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Sample records for fecob alloy particles

  1. Properties of amorphous FeCoB alloy particles (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, S. W.; Wells, S.; Meagher, A.; Mørup, S.; van Wonterghem, J.

    1988-11-01

    Amorphous and crystalline alloy particles (0.05-0.5 nm) of FexCoyBz in which the ratio x:y ranges from 0 to 1 have been prepared by the borohydride reduction of iron and cobalt salts in aqueous solution. The structure of the particles has been studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements of the saturation magnetization, coercivity, and remanence of the particles have been measured. The transition from the amorphous-to-crystalline state has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomagnetometry up to a temperature of 450 °C (see Fig. 1). It has been shown that the fraction of boron in the alloys (10-35 at. %) is dependent upon the rate of addition of salts to borohydride and the concentration of cobalt present; this in turn influences the crystallinity and magnetic properties .

  2. Chemical synthesis of magnetic Fe-B and Fe-Co-B particles and chains

    SciTech Connect

    Fulmer, P.; Kim, J.; Manthiram, A.; Sanchez, J.M.

    1999-04-01

    With an objective to develop magnetic materials with high saturation magnetization for the Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process the chemical synthesis of Fe-B and Fe-Co-B alloys by reducing iron and cobalt chloride solutions with potassium borohydride has been investigated systematically. The influence of the concentration of the reactants, applied magnetic field, reaction atmosphere, and method of mixing the reactants on the microstructure, particle size, composition and magnetic properties has been studied. Both M-B (M = Fe and Co) particles and elongated chains composed of nanometer size M-B particles have been obtained depending on the reaction conditions. The Fe-B samples exhibit saturation magnetization of M{sub S} of 120--190 emu/g, remanent magnetization M{sub r} of 10--22 emu/g, and coercive field H{sub c} of 400--900 Oe. A high M{sub S} value of 190 emu/g, which is close to the theoretical value of 218 emu/g for pure Fe, has been achieved particularly for samples with well-defined chain structures. Increasing the Co content in the Fe-Co-B alloys increases the boron content and thereby decreases the crystallinity and M{sub S} values although marginal increase in H{sub c} (1,250 Oe) and M{sub r} (36 emu/g) values could be made in some Fe-Co-B compositions. The chain structure with high M{sub S} may be attractive for other magnetic separation processes as well.

  3. Isotropic hysteresis modeling of Fe-Co-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Hans; Grössinger, Roland

    1999-04-01

    The energetic model of ferromagnetic hysteresis calculates the magnetic state of materials by minimizing the total energy function for statistical domain behavior. The physical constants of this model are derived from anisotropy energy constants, initial susceptibility, coercivity, and saturation magnetization. The approach shows a good agreement to the magnetization curves of FeCoB strips, also in dependence of applied stress.

  4. Barkhausen noise in FeCoB amorphous alloys (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durin, G.; Bertotti, G.

    1996-04-01

    In recent years, the Barkhausen effect has been indicated as a promising tool to investigate and verify the ideas about the self-organization of physical complex systems displaying power law distributions and 1/f noise. When measured at low magnetization rates, the Barkhausen signal displays 1/fα-type spectra (with α=1.5÷2) and power law distributions of duration and size of the Barkhausen jumps. These experimental data are quite well described by the model of Alessandro et al. which is based on a stochastic description of the domain wall dynamics over a pinning field with brownian properties. Yet, this model always predicts a 1/f 2 spectrum, and, at the moment, it is not clear if it can take into account possible effects of self-organization of the magnetization process. In order to improve the power of the model and clarify this problem, we have performed a thorough investigation of the noise spectra and the amplitude distributions of a wide set of FeCoB amorphous alloys. The stationary amplitude distribution of the signal is very well fitted by the gamma distribution P(ν)=νc-1 exp(-ν)/Γ(c), where ν is proportional to the domain wall velocity, and c is a dimensionless parameter. As predicted in Ref. , this parameter is found to have a parabolic dependence on the magnetization rate. In particular, the linear coefficient is related to the amplitude of the fluctuations of the pinning field, a parameter which can be measured directly from the power spectra. In all measured cases, the power spectra show α exponents less than 2, and thus poorly fitted by the model. Actually, the absolute value of the high frequency spectral density is not consistent with the c parameter determined from the amplitude distribution data. This discrepancy requires to introduce effects not taken into account in the model, as the propagation of the jumps along the domain wall. This highly enhances the fit of the data and indicates effects of propagation on the scale of a few

  5. Determination of the magnetostrictive atomic environments in FeCoB alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J.; Quirós, C.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Aroca, C.; Ranchal, R.; Ruffoni, M.; Pascarelli, S.

    2012-04-01

    The atomic environments of Fe and Co involved in the magnetostriction effect in FeCoB alloys have been identified by differential extended x-ray fine structure (DiffEXAFS) spectroscopy. The study, done in amorphous and polycrystalline FeCoB films, demonstrates that the alloys are heterogeneous and that boron plays a crucial role in the origin of their magnetostrictive properties. The analysis of DiffEXAFS in the polycrystalline and amorphous alloys indicates that boron activates magnetostriction when entering as an impurity into octahedral interstitial sites of the Fe bcc lattice, causing its tetragonal distortion. Magnetostriction would be explained then by the relative change in volume when the tetragonal axis of the site is reoriented under an externally applied magnetic field. The experiment demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of DiffEXAFS to characterize magnetostrictive environments that are undetectable in their related EXAFS spectra.

  6. Measurements of the Barkhausen effect in FeCoB amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durin, G.; Magni, A.; Bertotti, G.

    1996-07-01

    The Barkhausen noise of a wide series of amorphous Fe 85- xCo xB 15 alloys is studied. In spite of the great variability of their magnetic properties, the signal amplitude always follows the same type of distribution, while the power spectra show a 1/ω β behavior at high frequencies (with β = 1.5-2), with a transition to a 1/ω behavior at lower frequencies. This transition frequency is found to be strictly related to the parameter describing the amplitude distribution.

  7. Stress dependence of soft, high moment and nanocrystalline FeCoB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, M. Kevin; Crawford, T. M.; Klemmer, Timothy J.; Peng, Yingguo; Laughlin, David E.

    2002-05-01

    Soft, high moment materials are crucial for the magnetic data recording industry in applications such as write poles and soft underlayers. Ever increasing areal densities have pushed the requirements for materials exhibiting saturation magnetizations above 2 T. In this work we investigate nanocrystalline FeCoB which exhibits a saturation magnetization of ˜2.2 T. FeCoB exhibits a magnetostriction of >50×10-6 which suggests that the magnetoelastic anisotropy is important. Nanocrystalline FeCoB films are rf diode sputtered as a function of Ar pressure. As the pressure is increased, film stress increases from compressive to tensile with a critical pressure of ˜12 mTorr. TEM and XRD show that pressure has no significant effect on microstructure, however, at pressures above a critical pressure, the FeCoB films change from magnetically isotropic to magnetically uniaxial with low coercivity. This is due entirely to the magnetoelastic anisotropy which must be considered as the industry begins to utilize magnetic alloys with nonzero magnetostriction.

  8. Magnetic anisotropy and crystalline orientation in high Hk FeCoB thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsuto; Matsuu, Toshimitsu; Tada, Masaru; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2008-04-01

    FeCoB thin films with a high magnetic anisotropy field Hk were studied. Crystal structure of the FeCo was investigated by using x-Ray diffraction with particular interest for understanding the scheme to produce a high Hk in the FeCoB films. The as-deposited film with a high Hk of 280Oe showed a well-crystallized bcc (110) texture of FeCo and an asymmetric profile in the rocking curve measured along the easy axis. The pole figure profile revealed that the maximum diffraction intensity was observed at the point other than the original point, namely, the tilted crystal orientation to the substrate plane. In addition, elliptical contour lines of diffraction intensity were observed and their major axis aligned with the direction of the peak shift. These results indicated the correlation among the crystal orientation and the easy axis direction and also the incident direction of the sputtering particles to the substrate.

  9. Ultrahigh frequency permeability of sputtered Fe-Co-B thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemmer, T. J.; Ellis, K. A.; Chen, L. H.; van Dover, B.; Jin, S.

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous FeCoB alloys can have high resistivity and relatively high saturation magnetization which are desired for ultrahigh frequency devices such as future write heads and wireless inductors. In this study, FeCoB films are observed to have a low easy axis coercivity (1-2 Oe), a field deposited induced anisotropy of ˜35 Oe and 4πMs˜17 500 G when sputtered in a typical configuration. However, samples sputtered in an off axis arrangement are found to have an additional uniaxial anisotropy as a result of the oblique incidence of the atomic flux onto the substrate. This extra anisotropy increases with increasing oblique angle. For these same samples, there is little change in the easy axis coercivity, saturation magnetization, and the Hoffmann structure factor (S˜0.05 ergs/cm2). The obtained large anisotropy fields (>35 Oe) are found to push the ferromagnetic resonance frequency to at least above 1 GHz at the expense of the initial permeability.

  10. Effect of laminated crystalline FeCoB soft magnetic underlayer for perpendicular magnetic recording tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, Shunsuke; Mashiko, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Matsunuma, Satoshi; Inoue, Tetsutaro; Doi, Tsugihiro; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2011-04-01

    A crystalline FeCoB soft magnetic underlayer (SUL) improves c-axis orientations of the Ru intermediate layer (IML) and the CoPtCr-SiO2 recording layer (RL). (001) orientations of Ru IML and CoPtCr RL are attained by (110) oriented texture of FeCoB SUL. Since good c-axis orientation in CoPtCr-SiO2 RL as well as domain control in the FeCoB SUL is required for high recording density, a laminated FeCoB SUL is prepared as an underlayer of the bilayered Ru/CoPtCr-SiO2 films. A laminated FeCoB SUL results in better (001) orientation in both CoPtCr-SiO2 RL and Ru IML than the single layered FeCoB SUL. This leads to the reduction of media noise in the high recording frequency region. Recording medium layers composed of a laminated FeCoB SUL and bilayered Ru/CoPtCr-SiO2 films deposited on a 4.5-μm-thick Aramid tape show better (001) orientations of Ru and CoPtCr. Media noise of the tape medium with the laminated SUL is lower than that with the single layered FeCoB SUL.

  11. Characterization of alloy particles extracted from spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Eriksson, L.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.; Spahiu, K.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized, for the first time, submicro- and nanosized fission product-alloy particles that were extracted nondestructively from spent nuclear fuel, in terms of noble metal (Mo-Ru-Tc-Rh-Pd-Te) composition, atomic level homogeneity and lattice parameters. The evidences obtained in this work contribute to an improved understanding of the redox chemistry of radionuclides in nuclear waste repository environments and, in particular, of the catalytic properties of these unique metal alloy particles.

  12. Preparation of particle-dispersion alloys (M-6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muramatsu, Yuji

    1993-01-01

    A particle dispersion alloy is one type of metal-ceramic composite material, and is used as heat resistance material, wear resistance material, and electrical material. This material consists of a metal matrix and dispersed particles, and for its unique structure it has both tenacity as a metal and hardness as a ceramic. Its properties improve when the particles become finer and disperse more uniformly. Most of the particle dispersion alloys are produced by the powder metallurgical process. This process is favorable for uniform dispersion of particles, but it consists of complicated techniques such as mechanical alloying and hot extrusion, and has the following drawbacks: (1) it is difficult to fabricate large-sized products; (2) the amount of particles is limited to a few percent; and (3) the process is complicated and expensive. To overcome these drawbacks, recently special attention has been paid to conventional melting process. However, under terrestrial conditions, dispersions separate immediately due to the different specific gravities of the metal matrix and the particles and thermal convection effects. The microgravity environment is, therefore, considered to be an attractive place for fabricating the dispersion alloy. This space experiment is carried out to clarify the influence of microgravity on the properties of the particle dispersion alloy and to obtain a deeper understanding of the experiment under the microgravity environment.

  13. Effect of diffusional creep on particle morphology of polycrystalline alloys strengthened by second phase particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittenberger, J. D.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Diffusional creep in a polycrystalline alloy containing second-phase particles can disrupt the particle morphology. For alloys which depend on the particle distribution for strength, changes in the particle morphology can affect the mechanical properties. Recent observations of diffusional creep in alloys containing soluble particles (gamma-prime strengthened Ni base alloys) and inert particles have been reexamined in light of the basic mechanisms of diffusional creep, and a generalized model of this effect is proposed. The model indicates that diffusional creep will generally result in particle-free regions in the vicinity of grain boundaries serving as net vacancy sources. The factors which control the changes in second-phase morphology have been identified, and methods of reducing the effects of diffusional creep are suggested.

  14. Preparation of cast aluminum alloy-mica particle composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deonath, MR.; Bhat, R. T.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    A method for making aluminum-mica particle composites is presented in which mica particles are stirred in molten aluminum alloys followed by casting in permanent molds. Magnesium is added either as an alloying element or in the form of pieces to the surface of the alloy melts to disperse up to 3 wt% mica powders in the melts and to obtain high recoveries of mica in the castings. The mechanical properties of the aluminum alloy-mica composite decrease with increasing mica content; however, even at 2.2% it has a tensile strength of 14.22 kg/sq mm with 1.1% elongation, a compression strength of 42.61 kg/sq mm, and an impact strength of 0.30 kgm/sq cm. Cryogenic and self-lubricating bearing are mentioned applications.

  15. Effect of B content on structure and magnetic properties of FeCoB-Al2O3 nanogranular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xudong; Li, Jiangong; Tian, Qiang; Kou, Xinli

    2011-07-01

    The effect of B content on the structure, soft magnetic properties, and high frequency characteristics of as-deposited FeCoB-Al2O3 nanogranular films fabricated by radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering was studied in this work. The introduction of B into the FeCo-Al2O3 films leads to a refinement of granular microstructure. The FeCoB-Al2O3 nanogranular films consist of the FeCoB nanoparticles uniformly embedded in the amorphous Al2O3 matrix. An addition of a small amount of B into the FeCo-Al2O3 films can markedly decrease the coercivity of the films. The excellent magnetic softness with a low coercivity of about 0.08 kA/m was achieved in the FeCoB-Al2O3 films. The Henkel plots confirm the existence of intergranular exchange coupling in the FeCoB-Al2O3 films. The FeCoB-Al2O3 films with low B content exhibit a high permeability over 200 at low frequency and a high-resonance frequency of 3.2 GHz, implying a high cut-off frequency for high frequency applications.

  16. Cast aluminum alloys containing dispersions of zircon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, A.; Surappa, M. K.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1983-06-01

    A process for preparing Al-alloy castings containing dispersions of zircon particles is described. Composites were prepared by stirring zircon particles (40 to 200 µm size) in commercially pure Al (99.5 pct)* and Al-11.8 pct Si melts and subsequently casting these melts in permanent molds. It was found to be necessary to alloy the above two melts with 3 pct Mg to disperse substantial amounts of zircon particles (25 to 30 pct). Further, it was possible to disperse up to 60 wt pct zircon by adding up to 5 pct Mg; however, the melts containing above 30 wt pct zircon showed insufficient fluidity for gravity diecasting and had to be pressure diecast. Microstructural studies of cast composites indicated the presence of a reaction zone at the periphery of zircon particles, and electron probe microanalysis showed concentrations of Mg and Si at the particle-matrix interface. Hardness, abrasive wear resistance, elastic modulus, 0.2 pct proof stress, and tensile strength of cast Al-3 pct Mg alloy were found to improve with the dispersions of zircon particles. Scanning electron micrographs of abraded and fractured surfaces did not show any evidence of particle pull-outs or voids at the particle matrix interface, indicating strong continuous bonding.

  17. [Investigation of nascent polypropylene in-reactor alloy particles].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hua-Lin; Zhang, Chun-Bo; Niu, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Dong, Jin-Yong; Wu, Jin-Guang; Wang, Du-Jin

    2013-02-01

    Heterogeneous nascent particles were observed in a pilot product of polypropylene in-reactor alloy, which was polymerized by Ziegler-Natta/Metallocene hybrid catalyst using Spheripol technology. Most of the particles in the product are translucent, and opaque particles were observed as well. The differences in morphology, composition, chain structure, thermal properties and mechanical properties between these two kinds of particles were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized optical microscopy (POM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. The results of FTIR, NMR and SEM indicate that different morphology of these two different particles is caused by different content of ethylene-propylene copolymers. The results of DSC and POM showed that the translucent particles has higher crystallization rate than opaque particles due to the presence of ethylene-propylene copolymers. The mechanical properties results showed that the impact resistance property of opaque particles is obviously lower than that of translucent particles, while its tensile strength and bending modulus are much higher than that of translucent particles. Based on the process of Spheripol technology, a preliminary explanation for the formation of different nascent PP in-reactor alloy particles is proposed. PMID:23697124

  18. Composite of coated magnetic alloy particle

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  19. Characteristics of alumina particles in dispersion-strengthened copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-hui; Li, Xiao-xian

    2014-11-01

    Two types of alumina dispersion-strengthened copper (ADSC) alloys were fabricated by a novel in-situ reactive synthesis (IRS) and a traditional internal oxidation (IO) process. The features of alumina dispersoids in these ADSC alloys were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that nano-sized γ-Al2O3 particles of approximately 10 nm in diameter are homogeneously distributed in the IRS-ADSC composites. Meanwhile, larger-sized, mixed crystal structure alumina with rod-shaped morphology is embedded in the IO-ADSC alloy. The IRS-ADSC composites can obtain better mechanical and physical properties than the IO-ADSC composites; the tensile strength of the IRS-ADSC alloy can reach 570 MPa at room temperature, its electrical conductivity is 85% IACS, and the Rockwell hardness can reach 86 HRB.

  20. Platinum- and platinum alloy-coated palladium and palladium alloy particles and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir Branko

    2010-04-06

    The present invention relates to particle and nanoparticle composites useful as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts. The particle composites are composed of a palladium or palladium-alloy particle or nanoparticle substrate coated with an atomic submonolayer, monolayer, bilayer, or trilayer of zerovalent platinum atoms. The invention also relates to a catalyst and a fuel cell containing the particle or nanoparticle composites of the invention. The invention additionally includes methods for oxygen reduction and production of electrical energy by using the particle and nanoparticle composites of the invention.

  1. Thermal annealing effect on FeCoB soft underlayer for perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jun; Chang, Chunghee; Karns, Duane; Ju, Ganping; Kubota, Yukiko; Eppler, Walter; Brucker, Charles; Weller, Dieter

    2002-05-01

    We study the noise performance of amorphous FeCoB soft underlayers (SULs) with radial magnetic anisotropy. 200 nm thick FeCoB films are sputter deposited and optionally postannealed for 8 s at different annealing powers. The correlation of SUL read-back noise with the magnetic and structural properties is studied using spin stand testing, in-plane magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements, magnetic force microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The effects of annealing to achieve low read-back noise are examined. It is found that as-prepared films show large dc noise associated with stripe domains due to stress-induced perpendicular anisotropy. Thermal annealing reduces the internal stress and the films become magnetically anisotropic in the radial direction. The SUL-induced dc noise drops to the electronic noise floor. dc noise is found to decrease with an increase in annealing power until the films start to crystallize.

  2. Effect of argon ion etching on the magnetic properties of FeCoB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junwei; Zhou, Kan; Yang, Yi; Tang, Dongming; Zhang, Baoshan; Lu, Mu; Lu, Huaixian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new method to modify Ta underlayers by an argon ion etching technology is introduced. Surface roughness of Ta underlayers, as well as soft magnetic properties of post-deposited FeCoB films can be improved by applying a proper ion etching process. The reduction of magnetic coercivity of FeCoB films deposited on the modified Ta underlayers is attributed to the improvement of interfacial roughness, which can reduce magnetic ripples in magnetic films. The microwave damping linewidth of magnetic films is also found to be related to the interfacial roughness. Ta underlayers modified by the ion etching can reduce the influence of two-magnon scattering effect, and thus tune microwave properties of magnetic films. All the results prove that argon ion etching is an effective way to tailor magnetic properties of magnetic films.

  3. Effect of thermal process on magnetic anisotropy in FeCoB soft underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, A.; Matsuu, T.; Ito, S.; Nakagawa, S.

    Relationship between magnetic anisotropy field Hk and thermal processes during the preparation has been studied for FeCoB thin films. The FeCoB films deposited on the glass substrates by facing targets sputtering successfully showed strong magnetic anisotropy when the substrate was heated at the substrate temperature Ts above 100 °C. Additionally, the lattice spacing of FeCo(1 1 0) in the perpendicular direction was found to decrease depending on the substrate temperature Ts. Among various temperature histories, the heating processes with a phase of increasing Ts revealed the further improvement of Hk. Meanwhile, high Hk in the films disappears after the post-deposition annealing at the temperature above 400 °C.

  4. Transverse field anneal studies of high moment FeCoB and FeCoZr films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, M. Kevin; Klemmer, Timothy J.

    2003-05-01

    Ever increasing areal densities have driven the need for high moment materials with large saturation magnetizations greater than 2 T. In addition, for applications such as write poles and soft underlayers, the high moment materials must exhibit soft and uniaxial magnetic properties which are thermally stable during high temperature processing. In this work, we examine 2.1 T FeCoB and 1.8 T FeCoZr films which are amorphous in the as-deposited state. The films are given longitudinal field anneals (LFAs) at 220 and 250 °C for 4 h. FeCoZr films remain amorphous after the 220 and 250 °C LFAs. FeCoB films remain amorphous after the 220 °C LFA, however, the 250 °C LFA results in crystallization in the FeCoB film. This crystallization is accompanied by a degradation in soft magnetic properties. As-deposited and 220 and 250 °C LFA FeCoB and FeCoZr films are then given transverse field anneals (TFAs) at 150 °C. As-deposited FeCoB and FeCoZr experience a 90° rotation of Hk or switching after less than 2 h of TFA. LFAs result in improved thermal stability in all FeCoB and FeCoZr films. The crystalline FeCoB film given a 250 °C LFA exhibited the best thermal stability, however, the magnetic properties were not optimal due to crystallization.

  5. Local phase transformation in alloys during charged-particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-10-01

    Among the various mechanisms and processes by which energetic irradiation can alter the phase stability of alloys, radiation-induced segregation is one of the most important phenomena. Radiation-induced segregation in alloys occurs as a consequence of preferential coupling between persistent fluxes of excess defects and solute atoms, leading to local enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Thus, this phenomenon tends to drive alloy systems away from thermodynamic equilibrium, on a local scale. During charged-particle irradiations, the spatial nonuniformity in the defect production gives rise to a combination of persistent defect fluxes, near the irradiated surface and in the peak-damage region. This defect-flux combination can modify the alloy composition in a complex fashion, i.e., it can destabilize pre-existing phases, causing spatially- and temporally-dependent precipitation of new metastable phases. The effects of radiation-induced segregation on local phase transformations in Ni-based alloys during proton bombardment and high-voltage electron-microscope irradiation at elevated temperatures are discussed.

  6. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J.

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  7. Erosion of iron-chromium alloys by glass particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The material loss upon erosion was measured for several iron-chromium alloys. Two types of erodent material were used: spherical glass beads and sharp particles of crushed glass. For erosion with glass beads the erosion resistance (defined as the reciprocal of material loss rate) was linearly dependent on hardness. This is in accordance with the erosion behavior of pure metals, but contrary to the erosion behavior of alloys of constant composition that were subjected to different heat treatments. For erosion with crushed glass, however, no correlation existed between hardness and erosion resistance. Instead, the erosion resistance depended on alloy composition rather than on hardness and increased with the chromium content of the alloy. The difference in erosion behavior for the two types of erodent particles suggested that two different material removal mechanisms were involved. This was confirmed by SEM micrographs of the eroded surfaces, which showed that for erosion with glass beads the mechanism of material removal was deformation-induced flaking of surface layers, or peening, whereas for erosion with crushed glass it was cutting or chopping.

  8. Hydrogen absorption induced metal deposition on palladium and palladium-alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia X.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to methods for producing metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The method includes contacting hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles with one or more metal salts to produce a sub-monoatomic or monoatomic metal- or metal-alloy coating on the surface of the hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The invention also relates to methods for producing catalysts and methods for producing electrical energy using the metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles of the present invention.

  9. Statistical analysis of constituent particles in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.; Wang, M. Z.

    2006-11-01

    Pitting corrosion is a primary degradation mechanism that affects the durability and integrity of aluminum alloy structures especially in aircraft. The heterogeneity of aluminum alloys is directly responsible for pitting corrosion because about 200 constituent particles per mm2 are on polished surfaces. Corrosion pits commence at surface particles and evolve into severe pits by sustained growth through particle clusters. Severe pits are nuclei for subsequent corrosion fatigue cracking. Thus, heterogeneous clusters of constituent particles are critical to the quality of aluminum alloys subjected to deleterious environments. Models for structural reliability including corrosion fundamentally depend on quantitative descriptions of the spatial statistics of the particles and particle clusters, including their location, size, and density. The primary purpose of this effort is to statistically estimate the distribution functions of the key geometrical properties of the constituent particles in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy and their role in pitting corrosion.

  10. A surface-analytical examination of stringer particles in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, L. A.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A surface analytical examination of powder metallurgy processed Al-Li-Cu alloys was conducted. The oxide stringer particles often found in these alloys are characterized. Particle characterization is important to more fully understand their impact on the stress corrosion and fracture properties of the alloy. The techniques used where SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy) and SAM (Scanning Auger Microscopy). The results indicate that the oxide stringer particles contain both Al and LI with relatively high Li content and the Li compounds may be associated with the stringer particles, thereby locally depleting the adjacent matrix of Li solute.

  11. A surface analytical examination of Stringer particles in Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, L. A.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1983-01-01

    A surface analytical examination of powder metallurgy processed Al-Li-Cu alloys was conducted. The oxide stringer particles often found in these alloys was characterized. Particle characterization is important to more fully understand their impact on the stress corrosion and fracture properties of the alloy. The techniques used were SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy) and SAM (Scanning Auger Microscopy). The results indicate that the oxide stringer particles contain both Al and Li with relatively high Li content and the Li compounds may be associated with the stringer particles, thereby locally depleting the adjacent matrix of Li solute.

  12. Mössbauer and Kerr microscopy investigation of crystallization in FeCoB ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, V. Raghavendra; Hussain, Zaineb; Babu, Hari; Shrivastava, Namrata; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports the crystallization study of amorphous FeCoB ribbons using x-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy in transmission mode and magneto-optical Kerr (MOKE) microscopy. Annealing at 673 K is found to result in crystallization. From the Mossbauer measurements it is observed that the Fe magnetic moments are in the plane of sample for as-cast ribbon; α-FeCo, (Fe0.5Co0.5)2B and Fe2B phases are formed after crystallization. MOKE microscopy revealed that wide 180° domain walls & narrow fingerprint domains are observed before crystallization and fine domains are observed after crystallization. The results are explained in terms of the presence of internal stresses and their annealing with thermal heat treatment.

  13. Marked enhancement of synthetic-antiferromagnetic coupling in subnanocrystalline FeCoB /Ru/FeCoB sputtered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Saito, Shin; Omori, Kazumi; Takashima, Hiroshi; Ueno, Tomonori; Takahashi, Migaku

    2006-07-01

    Extremely large flopping field and saturation field were realized in an FeCoB /Ru/FeCoB sputtered film by using subnanocrystalline (Fe65Co35)88B12 soft magnetic material with high saturation magnetization. Phenomenological analysis of synthetic-antiferromagnetic coupling revealed that the bilinear coupling energy induced in this film was three times larger than that in a Co91Zr4Nb5/Ru/Co91Zr4Nb5 film. This large bilinear coupling is thought to be the result of not only the suppression of ferromagnetic coupling due to the flat interface between the Ru and FeCoB layers but also the small Ru thickness for the first peak of 0.3nm caused by the Fe-rich soft magnetic material.

  14. Nano-particle precipitation in mechanically alloyed and annealed precursor powders of legacy PM2000 ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl; Haigh, Sarah J.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Jones, Andy R.

    2015-09-01

    The early stages of nano-particulate formation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, precursor powders used to manufacture the legacy commercial oxide dispersion strengthened alloy PM2000, formerly produced by Plansee GmbH, have been investigated. Powders were analysed in both the as-mechanically-alloyed condition and after annealing over the temperature range 923-1423 K. The nucleation and growth of coherent nano-particles in the partially recovered, fine grained, ferritic matrix of powders annealed at temperatures as low as 923 K has been confirmed. Powders annealed for 1 h at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K were partially recrystallised and contained high number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent 2 nm yttrium-aluminium-oxygen rich nano-particles. The identification of particle free zones in recrystallised grains, adjacent to recrystallising interfaces, plus the identical orientation relationships between nano-particles and the matrices in both unrecrystallised and recrystallised grains, indicates that the Y-Al-O nano-particles, first formed in fine grained regions, are dissolved during recrystallisation and re-precipitated subsequently in recrystallised grains.

  15. Reversible susceptibility studies of magnetization switching in FeCoB synthetic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Cosmin; Cimpoesu, Dorin; Girt, Erol; Ju, Ganping; Stancu, Alexandru; Spinu, Leonard

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we present a study of switching characteristics of a series of synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) structures using reversible susceptibility experiments. Three series of SAF samples were considered in our study with (t1, t2), the thickness of the FeCoB layers of (80nm, 80nm), (50nm, 50nm), and (80nm, 20nm) and with the interlayer of Ru ranging from 0to2nm. A vector vibrating sample magnetometer was used to measure the hysteresis loops along the different directions in the plane of the samples. The reversible susceptibility experiments were performed using a resonant method based on a tunnel diode oscillator. We showed that the switching peaks in the susceptibility versus field plots obtained for different orientations of the applied dc field can be used to construct the switching diagram of the SAF structure. The critical curve constitutes the fingerprint of the switching behavior and provides information about micromagnetic and structural properties of SAF which is an essential component of modern magnetic random access memories.

  16. Energetic-particle synthesis of nanocomposite Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Barbour, J.C.; Myers, S.M.; Dugger, M.T.

    1996-11-26

    Ion implantation of O into Al and growth of Al(O) layers using electro-cyclotron resonance plasma and pulsed laser depositions produce composite alloys with a high density of nanometer-size oxide precipitates in an Al matrix. The precipitates impart high strength to the alloy and reduced adhesion during sliding contact, while electrical conductivity and ductility are retained. Implantation of N into Al produces similar microstructures and mechanical properties. The athermal energies of deposited atoms are a key factor in achieving these properties.

  17. The Study of Nano-Sized Carbide Particles Formed in Fe-Cr-W-V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinrooz, Abdul Javad; Moniri, Samira; Asadi Asadabad, Mohsen; Hojabri, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    The microstructural features of nanocarbide particles formed in Fe-Cr-W-V alloy were studied. A Fe-Cr-W-V alloy was first heat treated under different conditions. In this study, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and hardness tester were used. The shape, size distribution, type, and lattice parameters of the extracted particles were investigated. The identified carbides were MC, M7C3, and M23C6. The particle size measurements showed that the mean length of carbide particles during 0.5, 5, and 20 h was about 103, 128, and 142 nm, respectively. Also, the mean thickness of carbide particles during 0.5, 5, and 20 h was about 54, 67, and 74 nm, respectively.

  18. Electrolytic Formation of Crystalline Silicon/Germanium Alloy Nanotubes and Hollow Particles with Enhanced Lithium-Storage Properties.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Le; Wang, Dihua; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-06-20

    Crystalline silicon(Si)/germanium(Ge) alloy nanotubes and hollow particles are synthesized for the first time through a one-pot electrolytic process. The morphology of these alloy structures can be easily tailored from nanotubes to hollow particles by varying the overpotential during the electro-reduction reaction. The continuous solid diffusion governed by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect results in the formation of inner void in the alloy particles. Benefitting from the compositional and structural advantages, these SiGe alloy nanotubes exhibit much enhanced lithium-storage performance compared with the individual solid Si and Ge nanowires as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27159140

  19. Composite of ceramic-coated magnetic alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  20. Embedded Shape Memory Alloy Particles for the Self-Sensing of Fatigue Crack Growth in an Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leser, William Paul

    Future aerospace vehicles will be built using novel materials for mission conditions that are difficult to replicate in a laboratory. Structural health monitoring and condition-based maintenance will be critical to ensure the reliability of such vehicles. A multi-functional aluminum alloy containing embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) particles to detect fatigue crack growth is proposed. The regions of intensified strain near the tip of a growing fatigue crack cause the SMA particles to undergo a solid-to-solid phase transformation from austenite to martensite, releasing a detectable and identifiable acoustic emission (AE) signal that can be used to locate the crack in the affected component. This study investigates the AE response of two SMA systems, Ni-Ti, and Co-Ni-Al. Tensile (Ni-Ti) and compressive (Co-Ni-Al) tests were conducted to study the strain-induced transformation response in both of the alloy systems. It was found that the critical stress for transformation in both SMA systems was easily identified by a burst of AE activity during both transformation and reverse transformation. AE signals from these experiments were collected for use as training data for a Bayesian classifier to be used to identify transformation signals in a Al7050 matrix with embedded SMA particles. The Al/SMA composite was made by vacuum hot pressing SMA powder between aluminum plates. The effect of hot pressing temperature and subsequent heat treatments (solutionizing and peak aging) on the SMA particles was studied. It was found that, at the temperatures required, Co-Ni-Al developed a second phase that restricted the transformation from austenite to martensite, thus rendering it ineffective as a candidate for the embedded particles. Conversely, Ni-Ti did survive the embedding process and it was found that the solutionizing heat treatment applied after hot pressing was the main driver in determining the final transformation temperatures for the Ni-Ti particles. The effect of hot

  1. Ignition and combustion of aluminum/magnesium alloy particles in O2 at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Ted A.; Burton, Rodney L.; Krier, Herman

    1993-01-01

    The ignition and combustion of Al, Mg, and Al/Mg alloy particles in 99 percent O2/1 percent N2 mixtures is investigated at high temperatures and pressures for rocket engine applications. The 20-micron particles contain 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 wt pct Mg alloyed with Al, and are ignited in oxygen using the reflected shock in a single-pulse shock tube near the endwall. Using this technique, the ignition delay and combustion times of the particles are measured at temperatures up to 3250 K as a function of Mg content for oxygen pressures of 8.5, 17, and 34 atm. An ignition model is developed that employs a simple lumped capacitance energy equation and temperature and pressure dependent particle and gas properties. Good agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted trends in the ignition delay times.

  2. Effects of intermetallic particles on the SCC initiation of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Wakashima, Y.; Imahashi, H.; Nagai, M.

    1985-06-01

    In order to investigate effects of intermetallic particles on SCC initiation of zirconium alloys, tensile tests were conducted in an iodine atmosphere using zirconium plates with different amounts of impurities, and Zircaloy-2 plates. SCC susceptibility of zirconium increased significantly with its iron content. Even small amounts of iron could form the intermetallic compound ZrFe 2 whose particle size and number increased with iron content. In the case of Zircaloy-2, two different types of ternary compounds were detected, namely Zr(CrFe) 2 and Zr 2(NiFe). Metallographic examinations showed that the particles located at grain boundaries were important sites of SCC initiation in zirconium alloys. The initiation probability increased significantly with the amount of the particles, which supported the strong correlation between SCC susceptibility of zirconium and its iron content.

  3. Composition and orientation relationships of constituent particles in 3xxx aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggerud, Astrid Marie F.; Li, Yanjun; Holmestad, Randi

    2014-02-01

    Constituent and dispersoid phases in two Direct Chill-cast 3xxx aluminum alloys after low-temperature annealing, with different silicon content have been studied. The lattice parameters, chemical composition, morphology and orientations relationships of constituent particles with regard to Al matrix have been addressed. Al?(Fe,Mn) is found to be the most prominent constituent phase in the alloy with a low Si content. The orientation relationship between aluminum matrix and this phase is determined as ?, ?, which is consistent with the orientation relationships of Al?(Fe,Mn) dispersoids. ?-Al(Fe,Mn)Si constituent particles in the Si rich alloy have been found to have various possible orientations. A gradient of Fe content is found in the ?-Al(Fe,Mn)Si dispersoids due to slow diffusion of Fe into dispersoids during annealing.

  4. Solid-particle erosion behavior of cast alloys used in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atapek, Ş. Hakan; Fidan, Sinan

    2015-12-01

    The erosive-wear response of five commercial ferrous-based cast alloys used for crushing was examined in this study. The microstructures of the alloys were modified to elucidate the effect of microstructural features on wear. Erosion tests were conducted using aluminum oxide particles (90-125 μm) at 70 m/s and a normal impact angle (90°). The worn surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and 3D non-contact laser profilometry. It is found that (i) a pearlitic structure exhibiting a greater plastic deformation than both bainitic and martensitic structures shows the greatest resistance to erosive wear at normal impact and (ii) the fracture characteristics of carbide and graphite particles plays an important role in determining the erosion wear behavior of the cast alloy matrices.

  5. Structural optimization of Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles using an improved discrete particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Gui-Fang; Wang, Ting-Na; Liu, Tun-Dong; Chen, Jun-Ren; Zheng, Ji-Wen; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles, as potential catalyst candidates for new-energy resources such as fuel cells and lithium ion batteries owing to their excellent reactivity and selectivity, have aroused growing attention in the past years. Since structure determines physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, the development of a reliable method for searching the stable structures of Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles has become of increasing importance to exploring the origination of their properties. In this article, we have employed the particle swarm optimization algorithm to investigate the stable structures of alloy nanoparticles with fixed shape and atomic proportion. An improved discrete particle swarm optimization algorithm has been proposed and the corresponding scheme has been presented. Subsequently, the swap operator and swap sequence have been applied to reduce the probability of premature convergence to the local optima. Furthermore, the parameters of the exchange probability and the 'particle' size have also been considered in this article. Finally, tetrahexahedral Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles has been used to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. The calculated results verify that the improved particle swarm optimization algorithm has superior convergence and stability compared with the traditional one.

  6. Cu-Ni nano-alloy: mixed, core-shell or Janus nano-particle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Khanal, Subarna; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Roque de La Puente, Jorge; José-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles like Cu-Ni are particularly attractive due to their magnetic and catalytic properties; however, their properties depend strongly on the structure of the alloy i.e. mixed, core-shell or Janus. To predict the alloy structure, this paper investigates the size and shape effects as well as the surface segregation effect on the Cu-Ni phase diagram. Phase maps have been plotted to determine the mixing/demixing behavior of this alloy according the particle shape. Cu-Ni nanoalloy can form a mixed particle or a Janus one depending on the synthesis temperature. Surface segregation is also considered and reveals a nickel surface-enrichment. Finally, this paper provides a useful roadmap for experimentalists.Bimetallic nanoparticles like Cu-Ni are particularly attractive due to their magnetic and catalytic properties; however, their properties depend strongly on the structure of the alloy i.e. mixed, core-shell or Janus. To predict the alloy structure, this paper investigates the size and shape effects as well as the surface segregation effect on the Cu-Ni phase diagram. Phase maps have been plotted to determine the mixing/demixing behavior of this alloy according the particle shape. Cu-Ni nanoalloy can form a mixed particle or a Janus one depending on the synthesis temperature. Surface segregation is also considered and reveals a nickel surface-enrichment. Finally, this paper provides a useful roadmap for experimentalists. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05739b

  7. Spherical constituent particles formed by a multistage solution treatment in Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.B.; Chen, J.H.; Liu, J.Z. Liu, P.; Qin, F.; Cheng, Y.L.; Wu, C.L.

    2013-09-15

    The corrosion resistance and fracture toughness of Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloys are greatly affected by the remaining large constituent particles with sharp corners and sharp edges. Here, we show that with a careful high-temperature solution treatment, these constituent particles can be formed into spherical rather than irregular shapes. This results in better corrosion resistance and mechanical properties for the alloys than the conventional solution treatment. The complex microstructures of the formed spherical constituent particles and their formation mechanism were studied using focused ion beam (FIB), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). It was revealed that there are five types of spherical constituent particles formed after the special solution treatment, and each type has its own characteristic microstructural features. - Highlights: • Improved combined mechanical properties obtained by spheroidizing treatment. • Five spherical particles have been found in alloy treated by spheroidizing. • These particles have interesting structures, including quasicrystal, and so on. • It is the first time to observe petal-like η phase formed by solution treatment. • We reported a critical state to decompose the most constituents by spheroidizing.

  8. Influence of Sludge Particles on the Tensile Properties of Die-Cast Secondary Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Stefano; Timelli, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    The effects of sludge intermetallic particles on the mechanical properties of a secondary AlSi9Cu3(Fe) die-casting alloy have been studied. Different alloys have been produced by systematically varying the Fe, Mn, and Cr contents within the composition tolerance limits of the standard EN AC-46000 alloy. The microstructure shows primary α-Al x (Fe,Mn,Cr) y Si z sludge particles, with polyhedral and star-like morphologies, although the presence of primary β-Al5FeSi phase is also observed at the highest Fe:Mn ratio. The volume fraction of primary compounds increases as the Fe, Mn, and Cr contents increase and this can be accurately predicts from the Sludge Factor by a linear relationship. The sludge amount seems to not influence the size and the content of porosity in the die-cast material. Furthermore, the sludge factor is not a reliable parameter to describe the mechanical properties of the die-cast AlSi9Cu3(Fe) alloy, because this value does not consider the mutual interaction between the elements. In the analyzed range of composition, the design of experiment methodology and the analysis of variance have been used in order to develop a semi-empirical model that accurately predicts the mechanical properties of the die-cast AlSi9Cu3(Fe) alloys as function of Fe, Mn, and Cr concentrations.

