concentration of myosin-specific staining in the vicinity of the contractole ring and in the mitotic spindle, especially the region between the chromosomes and the poles. We detected no staining of erythrocytes, or nuclei of leukocytes and cultured cells, or the surface of platelets and cultured cells. PMID:62755

  1. Species-Specific Heterochromatin Prevents Mitotic Chromosome Segregation to Cause Hybrid Lethality in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Patrick M.; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive barriers such as sterility and lethality of hybrids are important for establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation between species. Identifying the causal loci and discerning how they interfere with the development of hybrids is essential for understanding how hybrid incompatibilities (HIs) evolve, but little is known about the mechanisms of how HI genes cause hybrid dysfunctions. A previously discovered Drosophila melanogaster locus called Zhr causes lethality in F1 daughters from crosses between Drosophila simulans females and D. melanogaster males. Zhr maps to a heterochromatic region of the D. melanogaster X that contains 359-bp satellite repeats, suggesting either that Zhr is a rare protein-coding gene embedded within heterochromatin, or is a locus consisting of the noncoding repetitive DNA that forms heterochromatin. The latter possibility raises the question of how heterochromatic DNA can induce lethality in hybrids. Here we show that hybrid females die because of widespread mitotic defects induced by lagging chromatin at the time during early embryogenesis when heterochromatin is first established. The lagging chromatin is confined solely to the paternally inherited D. melanogaster X chromatids, and consists predominantly of DNA from the 359-bp satellite block. We further found that a rearranged X chromosome carrying a deletion of the entire 359-bp satellite block segregated normally, while a translocation of the 359-bp satellite block to the Y chromosome resulted in defective Y segregation in males, strongly suggesting that the 359-bp satellite block specifically and directly inhibits chromatid separation. In hybrids produced from wild-type parents, the 359-bp satellite block was highly stretched and abnormally enriched with Topoisomerase II throughout mitosis. The 359-bp satellite block is not present in D. simulans, suggesting that lethality is caused by the absence or divergence of factors in the D. simulans maternal cytoplasm that are required for heterochromatin formation of this species-specific satellite block. These findings demonstrate how divergence of noncoding repetitive sequences between species can directly cause reproductive isolation by altering chromosome segregation. PMID:19859525

  2. vasa and piwi are required for mitotic integrity in early embryogenesis in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Evelyn E; Meng, Yue; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2015-06-15

    Studies in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms on the molecular basis of primordial germ cell (PGC) specification have revealed that metazoans can specify their germ line either early in development by maternally transmitted cytoplasmic factors (inheritance), or later in development by signaling factors from neighboring tissues (induction). Regardless of the mode of PGC specification, once animal germ cells are specified, they invariably express a number of highly conserved genes. These include vasa and piwi, which can play essential roles in any or all of PGC specification, development, or gametogenesis. Although the arthropods are the most speciose animal phylum, to date there have been no functional studies of conserved germ line genes in species of the most basally branching arthropod clade, the chelicerates (which includes spiders, scorpions, and horseshoe crabs). Here we present the first such study by using molecular and functional tools to examine germ line development and the roles of vasa and piwi orthologues in the common house spider Parasteatoda (formerly Achaearanea) tepidariorum. We use transcript and protein expression patterns of Pt-vasa and Pt-piwi to show that primordial germ cells (PGCs) in the spider arise during late embryogenesis. Neither Pt-vasa nor Pt-piwi gene products are localized asymmetrically to any embryonic region before PGCs emerge as paired segmental clusters in opisthosomal segments 2-6 at late germ band stages. RNA interference studies reveal that both genes are required maternally for egg laying, mitotic progression in early embryos, and embryonic survival. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that vasa and piwi can play important roles in somatic development, and provide evidence for a previously hypothesized conserved role for vasa in cell cycle progression. PMID:25257304

  3. The evaluation of vacuum venting and variotherm process for improving the replication by injection molding of high aspect ratio micro features for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorgato, Marco; Lucchetta, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    The aspect ratio achievable in replicating micro features is one of the most important process characteristics and it is a major manufacturing constraint in applying injection molding in a range of micro engineering applications. Vacuum venting has been reported to be an effective technique in replicating micro features by microinjection molding. High surface-to-volume ratio and reduced dimensions of micro parts promote the instantaneous drop of melt temperature and consequently lead to incomplete filling. This study aims to investigate the effects of variotherm process, cavity evacuation and their interaction on the production of a micro fluidic filter for biomedical applications. A low-viscosity polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer were molded applying a combination of mold evacuation and a rapid mold temperature variation that keeps the cavity temperature above the glass transition temperature during the injection phase. The research revealed the importance of these molding technologies in enhancing part filling and the replication quality for high aspect ratio micro features.

  4. Functional Characterization of G12, a Gene Required for Mitotic Progression during Gastrulation in Zebrafish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinsch, Sigrid; Conway, Gregory; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a differential RNA display screen we have isolated a zebrafish gene, G12, for which homologs can only be found in DNA databases for vertebrates, but not invertebrates. This suggests that this is a gene required specifically in vertebrates. G12 expression is upregulated at mid-blastula transition (MBT). Morpholino inactivation of this gene by injection into 1-cell embryos results in mitotic defects and apoptosis shortly after MBT. Nuclei in morpholino treated embryos also display segregation defects. We have characterized the localization of this gene as a GFP fusion in live and fixed embryos. Overexpression of G12-GFP is non-toxic. Animals retain GFP expression for at least 7 days with no developmental defects, Interestingly in these animals G12-GFP is never detectable in blood cells though blood is present. In the deep cells of early embryos, G 12GFP is localized to nuclei and cytoskeletal elements in interphase and to the centrosome and spindle apparatus during mitosis. In the EVL, G12-GFP shows additional localization to the cell periphery, especially in mitosis. In the yolk syncytium, G12-GFP again localizes to nuclei and strongly to cytoplasmic microtubules of migrating nuclei at the YSL margin. Morpholinc, injection specifically into the YSL after cellularization blocks epiboly and nuclei of the YSL show mitotic defects while deep cells show no mitotic defects and continue to divide. Rescue experiments in which morpholino and G12-GFP RNA are co-injected indicate partial rescue by the G12-GFP. The rescue is cell autonomous; that is, regions of the embryo with higher G12-GFP expression show fewer mitotic defects. Spot 14, the human bomolog of G12, has been shown to be amplified in aggressive breast tumors. This finding, along with our functional and morphological data suggest that G12 and spot 14 are vertebrate-specific and may function either as mitotic checkpoints or as structural components of the spindle apparatus.

  5. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J.; Mason, Susan M.; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A.; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N.; Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D.G.; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W.; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P.; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L.; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  6. Low-temperature plasma etching of high aspect-ratio densely packed 15 to sub-10 nm silicon features derived from PS-PDMS block copolymer patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuwei; Gu, Xiaodan; Hwu, Justin; Sassolini, Simone; Olynick, Deirdre L

    2014-07-18

    The combination of block copolymer (BCP) lithography and plasma etching offers a gateway to densely packed sub-10 nm features for advanced nanotechnology. Despite the advances in BCP lithography, plasma pattern transfer remains a major challenge. We use controlled and low substrate temperatures during plasma etching of a chromium hard mask and then the underlying substrate as a route to high aspect ratio sub-10 nm silicon features derived from BCP lithography. Siloxane masks were fabricated using poly(styrene-b-siloxane) (PS-PDMS) BCP to create either line-type masks or, with the addition of low molecular weight PS-OH homopolymer, dot-type masks. Temperature control was essential for preventing mask migration and controlling the etched feature's shape. Vertical silicon wire features (15 nm with feature-to-feature spacing of 26 nm) were etched with aspect ratios up to 17 : 1; higher aspect ratios were limited by the collapse of nanoscale silicon structures. Sub-10 nm fin structures were etched with aspect ratios greater than 10 : 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of the wires reveal a crystalline silicon core with an amorphous surface layer, just slightly thicker than a native oxide. PMID:24971641

  7. Analysis of the Competency-Based High School Diploma Program for CETA Clients. Report I: Structural and Programmatic Features of the Pilot Project as Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Samuel H., Jr.

    The University of Texas Pilot Program was operated in five sites in Texas (Abilene, Brownsville, El Paso, Houston, and Temple) to demonstrate the utility of competency-based high school diplomas for Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) clients. Included among the program features common to all five sites were the following: (1) the…

  8. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  9. Assessment of aerosol optical and micro-physical features retrieved from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements from Skyradiometer at a high altitude station at Merak : Assessment of aerosol optical features from Merak.

    PubMed

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S; Srivastava, A K; Bagare, S P; Singh, R B; Kanawade, V P; Dorjey, Namgyal

    2015-11-01

    Optical and micro-physical features of aerosol are reported using Skyradiometer (POM-01L, Prede, Japan) observations taken from a high-altitude station Merak, located in north-eastern Ladakh of the western trans-Himalayas region during January 2011 to December 2013. The observed daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, at 500 nm) at the site varied from 0.01 to 0.14. However, 75 % of the observed AOD lies below 0.05 during the study period. Seasonal peaks of AOD occurred in spring as 0.06 and minimum in winter as 0.03 which represents the aged background aerosols at the site. Yearly mean AOD at 500 nm is found to be around 0.04 and inter-annual variations of AOD is very small (nearly ±0.01). Angstrom exponent (a) varied seasonally from 0.73 in spring to 1.5 in autumn. About 30 % of the observed a lies below 0.8 which are the indicative for the presence of coarse-mode aerosols at the site. The station exhibits absorbing aerosol features which prominently occurred during spring and that may be attributed by the transported anthropogenic aerosol from Indo-Gangatic Plain (IGP). Results were well substantiated with the air mass back-trajectory analysis. Furthermore, seasonal mean of single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) varied from of 0.94 to 0.98 and a general increasing trend is noticed from 400 to 870 nm wavelengths. These features are apparently regional characteristics of the site. Aerosol asymmetry factor (AS) decreases gradually from 400 to 870 nm and varied from 0.66 to 0.69 at 500 nm across the seasons. Dominance of desert-dust aerosols, associated by coarse mode, is indicated by tri-modal features of aerosol volume size distribution over the station during the entire seasons. PMID:26081773

  10. Viscous flow features on the surface of Mars: Observations from high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC)

    E-print Network

    Head III, James William

    (MOC) images R. E. Milliken, J. F. Mustard, and D. L. Goldsby Department of Geological Sciences, Brown gullies Citation: Milliken, R. E., J. F. Mustard, and D. L. Goldsby, Viscous flow features on the surface of these latitude dependent fea- tures and ground ice stability models suggest that substan- tial amounts of ice may

  11. Unequal mitotic sister chromatid exchange: A rare mechanism for chromosomal abnormality resulting in duplication/deletion of chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Eydoux, P.; Ortenberg, J.; Chalifoux, N.