  9. Tribological Properties of Aluminum Alloy treated by Fine Particle Peening/DLC Hybrid Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Y.; Nanbu, H.; Kameyama, Y.; Komotori, J.

    2010-06-01

    In order to improve the adhesiveness of the DLC coating, Fine Particle Peening (FPP) treatment was employed as pre-treatment of the DLC coating process. FPP treatment was performed using SiC shot particles, and then AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was DLC-coated. A SiC-rich layer was formed around the surface of the aluminum alloy by the FPP treatment because small chips of shot particles were embedded into the substrate surface. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted to measure the friction coefficients. While the DLC coated specimen without FPP treatment showed a sudden increase in friction coefficient at the early stage of the wear cycles, the FPP/DLC hybrid treated specimen maintained a low friction coefficient value during the test period. Further investigation revealed that the tribological properties of the substrate after the DLC coating were improved with an increase in the amount of Si at the surface.

  10. Effect of nano-oxide particle size on radiation resistance of iron-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu; Valdez, James A.; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation resistance of Fe-14Cr alloys under 200 keV He irradiation at 500 °C was systematically investigated with varying sizes of nano oxide Zr, Hf and Cr particles. It is found that these nano oxide particles acted as effective sites for He bubble formation. By statistically analyzing 700-1500 He bubbles at the depth of about 150-700 nm from a series of HRTEM images for each sample, we established the variation of average He bubble size, He bubble density, and swelling percentage along the depth, and found them to be consistent with the He concentration profile calculated from the SIRM program. Oxide particles with sizes less than 3.5-4 nm are found most effective for enhancing radiation resistance in the studied alloy systems.

  11. Distribution of intermetallic particles and its effects on SCC of Zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Wakashima, Y.; Imahashi, H.; Nagai, M.

    1986-04-01

    In order to investigate effects of the distribution of intermetallic particles on the SCC of zirconium alloys, SCC tests were carried out on non-irradiated Zircaloy-2 and zirconium which were heat-treated under various conditions. Relatively large particles were randomly dispersed in samples annealed at temperatures in the α-phase domain. Quenching from relatively low temperatures in the (α + β)-phase domain, such as 1148 K, produced the grain boundary segregation of very small particles. Widmanstätten structures were seldom formed by the quenching. The frequency of transgranular cracks increased with the volume fraction of the particles on grain boundaries, while that of intergranular cracks increased with the averaged spacing of grain boundary particles. Not intergranular cracks, but transgranular cracks propagated rapidly enough to cause short time brittle fracture, and SCC susceptibility increased with the volume fraction of grain boundary particles.

  12. Influence of SiC Particles Distribution and Their Weight Percentage on 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-03-01

    The stir casting method was used for fabrication of 7075 aluminum alloy with 10 wt.% SiC particles of size 20-40 μm. The research objective of this paper are to achieve uniform distribution of SiC particles in the 7075 aluminum alloy matrix, characterization, and analysis of mechanical properties of composite formed. Experiments were carried out at stirring speeds of 500, 650, 750 rpm, and stirring period of 10 min. Microstructures of aluminum alloy and composites with 5, 10 wt.% SiC reinforcements were examined. The results reveal that composite produced at stirring speed of 650 rpm and stirring time of 10 min has uniform distribution of SiC particles. XRD and EDAX analysis were carried out for 7075 Al alloy and composite with 10 wt.% SiC reinforcement. No adverse reaction was observed in XRD and EDAX of composite with 10 wt.% SiC reinforcement. Tensile strength and hardness increased by 12.74% and 10.48%, respectively, with the increase in percentage of SiC reinforcement from 5 to 15 wt.%.

  13. Wear response of a Zn-base alloy in the presence of SiC particle reinforcement: A comparative study with a copper-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, B.K.; Das, S.; Modi, O.P.; Jha, A.K.; Dasgupta, R.; Yegneswaran, A.H.

    1999-12-01

    An attempt has been made in this study to examine the effects produced by the reinforcement of (10 wt%) SiC particles on the sliding wear behavior of a Zn-base alloy. The matrix alloy was also subjected to identical test conditions to assess the influence of the SiC dispersoid phase. The wear characteristics of the (Zn-base alloy) composite and the matrix alloy were also compared with those of a Cu-base alloy (i.e., an aluminum bronze) in order to understand the scope of exploiting the Zn-base alloy matrix/composite as a substitute material for the latter (Cu-base) alloy. It has been observed that low frictional heat generated at the lower sliding speed (0.42 m/s) enabled the Zn-base (matrix) alloy to perform better than the composite material, while the Cu-base alloy showed intermediate wear resistance. On the contrary, the trend changed at a higher sliding speed (4.62 m/s) when high frictional heating caused the wear behavior of the Cu-base alloy to be superior to that of the Zn-base (matrix) alloy. The composite in this case performed better than the matrix alloy. The wear behavior of the specimens has been explained in terms of factors like microcracking tendency and thermal stability introduced by the SiC dispersoid phase and lubricating, load bearing, and low melting characteristics of microconstituents like {alpha} and {eta} in the (Zn-base) alloy system and the thermal stability of the Cu-base alloy. It seems that the predominance of one set of parameters over the other actually controls the overall performance of a material. Once again, it is the test conditions that ultimately allow a particular set of factors to govern the other and influence the response of the specimens accordingly. The observed wear behavior of the samples has been substantiated further with their wear surface characteristics.

  14. Influence of the magnetic field annealing on the extrinsic damping of FeCoB soft magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Bailin; Tang, Dongming; Zhang, Baoshan; Lu, Mu; Lu, Huaixian

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the high-frequency damping properties of the ferromagnetic film for the electromagnetic shielding applications, FeCoB films with the thickness of 200 nm were fabricated by the rf magnetron sputtering and subsequently annealed with a static in-plane magnetic field of 2000 Oe under a series of temperatures. The annealed films exhibit excellent soft magnetic and microwave loss properties. The local resonance from the multiphase microstructure and two-magnon scattering at anisotropy inhomogeneities make an additional contribution to the extrinsic damping of the films. As a result, the film annealed at 450 °C achieves a high full width at half maximum Δf up to 6 GHz for the imaginary part of the frequency-dependent permeability. These films could be novel candidates for the electromagnetic shielding applications.

  15. Influence of the magnetic field annealing on the extrinsic damping of FeCoB soft magnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yi; Liu Bailin; Tang Dongming; Zhang Baoshan; Lu Mu; Lu Huaixian

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the high-frequency damping properties of the ferromagnetic film for the electromagnetic shielding applications, FeCoB films with the thickness of 200 nm were fabricated by the rf magnetron sputtering and subsequently annealed with a static in-plane magnetic field of 2000 Oe under a series of temperatures. The annealed films exhibit excellent soft magnetic and microwave loss properties. The local resonance from the multiphase microstructure and two-magnon scattering at anisotropy inhomogeneities make an additional contribution to the extrinsic damping of the films. As a result, the film annealed at 450 deg. C achieves a high full width at half maximum {Delta}f up to 6 GHz for the imaginary part of the frequency-dependent permeability. These films could be novel candidates for the electromagnetic shielding applications.

  16. Research on double resonance peaks and abnormal frequency shift in permeability spectra of annealed FeCoB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bailin; Yang, Yi; Tang, Dongming; Zhang, Baoshan; Lu, Mu; Lu, Huaixian; Shi, Yi

    2011-02-01

    A FeCoB magnetic film was prepared by a magnetron sputtering method and then was divided into several small pieces for vacuum annealing at different temperatures. The dependence of the coercivity along the hard axis on the annealing temperature reveals a degeneration of softness with the growth of grain size when the annealing temperature is above 350 °C. In permeability spectra measurements, double resonance peaks and an abnormal positive shift in the resonance peak at higher frequency with the increase in annealing temperature are observed. The existence of two peaks is attributed to the double magnetic phases (Fe and FeCo) in the films. The positive shift in the resonance peak at higher frequency has been analyzed and ascribed to the enhanced internal stray fields with the annealing temperature. This phenomenon of positive frequency-shift is very fascinating and novel, which makes the ferromagnetic films more efficient for the applications in the noise absorbing area.

  17. Morphology Control of FeCo Alloy Particles Synthesized by Polyol Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, D.; Sato, Y.; Tohji, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Shinoda, K.; Sato, K.

    2007-03-20

    FeCo alloy is a soft magnetic material that possesses the highest saturation magnetization of 2.4 T and crystallizes in bcc structure as in the case of {alpha}-Fe. However, the particles synthesized were highly agglomerated. Thus, in this paper, an attempt was made to control the morphology of the particles using different types and concentrations of surfactants such as oleic acid, oleyl amine, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), etc., during the synthesis of the particles. Though all the surfactant experimented partially prevented the agglomeration, products had larger size distribution except for PVP, which provided nearly monodispersed particles. Furthermore, the FeCo particles synthesized in the presence of PVP were either cubic or nearly spherical depending on the concentration of Fe.

  18. Physical and mechanical properties of LoVAR: a new lightweight particle-reinforced Fe-36Ni alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Timothy; Tricker, David; Tarrant, Andrew; Michel, Robert; Clune, Jason

    2015-09-01

    Fe-36Ni is an alloy of choice for low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) for optical, instrument and electrical applications in particular where dimensional stability is critical. This paper outlines the development of a particle-reinforced Fe-36Ni alloy that offers reduced density and lower CTE compared to the matrix alloy. A summary of processing capability will be given relating the composition and microstructure to mechanical and physical properties.

  19. Physical and Mechanical Properties of LoVAR: A New Lightweight Particle-Reinforced Fe-36Ni Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Timothy; Tricker, David; Tarrant, Andrew; Michel, Robert; Clune, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Fe-36Ni is an alloy of choice for low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) for optical, instrument and electrical applications in particular where dimensional stability is critical. This paper outlines the development of a particle-reinforced Fe-36Ni alloy that offers reduced density and lower CTE compared to the matrix alloy. A summary of processing capability will be given relating the composition and microstructure to mechanical and physical properties.

  20. Direct production of nanostructured copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Apaydin, Ramazan Oguzhan; Ebin, Burcak; Gurmen, Sebahattin

    2013-12-16

    Copper-Nickel (CuNi) nanostructured alloy particles were produced by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Hydrogen Reduction Method (USP-HR) from high purity copper and nickel nitrate aqueous solutions. The effect of the precursor solution in the range of 0.1 and 0.5 mol/L on the morphology and crystallite size of CuNi nanoparticles were investigated under 2 h running time, 700 °C operating temperature and 0.5 L/min H{sub 2} flow rate. Particle size, morphology, composition and crystallite structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Particle characterization studies show that nanostructured alloy particles have cubic crystal structure and they are in submicron size range with spherical morphology. The crystallite sizes of the particles calculated with Scherrer formula are 40 and 34 nm and average particles sizes observed from the SEM images are 300 and 510 nm for each experiment respectively.

  1. A method to determine the active particle nucleation undercooling distribution in a refined alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangelinck-Noël, N.; Spinelli, J. E.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Reinhart, G.; Nguyen-Thi, H.; Billia, B.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method to determine the active particle distribution of nucleation undercooling in a refined alloy. The experimental data used in this work are inferred from solidification experiments on a refined Al-3.5 wt% Ni alloy performed with X-ray radiography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. These in situ and real time observations allow the accurate and direct determination of the grain origin (heterogeneous nucleation on particles or fragmentation), of the density and of the equiaxed front growth rate. The LGK classical dendrite growth model is used to evaluate the front undercooling (ΔTC) corresponding to the measured equiaxed front growth rate. Then, the corresponding cumulative distribution of active refining particles is determined. From this cumulative distribution, we derive the corresponding Gaussian and log-normal laws to obtain the nucleation undercooling distribution of active particles. Results are discussed and compared to available measurements in the literature. The standard particle distribution parameters (density of nuclei, mean nucleation undercooling and standard deviation) are determined. We plan to use the determined nucleation undercooling particle distribution in a stochastic CAFE model for the grain structure without preliminary adjustment of the nucleation undercooling.

  2. Investigation of boron distribution in a TiAl-based alloy using particle-tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Z.; Wu, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    One of the key shortcomings of current TiAl intermetallic alloy is the inverse relationship between tensile properties and fracture/creep resistance. TiAl-based alloys with a fully lamellar structure generally display`s high fracture toughness and creep resistance, but poor ductility. Inversely, material with a duplex microstructure has very good ductility, but poor fracture toughness and creep resistance. Research efforts have focused on overcoming this deficiency. Now that it is widely accepted that the poor ductility of lamellar structures originates from the large grain size, refining the lamellar structure of TiAl-based alloys presents itself as a feasible solution. The question remains as to how to accomplish this goal. Microalloying is considered one approach for refining the fully lamellar structure. The present authors have reported that the addition of boron can effectively refine the grain size of fully lamellar structure. However, the distribution of boron in TiAl alloys and the mechanism in boron that suppresses grain growth are not yet clear. In the present paper, the distribution of boron in a Ti-rich TiAl-based alloy, as a function of the bulk boron content, annealing temperature, and thermomechanical process, is analyzed using a Particle-Tracking Autoradiography (PTA) technique.

  3. The nano-particle dispersion strengthening of V-4Cr-4Ti alloys for high temperature application in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pengfei; Chen, Jiming; Xu, Zengyu; Duan, Xuru

    2013-10-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti was identified as an attractive structural material for Li blanket in fusion reactors. However, both high temperature and irradiation induced degradation are great challenges for this material. It was thought that the nano-particles with high thermal stability can efficiently strengthen the alloy at elevated temperatures, and accommodate the irradiation induced defects at the boundaries. This study is a starting work aiming at improving the creep resistance and reducing the irradiation induced degradation for V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. Currently, we focus on the preparation of some comparative nano-particle dispersion strengthened V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. A mechanical alloying (MA) route is used to fabricate yttrium and carbides added V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. Nano-scale yttria, carbides and other possible particles have a combined dispersion-strengthening effect on the matrices of these MA-fabricated V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. High-temperature annealing is carried out to stabilize the optimized nano-particles. Mechanical properties are tested. Microstructures of the MA-fabricated V-4Cr-4Ti alloys with yttrium and carbide additions are characterized. Based on these results, the thermal stability of different nano-particle agents are classified. ITER related China domestic project 2011GB108007.

  4. A New Class of Engineering Materials: Particle-Stabilized Metallic Emulsions and Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, István; Kaptay, George

    2009-07-01

    Al-matrix particulate composites are melted and mixed with immiscible metals to form their small droplets in liquid aluminum. It is shown that, in the Al-Si/SiC/Bi system, the Bi droplets are stabilized by the SiC particles in the liquid Al matrix. Upon solidification, homogeneous distribution of solidified Bi droplets is obtained in the Al matrix at the bottom part of the ingot. Thus, a new class of engineering materials (particle-stabilized monotectic alloys) is obtained.

  5. In-situ processing of aluminum nitride particle reinforced aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingjun

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy composites (DRACs) have potential applications in automotive, electronic packaging, and recreation industries. Conventional processing of DRACs is by incorporation of ceramic particles/whiskers/fibers into matrix alloys. Because of the high cost of ceramic particles, DRACs are expensive. The goal of this work was to develop a low-cost route of AlN-Al DRACs processing through bubbling and reacting nitrogen and ammonia gases with aluminum alloy melt in the temperature range of 1373--1523 K. Thermodynamic analysis of AlN-Al alloy system was performed based on Gibbs energy minimization theory. AlN is stable in aluminum, Al-Mg, Al-Si, Al-Zn, and Al-Li alloys over the whole temperature range for application and processing of DRACs. Experiments were carried out to form AlN by bubbling nitrogen and ammonia gases through aluminum, Al-Mg, and Al-Si alloy melts. Products were characterized with XRD, SEM, and EDX. The results showed that in-situ processing of AlN reinforced DRACs is technically feasible. Significant AlN was synthesized by bubbling deoxidized nitrogen and ammonia gases. When nitrogen gas was used as the nitrogen precursor, the AlN particles formed in-situ are small in size, (<10 mum). The formation of AlN is strongly affected by the trace oxygen impurities in the nitrogen gas. The deleterious effect of oxygen impurities is due to their inhibition to the chemisorption of nitrogen gas at the interface. In comparison with nitrogen gas, bubbling ammonia led to formation of AlN particles in smaller size (about 2 mum or less) at a significantly higher rate. Ammonia is not stable and dissociated into nitrogen and hydrogen at reaction temperatures. The hydrogen functions as oxygen-getter at the interface and benefits chemisorption of nitrogen, thereby promoting the formation of AlN. The overall process of AlN formation was modeled using two-film model. For nitrogen bubbling gas, the whole process is controlled by chemisorption

  6. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; Xu, Huifang; Rathod, Shailendra; Shah, Pratik; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  7. Flow and fracture of particle hardened copper-titanium alloys: Interplay of slip and twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radetic, Tamara

    The flow and fracture behavior of Cu-rich Cu-Ti alloys hardened by ordered, metastable, coherent betasp' precipitates (Cusb4Ti,\\ D1sb{a} superstructure) are particularly interesting because these alloys show an unusual propensity to twin profusely after small amounts of plastic flow by slip. The mechanical behavior was studied using standard tensile testing along with modern electron optical techniques including CTEM, SEM and HREM. The deformation substructure in the early stages of aging and in samples aged for longer times is characterized by the coupled motion of five dislocations of the same Burgers vector (superdislocations in the D1sb{a} structure) after small degrees of deformation. Characterization of the fine-scale structure of the mechanical twins which form in the particle hardened Cu-Ti alloys is also reported in this study. The growth of deformation twins occurs via the motion of so-called G-ledges at twin/matrix interfaces and via a coalescence of fine twins. The atomic structure of the coherent twin/matrix interfaces and associated single and multiple layer ledges are also elucidated. Incoherent interfaces at the tip of deformation twins generated by 90sp° and 30sp° twinning dislocations have been investigated. The twin/twin and slip/twin interactions have been studied and analyzed as well as the effect of grain boundaries on deformation twinning. Deformation twins appear to nucleate at dislocation pile-ups serving as a stress relaxation mechanism. Shear transfer through obstacle twins is effected by slip and twining. The dominant strengthening mechanism is concluded to be coherency strain hardening and the interplay of particle strengthening and grain size hardening is analyzed. The particle dispersion was found to influence the Hall-Petch factor but a detailed understanding of these synergetic effects was not established. The fracture mode of the underaged Cu-Ti alloys was found to be dimpled ductile tearing.

  8. Hard particle reinforced aluminum-alloys for aircraft applications EWISCO 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.; Remer, P.; Yushchenko, K.; Borisov, Y.; Vitiaz, P.; Steinhaeuser, S.

    1994-12-31

    Light metals such as aluminum, titanium, magnesium are widely used as structural materials in industrial parts. Their low density combined with reasonable physical properties are the main advantages of these materials that have led to a wide range of applications in transportation, particularly in the fabrication of aircrafts. Some of the disadvantages of these light metals and alloys are low wear resistance, high reactivity and low thermal tolerance. Thermal sprayed coatings are required to protect these structures and to broaden the use of these materials. The goal of this collaborative research work was to improve wear and corrosion properties of common Al-alloys. Five hard particle reinforced aluminum based powders were sprayed with different thermal spray processes. In order to optimize the wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings different spray processes and spray parameters were investigated. The coatings were produced mainly using atmospherical plasma spraying and CDS (continuous detonation spraying). Further tests with two ukrainian types of flame spraying were carried out. The aluminum alloy 7075 [AlZnMgCu1,5] was used as substrate material. Powder and coating morphology, porosity and homogeneity were investigated. Several tests for wear, corrosion behavior, bond strength and hardness were also carried out. The results of this investigation illustrate the excellent properties of thermal sprayed surface coatings in the field of wear and corrosion protection which expands the future applications of these aluminum alloys. This paper presents the results obtained at the Materials Science Institute, Aachen.

  9. Phase and particle size distribution in magnetoresistive Fe-Cu granular alloys investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, M. S.; Pereira de Azevedo, M. M.; Sousa, J. B.

    1996-11-01

    The size distribution of ferromagnetic particles in granular Fe-Cu alloys is derived from the hyperfine field distribution of e57Fe Mössbauer spectra, on the grounds of collective magnetic excitations associated with the spectral line broadening. A good agreement with the X-ray diffraction results is found for the average particle size estimated from the Mössbauer data. The magnetoresistance of a splat-cooled Fe25Cu75 alloy reaches a maximum of 3% after appropriate annealing and its evolution is correlated with the various Fe phases (ferro, para and superparamagnetic) and particle sizes identified by the Mössbauer data.

  10. Particle size distribution of workplace aerosols in manganese alloy smelters applying a personal sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, B; Bugge, M D; Ulvestad, B; Kjuus, H; Kandler, K; Ellingsen, D G

    2015-12-01

    Air samples were collected by personal sampling with five stage Sioutas cascade impactors and respirable cyclones in parallel among tappers and crane operators in two manganese (Mn) alloy smelters in Norway to investigate PM fractions. The mass concentrations of PM collected by using the impactors and the respirable cyclones were critically evaluated by comparing the results of the parallel measurements. The geometric mean (GM) mass concentrations of the respirable fraction and the <10 μm PM fraction were 0.18 and 0.39 mg m(-3), respectively. Particle size distributions were determined using the impactor data in the range from 0 to 10 μm and by stationary measurements by using a scanning mobility particle sizer in the range from 10 to 487 nm. On average 50% of the particulate mass in the Mn alloy smelters was in the range from 2.5 to 10 μm, while the rest was distributed between the lower stages of the impactors. On average 15% of the particulate mass was found in the <0.25 μm PM fraction. The comparisons of the different PM fraction mass concentrations related to different work tasks or different workplaces, showed in many cases statistically significant differences, however, the particle size distribution of PM in the fraction <10 μm d(ae) was independent of the plant, furnace or work task. PMID:26498986

  11. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  12. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agentsmore » for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.« less

  13. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agents for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.

  14. Quantification of oxide particle composition in model oxide dispersion strengthened steel alloys.

    PubMed

    London, A J; Lozano-Perez, S; Moody, M P; Amirthapandian, S; Panigrahi, B K; Sundar, C S; Grovenor, C R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels (ODS) are being considered for structural components of future designs of fission and fusion reactors because of their impressive high-temperature mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage, both of which arise from the nanoscale oxide particles they contain. Because of the critical importance of these nanoscale phases, significant research activity has been dedicated to analysing their precise size, shape and composition (Odette et al., Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 38 (2008) 471-503 [1]; Miller et al., Mater. Sci. Technol. 29(10) (2013) 1174-1178 [2]). As part of a project to develop new fuel cladding alloys in India, model ODS alloys have been produced with the compositions, Fe-0.3Y2O3, Fe-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3 and Fe-14Cr-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3. The oxide particles in these three model alloys have been studied by APT in their as-received state and following ion irradiation (as a proxy for neutron irradiation) at various temperatures. In order to adequately quantify the composition of the oxide clusters, several difficulties must be managed, including issues relating to the chemical identification (ranging and variable peak-overlaps); trajectory aberrations and chemical structure; and particle sizing. This paper presents how these issues can be addressed by the application of bespoke data analysis tools and correlative microscopy. A discussion follows concerning the achievable precision in these measurements, with reference to the fundamental limiting factors. PMID:25754233

  15. Morphology of an aluminum alloy eroded by a jet of angular particles impinging at normal incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The erosion of an aluminum alloy impinged by crushed glass particles at normal incidence was studied. The erosion patterns were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometer measurements. From the analysis of specimens tested at various driving gas pressures and time intervals, four distinct erosion regions were identified. A study of pit morphology and its relationship to cumulative erosion was made. Cutting wear is believed to be the predominant material removal mechanism; some evidence of deformation wear was found during the incubation period.

  16. Effect of Particle Size on Microstructure and Cold Compaction of Gas-Atomized Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloy Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhiyong; Wang, Richu; Peng, Chaoqun; Zhang, Chun

    2015-04-01

    The effect of particle size on the cold compaction behavior of rapidly solidified hypereutectic Al-27 wt pct Si alloy powder was studied by double action axial pressing at room temperature. The geometrical characteristics (morphology, size, shape, and distribution of Si reinforcing phase) and hardness of the powder as a function of the particle size were investigated. The result shows that finer powder particle size showed smaller primary Si particles and achieved a lower density at a given pressure. Whereas, the microhardness of Al matrix increases while the particle size decreases, which indicates that the supersaturation due to the high solidification rate increases the deformation resistance of the alloy powder. Furthermore, the geometrical characteristics of Si phases strongly depend on the particle size due to the suppressed growth of Si phases during atomization. This microstructural characteristic evidently affects the powder compactibility at high applied pressures.

  17. Influence of flexible substrate thickness on static and dynamic magnetic properties of FeCoB thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Phuoc, Nguyen; Thanh Hung, Le; Ong, C. K.

    2010-06-01

    The influence of substrate thickness on the static and dynamic properties of FeCoB thin films grown onto flexible substrates by the sputtering technique was extensively investigated and the result was analysed based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The existence of rotatable magnetic anisotropy was observed and discussed within the framework of ripple theory. It was found that the variation of the rotatable anisotropy field with substrate thickness is roughly coincident with that of coercivity. This suggests that the arising of rotatable anisotropy and the enhancement of coercivity when the substrate thickness is reduced has the same mechanism, i.e. the existence of local random anisotropy. The ferromagnetic resonance frequency is enhanced and the frequency linewidth is broader as the substrate thickness is reduced, which is possibly related to the decrease in the stress in the films. The observed small variation of static permeability with substrate thickness suggests that reducing the substrate thickness is a good way to obtain high effective permeability.

  18. A Modified Constitutive Equation for Aluminum Alloy Reinforced by Silicon Carbide Particles at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yajing; Li, Fuguo; Yuan, Zhanwei; Qiao, Huijuan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the constitutive relationship of an aluminum alloy reinforced by silicon carbide particles is investigated using a new method of double multivariate nonlinear regression (DMNR) in which the strain, strain rate, deformation temperature, and the interaction effect among the strain, strain rate, and deformation temperature are considered. The experimental true stress-strain data were obtained by isothermal hot compression tests on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator in the temperature range of 623-773 K and the strain rate range of 0.001-10 s-1. The experiments showed that the material-softening behavior changed with the strain rate, and it changed from dynamic recovery to dynamic recrystallization with an increase in the strain rate. A new constitutive equation has been established by the DMNR; the correlation coefficient ( R) and average absolute relative error (AARE) of this model are 0.98 and 7.8%, respectively. To improve the accuracy of the model, separate constitutive relationships were obtained according to the softening behavior. At strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 s-1, the R and AARE are 0.9865 and 6.0%, respectively; at strain rates of 5 and 10 s-1, the R and AARE are 0.9860 and 3.0%, respectively. The DMNR gives an accurate and precise evaluation of the flow stress for the aluminum alloy reinforced by silicon carbide particles.

  19. Characterization of Wear Particles Generated from CoCrMo Alloy under Sliding Wear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pourzal, R.; Catelas, I.; Theissmann, R.; Kaddick, C.; Fischer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Biological effects of wear products (particles and metal ions) generated by metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements made of CoCrMo alloy remain a major cause of concern. Periprosthetic osteolysis, potential hypersensitivity response and pseudotumour formation are possible reactions that can lead to early revisions. To accurately analyse the biological response to wear particles from MoM implants, the exact nature of these particles needs to be characterized. Most previous studies used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis for characterization. The present study used energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction pattern analysis to allow for a more precise determination of the chemical composition and to gain knowledge of the crystalline structure of the wear particles. Particles were retrieved from two different test rigs: a reciprocating sliding wear tribometer (CoCrMo cylinder vs. bar) and a hip simulator according to ISO 14242-1 (CoCrMo head vs. CoCrMo cup). All tests were conducted in bovine serum. Particles were retrieved from the test medium using a previously published enzymatic digestion protocol. Particles isolated from tribometer samples had a size of 100 – 500 nm. Diffraction pattern analysis clearly revealed the lattice structure of strain induced hcp ε-martensite. Hip simulator samples revealed numerous particles of 15 – 30 nm and 30 – 80 nm size. Most of the larger particles appeared to be only partially oxidized and exhibited cobalt locally. The smallest particles were Cr2O3 with no trace of cobalt. It optically appeared that these Cr2O3 particles were flaking off the surface of larger particles that depicted a very high intensity of oxygen, as well as chromium, and only background noise of cobalt. The particle size difference between the two test rigs is likely related to the conditions of the two tribosystems, in particular the difference in the sample geometry and in the type of sliding

  20. Effect of Hf-Rich Particles on the Creep Life of a High-strength Nial Single Crystal Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Raj, S. V.; Darolia, R.

    1995-01-01

    Additions of small amounts of Hf and Si to NiAl single crystals significantly improve their high-temperature strength and creep properties. However, if large Hf-rich dendritic particles formed during casting of the alloyed single crystals are not dissolved completely during homogenization heat treatment, a large variation in creep rupture life can occur. This behavior, observed in five samples of a Hf containing NiAl single crystal alloy tested at 1144 K under an initial stress of 241.4 MPa, is described in detail highlighting the role of interdendritic Hf-rich particles in limiting creep rupture life.

  1. Characterization of aluminum alloy 2618 and its composites containing alumina particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguocha, Ikechukwuka N. A.

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) combine a stiff but brittle phase, typically a ceramic, with a more ductile metal matrix. The correct fractional combination of materials can result in a material with improved stiffness, creep resistance, yield stress, and wear resistance relative to the monolithic matrix. The use of MMCs in recent years has become more widespread due to a growing understanding of the dependence of composite properties on a number of factors (e.g., interface properties, metallurgy of the matrix, and stress partitioning between the constituent phases) and appreciation of the problems that can occur in their usage. The purpose of this work was to investigate microstructural evolution in ingot metallurgy AA2618 due to the addition of 10 and 15 vol. % angular alumina (Al2O3) particles. The primary investigative techniques employed were microhardness measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, other metallographic and data analysis techniques were used. The results of this study showed that the addition of Al2O 3 particles did not alter the aging sequence of AA2618, but it altered certain aspects of the precipitation reaction. It caused the suppression of Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatskii (GPB) zone nucleation, acceleration of the artificial aging response, lowering of peak hardness value, and nonuniform distribution of precipitate and dispersoid phases. However, it did not affect the growth mechanisms for S' and theta' formation. The growth parameters obtained for the unreinforced alloy and its composites were not significantly different. Magnesium accumulation around the reinforcing Al2O3 particles was very pronounced. Mg-rich intermetallic particles (suggested to be MgAl2O4 spinel) were observed existing in isolation and embedded in Al2O3 particles. The presence of these particles was considered to be responsible for

  2. Studies of near-surface phenomena and erosion mechanisms in metallic alloys using single- and multi-particle impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Keiser, J.R.

    1992-03-01

    An experimental study of the effects of material properties on erosion mechanisms was conducted by subjecting targets to single as well as multiple impacts of spherical particles at various velocities. A mechanical properties microprobe was used to monitor the hardening due to the impacts. Initial studies on several engineering alloys showed that work hardening was associated with single impacts, and the results suggested that the capacity to distribute the impact energy over large volumes improved a material's erosion resistance. Studies also showed that the alloys work hardened significantly under multiple-particle impacts. Single-particle impact studies were found to correlate well with results from low-velocity, multiple-particle erosion experiments. (VC)

  3. Particle morphology influence on mechanical and biocompatibility properties of injection molded Ti alloy powder.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, H Özkan; Gülsoy, Nagihan; Calışıcı, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    Titanium and Titanium alloys exhibits properties that are excellent for various bio-applications. Metal injection molding is a processing route that offers reduction in costs, with the added advantage of near net-shape components. Different physical properties of Titanium alloy powders, shaped and processed via injection molding can achieve high complexity of part geometry with mechanical and bioactivity properties, similar or superior to wrought material. This study describes that the effect of particle morphology on the microstructural, mechanical and biocompatibility properties of injection molded Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy powder for biomaterials applications. Ti64 powders irregular and spherical in shape were injection molded with wax based binder. Binder debinding was performed in solvent and thermal method. After debinding the samples were sintered under high vacuum. Metallographic studies were determined to densification and the corresponding microstructural changes. Sintered samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with elemental concentrations that were comparable to those of human blood plasma for a total period of 15 days. Both materials were implanted in fibroblast culture for biocompatibility evaluations were carried out. The results show that spherical and irregular powder could be sintered to a maximum theoretical density. Maximum tensile strength was obtained for spherical shape powder sintered. The tensile strength of the irregular shape powder sintered at the same temperature was lower due to higher porosity. Finally, mechanical tests show that the irregular shape powder has lower mechanical properties than spherical shape powder. The sintered irregular Ti64 powder exhibited better biocompatibility than sintered spherical Ti64 powder. Results of study showed that sintered spherical and irregular Ti64 powders exhibited high mechanical properties and good biocompatibility properties. PMID:25201399

  4. Performance of FeCoB based thin-film microwave noise suppressor applied to the electromagnetic interference design in the GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jing; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Jin; Li, Wenli

    2014-05-01

    To develop high performance microwave noise suppressor, the microwave noise suppressors based on a microstrip line using FeCoB based magnetic thin film are presented, whose microwave noise suppression effects have been investigated. It was found that suitable low argon pressure is beneficial to the improvement of microwave noise suppression. In addition, the microwave noise suppression properties of microwave noise suppressor could be tuned by controlling the geometric dimension of FeCoB based magnetic thin film and SiO2 dielectric layer, resulted from the ferromagnetic resonance loss and eddy current loss. The maximum power loss ratio (Ploss/Pin) of thin-film microwave noise suppressor (the length, width, and thickness of FeCoNiB thin film are 25 mm, 10 mm, and 250 nm, respectively) achieves 0.75 at 3.4 GHz. These results show that the presented film noise suppressors have potential for the electromagnetic interference design in the GHz frequency range.

  5. DFT Calculation of Vibrational Frequencies of FeCoB m-RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Lee Li; Jesudason, Christopher; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2010-07-01

    The present available random access memory materials are semiconductors. It is proposed to develop magnetoresistance based random access memory (m-RAM) materials. Hence, we consider an alloy of Fe, Co and B which will be strongly magnetic and work well as a memory device. We calculate the vibrational frequencies of clusters of atoms of Fe, Co and B. The larger vibrational frequencies indicate larger force constants. The result show that CoB3Fe to have the largest vibrational frequency of 1293.03 cm-1 whereas BFeCo2 has 509.59 cm-1. We identify the ratio of constituents and the structures which have large force constant. Hence, CoB3Fe is better than BFeCo2. The cluster formation depends on the method of quenching. Hence, method of preparation can be modified to achieve large force constants.

  6. A Generic Wet Impregnation Method for Preparing Substrate-Supported Platinum Group Metal and Alloy Nanoparticles with Controlled Particle Morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changlin; Oliaee, Shirin Norooz; Hwang, Sang Youp; Kong, Xiangkai; Peng, Zhenmeng

    2016-01-13

    Mass production of shape-controlled platinum group metal (PGM) and alloy nanoparticles is of high importance for their many fascinating properties in catalysis, electronics, and photonics. Despite of successful demonstrations at milligram scale using wet chemistry syntheses in many fundamental studies, there is still a big gap between the current methods and their real applications due to the complex synthetic procedures, scale-up difficulty, and surface contamination problem of the made particles. Here we report a generic wet impregnation method for facile, surfactant-free, and scalable preparation of nanoparticles of PGMs and their alloys on different substrate materials with controlled particle morphology and clean surface, which bridges the outstanding properties of these nanoparticles to practical important applications. The underlying particle growth and shape formation mechanisms were investigated using a combination of ex situ and in situ characterizations and were attributed to their different interactions with the applied gas molecules. PMID:26642094

  7. On the Influence of Dispersoids on the Particle Stimulated Nucleation of Recrystallization in an Al-Fe-Si Model Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, O.

    1997-12-31

    The recrystallization of Al-alloys is controlled by precipitates. Whereas large particles generally promote recrystallization by particle stimulated nucleation, finely dispersed precipitates - either already present in the as-deformed state or precipitating during the recrystallization anneal - are known to strongly retard recrystallization. It was the aim of the present study to elucidate these concurring effects of large particles and small dispersoids on recrystallization in a ternary Al-Fe-Si model alloy. For that purpose, samples were prepared according to different pre-annealing treatments so as to comprise different states of precipitation and supersaturation. The evolution of microstructure and texture during rolling and recrystallization was characterized by metallography and by conventional X-ray texture analysis. EBSD-local texture investigations were employed to yield information on the efficiency of nucleation at the various nucleation sites and, consequently, on the influence of dispersoids on recrystallization.

  8. Atomistic modeling of the reordering process of γ‧ disordered particles in Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Enrique; Soisson, Frédéric; Caro, Alfredo; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2016-09-01

    Ni-based alloys are used in nuclear applications, including as a window material at isotope production facilities, withstanding high fluxes of different energetic particles like protons. Irradiation disorders the γ‧ precipitates that in large extent confer the mechanical properties characterizing these materials. Upon disordering, the γ‧ phase transforms into oversaturated γ, degrading the materials properties. Experimentally it is observed that disordering might take place at fairly low irradiation doses. Once the particles are disordered, a competition between dissolution, due to strong concentration gradients in an oversaturated solid solution, and reordering appears. Here, we examine this competition in a model Ni-Al alloy under thermal conditions for different precipitates sizes and temperatures. We observe Al interdiffusion from the supersaturated particle to the matrix. Also, stochasticity appears as an important factor in to where precipitates locate. Stress relaxation seems to modify the precipitation process, with a stronger interface effect compared to rigid lattice simulations.

  9. Time dependence of solid-particle impingement erosion of an aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veerabhadrarao, P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Erosion studies were conducted on 6061-T6511 aluminum alloy by using jet impingement of glass beads and crushed glass particles to investigate the influence of exposure time on volume loss rate at different pressures. The results indicate a direct relationship between erosion-versus-time curves and pitmorphology (width, depth, and width-depth ratio)-versus-time curves for both glass forms. Extensive erosion data from the literature were analyzed to find the variations of erosion-rate-versus-time curves with respect to the type of device, the size and shape of erodent particles, the abrasive charge, the impact velocity, etc. Analysis of the experimental data, obtained with two forms of glass, resulted in three types of erosion-rate-versus-time curves: (1) curves with incubation, acceleration, and steadystate periods (type 1); (2) curves with incubation, acceleration, decleration, and steady-state periods (type 3); and (3) curves with incubation, acceleration, peak rate, and deceleration periods (type 4). The type 4 curve is a less frequently seen curve and was not reported in the literature. Analysis of extensive literature data generally indicated three types of erosion-rate-versus-time curves. Two types (types 1 and 3) were observed in the present study; the third type involves incubation (and deposition), acceleration, and steady-state periods (type 2). Examination of the extensive literature data indicated that it is absolutely necessary to consider the corresponding stages or periods of erosion in correlating and characterizing erosion resistance of a wide spectrum of ductile materials.

  10. Effect of Complex Inclusion Particles on the Solidification Structure of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Lee, Changhee; Park, Joo Hyun

    2012-12-01

    The effect of combinations of several deoxidizers, i.e., Mg-Al, Mg-Ti, Al-Ti, and Ce-Al, on the solidification structure of Fe-2 mass pct Ni-1 mass pct Mn-1 mass pct Mo alloy melt was investigated using a melt sampling and quenching method. Using this method, we evaluated the catalytic potency of several complex inclusion particles by taking the inclusion evolution process into account. Fine equiaxed crystals were obtained in the Mg-Ti-deoxidized steel wherein the MgO(MgAl2O4)-TiN complex compounds formed. However, the longer the holding time at high temperatures, the larger the fraction of Ti2O3, and very fine TiN formed because of microsegregation during solidification, resulting in poor equiaxed crystals. When the steel was deoxidized with Mg-Al, the initial structure was dominantly columnar. However, the longer the holding time, the larger the fraction of MgAl2O4 spinel, resulting in the formation of fine equiaxed crystals. Ce-Al complex deoxidation provided a relatively small portion of equiaxed crystals, whereas Ti-Al deoxidation produced the fewest equiaxed crystals because of the formation of alumina. The effectiveness of each inoculant particle for the crystallization of the primary δ-iron was explained well by the lattice disregistry concept.

  11. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-04-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  12. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  13. The effect of coarse second phase particles on fatigue crack propagation of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guerbuez, R.; Alpay, S.P. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of the most commonly observed coarse second phase particles; Al[sub 7]Cu[sub 2]Fe, Mg[sub 2]Si and CuAl[sub 2]Mg on the Stage 2 fatigue crack propagation of a 7050 aluminum alloy. The differences in the composition of this alloy when compared to the conventional 7075 alloy are: (1) increased Cu content for additional strengthening during aging and for increasing the temperature range of GP zone stability; (2) replacement of Cr by Zr to reduce quench sensitivity; (3) reduced Fe and Si contents to improve fracture toughness which, however, decreases fatigue crack growth threshold, [Delta]K[sub th], slightly; and (4) increased Zn content for strengthening.

  14. Influence of second-phase particles on grain growth in AZ31 magnesium alloy during equal channel angular pressing by phase field simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ri; Wang, Mingtao; Zhang, Xiangang; Yaping Zong, Bernie

    2016-06-01

    A phase-field model was established to simulate the refinement effect of different morphological factors of second-phase particles such as Al2O3 on the grain growth of AZ31 magnesium alloy during equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) in realistic spatiotemporal evolution. The simulation results agreed well with limited existing experimental data for the ECAP-processed AZ31 magnesium alloy and were consistent with the law of Zener. Simulations were performed to evaluate the influences of the fraction, size, distribution, and shape of incoherent second-phase particles. The simulation results showed that during high-temperature ECAP processes, the addition of 2 wt.% Al2O3 particles resulted in a strong refinement effect, reducing the grain size by 28.7% compared to that of the alloy without the particles. Nevertheless, when the fraction of particles was greater than 4 wt.%, adding more particles had little effect. In AZ31 Mg alloy, it was found that second-phase particles should have a critical size of 0.5–0.8 μm for the grain refinement effect to occur. If the size is smaller than the critical size, large particles will strongly hinder grain growth; in contrast, if the size is larger than the critical size, large particles will exhibit a weaker hindering effect than small particles. Moreover, the results showed that the refinement effect increased with increasing particle fraction located at grain boundaries with respect to the total particle content. However, the refinement effect was less pronounced when the fraction of particles located at boundaries was greater than 70%. Further simulations indicated that spherical second-phase particles hindered grain growth more than ellipsoid particles and much more than rod-shaped particles when the volume fraction of reinforcing particles was 2%. However, when the volume fraction was greater than 8%, rod-shaped particles best hindered grain growth, and spherical particles exhibited the weakest effect.

  15. The Effect of SiC Particle Addition During FSW on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M.; Abdollahzadeh, A.; Bagheri, B.; Omidvar, H.

    2015-12-01

    Welding and joining of magnesium alloys exert a profound effect on magnesium application expansion, especially in ground and air transportations where large-size, complex components are required. Due to specific physical properties of magnesium, its welding requires great control. In general, the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) process has been found to produce a low concentration of defects. In the current research, specimens from AZ31 magnesium alloy were welded together using the friction stir process with previously inserted SiC powder particles in the nugget zone. In other words, during the FSW process, the pre-placed SiC particles were stirred throughout the nugget zone of the weld. The results indicated that proper values of rotation and translation speeds led to good appearance of weld zone and suitable distribution of SiC particles producing increased weld strength. The comparison of the microstructures and mechanical properties of FS-welded AZ31 with those of FS-welded one using pre-placed SiC particles showed that the addition of SiC particles decreased the grain size and increased the strength and the formability index.

  16. Effect of tungsten metal particle sizes on the solubility of molten alloy melt: Experimental observation of Gibbs-Thomson effect in nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. H.; Das, J.; Sordelet, D. J.; Eckert, J.; Hurd, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the effect of tungsten particle sizes on the thermal stability and reactivity of uniformly dispersed W particles in molten Hf-based alloy melt at elevated temperature (1673 K). The solubility of particles less than 100 nm in radius is significantly enhanced. In case of fine W particles with 20 nm diameter, their solubility increases remarkably around 700% compared to that of coarse micrometer-scale particles. The mechanisms and kinetics of this dynamic growth of particle are discussed as well as techniques developed to obtain frozen microstructure of particle-reinforced composites by rapid solidification.

  17. Nano-size scaling of alloy intra-particle vs. inter-particle separation transitions: prediction of distinctly interface-affected critical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Polak, M; Rubinovich, L

    2016-07-21

    Phase-separation second-order transitions in binary alloy particles consisting of ∼1000 up to ∼70 000 atoms (∼1-10 nm) are modeled focusing on the unexplored issue of finite-size scaling in such systems, particularly on evaluation of correlation-length critical exponents. Our statistical-thermodynamic approach is based on mean-field analytical expression for the Ising model free energy that facilitates highly efficient computations furnishing comprehensive data for fcc rectangular nanoparticles (NPs). These are summed up in intra- and inter-particle scaling plots as well as in nanophase separation diagrams. Temperature-induced variations in the interface thickness in Janus-type intra-particle configurations and NP size-dependent shifts in the critical temperature of their transition to solid-solution reflect power-law behavior with the same critical exponent, ν = 0.83. It is attributed to dominant interfacial effects that are absent in inter-particle transitions. Variations in ν with nano-size, as revealed by a refined analysis, are linearly extrapolated in order to bridge the gap to larger particles within and well beyond the nanoscale, ultimately yielding ν = 1.0. Besides these findings, the study indicates the key role of the surface-area to volume ratio as an effective linear size, revealing a universal, particle-shape independent, nanoscaling of the critical-temperature shifts. PMID:27338842

  18. Quantitative assessment of the response of osteoblast- and macrophage-like cells to particles of Ni-free Fe-base alloys.

    PubMed

    Ciapetti, G; González-Carrasco, J L; Savarino, L; Montealegre, M A; Pagani, S; Baldini, N

    2005-03-01

    In the present study, the effect of mechanically alloyed particles of new FeAlCr alloys developed for potential applications as surgical implants has been tested on osteoblast- and macrophage-like cells and compared to particles of the Ti6Al4V alloy, for which there is a good clinical experience. After microstructural characterisation of the particles, cells were cultured with particles for 24-48 h using three different concentrations of particles, and the response of cells was quantified by assessment of viability, proliferation, and morphology. Mineralisation by osteoblasts was verified after 21 days. The amount of aluminium and chromium ions in the culture medium of macrophages was measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption and phagocytosis of particles assessed by light microscopy. Viability and proliferation of osteoblast- and macrophage-like cells were substantially unaffected by the presence of particles of the new alloys, which were phagocytosed according to their size. Aluminium and chromium ions were released in the culture medium, but no direct correlation with the cell behaviour was found. In vitro mineralisation was achieved by osteoblasts in due time. The new alloys are well tolerated in in vitro systems, and, due to their chemical and mechanical characteristics, they are under development for surgical implants. PMID:15353196

  19. Study on preparation and properties of molybdenum alloys reinforced by nano-sized ZrO2 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chaopeng; Gao, Yimin; Wei, Shizhong; Zhang, Guoshang; Zhou, Yucheng; Zhu, Xiangwei; Guo, Songliang

    2016-03-01

    The nano-sized ZrO2-reinforced Mo alloy was prepared by a hydrothermal method and a subsequent powder metallurgy process. During the hydrothermal process, the nano-sized ZrO2 particles were added into the Mo powder via the hydrothermal synthesis. The grain size of Mo powder decreases obviously with the addition of ZrO2 particles, and the fine-grain sintered structure is obtained correspondingly due to hereditation. In addition to a few of nano-sized ZrO2 particles in grain boundaries or sub-boundaries, most are dispersed in grains. The tensile strength and yield strength have been increased by 32.33 and 53.76 %.

  20. A transmission electron microscopy study of constituent-particle-induced corrosion in 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.; Liao, C.M.; Gao, M.

    1998-04-01

    To better understand particle-induced pitting corrosion in aluminum alloys, thin foil specimens of 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys, with identified constituent particles, were immersed in aerated 0.5M NaCl solution and then examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results clearly showed matrix dissolution around the iron- and manganese-containing particles (such as Al{sub 23}CuFe{sub 4}), as well as the Al{sub 2}Cu particles. While Al{sub 2}CuMg particles tended to dissolve relative to the matrix, limited local dissolution of the matrix was also observed around these particles. These results are consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of pitting corrosion and are discussed in terms of the electrochemical characteristics of the particles and the matrix.

  1. An investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of electrochemically coated Ag(4)Sn dental alloy particles condensed in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Jose Antonio

    As part of the ongoing scientific effort to develop a new amalgam-like material without mercury, a team of metallurgists and electrochemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, announced in 1993 the development of a new Ag-Sn dental alloy system without mercury that sought to replace conventional dental amalgams. They used spherical Ag3Sn and Ag4Sn intermetallic dental alloy particles, commonly used in conventional dental alloys, and coated them with electrodeposited silver with newly-developed electrolytic and immersion techniques. The particles had relatively pure silver coatings that were closely adherent to the intermetalfic cores. These silver-coated particles, due to silver's plasticity at room temperature, were condensed into PlexiglasRTM molds with the aid of an acidic surface activating solution (HBF4) and a mechanical condensing device, producing a metal-matrix composite with Ag3,4Sn filler particles surrounded by a cold-welded silver matrix. Since silver strain hardens rather easily, the layers had to be condensed in less than 0.5 mm increments to obtain a dense structure. Mechanical testing at NIST produced compressive strength values equal to or greater than those of conventional dental amalgams. Because of its potential for eliminating mercury as a constituent in dental amalgam, this material created a stir in dental circles when first developed and conceivably could prove to be a major breakthrough in the field of dental restoratives. To date, the chief impediments to its approval for human clinical applications by the Food and Drug Administration are the potentially-toxic surface activating solution used for oxide reduction, and the high condensation pressures needed for cold welding because of the tendency for silver to strain harden. In this related study, the author, who has practiced general dentistry for 25 years, evaluates some of the mechanical and microstructural properties of these

  2. Energetic-particle synthesis of high-strength Al(O) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Barbour, J.C.; Myers, S.M.; Dugger, M.T.

    1995-09-28

    High-strength Al(O) alloys, initially discovered by ion implantation, have now been produced with electron-cyclotron resonance plasma deposition and pulsed-laser deposition. The mechanical properties of these deposited alloy layers were examined with nanoindentation, and finite element modeling of the indented layer on Si substrates was used to determine yield stresses for the alloys of {approximately} 1--5 GPa. The key to these high strengths is the high density of nanometer-size {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitates formed when high concentrations (5--30 at.%) of oxygen are introduced into aluminum as individual atoms or molecules. The strongest alloys have precipitates as small as 1 nm, implying that such small precipitates block dislocation motion. Based upon previous studies with oxygen-implanted aluminum, improved tribological properties are expected for layers made by the two new deposition methods.

  3. Density and glass forming ability in amorphous atomic alloys: The role of the particle softness.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Ian; Hudson, Toby; Harrowell, Peter

    2016-04-14

    A key property of glass forming alloys, the anomalously small volume difference with respect to the crystal, is shown to arise as a direct consequence of the soft repulsive potentials between metals. This feature of the inter-atomic potential is demonstrated to be responsible for a significant component of the glass forming ability of alloys due to the decrease in the enthalpy of fusion and the associated depression of the freezing point. PMID:27083733

  4. Density and glass forming ability in amorphous atomic alloys: The role of the particle softness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Ian; Hudson, Toby; Harrowell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A key property of glass forming alloys, the anomalously small volume difference with respect to the crystal, is shown to arise as a direct consequence of the soft repulsive potentials between metals. This feature of the inter-atomic potential is demonstrated to be responsible for a significant component of the glass forming ability of alloys due to the decrease in the enthalpy of fusion and the associated depression of the freezing point.

  5. Effect of Sc2O3 particles on the microstructure and properties of tungsten alloy prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Luo, Lai-Ma; Chen, Jing-Bo; Li, Ping; Luo, Guang-Nan; Cheng, Ji-Gui; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    W-Sc2O3 composite powders (W, W-0.5 vol%Sc2O3, and W-2 vol%Sc2O3) doped with highly uniform Sc2O3 particles were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying followed by hydrogen reduction with Sc2O3 and WO3 powders. The reduced powders were then consolidated by spark plasma sintering at 1700 °C to suppress grain growth during sintering. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses, as well as tensile tests and thermal conductivity measurements, were used to characterize the samples. The results showed that the Sc2O3 particles were uniformly distributed in the tungsten grains and grain boundaries. The W-2vol%Sc2O3 composite possess the best relative density and Vickers micro-hardness up to 98.6% and 683.2 Hv, respectively. The Sc2O3 particles significantly refine the grain size and increase the density of tungsten alloy. With increased Sc2O3 content, the thermal conductivity decreased while tensile strength of the samples respectively increased at 700 and 800 °C.

  6. Comparison of Three Real-Time Measurement Methods for Airborne Ultrafine Particles in the Silicon Alloy Industry.

    PubMed

    Kero, Ida Teresia; Jørgensen, Rikke Bramming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the applicability and the correlation between three commercially available instruments capable of detection, quantification, and characterization of ultrafine airborne particulate matter in the industrial setting of a tapping area in a silicon alloy production plant. The number concentration of ultrafine particles was evaluated using an Electric Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(TM)), a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS(TM)), and a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC). The results are discussed in terms of particle size distribution and temporal variations linked to process operations. The instruments show excellent temporal covariation and the correlation between the FMPS and ELPI is good. The advantage of the FMPS is the excellent time- and size resolution of the results. The main advantage of the ELPI is the possibility to collect size-fractionated samples of the dust for subsequent analysis by, for example, electron microscopy. The CPC does not provide information about the particle size distribution and its correlation to the other two instruments is somewhat poor. Nonetheless, the CPC gives basic, real-time information about the ultrafine particle concentration and can therefore be used for source identification. PMID:27598180

  7. The debonding and fracture of Si particles during the fatigue of a cast Al-Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, K.; Yang, N.; Horstemeyer, M.; McDowell, D.L.; Fan, J.

    1999-12-01

    Constant-amplitude high-cycle fatigue tests ({sigma}{sub max} = 133 MPa, {sigma}{sub max}/{sigma}{sub y} = 0.55, and R = 0.1) were conducted on a cylindrical samples machined from a cast A356-T6 aluminum plate: The fracture surface of the sample with the smallest fatigue-crack nucleating defect was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). For low crack-tip driving forces (fatigue-crack growth rates of da/dN {lt} 1 x 10{sup {minus}7} m/cycle), the authors discovered that a small semicircular surface fatigue crack propagated primarily through the Al-1% Si dendrite cells. The silicon particles in the eutectic remained intact and served as barriers at low fatigue-crack propagation rates. when the semicircular fatigue crack inevitably crossed the three-dimensional Al-Si eutectic network, it propagated primarily along the interface between the silicon particles and the Al-1% Si matrix. Furthermore, nearly all of the silicon particles were progressively debonded by the fatigue cracks propagating at low rates, with the exception of elongated particles with a major axis perpendicular to the crack plane, which were fractured. As the fatigue cracks grew with a high crack-tip driving force (fatigue-crack growth rates of da/dN {gt} 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} m/cycle), silicon particles ahead of the crack tip were fractured, and the crack subsequently propagated through the weakest distribution of prefractured particles in the Al-Si eutectic. Only small rounded silicon particles were observed to debond while the fatigue crack grew at high rates. Using fracture-surface markings and fracture mechanics, a macroscopic measure of the maximum critical driving force between particle debonding vs fracture during fatigue-crack growth was calculated to be approximately K{sub max}{sup tr} {approx} 6.0 MPa {radical}m for the present cast A356 alloy.

  8. A method of removing oxides from the surface of Fe-Ni-Co alloy particles by chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Yelton, W.G.

    1989-04-01

    The addition of metal particles to bulk glass has been shown to increase fracture strength and toughness. Composites containing well-bonded particles exhibit the largest increases in these properties. This report discusses a study in which a method was developed to alter the surfaces of Fe--Ni--Co particles so that improved particle/glass matrix bonding resulted. In this method, as received Fe--Ni--Co particles were intentionally oxidized to create surface and grain boundary oxides. The surface and grain boundary oxides were then preferentially removed from the surfaces of iron-nickel-cobalt alloy particles by chemical etching. After removal of the surface oxides, coral-like structures remained on the surfaces of the metal particles and furnished good mechanical bonding sites to the glass matrix. The progression of this study involved completion of three designed experiments. In the first experiment, an etching process was identified by controlling etching solution temperature and hold time. Data from the first study were then incorporated into the design of a second experiment which examined solution temperature heating rate and hold time at 60/degree/C. Finally, the best conditions of the previous studies were selected to investigate the effects of the agitation rate of the etching solution on the particle yield. Combining the best conditions from each study yielded the most efficient method of removing oxides, in which a solution of 120 ml/l H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ and 50 ml/l HCl was heated at 1/degree/C/min to 60/degree/C, held at 60/degree/C, and then moderately agitated for 30 min. 6 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cr-SiC Particles-Reinforced Fe-Based Alloy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-cheng; Du, Xiao-dong; Zhan, Ma-ji; Lang, Jing-wei; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Guang-fu; Shen, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In this study, SiC particles were first coated with Cr to form a layer that can protect the SiC particles from dissolution in the molten pool. Then, the Cr-SiC powder was injected into the tail of molten pool during plasma-transferred arc welding process (PTAW), where the temperature was relatively low, to prepare Cr-SiC particles reinforced Fe-based alloy coating. The microstructure and phase composition of the powder and surface coatings were analyzed, and the element distribution and hardness at the interfacial region were also evaluated. The protective layer consists of Cr3Si, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, which play an important role in the microstructure and mechanical properties. The protective layer is dissolved in the molten pool forming a flocculent region and a transition region between the SiC particles and the matrix. The tribological performance of the coating was also assessed using a ring-block sliding wear tester with GGr15 grinding ring under 490 and 980 N load. Cr-SiC particles-reinforced coating has a lower wear rate than the unreinforced coating.

  10. Effects of TiB2 particles and Ag on the activation energy of Ω phase in Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melotti, F.; Hirst, T.; Dustan, A.; Griffiths, W. D.

    2016-03-01

    This work analyses the effects of TiB2 reinforcement particles and silver additions on the activation energy of the GP zones and the Ω phase in an aluminium matrix composite (AMC). Several additions of TiB2 and Ag were made to a 2xxx series alloy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to identify the temperature peaks and the Kissinger approach used to calculate activation energies. Results showed that the activation energy for the Ω phase was greatly reduced by the addition of both elements; however, the TiB2 particles were more effective. In addition, experimental results show that the lowest value of the activation energy, 68 kJmol-1, was not affected by the silver content. This value is lower than any value found in literature and suggests that the formation of the Ω phase is related to the pipe diffusion of Cu in Al.

  11. The surface modified composite layer formation with boron carbide particles on magnesium alloy surfaces through pulse gas tungsten arc treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. B.; Jiang, H. Y.; Zeng, X. Q.; Li, D. H.; Yao, S. S.

    2007-02-01

    A novel fabrication process of surface modified composite layer by pulse current gas tungsten arc (GTA) surface modification process was used to deposit B 4C particles on the surface of magnesium alloy AZ31. This method is an effective technique in producing a high performance surface modified composite layer. During the pulse current GTA surface modification process, considerable convection can exist in the molten pool due to various driving forces and the pulse current could cause violent stirring in the molten pool, and the large temperature gradient across the boundary between the GTA modified surface and matrix metal resulted in rapid resolidification with high cooling rates in the molten pool, so that the process result notable grain refinement in the GTA surface modified composite layer. The hardness and wear resistance of the GTA surface modified composite layer are superior to that of as-received magnesium alloy AZ31. The hardness values and wear resistance of GTA surface modified composite layer depend on the GTA process parameters and the B 4C particles powder concentration and distribution. The optimum processing parameters for the formation of a homogeneous crack/defect-free and grain refinement microstructure were established.

  12. Ignition of steel alloys by impact of low-velocity iron/inert particles in gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Frank J.; Mcilroy, Kenneth; Williams, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    The ignition of carbon steel and 316 and 304 stainless steels caused by the impact of low-velocity particles (a standard mixture consisting of 2 g of iron and 3 g of inert materials) in gaseous oxygen was investigated using NASA/White Sands Test Facility for the ignition test, and a subsonic particle impact chamber to accelerate the particles that were injected into flowing oxygen upstream of the target specimen. It was found that the oxygen velocities required to ignite the three alloys were the same as that required to ignite the particle mixture. Ignition occurred at oxygen velocities greater than 45 m/sec at 20 to 24 MPa and was found to be independent of pressure between 2 and 30 MPa. Comparison of the present results and the past results from Wegener (1964) with the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) oxygen velocity limits for safe operations indicates that the CGA limits may be excessively conservative at high pressures and too liberal at low pressures.

  13. Chemical composition of individual aerosol particles in workplace air during production of manganese alloys.

    PubMed

    Gunst, S; Weinbruch, S; Wentzel, M; Ortner, H M; Skogstad, A; Hetland, S; Thomassen, Y

    2000-02-01

    Aerosol particle samples were collected at ELKEM ASA ferromanganese (FeMn) and silicomanganese (SiMn) smelters at Porsgrunn, Norway, during different production steps: raw material mixing, welding of protective steel casings, tapping of FeMn and slag, crane operation moving the ladles with molten metal, operation of the Metal Oxygen Refinement (MOR) reactor and casting of SiMn. Aerosol fractions were assessed for the analysis of the bulk elemental composition as well as for individual particle analysis. The bulk elemental composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. For individual particle analysis, an electron microprobe was used in combination with wavelength-dispersive techniques. Most particles show a complex composition and cannot be attributed to a single phase. Therefore, the particles were divided into six groups according to their chemical composition: Group I, particles containing mainly metallic Fe and/or Mn; Group II, slag particles containing mainly Fe and/or Mn oxides; Group III, slag particles consisting predominantly of oxidized flux components such as Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Na and K; Group IV, particles consisting mainly of carbon; Group V, mixtures of particles from Groups II, III and IV; Group VI, mixtures of particles from Groups II and III. In raw material mixing, particles originating from the Mn ores were mostly found. In the welding of steel casings, most particles were assigned to Group II, Mn and Fe oxides. During the tapping of slag and metal, mostly slag particles from Group III were found (oxides of the flux components). During movement of the ladles, most particles came from Group II. At the MOR reactor, most of the particles belonged to the slag phase consisting of the flux components (Group III). The particles collected during the casting of SiMn were mainly attributed to the slag phase (Groups III and V). Due to the compositional complexity of the particles, toxicological investigations on the

  14. Effect of Y2O3 and TiC Reinforcement Particles on Intermetallic Formation and Hardness of Al6061 Composites via Mechanical Alloying and Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Lin, Chen-Han

    2015-08-01

    Al6061-based composites reinforced with 2 wt pctY2O3 and 2 wt pctTiC particles produced by mechanical alloying were investigated. The reinforced particles play important roles in the microstructural development and in determining the properties of the alloys. High-energy ball milling can facilitate a solid-state reaction between reinforced particles and the Al matrix, and the reaction kinetics of atomic diffusion can be accelerated enormously by subsequent sintering processing. As a result, complex intermetallic compounds and oxide particles can be formed in the alloy. In this study, the effect of reinforcement on phase formation and mechanical properties of Al6061-based composites has been examined. The results suggest that nano-Y2O3 particles can act as nucleation sites to facilitate formation of Al-Si-Y-O-based oxide particles. The addition of TiC particles can effectively refine the grain structure and encourage formation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds. Nanoindentation was used to understand the local variations in mechanical properties of the Al6061-based composites.

  15. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Processing on Microstructures and Desired Properties of Particle-Strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kenneth Reed

    2000-01-01

    Ternary Cu-Cr-Nb alloys, particularly Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb (in at.%), have demonstrated good thermal stability as well as high strength and conductivity at elevated temperatures. The initial powder material has a bimodal size distribution of Cr2Nb precipitates. Primary Cr2Nb precipitates are approx. 1 micron, and secondary Cr2Nb particles are 30-200 nm. The particle coarsening was analyzed and found to follow LSW-type behavior, This study provides a detailed examination of the stability and strengthening effects of Cr2Nb particles. This investigation also revealed that the primary particles provide direct grain boundary pinning and indirect grain boundary strengthening but virtually no Orowan strengthening. The secondary particles found within grains do provide Orowan strengthening. For extruded material, grain bound-ary strengthening (Hall-Petch effect) accounts for two-thirds of the strength with Orowan effects contributing the remainder. The proven advantages of Cu-Cr-Nb were the motivation to improve these attributes via microstructural refinement. Mechanical milling (MM) of Cu- 4 Cr-2 Nb and Cu-8 Cr-2 Nb produced an increase in hot pressed Vickers hardness of 122% and 96%, respectively. The increase in hardness was more due to Cu grain-size refinement than to Cr,,Nb refinement. This study also demonstrated enhanced stability of MM Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb. Hot pressed 4 h milled Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb experienced only a 22% drop in hardness when annealed at 1273 K for 50 h versus a 30% drop for extruded Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb. The goal of improving the strength and stability of Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb to better than such properties for as- extruded Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb has been met. In addition, a figure-of-merit (FOM) coupling hardness and thermal conductivity was maximized for the case of 4 h milled Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb material. Overall, Cu-Cr-Nb alloys not only possess high strength, conductivity and thermal stability but also can be further developed to improve strength and stability.

  16. Studies of near-surface phenomena and erosion mechanisms in metallic alloys using single- and multi-particle impacts. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Keiser, J.R.

    1992-03-01

    An experimental study of the effects of material properties on erosion mechanisms was conducted by subjecting targets to single as well as multiple impacts of spherical particles at various velocities. A mechanical properties microprobe was used to monitor the hardening due to the impacts. Initial studies on several engineering alloys showed that work hardening was associated with single impacts, and the results suggested that the capacity to distribute the impact energy over large volumes improved a material`s erosion resistance. Studies also showed that the alloys work hardened significantly under multiple-particle impacts. Single-particle impact studies were found to correlate well with results from low-velocity, multiple-particle erosion experiments. (VC)

  17. Three-dimensional characterization of fatigue-relevant intermetallic particles in high-strength aluminium alloys using synchrotron X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizery, E.; Proudhon, H.; Buffiere, J.-Y.; Cloetens, P.; Morgeneyer, T. F.; Forest, S.

    2015-09-01

    Second-phase particles and small porosities are known to favour fatigue crack initiation in high-strength aluminium alloys 2050-T8 and 7050-T7451. Using high-resolution X-ray tomography (320 nm voxel size), with Paganin reconstruction algorithms, the probability that large clusters of particles contain porosities could be measured for the first time in 3D, as well as precise 3D size distributions. Additional holotomography imaging provided improved spatial resolution (50 nm voxel size), allowing to estimate the probability of finding cracked particles in the as-received material state. The extremely precise 3D shape (including cracks) as well as local chemistry of the particles has been determined. This experiment enabled unprecedented 3D identification of detrimental stress risers relevant for fatigue in as-received aluminium alloys.

  18. Formation of bands of ultrafine beryllium particles during rapid solidification of Al-Be alloys: Modeling and direct observations

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Tanner, L.E.; Smith, P.M.; Wall, M.A. ); Aziz, M.J. . Div. of Applied Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Rapid solidification of dilute hyper-eutectic and monotectic alloys sometimes produces a dispersion of ultrafine randomly-oriented particles that lie in arrays parallel to the advancing solidification front. The authors characterize this effect in Al-Be where Be-rich particles with diameters on the order of 10 nm form in arrays spaced approximately 25 nm apart, and they present a model of macroscopically steady state but microscopically oscillatory motion of the solidification front to explain this unusual microstructure. The proposed mechanism involves; (i) the build-up of rejected solute in a diffusional boundary layer which slows down the growing crystal matrix, (2) the boundary layer composition entering a metastable liquid miscibility gap, (3) homogeneous nucleation of solute rich liquid droplets in the boundary layer, and crystallization of these droplets, and (4) growth of the matrix past the droplets and its reformation into a planar interface. The size of the Be-rich particles is limited by the beryllium supersaturation in the diffusional boundary layer. A numerical model was developed to investigate this solidification mechanism, and the results of the model are in good agreement with experimental observations of rapidly solidified Al-5 at.% Be.

  19. The Correlation of Structural, Chemical, and Electronic Properties of Small Metal Particles and Their Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The low pressure interaction of CO with small Ru particles supported on ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) cleaved mica was studied using flash thermal desorption, Auger electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and transmission electron diffraction. Average particle sizes for these experiments varied between 1.2 and 16 nm. A careful search for CO decomposition on the Ru particles revealed no evidence of dissociaiton over a temperature range and pressure range of 300 to 550 C and 10 to the minus 11th power to 10 to the minus 6th millibar, respectively. Cas and heat treatments caused significant morphological changes and dispersion in the Ru particles, which affected CO desorptiom These effects were dependent on the particle size.

  20. Effect of alloy deformation on the average spacing parameters of non-deforming particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J; Gurland, J

    1980-02-01

    It is shown on the basis of stereological definitions and a few simple experiments that the commonly used average dispersion parameters, area fraction (A/sub A/)/sub ..beta../, areal particle density N/sub A..beta../ and mean free path lambda/sub ..cap alpha../, remain invariant during plastic deformation in the case of non-deforming equiaxed particles. Directional effects on the spacing parameters N/sub A..beta../ and lambda/sub ..cap alpha../ arise during uniaxial deformation by rotation and preferred orientation of nonequiaxed particles. Particle arrangement in stringered or layered structures and the effect of deformation on nearest neighbor distances of particles and voids are briefly discussed in relation to strength and fracture theories.

  1. Effect of texture of polishing particle on the surface roughness of a cobalt-chromium alloy using a centrifugal shooting type polishing machine.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Kaori; Yamaba, Osamu; Nokubi, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    In a previous report, we investigated the influence of the shooting angle of polishing particle on the surface roughness of a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy using a centrifugal shooting type polishing machine. In the present work, we examined the effects of the texture of polishing particle and polishing time on the surface roughness of Co-Cr alloy cast specimens. Nine different textures of polishing particle were investigated with respect to core material and particle abrasiveness: three different elastic body cores (core A, hard chloroprene rubber; core B, soft chloroprene rubber; core C, natural rubber) and three different green carborundum powders as abrasives (#800, #3000, and #6000). Polishing was performed under a fixed shooting angle of 30 degrees for six different polishing times (1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 minutes). Surface roughness (Ra, Sm) and cutting depth on the polished surface were measured after each polishing stage. Surface roughness was significantly improved within three minutes, particularly using a polishing particle with rough carborundum powder (#800 or #3000) and a heavy core (core A or core B). Cutting depth increased in proportion to polishing time and roughness of carborundum powder, and was least with core C. These results suggested that a polishing particle composed of core B and #3000 carborundum paste was superior for the intermediate polishing of a Co-Cr alloy, and that polishing time should be limited to within three minutes. PMID:16445008

  2. Room-temperature amorphous alloy field-effect transistor exhibiting particle and wave electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, M.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-02-28

    The realization of room-temperature macroscopic field effect transistors (FETs) will lead to new epoch-making possibilities for electronic applications. The I{sub d}-V{sub g} characteristics of the millimeter-sized aluminum-oxide amorphous alloy (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} FETs were measured at a gate-drain bias voltage of 0–60 μV in nonmagnetic conditions and under a magnetic fields at room temperature. Application of dc voltages to the gate electrode resulted in the transistor exhibiting one-electron Coulomb oscillation with a period of 0.28 mV, Fabry-Perot interference with a period of 2.35 μV under nonmagnetic conditions, and a Fano effect with a period of 0.26 mV for Vg and 0.2 T under a magnetic field. The realization of a low-energy controllable device made from millimeter-sized Ni-Nb-Zr-H amorphous alloy throws new light on cluster electronics.

  3. Studies of second phase particles in different zirconium alloys using extractive carbon replica and an electrolytic anodic dissolution procedure [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Jago, Gilles

    2002-10-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely studied for applications as cladding tubes and structural components of PWR fuel assemblies. Due to their influence on some of the alloys properties (corrosion resistance, irradiation growth, …), the crystallographic structure and the chemical stoichiometry of the second phase particles (SPP) precipitated in these alloys have to be well established. The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained using two methods of SPP extractions. The first one, the extractive carbon replica method, allowed us to determine the chemical composition of SPP in different zirconium alloys: Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr (Zircaloy-4 ®), Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr-(V,Mo), Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Fe alloys. The second one, an anodic dissolution procedure of the matrix, is an interesting way of isolating SPP from the surrounding α-Zr matrix, giving access to a precise determination of the crystallographic structure and lattice parameters of the SPP by X-ray diffraction. This procedure was validated for Zy-4 by comparing the SPP size distribution obtained by extraction with that directly measured on a massive Zy-4 alloy (i.e. the SPP size distributions were the same for both measurements).

  4. Influence of reduction temperature on composition, particle size, and magnetic properties of CoFe alloy nanomaterials derived from layered double hydroxide precursors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuangxia; Wang, Lianying; Yue, Shuang; Lu, Yanluo; He, Jing; Zhao, Dongye

    2014-06-14

    Individual CoFe alloy nanoparticles and CoFe-MgO nanocomposites were prepared through thermal reduction of single-source layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors at various temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses to investigate the influence of reduction temperature on the composition, particle size and size distribution, as well as the magnetic properties of the resulting materials. XRD and SEM results show that the as-prepared CoFe alloy nanoparticles and CoFe-MgO nanocomposites display high crystallinity and high purity. The average particle size of individual CoFe nanoparticles increases with the increase of reduction temperature. In the presence of the MgO matrix, uniform CoFe alloy nanoparticles with a narrow diameter distribution (8-11 nm) were obtained. Magnetic measurements indicate that the saturation magnetization strength (Ms) of the resulting materials increases with reduction temperature. The individual CoFe alloy nanoparticles exhibit excellent soft magnetic behavior with an extremely high Ms value (213 emu g(-1) at 800 °C), comparable to that of bulk CoFe alloy (230 emu g(-1)). For CoFe-MgO nanocomposites, small Ms values were obtained due to the small CoFe alloy particle size and low percentage of magnetic component. However, the coercivities are greatly enhanced (663 Oe at 450 °C) for the composites, implying their potential applications in data storage and other magnetic devices. PMID:24695765

  5. High-resolution chemical analysis by STEM-EELS of nanosized oxide particles in a mechanically-alloyed FeCrAl intermetallic

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G. Muñoz-Morris, M.A.

    2015-05-15

    The chemical composition of nanosized oxides has been analysed in a mechanically-alloyed (MA) iron–chromium–aluminium intermetallic containing yttria additions using an aberration-corrected, high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The oxide particles are seen to contain yttrium and oxygen only, but very little of the matrix metallic elements, while the matrix in the immediate vicinity shows a very low iron content. Possible reasons for the change of matrix composition outside the particle-matrix interface are discussed. - Highlights: • High-resolution chemical analysis of oxide particles was performed using STEM-EELS. • Oxide particles contain Y and O but essentially no elements from the Fe–Cr–Al matrix. • The matrix immediately outside the particles appears to be depleted in Fe. • Diffusion of Y during particle growth possibly transports vacancies to the interface.

  6. Application of the Eyring Equation in the Evaluation of Semi-Solid Forming-Induced Si Particle Refinement in the Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Yasuyoshi; Nara, Daisaku; Fushimi, Kazuyo; Kumazawa, Noriyoshi

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of Eyring's theory of absolute reaction rate, an approach to modeling Si particle refinement acceleration in the semi-solid forming of a hypereutectic Al-Si alloy has been developed. The acceleration variable data used in the present analysis were obtained from a semi-solid compression test using Al-25 mass pct Si alloy cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 15 mm and a height of 15 mm; the test conditions comprised a combination of compression displacements ∆ h = 5, 10, and 12 mm; compression rates v = 5, 25, and 125 mm/min; and test temperatures T = 853 K and 863 K (580 °C and 590 °C). The coarse primary Si particle refinement depends on a complex interaction among variables, such as compression displacement, compression rate, and test temperature. The performance of Si particle refinement degraded under higher temperature, slower strain rates, and slower shear rates. The results of the Si particle size are suitably summarized by the Eyring equation as a function of the temperature and the shear rate. The baseline Si particle size and the baseline temperature of Si particle refinement, i.e., the reference temperature, were G N = 0.27 mm and T N = 866.4 K (593.4 °C), respectively. The calculated results using this equation correlated well with the observed results. An acceleration factor of Si particle refinement was successfully derived on the basis of this equation and indicated that operating at a higher shear rate and a temperature just above the melting point of eutectic Al-Si alloy are the optimum conditions for refining Si particles.

  7. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Tang

    2004-12-19

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  8. Evaluation of the response of aluminum alloys to single and multiple particle impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Rao, M.; Notre Dame Univ., IN )

    1989-01-01

    Samples of annealed 1100 aluminum and 7075-T6 aluminum were eroded to steady-state conditions in a multiple particle erosion system. The samples were sectioned through the eroded areas, and a mechanical properties microprobe was used to measure the hardness of the material. The oblique multiple particle impacts produced a rippled surface with the hardness at the top of the wave crests approximately equal to that in the valleys. However, the total depth of hardening was significantly greater in material below the wave crests and was a function of the material for both wave crests and valleys. The depth of hardened material below the wave crest was about equal to the height of the wave plus the depth of hardening below the valley. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Influence of particle velocity and molten phase on the chemical and mechanical properties of HVOF-sprayed structural coatings of alloy 316L

    SciTech Connect

    Voggenreiter, H.; Huber, H.; Beyer, S.; Spies, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    The HP/HVOF spraying process allows the production of oxide-low, thick coatings with low porosity. This fact implies the feasibility of load-bearing HP/HVOF-sprayed structures. Optimum mechanical properties are required for structural applications of HP/HVOF-sprayed iron base alloy 316L. Process-parameter-dependent particle properties like temperature and velocity strongly influence the microstructure and the chemical and mechanical properties of HP/HVOF-sprayed alloy 316L. Results of metallographical and chemical analysis and laser-optic-aided particle velocity measurement lead to a new understanding of particle oxidation based on a high volume fraction of liquid phase and high particle impact velocity. The volume fraction of oxides greatly affects the mechanical properties of homogenized HP/HVOF-316 L. Optimum process parameters result in reduced oxide content less than 0.9% and consequently in strength and elongation comparable to that of wrought alloy 316L. Additionally to these excellent mechanical properties, a low porosity level of about 0.1 to 0.2% is achieved. These fundamental results were transferred successfully to a new type of combustion chamber for hypersonic aircraft with reduced complexity and weight.

  10. The Use of Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) to Study the Movement of Inclusions in Low-Melting-Point Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, W. D.; Beshay, Y.; Caden, A. J.; Fan, X.; Gargiuli, J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Parker, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) employs a radioactive particle that decays by emission of positrons. These positrons collide with local electrons to produce γ-rays emitted at 180 deg to each other; detection of these γ-ray pairs allows the location of the radioactive particle to be identified within a few millimeters. This technique has been tested to determine its applicability to the study of inclusions in cast metals. To use particles representative of inclusion sizes in castings, both alumina particles and particles of an ion exchange resin were employed. These were within a size range of approximately 60 to 100 μm, made radioactive by adsorption and ion exchange techniques, respectively. The radioactive particles, of activity 100 to 1000 μCi, were introduced into tube-shaped castings made from the low-melting-point alloys Field's metal and Lensalloy-136, cast into an acrylic mold. The technique allowed the particle track to be determined from the point of initial introduction to the final resting place of the particle, with increasing reproducibility being obtained as the reproducibility as the casting technique was improved. Experiments in which filters were placed in to the running system showed that the removal of the particles by the filters varied according to the filter pore size.

  11. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Erik Q.; Cafasso, Danielle E.; Lee, Karen W.M.; Pierce, Lisa M.

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  12. The Effect of the Second Phase Particle Size on Fracture Behavior of Cu - 0.1% Sn Ultra-Fine-Grained Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizova, S. N.; Raab, G. I.; Faizov, I. A.; Aksenov, D. A.; Zaripov, N. G.; Faizov, R. A.; Semenov, V. I.; Zemlyakova, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    The fracture behavior of Cu - 0.1% Sn alloy in samples of two types, namely with similar characteristics of ultra-fine-grained structure, but different in the second phase particle size has been investigated. These two types of samples were obtained by means of equal channel angular pressing with different number of passes. It has been found that with increase in the total strain the morphology and orientation of the fracture surface demonstrate changes corresponding to the development of shear mode. The arguments for the hypothesis that the fracture behavior change is connected with the decrease of the particle size and increase of their distribution density are given.

  13. Competition of single-ion anisotropy of Sm and Dy ions during the spin-reorientation transition in (Nd1- x- y Sm x Dy y )(FeCo)B supermagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, E. N.; Ospennikova, O. G.; Piskorskii, V. P.; Korolev, D. V.; Kunitsyna, E. I.; Talantsev, A. D.; Morgunov, R. B.

    2016-07-01

    It has been found that an increase in the Sm concentration in the range x = 0.05-0.18 in (Nd1‒ x‒ y Sm x Dy y )(FeCo)B supermagnets leads to a shift in the spin-reorientation transition temperature to higher values, whereas a Dy addition results in a decrease in the transition temperature. Single-ion anisotropy of Sm and Dy ions has different symmetry, making contributions of opposite signs to the resulting magnetic anisotropy of the lattice. Therefore, the threshold temperature T S of the spin-reorientation transition, which is determined by the balance of magnetic anisotropies of sublattices, can be controlled using ions with different symmetries.