    1994-09-01

    We report a case of unequal mitotic chromatid exchange, which has rarely been reported as a mechanism for microscopic chromosomal anomalies. The proposita was born at 40 weeks, after an uneventful pregnancy, of parents with a negative family history. The baby was small for gestational age and had dysmorphic features, including scaphocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds and palpebral ptosis, mild hypertelorism, hypoplasia of orbital contours, right coloboma, bulbous prominent nose, retrognathism, downturned mouth, low set posteriorly rotated ears, tapering of the limbs. bilateral Sydney creases. At 5 months, she was under the 5th percentile for height, weight and head circumference, and had a mild developmental delay. The karyotype showed an abnormality of chromosome 7 in all cells, half with a duplication and half with a deletion of the same region; 46,XX,del(7)(q33{yields}q34)/46,XX,dup(7)(q33{yields}q34). This chromosomal abnormality could be explained by an unequal chromatid exchange occuring in the first mitosis of the embryo. To our knowledge, only one such human microscopic abnormality, involving chromosome Y, has been reported to date. This type of genetic unbalance could be missed by molecular techniques.

  12. An evaluation of techniques for the extraction of mineral absorption features from high spectral resolution remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rast, Michael; Hook, Simon J.; Alley, Ronald E.; Elvidge, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer data covering the wavelength range between 2000 and 2400 nm are examined for their ability to display the diagnostic mineral absorption features of certain alteration minerals, employing various data processing techniques. The techniques may be separated into two broad categories: scene based techniques that use parameters derived from the data themselves, and correction techniques utilizing external information such as solar/atmospheric models. Results indicate that the data corrected utilizing the LOWTRAN 7 atmospheric transfer code constrained with local weather station data are the most effective at showing the diagnostic absorption features of the regions of known mineralogy and introduce the least number of artifacts into the data.

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Supercritical CO[subscript 2]-Tolerant Bacteria Bacillus subterraneus MITOT1 and Bacillus cereus MIT0214

    E-print Network

    Peet, Kyle Creighton

    We report draft genome sequences of Bacillus subterraneus MITOT1 and Bacillus cereus MIT0214 isolated through enrichment of samples from geologic sequestration sites in pressurized bioreactors containing a supercritical ...

  14. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yueyang; Munger, Karl

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  15. Arrest in metaphase and anatomy of mitotic catastrophe: mild heat shock in two human osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Erenpreisa, J E; Ivanov, A; Dekena, G; Vitina, A; Krampe, R; Freivalds, T; Selivanova, G; Roach, H I

    2000-01-01

    The exits from metaphase arrest and anatomy of mitotic catastrophe were studied in two human osteosarcoma cell lines, nontumorigenic HOS TE85 and its chemically transformed strain MNNG-HOS, applying mild genotoxic damage by heat shock at 41.8 degrees C for 24 h. Under these conditions, both cell lines doubled or tripled their mitotic index entering arrest in metaphase. On return to 37 degrees C, the arrest was either released or ended in apoptosis. The transformed strain showed a greater capacity to arrest in metaphase as well as a greater probability of developing the third pathway: to restitute this arrest in polyploid interphase. This, in turn, either entered an 'endocycle' or, following a delay, apoptosis. Thus, arrest in metaphase was a cross-point of the mitotic cycle, apoptosis, and endocycle. Mitotic catastrophe can morphologically manifest combinations of elements of these three processes. PMID:10772764

  16. A Study On Surges: I. Automatic Detection Of Dynamic H? Dark Features From High-Cadence Full-Disk Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Kurokawa, H.; Kitai, R.; Ueno, S.; Su, J. T.

    2005-05-01

    We present a new method for the automatic identification and classification of dynamic H? dark features found in time series of full-disk solar images at three H? wavelengths (center, and ± 0.8 Å). The simultaneous H? observations are obtained by the multi-channel Flare Monitoring Telescope (FMT) at Hida Observatory. The program was developed in order to replace the present visual detection and classification of the phenomena. Usually, an obvious dark feature found in the H? -0.8 Å observations probably corresponds to some phenomenon such as a surge or chromospheric network enhancement, or filament activity. Thus, one of our aims in this program is to distinguish each phenomenon by its own properties and key parameters. We optimized the threshold values of the key parameters such as the area and darkness of the transiently darkening features in H? -0.8 Å so that the computer can reasonably identify surges and filament activations. In comparison, for a 7-day observation period, the number of dark events detected by the program contains 89% of the events recognized visually. However, 10 times more events are detected automatically. The missing events are mainly caused by the deletion of data with poor visibility. It is found that the dark events can be identified with more precise starting and ending times by a machine than by a human. Some statistical studies of surges or other activities can be carried out based on the computer-produced database. With some modifications the program can be applied to monitor real-time dynamic features on disk, including flare ribbons.

  17. The SUMO protease SENP1 is required for cohesion maintenance and mitotic arrest following spindle poison treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Era, Saho; Radiation Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 ; Abe, Takuya; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Szakal, Barnabas; Yoshikawa, Yusuke; Motegi, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi; Branzei, Dana

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SENP1 knockout chicken DT40 cells are hypersensitive to spindle poisons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spindle poison treatment of SENP1{sup -/-} cells leads to increased mitotic slippage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic slippage in SENP1{sup -/-} cells associates with apoptosis and endoreplication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SENP1 counteracts sister chromatid separation during mitotic arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plk1-mediated cohesion down-regulation is involved in colcemid cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: SUMO conjugation is a reversible posttranslational modification that regulates protein function. SENP1 is one of the six SUMO-specific proteases present in vertebrate cells and its altered expression is observed in several carcinomas. To characterize SENP1 role in genome integrity, we generated Senp1 knockout chicken DT40 cells. SENP1{sup -/-} cells show normal proliferation, but are sensitive to spindle poisons. This hypersensitivity correlates with increased sister chromatid separation, mitotic slippage, and apoptosis. To test whether the cohesion defect had a causal relationship with the observed mitotic events, we restored the cohesive status of sister chromatids by introducing the TOP2{alpha}{sup +/-} mutation, which leads to increased catenation, or by inhibiting Plk1 and Aurora B kinases that promote cohesin release from chromosomes during prolonged mitotic arrest. Although TOP2{alpha} is SUMOylated during mitosis, the TOP2{alpha}{sup +/-} mutation had no obvious effect. By contrast, inhibition of Plk1 or Aurora B rescued the hypersensitivity of SENP1{sup -/-} cells to colcemid. In conclusion, we identify SENP1 as a novel factor required for mitotic arrest and cohesion maintenance during prolonged mitotic arrest induced by spindle poisons.

  18. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P; Kellogg, Douglas R; Tallada, Victor A; Daga, Rafael R; Jimenez, Juan

    2015-05-11

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  19. Mitotic Membrane Turnover Coordinates Differential Induction of the Heart Progenitor Lineage.

    PubMed

    Cota, Christina D; Davidson, Brad

    2015-09-14

    In response to microenvironmental cues, embryonic cells form adhesive signaling compartments that influence survival and patterning. Dividing cells detach from the surrounding matrix and initiate extensive membrane remodeling, but the in vivo impact of mitosis on adhesion-dependent signaling remains poorly characterized. We investigate in vivo signaling dynamics using the invertebrate chordate, Ciona intestinalis. In Ciona, matrix adhesion polarizes fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-dependent heart progenitor induction. Here, we show that adhesion inhibits mitotic FGF receptor internalization, leading to receptor enrichment along adherent membranes. Targeted disruption of matrix adhesion promotes uniform FGF receptor internalization and degradation while enhanced adhesion suppresses degradation. Chimeric analysis indicates that integrin ? chain-specific impacts on induction are dictated by distinct internalization motifs. We also found that matrix adhesion impacts receptor enrichment through Caveolin-rich membrane domains. These results redefine the relationship between cell division and adhesive signaling, revealing how mitotic membrane turnover orchestrates adhesion-dependent signal polarization. PMID:26300448

  20. PLK1 regulation of PCNT cleavage ensures fidelity of centriole separation during mitotic exit

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyoun; Lee, Kwanwoo; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are duplicated and segregated in close link to the cell cycle. During mitosis, daughter centrioles are disengaged and eventually separated from mother centrioles. New daughter centrioles may be generated only after centriole separation. Therefore, centriole separation is considered a licensing step for centriole duplication. It was previously known that separase specifically cleaves pericentrin (PCNT) during mitotic exit. Here we report that PCNT has to be phosphorylated by PLK1 to be a suitable substrate of separase. Phospho-resistant mutants of PCNT are not cleaved by separase and eventually inhibit centriole separation. Furthermore, phospho-mimetic PCNT mutants rescue centriole separation even in the presence of a PLK1 inhibitor. On the basis on these results, we propose that PLK1 phosphorylation is a priming step for separase-mediated cleavage of PCNT and eventually for centriole separation. PLK1 phosphorylation of PCNT provides an additional layer of regulatory mechanism to ensure the fidelity of centriole separation during mitotic exit. PMID:26647647