  14. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated with the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.

  15. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated withmore » the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.« less

  16. Fe and Mn oxidation states by TEM-EELS in fine-particle emissions from a Fe-Mn alloy making plant.

    PubMed

    Marris, Hélène; Deboudt, Karine; Flament, Pascal; Grobéty, Bernard; Gieré, Reto

    2013-10-01

    Fine particles were sampled both inside the chimneys and in the near-field of an Fe-Mn-alloy manufacturing plant. The transfer from one point to another point in the environment, as well as the bioavailability and toxicity of these two metals, depend above all on their speciation. The oxidation states of iron and manganese in the collected particles were determined by using transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (TEM-EELS). The mineralogical identity of these metal-rich particles was determined by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This study shows that both iron and manganese in metallic particles are prone to oxidation reactions via gas/particle conversion mechanisms, which take place in the flue gases within the smoke stacks. This phenomenon is more pronounced for the smallest Fe-rich particles. However, no further change of oxidation state of the two elements was observed in the near-field of the plant, after emission into the atmosphere (within <2000 m of the smoke stacks). The oxidation states of iron and manganese remain mainly between +II and +III, which is probably due to short residence time of these particles in the pollution plume. PMID:24000787

  17. Porous Au-Ag Alloy Particles Inlaid AgCl Membranes As Versatile Plasmonic Catalytic Interfaces with Simultaneous, in Situ SERS Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Yuan, Kaiping; Liu, Qinghe; Liang, Chongyun; Wang, Xiang; Cheng, Yi-Feng; Li, Qingqing; Wang, Min; Che, Renchao

    2015-08-26

    We present a novel porous Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membrane as plasmonic catalytic interfaces with real-time, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) monitoring. The Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membranes were obtained via a facile two-step, air-exposed, and room-temperature immersion reaction with appropriate annealing process. Owing to the designed integration of semiconductor component AgCl and noble metal Au-Ag particles, both the catalytic reduction and visible-light-driven photocatalytic activities toward organic contaminants were attained. Specifically, the efficiencies of about 94% of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP, 5 × 10(-5) M) reduction after 8 min of reaction, and degradation of rhodamine 6G (R6G, 10(-5) M) after 12 min of visible light irradiation were demonstrated. Moreover, efficiencies of above 85% of conversion of 4-NP to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and 90% of R6G degradation were achieved as well after 6 cycles of reactions, by which robust recyclability was confirmed. Further, with distinct SERS signals generated simultaneously from the surfaces of Au-Ag particles under laser excitation, in situ SERS monitoring of the process of catalytic reactions with superior sensitivity and linearity has been realized. Overall, the capability of the Au-Ag particles inlaid AgCl membranes to provide SERS monitored catalytic and visible-light-driven photocatalytic conversion of organic pollutants, along with their mild and cost-effective fabrication method, would make sense for in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of (photo)catalytic reactions, and also future development of potable, multifunctional and integrated catalytic and sensing devices. PMID:26263301

  18. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  19. Prediction of scratch resistance of cobalt chromium alloy bearing surface, articulating against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, due to third-body wear particles.

    PubMed

    Mirghany, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    The entrapment of abrasive particles within the articulation between a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCrMo) femoral component and an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cup of artificial hip joints or tibial inserts of artificial knee joints usually scratches the metallic bearing surface and consequently increases the surface roughness. This has been recognized as one of the main causes of excessive polyethylene wear, leading to osteolysis and loosening of the prosthetic components. The purpose of this study was to use the finite element method to investigate the resistance of the cobalt chromium alloy bearing surface to plastic deformation, as a first approximation to causing scratches, due to various entrapped debris such as bone, CoCrMo and ZrO2 (contained in radiopaque polymethyl methacrylate cement). A simple axisymmetric micro contact mechanics model was developed, where a spherical third-body wear particle was indented between the two bearing surfaces, modelled as two solid cylinders of a given diameter, under the contact pressure determined from macro-models representing either hip or knee implants. The deformation of both the wear particle and the bearing surfaces was modelled and was treated as elastic-plastic. The indented peak-to-valley height on the CoCrMo bearing surface from the finite element model was found to be in good agreement with that reported in a previous study when the third-body wear particle was assumed to be rigid. Under the physiological contact pressure experienced in both hip and knee implants, ZrO2 wear particles were found to be fully embedded within the UHMWPE bearing surface, and the maximum von Mises stresses within the CoCrMo bearing surface reached the corresponding yield strength. Consequently, the CoCrMo bearing surface was deformed plastically and the corresponding peak-to-valley height (surface roughness) was found to increase with both the hardness and the size of the wear particle. Even in the case of CoCrMo wear

  20. Studies of waste-canister compatibility. [Waste forms: Al-Si and Pb-Sn matrix alloys, FUETAP, glass, Synroc D, and waste particles coated with carbon or carbon plus SiC

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    Compatibility studies were conducted between 7 waste forms and 15 potential canister structural materials. The waste forms were Al-Si and Pb-Sn matrix alloys, FUETAP, glass, Synroc D, and waste particles coated with carbon or carbon plus silicon carbide. The canister materials included carbon steel (bare and with chromium or nickel coatings), copper, Monel, Cu-35% Ni, titanium (grades 2 and 12), several Inconels, aluminum alloy 5052, and two stainless steels. Tests of either 6888 or 8821 h were conducted at 100 and 300/sup 0/C, which bracket the low and high limits expected during storage. Glass and FUETAP evolved sulfur, which reacted preferentially with copper, nickel, and alloys of these metals. The Pb-Sn matrix alloy stuck to all samples and the carbon-coated particles to most samples at 300/sup 0/C, but the extent of chemical reaction was not determined. Testing for 0.5 h at 800/sup 0/C was included because it is representative of a transportation accident and is required of casks containing nuclear materials. During these tests (1) glass and FUETAP evolved sulfur, (2) FUETAP evolved large amounts of gas, (3) Synroc stuck to titanium alloys, (4) glass was molten, and (5) both matrix alloys were molten with considerable chemical interactions with many of the canister samples. If this test condition were imposed on waste canisters, it would be design limiting in many waste storage concepts.

  1. Oxidation of nanoscale Au–In alloy particles as a possible route toward stable Au-based catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Eli A.; Tong, Xiao; Jungjohann, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of bimetallic alloy nanoparticles comprising a noble and a nonnoble metal is expected to cause the formation of a single-component surface oxide of the nonnoble metal, surrounding a core enriched with the noble metal. Studying the room temperature oxidation of Au–In nanoparticles, we show that this simple picture does not apply to an important class of bimetallic alloys, in which the oxidation proceeds via predominant oxygen diffusion. Instead of a crystalline In2O3 shell, such oxidation leads to an amorphous shell of mixed Au–In oxide that remains stable to high temperatures and whose surface layer is enriched with Au. The Au-rich mixed oxide is capable of adsorbing both CO and O2 and converting them to CO2, which desorbs near room temperature. The oxidation of Au–In alloys to a mixed Au–In oxide shows significant promise as a viable approach toward Au-based oxidation catalysts, which do not require any complex synthesis processes and resist deactivation up to at least 300 °C. PMID:23754412

  2. Electron Microscopy Characterization of an As-Fabricated Research Reactor Fuel Plate Comprised of U-7Mo Particles Dispersed in an Al-2Si Alloy Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; J. Gan; J. F. Jue; B. D. Miller

    2010-11-01

    To understand the microstructural development of nuclear fuel plates during irradiation, it is imperative to know the microstructure of a fuel plate after all the fabrication steps have been completed and before it is inserted into the reactor. To this end, a U–7 wt.% Mo alloy research reactor dispersion fuel plate with Al–2 wt.% Si matrix was destructively examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the developed microstructure after fabrication. Of particular interest for this study was how the Si that was added to the fuel matrix partitioned between the various fuel plate phases during fabrication. Si was added to the matrix so that the microstructure that developed during fuel fabrication would exhibit good irradiation behavior. SEM analysis was used to identify the representative microstructure, the compositions of the various phases, and the partitioning behavior of the fuel and matrix constituents. TEM analysis was employed to definitively identify the phases in the U–7Mo alloy and the phases that formed due to diffusional interactions between the fuel particles and matrix during fuel plate fabrication. The TEM results are the first reported for an as-fabricated U–7 wt.% Mo dispersion fuel plate with an Al alloy matrix. SEM results showed that a significant portion of the original ?-(U–Mo) fuel particles had transformed to a lamellar microstructure, comprised of a-U and either ? or ?' phases, and the fuel/matrix interaction layers were enriched in Si. TEM analysis identified an ordered fcc (U–Mo)(Al–Si)3 type of phase, which formed at the decomposed U–7Mo/matrix interface and extended into the lamellar microstructure. Some regions of the U–7Mo particles retained the single-phase ?-(U–Mo). Small precipitate phases were observed in the fuel meat matrix that contained Fe, Al, and Si. The Si that is added to the matrix of a U–Mo dispersion fuel plate to improve irradiation performance appears to result in

  3. Fabrication and electromagnetic properties of bio-based helical soft-core particles by way of Ni-Fe alloy electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mingming; Zhang, Deyuan; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Wenqiang; Yuan, Liming

    2011-12-01

    Ni-Fe alloy electroplating was used as a bio-limited forming process to fabricate bio-based helical soft-core ferromagnetic particles, and a low frequency vibration device was applied to the cathode to avoid microorganism ( Spirulina platens) cells adhesion to the copper net during the course of plating. The morphologies and ingredients of the coated Spirulina cells were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer. The complex permittivity and permeability of the samples containing the coated Spirulina cells before and after heat treatment were measured and investigated by a vector network analyzer. The results show that the Spirulina cells after plating keep their initial helical shape, and applying low frequency vibration to the copper net cathode in the plating process can effectively prevent agglomeration and intertwinement of the Spirulina cells. The microwave absorbing and electromagnetic properties of the samples containing the coated Spirulina cells particles with heat treatment are superior to those samples containing the coated Spirulina cells particles without heat treatment.

  4. Evolution of insoluble eutectic Si particles in anodic oxidation films during adipic-sulfuric acid anodizing processes of ZL114A aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lei; Liu, Jian-hua; Li, Song-mei; Yu, Mei; Wang, Lei; Cui, Yong-xin

    2015-03-01

    The effects of insoluble eutectic Si particles on the growth of anodic oxide films on ZL114A aluminum alloy substrates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anodic oxidation was performed at 25°C and a constant voltage of 15 V in a solution containing 50 g/L sulfuric acid and 10 g/L adipic acid. The thickness of the formed anodic oxidation film was approximately 7.13 μm. The interpore distance and the diameters of the major pores in the porous layer of the film were within the approximate ranges of 10-20 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. Insoluble eutectic Si particles strongly influenced the morphology of the anodic oxidation films. The anodic oxidation films exhibited minimal defects and a uniform thickness on the ZL114A substrates; in contrast, when the front of the oxide oxidation films encountered eutectic Si particles, defects such as pits and non-uniform thickness were observed, and pits were observed in the films.

  5. Tuning of platinum nano-particles by Au usage in their binary alloy for direct ethanol fuel cell: Controlled synthesis, electrode kinetics and mechanistic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Abhijit; Mondal, Achintya; Datta, Jayati

    2015-06-01

    Understanding of the electrode-kinetics and mechanism of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is of considerable interest for optimizing electro-catalysis in direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). This work attempts to design Pt based electro-catalyst on carbon support, tuned with gold nano-particles (NPs), for their use in DEFC operating in alkaline medium. The platinum-gold alloyed NPs are synthesized at desired compositions and size (2-10 nm) by controlled borohydride reduction method and successfully characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS and XPS techniques. The kinetic parameters along with the activation energies for the EOR are evaluated over the temperature range 20-80 °C and the oxidation reaction products estimated through ion chromatographic analysis. Compared to single Pt/C catalyst, the over potential of EOR is reduced by ca. 500 mV, at the onset during the reaction, for PtAu/C alloy with only 23% Pt content demonstrating the ability of Au and/or its surface oxides providing oxygen species at much lower potentials compared to Pt. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the peak power density (>191%) is observed in an in-house fabricated direct ethanol anion exchange membrane fuel cell, DE(AEM)FC using the best performing Au covered Pt electrode (23% Pt) compared to the monometallic Pt catalyst.

  6. Influence of shooting angle of polishing particle on surface roughness of a cobalt-chromium alloy using a centrifugal shooting type polishing machine.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Kaori; Yamaba, Osamu; Nokubi, Takashi

    2004-12-01

    The centrifugal shooting type polishing machine is a recently developed apparatus that seeks to improve the efficiency and environment of polishing removable prostheses. In an attempt to optimize the effectiveness of this apparatus, this study examined the influence of the shooting angle of polishing particle on the surface roughness of cobalt-chromium alloy casting specimens. Polishing was performed for three minutes under five shooting angle conditions: 90 degrees, 60 degrees, 45 degrees, 30 degrees, and 15 degrees. Surface roughness (Ra, Sm) was measured after each polishing stage. There were significant differences (p < 0.01) in Ra between shooting angle of 90 degrees (0.95 microm) and shooting angles of 45 degrees (0.62 microm) or less, and in Sm between 90 degrees (207 microm), 60 degrees (350 microm), and shooting angles of 45 degrees (868 microm) or less. These findings indicated that excellent surface texture was produced when shooting angle was 45 degrees or less. PMID:15688732

  7. Microstructure and martensitic transformation in the Fe-Mn-Al-Ni shape memory alloy with B2-type coherent fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, T.; Nagasako, M.; Okano, M.; Endo, K.; Kainuma, R.

    2012-12-01

    Microstructure and martensitic transformation yielding a magnetic change were investigated for Fe43.5Mn34Al15Ni7.5 alloy with B2-type fine precipitates. Thermoelastic martensitic transformation from the ferromagnetic parent phase to the weak magnetic martensite with a nano-twinned fcc structure was confirmed. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopic observation revealed that a β particle of about 10 nm maintains coherency with the matrix martensite phase, even though distorted due to the martensitic transformation. The martensitic transformation temperatures decreased about 75 K by application of a magnetic field of 70 kOe and magnetic field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was confirmed.

  8. Improved Wear Resistance of Al-Mg Alloy with SiC and Al2O3 Particle Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi, Md. A.; Bhadhon, K. M. H.; Haque, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Al-3.73Mg alloy was reinforced with a different ratio of SiC and Al2O3 particulate mixtures, and their corresponding wear properties were investigated by pin-on-disk method. The investigation revealed that the mass loss of the hybrid composite at different loads and sliding velocities reduced with the increase of the SiC volume. Only 6% particulate reinforcement in the Al-Mg matrix was enough to reduce the wear of the surface by one-fourth. The wear mechanism was also investigated by examining the worn surface with a scanning electron microscope.

  9. Precipitation of Non-Spherical Particles in Aluminum Alloys Part I: Generalization of the Kampmann-Wagner Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmedal, Bjørn; Osmundsen, Elisa; Du, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Particles precipitated during aging treatments often have non-spherical shapes, e.g., needles or plates, while in the classical Kampmann-Wagner Numerical (KWN) precipitation model, it is assumed that the particles are of spherical shape. This model is here generalized resulting in two correction factors accounting for the effects induced by the particles' non-spherical shape on their growth kinetics. The first one is for the correction of the growth rate. It is derived from the approximate solution of the diffusion problem on spheroidal coordinate and verified by the three-dimensional numerical solutions for cuboid particles. The second factor is for the energetic correction due to the particle surface curvature. It is derived from chemical potential equality (or Gibbs energy minimization principle) at equilibrium for non-spherical particles and provides a correction factor for the Gibbs-Thomson effect. In the accompanying paper, the two correction factors are implemented into a multi-component KWN modeling framework, and the resulting improvements on the model's predictive power are demonstrated.

  10. Hybrid Effect on Whisker Orientation Dependence of Composite Strength of Aluminum Cast Alloy Reinforced by Al2O3 Whiskers and SiC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md, Rafiquzzaman; Arai, Yoshio

    The hybrid effect on the orientation dependence of the composite strength of an aluminum cast alloy reinforced by Al2O3 whiskers and SiC particles is studied experimentally and numerically. Two types of specimens are prepared for monotonic bending tests. The longitudinal specimen orientation (maximum stress direction) is parallel to or normal to randomly oriented whiskers in plane. The monotonic strength is 18% higher when the hybrid metal matrix composite (MMC) is subjected to an external load parallel to the random whisker orientation in plane than when the load is perpendicular to the whisker orientation. The whisker orientation dependence of composite strength in hybrid composite is weaker than that in whisker-reinforced composite. On the fracture surface of the specimen loaded along the direction parallel to the random whisker orientation in plane, most whiskers are broken while many de-bonded interfaces between the whiskers and matrix are observed on the fracture surface of the specimen loaded along the direction perpendicular to the whisker orientation. To characterize the hybrid effect on the whisker orientation dependence of composite strength, a three-dimensional hybrid composite unit cell model including one whisker and a few particles under a periodic boundary condition is developed using the finite element method. The hybrid composites have higher whisker stress than whisker-reinforced composite when subjected to an external load parallel to the whisker orientation if these composites have the same total volume fraction of reinforcement and the particles are distributed randomly. Under an external load perpendicular to the whisker orientation, the interface stress of hybrid composites is lower than that of whisker-reinforced composite. As a result, the strength difference for parallel and perpendicular loading conditions of the hybrid composites is smaller than that of whisker-reinforced composite. Thus, the weak whisker orientation effect in the

  11. A new smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for friction stir welding: Process modeling and simulation of microstructure evolution in a magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Dongsheng; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ahzi, Said; Khraisheh, Marwan; Khaleel, Moe

    2013-09-01

    We present a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for friction stir welding (FSW). FSW has broad commercial application in the marine, aerospace, rail, and automotive industries. However, development of the FSW process for each new application has remained largely empirical. Few established numerical modeling techniques have been developed that can explain and predict important features of the process physics involved in FSW. This is particularly true in the areas of material flow and mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW that may have significant advantages over current finite element or finite difference based methods. Unlike traditional grid-based methods, Lagrangian particle methods such as SPH can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, and the material’s strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Three-dimensional simulations of FSW on AZ31 Mg alloy are performed. The temperature history and distribution, grain size, microhardness as well as the texture evolution are presented. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. The use of mechanical alloying for the preparation of palladized magnesium bimetallic particles for the remediation of PCBs.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Janelle L; Devor, Robert W; Aitken, Brian; Hampton, Michael D; Quinn, Jacqueline W; Clausen, Christian A; Geiger, Cherie L

    2011-09-15

    The kinetic rate of dechlorination of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB-151) by mechanically alloyed Mg/Pd was studied for optimization of the bimetallic system. Bimetal production was first carried out in a small-scale environment using a SPEX 8000M high-energy ball mill with 4-μm-magnesium and palladium impregnated on graphite, with optimized parameters including milling time and Pd-loading. A 5.57-g sample of bimetal containing 0.1257% Pd and ball milled for 3 min resulted in a degradation rate of 0.00176 min(-1)g(-1) catalyst as the most reactive bimetal. The process was then scaled-up, using a Red Devil 5400 Twin-Arm Paint Shaker, fitted with custom plates to hold milling canisters. Optimization parameters tested included milling time, number of ball bearings used, Pd-loading, and total bimetal mass milled. An 85-g sample of bimetal containing 0.1059% Pd and ball-milled for 23 min with 16 ball bearings yielded the most reactive bimetal with a degradation rate of 0.00122 min(-1)g(-1) catalyst. Further testing showed adsorption did not hinder extraction efficiency and that dechlorination products were only seen when using the bimetallic system, as opposed to any of its single components. The bimetallic system was also tested for its ability to degrade a second PCB congener, PCB-45, and a PCB mixture (Arochlor 1254); both contaminants were seen to degrade successfully. PMID:21807459

  13. An Investigation on Axial Deformation Behavior of Thin-Wall Unfilled and Filled Tube with Aluminum Alloy (Al-Si7Mg) Foam Reinforced with SiC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaraswamidhas, L. A.; Rajak, Dipen Kumar; Das, S.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to produce superior quality aluminum alloy foam with low relative density and higher resistance against compression deformation. This investigation has studied crash energy capacities of unfilled and filled aluminum alloy foams in mild steel tubes. The foam has been prepared by the melt route process with an addition of 5wt.% silicon carbide particles. The fabricated aluminum alloy foams were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Material Pro analyzer. It was observed that the foam-filled tubes could absorb more energy as compared to the unfilled tubes before reaching the complete densification point. Also, the aluminum alloy foams had better energy absorption capacity during the crash or impact loading. This article demonstrates the excellent ability of aluminum alloy foam application in the field where there is a need to absorb crash energy. It is to be noted that the amount of energy absorption will be greater for low-density foam filled in thin-wall rectangular section tubes. We have seen an increasing trend in the application of aluminum foams inside the thin-wall mild steel tubes for maximum energy absorption.

  14. Characteristics and in vitro response of thin hydroxyapatite–titania films produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation of Ti alloys in electrolytes with particle additions

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, W. K.; Sukhorukova, I. V.; Shtansky, D. V.; Levashov, E. A.; Zhitnyak, I. Y.; Gloushankova, N. A.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, P. V.; Petrzhik, M. I.; Matthews, A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of the biological properties of Ti by surface doping with hydroxyapatite (HA) is of great significance, especially for orthodontic applications. This study addressed the effects of HA particle size in the electrolyte suspension on the characteristics and biological properties of thin titania-based coatings produced on Ti–6Al–4V alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). Detailed morphological investigation of the coatings formed by a single-stage PEO process with two-step control of the electrical parameters was performed using the Minkowski functionals approach. The surface chemistry was studied by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, whereas mechanical properties were evaluated using scratch tests. The biological assessment included in vitro evaluation of the coating bioactivity in simulated body fluid (SBF) as well as studies of spreading, proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The results demonstrated that both HA micro- and nanoparticles were successfully incorporated in the coatings but had different effects on their surface morphology and elemental distributions. The micro-particles formed an irregular surface morphology featuring interpenetrated networks of fine pores and coating material, whereas the nanoparticles penetrated deeper into the coating matrix which retained major morphological features of the porous TiO2 coating. All coatings suffered cohesive failure in scratch tests, but no adhesive failure was observed; moreover doping with HA increased the coating scratch resistance. In vitro tests in SBF revealed enhanced bioactivity of both HA-doped PEO coatings; furthermore, the cell proliferation/morphometric tests showed their good biocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a well-organised actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions in MC3T3-E1 cells cultivated on these substrates. The cell alkaline phosphatase activity in the presence of

  15. Martensitic transformations in shape-memory Cu-Zn-AI alloys with the α-phase particles and the bainite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskaya, I.; Zel'Dovich, V.; Frolova, N.

    2003-10-01

    The martensitic transformations in Cu-Zn-A1 alloys undergoing the decomposition of β solid solution with the formation of rod-like α-phase or of plate-type bainite crystals have been studied by optical microscopy, electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis. The fine structure of the phases formed upon the partial decomposition of β-phase and upon the subsequent martensitic transformation was studied. The α {to} β transformation was shown to occur in a crystallographically ordered manner and to obey the Kurdyumov-Sachs orientation relationships. The α {to} β transformation includes features of both diffusional and martensitic transformations. The α-phase formation inclues a crystals lattice reconstruction and the nucleation dislocations in periodically arranged slip planes. At the same time, the shape of the α-phase crystals and their coalescence and changes in chemical composition are typical of diffusional transformation. The interactions of martensite crystals with particles of the α phase and bainite crystals were studied.

  16. Alloying and oxidation of in situ produced core-shell Al@Yb nanoalloy particles--an "on-the-fly" study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Mikkelä, Mikko-Heikki; Mårsell, Erik; Björneholm, Olle; Xu, Xiaojun; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Liu, Zejin

    2014-08-28

    Core-shell-structured nanoalloy particles with an Al-dominated interior covered by few Yb monolayers have been fabricated using a vapor-aggregation method involving magnetron sputtering. The radially segregated structure of the Yb-Al nanoparticles has been disclosed by "on-the-fly" photoelectron spectroscopy monitoring of the nanoparticle beam in Yb 4f and Al 2p electron binding energy regions. Both, the binding energy values and the electron microscopy images taken on the deposited nanoparticles, allow estimating their dimensions to be in the 5-10 nm range. The photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that in these nanoparticles no trivalent Yb--the typical case for the macroscopic Yb-Al alloy--is present. The oxidation of preformed Yb-Al nanoparticles was successfully attempted, leading to the appearance of divalent Yb surface oxide--in contrast to the bulk macroscopic Yb which is trivalent in the oxide. Our results suggest that at intermediate oxygen exposures "sandwich-like" nanoparticles of YbO/Yb/Al were synthesized. At higher O2 exposures, the oxygen seems to penetrate all the way to the Yb-Al interface. The results of the present study have to be considered when photonic applications of Yb-doped garnet nanoparticles are planned. PMID:25173009

  17. Alloys in energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems.

  18. Early-stage nucleation of manganese sulfide particle and its processing evolution in Fe—3wt.%Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Meng, Li; Wang, Hongcai; Yan, Guochun; Mao, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    Manganese sulfide is often referred to as one of important inhibitors in grain-oriented electrical steels, which is of great importance to yield strong Goss texture. However, the early stage of nucleation for such inhibitors and their evolution during the processing has not been well understood. In present work we selected a Fe—3.12wt.%Si—0.11wt.%Mn—0.021wt.%S model system and used FE-SEM and atom probe tomography (APT) to investigate the precipitation behavior of MnS inhibitors at near atomic scale. It was found that the Si—S enriched clusters with sizes of 5—15 nm were formed close to the MnS particles. The density of inhibitors decreased after large pseudo-plane-strain compression because of the effect of dislocation motion, and then slightly increased again when sample was aged at 200°C for 48 h. The dislocations and grain boundaries can act as fast diffusion paths and assist the reemergence of Si—S enriched clusters.

  19. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  20. Respiratory manganese particle size, time-course and neurobehavioral outcomes in workers at a manganese alloy production plant

    PubMed Central

    Park, Robert M.; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Baldwin, Mary; Bowler, Rosemarie; Mergler, Donna

    2015-01-01

    The progression of manganism with chronic exposure to airborne manganese (Mn) is not well understood. Here, we further investigate the findings on exposure and neurobehavioral outcomes of workers from a silico- and ferromanganese production plant and non-exposed workers from the same community in 1990 and 2004, using a variety of exposure metrics that distinguish particle size and origin within the range of respirable airborne exposures. Mn exposure matrices for large respirable particulate (Mn-LRP, dust) and small respirable particulate (Mn-SRP, fume), based on process origins, were used together with detailed work histories since 1973 (plant opening), to construct exposure metrics including burdens and cumulative burdens with various clearance half-lives. For three out of eight 1990 neurobehavioral tests analyzed with linear regression models, duration of Mn exposure was the best predictor: Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery – Motor Scale, Trail-Making B and Finger Tapping. The Luria-Nebraska Motor Scale had the strongest association (t ~ 5.0, p < 10−6). For outcomes on three other tests, the duration and Mn-SRP metrics were comparable: Trail Making Test A, Cancellation H and Stroop Color-Word Test (color/word subtest). Delayed Word Recall was best predicted by Mn-SRP (based on square root or truncated air-concentrations). The Word score on the Stroop Color-Word Test was the only outcome for which Mn-LRP was the leading predictor (t = −2.92, p = 0.003), while performance on the WAIS-R Digit Span Test was not significantly predicted by any metric. For outcomes evaluated in both 1990 and 2004, a mixed-effect linear regression model was used to examine estimates of within-individual trends. Duration and Mn-SRP were associated with performance on the Luria-Nebraska Motor Scale, as well as with other outcomes that appeared to have both reversible and progressive features, including Trail Making A and B, Cancellation H and Delayed Word Recall. With the

  1. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Michelic, S.K.; Loder, D.; Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A.; Bernhard, C.

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  2. Particle size effect on microwave absorbing of La0.67Ba0.33Mn0.94Ti0.06O3 powders prepared by mechanical alloying with the assistance of ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptari, Sitti Ahmiatri; Manaf, Azwar; Kurniawan, Budhy

    2016-03-01

    Doped manganites have attracted substantial interest due to their unique chemical and physics properties, which makes it possible to be used for microwave absorbing materials. In this paper we report synthesizes and characterization of La0.67Ba0.33Mn0.94Ti0.06O3 powders prepared by mechanical alloying with the assistance of a high power ultrasonic treatment. After solid state reaction, the presence of single phase was confirmed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Refinement results showed that samples are single phase with monoclinic structure. It was found that powder materials derived from mechanical alloying results in large variation in the particle size. A significant improvement was obtained upon subjecting the mechanically milled powder materials to an ultrasonication treatment for a relatively short period of time. As determined by particle size analyzer (PSA), the mean particle size gradually decreased from the original size of 5.02 µm to 0.36 µm. Magnetic properties were characterized by VSM, and hysteresis loops results showed that samples are soft magnetic. It was found that when the mean particle size decreases, saturation was increases and coersitivity was decreases. Microwave absorption properties were investigated in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz using vector network analyzer. An optimal reflection loss of 24.44 dB is reached at 11.4 GHz.

  3. Iron cobalt boride and iron zirconium silicide-based nanocomposite soft magnetic alloys and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jianguo

    Nanocrystalline composite soft magnetic materials, which consist of nanoscale crystalline ferromagnetic phases (typical 10 nm) homogeneously dispersed in an amorphous matrix are derived from crystallizing amorphous ribbons. The excellent soft magnetic properties, such as extremely low coercivities, high permeabilities, low energy losses, etc, have attracted the major interest and research activity in both academic community and industrial community in the past two decades. In this thesis, two classes of nanocrystalline composite soft magnetic alloys are developed from their amorphous precursors, accompanying the analysis on their sturctural evolution, thermal kinetics and variou magnetic properties. FeCoB based nanocrystalline composite soft magnetic alloy is developed, in collaboration with Magnetics Division at Spang & Company, for application in high frequency and high temperature. This class of nanocrystalline composite alloy has the nominal composition (FeCo)80Nb4[BGe(Si)] 15Cu1. The crystallization products are bcc FeCo for primary crystallization at 410°C and (FeCoNb)23B 6 for second crystallization. The average grain size is below 10 nm after annealed at 500°C for 1 hour. After transverse field annealing at its primary crystallization temperature, the core loss significantly decreased to the value which can comparable with other commercial soft magnetic alloy. Another class of nanocrystalline composite soft magnetic alloy is Fe based and Boron free alloy. This class of soft magnetic alloy with the nominal composition Fe79ZrxSi20- xCu1 was developed for low cost on raw materials. The nanocrystalline phase alpha-Fe(Si) with average grain size 10 nm was observed in this kind alloy annealed at 460°C for 1 hour. Cu acts as the nucleation agent for making the precipitated nanocrystals uniform and very fine. The measurement of core loss shows the alloy annealed at 460°C for 2 hour has the relatively core loss which can be comparable that of other commericial

  4. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-08-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  5. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  6. Weldable ductile molybdenum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Byun, Thak Sang; Schneibel, Joachim H; Miller, Michael K; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys are attractive structural materials for high-temperature applications. However, various practical issues have limited its use. One concern relates to the loss of ductility occurring in the heat-affected weld zone caused by segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries. In this study, a series of arc melted molybdenum alloys have been produced containing controlled additions of B, C, Zr, and Al. These alloys were characterized with respect to their tensile properties, smooth bend properties, and impact energy for both the base metal and welds. These alloys were compared with a very high purity low carbon arc cast molybdenum reference. For discussion purposes the alloys produced are separated into two categories: Mo Al B alloys, and Mo Zr B alloys. The properties of Mo Zr B alloy welds containing higher carbon levels exhibited slight improvement over unalloyed molybdenum, though the base-metal properties for all Mo Zr B alloys were somewhat inconsistent with properties better, or worse, than unalloyed molybdenum. A Mo Al B alloy exhibited the best DBTT values for welds, and the base metal properties were comparable to or slightly better than unalloyed molybdenum. The Mo Al B alloy contained a low volume fraction of second-phase particles, with segregation of boron and carbon to grain boundaries believed to displace oxygen resulting in improved weld properties. The volume fractions of second-phase particles are higher for the Mo Zr B alloys, and these alloys were prone to brittle fracture. It is also noted that these Mo Zr B alloys exhibited segregation of zirconium, boron and carbon to the grain boundaries.

  7. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  8. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  9. Electrocatalysts having platium monolayers on palladium, palladium alloy, and gold alloy core-shell nanoparticles, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-12-21

    The invention relates to platinum-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of a noble metal or metal alloy core at least partially encapsulated by an atomically thin surface layer of platinum atoms. The invention particularly relates to such particles having a palladium, palladium alloy, gold alloy, or rhenium alloy core encapsulated by an atomic monolayer of platinum. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  10. Diffusion bonding of an aluminum-copper alloy reinforced with silicon carbide particles (AA2014/SiC/13p) using metallic interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Urena, A.; Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Escalera, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    In this work, the application of solid state diffusion bonding to a SiC particulate reinforced aluminium-copper alloy (AA2014) has been studied. The use of metallic interlayers such as an aluminum-lithium alloy and pure silver, has been tested. Bonding interfaces were microstructural characterized using scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopies (TEM). Joint strengths were evaluated by shear mechanical tests, completed with fractographic studies to determine the failure mechanisms of each kind of joint.

  11. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  12. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  13. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2012-06-12

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.

  14. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2010-04-20

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.

  15. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  16. Three-Dimensional Microstructure Visualization of Porosity and Fe-Rich Inclusions in SiC Particle-Reinforced Al Alloy Matrix Composites by X-Ray Synchrotron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Flávio de Andrade; Williams, Jason J.; Müller, Bernd R.; Hentschel, Manfred P.; Portella, Pedro D.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2011-11-15

    Microstructural aspects of composites such as reinforcement particle size, shape, and distribution play important roles in deformation behavior. In addition, Fe-rich inclusions and porosity also influence the behavior of these composites, particularly under fatigue loading. Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of porosity and Fe-rich inclusions in three dimensions is critical to a thorough understanding of fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs), because cracks often initiate at these defects. In this article, we have used X-ray synchrotron tomography to visualize and quantify the morphology and size distribution of pores and Fe-rich inclusions in a SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composite. The 3-D data sets were also used to predict and understand the influence of defects on the deformation behavior by 3-D finite element modeling.

  17. Comment on "Hydrothermal preparation of analogous matrix minerals of CM carbonaceous chondrites from metal alloy particles" by Y. Peng and Y. Jing [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 408 (2014) 252-262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Vacher, Lionel G.; Marrocchi, Yves

    2015-10-01

    Peng and Jing (2014) recently reported the results of hydrothermal experiments designed to produce synthetic tochilinite/cronstedtite assemblages analogous to those found in the matrix of CM chondrites (Tomeoka and Buseck, 1982, 1983a, 1983b, 1985; Mackinnon and Zolensky, 1984; Zolensky and Mackinnon, 1986; Rubin et al., 2007; Bourot-Denise et al., 2010; Hewins et al., 2014; Marrocchi et al., 2014). The assemblage was obtained from an alloyed metal particle mixture of Fe, Mg, Al, Si, Cr and Ni under basic, reducing and S2--rich conditions. The hydrothermal syntheses were conducted in Teflon-lined stainless-steel autoclaves at temperature of 106-160 °C for short-duration runs and at 153 °C for long-duration runs. The phases in the assemblage were characterized by XRD and TEM, but only the analytical results of long-duration runs were reported in the article and in the Appendix as supplementary material. The phases identified were: cronstedtite and tochilinite (both present in all run products), tochilinite-cronstedtite intergrowths, polyhedral serpentine, a chrysotile-like phase, nanotube-like structures, and lizardite-like and brucite-like phases. Based on their experimental results, the authors put forward a hypothesis to explain the formation of matrix minerals in CM chondrites proposing that the precursors may be nanometer- to micrometer-sized particles of metal alloys that were altered at low temperatures by interaction with S-rich water under reducing and dynamic pressurized conditions.

  18. Alloys based on NiAl for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K. M.; Pathare, V.; Aslanidis, I.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The NiAl alloys for potential high temperature applications were studied. Alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Flow stress values at slow strain rates and high temperatures were measured. Some ternary alloying additions (Hf, Ta and Nb) were identified. The mechanism of strengthening in alloys containing these additions appears to be a form of particle dislocation interaction. The effects of grain size and stoichiometry in binary alloys are also presented.

  19. Kinetics of aluminum lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletcher, Ben A.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum lithium alloys are increasingly used in aerospace for their high strength-to-weight ratio. Additions of lithium, up to 4.2 wt% decrease the alloy density while increasing the modulus and yield strength. The metastable, second phase Al3Li or delta' is intriguing, as it remains spherical and coherent with the matrix phase, alpha, well into the overaged condition. Small interfacial strain energy allows these precipitates to remain spherical for volume fractions (VV ) of delta' less than 0.3, making this alloy system ideal for investigation of late-stage coarsening phenomena. Experimental characterization of three binary Al-Li alloys are presented as a critical test of diffusion screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy is used to image the precipitates directly using the centered dark-field technique. Images are analyzed autonomously within a novel Matlab function that determines the center and size of each precipitate. Particle size distribution, particle growth kinetics, and maximum particle size are used to track the precipitate growth and correlate with the predictions of screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. This project is the first extensive study of Al-Li alloys, in over 25 years, applying modern transmission electron microscopy and image analysis techniques. Previous studies sampled but a single alloy composition, and measured far fewer precipitates. This study investigates 3 alloys with volume fractions of the delta precipitates, VV =0.1-0.27, aged at 225C for 1 to 10 days. More than 1000 precipitates were sampled per aging time, creating more statistically significant data. Experimental results are used to test the predictions based on diffusion screening theory and multi-particle aging simulations. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  20. Kinetic Analyses of the Growth and Dissolution Phenomena of Primary Si and α-Al in Partially Molten Al-Si (-Cu-Mg) Alloy Particles Using In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswara Moorthy, Santhana K.; Howe, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The growth and dissolution behavior of primary Si and α-Al in partially molten hypereutectic Al-Si-based alloy particles was investigated using in situ TEM to reveal the dynamic and instantaneous processes occurring during these phenomena. Direct evidence for the preferential growth of Si {113} facets compared with {111} facets resulting in prominent {111} facets bounding the Si crystals was obtained. The nucleation of primary Si was found to occur heterogeneously on the encapsulating alumina shell, whereas the α-Al phase nucleated homogeneously from the liquid Al-Si phase. The morphology of primary Si during growth was found to be highly faceted during growth but smoothly curved during dissolution, revealing fundamental mechanistic differences during these processes. We provide a ledge-based interpretation to explain the difference in growth and dissolution behavior. The α-Al phase displayed smoothly curved growth and dissolution morphologies, which are characteristic of an isotropic interfacial energy and a continuous growth mechanism.

  1. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  2. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  3. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E; Rieken, Joel

    2013-12-10

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with an introduced reactive species than does the alloying element and wherein one or more atomizing parameters is/are modified to controllably reduce the amount of the reactive species, such as oxygen, introduced into the atomized particles so as to reduce anneal times and improve reaction (conversion) to the desired strengthening dispersoids in the matrix. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies are made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.

  4. Phase field simulation of coherent precipitation of Ni4Ti3 particles during stress-assisted aging of a porous NiTi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, C. B.; Cao, S. S.; Zhang, X. P.

    2015-07-01

    Morphological evolution and growth behavior of Ni4Ti3 precipitates during stress-assisted aging of a porous NiTi alloy are investigated by means of phase field method through introducing nano-scale volume elements around the micro-sized pores. The model naturally takes into account the stress redistribution arising from the structural and elastic inhomogeneity across the matrix of the porous NiTi alloy aged under compressive stress. Simulation results show that the orientation and distribution of Ni4Ti3 precipitates in different volume elements are evidently distinct. A gradient distribution in terms of the area fraction of Ni4Ti3 precipitates across the selected volume elements can be seen. The area fraction and average size of Ni4Ti3 precipitates are dependent on position of the volume element, i.e. distance to the pore. Differences in the orientation, distribution and average size of Ni4Ti3 precipitates among different selected volume elements are attributed to the disparities of stress states in the volume elements.

  5. Influence of Powder Particle Size on the Compaction Behavior and Mechanical Properties of a High-Alloy Austenitic CrMnNi TRIP Steel During Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, S.; Martin, S.; Krüger, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, varying powder particle size fractions (<25, 25 to 45, 45 to 63 µm) of a TRIP steel powder were compacted by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Densification initiated at a slightly lower temperature with decreasing particle size due to increasing green density. With decreasing powder particle size fraction, the as-sintered materials exhibited smaller grain sizes. Compression tests revealed a slight decrease of the compressive yield strength with increasing particle size and, accordingly, larger grain size. A few large deformation bands formed in bigger grains, while many thin deformation bands were formed in smaller grains. α'-Martensite nuclei formed successively inside the deformation bands, reducing the mean free path of (partial) dislocation slip. Due to the size of the deformation bands, α'-martensite formation started at lower strains with increasing particle size. When α'-martensite formation was initiated, work hardening was influenced more by α'-martensite formation than by the grain size of the steel matrix. Hence, work hardening increased with increasing particle size.