  1. PLK1 regulation of PCNT cleavage ensures fidelity of centriole separation during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyoun; Lee, Kwanwoo; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are duplicated and segregated in close link to the cell cycle. During mitosis, daughter centrioles are disengaged and eventually separated from mother centrioles. New daughter centrioles may be generated only after centriole separation. Therefore, centriole separation is considered a licensing step for centriole duplication. It was previously known that separase specifically cleaves pericentrin (PCNT) during mitotic exit. Here we report that PCNT has to be phosphorylated by PLK1 to be a suitable substrate of separase. Phospho-resistant mutants of PCNT are not cleaved by separase and eventually inhibit centriole separation. Furthermore, phospho-mimetic PCNT mutants rescue centriole separation even in the presence of a PLK1 inhibitor. On the basis on these results, we propose that PLK1 phosphorylation is a priming step for separase-mediated cleavage of PCNT and eventually for centriole separation. PLK1 phosphorylation of PCNT provides an additional layer of regulatory mechanism to ensure the fidelity of centriole separation during mitotic exit. PMID:26647647

  2. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  3. Mitotic index, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis define 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas associated with different genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Carpentier, Catherine; Forest, Fabien; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Viennet, Gabriel; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Loussouarn, Delphine; Lacroix, Catherine; Rigau, Valérie; Laquerrière, Annie; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michalak, Sophie; Sevestre, Henri; Peoch, Michel; Labrousse, François; Christov, Christo; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Desenclos, Christine; Menei, Philippe; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Antoine; Loiseau, Hugues; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Emery, Evelyne; Verelle, Pierre; Durando, Xavier; Faillot, Thierry; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Ghiringhelli, François; Parker, Fabrice; Adam, Clovis; Dubois, François; Ramirez, Carole; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Honnorat, Jerome; Chinot, Olivier; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Campone, Mario; Frenel, Jean Sébastien; Fontaine, Denys; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Heitzmann, Anne; Fesneau, Mélanie; Delattre, Jean Yves; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Ricard, Damien; Colin, Philippe; Vauléon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Lubrano, Vincent; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate histological features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The histological characteristics of 203 AO patients, enrolled in the French national network POLA, were analyzed. The genomic profiles of 191 cases were studied using genomic arrays. IDH mutational status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and direct sequencing. Results 1p/19q codeletion was present in 79% of cases and was associated with alpha-internexin expression (P < 10?4), IDH1/2 mutation (P < 10?4), chromosome 4 loss (P < 10?3), and better overall survival (P < 10?4). Based on mitotic index, microvascular proliferation (MVP), and necrosis, 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted AOs were identified: (group 1) AO with more than 5 mitoses per 10-HPF, no MVP, and no necrosis; (group 2) AO with MVP and no necrosis; and (group 3) AO with MVP and necrosis. Compared with group 1, groups 2 and 3 AOs had a higher mean Ki-67 proliferation index and a higher rate of 9p and 9q losses. Compared with group 2, group 3 AOs had a higher number of chromosomal alterations including chromosome 4 loss. In the subgroup of 157 1p/19q codeleted AOs, chromosomal instability was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = .024) and shorter overall survival (P = .023). Conclusions The present study shows that oligodendrogliomas with classic histological features remain a molecularly heterogeneous entity and should be stratified according to 1p/19q status because of its major prognostic relevance. Moreover, 1p/19q codeleted AOs are also heterogeneous. Interestingly, mitotic index, MVP, and necrosis help to classify them into 3 groups associated with distinct genomic alterations. PMID:24723566

  4. How to be good at being bad: centrosome amplification and mitotic propensity drive intratumoral heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rida, Padmashree C G; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Reid, Michelle D; Kucuk, Omer; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is truly an iconic disease-a tour de force whose multiple formidable strengths can be attributed to the bewildering heterogeneity that a tumor can manifest both spatially and temporally. A Darwinian evolutionary process is believed to undergird, at least in part, the generation of this heterogeneity that contributes to poor clinical outcomes. Risk assessment in clinical oncology is currently based on a small number of clinicopathologic factors (like stage, histological grade, receptor status, and serum tumor markers) and offers limited accuracy in predicting disease course as evidenced by the prognostic heterogeneity that persists in risk segments produced by present-day models. We posit that this insufficiency stems from the exclusion of key risk contributors from such models, especially the omission of certain factors implicated in generating intratumoral heterogeneity. The extent of centrosome amplification and the mitotic propensity inherent in a tumor are two such vital factors whose contributions to poor prognosis are presently overlooked in risk prognostication. Supernumerary centrosomes occur widely in tumors and are potent drivers of chromosomal instability that fosters intratumoral heterogeneity. The mitotic propensity of a proliferating population of tumor cells reflects the cell cycling kinetics of that population. Since frequent passage through improperly regulated mitotic divisions accelerates production of diverse genotypes, the mitotic propensity inherent in a tumor serves as a powerful beacon of risk. In this review, we highlight how centrosome amplification and error-prone mitoses contribute to poor clinical outcomes and urge the need to develop these cancer-specific traits as much-needed clinically-facile prognostic biomarkers with immense potential value for individualized cancer treatment in the clinic. PMID:26358854

  5. p31comet promotes disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex in an ATP-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Teichner, Adar; Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Dumin, Elena; Gromis, Jonathan; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes in mitosis is ensured by a surveillance mechanism called the mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint. It prevents sister chromatid separation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle through their kinetochores. The checkpoint acts by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. The activity of APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 bound to the checkpoint proteins MAD2, BubR1, and Bub3. When all kinetochores acquire bipolar attachment the checkpoint is inactivated, but the mechanisms of checkpoint inactivation are not understood. We have previously observed that hydrolyzable ATP is required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. In this investigation we examined the possibility that ATP hydrolysis in exit from checkpoint is linked to the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet in this process. It is known that p31comet prevents the formation of a Mad2 dimer that it thought to be important for turning on the mitotic checkpoint. This explains how p31comet blocks the activation of the checkpoint but not how it promotes its inactivation. Using extracts from checkpoint-arrested cells and MCC isolated from such extracts, we now show that p31comet causes the disassembly of MCC and that this process requires ?,?-hydrolyzable ATP. Although p31comet binds to Mad2, it promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC. PMID:21300909

  6. Remarks: Highly upgraded condo features granite, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, balcony, upgraded baths, and generous room sizes all while being located in a prime Lincoln Park location close to everything. PARKING INCLUDED IN PRICE.

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    #12;Remarks: Highly upgraded condo features granite, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, Refrigerator, Washer, Dryer, All Stainless Steel Kitchen Appliances Dining: Bath Amn: Fireplace Details

  7. Dnt1 acts as a mitotic inhibitor of the spindle checkpoint protein dma1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yamei; Li, Wen-zhu; Johnson, Alyssa E; Luo, Zhou-qing; Sun, Xue-li; Feoktistova, Anna; McDonald, W Hayes; McLeod, Ian; Yates, John R; Gould, Kathleen L; McCollum, Dannel; Jin, Quan-wen

    2012-09-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe checkpoint protein Dma1 couples mitotic progression with cytokinesis and is important in delaying mitotic exit and cytokinesis when kinetochores are not properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Dma1 is a ubiquitin ligase and potential functional relative of the human tumor suppressor Chfr. Dma1 delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis by ubiquitinating a scaffold protein (Sid4) of the septation initiation network, which, in turn, antagonizes the ability of the Polo-like kinase Plo1 to promote cell division. Here we identify Dnt1 as a Dma1-binding protein. Several lines of evidence indicate that Dnt1 inhibits Dma1 function during metaphase. First, Dnt1 interacts preferentially with Dma1 during metaphase. Second, Dma1 ubiquitin ligase activity and Sid4 ubiquitination are elevated in dnt1 cells. Third, the enhanced mitotic defects in dnt1? plo1 double mutants are partially rescued by deletion of dma1(+), suggesting that the defects in dnt1 plo1 double mutants are attributable to excess Dma1 activity. Taken together, these data show that Dnt1 acts to restrain Dma1 activity in early mitosis to allow normal mitotic progression. PMID:22809626

  8. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13) AAA-ATPase Is a Novel Mitotic Checkpoint-silencing Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kexi; Sturt-Gillespie, Brianne; Hittle, James C.; Macdonald, Dawn; Chan, Gordon K.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (or spindle assembly checkpoint) is a fail-safe mechanism to prevent chromosome missegregation by delaying anaphase onset in the presence of defective kinetochore-microtubule attachment. The target of the checkpoint is the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Once all chromosomes are properly attached and bioriented at the metaphase plate, the checkpoint needs to be silenced. Previously, we and others have reported that TRIP13 AAA-ATPase binds to the mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein p31comet. Here we show that endogenous TRIP13 localizes to kinetochores. TRIP13 knockdown delays metaphase-to-anaphase transition. The delay is caused by prolonged presence of the effector for the checkpoint, the mitotic checkpoint complex, and its association and inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. These results suggest that TRIP13 is a novel mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein. The ATPase activity of TRIP13 is essential for its checkpoint function, and interference with TRIP13 abolished p31comet-mediated mitotic checkpoint silencing. TRIP13 overexpression is a hallmark of cancer cells showing chromosomal instability, particularly in certain breast cancers with poor prognosis. We suggest that premature mitotic checkpoint silencing triggered by TRIP13 overexpression may promote cancer development. PMID:25012665

  9. Dnt1 acts as a mitotic inhibitor of the spindle checkpoint protein dma1 in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yamei; Li, Wen-zhu; Johnson, Alyssa E.; Luo, Zhou-qing; Sun, Xue-li; Feoktistova, Anna; McDonald, W. Hayes; McLeod, Ian; Yates, John R.; Gould, Kathleen L.; McCollum, Dannel; Jin, Quan-wen

    2012-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe checkpoint protein Dma1 couples mitotic progression with cytokinesis and is important in delaying mitotic exit and cytokinesis when kinetochores are not properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Dma1 is a ubiquitin ligase and potential functional relative of the human tumor suppressor Chfr. Dma1 delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis by ubiquitinating a scaffold protein (Sid4) of the septation initiation network, which, in turn, antagonizes the ability of the Polo-like kinase Plo1 to promote cell division. Here we identify Dnt1 as a Dma1-binding protein. Several lines of evidence indicate that Dnt1 inhibits Dma1 function during metaphase. First, Dnt1 interacts preferentially with Dma1 during metaphase. Second, Dma1 ubiquitin ligase activity and Sid4 ubiquitination are elevated in dnt1? cells. Third, the enhanced mitotic defects in dnt1? plo1 double mutants are partially rescued by deletion of dma1+, suggesting that the defects in dnt1? plo1 double mutants are attributable to excess Dma1 activity. Taken together, these data show that Dnt1 acts to restrain Dma1 activity in early mitosis to allow normal mitotic progression. PMID:22809626

  10. The schedule of destruction of three mitotic cyclins can dictate the timing of events during exit from mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Devin H.; O’Farrell, Patrick H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Degradation of the mitotic cyclins is a hallmark of the exit from mitosis. Induction of stable versions of each of the three mitotic cyclins of Drosophila, cyclins A, B, and B3, arrests mitosis with different phenotypes. We tested a recent proposal that the destruction of the different cyclins guides progress through mitosis. Results Real-time imaging revealed that arrest phenotypes differ because each stable cyclin affects specific mitotic events differently. Stable cyclin A prolonged or blocked chromosome disjunction, leading to metaphase arrest. Stable cyclin B allowed the transition to anaphase, but anaphase A chromosome movements were slowed, anaphase B spindle elongation did not occur, and the monooriented disjoined chromosomes began to oscillate between the spindle poles. Stable cyclin B3 prevented normal spindle maturation and blocked major mitotic exit events such as chromosome decondensation but nonetheless allowed chromosome disjunction, anaphase B, and formation of a cytokinetic furrow, which split the spindle. Conclusions We conclude that degradation of distinct mitotic cyclins is required to transit specific steps of mitosis: cyclin A degradation facilitates chromosome disjunction, cyclin B destruction is required for anaphase B and cytokinesis and for directional stability of univalent chromosome movements, and cyclin B3 degradation is required for proper spindle reorganization and restoration of the interphase nucleus. We suggest that the schedule of degradation of cyclin A, cyclin B, and then cyclin B3 contributes to the temporal coordination of mitotic events. PMID:11369230

  11. Population dynamics of a meiotic/mitotic expansion model for the fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, A.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1995-12-01

    A model to explain the mutational process and population dynamics of the fragile X syndrome is presented. The mutational mechanism was assumed to be a multi-pathway, multistep process. Expansion of CGG repeats was based on an underlying biological process and was assumed to occur at two time points: meiosis and early embryonic development (mitosis). Meiotic expansion was assumed to occur equally in oogenesis and spermatogenesis, while mitotic expansion was restricted to somatic, or constitutional, alleles of maternal origin. Testable hypotheses were predicted by this meiotic/mitotic model. First, parental origin of mutation is predicted to be associated with the risk of a woman to have a full-mutation child. Second, {open_quotes}contractions{close_quotes} seen in premutation male transmissions are predicted not to be true contractions in repeat size, but a consequence of the lack of mitotic expansion in paternally derived alleles. Third, a portion of full-mutation males should have full-mutation alleles in their sperm, due to the lack of complete selection against the full-mutation female. Fourth, a specific premutation-allele frequency distribution is predicted and differs from that based on models assuming only meiotic expansion. Last, it is predicted that {approximately}65 generations are required to achieve equilibrium, but this depends greatly on the expansion probabilities. 42 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Changes in Ect2 Localization Couple Actomyosin-Dependent Cell Shape Changes to Mitotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Helen K.; Delabre, Ulysse; Rohn, Jennifer L.; Guck, Jochen; Kunda, Patricia; Baum, Buzz

    2012-01-01

    Summary As they enter mitosis, animal cells undergo profound actin-dependent changes in shape to become round. Here we identify the Cdk1 substrate, Ect2, as a central regulator of mitotic rounding, thus uncovering a link between the cell-cycle machinery that drives mitotic entry and its accompanying actin remodeling. Ect2 is a RhoGEF that plays a well-established role in formation of the actomyosin contractile ring at mitotic exit, through the local activation of RhoA. We find that Ect2 first becomes active in prophase, when it is exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm, activating RhoA to induce the formation of a mechanically stiff and rounded metaphase cortex. Then, at anaphase, binding to RacGAP1 at the spindle midzone repositions Ect2 to induce local actomyosin ring formation. Ect2 localization therefore defines the stage-specific changes in actin cortex organization critical for accurate cell division. PMID:22898780

  13. Aurora B-dependent Regulation of Class IIa Histone Deacetylases by Mitotic Nuclear Localization Signal Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Amanda J.; Greco, Todd M.; Zhang, Irene Y.; Yu, Fang; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2012-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs 4/5/7/9) are transcriptional regulators with critical roles in cardiac disease and cancer. HDAC inhibitors are promising anticancer agents, and although they are known to disrupt mitotic progression, the underlying mechanisms of mitotic regulation by HDACs are not fully understood. Here we provide the first identification of histone deacetylases as substrates of Aurora B kinase (AurB). Our study identifies class IIa HDACs as a novel family of AurB targets and provides the first evidence that HDACs are temporally and spatially regulated by phosphorylation during the cell cycle. We define the precise site of AurB-mediated phosphorylation as a conserved serine within the nuclear localization signals of HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9 at Ser265, Ser278, and Ser242, respectively. We establish that AurB interacts with these HDACs in vivo, and that this association increases upon disruption of 14-3-3 binding. We observe colocalization of endogenous, phosphorylated HDACs with AurB at the mitotic midzone in late anaphase and the midbody during cytokinesis, complemented by a reduction in HDAC interactions with components of the nuclear corepressor complex. We propose that AurB-dependent phosphorylation of HDACs induces sequestration within a phosphorylation gradient at the midzone, maintaining separation from re-forming nuclei and contributing to transcriptional control. PMID:22865920

  14. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2013-03-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  15. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2013-01-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  16. Cell cycle regulation of Greatwall kinase nuclear localization facilitates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Galan, Jacob A.; Normandin, Karine; Bonneil, Éric; Hickson, Gilles R.; Roux, Philippe P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cell division requires the coordination of critical protein kinases and phosphatases. Greatwall (Gwl) kinase activity inactivates PP2A-B55 at mitotic entry to promote the phosphorylation of cyclin B–Cdk1 substrates, but how Gwl is regulated is poorly understood. We found that the subcellular localization of Gwl changed dramatically during the cell cycle in Drosophila. Gwl translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in prophase. We identified two critical nuclear localization signals in the central, poorly characterized region of Gwl, which are required for its function. The Polo kinase associated with and phosphorylated Gwl in this region, promoting its binding to 14-3-3? and its localization to the cytoplasm in prophase. Our results suggest that cyclin B–Cdk1 phosphorylation of Gwl is also required for its nuclear exclusion by a distinct mechanism. We show that the nucleo-cytoplasmic regulation of Gwl is essential for its functions in vivo and propose that the spatial regulation of Gwl at mitotic entry contributes to the mitotic switch. PMID:23857770

  17. Aurora Kinases Phosphorylate Lgl to Induce Mitotic Spindle Orientation in Drosophila Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham P.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; Brain, Ruth; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) protein was discovered in Drosophila as a tumor suppressor in both neural stem cells (neuroblasts) and epithelia. In neuroblasts, Lgl relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis, an event attributed to phosphorylation by mitotically activated aPKC kinase and thought to promote asymmetric cell division. Here we show that Lgl also relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis in epithelial cells, which divide symmetrically. The Aurora A and B kinases directly phosphorylate Lgl to promote its mitotic relocalization, whereas aPKC kinase activity is required only for polarization of Lgl. A form of Lgl that is a substrate for aPKC, but not Aurora kinases, can restore cell polarity in lgl mutants but reveals defects in mitotic spindle orientation in epithelia. We propose that removal of Lgl from the plasma membrane at mitosis allows Pins/LGN to bind Dlg and thus orient the spindle in the plane of the epithelium. Our findings suggest a revised model for Lgl regulation and function in both symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:25484300

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote glioma cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation leading to mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Cornago, M; Garcia-Alberich, C; Blasco-Angulo, N; Vall-Llaura, N; Nager, M; Herreros, J; Comella, J X; Sanchis, D; Llovera, M

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is resistant to conventional anti-tumoral treatments due to its infiltrative nature and capability of relapse; therefore, research efforts focus on characterizing gliomagenesis and identifying molecular targets useful on therapy. New therapeutic strategies are being tested in patients, such as Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) either alone or in combination with other therapies. Here two HDACi included in clinical trials have been tested, suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid (VPA), to characterize their effects on glioma cell growth in vitro and to determine the molecular changes that promote cancer cell death. We found that both HDACi reduce glioma cell viability, proliferation and clonogenicity. They have multiple effects, such as inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, nevertheless cell death is not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh. Importantly, we found that HDACi alter cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of G2 checkpoint kinases Wee1 and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). In addition, HDACi reduce the expression of proteins involved in DNA repair (Rad51), mitotic spindle formation (TPX2) and chromosome segregation (Survivin) in glioma cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme primary cultures. Therefore, HDACi treatment causes glioma cell entry into mitosis before DNA damage could be repaired and to the formation of an aberrant mitotic spindle that results in glioma cell death through mitotic catastrophe-induced apoptosis. PMID:25275596