  6. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  7. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  8. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  9. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E; Terpstra, Robert L

    2014-10-21

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened solidified particles exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures.

  10. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  11. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  12. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  13. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  14. Development of Lead-Free Copper Alloy-Graphite Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    In this project, graphite is used as a substitute for lead in order to maintain the machinability of plumbing components at the level of leaded brass. Graphite dispersed in Cu alloy was observed to impart good machinability and reduce the sizes of chips during machining of plumbing components in a manner similar to lead. Copper alloys containing dispersed graphite particles could be successfully cast in several plumbing fixtures which exhibited acceptable corrosion rate, solderability, platability, and pressure tightness. The power consumption for machining of composites was also lower than that of the matrix alloy. In addition, centrifugally cast copper alloy cylinders containing graphite particles were successfully made. These cylinders can therefore be used for bearing applications, as substitutes for lead-containing copper alloys. The results indicate that copper graphite alloys developed under this DOE project have a great potential to substitute for lead copper alloys in both plumbing and bearing applications.

  15. Microstructural studies on Alloy 693

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, R.; Dutta, R. S.; Sengupta, P.; Samajdar, I.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-10-01

    Superalloy 693, is a newly identified ‘high-temperature corrosion resistant alloy’. Present study focuses on microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy prepared by double ‘vacuum melting’ route. In general, the alloy contains ordered Ni3Al precipitates distributed within austenitic matrix. M6C primary carbide, M23C6 type secondary carbide and NbC particles are also found to be present. Heat treatment of the alloy at 1373 K for 30 min followed by water quenching (WQ) brings about a microstructure that is free from secondary carbides and Ni3Al type precipitates but contains primary carbides. Tensile property of Alloy 693 materials was measured with as received and solution annealed (1323 K, 60 min, WQ) and (1373 K, 30 min, WQ) conditions. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness of the alloy are found to drop with annealing. It is noted that in annealed condition, considerable cold working of the alloy can be performed.

  16. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  17. Oxide dispersion hardened mechanically alloyed materials for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, J. S.; Strassburg, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure of mechanical alloying makes it possible to obtain, with the aid of powder-metallurgy techniques, alloys that consist of a metallic matrix in which very fine oxide particles are dispersed. Mechanically alloyed compound powders can be used for making either forged or hot-rolled semifinished products. For these products, dispersion strengthening and precipitation hardening has been combined. At high temperatures, the strength characteristics of the alloy are determined by both dispersion hardening and by precipitation hardening processes. The effect produced by each process is independent of that due to the other. Attention is given to the principle of mechanical alloying developed by Benjamin (1970, 1976), the strength characteristics of mechanically alloyed materials, the corrosion resistance of mechanically alloyed material at high temperatures, and the preparation and characteristics of the alloy MA 6000 E.

  18. Plastic instability in omega forming alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.

    2006-11-01

    The plastic flow behaviour of two ω forming systems namely ordered Nb-40Ti-15Al and metastable Zr-Nb alloys has been studied over a range of strain rate and temperature to establish the domain of serrated flow or Protevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect. The observed features of serrated flow in these alloys are strikingly similar to that observed during PLC effect of solid solution alloys. Samples deformed in the serrated flow regime have been studied at different levels of magnification using light, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. A very characteristic feature of deformation in these alloys has been the presence precipitate free channels, microbands and deformation bands. The proposed mechanism of serrated flow involves creation of soft channels formed by shearing of ω-particles and dynamic restoration of ω-particles within the soft channel resulting in pinning of dislocation. It appears that this is the characteristic feature of deformation of ω forming system exhibiting PLC effect.

  19. Low energy milling method, low crystallinity alloy, and negative electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Le, Dihn B; Obrovac, Mark N; Kube, Robert Y; Landucci, James R

    2012-10-16

    A method of making nanostructured alloy particles includes milling a millbase in a pebble mill containing milling media. The millbase comprises: (i) silicon, and (ii) at least one of carbon or a transition metal, and wherein the nanostructured alloy particles are substantially free of crystalline domains greater than 50 nanometers in size. A method of making a negative electrode composition for a lithium ion battery including the nanostructured alloy particles is also disclosed.

  20. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the morphology and chemistry of a PdCl{sub 2}/SnCl{sub 2} electroless plating catalysis system adsorbed onto shape memory alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Silvain, J.F.; Fouassier, O.; Lescaux, S.

    2004-11-01

    A study of the different stages of the electroless deposition of copper on micronic NiTi shape memory alloy particles activated by one-step and two-step methods has been conducted from both a chemical and a morphological point of view. The combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has allowed detection of the distribution of the formed compounds and depth quantification and estimation of the surface topographic parameters. For the two-step method, at the sensitization of the early stages, it is observed by AFM that Sn is absorbed in form of clusters that tend to completely cover the surface and form a continuous film. XPS analysis have shown that Sn and Pd are first absorbed in form of oxide (SnO{sub 2} and PdO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH){sub 4}]. After the entire sensitization step, the NiTi substrate is covered with Sn-based compounds. After the sensitization and the activation steps the powder roughness increases. Behavior of the Sn and Pd growth for the one-step method does not follow the behavior found for the two-step method. Indeed, XPS analysis shows a three-dimensional (3D) growth of Pd clusters on top of a mixture of metallic tin, oxide (SnO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH){sub 2}]. These Pd clusters are covered with a thin layer of Pd-oxide contamination induced by the electroless process. The mean roughness for the one-step and two-step processes are equivalent. After copper deposition, the decrease of mean roughness is attributed to a filling of surface valleys, observed after the Sn-Pd coating step.

  1. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the morphology and chemistry of a PdCl2/SnCl2 electroless plating catalysis system adsorbed onto shape memory alloy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvain, J. F.; Fouassier, O.; Lescaux, S.

    2004-11-01

    A study of the different stages of the electroless deposition of copper on micronic NiTi shape memory alloy particles activated by one-step and two-step methods has been conducted from both a chemical and a morphological point of view. The combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has allowed detection of the distribution of the formed compounds and depth quantification and estimation of the surface topographic parameters. For the two-step method, at the sensitization of the early stages, it is observed by AFM that Sn is absorbed in form of clusters that tend to completely cover the surface and form a continuous film. XPS analysis have shown that Sn and Pd are first absorbed in form of oxide (SnO2 and PdO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH)4]. After the entire sensitization step, the NiTi substrate is covered with Sn-based compounds. After the sensitization and the activation steps the powder roughness increases. Behavior of the Sn and Pd growth for the one-step method does not follow the behavior found for the two-step method. Indeed, XPS analysis shows a three-dimensional (3D) growth of Pd clusters on top of a mixture of metallic tin, oxide (SnO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH)2]. These Pd clusters are covered with a thin layer of Pd-oxide contamination induced by the electroless process. The mean roughness for the one-step and two-step processes are equivalent. After copper deposition, the decrease of mean roughness is attributed to a filling of surface valleys, observed after the Sn-Pd coating step.

  2. Measurement Of Composition In Transparent Model Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Perry, Gretchen L.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    Variation of FTIR technique developed to enable study of growth of cells of different solid phase in unidirectional solidification of these organic mixtures, which serve as transparent anologs of opaque monotectic metal alloys. Study of organic analogs expected to contribute to understanding of formation of aligned rods and particles in directional solidification of metal alloys. Advantage of technique is redistribution of material caused by solidification determined after fact, to very fine scale.

  3. Processing of Iridium and Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    Iridium and its alloys have been considered to be difficult to fabricate due to their high melting temperatures, limited ductility, sensitivity to impurity content, and chemical properties. The variety of processing methods used for iridium and its alloys are reviewed, including purification, melting, forming, joining, and powder metallurgy techniques. Also included are coating and forming by the methods of electroplating, chemical and physical vapor deposition, and melt particle deposition.

  4. Trace Carbon in Biomedical Beta-Titanium Alloys: Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Ebel, T.; Yan, M.; Qian, M.

    2015-08-01

    Owing to their relatively low Young's modulus, high strength, good resistance to corrosion, and excellent biocompatibility, β-titanium (Ti) alloys have shown great potential for biomedical applications. In β-Ti alloys, carbon can exist in the form of titanium carbide (TiC x ) as well as interstitial atoms. The Ti-C binary phase diagram predicts a carbon solubility value of 0.08 wt.% in β-Ti, which has been used as the carbon limit for a variety of β-Ti alloys. However, noticeable grain boundary TiC x particles have been observed in β-Ti alloys containing impurity levels of carbon well below the predicted 0.08 wt.%. This review focuses its attention on trace carbon (≤0.08 wt.%) in biomedical β-Ti alloys containing niobium (Nb) and molybdenum (Mo), and it discusses the nature and precipitation mechanism of the TiC x particles in these alloys.

  5. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  6. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  7. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  8. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. Amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 to 85. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  9. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    1993-11-16

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  10. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    1991-12-31

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. Amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 to 85. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  11. Dual-phase Cr-Ta alloys for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Brady, Michael P.; Zhu, Jiahong; Tortorelli, Peter F.

    2001-01-01

    Dual phase alloys of chromium containing 2 to 11 atomic percent tantalum with minor amounts of Mo, Cr, Ti, Y, La, Cr, Si and Ge are disclosed. These alloys contain two phases including Laves phase and Cr-rich solid solution in either eutectic structures or dispersed Laves phase particles in the Cr-rich solid solution matrix. The alloys have superior mechanical properties at high temperature and good oxidation resistance when heated to above 1000.degree. C. in air.

  12. Electromagnetic Characterization Of Metallic Sensory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  13. Electromagnetic characterization of metallic sensory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  14. Noble metal/vanadium alloy catalyst and method for making

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, V.M.

    1980-05-13

    A novel catalyst comprises an alloy of a noble metal and vanadium. The catalyst is particularly useful in an electrochemical cell cathode electrode. The method for making the alloy involves reacting a vanadium compound with sodium dithionite to form a sol of a finely dispersed vanadium sulfite complex, and then reacting noble metal particles with the complex in a reducing environment.

  15. Strain hardening mechanisms in a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dymek, S. ); Dollar, M. ); Klarstrom, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    HAYNES 242 alloy has been recently developed for gas turbine components applications. This age-hardenable alloy, consisting essentially of Ni-25%Mo-8%Cr, utilizes a long-range-ordering reaction to form uniformly sized and distributed, extremely small (on the order of 10nm), ordered particles. Excellent strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, low thermal expansion characteristics and good oxidation resistance of Haynes 242 alloy has encouraged a number of studies designed to characterize its properties. What is lacking is an attempt to understand the fundamentals of the deformation and strengthening mechanisms in this alloy. This on-going research has been undertaken to explore deformation mechanisms in unaged and aged Haynes 242 alloy. The emphasis has been put on the effects of initial precipitation structure on the development of deformation structure and how it controls selected mechanical properties. This paper presents selected results and reports a change in the deformation mode from crystallographic glide in an unaged alloy into twinning in the presence of ordered particles. Deformation twinning in Ni-Mo and Ni-Mo-Cr alloys was reported earlier but was not discussed in detail. This research sheds light on possible origins of particle-induced twinning in alloys strengthened by small ordered particles.

  16. Microstructural effects on the tensile and fracture behavior of aluminum casting alloys A356/357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. G.

    2003-12-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of cast aluminum alloys A356 and A357 strongly depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), Mg content, and, in particular, the size and shape of eutectic silicon particles and Fe-rich intermetallics. In the unmodified alloys, increasing the cooling rate during solidification refines both the dendrites and eutectic particles and increases ductility. Strontium modification reduces the size and aspect ratio of the eutectic silicon particles, leading to a fairly constant particle size and aspect ratio over the range of SDAS studied. In comparison with the unmodified alloys, the Sr-modified alloys show higher ductility, particularly the A356 alloy, but slightly lower yield strength. In the microstructures with large SDAS (>50 µm), the ductility of the Sr-modified alloys does not continuously decrease with SDAS as it does in the unmodified alloy. Increasing Mg content increases both the matrix strength and eutectic particle size. This decreases ductility in both the Sr-modified and unmodified alloys. The A356/357 alloys with large and elongated particles show higher strain hardening and, thus, have a higher damage accumulation rate by particle cracking. Compared to A356, the increased volume fraction and size of the Fe-rich intermetallics ( π phase) in the A357 alloy are responsible for the lower ductility, especially in the Sr-modified alloy. In alloys with large SDAS (>50 µm), final fracture occurs along the cell boundaries, and the fracture mode is transgranular. In the small SDAS (<30 µm) alloys, final fracture tends to concentrate along grain boundaries. The transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture mode is accompanied by an increase in the ductility of the alloys.

  17. High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Mg-Zn-Ca Alloys with Excellent Biodegradation Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, J.; Becker, M.; Martinelli, E.; Weinberg, A. M.; Mingler, B.; Kilian, H.; Pogatscher, S.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    This article deals with the development of fine-grained high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) magnesium alloys intended for use as biodegradable implant material. The alloys contain solely low amounts of Zn and Ca as alloying elements. We illustrate the development path starting from the high-Zn-containing ZX50 (MgZn5Ca0.25) alloy with conventional purity, to an ultrahigh-purity ZX50 modification, and further to the ultrahigh-purity Zn-lean alloy ZX10 (MgZn1Ca0.3). It is shown that alloys with high Zn-content are prone to biocorrosion in various environments, most probably because of the presence of the intermetallic phase Mg6Zn3Ca2. A reduction of the Zn content results in (Mg,Zn)2Ca phase formation. This phase is less noble than the Mg-matrix and therefore, in contrast to Mg6Zn3Ca2, does not act as cathodic site. A fine-grained microstructure is achieved by the controlled formation of fine and homogeneously distributed (Mg,Zn)2Ca precipitates, which influence dynamic recrystallization and grain growth during hot forming. Such design scheme is comparable to that of HSLA steels, where low amounts of alloying elements are intended to produce a very fine dispersion of particles to increase the material's strength by refining the grain size. Consequently our new, ultrapure ZX10 alloy exhibits high strength (yield strength R p = 240 MPa, ultimate tensile strength R m = 255 MPa) and simultaneously high ductility (elongation to fracture A = 27%), as well as low mechanical anisotropy. Because of the anodic nature of the (Mg,Zn)2Ca particles used in the HSLA concept, the in vivo degradation in a rat femur implantation study is very slow and homogeneous without clinically observable hydrogen evolution, making the ZX10 alloy a promising material for biodegradable implants.

  18. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  19. Investigation on corrosion and wear behaviors of nanoparticles reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Xu, Zhong

    2008-04-01

    In order to investigate the role of amorphous SiO 2 particles in corrosion and wear resistance of Ni-based metal matrix composite alloying layer, the amorphous nano-SiO 2 particles reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layer has been prepared by double glow plasma alloying on AISI 316L stainless steel surface, where Ni/amorphous nano-SiO 2 was firstly predeposited by brush plating. The composition and microstructure of the nano-SiO 2 particles reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layer were analyzed by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The results indicated that the composite alloying layer consisted of γ-phase and amorphous nano-SiO 2 particles, and under alloying temperature (1000 °C) condition, the nano-SiO 2 particles were uniformly distributed in the alloying layer and still kept the amorphous structure. The corrosion resistance of composite alloying layer was investigated by an electrochemical method in 3.5%NaCl solution. Compared with single alloying layer, the amorphous nano-SiO 2 particles slightly decreased the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu alloying layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the passive films formed on the composite alloying consisted of Cr 2O 3, MoO 3, SiO 2 and metallic Ni and Mo. The dry wear test results showed that the composite alloying layer had excellent friction-reduced property, and the wear weight loss of composite alloying layer was less than 60% of that of Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu alloying layer.

  20. NiAl alloys for structural uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    conventional sense requires ductile powder particles which, through a cold welding and fracture process, can be dispersion strengthened by submicron-sized oxide particles. Using both the Ni-35Al-Fe alloys to contain approx. 1 v/o Y2O3. Preliminary results indicate that mechanically alloyed and extruded NiAl-Fe + Y2O3 alloys when heat treated to a grain-coarsened condition, exhibit improved creep resistance at 1000 C when compared to NiAl; oxidation resistance comparable to NiAl; and fracture toughness values a factor of three better than NiAl. As a result of the research initiated on this NASA program, a subsequent project with support from Inco Alloys International is underway.

  1. Physicochemical characteristics of the internal nitriding of multicomponent alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, L.G.

    1995-07-01

    Internal nitriding is the saturation of the deep layers of an alloy with nitrogen, which produces a structure composed of disperse nitride particles distributed in a solid solution. This distinguishes internal nitriding from conventional nitriding where a continuous nitride zone is formed in the surface layer. Therefore, internal nitrogenization, as in other processes of alloy saturation with implantation elements (e.g., internal oxidation), ensures the disperse strengthening of the alloy. The degree of strengthening is dependent on the amount and dispersion of the evolved nitrides and is associated with their thermodynamic stability and coagulation resistance. The study of the characteristics of internal nitriding of multicomponent alloys is of interest.

  2. Metal dusting of nickel-containing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1998-12-31

    Metal dusting is a catastrophic form of carburization which leads to pitting and grooves as the affected metal disintegrates into a mixture of powdery carbon, metallic particles, and possibly oxides and carbides. This high temperature carburization mode is not yet well understood and while relatively infrequent, can be economically disastrous when it does occur in large and complex chemical and petrochemical process streams. References in the literature show that all classes of heat resistant alloys are prone to metal dusting, given the necessary and specific environmental conditions. These same references describe the environments that plague nickel-containing alloys and are used as the basis for postulation on the probable corrosion mechanisms responsible for metal dusting. Using alloy 800 and other nickel-containing alloys and metal dusting atmospheres, an effort is made to examine the steps in the metal dusting process and the temperature ranges over which metal dusting occurs.

  3. An investigation of plastic fracture in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, J. R., Jr.; Vanstone, R. H.; Merchant, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The brittle fracture of many high strength alloys such as steel, titanium, and aluminum was shown to occur by a process called plastic fracture. According to this process microscopic voids form at impurity particles, then grow and coalesce to cause the final rupture. To further understand the role of impurities, four aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T851, 2124-T851, 7075-T7351 and 7079-T651. Fractography, quantitative metallography, and microprobe studies assessed the roles of various impurity particles relative to these alloys.

  4. Structural and Mössbauer spectroscopic study of Fe-Ni alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Asheesh; Banerjee, S. Sudarsan, V.; Meena, S. S.

    2014-04-24

    Nano-crystalline Fe-Ni alloys have been synthesized in ethylene glycol medium. Based on XRD studies it is confirmed that, in these alloys Fe atoms are incorporated at Ni site to form Ni-Fe solid solutions. Mössbauer studies have established that for alloy particles having smaller size there is significant concentration of two different types of paramagnetic Fe species and their relative concentration decreased with increase in particle size.

  5. Aluminium alloys in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanjun; Rem, Peter

    2009-05-01

    With the increasing growth of incineration of household waste, more and more aluminium is retained in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Therefore recycling of aluminium from bottom ash becomes increasingly important. Previous research suggests that aluminium from different sources is found in different size fractions resulting in different recycling rates. The purpose of this study was to develop analytical and sampling techniques to measure the particle size distribution of individual alloys in bottom ash. In particular, cast aluminium alloys were investigated. Based on the particle size distribution it was computed how well these alloys were recovered in a typical state-of-the-art treatment plant. Assessment of the cast alloy distribution was carried out by wet physical separation processes, as well as chemical methods, X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron microprobe analysis. The results from laboratory analyses showed that cast alloys tend to concentrate in the coarser fractions and therefore are better recovered in bottom ash treatment plants. PMID:19423581

  6. Criteria for Yielding of Dispersion-Strengthened Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Lenel, F. V.

    1960-01-01

    A dislocation model is presented in order to account for the yield behavior of alloys with a finely dispersed second-phase. The criteria for yielding used in the model, is that appreciable yielding occurs in these alloys when the shear stress due to piled-up groups of dislocations is sufficient to fracture or plastically deform the dispersed second-phase particles, relieving the back stress on the dislocation sources. Equations derived on the basis of this model, predict that the yield stress of the alloys varies as the reciprocal square root of the mean free path between dispersed particles. Experimental data is presented for several SAP-Type alloys, precipitation-hardened alloys and steels which are in good agreement with the yield strength variation as a function of dispersion spacing predicted by this theoretical treatment.

  7. Surface segregations in platinum-based alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Shunsuke; Asahi, Ryoji; Koyama, Toshiyuki

    2014-04-01

    A phase-field model that describes the radial distributions of the ordered-disordered phase and surface segregation in a single-alloy nanoparticle is introduced to clarify the overall behavior of surface segregation of various Pt-based alloy nanoparticles. One of the obstacles to apply a platinum-transition metal alloy as a cathode electro-catalyst of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is the need to ensure the retention of the designed surface composition in an alloy nanoparticle against the alloy combinations, a particle size, and heat treatment. From the results of calculations for CrPt, FePt, CoPt, NiPt, CuPt, PdPt, IrPt, and AuPt binary nanoparticles with diameters below 10 nm at 973.15 K, the compositional variation within a single particle was found to depend on the balance between the atomic interaction within particles and the surface free energy. In addition, the obtained specific steady-state composition of the surface varied significantly with alloy combination and particle diameter. Based on the general tendencies of a binary system to exhibit segregation, attempts to control the amount of platinum segregation on the surface using a ternary-alloy system were examined.

  8. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Aspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Aspheres (BCAT-5-Aspheres) experiment photographs initially randomized colloidal samples (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) in microgravity to determine their resulting structure over time. BCAT-5-Aspheres will study the properties of concentrated systems of small particles when they are identical, but not spherical in microgravity..

  9. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys

    PubMed Central

    Middleburgh, S. C.; King, D. M.; Lumpkin, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)—making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance. PMID:26064629

  10. Morphological development during ageing of Ni-W alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.; Aust, K.T.; Weatherly, G.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the ageing response of a Ni-W alloy studies by electron microscopy. Two particles morphologies develop on ageing: A semi-coherent lath shaped particle and a coherent multi-variant domain (MVD) plate-shape particle composed of two perpendicular twin variants. The factors responsible for the evolution of these shapes on coarsening are discussed. A comparison of the energies associated with the two morphologies suggests that the MVD particles will be more stable.

  11. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report, January--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    The distribution of graphite particles in graphite containing copper alloy was further improved very significantly using several procedures and technological modifications. The developed techniques attacked the graphite distribution problem in two ways. Realizing that clustering of very fine (5um) graphite particles is one of the two major problems, a pretreatment process has been developed using aluminum powders to deagglomerate graphite particles. Along with this, a two-stage stirring technique was used to first incorporate and then to distribute uniformly the deagglomerated particles in the melt. During this year, based on these developments, several components were cast to evaluate the castability of Cu alloy-graphite melts. In addition, machinability tests were done to clearly established that addition of graphite particles improve the machinability of copper MMC alloys over and above that of monolithic copper alloys. The results show that the machining chip sizes and cutting forces of Cu alloys containing graphite particles are smaller than these of the corresponding monolithic Cu alloys. This clearly establishes that the presence of graphite particles in copper alloy improves the machinability in a fashion similar to lead additions to copper alloys. Centrifugal casting of shapes of different sizes appear to be a very attractive method for casting graphite containing copper alloys, since all the graphite particles (regardless of their distribution in the melt) are forced to segregate to the inner periphery of the castings where they impart a very desirable solid lubrication property for bushing and bearing use. A very large number of cylindrical elements of lead bearing copper alloys are now used for similar bearing bushing applications and the manufacturers of these type of bearings are under safety and health hazard pressure to remove lead. This year several parameters for centrifugal casting of copper graphite alloys have been established.

  12. Development of Metallic Sensory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Horne, Michael R.; Messick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are inherently limited by the physical response of the structural material being inspected and are therefore not generally effective at the identification of small discontinuities, making the detection of incipient damage extremely difficult. One innovative solution to this problem is to enhance or complement the NDE signature of structural materials to dramatically improve the ability of existing NDE tools to detect damage. To address this need, a multifunctional metallic material has been developed that can be used in structural applications. The material is processed to contain second phase sensory particles that significantly improve the NDE response, enhancing the ability of conventional NDE techniques to detect incipient damage both during and after flight. Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) are an ideal material for these sensory particles as they undergo a uniform and repeatable change in both magnetic properties and crystallographic structure (martensitic transformation) when subjected to strain and/or temperature changes which can be detected using conventional NDE techniques. In this study, the use of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) as the sensory particles was investigated.

  13. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  15. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  16. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  17. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  18. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  19. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  20. ) Composites Containing Nanoparticles and Larger Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanaraja, S.; Nath, S. K.; Ray, S.

    2014-07-01

    The composites reinforced with nanoparticles result in improved strength and ductility while those containing coarser particles of micron size have limited ductility. The present study investigates the outcome of mechanical properties in a composite reinforced simultaneously with coarse and fine particles. High energy milling of manganese dioxide particles with excess of aluminum powder ensures that nanoparticles generated, either of MnO2 or alumina, are mostly separate and surrounded by aluminum particles. The milled powder when added to aluminum alloy melt, the excess aluminum particles will melt leaving behind separate oxide nanoparticles without significant agglomeration. Different amounts of milled powder mix have been stirred into molten aluminum alloy where nanoparticles of MnO2 react with melt to form alumina. The resulting slurry is cast into composites, which also contains coarser (nearly micron size) alumina particles formed by internal oxidation of the melt during processing. The microstructure of the composites shows good distribution of both the size categories of particles without significant clustering. The oxide particles are primarily γ-alumina in a matrix of aluminum-magnesium-manganese alloy containing some iron picked up from the stirrer. These composites fail during tensile test by ductile fracture due to debonding of coarser particles. The presence of nanoparticles along with coarser particles in a composite improves both strength and ductility considerably, presumably due to delay in debonding of coarser particles to higher stress because of reduced mismatch in extension caused by increased strain hardening in presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The composites containing only coarser oxide particles show limited strength and ductility attributed to early debonding of particles at a relatively lower stress due to larger mismatch in extension between matrix and larger particles. Higher addition of powder mix beyond a limit, however

  1. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  2. Study on solidification of immisible alloys (M-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamio, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    Alloying of immiscible alloys under microgravity is of interest in metallurgical processes. Several experiments investigating the alloying of immiscible alloys, such as Al-In, Al-Bi, Zn-Bi, and Zn-Pb, were done in space. Homogeneous distribution of small L2 particles in the matrix, such as an emulsion structure, was expected in the space-solidifed alloys. However, the alloys demonstrated an extremely segregated structure. To date insufficient information was obtained to explain these unexpected results. Our experiment was proposed to clarify the solidification manner of immiscible alloys and to obtain fundamental information concerning structural control of the alloys. In space, density differences between the two liquids separated in immiscible regions can be neglected, so that no sedimentation of L(sub 2) phase will take place. When the growth of the alloys is interrupted and this status is frozen by an adequate rapid cooling procedure, it will provide much information concerning decomposing homogeneous liquid and the interaction between the monotectic growth front morphology and the distribution of L(sub 2) phase. It is anticipated that the results will be useful for elucidating the monotectic solidification manner and it will be instructive to explain the segregated structures obtained in the past space experiments.

  3. Microstructure and properties of sintered tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, F.A.; Bhatti, M.R.

    1999-02-01

    The microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys were studied. The structure and segregation of the impurity elements at the interfacial boundaries were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fine-probe energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis. Test results of mechanical properties are presented and correlated with fracture behavior of the liquid-phase sintered tungsten alloys. It was found that the Fe-Ni-W alloy exhibits superior properties as compared with the Cu-Ni-W alloy. The detection of copper was found across tungsten grains and matrix that could be associated with inferior properties of the Cu-Ni-W alloy as compared to the Fe-Ni-W alloy. Although the fracture was predominantly brittle in both alloys, complex fracture modes seem to be operative due to the composite microstructure of the alloys. Evidence of microsegregation was observed that also contributed primarily to the brittle failure in the alloys. The impurity elements, such as sulfur and phosphorus, were detected at the tungsten matrix and tungsten-tungsten particle boundaries.

  4. Spark alloying of an AL9 alloy by hard alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, S. G.; Fominykh, M. V.; Mukhinov, D. V.; Magomedova, R. S.; Nikonenko, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The phase compositions of spark coatings of Kh12M steel with a VT1-0 (titanium) alloy and T15K6 and T30K4 hard alloys are studied. It is shown that the TiC titanium carbide forms in all cases and tungsten carbide decomposes with the formation of tungsten in a coating. These processes are intensified by increasing time, capacitance, and frequency. The surface hardness, the sample weight, and the white layer thickness increase monotonically.

  5. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  6. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  7. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  8. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  9. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  10. Mo-Si-B Alloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Brady, Michael P; Meyer III, Harry M; Horton Jr, Joe A; Kruzic, JJ; Ritchie, R O

    2005-01-01

    Mo-Si-B silicides consisting of the phases {alpha}-Mo (Mo solid solution), Mo{sub 3}Si, and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} have melting points on the order of 2000 C and have potential as ultra-high temperature structural materials. Mo-Si-B alloys can be processed such that the {alpha}-Mo is present in the form of isolated particles in a silicide matrix, or as a continuous matrix 'cementing' individual silicide particles together. The latter microstructure is similar to that of WC-Co hard metals. This paper focuses on the relationship between the topology as well as scale of the microstructure of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} alloys, and their creep strength and fracture toughness. For example, the creep strength of Mo-Si-B alloys is improved by reducing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase discontinuous. The fracture toughness is improved by increasing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase continuous. Room temperature stress intensity factors as high as 21 MPa m{sup 1/2} were obtained. The room temperature fracture toughness of Mo-Si-B alloys can also be improved by microalloying with Zr. The room temperature ductility of Mo itself can be improved by adding MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel particles suggesting yet another way to improve the ductile phase toughening of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  11. Mo-Si-B Alloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Kruzie, J.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-04-24

    Mo-Si-B silicides consisting of the phases {alpha}-Mo (Mo solid solution), Mo{sub 3}Si, and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} have melting points on the order of 2000 C and have potential as ultra-high temperature structural materials. Mo-Si-B alloys can be processed such that the {alpha}-Mo is present in the form of isolated particles in a silicide matrix, or as a continuous matrix ''cementing'' individual silicide particles together. The latter microstructure is similar to that of WC-Co hard metals. This paper focuses on the relationship between the topology as well as scale of the microstructure of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} alloys, and their creep strength and fracture toughness. For example, the creep strength of Mo-Si-B alloys is improved by reducing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase discontinuous. The fracture toughness is improved by increasing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase continuous. Room temperature stress intensity factors as high as 21 MPa m{sup 1/2} were obtained. The room temperature fracture toughness of Mo-Si-B alloys can also be improved by microalloying with Zr. The room temperature ductility of Mo itself can be improved by adding MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel particles suggesting yet another way to improve the ductile phase toughening of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  12. A nanoglass alloying immiscible Fe and Cu at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Wang, Di; Feng, Tao; Kruk, Robert; Yao, Ke-Fu; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V; Hahn, Horst; Gleiter, Herbert

    2015-04-21

    Synthesized from ultrafine particles with a bottom-up approach, nanoglasses are of particular importance in pursuing unique properties. Here, we design a metallic nanoglass alloy from two components of ∼Cu64Sc36 and ∼Fe90Sc10 nanoglasses. With nanoalloying mutually immiscible Fe and Cu, the properties of the nanoglass alloys can be tuned by varying the proportions of the ∼Fe90Sc10 component. This offers opportunity to create novel metallic glass nanocomposites and sheds light on building a structure-property correlation for the nanoglass alloys. PMID:25792519

  13. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Thornton, Earl A.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The report on progress achieved in accomplishing of the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program is presented. The objective is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys and associated thermal gradient structures in close collaboration with researchers. The efforts will produce basic understanding of material behavior, new monolithic and composite alloys, processing methods, solid and fluid mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students. The presented accomplishments include: research on corrosion fatigue of Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090; research on the strengthening effect of small In additions to Al-Li-Cu alloys; research on localized corrosion of Al-Li alloys; research on stress corrosion cracking of Al-Li-Cu alloys; research on fiber-matrix reaction studies (Ti-1100 and Ti-15-3 matrices containing SCS-6, SCS-9, and SCS-10 fibers); and research on methods for quantifying non-random particle distribution in materials that has led to generation of a set of computer programs that can detect and characterize clusters in particles.

  14. Alloy and method of producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Hufnagel, Todd C.; Ott, Ryan T.; Fan, Cang; Kecskes, Laszlo

    2005-07-19

    In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, an alloy or other composite material is provided formed of a bulk metallic glass matrix with a microstructure of crystalline metal particles. The alloy preferably has a composition of (X.sub.a Ni.sub.b Cu.sub.c).sub.100-d-c Y.sub.d Al.sub.c, wherein the sum of a, b and c equals 100, wherein 40.ltoreq.a.ltoreq.80, 0.ltoreq.b.ltoreq.35, 0.ltoreq.c.ltoreq.40, 4.ltoreq.d.ltoreq.30, and 0.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.20, and wherein preferably X is composed of an early transition metal and preferably Y is composed of a refractory body-centered cubic early transition metal. A preferred embodiment of the invention also provides a method of producing an alloy composed of two or more phases at ambient temperature. The method includes the steps of providing a metastable crystalline phase composed of at least two elements, heating the metastable crystalline phase together with at least one additional element to form a liquid, casting the liquid, and cooling the liquid to form the alloy. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, the composition and cooling rate of the liquid can be controlled to determine the volume fraction of the crystalline phase and determine the size of the crystalline particles, respectively.

  15. Survey of Radiation Effects in Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K

    2008-08-01

    Information on radiation effects in titanium alloys has been reviewed. Only sparse experimental data from fission reactor and charged particle irradiations is available, none of which is directly applicable to the SNS. Within this limited data it is found that although mechanical properties are substantially degraded, several Ti alloys may retain acceptable properties to low or moderate doses. Therefore, it is recommended that titanium alloys be examined further for application to the SNS target. Since information directly relevant to the SNS mercury target environment and irradiation conditions is not available, it is recommended that ORNL generate the necessary experimental data using a graded approach. The first testing would be for cavitation erosion resistance using two different test devices. If the material performs acceptably the next tests should be for long term mercury compatibility testing of the most promising alloys. Irradiation tests to anticipated SNS displacement doses followed by mechanical property measurements would be the last stage in determining whether the alloys should be considered for service in the SNS target module.

  16. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  17. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  18. Development of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; McKamey, C.G.

    1997-12-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200 C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The main areas being addressed are: (a) alloy processing to achieve the desired alloy grain size and shape, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to semi-commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. The recent studies have focused on mechanically-alloyed powder from a commercial alloy vendor. These starting alloy powders were very clean in terms of oxygen content compared to ORNL-produced powders, but contained similar levels of carbon picked up during the milling process. The specific environment used in milling the powder appears to exert a considerable influence on the post-consolidation recrystallization behavior of the alloy. A milling environment which produced powder particles having a high surface carbon content resulted in a consolidated alloy which readily recrystallized, whereas powder with a low surface carbon level after milling resulted in no recrystallization even at 1380 C. A feature of these alloys was the appearance of voids or porosity after the recrystallization anneal, as had been found with ORNL-produced alloys. Adjustment of the recrystallization parameters did not reveal any range of conditions where recrystallization could be accomplished without the formation of voids. Initial creep tests of specimens of the recrystallized alloys indicated a significant increase in creep strength compared to cast or wrought Fe{sub 3}Al, but the specimens failed prematurely by a mechanism that involved brittle fracture of one of the two grains in the test cross section, followed by ductile fracture of the remaining grain. The reasons for this behavior are not yet understood. The

  19. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  20. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  1. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  2. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  3. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, Suleyman B.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quaiscrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked compositehibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus (stiffness).

  4. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked composite exhibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young`s modulus (stiffness). 3 figs.

  5. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  6. Rechargeable sodium alloy anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, T.R.

    1988-06-28

    A secondary battery is described comprising: (a) an anode which comprises an alloy of sodium and one or metals selected from the group consisting of tin, lead antimony, bismuth, selenium and tellerium, (b) an electrolyte comprising one or more organic solvents and one or more sodium salts dissolved therein forming dissolved sodium cations in solution; and (c) a cathode; the sodium cations from the electrolyte alloying with the one or more metals of the alloy in the anode during the charging of the battery and sodium in the alloy disoloving in the electrolyte during the discharging of the battery.

  7. POWDER METALLURGY TiAl ALLOYS: MICROSTRUCTURES AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L

    2006-12-11

    The microstructures and properties of powder metallurgy TiAl alloys fabricated by hot extrusion of gas-atomized powder at different elevated temperatures were investigated. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1150 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains and coarse ordered B2 grains. Particles of ordered hexagonal {omega} phase were also observed in some B2 grains. The alloy containing B2 grains displayed a low-temperature superplastic behavior: a tensile elongation of 310% was measured when the alloy was tested at 800 C under a strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1250 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains, coarse {alpha}{sub 2} grains, and lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. An observation of stacking faults associated with fine {gamma} lamellae in {alpha}{sub 2} grains reveals that the stacking fault of {alpha}{sub 2} phase plays an important role in the formation of lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. Unlike the alloy fabricated at 1150{sup o}, the alloy fabricated at 1250{sup o} displayed no low-temperature superplasticity, but a tensile elongation of 260% at 1000 C was measured. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1400 C consisted of fully lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies with the colony size ranging between 50 {micro}m and 100 {micro}m, in which the width of {gamma} lamella is in a range between 100 nm and 350 nm, and the width of {alpha}{sub 2} lamella is in a range between 10 nm and 50 nm. Creep behavior of the ultrafine lamellar alloy and the effects of alloying addition on the creep resistance of the fully lamellar alloy are also investigated.

  8. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  9. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  10. Tensile and impact properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-12-31

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens from a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys [based on Fe-8Al (wt %)] had lower transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al-type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with yttrium showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150 C, compared to approximately 300 C for FA-129. In general, the microstructures were coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  11. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of low-activation ferritic alloys*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    Microstructures of low-activation ferritic alloys, such as 2.25% Cr-2% W, 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys, were observed after FFTF irradiation at 698 K to a dose of 36 dpa. Martensite in 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys and bainite in 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy were fairly stable after the irradiation. Microvoids were observed in the martensite in each alloy but not in bainite and δ-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. An addition of 0.02% Ti to 9% Cr-2% W alloy considerably reduced the void density. Spherical (Ta, W) and Ti-rich precipitates were observed in the Ti-added 9% Cr-2% W alloy. Precipitates observed in 9% Cr-2% W and 7% Cr-2% W alloys are mainly Cr-rich M 23C 6 (Ta, W) and Ta(W)-rich M 6C and Fe-rich Laves phase. In 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy, high density of fine (Ta, W)-rich M 2C type precipitates as well as M 6C were observed. Spherical small α' Cr-rich particles were observed in both martensite and α-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. Correlation between postirradiation microstructure and irradiation hardening is shown and discussed for these alloys.

  12. Functionally Graded Al Alloy Matrix In-Situ Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Subramaniya Sarma, V.; Murty, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, functionally graded (FG) aluminum alloy matrix in-situ composites (FG-AMCs) with TiB2 and TiC reinforcements were synthesized using the horizontal centrifugal casting process. A commercial Al-Si alloy (A356) and an Al-Cu alloy were used as matrices in the present study. The material parameters (such as matrix and reinforcement type) and process parameters (such as mold temperature, mold speed, and melt stirring) were found to influence the gradient in the FG-AMCs. Detailed microstructural analysis of the composites in different processing conditions revealed that the gradients in the reinforcement modify the microstructure and hardness of the Al alloy. The segregated in-situ formed TiB2 and TiC particles change the morphology of Si particles during the solidification of Al-Si alloy. A maximum of 20 vol pct of reinforcement at the surface was achieved by this process in the Al-4Cu-TiB2 system. The stirring of the melt before pouring causes the reinforcement particles to segregate at the periphery of the casting, while in the absence of such stirring, the particles are segregated at the interior of the casting.

  13. Examination of some high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dadras, M.M.; Morris, D.G.

    1997-12-22

    Copper alloys with high strength and high thermal and electrical conductivity have received a lot of attention over the last decades. Most of such efforts have concentrated on the development of alloys containing fine, dispersed particles, and using rapid solidification techniques to ensure a sufficient volume fraction and sufficient fineness of the dispersed phase. In a recent study, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy was developed which shows relatively good strength up to 700 C, a result which was explained by the resistance to coarsening of the fine Cr{sub 2}Nb intermetallic particles in this materials. The amount of intermetallic Cr{sub 2}Nb second phase in this alloy was about 14vol% and it was claimed that the special compound-nature of the intermetallic phase was responsible for the good stability and retention of strength to high temperature. In order to examine the influence of the nature of the fine particles present and their stability against coarsening, as well as to examine the influence of volume fraction of second phase on tensile strength, three different alloys have been chosen for study: Cu-2Nb and Cu-4Cr for examining the role of second phase chemistry (Nb or Cr) on structural and property stability; and a Cu-14Cr alloy, for comparison with the Cu-4Cr alloy, to examine the role of volume fraction of the second phase. The stability of these alloys will then be compared with that reported for the Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy.