  19. Spindle Pole Mechanics Studied in Mitotic Asters: Dynamic Distribution of Spindle Forces through Compliant Linkages

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Blake D.; Kollu, Swapna; Schek, Henry T.; Compton, Duane A.; Hunt, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    During cell division, chromosomes must faithfully segregate to maintain genome integrity, and this dynamic mechanical process is driven by the macromolecular machinery of the mitotic spindle. However, little is known about spindle mechanics. For example, spindle microtubules are organized by numerous cross-linking proteins yet the mechanical properties of those cross-links remain unexplored. To examine the mechanical properties of microtubule cross-links we applied optical trapping to mitotic asters that form in mammalian mitotic extracts. These asters are foci of microtubules, motors, and microtubule-associated proteins that reflect many of the functional properties of spindle poles and represent centrosome-independent spindle-pole analogs. We observed bidirectional motor-driven microtubule movements, showing that microtubule linkages within asters are remarkably compliant (mean stiffness 0.025 pN/nm) and mediated by only a handful of cross-links. Depleting the motor Eg5 reduced this stiffness, indicating that Eg5 contributes to the mechanical properties of microtubule asters in a manner consistent with its localization to spindle poles in cells. We propose that compliant linkages among microtubules provide a mechanical architecture capable of accommodating microtubule movements and distributing force among microtubules without loss of pole integrity—a mechanical paradigm that may be important throughout the spindle. PMID:21463589

  20. Transportin acts to regulate mitotic assembly events by target binding rather than Ran sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Bernis, Cyril; Swift-Taylor, Beth; Nord, Matthew; Carmona, Sarah; Chook, Yuh Min; Forbes, Douglass J.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear import receptors importin ? and transportin play a different role in mitosis: both act phenotypically as spatial regulators to ensure that mitotic spindle, nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore assembly occur exclusively around chromatin. Importin ? is known to act by repressing assembly factors in regions distant from chromatin, whereas RanGTP produced on chromatin frees factors from importin ? for localized assembly. The mechanism of transportin regulation was unknown. Diametrically opposed models for transportin action are as follows: 1) indirect action by RanGTP sequestration, thus down-regulating release of assembly factors from importin ?, and 2) direct action by transportin binding and inhibiting assembly factors. Experiments in Xenopus assembly extracts with M9M, a superaffinity nuclear localization sequence that displaces cargoes bound by transportin, or TLB, a mutant transportin that can bind cargo and RanGTP simultaneously, support direct inhibition. Consistently, simple addition of M9M to mitotic cytosol induces microtubule aster assembly. ELYS and the nucleoporin 107–160 complex, components of mitotic kinetochores and nuclear pores, are blocked from binding to kinetochores in vitro by transportin, a block reversible by M9M. In vivo, 30% of M9M-transfected cells have spindle/cytokinesis defects. We conclude that the cell contains importin ? and transportin “global positioning system”or “GPS” pathways that are mechanistically parallel. PMID:24478460

  1. PKR is activated by cellular dsRNAs during mitosis and acts as a mitotic regulator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, Jong-Eun; Cho, Jun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, V. Narry

    2014-01-01

    dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme well known for its roles in immune response. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation, and the phosphorylated PKR (pPKR) regulates translation and multiple signaling pathways in infected cells. Here, we found that PKR is activated in uninfected cells, specifically during mitosis, by binding to dsRNAs formed by inverted Alu repeats (IRAlus). While PKR and IRAlu-containing RNAs are segregated in the cytosol and nucleus of interphase cells, respectively, they interact during mitosis when nuclear structure is disrupted. Once phosphorylated, PKR suppresses global translation by phosphorylating the ? subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2?). In addition, pPKR acts as an upstream kinase for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and regulates the levels of multiple mitotic factors such as CYCLINS A and B and POLO-LIKE KINASE 1 and phosphorylation of HISTONE H3. Disruption of PKR activation via RNAi or expression of a transdominant-negative mutant leads to misregulation of the mitotic factors, delay in mitotic progression, and defects in cytokinesis. Our study unveils a novel function of PKR and endogenous dsRNAs as signaling molecules during the mitosis of uninfected cells. PMID:24939934

  2. Mitotic-dependent phosphorylation of leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) by Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Helms, Michelle C; Grabocka, Elda; Martz, Matthew K; Fischer, Christopher C; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases are integral to the regulation of actin cytoskeleton-dependent processes, including mitosis. Rho and leukemia-associated Rho guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (LARG), also known as ARHGEF12, are involved in mitosis as well as diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Since LARG has a role in mitosis and diverse signaling functions beyond mitosis, it is important to understand the regulation of the protein through modifications such as phosphorylation. Here we report that LARG undergoes a mitotic-dependent and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation. Additionally, LARG is phosphorylated at the onset of mitosis and dephosphorylated as cells exit mitosis, concomitant with Cdk1 activity. Furthermore, using an in vitro kinase assay, we show that LARG can be directly phosphorylated by Cdk1. Through expression of phosphonull mutants that contain non-phosphorylatable alanine mutations at potential Cdk1 S/TP sites, we demonstrate that LARG phosphorylation occurs in both termini. Using phosphospecific antibodies, we confirm that two sites, serine 190 and serine 1176, are phosphorylated during mitosis in a Cdk1-dependent manner. In addition, these phosphospecific antibodies show phosphorylated LARG at specific mitotic locations, namely the mitotic organizing centers and flanking the midbody. Lastly, RhoA activity assays reveal that phosphonull LARG is more active in cells than phosphomimetic LARG. Our data thus identifies LARG as a phosphoregulated RhoGEF during mitosis. PMID:26483157

  3. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Burton, M. D.; Fashena, D. S.; Naeger, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  4. Preventing farnesylation of the dynein adaptor Spindly contributes to the mitotic defects caused by farnesyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Andrew J.; Reis, Rita M.; Niessen, Sherry; Pereira, Cláudia; Andres, Douglas A.; Spielmann, H. Peter; Cleveland, Don W.; Desai, Arshad; Gassmann, Reto

    2015-01-01

    The clinical interest in farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) makes it important to understand how these compounds affect cellular processes involving farnesylated proteins. Mitotic abnormalities observed after treatment with FTIs have so far been attributed to defects in the farnesylation of the outer kinetochore proteins CENP-E and CENP-F, which are involved in chromosome congression and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling. Here we identify the cytoplasmic dynein adaptor Spindly as an additional component of the outer kinetochore that is modified by farnesyltransferase (FTase). We show that farnesylation of Spindly is essential for its localization, and thus for the proper localization of dynein and its cofactor dynactin, to prometaphase kinetochores and that Spindly kinetochore recruitment is more severely affected by FTase inhibition than kinetochore recruitment of CENP-E and CENP-F. Molecular replacement experiments show that both Spindly and CENP-E farnesylation are required for efficient chromosome congression. The identification of Spindly as a new mitotic substrate of FTase provides insight into the causes of the mitotic phenotypes observed with FTase inhibitors. PMID:25808490

  5. High-velocity ultraviolet iron, silicon, oxygen, and sulfur absorption features associated with the remnant of SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Wu, Chi-Chao; Leventhal, Marvin; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    1988-01-01

    New low-dispersion IUE spectra of a faint sdOb star located in a direction near the center of the SN 1006 remnant are presented. The UV spectrum of the star exhibits several strong absorption features which are uncharacteristic of its optical sdOB star classification. The identification by Wu et al. (1983) of very broad absorption features at 1610, 2370, 2600 A as Fe II gas associated with the SN 1006 remnant is supported. The observed Fe II line profiles indicate a concentration of Fe(+) toward the remnant's center with a radial velocity range on the order of + or - 5000 km/s. Strong absorption lines at 1281, 1331, and 1420 A are interpreted as originating from clumps of O-, Si- and S-rich ejecta with central radial velocities in the range 5000-6500 km/s. The presence in the SN 1006 remnant of an expanding sphere of iron-rich ejecta interior to O-, Si-, and S-rich clumps of ejecta having velocities over the maximum seen for the Fe II absorbing gas is consistent with type Ia Sn observations and carbon deflagration models.

  6. GATA-3 expression identifies a high-risk subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct molecular and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianjiao; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wada, David A.; Lu, Ye; Polk, Avery; Briski, Robert; Ristow, Kay; Habermann, Thomas M.; Thomas, Dafydd; Ziesmer, Steven C.; Wellik, Linda E.; Lanigan, Thomas M.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Bailey, Nathanael G.; Hristov, Alexandra C.; Lim, Megan S.; Ansell, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The cell of origin and the tumor microenvironment’s role remain elusive for the most common peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). As macrophages promote the growth and survival of malignant T cells and are abundant constituents of the tumor microenvironment, their functional polarization was examined in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Cytokines that are abundant within the tumor microenvironment, particularly interleukin (IL)-10, were observed to promote alternative macrophage polarization. Macrophage polarization was signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 dependent and was impaired by the Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib. In conventional T cells, the production of T helper (Th)2-associated cytokines and IL-10, both of which promote alternative macrophage polarization, is regulated by the T-cell transcription factor GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3). Therefore, its role in the T-cell lymphomas was examined. GATA-3 expression was observed in 45% of PTCLs, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) and was associated with distinct molecular features, including the production of Th2-associated cytokines. In addition, GATA-3 expression identified a subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct clinical features, including inferior progression-free and overall survival. Collectively, these data suggest that further understanding the cell of origin and lymphocyte ontogeny among the T-cell lymphomas may improve our understanding of the tumor microenvironment’s pathogenic role in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:24497534

  7. GATA-3 expression identifies a high-risk subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct molecular and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Feldman, Andrew L; Wada, David A; Lu, Ye; Polk, Avery; Briski, Robert; Ristow, Kay; Habermann, Thomas M; Thomas, Dafydd; Ziesmer, Steven C; Wellik, Linda E; Lanigan, Thomas M; Witzig, Thomas E; Pittelkow, Mark R; Bailey, Nathanael G; Hristov, Alexandra C; Lim, Megan S; Ansell, Stephen M; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2014-05-01

    The cell of origin and the tumor microenvironment's role remain elusive for the most common peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). As macrophages promote the growth and survival of malignant T cells and are abundant constituents of the tumor microenvironment, their functional polarization was examined in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Cytokines that are abundant within the tumor microenvironment, particularly interleukin (IL)-10, were observed to promote alternative macrophage polarization. Macrophage polarization was signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 dependent and was impaired by the Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib. In conventional T cells, the production of T helper (Th)2-associated cytokines and IL-10, both of which promote alternative macrophage polarization, is regulated by the T-cell transcription factor GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3). Therefore, its role in the T-cell lymphomas was examined. GATA-3 expression was observed in 45% of PTCLs, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) and was associated with distinct molecular features, including the production of Th2-associated cytokines. In addition, GATA-3 expression identified a subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct clinical features, including inferior progression-free and overall survival. Collectively, these data suggest that further understanding the cell of origin and lymphocyte ontogeny among the T-cell lymphomas may improve our understanding of the tumor microenvironment's pathogenic role in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:24497534

  8. Cellular and molecular effects of 1GeV/n iron ion exposure on post-mitotic human neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Peter; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Guida, Peter; Kim, Angela

    During space travel, astronauts will be exposed to high energy, high atomic number (HZE) radiation. The potential for damage to cells of the central nervous system following exposure to HZE particle radiation has been characterized as a potential critical risk. Unfortunately, there are very few working model systems of human neurons and as a result, data describing the effects of HZE radiation on them is scarce. To begin risk assessment studies, we utilized an in vitro model consisting of terminally differentiated, post-mitotic human neurons (hNT cells). Previous studies have shown that transplantation of these cells into numerous rodent models of neurological diseases has resulted in successful mitigation of the related disorders, thereby demonstrating their functional relevance. Following exposure of these cells to 1GeV/n Fe ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, we measured the induction and repair of DNA damage (as revealed by g-H2AX foci), cytotoxicity, gene expression changes, and the induction of apoptosis and its pharmacological reduction. Fluorescence microscopy techniques revealed that there was a dose-dependent induction of g- H2AX foci in hNT cells, with a peak effect 4 hours after exposure (which is significantly longer than for reports using mitotic cells). DNA repair was evident in that the levels of g-H2AX foci were reduced to those in unirradiated cells by 24 hours post-irradiation. Cytotoxicity was also induced in a dose-dependent manner as detected by the fluorescent-based Live/Dead assay. Analysis of the status of the apoptosis-inducing gene p53 showed that the levels of this protein increased significantly 4-8 hours after exposure to Fe ions. By 3 days post-irradiation, annexin V staining demonstrated a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in the hNT cells. Pre-treatment with two different concentrations of the growth factor TGF-b were effective in reducing the levels of Fe ion-induced apoptosis to statistically significant degrees.

  9. CDK1 substitutes for mTOR kinase to activate mitotic cap-dependent protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Shuda, Masahiro; Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Cordek, Daniel G.; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is commonly thought to be associated with reduced cap-dependent protein translation. Here we show an alternative control mechanism for maintaining cap-dependent translation during mitosis revealed by a viral oncoprotein, Merkel cell polyomavirus small T (MCV sT). We find MCV sT to be a promiscuous E3 ligase inhibitor targeting the anaphase-promoting complex, which increases cell mitogenesis. MCV sT binds through its Large T stabilization domain region to cell division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) and, possibly, cdc20 homolog 1 (Cdh1) E3 ligase adapters. This activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 (CDK1/CYCB1) to directly hyperphosphorylate eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein (4E-BP1) at authentic sites, generating a mitosis-specific, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-resistant ? phospho-isoform not present in G1-arrested cells. Recombinant 4E-BP1 inhibits capped mRNA reticulocyte translation, which is partially reversed by CDK1/CYCB1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. eIF4G binding to the eIF4E–m7GTP cap complex is resistant to mTOR inhibition during mitosis but sensitive during interphase. Flow cytometry, with and without sT, reveals an orthogonal pH3S10+ mitotic cell population having higher inactive p4E-BP1T37/T46+ saturation levels than pH3S10– interphase cells. Using a Click-iT flow cytometric assay to directly measure mitotic protein synthesis, we find that most new protein synthesis during mitosis is cap-dependent, a result confirmed using the eIF4E/4G inhibitor drug 4E1RCat. For most cell lines tested, cap-dependent translation levels were generally similar between mitotic and interphase cells, and the majority of new mitotic protein synthesis was cap-dependent. These findings suggest that mitotic cap-dependent translation is generally sustained during mitosis by CDK1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 even under conditions of reduced mTOR signaling. PMID:25883264

  10. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs–deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality. PMID:25925375

  11. Mad2, Bub3, and Mps1 regulate chromosome segregation and mitotic synchrony in Giardia intestinalis, a binucleate protist lacking an anaphase-promoting complex

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Juan-Jesus; Cande, W. Zacheus

    2014-01-01

    The binucleate pathogen Giardia intestinalis is a highly divergent eukaryote with a semiopen mitosis, lacking an anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and many of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) proteins. However, Giardia has some MCC components (Bub3, Mad2, and Mps1) and proteins from the cohesin system (Smc1 and Smc3). Mad2 localizes to the cytoplasm, but Bub3 and Mps1 are either located on chromosomes or in the cytoplasm, depending on the cell cycle stage. Depletion of Bub3, Mad2, or Mps1 resulted in a lowered mitotic index, errors in chromosome segregation (including lagging chromosomes), and abnormalities in spindle morphology. During interphase, MCC knockdown cells have an abnormal number of nuclei, either one nucleus usually on the left-hand side of the cell or two nuclei with one mislocalized. These results suggest that the minimal set of MCC proteins in Giardia play a major role in regulating many aspects of mitosis, including chromosome segregation, coordination of mitosis between the two nuclei, and subsequent nuclear positioning. The critical importance of MCC proteins in an organism that lacks their canonical target, the APC/C, suggests a broader role for these proteins and hints at new pathways to be discovered. PMID:25057014

  12. Characterization of the cellular and antitumor effects of MPI-0479605, a small-molecule inhibitor of the mitotic kinase Mps1.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Keith D; Rogers, Aaron; Cassiano, Jared; Roth, Bruce L; Cimbora, Daniel M; McKinnon, Rena; Peterson, Ashley; Douce, Thomas B; Robinson, Rosann; Dorweiler, Irene; Davis, Thaylon; Hess, Mark A; Ostanin, Kirill; Papac, Damon I; Baichwal, Vijay; McAlexander, Ian; Willardsen, J Adam; Saunders, Michael; Christophe, Hoarau; Kumar, D Vijay; Wettstein, Daniel A; Carlson, Robert O; Williams, Brandi L

    2011-12-01

    Mps1 is a dual specificity protein kinase that is essential for the bipolar attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle and for maintaining the spindle assembly checkpoint until all chromosomes are properly attached. Mps1 is expressed at high levels during mitosis and is abundantly expressed in cancer cells. Disruption of Mps1 function induces aneuploidy and cell death. We report the identification of MPI-0479605, a potent and selective ATP competitive inhibitor of Mps1. Cells treated with MPI-0479605 undergo aberrant mitosis, resulting in aneuploidy and formation of micronuclei. In cells with wild-type p53, this promotes the induction of a postmitotic checkpoint characterized by the ATM- and RAD3-related-dependent activation of the p53-p21 pathway. In both wild-type and p53 mutant cells lines, there is a growth arrest and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Subsequently, cells undergo mitotic catastrophe and/or an apoptotic response. In xenograft models, MPI-0479605 inhibits tumor growth, suggesting that drugs targeting Mps1 may have utility as novel cancer therapeutics. PMID:21980130

  13. Mad2, Bub3, and Mps1 regulate chromosome segregation and mitotic synchrony in Giardia intestinalis, a binucleate protist lacking an anaphase-promoting complex.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Juan-Jesus; Cande, W Zacheus

    2014-09-15

    The binucleate pathogen Giardia intestinalis is a highly divergent eukaryote with a semiopen mitosis, lacking an anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and many of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) proteins. However, Giardia has some MCC components (Bub3, Mad2, and Mps1) and proteins from the cohesin system (Smc1 and Smc3). Mad2 localizes to the cytoplasm, but Bub3 and Mps1 are either located on chromosomes or in the cytoplasm, depending on the cell cycle stage. Depletion of Bub3, Mad2, or Mps1 resulted in a lowered mitotic index, errors in chromosome segregation (including lagging chromosomes), and abnormalities in spindle morphology. During interphase, MCC knockdown cells have an abnormal number of nuclei, either one nucleus usually on the left-hand side of the cell or two nuclei with one mislocalized. These results suggest that the minimal set of MCC proteins in Giardia play a major role in regulating many aspects of mitosis, including chromosome segregation, coordination of mitosis between the two nuclei, and subsequent nuclear positioning. The critical importance of MCC proteins in an organism that lacks their canonical target, the APC/C, suggests a broader role for these proteins and hints at new pathways to be discovered. PMID:25057014

  14. The requirements for protein synthesis and degradation, and the control of destruction of cyclins A and B in the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles of the clam embryo

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Fertilization of clam oocytes initiates a series of cell divisions, of which the first three--meiosis I, meiosis II, and the first mitotic division--are highly synchronous. After fertilization, protein synthesis is required for the successful completion of every division except meiosis I. When protein synthesis is inhibited, entry into meiosis I and the maintenance of M phase for the normal duration of meiosis occur normally, but the chromosomes fail to interact correctly with the spindle in meiosis II metaphase. By contrast, inhibition of protein synthesis immediately after completion of meiosis or mitosis stops cells entering the next mitosis. We describe the behavior of cyclins A and B in relation to these "points of no return." The cyclins are synthesized continuously and are rapidly destroyed shortly before the metaphase-anaphase transition of the mitotic cell cycles, with cyclin A being degraded in advance of cyclin B. Cyclin destruction normally occurs during a 5-min window in mitosis, but in the monopolar mitosis that occurs after parthenogenetic activation of clam oocytes, or when colchicine is added to fertilized eggs about to enter first mitosis, the destruction of cyclin B is strongly delayed, whereas proteolysis of cyclin A is maintained in an activated state for the duration of metaphase arrest. Under either of these abnormal conditions, inhibition of protein synthesis causes a premature return to interphase that correlates with the time when cyclin B disappears. PMID:1530948

  15. Identification and characterization of INMAP, a novel interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus protein that is involved in spindle formation and cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Enzhi; Lei, Yan; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yanbo; Song, Chunqing; Marc, Jan; Wang, Yongchao; Sun, Le; Liang, Qianjin; College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Key Laboratory, Beijing 100875

    2009-04-15

    A novel protein that associates with interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus (INMAP) was identified by screening HeLa cDNA expression library with an autoimmune serum followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Its complete cDNA sequence of 1.818 kb encodes 343 amino acids with predicted molecular mass of 38.2 kDa and numerous phosphorylation sites. The sequence is identical with nucleotides 1-1800 bp of an unnamed gene (GenBank accession no. (7022388)) and highly homologous with the 3'-terminal sequence of POLR3B. A monoclonal antibody against INMAP reacted with similar proteins in S. cerevisiae, Mel and HeLa cells, suggesting that it is a conserved protein. Confocal microscopy using either GFP-INMAP fusion protein or labeling with the monoclonal antibody revealed that the protein localizes as distinct dots in the interphase nucleus, but during mitosis associates closely with the spindle. Double immunolabeling using specific antibodies showed that the INMAP co-localizes with {alpha}-tubulin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA. INMAP also co-immunoprecipitated with these proteins in their native state. Stable overexpression of INMAP in HeLa cell lines leads to defects in the spindle, mitotic arrest, formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, inhibition of growth, and apoptosis. We propose that INMAP is a novel protein that plays essential role in spindle formation and cell-cycle progression.

  16. The conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and its DNA binding subunit Ume6 control dynamic transcript architecture during mitotic growth and meiotic development

    PubMed Central

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Stuparevic, Igor; Liu, Yuchen; Law, Michael J.; Becker, Emmanuelle; Smagulova, Fatima; Waern, Karl; Guilleux, Marie-Hélène; Horecka, Joe; Chu, Angela; Kervarrec, Christine; Strich, Randy; Snyder, Mike; Davis, Ronald W.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Primig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that the sizes of many mRNAs change when budding yeast cells exit mitosis and enter the meiotic differentiation pathway. These differences were attributed to length variations of their untranslated regions. The function of UTRs in protein translation is well established. However, the mechanism controlling the expression of distinct transcript isoforms during mitotic growth and meiotic development is unknown. In this study, we order developmentally regulated transcript isoforms according to their expression at specific stages during meiosis and gametogenesis, as compared to vegetative growth and starvation. We employ regulatory motif prediction, in vivo protein-DNA binding assays, genetic analyses and monitoring of epigenetic amino acid modification patterns to identify a novel role for Rpd3 and Ume6, two components of a histone deacetylase complex already known to repress early meiosis-specific genes in dividing cells, in mitotic repression of meiosis-specific transcript isoforms. Our findings classify developmental stage-specific early, middle and late meiotic transcript isoforms, and they point to a novel HDAC-dependent control mechanism for flexible transcript architecture during cell growth and differentiation. Since Rpd3 is highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed in many tissues, our results are likely relevant for development and disease in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25477386

  17. Design features of a mitotic spindle: balancing tension and compression at a single microtubule kinetochore interface in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Bouck, David C; Joglekar, Ajit P; Bloom, Kerry S

    2008-01-01

    Accurate segregation of duplicated chromosomes ensures that daughter cells get one and only one copy of each chromosome. Errors in chromosome segregation result in aneuploidy and have severe consequences on human health. Incorrect chromosome number and chromosomal instability are hallmarks of tumor cells. Hence, segregation errors are thought to be a major cause of tumorigenesis. A study of the physical mechanical basis of chromosome segregation is essential to understand the processes that can lead to errors. Tremendous progress has been made in recent years in identifying the proteins necessary for chromosome movement and segregation, but the mechanism and structure of critical force generating components and the molecular basis of centromere stiffness remain poorly understood. PMID:18680435

  18. Classification of simulated and actual NOAA-6 AVHRR data for hydrologic land-surface feature definition. [Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An examination of the possibilities of using Landsat data to simulate NOAA-6 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data on two channels, as well as using actual NOAA-6 imagery, for large-scale hydrological studies is presented. A running average was obtained of 18 consecutive pixels of 1 km resolution taken by the Landsat scanners were scaled up to 8-bit data and investigated for different gray levels. AVHRR data comprising five channels of 10-bit, band-interleaved information covering 10 deg latitude were analyzed and a suitable pixel grid was chosen for comparison with the Landsat data in a supervised classification format, an unsupervised mode, and with ground truth. Landcover delineation was explored by removing snow, water, and cloud features from the cluster analysis, and resulted in less than 10% difference. Low resolution large-scale data was determined useful for characterizing some landcover features if weekly and/or monthly updates are maintained.

  19. Using high resolution IKONOS imagery and feature-based classifiers to automate a classification of savanna woodlands 

    E-print Network

    Michelakis, Dimitrios

    2008-12-05

    High resolution remote sensing imagery offers one possible means to discriminate the constituent land cover components within savanna woodlands, with differing economic potential and ability to sequester carbon. Recent ...

  20. Sequential Cdk1 and Plk1 phosphorylation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B promotes mitotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, D S; MacFhearraigh, S; Whitfield, J; Swigart, L B; Evan, G I; Mc Gee, M M

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic cell death following prolonged arrest is an important death mechanism that is not completely understood. This study shows that Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) undergoes phosphorylation during mitotic arrest induced by microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in chronic myeloid leukaemia cells. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) or polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) during mitosis prevents PTP1B phosphorylation, implicating these kinases in PTP1B phosphorylation. In support of this, Cdk1 and Plk1 co-immunoprecipitate with endogenous PTP1B from mitotic cells. In addition, active recombinant Cdk1-cyclin B1 directly phosphorylates PTP1B at serine 386 in a kinase assay. Recombinant Plk1 phosphorylates PTP1B on serine 286 and 393 in vitro, however, it requires a priming phosphorylation by Cdk1 at serine 386 highlighting a novel co-operation between Cdk1 and Plk1 in the regulation of PTP1B. Furthermore, overexpression of wild-type PTP1B induced mitotic cell death, which is potentiated by MTAs. Moreover, mutation of serine 286 abrogates the cell death induced by PTP1B, whereas mutation of serine 393 does not, highlighting the importance of serine 286 phosphorylation in the execution of mitotic cell death. Finally, phosphorylation on serine 286 enhanced PTP1B phosphatase activity. Collectively, these data reveal that PTP1B activity promotes mitotic cell death and is regulated by the co-operative action of Cdk1 and Plk1 during mitotic arrest. PMID:23348582

  1. Curcumin-induced mitotic arrest is characterized by spindle abnormalities, defects in chromosomal congression and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Louise M; Boes, Christoph; Cordell, Rebecca; Manson, Margaret M

    2013-02-01

    The chemopreventive agent curcumin has anti-proliferative effects in many tumour types, but characterization of cell cycle arrest, particularly with physiologically relevant concentrations, is still incomplete. Following oral ingestion, the highest concentrations of curcumin are achievable in the gut. Although it has been established that curcumin induces arrest at the G(2)/M stage of the cell cycle in colorectal cancer lines, it is not clear whether arrest occurs at the G(2)/M transition or in mitosis. To elucidate the precise stage of arrest, we performed a direct comparison of the levels of curcumin-induced G(2)/M boundary and mitotic arrest in eight colorectal cancer lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCA-7, HCT116p53+/+, HCT116p53(-)/(-), HCT116p21(-)/(-), HT-29 and SW480). Flow cytometry confirmed that these lines underwent G(2)/M arrest following treatment for 12h with clinically relevant concentrations of curcumin (5-10 ?M). In all eight lines, the majority of this arrest occurred at the G(2)/M transition, with a proportion of cells arresting in mitosis. Examination of the mitotic index using fluorescence microscopy showed that the HCT116 and Caco-2 lines exhibited the highest levels of curcumin-induced mitotic arrest. Image analysis revealed impaired mitotic progression in all lines, exemplified by mitotic spindle abnormalities and defects in chromosomal congression. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of the DNA damage signalling pathway abrogated curcumin-induced mitotic arrest, but had little effect at the G(2)/M boundary. Moreover, pH2A.X staining seen in mitotic, but not interphase, cells suggests that this aberrant mitosis results in DNA damage. PMID:23125222

  2. Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane in a MOF Featuring the Combination of Open Metal Site and -Complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiming; LI, Baiyan; Wu, Zili; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of the combination of open metal site (OMS) and -complexation into MOF has led to very high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity at 318K, as illustrated in the context of MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag. The interactions with ethylene from both OMS and -complexation in MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag have been investigated by in situ IR spectroscopic studies and computational calculations, which suggest -complexation contributes dominantly to the high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity.