  14. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Composites and Light Alloys Reinforced with Detonation Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakovich, G. V.; Vorozhtsov, S. A.; Vorozhtsov, A. B.; Potekaev, A. I.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of introduction of particles of detonation-synthesized nanodiamonds into composites and aluminum-base light alloys on their physical and mechanical properties is analyzed. The data on microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of composites and cast aluminum alloys reinforced with diamond nanoparticles are presented. The introduction of nanoparticles is shown to result in a significant improvement of the material properties.

  15. Influence of Tin Additions on the Phase-Transformation Characteristics of Mechanical Alloyed Cu-Al-Ni Shape-Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saud, Safaa N.; Hamzah, E.; Abubakar, T.; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H. R.; Mohammed, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the addition of Sn to Cu-Al-Ni alloy as a fourth element with different percentages of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt pct on the microstructure, phase-transformation temperatures, mechanical properties, and corrosion behaviors was investigated. The modified and unmodified alloys were fabricated by mechanical alloying followed by microwave sintering. The sintered and homogenized alloys of Cu-Al-Ni-xSn shape-memory alloys had a refined particle structure with an average particle size of 40 to 50 µm associated with an improvement in the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. With the addition of Sn, the porosity density tends to decrease, which can also lead to improvements in the properties of the modified alloys. The minimum porosity percentage was observed in the Cu-Al-Ni-1.0 wt pct Sn alloy, which resulted in enhancing the ductility, strain recovery, and corrosion resistance. Further increasing the Sn addition to 1.5 wt pct, the strength of the alloy increased because the highest volume fraction of precipitates was formed. Regarding the corrosion behavior, addition of Sn up to 1 wt pct increased the corrosion resistance of the base SMA from 2.97 to 19.20 kΩ cm2 because of formation of a protective film that contains hydrated tin oxyhydroxide, aluminum dihydroxychloride, and copper chloride on the alloy. However, further addition of Sn reduced the corrosion resistance.

  16. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  17. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  18. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  19. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  20. Surface composition of alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachtler, W. M. H.

    1984-11-01

    In equilibrium, the composition of the surface of an alloy will, in general, differ from that of the bulk. The broken-bond model is applicable to alloys with atoms of virtually equal size. If the heat of alloy formation is zero, the component of lower heat of atomization is found enriched in the surface. If both partners have equal heats of sublimination, the surface of a diluted alloy is enriched with the minority component. Size effects can enhance or weaken the electronic effects. In general, lattice strain can be relaxed by precipitating atoms of deviating size on the surface. Two-phase alloys are described by the "cherry model", i.e. one alloy phase, the "kernel" is surrounded by another alloy, the "flesh", and the surface of the outer phase, the "skin" displays a deviating surface composition as in monophasic alloys. In the presence of molecules capable of forming chemical bonds with individual metal atoms, "chemisorption induced surface segregation" can be observed at low temperatures, i.e. the surface becomes enriched with the metal forming the stronger chemisorption bonds.

  1. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  4. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  5. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  6. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  7. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  8. Recovery and recrystallisation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, legacy, FeCrAlY ODS alloy precursor powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K.; Rao, A.; Tatlock, G. J.; Jones, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents findings related to the recrystallisation behaviour in Mechanically Alloyed (MA) and annealed powders of legacy commercial Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys PM2000, MA956 and ODM751. Annealing of as-MA ODS alloy powders at temperatures ≥ 800 °C induced primary recrystallisation. The volume fraction (Vf) recrystallised increased with higher annealing temperatures in the range studied (∼800-1050 °C). However, low temperature (650 °C) recovery reduced the subsequent kinetics of recrystallisation in PM2000 alloy. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis of annealed PM2000 and MA956 alloy powders indicates that precipitation of nano-particulate Y-Al-O phases begins at temperatures as low as 650 °C and microstructural changes during annealing of ODS powders involved interactions between nano-particle formation and recovery/recrystallisation processes. High number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent nano-precipitates were identified in both recovered and recrystallised regions of powder particles. These formed over a range of temperatures used in the consolidation processing of ODS alloys. The orientation relationship between nano-particles and the matrix was identical in both recovered and recrystallised grains, indicating that particles were dissolved at recrystallising interfaces and subsequently reprecipitated. Examination and comparison of as-MA and annealed powder specimens suggests that nuances in the manufacturing of these three, nominally similar, alloys leads to differences in recovery/recrystallisation behaviour, which may influence microstructure and, ultimately, properties in the final product form.

  9. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  10. Diffusion of boron in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Zhang, S; He, X.

    1995-04-01

    By means of particle tracking autoradiography (PTA), the diffusion coefficients of boron between 900 and 1,200 C were measured in 04MnNbB steel, 25MnTiB steel, Ni-B, Fe-30%Ni-B and Fe-3%Si-B alloys, and the frequency factor D{sub 0} and activation energy Q were obtained respectively. The experiment results indicated that there was an obvious difference between the present result and the result obtained by Busby (in 1953). It was found that the boron diffusivity in {gamma}-Fe increased as Ni was added. The diffusivity of boron in Fe-3%Si-B alloy with b.c.c. structure was much slower than one obtained by Busby in {alpha}-Fe (1954), which, however, was much faster than the results obtained in {gamma}-Fe (with f.c.c. structure). Based on the present data of boron diffusion coefficients, the mechanism of segregation of boron to grain boundaries is discussed.

  11. Ancient Metal Mirror Alloy Revisited: Quasicrystalline Nanoparticles Observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, J. A.; Mantri, A. S.; Yamjala, S.; Saha, Sabyasachi; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Rao, P. Rama

    2015-12-01

    This article presents, for the first time, evidence of nanocrystalline structure, through direct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, in a Cu-32 wt.% Sn alloy that has been made by an age-old, uniquely crafted casting process. This alloy has been used as a metal mirror for centuries. The TEM images also reveal five-sided projections of nano-particles. The convergent beam nano-diffraction patterns obtained from the nano-particles point to the nano-phase being quasicrystalline, a feature that has never before been reported for a copper alloy, although there have been reports of the presence of icosahedral `clusters' within large unit cell intermetallic phases. This observation has been substantiated by x-ray diffraction, wherein the observed peaks could be indexed to an icosahedral quasi-crystalline phase. The mirror alloy casting has been valued for its high hardness and high reflectance properties, both of which result from its unique internal microstructure that include nano-grains as well as quasi-crystallinity. We further postulate that this microstructure is a consequence of the raw materials used and the manufacturing process, including the choice of mold material. While the alloy consists primarily of copper and tin, impurity elements such as zinc, iron, sulfur, aluminum and nickel are also present, in individual amounts not exceeding one wt.%. It is believed that these trace impurities could have influenced the microstructure and, consequently, the properties of the metal mirror alloy.

  12. Development of a new β Ti alloy with low modulus and favorable plasticity for implant material.

    PubMed

    Liang, S X; Feng, X J; Yin, L X; Liu, X Y; Ma, M Z; Liu, R P

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important development directions of the Ti and its alloys is the applications in medical field. Development of new Ti alloys with low elastic modulus and/or favorable biocompatibility plays an important role for promoting its application in medical field. In this work, a new β Ti alloy (Ti-31Nb-6Zr-5Mo, wt.%) was designed for implant material using d-electron alloy design method. Microstructure and tensile properties of the designed alloy after hot rolling (HR) and solution followed by aging treatments (SA) were investigated. Results show that the designed alloy is composed of single β phase. However, microstructural analysis shows that the β phase in the designed alloy separates into Nb-rich and Nb-poor phase regions. The Nb-rich regions in HR specimen are typical elongated fiber texture, but are equiaxed particles with several micrometers in SA specimen. Tensile results show that the designed alloy has low Young's modulus of 44 GPa for HR specimen and 48 GPa for SA specimen which are very close to the extreme of Young's modulus of bulk titanium alloys. At the same time, the designed alloy has favorable plasticity in term of elongation of 26.7% for HR specimen and 20.6% for SA specimen, and appropriate tensile strength over 700 MPa. In short, the designed alloy has low elastic modulus close to that of bone and favorable plasticity and strength which can be a potential candidate for hard tissue replacements. PMID:26838858

  13. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  14. Creep and stress rupture of oxide dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed Inconel alloy MA 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Stulga, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of the mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy MA 754 was studied at 760, 982 and 1093 C. Tensile specimens with a fine, highly elongated grain structure, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal grain direction were tested at various stresses in air under constant load. It was found that the apparent stress dependence was large, with power law exponents ranging from 19 to 33 over the temperature range studied. The creep activation energy, after correction for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, was close to but slightly larger than the activation energy for self diffusion. Rupture was intergranular and the rupture ductility as measured by percentage elongation was generally low, with values ranging from 0.5 to 16 pct. The creep properties are rationalized by describing the creep rates in terms of an effective stress which is the applied stress minus a resisting stress consistent with the alloy microstructure. Values of the resisting stress obtained through a curve fitting procedure are found to be close to the values of the particle by-pass stress for this oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, as calculated from the measured oxide particle distribution.

  15. THORIUM-SILICON-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.G.

    1959-02-10

    Th, Si, anol Bt alloys where Be and Si are each present in anmounts between 0.1 and 3.5% by weight and the total weight per cent of the minor alloying elements is between 1.5 and 4.5% are discussed. These ternary alloys show increased hardness and greater resistant to aqueous corrosion than is found in pure Th, Th-Si alloys, or Th-Be alloys.

  16. Properties of splat-quenched 7075 aluminum type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, J. P. H. A.; Pelloux, R. M.; Grant, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The 7075 alloy belonging to the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system, prepared by powder metallurgy techniques, was used in a study of alloys prepared from splat-quenched foils consolidated into bar material by hot extrusion. Ni and Fe were included in one alloy specimen, producing a fine dispersion of FeAl3 type particles which added to the strength of the aged alloy but did not coarsen upon heat treatment. Fine oxide films showing up on air-splatted foils induce finely dispersed oxide stringers (if the foils are not hot-worked subsequently) which in turn promote axial cracking (but longitudinal tensile strength is not seriously impaired). Splatting in a protective atmosphere, or thermomechanical processing, is recommended to compensate for this.

  17. Precipitation Strengthening in Al-Ni-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yangyang; Huang, Kai; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation hardening of eutectic and hypoeutectic Al-Ni alloys by 2 to 4 wt pct. manganese is investigated with focus on the effect of the alloys' chemical composition and solidification cooling rate on microstructure and tensile strength. Within the context of the investigation, mathematical equations based on the Orowan Looping strengthening mechanism were used to calculate the strengthening increment contributed by each of the phases present in the aged alloy. The calculations agree well with measured values and suggest that the larger part of the alloy's yield strength is due to the Al3Ni eutectic phase, this is closely followed by contribution from the Al6Mn particles, which precipitate predominantly at grain boundaries.

  18. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an enlongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15% Cr-2% Mo-2% Ta-4% W-4.5% Al-2.5% Ti-0.15% Zr-0.05% C-0.01% B-1.1% Y2O3. It exhibits strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F, but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high-cycle, low-cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy micro-structure and properties is discussed.

  19. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an elongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15Cr-2Mo-2Ta-4W-4.5Al-2.5Ti-0.15Zr 0.05C-0.01B-1.1Y2O3. It exhibits the strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high cycle, low cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy microstructure and properties is discussed.

  20. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  1. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  2. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  3. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  4. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  5. Evidence of [eta]' or ordered zone formation in aluminum alloy 7075 from differential scanning calorimetry. [Aluminium alloy 7075

    SciTech Connect

    Bartges, C.W. )

    1993-05-01

    The development of high strength levels in Al-Mg-Zn-(Cu) alloys is dependent on the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution ([alpha][sub ss]). The equilibrium phase, [eta], and the transition phase, [eta][prime], have compositions Mg(Zn, Al, Cu)[sub 2] and the GP Zones are solute rich clusters. Several authors have presented evidence that there is another precipitate which forms between the GP Zones and [eta][prime], though there is some controversy whether it is crystallographically distinct from the matrix, [eta][prime], or an ordered GP Zone. Regardless of their structure, these particles are seldom observed and are not usually considered in the decomposition of these alloys. Most of the previous observations of these particles have been the result of involved transmission electron microscopic and X-ray scattering experiments. This report shows they may also be detected using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Also significant is the fact that the particles were observed in AA 7075, an important commercial alloy. Lloyd and Chaturvedi also saw indications of [eta][prime] or ordered zones using DSC, but the results reported herein are different in several important respects. DSC traces of alloys aged for various times at room temperature and 121 C have shown there is at least one phase which can form during the decomposition of aluminum alloy 7075 that is not usually stated in the decomposition reaction. The results of previous studies suggest they may be ordered GP Zones or [eta][prime].

  6. Effect of Alloying Element Partition in Pearlite on the Growth of Austenite in High-Carbon Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. N.; Xia, Y.; Enomoto, M.; Zhang, C.; Yang, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    The growth of austenite from pearlite in high-carbon low alloy steel occurs with and without alloy element redistribution depending on the amount of superheating above the eutectoid temperature. The transition temperature of austenite growth (denoted PNTT) is calculated as a function of pearlite transformation temperature and subsequent holding time, which affect the degree of partitioning in pearlite, using experimental partition coefficients k θ/ α of Mn, Cr, Co, Si, and Ni reported in the literature. PNTT is the highest in Cr-containing alloys which have the largest k θ/ α in pearlite. Post-transformation aging, usually accompanied by cementite spheroidization, leads to a marked increase of PNTT in Mn and Cr alloys. PNTT of Ni alloy does not depend on pearlite transformation temperature because practically the formation of partitioned pearlite is severely limited in this alloy for kinetic reasons. Above PNTT, austenite growth occurs fast initially, but slows down in the order of ten seconds when the ferrite disappears, and the remaining small carbide particles dissolve very slowly under the control of alloy element diffusion.

  7. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Olga M.; Gilmour, Denise; Tate, Rothwelle J.; Grant, M. Helen

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p < 0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p < 0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p < 0.05) in apoptosis after a 48 h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions + debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. - Highlights: • Effects of CoCr nanoparticles and Co ions on U937 cells were investigated. • Ions released from wear debris play an important role in cellular response, • Toxicity of Co ions could be related to NO metabolic processes and apoptosis. • CoCr particles were a more effective inducer of apoptosis after cell

  8. Synthesis of biodegradable Mg-Zn alloy using mechanical alloying: Effect of ball to powder weight ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhailawati, Hussain; Salleh, Emee Marina; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of ball to powder weight ratio (BPR) on biodegradable binary magnesium-zinc (Mg-Zn) alloy synthesized using mechanical alloying. A powder mixture of Mg-5wt%Zn was milled in a planetary mill under argon atmosphere using a stainless steel container and balls. Milling process was carried out at 200 rpm for 5 hours using various BPR (i.e. 5:1, 10:1, 15:1, 20:1). Then, as milled powder was compacted under 400 MPa and sintered in a tube furnace at 300 °C in argon flow for an hour. The sintered density and microhardness of the alloy increased as BPR increased up to 15:1. However a further increasing showed a reduction in both density and microhardness which due to enlargement of crystallite and particle which resulted from the excessive internal energy during mechanical alloying.

  9. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  10. Compressive strength of the mineral reinforced aluminium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Rama; Sharma, Anju; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, Gurmel; Pandey, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of quasi-static compressive strength of aluminium alloy reinforced with different concentration of rutile mineral particles. The reinforced material shows increase in compressive strength with 5wt% rutile concentration as compared to the base alloy. This increase in compressive strength of composite is attributed to direct strengthening due to transfer of load from lower stiffness matrix (LM13 alloy) to higher stiffness reinforcement (rutile particles). Indirect strengthening mechanisms like increase in dislocation density at the matrix-reinforcement interface, grain size refinement of the matrix and dispersion strengthening are also the contributing factors. The decrease in compressive strength of composite with the increased concentration of rutile concentration beyond 5 wt.% can be attributed to the increase in dislocation density due to the void formation at the matrix-reinforcement interface.

  11. MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION MODELING FOR SOLUTION TREATMENT OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hebi; Sabau, Adrian S; Skszek, Timothy; Niu, X

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure evolution during solution treatment plays an important role in mechanical properties of heat-treated aluminum alloys. In this paper, models were reviewed that can predict the microstructure evolution during the solutionizing process of the aging heat treatment of aluminum alloys. The dissolution of Mg2Si particles has been modeled as a diffusion process of Mg in the -Al matrix. The evolution of volumetric fraction of fragmented silicon as a function of time and temperature was also considered. The growth and coarsening of silicon particles during the heat treatment was considered. It was found that constitutive equations and required property data for most of the phenomena that need to be considered are available. Several model parameters that need to be obtained from material characterization were identified. Pending the availability of these model parameters, this comprehensive model can be used to describe the microstructure evolution of aluminum alloys in order to optimize the solutionizing heat treatment for energy savings.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Pizzo, P. P.; Larson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitation events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significant alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  13. Constituent Particle Clustering and Pitting Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, D. Gary

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a primary degradation mechanism that affects the durability and integrity of structures made of aluminum alloys, and it is a concern for commercial transport and military aircraft. In aluminum alloys, corrosion results from local galvanic coupling between constituent particles and the metal matrix. Due to variability in particle sizes, spatial location, and chemical composition, to name a few critical variables, corrosion is a complex stochastic process. Severe pitting is caused by particle clusters that are located near the material surface, which, in turn, serve as nucleation sites for subsequent corrosion fatigue crack growth. These evolution processes are highly dependent on the spatial statistics of particles. The localized corrosion growth rate is primarily dependent on the galvanic process perpetuated by particle-to-particle interactions and electrochemical potentials. Frequently, severe pits are millimeters in length, and these pits have a dominant impact on the structural prognosis. To accommodate large sizes, a model for three-dimensional (3-D) constituent particle microstructure is proposed. To describe the constituent particle microstructure in three dimensions, the model employs a fusion of classic stereological techniques, spatial point pattern analyses, and qualitative observations. The methodology can be carried out using standard optical microscopy and image analysis techniques.

  14. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  15. Alloy Selection System

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    Software will Predict Corrosion Rates to Improve Productivity in the Chemical Industry. Many aspects of equipment design and operation are influenced by the choice of the alloys used to fabricate process equipment.

  16. Effect of carbonitride precipitates on the abrasive wear behaviour of hardfacing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ke; Yu, Shengfu; Li, Yingbin; Li, Chenglin

    2008-06-01

    Hardfacing alloy of martensitic stainless steel expect higher abradability to be achieved through the addition of nitrogen being provided by the fine scale precipitation of complex carbonitride particles. Niobium and titanium as the most effective carbonitride alloying elements were added in the Fe-Cr13-Mn-N hardfacing alloy to get carbonitride precipitates. Carbonitride was systematically studied by optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and energy spectrum analysis. Abrasive wear resistance of hardfacing alloy in as-welded and heat-treated conditions was tested by using the belt abrasion test apparatus where the samples slide against the abrasive belt. It is found that carbonitride particles in the hardfacing alloy are complex of Cr, Ti and Nb distributing on the grain boundary or matrix of the hardfacing alloy with different number and size in as-welded and heat-treated conditions. A large number of carbonitrides can be precipitated with very fine size (nanoscale) after heat treatment. As a result, the homogeneous distribution of very fine carbonitride particles can significantly improve the grain-abrasion wear-resisting property of the hardfacing alloy, and the mass loss is plastic deformation with minimum depth of grooving by abrasive particles and fine delamination.

  17. Silver-palladium braze alloy recovered from masking materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cierniak, R.; Colman, G.; De Carlo, F.

    1966-01-01

    Method for recovering powdered silver-palladium braze alloy from an acrylic spray binder and rubber masking adhesive used in spray brazing is devised. The process involves agitation and dissolution of masking materials and recovery of suspended precious metal particles on a filter.

  18. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2011-08-09

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  19. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

    2009-12-01

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  20. Effects of Al-5Ti-1B master alloy on the microstructural evaluation of a highly alloyed aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process

    SciTech Connect

    Alipour, M.; Emamy, M.; Azarbarmas, M.; Karamouz, M.

    2010-06-15

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of Al-5Ti-1B master alloy on the structural characteristics of Al-12Zn-3 Mg-2.5Cu aluminum alloy. The optimum amount of Ti containing master alloy for proper grain refining was selected as 6 wt.%. A modified strain-induced, melt-activated (SIMA) process for semi-solid processing of alloys was proposed. In order to examine the effectiveness of the modified SIMA process, the recrystallized microstructures of the Al alloy (Al-12Zn-3 Mg-2.5Cu) prepared by the modified SIMA processes were macroscopically. The modified SIMA process employed casting, warm multi-forging, recrystallization and partial melting instead of the conventional process. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. The microstructure evolution of reheated Al-12Zn-3 Mg-2.5Cu aluminum alloy was characterized by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) and optical microscopy. In this study the relation between the induced strain with size and shape of grain size has been studied. Results indicated that with the increase of strain sphericity of particles, their size decreases and sphericity takes place in less reahiting time.

  1. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    Pu-U-Fe and Pu-U-Co alloys suitable for use as fuel elements tn fast breeder reactors are described. The advantages of these alloys are ease of fabrication without microcracks, good corrosion restatance, and good resistance to radiation damage. These advantages are secured by limitation of the zeta phase of plutonium in favor of a tetragonal crystal structure of the U/sub 6/Mn type.

  2. Electroless synthesis of 3 nm wide alloy nanowires inside Tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Hahn, Kersten; Kopold, Peter; Kadri, Anan; Wege, Christina; Kern, Klaus; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2012-02-01

    We show that 3 nm wide cobalt-iron alloy nanowires can be synthesized by simple wet chemical electroless deposition inside tubular Tobacco mosaic virus particles. The method is based on adsorption of Pd(II) ions, formation of a Pd catalyst, and autocatalytic deposition of the alloy from dissolved metal salts, reduced by a borane compound. Extensive energy-filtering TEM investigations at the nanoscale revealed that the synthesized wires are alloys of Co, Fe, and Ni. We confirmed by high-resolution TEM that our alloy nanowires are at least partially crystalline, which is compatible with typical Co-rich alloys. Ni traces bestow higher stability, presumably against corrosion, as also known from bulk CoFe. Alloy nanowires, as small as the ones presented here, might be used for a variety of applications including high density data storage, imaging, sensing, and even drug delivery.

  3. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  4. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  5. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  6. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  7. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  8. The effect of second-phase on the corrosion and wear behaviors of composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhuo, Chenzhi; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun

    2008-12-01

    The present study concerns the effect of second-phase on the corrosion and wear behaviors of composite alloying layer, which is prepared by double glow plasma alloying of AISI316L steel with predeposited Ni/nano-SiC particle interlayer (by electric brush plating). The composition and microstructure of the composite alloying layer are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that decomposition of nano-SiC particles have occurred under alloying temperature (1000 °C) condition and nano-SiC particles have reacted with Ni and Cr to form Cr 6.5Ni 2.5Si phase and Cr 23C 6 phase. The corrosion resistance of composite alloying layer was investigated by an electrochemical method in 3.5% NaCl and 5% HCl solution. The experimental results show that the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer is higher than that of AISI316L stainless steel and Ni/nano-SiC plating coating, but apparently lower than that of single alloying layer, which proves that the precipitated phase is harmful to the corrosion behavior of Ni-based alloying layer. The dry wear test results show that the composite alloying layer has excellent friction-reduced property, and relative wear resistance of composite alloying layer to Ni/nano-SiC plating coating, alloying layer and 316L stainless steel is 2.9, 3.6 and 5.3, respectively.

  9. Gas-deposit-alloy corrosion interactions in simulated combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luer, Kevin Raymond

    High temperature corrosion in aggressive coal combustion environments involves simultaneous corrosion reactions between combustion gases, ash deposits, and alloys. This research investigated the behavior of a ferritic steel (SA387-Gr11) and three weld claddings (309L SS, Alloy 72, and Alloy 622) in five combustion environments beneath solid deposits at 500°C for up to 1000 hours. The synthetic gases consisted of N2-CO-CO-H2-H2O-H 2S-SO2 mixtures that simulated a range of fuel-rich or fuel-lean combustion environments with a constant sulfur content. The synthetic deposits contained FeS2, FeS, Fe3O4 and/or carbon. Reaction kinetics was studied in individual gas-metal, gas deposit, and deposit-alloy systems. A test method was developed to investigate simultaneous gas-deposit-metal corrosion reactions. The results showed reaction kinetics varied widely, depending on the gas-alloy system and followed linear, parabolic, and logarithmic rate laws. Under reducing conditions, the alloys exhibited a range of corrosion mechanisms including carburization-sulfidation, sulfidation, and sulfidation-oxidation. Most alloys were not resistant to the highly reducing gases but offered moderate resistance to mixed oxidation-sulfidation by demonstrating parabolic or logarithmic behavior. Under oxidizing conditions, all of the alloys were resistant. Under oxidizing-sulfating conditions, alloys with high Fe or Cr contents sulfated whereas an alloy containing Mo and W was resistant. In the gas-deposit-metal tests, FeS2-bearing deposits were extremely corrosive to low alloy steel under both reducing and oxidizing conditions but they had little influence on the weld claddings. Accelerated corrosion was attributed to rapid decomposition or oxidation of FeS2 particles that generated sulfur-rich gases above the alloy surface. In contrast, FeS-type deposits had no influence under reducing conditions but they were aggressive to low alloy steel under oxidizing conditions. The extent of damage

  10. Electron beam driven disordering in small particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vanfleet, R.R.; Mochel, J.

    1997-11-01

    Small metal particles in the range of a few nanometers in diameter are seen to progressively disorder when the 100 keV electron beam of a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) is held stationary on the particle. The diffraction pattern of the individual particle is seen to progress from an initial array of indexable diffraction spots to a mixture of diffraction spots and amorphous-like rings and finally to rings with no persistent diffraction spots. After the electron beam is removed, the particles will recrystallize after minutes or hours. Only particles below a critical size are seen to fully disorder. The authors have observed this in platinum, palladium, rhodium, and iridium and based on the model of disordering process believe it is a universal effect. It has also been observed with a platinum ruthenium alloy. They discuss the mechanism of this disordering and the structure of the resulting disordering particle for the case of platinum clusters.

  11. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  12. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Posada, Olga M; Gilmour, Denise; Tate, Rothwelle J; Grant, M Helen

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p<0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p<0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p<0.05) in apoptosis after a 48h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p<0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions+debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. PMID:25281833

  13. Characterization of Cu-Zn Alloy Nanocrystalline Powders Prepared by Wire Electrical Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qun, Wang; Hai-Bin, Yang; Wei-Li, Guo; Guang-Tian, Zou

    2000-02-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of Cu-Zn alloy in size ranging from 10 to 140 nm was prepared from α-Cu-Zn alloy wire containing 39.8 at.% Zn by an electrical explosion method. The particles are identified from x-ray diffraction as a mixture of the α, β, γ, and ɛ phases of Cu-Zn alloy. Most of the particles are hexagonal in shape, with only a small part being spherical and cubic. The composition of Zn in the explosion products varied from 6.9 to 45.2 at.% in different particles as determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer. A possible mechanism for the formation of the alloy nanocrystalline powders is proposed, in which a redistribution process occurred caused by strong collision and diffusion between the two kinds of atoms during the powder formation.

  14. Reversible Cycling of Silicon and Silicon Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrovac, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Lithium ion batteries typically use a graphite negative electrode. Silicon can store more lithium than any other element and has long been considered as an attractive replacement for graphite. The theoretical lithium storage capacity of silicon is nearly ten times higher than graphite volumetrically and three times higher gravimetrically. The equilibrium Si-Li binary system is well known. Completely new phase behaviors are observed at room temperature. This includes the formation of a new phase, Li15Si4, which is the highest lithium containing phase at room temperature [1]. The formation of Li15Si4 is accompanied by a 280 percent volume expansion of silicon. During de-alloying this phase contracts, forming amorphous silicon. The volume expansion of alloys can cause intra-particle fracture and inter-particle disconnection; leading to loss of cycle life. To overcome issues with volume expansion requires a detailed knowledge of Li-Si phase behavior, careful design of the composition and nanostructure of the alloy and the microstructure of the negative electrode [2]. In this presentation the phase behavior of the Li-Si system will be described. Using this knowledge alone, strategies can be developed so that silicon can be reversibly cycled in a battery hundreds of times. Further increases in energy density and efficiency can be gained by alloying silicon with other elements, while controlling microstructure [2]. Coupled with negative electrode design strategies, practical negative electrodes for lithium ion cells can be developed based on bulk materials, with significant energy density improvement over conventional electrodes. [4pt] [1] M.N. Obrovac and L.J. Krause, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A103. [0pt] [2] M.N. Obrovac, Leif Christensen, Dinh Ba Le, and J.R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A849

  15. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Microstructure and Properties of a Cu-Fe-P Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qiyi; Shen, Leinuo; Cao, Feng; Jia, Yanlin; Liao, Kaiju; Wang, Mingpu

    2015-04-01

    A Cu-0.7Fe-0.15P (wt.%) alloy was designed, and its comprehensive properties, especially electrical conductivity and temper-softening resistance of the designed alloy, were higher than those of traditional Cu-Fe-P alloys. The microstructure of this alloy was investigated with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The particle of secondary phase was confirmed to be Fe2P with x-ray spectroscopy and digital diffractogram. By virtue of precipitation hardening and work hardening, the tensile strength and electrical conductivity of Cu-0.7Fe-0.15P alloy were 498 MPa and 62% IACS, respectively. The electrical conductivity of this alloy can be up to 92% IACS due to the complete precipitation of Fe2P. After repeating the cold rolling and aging process for three times, the tensile strength, elongation, and conductivity of this alloy were 467 MPa, 22%, and 78% IACS, respectively. Due to the low driving force of recrystallization and the pinning effect of fine dispersed Fe2P, the alloy with low deformation rate showed excellent softening resistance. The designed alloy can be used as a high-strength, high-electrical-conductivity lead-frame alloy.

  16. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that there is a correlation between the alloying energy of an alloy, and the diffusion barriers of the minority component. Alloys with a negative alloying energy may show improved long term stability, despite the fact that there is typically a greater thermodynamic driving force towards dissolution of the solute metal over alloying. In addition to Pt, we find that this trend also appears to hold for alloys based on Al and Pd. PMID:26750475

  17. Solid State Joining of Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Todd W.

    Solid state joining of titanium via friction stir welding and diffusion bonding have emerged as enablers of efficient monolithic structural designs by the eliminations fasteners for the aerospace industry. As design complexity and service demands increase, the need for joints of dissimilar alloys has emerged. Complex thermomechanical conditions in friction stir weld joints and high temperature deformation behavior differences between alloys used in dissimilar joints gives rise to a highly variable flow pattern within a stir zone. Experiments performed welding Ti-6Al-4V to beta21S show that mechanical intermixing of the two alloys is the primary mechanism for the generation of the localized chemistry and microstructure, the magnitude of which can be directly related to pin rotation and travel speed weld parameters. Mechanical mixing of the two alloys is heavily influenced by strain rate softening phenomena, and can be used to manipulate weld nugget structure by switching which alloy is subjected to the advancing side of the pin. Turbulent mixing of a weld nugget and a significant reduction in defects and weld forces are observed when the beta21S is put on the advancing side of the weld where higher strain rates are present. Chemical diffusion driven by the heat of weld parameters is characterized using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and is shown to be a secondary process responsible for generating short-range chemical gradients that lead to a gradient of alpha particle structures. Diffusion calculations are inconsistent with an assumption of steady-state diffusion and show that material interfaces in the weld nugget evolve through the break-down of turbulent interface features generated by material flows. A high degree of recrystallization is seen throughout the welds, with unique, hybrid chemistry grains that are generated at material interfaces in the weld nugget that help to unify the crystal structure of dissimilar alloys. The degree of

  18. Light-weight alloys for aerospace applications; Proceedings of the Symposium, Las Vegas, NV, Feb. 28-Mar. 2, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.W.; Chia, E.H.; Kim, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on lightweight alloys for aerospace applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: P/M-aluminum alloy for high-temperature application, elevated temperature behavior of RST Al-Ti-X alloys, microstructural characterization of rapidly solidified Al-Ze-V alloys, high-strength aluminum alloys for aerospace applications, oxidation behavior of some Mg-Li and Mg-Li-SI alloys, the effect of various environments on fatigue crack propagation in a 2090 Al-Li alloy, and surface-generated scratches and their effects on the fatigue life of Al-Li alloys. Consideration is given to the stretch formability of sheet Al-Li, hydrogen solution in Al-Li alloys, particle-reinforced aluminum-based composites, applications for discontinuously reinforced aluminum, age hardening of cast SiC-reinforced Mg-6Zn, superplasticity in high-strength aluminum alloys and in spray-deposited 7075 Al alloys, and superplastic behavior in an aluminum-lithium alloy.

  19. Annealing group III-V compound doped silicon-germanium alloy for improved thermo-electric conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W. (Inventor); Wood, Charles (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The thermoelectric conversion efficiency of a GaP doped SiGe alloy is improved about 30 percent by annealing the alloy at a temperature above the melting point of the alloy, preferably stepwise from 1200 C to 1275 C in air to form large grains having a size over 50 microns and to form a GeGaP rich phase and a silicon rich phase containing SiP and SiO2 particles.

  20. Atomic-level alloying and de-alloying in doped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Eric; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao

    2013-03-25

    Atomically precise alloying and de-alloying processes for the formation of Ag-Au and Cu-Au nanoparticles of 25-metal-atom composition (referred to as Ag(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 and Cu(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 , in which R = CH2CH2Ph) are reported. The identities of the particles were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI-MS). Their structures were probed by fragmentation analysis in MALDI-MS and comparison with the icosahedral structure of the homogold Au25(SR)18 nanoparticles (an icosahedral Au13 core protected by a shell of Au12(SR)18). The Cu and Ag atoms were found to preferentially occupy the 13-atom icosahedral sites, instead of the exterior shell. The number of Ag atoms in Ag(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 (x = 0-8) was dependent on the molar ratio of Ag(I)/Au(III) precursors in the synthesis, whereas the number of Cu atoms in Cu(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 (x = 0-4) was independent of the molar ratio of Cu(II)/Au(III) precursors applied. Interestingly, the Cu(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 nanoparticles show a spontaneous de-alloying process over time, and the initially formed Cu(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 nanoparticles were converted to pure Au25(SR)18. This de-alloying process was not observed in the case of alloyed Ag(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 nanoparticles. This contrast can be attributed to the stability difference between Cu(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 and Ag(x)Au(25-x)(SR)18 nanoparticles. These alloyed nanoparticles are promising candidates for applications such as catalysis. PMID:23404729

  1. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  2. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  3. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  5. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  6. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  7. Elementary Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, R.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the text of a speech given to a conference of physics teachers in which the full spectrum of elementary particles is given, along with their classification. Also includes some teaching materials available on this topic. (PEB)

  8. Elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

  9. Hot Microfissuring in Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Nunes, A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments in intergranular cracking of nickel alloy near solidus temperature discussed in contractor report. Purpose of investigation development of schedule for welding, casting, forging, or other processing of alloy without causing microfissuring.

  10. Photobiomolecular metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2003-05-06

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  11. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  12. Processing, Microstructure, and Properties of Multiphase Mo Silicide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heatherly, L.; Liu, C.T.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-11-30

    Multiphase Mo silicide alloys containing T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}), Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo phases where prepared by both melting and casting (M and C) and powder metallurgical (PM) processes. Glassy phases are observed in PM materials but not in M and C materials. Microstructural studies indicate that the primary phase is Mo-rich solid solution in alloys containing {le}(9.4Si+13.8B, at. %) and T2 in alloys with {ge}(9.8Si+14.6B). An eutectic composition is estimated to be close to Mo-9.6Si-14.2B. The mechanical properties of multiphase silicide alloys were determined by hardness, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. The multiphase alloy MSB-18 (Mo-9.4Si-13.8B) possesses a flexure strength distinctly higher than that of MoSi{sub 2} and other Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicide alloys containing no Mo particles. Also, MSB-18 is tougher than MoSi{sub 2} by a factor of 4.

  13. Processing, microstructure, and properties of multiphase Mo silicide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Schneibel, J.H.; Heatherly, L.

    1999-07-01

    Multiphase Mo silicide alloys containing T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}), Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo phases were prepared by both melting and casting (M and C) and powder metallurgical (PM) processes. Glassy phases are observed in PM materials but not in M and C materials. Microstructural studies indicate that the primary phase is Mo-rich solid solution in alloys containing {le}(9.4Si+13.8B, at.%) and T2 in alloys with {ge}(9.8Si+14.6B). An eutectic composition is estimated to be close to Mo-9.6Si-14.2B. The mechanical properties of multiphase silicide alloys were determined by hardness, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. The multiphase alloy MSB-18 (Mo-9.4Si-13.8B) possesses a flexure strength distinctly higher than that of MoSi{sub 2} and other Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicide alloys containing no Mo particles. Also, MSB-18 is tougher than MoSi{sub 2} by a factor of 4.

  14. Supercoducting property of Zr-Cu-Al-Ni-Nb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, D.; Motoyama, G.; Kimura, H.; Inoue, A.

    The superconducting property of Zr55Cu(30-X)Al10Ni5NbX alloys prepared by arc melting and liquid quenching methods was investigated by magnetic susceptibility measurements. The crystalline alloys with X = 0∼25 at.% prepared by arc melting method exhibited superconductivity with maximum Tc,on of 10.1 K. The alloys (X = 10∼23 at.%) with crystalline particles embedded in an amorphous structure, which were fabricated by melt spinning method, showed superconductivity with Tc,on of less than 4.0 K. The superconducting property of the Zr-Cu-Al-Ni-Nb alloys was attributed to superconducting phases of Zr2Cu, Zr2Ni, Zr65Al10Nb25 and Zr-Nb contained in the Zr-Cu-Al-Ni-Nb alloys. The melt-spun Zr55Cu(30-X)Al10Ni5NbX (X = 10∼20 at.%) alloys exhibited glass transition at 718∼743 K and were found to be superconducting metallic glasses.

  15. A low-gold dental alloy: structure and segregations.

    PubMed

    Herø, H; Jørgensen, R; Sørbrøden, E

    1982-11-01

    The structure and concentration gradients were studied in the as-cast state for a low-gold alloy and a conventional Type III gold alloy. A much more lamellar eutectic phase was found at the grain boundaries in the low-gold alloy. TEM investigations showed that the interior of the grains consisted of fine lamellae, which probably were alternating Au-Ag and Au-Cu-rich bands due to the miscibility gap in the solid state. Microprobe analyses, where the beam overlapped several of the observed lamellae, displayed both the interdendritic and grain boundary segregations to be much larger for the low-gold alloy than for the Type III alloy. The lamellae observed in the as-cast state are quickly dissolved at 700 degrees C into one phase, but the relaxation by diffusion of the concentration differences associated with grain boundary segregations required several hours because of the much larger distances involved. Aging at 350 degrees C cause precipitation of ordered fct particles. On the basis of structure and alloy composition, they are most likely AuCu I and may contain some Pd. PMID:6958729

  16. Observation of Oxide Formation for Molten Fe-Cr-C Alloy at a High Carbon Region by Oxygen Top Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Ryosuke; Gao, Xu; Kaneko, Shigeru; Kim, Sunjoong; Ueda, Shigeru; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Seok, Min Oh; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-04-01

    The oxide formation behavior during decarburization by top blowing for molten Fe-Cr-C alloy was directly observed. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1673 K to 1723 K (1400 °C to 1450 °C), as well as for 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1623 K to 1673 K (1350 °C to 1400 °C), oxide particles always formed within several minutes after decarburization started. Also, unstable oxide film followed by stable oxide film formed after C content was decreased to certain levels. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1773 K (1500 °C) and 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), only the oxide particle and stable oxide film were observed. For 18 mass pct Cr-5 mass pct C alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), stable oxide film formed twice. By comparing the critical C and Cr contents of alloy when oxides started to form with the equilibrium relation, the formation of the oxide particle and unstable oxide film was found to be under a nonequilibrium condition, whereas the stable oxide film that formed was near an equilibrium condition. For 11 and 14 mass pct Cr alloy, the decarburization rate stayed constant and was not affected by the formation of the oxide particle or unstable oxide film, but it started to decrease after the formation of the stable oxide film.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of novel W80Ni10Nb10 alloy produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, R.; Patra, A.; Karak, S. K.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured tungsten (W) based alloy with nominal composition of W80Ni10Nb10 (in wt. %) was synthesized by mechanical alloying of elemental powders of tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), niobium (Nb) in a high energy planetary ball-mill for 20 h using chrome steel as grinding media and toluene as process control agent followed by compaction at 500 MPa pressure for 5 mins and sintering at 1500°C for 2 h in Ar atmosphere. The phase evolution and the microstructure of the milled powder and consolidated product were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallite size of W in W80Ni10Nb10 powder was reduced from 100 μm at 0 h to 45.6 nm at 10 h and 34.1 nm at 20 h of milling whereas lattice strain increases to 35% at 20 h of milling. The dislocation density shows sharp increase up to 5 h of milling and the rate of increase drops beyond 5 to 20 h of milling. The lattice parameter of tungsten in W80Ni10Nb10 expanded upto 0.04% at 10 h of milling and contracted upto 0.02% at 20 h of milling. The SEM micrograph revealed the presence of spherical and elongated particles in W80Ni10Nb10 powders at 20 h of milling. The particle size decreases from 100 μm to 2 μm with an increase in the milling time from 0 to 20 hours. The crystallite size of W in milled W80Ni10Nb10 alloy as evident from bright field TEM image was in well agreement with the measured crystallite size from XRD. Structure of W in 20 h milled W80Ni10Nb10 alloy was identified by indexing of selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern. Formation of NbNi intermetallic was evident from XRD pattern and SEM micrograph of sintered alloy. Maximum sinterability of 90.8% was achieved in 20 h milled sintered alloy. Hardness and wear study was also conducted to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the sintered product. Hardness of W80Ni10Nb10 alloy reduces with increasing load whereas wear rate increases with increasing load. The evaluated

  18. Tantalum and tantalum alloy tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The specification includes ordering information, manufacture, chemical requirements, tension testing, flare test, ultrasonic test, hydrostatic test, pneumatic proof test, dimensions and tolerances, finish, packaging, marking, inspection, and certification. The specification covers tantalum and tantalum alloy tubing of the following types: Alloy 400 (unalloyed tantalum) and Alloy 401 (tantalum-10% tungsten). (JMT)

  19. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  20. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  1. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  2. Influence of Ti content on synthesis and characteristics of W-Ti ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Zeng, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten-titanium alloys are considered as promising materials for the future fusion devices, in particular for the divertor and other first wall components. The microstructure and the mechanical properties of the material are dependent on the amount of Ti present in the alloy. In this study, W-Ti-Y2O3 alloys with varied Ti contents between 1 wt.% and 10 wt.% fabricated by mechanical alloying were investigated. The effect of Ti on the phase formation and mechanical properties of W-Ti-Y2O3 alloys has been examined. The results suggest that the alloys containing low Ti content exhibit homogeneous microstructure with a uniform distribution of fine titanium oxide particles and tungsten carbides, leading to a significant increase in hardness and elastic modulus of alloys. In addition, high-energy ball milling can facilitate a solid-state reaction between Y2O3 particles and the tungsten-titanium matrix and the subsequent sintering processing promotes the formation of stable nano Ti2Y2O7 oxide particles, which greatly increase the mechanical properties at elevated temperature and enhance irradiation resistance.

  3. Microstructure-property relationships in low-density Al-Li-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheit, T. E.; Wert, J. A.

    1993-04-01

    The present article describes an investigation of the microstructure and tensile properties of cast Al-Li-Mg alloys with very low densities, in the range 2.3 to 2.4 Mg/m3. Low density is achieved by adding Li and Mg in excess of the solubility limit, which prevents subsequent dissolution of the Al2LiMg particles that form during solidification. A simple model developed during the course of this research allows prediction of the volume fraction of Al2LiMg and alloy density from alloy composition. The model was used to select two alloy compositions for detailed investigation: A112Li6Mg and A116Li8Mg. The microstructures of the cast alloys consist of coarse Al2LiMg particles embedded in an Al matrix containing Al3Li particles. Both alloys exhibit low tensile elongation in the as-cast condition. Additional processing steps were used to modify the microstructural characteristics thought to be responsible for the low tensile elongation of the ascast alloys. The A116Li8Mg alloy, with an Al2LiMg volume fraction of 0.25, does not exhibit increased tensile elongation as a result of processing, and the brittle nature of this material is attributed to the high volume fraction of the Al2LiMg phase. The A112Li6Mg alloy, with an Al2LiMg volume fraction of 0.13, exhibits a remarkable increase in tensile elongation after extrusion, an effect attributed to fragmentation and dispersal of a three-dimensional (3-D) network of the intermetallic phase in the as-cast alloy.

  4. Microstructure-property relationships in low-density Al-Li-Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Wert, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The present article describes an investigation of the microstructure and tensile properties of cast Al-Li-Mg alloys with very low densities, in the range 2.3 to 2.4 Mg/m[sup 3]. Low density is achieved by adding Li and Mg in excess of the solubility limit, which prevents subsequent dissolution of the Al[sub 2]LiMg particles that form during solidification. A simple model developed during the course of this research allows prediction of the volume fraction of Al[sub 2]LiMg and alloy density from alloy composition. The model was used to select two alloy compositions for detailed investigation: Al12Li6Mg and Al16Li8Mg. The microstructures of the cast alloys consist of coarse Al[sub 2]LiMg particles embedded in an Al matrix containing Al[sub 3]Li particles. Both alloys exhibit low tensile elongation in the as-cast condition. Additional processing steps were used to modify the microstructural characteristics thought to be responsible for the low tensile elongation of the as-cast alloys. The Al16Li8Mg alloy, with an Al[sub 2]LiMg volume fraction of 0.25, does not exhibit increased tensile elongation as a result of processing, and the brittle nature of this material is attributed to the high volume fraction of the Al[sub 2]LiMg phase. The Al12Li6Mg alloy, with an Al[sub 2]LiMg volume fraction of 0.13, exhibits a remarkable increase in tensile elongation after extrusion, an effect attributed to fragmentation and dispersal of a three-dimensional (3-D) network of the intermetallic phase in the as-cast alloy.

  5. Nano {gamma}'/{gamma}'' composite precipitates in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P. J.; McAllister, D.; Gao, Y.; Lv, D.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J.; Peterson, B.

    2012-05-21

    Nanoscale composite precipitates of Alloy 718 have been investigated with both high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase field modeling. Chemical analysis via energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy allowed for the differentiation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' particles, which is not otherwise possible through traditional Z-contrast methods. Phase field modeling was applied to determine the stress distribution and elastic interaction around and between the particles, respectively, and it was determined that a composite particle (of both {gamma}' and {gamma}'') has an elastic energy that is significantly lower than, for example, single {gamma}' and {gamma}'' precipitates which are non-interacting.

  6. Noble alloys in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gettleman, L

    1991-04-01

    Noble metals used for dental castings continue to consist of alloys of gold, palladium, and silver (not a noble metal), with smaller amounts of iridium, ruthenium, and platinum. The majority are used as a backing for ceramic baking, with the rest used as inlays, onlays, and unveneered crowns. Base metal alloys, principally made of nickel, chromium, and beryllium have gained widespread usage, especially in the United States, due to their lower cost and higher mechanical properties. The current literature, for the most part, cites the use of noble alloys as controls for trials of alternative materials. Direct gold (gold foil) still retains a following and a number of new patents were founded. PMID:1777669

  7. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  8. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, G W; Davis, J W

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500/sup 0/C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150/sup 0/C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. Surface Segregation in Multicomponent Systems: Modeling of Surface Alloys and Alloy Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Noebe, Ronald D.; Good, Brian; Honecy, Frank S.; Abel, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    The study of surface segregation, although of great technological importance, has been largely restricted to experimental work due to limitations associated with theoretical methods. However, recent improvements in both first-particle and semi-empirical methods are opening, the doors to an array of new possibilities for surface scientists. We apply one of these techniques, the Bozzolo, Ferrante and Smith (BFS) method for alloys, which is particularly suitable for complex systems, to several aspects of the computational modeling of surfaces and segregation, including alloy surface segregation, structure and composition of alloy surfaces, and the formation of surface alloys. We conclude with the study of complex NiAl-based binary, ternary and quaternary thin films (with Ti, Cr and Cu additions to NiAl). Differences and similarities between bulk and surface compositions are discussed, illustrated by the results of Monte Carlo simulations. For some binary and ternary cases, the theoretical predictions are compared to experimental results, highlighting the accuracy and value of this developing theoretical tool.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of eutectic nickel alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper discusses the peculiarities of a structure and a coating composition after reflow. It was established that the structure of coatings from nickel alloy is a solid solution based on nickel, the eutectic of γ-Ni+Ni3B composition and dispersed reinforcing particles. The content of alloying elements in the initial powder material determines the type of the coating structure and the formation of hypoeutectic or hypereutectic structures. The influence of formation conditions on the structure and physical-mechanical properties of the coatings is considered in this paper.

  11. Sample preparation of metal alloys by electric discharge machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric discharge machining was investigated as a noncontaminating method of comminuting alloys for subsequent chemical analysis. Particulate dispersions in water were produced from bulk alloys at a rate of about 5 mg/min by using a commercially available machining instrument. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by results obtained when acidified dispersions were substituted for true acid solutions in an established spectrochemical method. The analysis results were not significantly different for the two sample forms. Particle size measurements and preliminary results from other spectrochemical methods which require direct aspiration of liquid into flame or plasma sources are reported.

  12. A sourcebook of titanium alloy superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collings, E. W.

    1983-09-01

    The development, properties, and applications of Ti-based superconducting alloys are presented in a handbook based on an extensive review of published investigations. The literature is compiled and characterized in a table arranged by alloy, and individual chapters are devoted to unalloyed Ti; Ti-V binary alloys; binary Ti-Cr, Ti-Mn, Ti-Fe, Ti-Co, and Ti-Ni alloys; binary alloys of Ti with the 4d and 5d transition elements; ternary alloys of Ti with simple and transition metals; Ti-Nb binary alloys; Ti-Nb alloys with small amounts of B, C, N, or O; ternary alloys of Ti-Nb with simple metals; Soviet technical alloys; Ti-Zr-Nb alloys; other Ti-Nb-transition-metal alloys; Ti-Nb-based quaternary alloys; and amorphous Ti-alloy superconductors. Tables, graphs, diagrams, and micrographs are provided.

  13. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  14. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  15. Particle Engulfment and Pushing By Solidifying Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Juretzko, Frank Robert; Catalina, A.drian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Curreri, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenon of interaction of particles with solid-liquid interfaces (SLI) has been studied since the mid 1960's. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that fundamental understanding of particles behavior at solidifying interfaces might yield practical benefits in other fields, including metallurgy. In materials engineering the main issue is the location of particles with respect to grain boundaries at the end of solidification. Considerable experimental and theoretical research was lately focused on applications to metal matrix composites produced by casting or spray forming techniques, and on inclusion management in steel. Another application of particle SLI interaction is in the growing of Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (123) superconductor crystals from an undercooled liquid. The oxide melt contains Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (211) precipitates, which act as flux pinning sites. The experimental evidence on transparent organic materials, as well as the recent in situ observations on steel demonstrates that there exist a critical velocity of the planar SLI below which particles are pushed ahead of the interface, and above which particles are engulfment. The engulfment of a SiC particle in succinonitrile is exemplified. However, in most commercial alloys dendritic interfaces must be considered. Indeed, most data available on metallic alloys are on dendritic structures. The term engulfment is used to describe incorporation of a particle by a planar or cellular interface as a result of local interface perturbation, as opposed to entrapment that implies particle incorporation at cells or dendrites boundaries. During entrapment the particles are pushed in the intercellular or interdendritic regions and then captured when local solidification occurs. The physics of these two phenomena is fundamentally different.

  16. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  17. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  18. Ti Multicomponent Alloy Bulks by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Wen, Guanjun; Dai, Hongchuan; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti multicomponent alloy bulks were prepared by powder metallurgy of mechanical alloying and sintering. A simple body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution was prepared after 40 h ball milling of the raw CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti metallic powder. Particles of the alloyed powder are in microsized structures, which are actually a soft agglomeration of lamellar grains with thicknesses less than 1 μm. Meanwhile, the lamellar granules are consisted of nanosized grains under rigid cold welding. The 80-h ball-milled powder was consolidated by cold pressing and subsequent sintering at 800°C. The observed main phase in the consolidated sample after milling for 80 h is still a bcc solid solution. The solidified sample of 80-h ball-milled powder exhibits a Vickers hardness of 468 HV, which is much higher than 171 HV of the counterpart prepared from the raw metallic powder.

  19. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  20. Hydrogenation properties of nanostructured Ti2Ni-based alloys and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, M.; Jakubowicz, J.; Kachlicki, T.; Jurczyk, M.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical alloying and annealing at 1023 K for 0.5 h under an argon atmosphere were used to prepare Ti2Ni-based nanocrystalline alloys and their nanocomposites. Ti2Ni alloy was chemically modified by Pd and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. An objective of the present study is to provide data on hydrogenation properties of Ti2Ni-based alloys and compounds containing Pd and/or multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Alloys and composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an electron energy dispersive spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy to evaluate phase composition, crystal structure, grain size, particle morphology and distribution of catalyst element. Hydrogenation/dehydrogenation properties and hydriding kinetics of materials were measured using a Sievert's apparatus. Hydrogenation properties of nanostructured Ti2Ni-based alloy and Ti2Ni-based nanocomposites were compared with those of the binary Ti2Ni compound. In present work we shown how mechanical alloying method and chemical modification by Pd and MWCNTs affected hydrogen storage properties of Ti2Ni alloy. The highest hydrogen capacity obtained for nanostructured Ti2Ni + Pd alloy equaled 2.1 wt.%. Up to our knowledge it is the highest hydrogen storage capacity obtained so far for Ti2Ni-based materials.

  1. Alloyed coatings for dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wermuth, F. R.; Stetson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for applying several diffusion barriers to TD-Ni and TD-NiCr. Barrier coated specimens of both substrates were clad with Ni-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al alloys and diffusion annealed in argon. Measurement of the aluminum distribution after annealing showed that, of the readily applicable diffusion barriers, a slurry applied tungsten barrier most effectively inhibited the diffusion of aluminum from the Ni-Cr-Al clad into the TD-alloy substrates. No barrier effectively limited interdiffusion of the Fe-Cr-Al clad with the substrates. A duplex process was then developed for applying Ni-Cr-Al coating compositions to the tungsten barrier coated substrates. A Ni-(16 to 32)Cr-3Si modifier was applied by slurry spraying and firing in vacuum, and was then aluminized by a fusion slurry process. Cyclic oxidation tests at 2300 F resulted in early coating failure due to inadequate edge coverage and areas of coating porosity. EMP analysis showed that oxidation had consumed 70 to 80 percent of the aluminum in the coating in less than 50 hours.

  2. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  3. Development of lead-free copper alloy-graphite castings. Technical report, January 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1995-07-01

    Water model experiments were conducted to develop a two-stage stirring method for obtaining higher yields and a more uniform distribution of graphite particles in copper alloys. This was followed by several melts for synthesis of copper-graphite alloys in which Ti was used as a wetting agent to improve the wettability of graphite in the copper melt. In the first stage, a vortex method was employed to facilitate the addition of graphite particles into the copper melt. In the second stage, a specially designed stirrer was used for uniform particle distribution while avoiding the formation of vortex in the melt. The two-stage stirring was found to considerably improve the recovery of graphite, over those obtained with the prior practice of single-stage stirring and resulting in a more uniform particle distribution. In addition, graphite recoveries increased with increasing Ti content in the range investigated. Floatation, fluidity, and directional solidification experiments were also conducted on copper-graphite alloys synthesized in this study. Fluidity tests showed that the spiral fluidity length of the yellow brass alloy increased with temperature and decreased with graphite. The fluidity of copper-graphite alloys investigated to-date remained adequate to make a variety of castings. The observations of casting microstructure under directional solidification and floatation showed that in certain castings the graphite particles remained agglomerated, and they readily floated to the upper part of the castings where they reduced the size of gains. However, even in the agglomerated form, the graphite particles improved the machinability of copper alloys in a manner similar to lead. The results of the first year work provide an improved method of synthesis of lead free copper graphite alloys with improved machinability and adequate fluidity.

  4. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  5. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  6. Annealing strained alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    Report shows that grain coarsening in Alloy 718 can result in greatly reduced resistance to weld-heat-produced zone fissuring, especially when final grain size is ASTM 2. Tensile tests and metallographic examination of bend test specimens provide necessary data.

  7. Superplasticity in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T. G.

    1997-12-01

    We have characterized in the Al-Mg system the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cold-rolled Al-6Mg-0.3Sc alloy. The alloy exhibited superplasticity at relatively high strain rates (about 10-2 s-1). At a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 there exists a wide temperature range (475-520`C) within which the tensile elongation is over 1000%. There also exists a wide strain rate range (10-3 - 10-1 s-1) within which the tensile elongation is over 500%. The presence of Sc in the alloy results in a uniform distribution of fine coherent Al3SC precipitates which effectively pin grain and subgrain boundaries during static and continuous recrystallization. As a result, the alloy retains its fine grain size (about 7 micron), even after extensive superplastic deformation (>1000%). During deformation, dislocations Mg with a high Schmidt factor slip across subgrains but are trapped by subgrain boundaries, as a result of the strong pining of Al3Sc. This process leads to the conversion of low-angled subgrain boundaries to high-angled grain boundaries and the subsequent grain boundary sliding, which produces superelasticity. A model is proposed to describe grain boundary sliding accommodated by dislocation glide across grains with a uniform distribution of coherent precipitates. The model predictions is consistent with experimental observations.

  8. Eutectic-Alloy Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, R. G.; Poit, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Deviation in controlled-rod eutectic morphology anticipated for diffusion only crystal growth characterized at low solidification velocities. Naturally induced, gravity-related convective instabilities result in nonalined irregularly dispersed fibers or platelets. Lower solidification limit for controlled growth Bi/Mn alloys is 1 centimeter/ hour.

  9. Improving the corrosion wear resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by particulate reinforced Ni matrix composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhuo, Chengzhi; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Liu, Linlin

    2009-01-01

    In order to overcome the problem of corrosion wear of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS), two kinds of composite alloying layers were prepared by a duplex treatment, consisting of Ni/nano-SiC and Ni/nano-SiO2 predeposited by brush plating, respectively, and subsequent surface alloying with Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu by a double glow process. The microstructure of the two kinds of nanoparticle reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layers was investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of composite alloying layers compared with the Ni-based alloying layer and 316L SS under different conditions was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results showed that under alloying temperature (1000 °C) conditions, amorphous nano-SiO2 particles still retained the amorphous structure, whereas nano-SiC particles were decomposed and Ni, Cr reacted with SiC to form Cr6.5Ni2.5Si and Cr23C6. In static acidic solution, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer. However, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is prominently superior to that of the Ni-based alloying layer under acidic flow medium condition and acidic slurry flow condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiC particles interlayer is evidently lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer, but higher than that of 316L SS under all test conditions. The results show that the highly dispersive nano-SiO2 particles are helpful in improving the corrosion wear resistance of the Ni-based alloying layer, whereas carbides and silicide phase are deleterious to that of the Ni-based alloying layer due to the fact that the preferential removal of the matrix around the precipitated phase takes place by the chemical

  10. Effects of Al2O3 Nanopowders on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; Öksüz, K. Emre

    2014-01-01

    TiNi shape memory alloy and its composite using δ-Al2O3 nanosize particles were prepared by the powder metallurgy method, and some mechanical properties like hardness, wear, and corrosion behavior were investigated. The experimental results exhibited that the lower wear rate was obtained for the nano-Al2O3-reinforced Ti alloy composite due to increased hardness, but the wear rate increased considerably with increasing the load over 25 N for Ti alloy. However, the best corrosion resistance was obtained for the base alloy, which is very important for implant applications.

  11. Mechanisms affecting swelling in alloys with precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Haynes, M.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    In alloys under irradiation many mechanisms exist that couple phase instability to cavity swelling. These are compounded with the more familiar mechanisms associated with point defect behavior and the evolution of microstructure. The mechanisms may be classified according to three modes of operation. Some affect cavity swelling directly by cavity-precipitate particle association, others operate indirectly by precipitate-induced changes in sinks other than cavities and finally there are mechanisms that are mediated by precipitate-induced changes in the host matrix. The physics of one mechanism of each type is developed in detail and the results compared where possible to experimental measurements. In particular, we develop the theory necessary to treat the effects on swelling of precipitation-induced changes in overall sink density; precipitation-induced changes in point defect trapping by solute depletion and creation of precipitate particle-matrix interfacial trap sites.

  12. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  13. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  14. Particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, B. |

    1992-12-31

    In the last few years, particle astrophysics has emerged as a new field at the frontier between high energy astrophysics, cosmology, and particle physics. Two spectacular achievements of this new field in the last decade have been the establishment of neutrino astronomy with the detection of solar neutrinos by two independent experiments and the spectacular observation of the neutrinos from the supernova SN1987A. In addition, the field has produced tantalizing hints of new physics beyond the standard models of astrophysics and particle physics, generating enthusiastic attempts to confirm these potential effects. This new field involves some two hundred experimentalists and a similar number of theorists, most of them coming from particle and nuclear physics, and as scientist will see, their effort is to a large extent complementary to accelerator based high energy physics. This review attempts, at the beginning of this workshop, to capture the excitement of this new field. Summary talks will describe in more detail some of the topics discussed in the study groups.

  15. Nanoparticles formation mechanisms through the spark erosion of alloys in cryogenic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrsky, Gennady

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of the formation of nanoparticles of some B2 shape memory intermetallic compounds, glass-forming Zr-based alloy, and pure Ti obtained by spark erosion method in liquid nitrogen and argon are considered. One of peculiarity is a foam-like structure, which covers the surface of micron-sized particles that appear during spark erosion. Such morphology is related to the nanosized particles gathered in agglomerates. Detailed examination of those particles allows proposed several mechanisms of their formation. The mechanisms explains two kinds of nanosized particles: particles of several tens and even hundreds of nanometers are formed due to explosion of molten droplets while the smaller particles having in turn a different structure and morphology are formed as a result of condensation of evaporated constituents under different conditions. The latter have the composition usually different from the target composition while the composition of the former is very close to the target (master alloy) composition.

  16. Nanoparticles formation mechanisms through the spark erosion of alloys in cryogenic liquids.

    PubMed

    Monastyrsky, Gennady

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of the formation of nanoparticles of some B2 shape memory intermetallic compounds, glass-forming Zr-based alloy, and pure Ti obtained by spark erosion method in liquid nitrogen and argon are considered. One of peculiarity is a foam-like structure, which covers the surface of micron-sized particles that appear during spark erosion. Such morphology is related to the nanosized particles gathered in agglomerates. Detailed examination of those particles allows proposed several mechanisms of their formation. The mechanisms explains two kinds of nanosized particles: particles of several tens and even hundreds of nanometers are formed due to explosion of molten droplets while the smaller particles having in turn a different structure and morphology are formed as a result of condensation of evaporated constituents under different conditions. The latter have the composition usually different from the target composition while the composition of the former is very close to the target (master alloy) composition. PMID:26714865

  17. Characterization of Two ODS Alloys: Chromium-18 ODS and Chromium-9 ODS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julianne

    ODS alloys, or oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, are made from elemental or pre-alloyed metal powders mechanically alloyed with oxide powders in a high-energy attributor mill, and then consolidated by either hot isostatic pressing or hot extrusion causing the production of nanometer scale oxide and carbide particles within the alloy matrix; crystalline properties such as creep strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, tensile strength, swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement are all observed to be improved by the presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The presented research uses various methods to observe and characterize the microstructural and microchemical properties of two experimental ODS alloys, 18Cr ODS and 9Cr ODS. The results found aid in assessing the influence of chemical and structural variations on the effectiveness of the alloy, and further aid in the optimization of these advanced alloys for future use in nuclear cladding and structural applications in Generation IV nuclear reactors. Characterization of these alloys has been conducted in order to identify the second-phase small precipitates through FESEM, TEM, EDS, Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis, and CuKalpha XRD analysis of bulk samples and of nanoparticles after extraction from the alloy matrix. Comparison of results from these methods allows further substantiation of the accuracy of observed nanoparticle composition and identification. Also, TEM samples of the two alloys have been irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr and 300 keV Fe ions to various doses and temperatures at the IVEM-Tandem TEM at Argonne National Laboratory and post-irradiated characterization has been conducted and compared to the pre-irradiated characterization results in order to observe the microstructural and microchemical evolution of nanoparticles under irradiation. Overall in the as-received state, the initial Y2O3 is not found anymore and in addition to oxide particles the alloys contain carbides

  18. A Fatigue Model for Discontinuous Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Composite: Influence of Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, R. R.; Jordon, J. B.; Brammer, A. T.; Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Allison, P. G.; Rushing, T. W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model is put forth for the analysis of discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy metal matrix composite. The fatigue model was used for a ceramic particle-reinforced aluminum alloy deformed under conditions of fully reversed strain control. Experimental results revealed the aluminum alloy to be strongly influenced by volume fraction of the particulate reinforcement phase under conditions of strain-controlled fatigue. The model safely characterizes the evolution of fatigue damage in this aluminum alloy composite into the distinct stages of crack initiation and crack growth culminating in failure. The model is able to capture the specific influence of particle volume fraction, particle size, and nearest neighbor distance in quantifying fatigue life. The model yields good results for correlation of the predicted results with the experimental test results on the fatigue behavior of the chosen aluminum alloy for two different percentages of the ceramic particle reinforcement. Further, the model illustrates that both particle size and volume fraction are key factors that govern fatigue lifetime. This conclusion is well supported by fractographic observations of the cyclically deformed and failed specimens.

  19. Precipitation during infiltration of A201 aluminum alloy into Al-Fe-V-Si preform

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.C.; Chen, Y.C.; Chang, E.

    1996-04-01

    The newly developed Al-Fe-V-Si aluminum alloy, produced by melt spinning into ribbons, comminution of ribbon to particles, and then consolidation of particles by extrusion and forging, is being considered for high temperature applications due to the material`s characteristics of high elevated temperature strength, low density, good toughness and thermal stability. In order to extend the near-net shaping capability of the material, the authors have proposed a new process that Al-Fe-V-Si aluminum alloy particles can be consolidated by casting, in which the liquid aluminum alloy was infiltrated around the Al-Fe-V-Si particles to form a FVS1212/A201 composite material. Preliminary study of the Al-Fe-V-Si particle reinforced A201 aluminum alloy composite demonstrated that the compression strength at 300 C can be twice as high as A201 aluminum alloy. This work constitutes a continuation of the previous efforts to understand the microstructural evolution sequences, particularly the precipitation events during infiltration of the liquid aluminum into Al-Fe-V-Si preform.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Iron Alumininides Intermetallic Alloy with Molybdenum Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhailawati, H.; Fauzi, M. N. A.

    2010-03-11

    In this work, FeAl-based alloys with and without molybdenum addition were fabricated by sintering of mechanically alloyed powders in order to investigate the effect of molybdenum on iron aluminide mechanical properties. Bulk samples were prepared by mechanical alloying for 4 hours, pressing at 360 MPa and sintering at 1000 deg. C for 2 hours. The specimens were tested in compression at room temperature using Instron machine. The phase identification and microstructure of the consolidated material was examined by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope correspondingly. Results show that 2.5 wt%Mo addition significantly increased the ultimate stress and ultimate strain in compressive mode due to solid solution hardening. However, the addition of Mo more than 2.5 wt% was accompanied by a reduction in both properties caused by the presence of Mo-rich precipitate particles.

  1. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Even, Jr., William R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  2. Motions of alloying additions in the CAS steelmaking operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, D.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1993-08-01

    Water model studies in a pilot scale ladle ( D = 1.12 m and L = 0.93 m) were carried out to investigate the subsurface motion of both buoyant and sinking additions during the CAS (com-position adjustment by sealed argon bubbling systems) alloy addition procedure in steelmaking. This technique involves placing a refractory baffle around a rising gas/liquid plume within a stirred ladle of steel. Alloy additions are then made by projecting them into the slag-free region of steel within the baffled region. It was found that such particles while moving through the upwelling two-phase plume region can experience a significant reduction in drag forces, causing buoyant particles to penetrate more deeply than anticipated for a homogeneous fluid. Therefore, considering reduced drag on particles penetrating the upwelling gas liquid plume region, predictions were made for the trajectories of spherical-shaped particles using Newton’s law of motion. Predictions were in very reasonable agreement with those measured. Incorporating the velocity fields in industrial size vessels already reported by the present authors, trajectories of spherical-shaped additions (diameter ˜ 80 mm) in a 150-ton ladle during CAS operations were then predicted. The industrial implications of such trajectories, together with the alloy’s dissolution and dispersion behavior, were also analyzed. Finally, advantages of the CAS alloy addition procedure over conventional methods, in terms of the recovery rates of buoyant additions, are discussed.

  3. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Olvera, S.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Palomares, F.J.; Salas, E.; Arce, E.M.; Herrasti, P.

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  4. Processing of New Materials by Additive Manufacturing: Iron-Based Alloys Containing Silver for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, Thomas; Brenne, Florian; Hoyer, Peter; Schwarze, Dieter; Schaper, Mirko; Grothe, Richard; Wiesener, Markus; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    In the biomedical sector, production of bioresorbable implants remains challenging due to improper dissolution rates or deficient strength of many candidate alloys. Promising materials for overcoming the prevalent drawbacks are iron-based alloys containing silver. However, due to immiscibility of iron and silver these alloys cannot be manufactured based on conventional processing routes. In this study, iron-manganese-silver alloys were for the first time synthesized by means of additive manufacturing. Based on combined mechanical, microscopic, and electrochemical studies, it is shown that silver particles well distributed in the matrix can be obtained, leading to cathodic sites in the composite material. Eventually, this results in an increased dissolution rate of the alloy. Stress-strain curves showed that the incorporation of silver barely affects the mechanical properties.

  5. The unexpected role of metal nanoparticles and nanonetworks in alloy degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z.; Natesan, K.; Cai, Z.; Darling, S. B.

    2008-08-01

    Oxide scale, which is essential to protect structural alloys from high-temperature degradation such as oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, is usually considered to consist simply of oxide phases. Here, we report on a nanobeam X-ray and magnetic force microscopy investigation that reveals that the oxide scale actually consists of a mixture of oxide materials and metal nanoparticles. The metal nanoparticles self-assemble into nanonetworks, forming continuous channels for carbon transport through the oxide scales. To avoid the formation of these metallic particles in the oxide scale, alloys must develop a scale without spinel phase. We have designed a novel alloy that has been tested in a high-carbon-activity environment. Our results show that the incubation time for carbon transport through the oxide scale of the new alloy is more than an order of magnitude longer compared with commercial alloys with similar chromium content.

  6. Hydrogenation of deformable aluminum alloy semiproducts during water quenching and artificial aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, V. P.; Tul'Pakova, R. V.

    2007-10-01

    The surface layers of rods made of magnesium-containing aluminum alloys are shown to undergo strong hydrogenation during water quenching. Hydrogenation is detected during vacuum heating after artificial aging (D16 alloy) or long-term storage (V95, AK4-1ch alloys). Very high hydrogen concentrations in the surface layers of semiproducts that appear in regions with a minimum cooling rate during quenching are likely to cause bubble formation on the surface of the heat-treated semiproducts. Compared to the V95 alloy, hydrogen dissolved in the AK4-1ch alloy rods behaves differently during air annealing. Specifically, hydrogen is rapidly absorbed by the degassed rods and is slowly extracted from the saturated rods. This behavior is most likely to be caused by hydrogen-ion entrapment by FeNiAl9 intermetallic particles.

  7. Composition effects on mechanical properties of HfC-strengthened molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical properties of swaged rod thermomechanically processed from arc-melted Mo-2Re-Hf-C alloys containing as much as 0.9 mol pct HfC have been evaluated. The low temperature ductilities of these alloys were not influenced by the amount of HfC present but by the amount of Hf in excess of stoichiometry. Maximum ductility occurred at 0.2 to 0.3 at. pct excess Hf. At 0.3 to 0.5 mol pct HfC, alloy strength varied directly with the Mo content of extracted carbide particles, both decreasing as the amount of excess Hf increased. Additions of 2 at. pct Re had little effect on strength or ductility. Tensile and creep strengths of Mo-2Re-0.7Hf-0.5C alloy equaled or exceeded those of other high strength Mo alloys.

  8. Compositional effects on mechanical properties of hafnium-carbide-strengthened molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of swaged rod thermomechanically processed from arc melted Mo-2Re-Hf-C alloys containing as much as 0.9-mol% HfC were evaluated. The low-temperature ductilities of these alloys were not influenced by the amount of HfC present but by the amount of Hf in excess of stoichiometry. Maximum ductility occurred at 0.2- to 0.3-at.% excess Hf. At 0.3- to 0.5-mol% HfC, alloy strength varied directly with the Mo content of extracted carbide particles, both decreasing as the amount of excess Hf increased. Additions of 2-at.% Re had little effect on strength or ductility. Tensile and creep strengths of Mo-2Re-0.7Hf-0.5C alloy equaled or exceeded those of other high strength Mo alloys.

  9. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    McMasters, O.D.

    1986-09-02

    Rods of magnetostrictive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube. 5 figs.

  10. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    McMasters, O. Dale

    1986-09-02

    Rods of magnetrostructive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube.

  11. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-02-01

    Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating.

  12. Microstructure and texture studies on magnesium sheet alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohsen

    The AZ3, the most common Mg sheet alloy, is currently produced by hot rolling of the DC cast ingot. Mg wrought alloys, in general have limited formability due to hexagonal close-packed structure and preferred orientation (texture). In order to improve magnesium sheet formability, a good understanding of microstructure and texture evolution in twin-roll casting is necessary. The objectives of this research are to study the microstructural and texture evolution in twin-roll cast AZ31 Mg sheet alloy and to develop/modify alloy compositions with improved mechanical properties (weakened texture). In the first part of study, the influence of cooling rate (CR) on the casting structure of AZ31 magnesium alloy has been investigated, as a background to understand microstructural development in TRC AZ31, using different moulds to obtain slow to moderate cooling rates. It was found that grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) reduces as the cooling rate increases. Moreover, it was observed that with an increase in cooling rate the fraction of second phase particles increases and the second phase particles become finer. The second part focused on the microstructure and texture study of the twin-roll cast (TRC) AZ31 (Mg-3wt.%Al-1wt.%Zn) sheet. The results indicate that TRC AZ31 exhibits a dendritic microstructure with columnar and equiaxed grains. It was noted that the amount of these second phases in the TRC alloy is greater than the conventionally cast AZ31. Recrystallization at 420 °C leads to a bimodal grain-size distribution, while a fine-grain structure is obtained after rolling and annealing. The TRC AZ31 sheet exhibits basal textures in the (i) as-received, (ii) rolled and (iii) rolled-annealed conditions. However, post-annealing of the TRC AZ31 at 420 °C produces a relatively random texture that has not been previously observed in the conventional AZ31 sheet. The texture randomization is attributed to the particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN) of new grains

  13. Electromagnetic properties of Permendur granular composite materials containing flaky particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasagi, Teruhiro; Tsutaoka, Takanori; Hatakeyama, Kenichi

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic properties of Permendur (Fe50Co50 alloy) granular composite materials containing flaky particle have been studied from the RF to microwave frequency range. Properties of the flaky particle composites were compared with the spherical particle ones. The electrical conductivity of the flaky particle composite was higher than that of the spherical particle composite at the same particle content. An insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold φc in both composites. The φc of the flaky particle composite was lower than that of the spherical one. The relative complex permittivity indicates that the insulating state has dielectric properties. For the spherical particle composite, the permittivity enhancement caused by particle cluster formation can be described by the effective cluster model (ECM). The enhancement of the dielectric constant in the flaky particle composite is larger than the ECM prediction. A negative permittivity spectrum indicating a low frequency plasmonic state was observed in the metallic 70 vol. % flaky particle composite. The relative complex permeability spectra of the flaky particle composite are different from those of the spherical one. The flaky particle composite shows a larger permeability value and lower permeability dispersion frequency than the spherical particle composite. Negative permeability spectra were observed in the both composite materials. The negative permeability frequency band of the flaky particle composite is lower than that of the spherical particle composite owing to the demagnetizing field effect.

  14. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles ({approximately}30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller ({approximately} mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced {approximately}100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was {ge}343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water.

  15. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles ({approximately}30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller ({approximately} mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced {approximately}100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was {ge}343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water.

  16. Effects of Ce additions on the age hardening response of Mg–Zn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Langelier, Brian Esmaeili, Shahrzad

    2015-03-15

    The effects of Ce additions on the precipitation hardening behaviour of Mg–Zn are examined for a series of alloys, with Ce additions at both alloying and microalloying levels. The alloys are artificially aged, and studied using hardness measurement and X-ray diffraction, as well as optical and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the age-hardening effect is driven by the formation of fine precipitates, the number density of which is related to the Zn content of the alloy. Conversely, the Ce content is found to slightly reduce hardening. When the alloy content of Ce is high, large secondary phase particles containing both Ce and Zn are present, and remain stable during solutionizing. These particles effectively reduce the amount of Zn available as solute for precipitation, and thereby reduce hardening. Combining hardness results with thermodynamic analysis of alloy solute levels also suggests that Ce can have a negative effect on hardening when present as solutes at the onset of ageing. This effect is confirmed by designing a pre-ageing heat treatment to preferentially remove Ce solutes, which is found to restore the hardening capability of an Mg–Zn–Ce alloy to the level of the Ce-free alloy. - Highlights: • The effects of Ce additions on precipitation in Mg–Zn alloys are examined. • Additions of Ce to Mg–Zn slightly reduce the age-hardening response. • Ce-rich secondary phase particles deplete the matrix of Zn solute. • Hardening is also decreased when Ce is present in solution. • Pre-ageing to preferentially precipitate out Ce restores hardening capabilities.

  17. Formation of the alloy of Au and Ag nanoparticles upon laser irradiation of the mixture of their colloidal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Izgaliev, Andrei T; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2004-01-31

    The formation dynamics of the alloy of gold and silver nanoparticles is studied upon laser irradiation of the mixture of these nanoparticles and factors affecting the alloy formation are determined. Individual nanoparticles are obtained by ablation of the corresponding metals in water or ethanol by copper vapour laser radiation at a wavelength of 510.6 nm close to the maximum of the plasmon resonance of gold particles at 518 nm. The intermediate phase of the alloy characterised by an anomalous red shift of the absorption spectrum is found for the first time. The dependences of the absorption spectrum of the alloy of colloidal particles of these metals and their morphology on the irradiation time are obtained. It is found that the rate of the alloy formation depends on the concentrations of nanoparticles and surfactants in the mixture. (nanoparticles)

  18. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  19. Sintered rare earth-iron Laves phase magnetostrictive alloy product and preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Malekzadeh, Manoochehr; Pickus, Milton R.

    1979-01-01

    A sintered rare earth-iron Laves phase magnetostrictive alloy product characterized by a grain oriented morphology. The grain oriented morphology is obtained by magnetically aligning powder particles of the magnetostrictive alloy prior to sintering. Specifically disclosed are grain oriented sintered compacts of Tb.sub.x Dy.sub.1-x Fe.sub.2 and their method of preparation. The present sintered products have enhanced magnetostrictive properties.

  20. Characteristics of strength and plasticity of tungsten and tungsten-base alloys I. Mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhanovskii, V.V.; Golovin, S.A.; Kharchenko, V.K.; Kravchenko, V.S.; Nikol'skii, V.N.; Ol'shanskii, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors establish the temperature relationship of the strength and plastic properties of tungsten and tungsten-base alloys taking into consideration the statistical parameters of the spread caused by structural and technical factors and a quantitative determination of the influence in tension of dispersion hardening of tungsten with refractory particles of hafnium and yttrium oxides. The observed dip in plasticity in the dispersion-hardened tungsten alloys does not contradict the mechanism of high temperature embrittlement of commercially pure tungsten.

  1. Effect of processing parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed AA 2219 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surekha, K.; Murty, B. S.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of processing parameters (rotation speed and traverse speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed high strength precipitation hardenable AA 2219-T87 alloy was investigated. The results indicate that the rotation speed has a major influence in determining the rate of corrosion, which is attributed to the breaking down and dissolution of the intermetallic particles. Corrosion resistance of friction stir processed alloy was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, salt spray and immersion tests.

  2. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.

  3. Microstructural characterization of low and high carbon CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles produced by mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes, T. A.; Goode, A. E.; Porter, A. E.; Ryan, M. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2014-06-01

    CoCrMo alloys are utilised as the main material in hip prostheses. The link between this type of hip prosthesis and chronic pain remains unclear. Studies suggest that wear debris generated in-vivo may be related to post-operative complications such as inflammation. These alloys can contain different amounts of carbon, which improves the mechanical properties of the alloy. However, the formation of carbides could become sites that initiate corrosion, releasing ions and/or particles into the human body. This study analysed the mechanical milling of alloys containing both high and low carbon levels in relevant biological media, as an alternative route to generate wear debris. The results show that low carbon alloys produce significantly more nanoparticles than high carbon alloys. During the milling process, strain induces an fcc to hcp phase transformation. Evidence for cobalt and molybdenum dissolution in the presence of serum was confirmed by ICP-MS and TEM EDX techniques.

  4. Mechanical activation of a hard magnetic Fe-Cr-Co alloy powder charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alymov, M. I.; Milyaev, I. M.; Sychev, A. E.; Kovalev, D. Yu.; Korneev, V. P.; Morozov, Yu. G.; Yusupov, V. S.; Bompe, T. A.