  3. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Aaron C.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth; Laurie, Fran; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Arndt, Carola A.S.; Michalski, Jeff M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  4. Monoclonal antibody raised against human mitotic cyclin B1, identifies cyclin B-like mitotic proteins in synchronized onion (Allium cepa L.) root meristem.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, S K; Ghosh, S

    1997-03-01

    Cyclin B-like mitotic proteins have been detected in synchronized Allium cepa L. root tip cells by using mouse monoclonal anti-cyclin B1 antibody raised against human cyclin B1. Immunoblot shows two closely placed isoforms of cyclin B-like proteins having an apparent molecular weight around 54 kDa. In vivo [35S]-methionine labelling followed by immunoprecipitation and autoradiography indicates that cyclin B-like proteins are mainly synthesized in the G2 phase of the cell cycle and destroyed in late mitosis. Immunoblotting data depict that the level of cyclin B-like proteins reaches the maximum at the late G2 to early M phase; and it becomes degraded in the late hours of mitosis. Moreover, the cyclin B isoforms are stabilized in colchicine-arrested metaphase cells as already reported in animal cells. PMID:9151992

  5. TOWARD DETECTING THE 2175 A DUST FEATURE ASSOCIATED WITH STRONG HIGH-REDSHIFT Mg II ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Peng; Zhou Hongyan; Wang Junxian; Wang Tinggui; Ge Jian

    2011-05-10

    We report detections of 39 2175 A dust extinction bump candidates associated with strong Mg II absorption lines at z{approx} 1-1.8 on quasar spectra in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR3. These strong Mg II absorption line systems are detected among 2951 strong Mg II absorbers with a rest equivalent width W{sub r} {lambda}2796> 1.0 A at 1.0 < z < 1.86, which is part of a full sample of 7421 strong Mg II absorbers compiled by Prochter et al. The redshift range of the absorbers is chosen to allow the 2175 A extinction features to be completely covered within the SDSS spectrograph operation wavelength range. An upper limit of the background quasar emission redshift at z = 2.1 is set to prevent the Ly{alpha} forest lines from contaminating the sensitive spectral region for the 2175 A bump measurements. The FM90 parameterization is applied to model the optical/UV extinction curve in the rest frame of Mg II absorbers of the 2175 A bump candidates. The simulation technique developed by Jiang et al. is used to derive the statistical significance of the candidate 2175 A bumps. A total of 12 absorbers are detected with 2175 A bumps at a 5{sigma} level of statistical significance, 10 are detected at a 4{sigma} level, and 17 are detected at a 3{sigma} level. Most of the candidate bumps in this work are similar to the relatively weak 2175 A bumps observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud LMC2 supershell rather than the strong ones observed in the Milky Way. This sample has greatly increased the total number of 2175 A extinction bumps measured on SDSS quasar spectra. Follow-up observations may rule out some of the possible false detections and reveal the physical and chemical natures of 2175 A quasar absorbers.

  6. Highly diverse and spatially heterogeneous mycorrhizal symbiosis in a rare epiphyte is unrelated to broad biogeographic or environmental features.

    PubMed

    Kartzinel, Tyler R; Trapnell, Dorset W; Shefferson, Richard P

    2013-12-01

    Symbiotic interactions are common in nature. In dynamic or degraded environments, the ability to associate with multiple partners (i.e. broad specificity) may enable species to persist through fluctuations in the availability of any particular partner. Understanding how species interactions vary across landscapes is necessary to anticipate direct and indirect consequences of environmental degradation on species conservation. We asked whether mycorrhizal symbiosis by populations of a rare epiphytic orchid (Epidendrum firmum) is related to geographic or environmental heterogeneity. The latter would suggest that interactions are governed by environmental conditions rather than historic isolation of populations and/or mycorrhizal fungi. We used DNA-based methods to identify mycorrhizal fungi from eleven E. firmum populations in Costa Rica. We used molecular and phylogenetic analyses to compare associations. Epidendrum firmum exhibited broad specificity, associating with diverse mycorrhizal fungi, including six Tulasnellaceae molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs), five Sebacinales MOTUs and others. Notably, diverse mycorrhizal symbioses formed in disturbed pasture and roadside habitats. Mycorrhizal fungi exhibited significant similarity within populations (spatial and phylogenetic autocorrelation) and significant differences among populations (phylogenetic community dissimilarity). However, mycorrhizal symbioses were not significantly associated with biogeographic or environmental features. Such unexpected heterogeneity among populations may result from complex combinations of fine-scale environmental factors and macro-evolutionary patterns of change in mycorrhizal specificity. Thus, E. firmum exhibits broad specificity and the potential for opportunistic associations with diverse fungi. We suggest that these characteristics could confer symbiotic assurance when mycorrhizal fungi are stochastically available, which may be crucial in dynamic or disturbed habitats such as tropical forest canopies. PMID:24112555

  7. Geochronology and geochemistry of the high Mg dioritic dikes in Eastern Tianshan, NW China: Geochemical features, petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deng-Feng; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hua-Yong; Hollings, Pete; Cao, Ming-Jian; Fang, Jing; Wang, Cheng-Ming; Lu, Wan-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Zircon U-Pb ages of high Mg dioritic dikes in the Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake Group in the Eastern Tianshan area, NW China indicate that they were emplaced in the Early Carboniferous at 353-348 Ma. The dikes consist of medium-grained plagioclase and hornblende with minor clinopyroxene and trace quartz. They are characterized by intermediate SiO2 (60-62 wt.%), low TiO2 (0.63-0.71 wt.%), relatively high Al2O3 (15.1-15.8 wt.%) and MgO contents (3.45-4.15 wt.%) with Mg# generally higher than 56 (56-59). The geochemistry of the high Mg diorites suggest they were formed by similar magmatic processes to sanukitoid high Mg Andesites such as those of the Setouchi volcanic belt, Japan. Zircons from the high Mg dioritic dikes have ?Hf(t) values of -6.8 to +14.5. The dominantly positive values suggest a juvenile source, whereas the small number of negative values suggests mature components were also incorporated into the source. Similarly, the positive ?Nd(t) values (0 to +2.2) are interpreted to reflect a juvenile source whereas the negative values of (-5.2 to 0) suggest participation of old crustal rocks in the petrogenesis of the diorites. The variable ?Hf(t) and ?Nd(t) values suggest that the mature material was assimilated during magma ascent rather than in the mantle wedge which would result in more uniform values. Mass balance calculations suggest that the dioritic dikes were derived from sources composed of approximately 97% juvenile mantle-derived material and 3% sediment. Petrographic, elemental, and isotopic evidence suggest that the dioritic dikes were generated by partial melting of depleted mantle that migrated into the shallow crust where it assimilated older sedimentary rocks of the Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake Group.

  8. Stimulatory Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Phytochemical Properties, Mitotic Behaviour, and Nutritional Composition of Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Lay, Ma Ma; Khalili, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Syn. Onobrychis sativa L.) is a bloat-safe forage crop with high levels of tannins, which is renowned for its medicinal qualities in grazing animals. Mutagenesis technique was applied to investigate the influence of gamma irradiation at 30, 60, 90, and 120?Gy on mitotic behavior, in vitro growth factors, phytochemical and nutritional constituents of sainfoin. Although a percentage of plant necrosis and non-growing seed were enhanced by irradiation increment, the germination speed was significantly decreased. It was observed that gamma irradiated seeds had higher value of crude protein and dry matter digestibility compared to control seeds. Toxicity of copper was reduced in sainfoin irradiated seeds at different doses of gamma rays. Anthocyanin content also decreased in inverse proportion to irradiation intensity. Accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was enhanced by gamma irradiation exposure in leaf cells. HPLC profiles differed in peak areas of the two important alkaloids, Berberine and Sanguinarine, in 120?Gy irradiated seeds compared to control seeds. There were positive correlations between irradiation dose and some abnormality divisions such as laggard chromosome, micronucleus, binucleated cells, chromosome bridge, and cytomixis. In reality, radiocytological evaluation was proven to be essential in deducing the effectiveness of gamma irradiation to induce somaclonal variation in sainfoin. PMID:25147870

  9. Defeating feature fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Thompson, Debora Viana; Hamilton, Rebecca W

    2006-02-01

    Consider a coffeemaker that offers 12 drink options, a car with more than 700 features on the dashboard, and a mouse pad that's also a clock, calculator, and FM radio. All are examples of "feature bloat", or "featuritis", the result of an almost irresistible temptation to load products with lots of bells and whistles. The problem is that the more features a product boasts, the harder it is to use. Manufacturers that increase a product's capability--the number of useful functions it can perform--at the expense of its usability are exposing their customers to feature fatigue. The authors have conducted three studies to gain a better understanding of how consumers weigh a product's capability relative to its usability. They found that even though consumers know that products with more features are harder to use, they initially choose high-feature models. They also pile on more features when given the chance to customize a product for their needs. Once consumers have actually worked with a product, however, usability starts to matter more to them than capability. For managers in consumer products companies, these findings present a dilemma: Should they maximize initial sales by designing high-feature models, which consumers consistently choose, or should they limit the number of features in order to enhance the lifetime value of their customers? The authors' analytical model guides companies toward a happy middle ground: maximizing the net present value of the typical customer's profit stream. The authors also advise companies to build simpler products, help consumers learn which products suit their needs, develop products that do one thing very well, and design market research in which consumers use actual products or prototypes. PMID:16485808

  10. Cdk1 phosphorylates SPAT-1/Bora to trigger PLK-1 activation and drive mitotic entry in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Nicolas; Noatynska, Anna; Panbianco, Costanza; Martino, Lisa; Van Hove, Lucie; Schwager, Françoise; Léger, Thibaut; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2015-03-16

    The molecular mechanisms governing mitotic entry during animal development are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the mitotic kinase CDK-1 phosphorylates Suppressor of Par-Two 1 (SPAT-1)/Bora to regulate its interaction with PLK-1 and to trigger mitotic entry in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Embryos expressing a SPAT-1 version that is nonphosphorylatable by CDK-1 and that is defective in PLK-1 binding in vitro present delays in mitotic entry, mimicking embryos lacking SPAT-1 or PLK-1 functions. We further show that phospho-SPAT-1 activates PLK-1 by triggering phosphorylation on its activator T loop in vitro by Aurora A. Likewise, we show that phosphorylation of human Bora by Cdk1 promotes phosphorylation of human Plk1 by Aurora A, suggesting that this mechanism is conserved in humans. Our results suggest that CDK-1 activates PLK-1 via SPAT-1 phosphorylation to promote entry into mitosis. We propose the existence of a positive feedback loop that connects Cdk1 and Plk1 activation to ensure a robust control of mitotic entry and cell division timing. PMID:25753