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical activation (MA) of a charge of a hard magnetic 22Kh15KT alloy is studied by wet and dry milling in a planetary mill in a medium of argon and ethyl alcohol with addition of surface-active materials and without them. It is shown that, upon dry MA, powder alloy components are alloyed with formation of two bcc solid solutions and, upon wet MA, charge particles are only intensely dispersed. Dispersion is developed at the highest degree in the first five minutes of MA.

  5. A Novel Zr-1Nb Alloy and a New Look at Hydriding

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Mariani; James I. Cole; Assel Aitkaliyeva

    2013-09-01

    A novel Zr-1Nb has begun development based on a working model that takes into account the hydrogen permeabilities for zirconium and niobium metals. The beta-Nb secondary phase particles (SPPs) in Zr-1Nb are believed to promote more rapid hydrogen dynamics in the alloy in comparison to other zirconium alloys. Furthermore, some hydrogen release is expected at the lower temperatures corresponding to outages when the partial pressure of H2 in the coolant is less. These characteristics lessen the negative synergism between corrosion and hydriding that is otherwise observed in cladding alloys without niobium. In accord with the working model, development of nanoscale precursors was initiated to enhance the performance of existing Zr-1Nb alloys. Their characteristics and properties can be compared to oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys, and material additions have been proposed to zirconium-based LWR cladding to guard further against hydriding and to fix the size of the SPPs for microstructure stability enhancements. A preparative route is being investigated that does not require mechanical alloying, and 10 nanometer molybdenum particles have been prepared which are part of the nanoscale precursors. If successful, the approach has implications for long term dry storage of used fuel and for new routes to nanoferritic and ODS alloys.

  6. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  9. An alloy solidification experiment conducted on shenzhou spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-H.; Huang, Q.

    To gain a better understanding of how gravity-driven phenomena affect the solidification and crystal growth of metallic materials, directional solidification of Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy and Al-Bi monotectic alloy were performed in the Multi-functional Crystal Growing Furnace on board the unmanned Chinese Shenzhou III spacecraft and on the ground respectively. The specimens were investigated applying metallographic, SEM, XRD and image analysis techniques. The results show that, for the Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy, 1) microgravity condition is beneficial to eliminate solidification defects; 2) the Al3Ni rods precipitated in the space sample are shorter in length, larger in diameter and inhomogenous in inter-rod spacing distribution, compared with those in the ground sample, which are more homogenous and parallel with each other to the growth direction; 3) the mean spacing between Al3Ni rods obtained under microgravity is larger than that in normal gravity, which attributes to many large inter-rod spacing distributions existing in space sample rather than in ground sample; 4) preferred crystal directions in the sample solidified in space were found different to that on the ground. While, in the Al-Bi monotectic alloys, different sizes and distributions of Bi particles were obtained in space and on the earth, respectively. Some special Bi particle distribution patterns were also found in the space sample. It could be concluded that gravity condition had a strong influence on the solidification behavior of materials.

  10. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of gamma-prime particles in a gamma matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest gamma-prime particles, and had the lowest gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650 gamma C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760 C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the gamma-prime particle size distribution and the gamma-gamma-prime mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  11. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1985-06-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of γ' particles in a γ matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest γ' particles, and had the lowest γ-γ' lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650°C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760°C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the γ' particle size distribution and the γ-γ' mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  12. Performance of V-4Cr-4Ti Alloy Exposed to the JFT-2M Tokamak Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Trester, P.W.; Sengoku, S.; Ishiyama, S.; Fukaya, K.; Eto, M.; Oda, T.; Hirohata, Y.; Hino, T.; Tsai, H.

    1999-10-01

    A long-term test has been conducted in the JFT-2M tokamak fusion device to determine the effects of environmental exposure on the mechanical and chemical behavior of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. Test specimens of the alloy were exposed in the outward lower divertor chamber of JFT-2M in a region away from direct contact with the plasma and were preheated to 300 C just prior to and during selected plasma discharges. During their nine-month residence time in JFT-2M, the specimens experienced approximately 200 lower single-null divertor shots at 300 C, during which high energy particle fluxes to the preheated test specimens were significant, and approximately 2,010 upper single-null divertor shots and non-diverter shots at room temperature, for which high energy particle fluxes to and expected particle retention in the test specimens were very low. Data from post-exposure tests have indicated that the performance of the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy would not be significantly affected by environmental exposure to gaseous species at partial pressures typical for tokamak operation. Deuterium retention in the exposed alloy was also low (<2 ppm). Absorption of interstitial by the alloy was limited to the very near surface, and neither the strength nor the Charpy impact properties of the alloy appeared to be significantly changed from the exposure to the JFT-2M tokamak environment.

  13. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Waber, J.T.

    1960-02-23

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and plutonium in the ratio of from 1 to 9 atoms of uranlum for each atom of plutonium. These alloys are prepared by melting the constituent elements, treating them at an elevated temperature for homogenization, and cooling them to room temperature, the rate of cooling varying with the oomposition and the desired phase structure. The preferred embodiment contains 12 to 25 at.% of molybdenum and is treated by quenching to obtain a body centered cubic crystal structure. The most important advantage of these alloys over prior binary alloys of both plutonium and uranium is the lack of cracking during casting and their ready machinability.

  14. Magnesium-lithium casting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latenko, V. P.; Silchenko, T. V.; Tikhonov, V. A.; Maltsev, V. P.; Korablin, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The strength properties of magnesium-lithium alloys at room, low, and high temperatures are investigated. It is found that the alloys may have practical application at ambient temperatures up to 100 C, that negative temperatures have a favorable influence on the alloy strength, and that cyclic temperature variations have practically no effect on the strength characteristics. The influence of chemical coatings on corrosion resistance of the MgLi alloys is examined. Several facilities based on pressure casting machines, low-pressure casting machines, and magnetodynamic pumps were designed for producing MgLi alloy castings. Results were obtained for MgLi alloys reinforced with fibers having a volumetric content of 15%.

  15. Development of lead-free copper alloy-graphite casting. Annual report, January--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-02-01

    Water model experiments were conducted to develop a two-stage stirring method for obtaining higher yields and a more uniform distribution of particles in copper alloys. This was followed by several melts for synthesis of copper-graphite alloys in which T1 was used as a wetting agent to improve the wettability of graphite in the copper melt. In the first stage, a vortex method was employed to facilitate the suction of graphite particles into the copper melt. In the second stage, the specially designed stirrer was used to avoid the formation of vortex in melt. The two stage stirring was found to considerably improve the recovery of graphite, over those obtained with the prior practice of single stage stirring. In addition, graphite recoveries increased with increasing Ti content. Flotation, fluidity, and directional solidification experiments were also conducted on copper-graphite alloys synthesized in this study. Tests showed that the spiral fluidity length of the yellow brass alloy increased with temperature and decreased with graphite. The fluidity of copper-graphite alloys investigated to date remained adequate to make a variety of castings. The observations of microstructure of directional solidification and flotation showed that in certain castings the graphite particles were agglomerated and they float to the upper part of the castings where they reduced the size of grains. However, in the agglomerated form, the graphite particles improved the machinability of copper alloys in a manner similar to lead. The result of the first years work provide an improved method of synthesis of lead free copper graphite alloys with improved machinability and adequate fluidity. Future work will continue to further improve the distribution of graphite particles in casting while retaining adequate fluidity and improved machinability. Techniques like centrifugal casting will be developed to concentrate graphite in regions where it is required for machinability in bearings.

  16. Improved Mo-Re VPS Alloys for High-Temperature Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Martin, James; McKechnie, Timothy; O'Dell, John Scott

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened molybdenum- rhenium alloys for vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) fabrication of high-temperature-resistant components are undergoing development. In comparison with otherwise equivalent non-dispersion-strengthened Mo-Re alloys, these alloys have improved high-temperature properties. Examples of VPS-fabricated high-temperature-resistant components for which these alloys are expected to be suitable include parts of aircraft and spacecraft engines, furnaces, and nuclear power plants; wear coatings; sputtering targets; x-ray targets; heat pipes in which liquid metals are used as working fluids; and heat exchangers in general. These alloys could also be useful as coating materials in some biomedical applications. The alloys consist of 60 weight percent Mo with 40 weight percent Re made from (1) blends of elemental Mo and Re powders or (2) Re-coated Mo particles that have been subjected to a proprietary powder-alloying-and-spheroidization process. For most of the dispersion- strengthening experiments performed thus far in this development effort, 0.4 volume percent of transition-metal ceramic dispersoids were mixed into the feedstock powders. For one experiment, the proportion of dispersoid was 1 volume percent. In each case, the dispersoid consisted of either ZrN particles having sizes <45 m, ZrO2 particles having sizes of about 1 m, HfO2 particles having sizes <45 m, or HfN particles having sizes <1 m. These materials were chosen for evaluation on the basis of previously published thermodynamic stability data. For comparison, Mo-Re feedstock powders without dispersoids were also prepared.

  17. New alloys for pressure vessels and piping

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, M.; Cantzler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes new alloys for pressure vessels and piping applications. Topics include: Cr-Mo-Si alloys, HAZ liquation cracking in lean 316 stainless steels, copper bearing stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-W-Mo alloys.

  18. Materials data handbook, aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbook on aluminum alloy 7075 includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures, and other pertinent engineering information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  19. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  20. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Produced in-situ Particle Reinforced Fe-matrix Composite Coating with High Nickel Content on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiwen, W.; Mingxing, M.; Cunyuan, P.; Xiaohui, Y.; Weiming, Z.

    Fe-matrix composite coatings reinforced by in-situ particles with high nickel content were produced on QT450-10 by laser alloying. Coatings with different microstructure proportions and particle distributions were obtained by the adjustment of the content of Ni, Ti and Zr in the alloying powder and the laser parameters. The influence of the content of Ni and the particle distribution on coating's corrosion resistance is studied, which is revealed by the electrochemical characteristics. The results indicate that the alloying coating with more content of nickel and less particles get corroded much harder with a higher corrosion rate.

  1. Surface Segregation in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    Surface segregation profiles of binary (Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Cu-Au) and ternary (Cu-Au-Ni) alloys are determined via Monte Carlo-Metropolis computer simulations using the BFS method for alloys for the calculation of the energetics. The behavior of Cu or Au in Ni is contrasted with their behavior when both are present. The interaction between Cu and Au and its effect on the segregation profiles for Cu-Au-Ni alloys is discussed.

  2. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  3. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  4. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  5. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  6. Duct and cladding alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Korenko, M.K.

    1983-03-22

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700/sup 0/ C consists essentially of 35-45% nick 5-14% chromi 8-3.2% molybden 3-1.0% silic 2-1.0% mangane 0-0.1% zirconiu 0-3.5% titani 0-2.0% alumin 02-0.1% car 0-0.01% boro and the balance iron.

  7. Eutectic nucleation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nafisi, S. Ghomashchi, R.; Vali, H.

    2008-10-15

    The nucleation mechanism of eutectic grains in hypoeutectic Al-Si foundry alloys has been investigated by examining deep etched specimens in high-resolution field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and by using in-situ Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and microscopy. Both unmodified and Sr-modified alloys were studied to characterize the nucleation mechanism of eutectic silicon flakes and fibers. It is proposed that following nucleation of eutectic Al on the primary {alpha}-Al dendrites, fine Si particles form at the solidification front upon which the eutectic Si flakes and fibers could develop. The formation of small Si particles is attributed to Si enrichment of the remaining melt due to the formation of eutectic Al (aluminum spikes) at the eutectic temperature. A hypothesis is then proposed to explain the mechanism of eutectic grains formation with main emphasis on the eutectic Si phase.

  8. Growth model of binary alloy nanopowders for thermal plasma synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeta, Masaya; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2010-08-15

    A new model is developed for numerical analysis of the entire growth process of binary alloy nanopowders in thermal plasma synthesis. The model can express any nanopowder profile in the particle size-composition distribution (PSCD). Moreover, its numerical solution algorithm is arithmetic and straightforward so that the model is easy to use. By virtue of these features, the model effectively simulates the collective and simultaneous combined process of binary homogeneous nucleation, binary heterogeneous cocondensation, and coagulation among nanoparticles. The effect of the freezing point depression due to nanoscale particle diameters is also considered in the model. In this study, the metal-silicon systems are particularly chosen as representative binary systems involving cocondensation processes. In consequence, the numerical calculation with the present model reveals the growth mechanisms of the Mo-Si and Ti-Si nanopowders by exhibiting their PSCD evolutions. The difference of the materials' saturation pressures strongly affects the growth behaviors and mature states of the binary alloy nanopowder.

  9. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A series of fourteen (14) novel high-strength molybdenum alloy compositions containing a dispersion of very fine (< 1 {mu}m diameter) oxide particles were consolidated using two proprietary powder metallurgy techniques. The developmental compositions were evaluated to determine the microstructural stability and mechanical properties from cryogenic (-148{degrees}F) to elevated temperatures (4000{degrees}F) for material in the as-swaged (>98% cold work) condition and for as-swaged material in the heat treated condition. Extremely fine oxide particle sizes (<1000 {Angstrom}) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for a number of the experimental compositions in the as-swaged condition. A one hour recrystallization temperature as high as 3990{degrees}F was measured and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as low as {approximately}58{degrees}F for material in the recrystallized condition was determined. The preliminary results support the alloy design concept feasibility.

  10. Optical absorption properties of dispersed gold and silver alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxon, Jess

    2009-03-01

    The oldest topic in nanoscience is the size-dependent optical properties of gold and silver colloids or nanoparticles, first investigated scientifically by Michael Faraday in 1857. In the modern era, advances in both synthesis and characterization have resulted in new insights into the size-dependent absorbance of Au and Ag nanoparticles with sizes below the classical limit for Mie theory. In this paper we discuss the synthesis and properties of core/shell and nanoalloy particles of Au and Ag, compare them to particles of pure gold and silver, and discuss how alloying affects nanoparticle chemical stability. We show that composition, size, and nanostructure (e.g., core/shell vs quasi-random nanoalloy) can all be employed to adjust the optical absorbance properties. The type of nanostructure--core/shell vs alloy--is reflected in their optical absorbance features. PMID:19708105

  11. The effect of copper, chromium, and zirconium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of the systematic variation of copper, chromium, and zirconium contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 7000-type aluminum alloy. Fracture toughness and tensile properties are evaluated for each alloy in both the peak aging, T8, and the overaging, T73, conditions. Results show that dimpled rupture essentially characterize the fracture process in these alloys. In the T8 condition, a significant loss of toughness is observed for alloys containing 2.5 pct Cu due to the increase in the quantity of Al-Cu-Mg-rich S-phase particles. An examination of T8 alloys at constant Cu levels shows that Zr-bearing alloys exhibit higher strength and toughness than the Cr-bearing alloys. In the T73 condition, Cr-bearing alloys are inherently tougher than Zr-bearing alloys. A void nucleation and growth mechanism accounts for the loss of toughness in these alloys with increasing copper content.

  12. Microstructural investigations on as-cast and annealed Al-Sc and Al-Sc-Zr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lohar, A.K.; Mondal, B.; Rafaja, D.; Klemm, V.; Panigrahi, S.C.

    2009-11-15

    Al-Sc and Al-Sc-Zr alloys containing 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 wt.% Sc and 0.15 wt.% Zr were investigated using optical microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The phase composition of the alloys and the morphology of precipitates that developed during solidification in the sand casting process and subsequent thermal treatment of the samples were studied. XRD analysis shows that the weight percentage of the Al{sub 3}Sc/Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) precipitates was significantly below 1% in all alloys except for the virgin Al0.5Sc0.15Zr alloy. In this alloy the precipitates were observed as primary dendritic particles. In the binary Al-Sc alloys, ageing at 470 deg. C for 24 h produced precipitates associated with dislocation networks, whereas the precipitates in the annealed Al-Sc-Zr alloys were free of interfacial dislocations except at the lowest content of Sc. Development of large incoherent precipitates during precipitation heat treatment reduced hardness of all the alloys studied. Growth of the Al{sub 3}Sc/Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) precipitates after heat treatment was less at low Sc content and in the presence of Zr. Increase in hardness was observed after heat treatment at 300 deg. C in all alloys. There is a small difference in hardness between binary and ternary alloys slow cooled after sand casting.

  13. In vitro biocompatibility of Ti-Mg alloys fabricated by direct current magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Junko; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken

    2015-09-01

    Ti-xMg (x=17, 33, and 55 mass%) alloy films, which cannot be prepared by conventional melting processes owing to the absence of a solid-solution phase in the phase diagram, were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering in order to investigate their biocompatibility. Ti and Mg films were also prepared by the same process for comparison. The crystal structures were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the surfaces were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ti, Ti-xMg alloy, and Mg films were immersed in a 0.9% NaCl solution at 310 K for 7d to evaluate the dissolution amounts of Ti and Mg. In addition, to evaluate the formation ability of calcium phosphate in vitro, the Ti, Ti-xMg alloy, and Mg films were immersed in Hanks' solution at 310 K for 30 d. Ti and Mg form solid-solution alloys because the peaks attributed to pure Ti and Mg do not appear in the XRD patterns of any of the Ti-xMg alloy films. The surfaces of the Ti-17 Mg alloy and Ti-33 Mg alloy films contain Ti oxides and MgO, whereas MgO is the main component of the surface oxide of the Ti-55 Mg alloy and Mg films. The dissolution amounts of Ti from all films are below or near the detection limit of inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. On the other hand, the Ti-17 Mg alloy, Ti-33 Mg alloy, Ti-55 Mg alloy, and Mg films exhibit Mg dissolution amounts of approximately 2.5, 1.4, 21, and 41 μg/cm(2), respectively. The diffraction peaks attributed to calcium phosphate are present in the XRD patterns of the Ti-33 Mg alloy, Ti-55 Mg alloy, and Mg films after the immersion in Hanks' solution. Spherical calcium phosphate particles precipitate on the surface of the Ti-33 Mg film. However, many cracks are observed in the Ti-55 Mg film, and delamination of the film occurs after the immersion in Hanks' solution. The Mg film is dissolved in Hanks' solution and calcium phosphate particles precipitate on the glass substrate. Consequently, it is revealed that the Ti-33 Mg

  14. Lead alloys past present future

    SciTech Connect

    Bagshaw, N.E.

    1995-03-01

    The most critical non-active component in the lead acid battery is the grid of substrate. A review of the work on and grid alloys in the period 1960-1993 has been carried out by by the Advanced Lead-Acid Consortium, (ALABC), and, in this paper, the results are analyzed in relation to the effort expended in different alloy systems. Lead-antimony alloys and the effects on them of additions of arsenic, tin, and grain-refining elements (selenium, sulfur, copper), together with lead-calcium alloys and the effect on them of tin additions have received the greatest attention in the past.

  15. Assembly of hybrid oligonucleotide modified gold (Au) and alloy nanoparticles building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Ching; Jen, Chun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Hung; Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Shu-Hui; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The alloy-based hybrid materials with macroscopic network arrays were developed by AuAg/Au and AuAgPd/Au nanoparticle composites through oligonucleotides hybridization. AuAg/Au and AuAgPd/Au exhibited distinct organization. The morphology of AuAg/Au conjugation assembled mainly as compact aggregates while AuAgPd/Au hybrid conjugated into the loosen network assemblies. The dehybridization temperatures were studied as a function of molar ratio of alloy/Au. It was found that higher alloy/gold molar ratio led to stronger hybridization for alloy/gold composite, accompanied with increased melting temperature. These results could be interpreted in terms of more alloy nanoparticles bound to a Au particle when the molar ratio of alloy/gold increased. The thermal analysis also showed that AuAg/Au exhibited higher dehybridization temperature. A modified model describing the dehybridization probability of an intact Au/alloy aggregate was performed to support the dehybridization temperature increased with increasing alloy/Au molar ratio. As to more oligonucleotides carried by AuAg (4.9 +/- 1.9 nm) than by AuAgPd (4.4 +/- 1.5 nm) due to larger size in AuAg, the efficient hybridization could result in higher dehybridization temperature in AuAg/Au. PMID:16573077

  16. Effect of temperature on the dynamic compressive properties of magnesium alloy and its nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Shu, D. W.; Goh, Kok Swee

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are very attractive in applications such as automotive, railway and aerospace industries due to their low density in comparison with aluminum and steel alloys. Magnesium-based composites exhibit high specific properties compared to unreinforced magnesium alloys and they are found to be promising for mechanical applications under impact and high temperature conditions beyond those possible with magnesium alloys. In the present study, the effect of temperature variation has been investigated for both magnesium alloy AZ31B and the same alloy reinforced with silicon carbide nano-particles at high strain rates. The temperature is varied in the range from -30°C to 200°C at a high strain rate of 3300 s-1. Lower stresses and larger strains to peak compressive stresses are observed with increasing temperature. An analytic comparison between AZ31B alloy and AZ31B nanocomposite was also examined and results reveal that AZ31B nanocomposite displays superior strength properties with slightly weaker ductility than AZ31B alloy at all three temperature variations. The result of this is an improved energy absorption capability possessed by AZ31B nanocomposite.

  17. Characteristics of the aluminum alloy sheets for forming and application examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uema, Naoyuki; Asano, Mineo

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the characteristics and application examples of aluminum alloy sheets developed for automotive parts by Sumitomo Light Metal are described. For the automotive closure panels (ex., hood, back-door), an Al-Mg-Si alloy sheet having an excellent hemming performance was developed. The cause of the occurrence and the propagation of cracks by bending were considered to be the combined effect of the shear bands formed across several crystal grains and the micro-voids formed around the second phase particles. By reducing the shear band formation during bending by controlling the crystallographic texture, the Al-Mg-Si alloy sheets showed an excellent hemming performance. For the automotive outer panels (ex., roof, fender, trunk-lid), an Al-Mg alloy sheet, which has both a good hot blow formability and excellent surface appearance after hot blow forming was developed, and hot blow forming technology was put to practical use using this developed Al-Mg alloy sheet. For automotive heat insulators, a high ductile Al-Fe alloy sheet was developed. The heat insulator, which integrated several panels, was put into practical use using this developed Al-Fe alloy sheet. The textured sheet was often used as a heat insulator in order to reduce the thickness of the aluminum alloy sheet and obtain good press formability. The new textured sheet, which has both high rigidity and good press formability for heat insulators, was developed by FE analysis.

  18. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-3 and 4: Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 3 and 4: Critical Point (BCAT-3-4-CP) will determine phase separation rates and add needed points to the phase diagram of a model critical fluid system. Crewmembers photograph samples of polymer and colloidal particles (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) that model liquid/gas phase changes. Results will help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously cloaked by the effects of gravity.

  19. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  20. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  1. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  2. Effect of the Fine-Grained Structure on the Fatigue Properties of the Heat-Resistant Nickel-Iron Alloy Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Sh. Kh.; Shakhov, R. V.

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that ultrafine-grained nickel alloys with average grain sizes d = 0.1-1 μm possess improved hot workability and can be used for superplastic forming or rolling. However, microstructure refinement can worsen some performance characteristics of the alloy, for example, heat-resistant or fatigue properties. In the present work, fatigue characteristics of the fine-grained alloy Inconel 718 are investigated. Ultrafine-grained alloys with average grain sizes d = 0.1-1 μm were manufactured by multiple forging with stage-by-stage deformation temperature decrease. During standard heat treatment of the alloy performed to obtain the desired properties, the γ-grain size was controlled by precipitations of δ-phase particles along the boundaries. Results of low-cycle fatigue tests of the fine-grained alloy at room and elevated temperatures are compared with the properties of the coarse-grained alloy.

  3. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test Conducted on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica I.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are tiny (submicron) particles suspended in fluid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) is part of an extensive series of experiments planned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals. These crystals may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices. Windows made of liquid crystals are already in the marketplace. These windows change their appearance from transparent to opaque when a weak electric current is applied. In the future, if the colloidal crystals can be made to control the passage of light through them, such products could be made much more cheaply. These experiments require the microgravity environment of space because good quality crystals are difficult to produce on Earth because of sedimentation and convection in the fluid. The BCAT experiment hardware included two separate modules for two different experiments. The "Slow Growth" hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera with a 250- exposure photo film cartridge. The camera was aimed toward the sample module, which contained 10 separate colloid samples. A rack of small lights provided backlighting for the photographs. The BCAT hardware was launched on the shuttle and was operated aboard the Russian space station Mir by American astronauts John Blaha and David Wolf (launched September 1996 and returned January 1997; reflown September 1997 and returned January 1998). To begin the experiment, one of these astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles and break up any crystals that might have already formed. Once the samples were mixed and

  4. Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Necia Grant; West, Geoffrey B.

    1988-06-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Framework: 1. Scale and dimension - From animals to quarks Geoffrey B. West; 2. Particle physics and the standard model Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky and Geoffrey B. West; QCD on a Cray: the masses of elementary particles Gerald Guralnik, Tony Warnock and Charles Zemach; Lecture Notes - From simple field theories to the standard model; 3. Toward a unified theory: an essay on the role of supergravity in the search for unification Richard C. Slansky; 4. Supersymmetry at 100 GeV Stuart Raby; 5. The family problem T. Goldman and Michael Martin Nieto; Part II. Experimental Developments: 6. Experiments to test unification schemes Gary H. Sanders; 7. The march toward higher energies S. Peter Rosen; LAMPF II and the High-Intensity Frontier Henry A. Thiessen; The SSC - An engineering challenge Mahlon T. Wilson; 8. Science underground - the search for rare events L. M. Simmons, Jr; Part III. Personal Perspectives: 9. Quarks and quirks among friends Peter A. Carruthers, Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky, Geoffrey B. West and George Zweig; Index.

  5. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report for the period January through December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1997-03-01

    Centrifugal casting of Copper alloys containing graphite particles established the feasibility of making hollow cylindrical castings. In theses castings, the graphite particles are segregated to the inner periphery making them well suited for bearing applications because of the lubricity of the graphite particles. The recovery of graphite is found to be around 90%. Chemical analysis shows that the average concentration of graphite particles near the inner periphery is 13 vol.% (3.5 wt.%) and 16.3 vol.% (4.54 wt.%) for castings made from melts originally containing 7 vol.% (2 wt.%) and 13 vol.% (3.5 wt. %) graphite particles, respectively. Hardness tests show that as the volume fraction of graphite particles increases, the hardness values in the graphite rich zone is found to be widely scattered. The results indicate that it is feasible to centrifugally cast copper alloys containing dispersed graphite particles to produce cylindrical components with graphite rich inner periphery for bearing and plumbing applications.

  6. Half-heusler alloys with enhanced figure of merit and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhifeng; Yan, Xiao; Joshi, Giri; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Gang; Poudel, Bed; Caylor, James Christopher

    2015-06-02

    Thermoelectric materials and methods of making thermoelectric materials having a nanometer mean grain size less than 1 micron. The method includes combining and arc melting constituent elements of the thermoelectric material to form a liquid alloy of the thermoelectric material and casting the liquid alloy of the thermoelectric material to form a solid casting of the thermoelectric material. The method also includes ball milling the solid casting of the thermoelectric material into nanometer mean size particles and sintering the nanometer size particles to form the thermoelectric material having nanometer scale mean grain size.

  7. [Studies on high temperature oxidation of noble metal alloys for dental use (I). Formation of oxide layers and oxidation rate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ohno, H

    1976-11-01

    Eight commercial and two experimental alloys were examined. The cast specimens were polished metallographically and oxidized at 700 degrees and 800 degrees C in air. An electron probe X-ray microanalyser and a microthermobalance were employed to investigate the oxidation behavior of the alloys. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The copper in the alloys was selectively oxidized and the scales formed on the alloys consisted of two layers, CuO overlying Cu2O. 2. The oxide particles in the internal oxidation zone (subscale) on the alloys containing only Cu as the base metal were Cu2O and on the alloys containing Zn, Cd, and Ni with Cu were ZnO, CdO, and NiO, respectively. 3. The size of the ZnO and CdO particles in the subscale increased with the penetration into the specimen. 4. The ZnO particles in the metal-subscale interface showed preferential precipitation at the grain boundaries. 5. When the oxide particles in the subscale did not develop remarkably, the oxidation rate at constant temperature conformed with the parabolic law. 6. In the 18 carat gold alloy, the oxidation rate at 800 degrees C was about 10 times that at 700 degrees C. 7. Owing to preferential oxidation of the Cu in the alloys, Cu concentration in the outer layer of the metal decreased remarkably and Au, Pt, Ag and Pd concentration increased. PMID:1069823

  8. Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling at certain rates produced fibrous composite structures. Alloy samples melted in alumina or graphite crucibles under argon and then chillcast into 33-mm-diameter rods or sucked directly into 3-mm-bore alumina or silica tubes. Alloying not automatic with immiscible components of different densities and widely different melting points.

  9. Directional Solidification Of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Singh, A. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions promoting formation of aligned fibers sought. Report describes experiments in directional solidification of Cu/Pb and Bi/Ga monotectic alloys. Study motivated by need to understand physical mechanism governing formation of rodlike or fiberlike aligned structures in solidifying alloy and to determine process conditions favoring such structures.

  10. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  11. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  12. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  13. In situ CrB{sub 2} and its effect on the mechanical properties of A390 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaoli; Wu, Yuying Gao, Tong; Li, Chong; Nie, Jinfeng; Liu, Xiangfa

    2013-12-15

    In this work, a series of CrB{sub 2}/A390 composite alloys have been prepared and analyzed by a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Firstly, in situ CrB{sub 2} has been prepared by reducing reaction that occurred in Al melt: AlB{sub 2} + [Cr] → Al + CrB{sub 2}. The CrB{sub 2} particles exhibit regular hexagonal platelet morphology and distribute uniformly in the Al matrix. Then, A390 alloys with different CrB{sub 2} additions have been prepared. With the addition of CrB{sub 2}, the size of primary Si can be reduced remarkably. The generation of CrB{sub 2} particles and their diffuse distribution can improve the mechanical properties of A390 alloy obviously. The mechanical properties of the base alloy, including ultimate tensile strength at 25 °C (UTS{sub 25°C}), the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and wear resistance have been studied and the composite alloy with 3 wt.% CrB{sub 2} particle addition showed the best performance. - Highlights: • CrB2/A390 composite alloy was successfully fabricated at 850 °C. • The reaction between AlB2 and Cr was investigated. • The possible coherent interface of CrB2 and Si was calculated. • Mechanical properties of A390 alloy are improved with the addition of CrB2.

  14. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Dang, B; Zhang, X; Chen, Y Z; Chen, C X; Wang, H T; Liu, F

    2016-01-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy. PMID:27502444

  15. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-08-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy.

  16. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    PubMed Central

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy. PMID:27502444

  17. Mechanical properties and phase composition of potential biodegradable Mg-Zn-Mn-base alloys with addition of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stulikova, Ivana; Smola, Bohumil

    2010-10-15

    Mechanical properties and creep resistance of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the as cast as well as in the T5 condition were compared to those of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the same conditions. Yield tensile stress and ultimate tensile strength of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy are slightly better in the temperature range 20 deg. C-400 deg. C than these of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Better thermal stability of ultimate tensile strength was observed in the T5 treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy than in this material in the as cast condition. An outstanding creep resistance at 225 deg. C-350 deg. C found in the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy is due to the existence of the 18R long period stacking structure persisting in this alloy even a long heat treatment of 500 deg. C/32 h. No similar stacking effects happen when Ce substitutes Y in approximately the same concentration. The creep resistance deteriorates considerably in the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Rectangular particles of the equilibrium Mg{sub 12}Ce phase dominate in the microstructure of as cast as well as of high temperature heat-treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. A population of small oval particles containing Mg and Zn develops additionally during annealing of this alloy. These particles pin effectively dislocations and can be responsible for the better thermal stability of the T5 treated material.

  18. Effect of the structural and phase state and application conditions on the strength of detonation-deposited VK alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ivashchenko, R.K.; Fedorenko, V.K.; Kadryov, V.K.; Khairutdinov, A.M.; Mil'man, Y.V.

    1985-05-01

    In this work an attempt was made, by lowering the temperature in the detonation zone, decreasing the particle flight velocity, and employing starting powders in which the WC particle size 20-40 mum predominated, to obtain detonation-deposited VK20 alloy coatings approaching closely in structure and phase composition hard-metal composites produced by the powder metallurgy method.

  19. Time-dependent crack growth behavior of alloy 617 and alloy 230 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shawoon Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Two Ni-base solid-solution-strengthened superalloys: INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 were studied to check sustained loading crack growth (SLCG) behavior at elevated temperatures appropriate for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) applictaions with constant stress intensity factor (Kmax= 27.75 MPa✓m) in air. The results indicate a time-dependent rate controlling process which can be characterized by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter -- stress intensity factor (K). At elevated temperatures, the crack growth mechanism was best described using a damage zone concept. Based on results and study, SAGBOE (stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation embrittlement) is considered the primary reason for time-dependent SLCG. A thermodynamic equation was considered to correlate all the SLCG results to determine the thermal activation energy in the process. A phenomenological model based on a time-dependent factor was developed considering the previous researcher's time-dependent fatigue crack propagation (FCP) results and current SLCG results to relate cycle-dependent and time-dependent FCP for both alloys. Further study includes hold time (3+300s) fatigue testing and no hold (1s) fatigue testing with various load ratios (R) at 700°C with a Kmax of 27.75 MPa✓m. Study results suggest an interesting point: crack growth behavior is significantly affected with the change in R value in cycle-dependent process whereas in time-dependent process, change in R does not have any significant effect. Fractography study showed intergranular cracking mode for all time-dependent processes and transgranular cracking mode for cycle-dependent processes. In Alloy 230, SEM images display intergranular cracking with carbide particles, dense oxides and dimple mixed secondary cracks for time-dependent 3+300s FCP and SLCG test. In all cases, Alloy 230 shows better crack growth resistance compared to Alloy 617.

  20. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  1. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  2. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  3. Normal evaporation of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    In the study of normal evaporation, it is assumed that the evaporating alloy is homogeneous, that the vapor is instantly removed, and that the alloy follows Raoult's law. The differential equation of normal evaporation relating the evaporating time to the final solute concentration is given and solved for several important special cases. Uses of the derived equations are exemplified with a Ni-Al alloy and some binary iron alloys. The accuracy of the predicted results are checked by analyses of actual experimental data on Fe-Ni and Ni-Cr alloys evaporated at 1600 C, and also on the vacuum purification of beryllium. These analyses suggest that the normal evaporation equations presented here give satisfactory results that are accurate to within an order of magnitude of the correct values, even for some highly concentrated solutions. Limited diffusion and the resultant surface solute depletion or enrichment appear important in the extension of this normal evaporation approach.

  4. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. A.; Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the relation between the size distribution of Ti3Al particles in a Ti-8Al alloy and the tensile properties measured in air and in saltwater. The size distribution of Ti3Al was varied by isothermal aging for various times at temperatures in the range 770 to 970 K (930 to 1290 F). The aging kinetics were found to be relatively slow. Quantitative measurements of the particle coarsening rate at 920 K (1200 F) showed good agreement with the predicted behavior for coarsening controlled by matrix diffusion, and suggested that the specific free energy of the Ti3Al alpha interface in negligible small. In all cases, the Ti3Al particles were sheared by the glide dislocations. It was concluded that there is a definite correlation between the presence of deformable Ti3Al particles and an alloy's susceptibility to aqueous stress corrosion cracking. Furthermore, the appearance of the surface slip lines and the dislocation substructure in deformed specimens suggest that the specific effect of the Ti3Al particles is to cause a nonhomogeneous planar slip character and an enhanced chemical potential of the slip bands.

  5. New magnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Chin, G Y

    1980-05-23

    Three notable new developments in magnetic alloys are highlighted. These include rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets with maximum energy products up to 240 kilojoules per cubic meter; chromium-cobalt-iron permanent magnets that have magnetic properties similar to those of the Alnicos, but contain only about half as much cobalt and are sufficiently ductile to be cold-formable; and high-induction grain-oriented silicon steels that exhibit 20 percent less core loss as transformer core materials than conventional oriented grades. PMID:17772813

  6. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  7. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Paxton, Michael M.

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  8. Effect of extrusion processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties, biocorrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Cu sintered alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erlin; Li, Shengyi; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Lan; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Ti-Cu sintered alloys, Ti-Cu(S) alloy, have exhibited good anticorrosion resistance and strong antibacterial properties, but low ductility in previous study. In this paper, Ti-Cu(S) alloys were subjected to extrusion processing in order to improve the comprehensive property. The phase constitute, microstructure, mechanical property, biocorrosion property and antibacterial activity of the extruded alloys, Ti-Cu(E), were investigated in comparison with Ti-Cu(S) by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) with energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), mechanical testing, electrochemical testing and plate-count method in order to reveal the effect of the extrusion process. XRD, OM and SEM results showed that the extrusion process did not change the phase constitute but refined the grain size and Ti2Cu particle significantly. Ti-Cu(E) alloys exhibited higher hardness and compressive yield strength than Ti-Cu(S) alloys due to the fine grain and Ti2Cu particles. With the consideration of the total compressive strain, it was suggested that the extrusion process could improve the ductility of Ti-Cu alloy(S) alloys. Electrochemical results have indicated that the extrusion process improved the corrosion resistance of Ti-Cu(S) alloys. Plate-count method displayed that both Ti-Cu(S) and Ti-Cu(E) exhibited strong antibacterial activity (>99%) against S. aureus. All these results demonstrated that hot forming processing, such as the extrusion in this study, refined the microstructure and densified the alloy, in turn improved the ductility and strength as well as anticorrosion properties without reduction in antibacterial properties. PMID:27612770

  9. Semi-solid Processing of Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, David H.; Suéry, Michel; Kapranos, Plato; Atkinson, Helen V.; Young, Kenneth P.

    The original semisolid forming process, developed at MIT in 1972, involved stirring an alloy during solidification to produce a slurry of spheroidal primary particles in a liquid matrix, which was then injected directly into a die to produce a solid component. This was termed "rheocasting." Subsequently, it was found more convenient to solidify the slurry completely during the continuous casting of an electromag netically stirred strand, which was then cut into slugs for partial remelting back into semisolid billets on demand. These could be loaded into a diecasting machine in this state for injection into the die. This alternative process route is called "thixoforming," and until recently, it was the preferred industrial process. For this reason, the microstructure developed during the reheating and melting for thixo forming will be considered first. Experimentally, it has been found that the most effective fraction solid f s for thixoforming, lies between 0.5 and 0.6. Below this range, the semisolid slug becomes too soft to support its own weight and sags during remelting; above this range, it is too stiff to flow readily and fill the die. However, the slurry technologies used in rheocasting typically operate at lower fraction solids and rely on the ability to pour the semisolid alloy much like a liquid (see Chap. 4). It has been observed in practice that the fraction solid is in fact a critical factor for effective thixoforming, and therefore, both good temperature control and lack of sensitivity of f s to small temperature variations of the alloy are essential to efficient manufacturing.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of W80Ni10Mo10 alloy produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A.; Karak, S. K.; Pal, S.

    2015-02-01

    The present study aims at synthesis and characterization of nanostructured W80Ni10Mo10 (wt. %) alloy produced by mechanical alloying (MA). Elemental powders of tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo) were subjected to mechanical attrition in a high energy planetary ball-mill using chrome steel as grinding media and toluene as a process control agent. The crystallite size and lattice strain of the nanostructured powders at different stages of milling (0 h to 20h) was calculated from the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD). The crystallite size of W in W80Ni10Mo10 powder was reduced from 100 μm to 55 nm at 10 h and farther reduction to 40 nm at 20 h of milling with increase in lattice strain of 0.25% at 20 h of milling. The lattice parameter of tungsten showed initial expansion upto 0.03% at 10 h of milling and then contraction upto 0.04% at 20 h of milling. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed mixed morphology of W80Ni10Mo10 powders consisting spherical and elongated particles after 20 h of milling. SEM analysis also revealed that particle size reduced from 100 μm to 2 μm with an increase in the milling time from 0 to 20 hours. The dark-field Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observations revealed that the crystallite size of W in milled W80Ni10Mo10 alloy is in good agreement with calculated crystallite size from XRD.

  11. Stable palladium alloys for diffusion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patapoff, M.

    1973-01-01

    Literature search on hydrogen absorption effect on palladium alloys revealed existence of alloy compositions in which alpha--beta transition does not take place. Survey conclusions: 40 percent gold alloy of palladium should be used in place of palladium; alloy must be free of interstitial impurities; and metallic surfaces of tube must be clean.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  13. The role of equiaxed particles on the yield stress of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, R. M., Jr.; Christodoulou, L.

    1991-01-01

    Possible explanations are investigated for the yield strength enhancement of discontinuously reinforced Al alloy matrix MMCs, for the case of low temperature yield behavior where deformation occurs by dislocation slide. The Al alloys contain 0.1-10 micron diameter equiaxed particle discontinuous reinforcements of TiB2, Al2O3, and TiC. Attention is given to a single dislocation-particle interaction model, and both dislocation pile-up and forest-hardening multiple-dislocation particle interaction models.

  14. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  15. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  16. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  17. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    PubMed

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  18. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  19. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  20. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost