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Sample records for feeding intolerance paralytic

  1. The etiology and prevention of feeding intolerance paralytic ileus – revisiting an old concept

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal (G-I) motility is impaired ("paralytic ileus") after abdominal surgery. Premature feeding attempts delay recovery by inducing "feeding intolerance," especially abdominal distention that compromises respiration. Controlled studies (e.g., from Sloan-Kettering Memorial Hospital) have lead to recommendations that patients not be fed soon after major abdominal surgery to avoid this complication. We postulate that when total fluid inflow of feedings, digestive secretions, and swallowed air outstrip peristaltic outflow from the feeding site, fluid accumulates. This localized stagnation triggers G-I vagal reflexes that further slow the already sluggish gut, leading to generalized abdominal distention. Similarly, vagal cardiovascular reflexes in susceptible subjects could account for the 1:1,000 incidence of unexplained bowel necrosis reported with enteral feeding. We re-evaluated our data, which supports this postulated mechanism for the induction of "feeding intolerance." We had focused our efforts on postoperative enteral nutrition, with the largest reported series of immediate feeding of at least 100 kcal/hour after major surgery. We found that this complication can be avoided consistently by monitoring inflow versus peristaltic outflow, immediately removing any potential excess from the feeding site. We fed intraduodenally immediately following "open" surgery for 31 colectomy and 160 consecutive cholecystectomy patients. The duodenum was aspirated simultaneously just proximal to the feeding site, efficiently removing all swallowed air and excess feedings. To salvage digestive secretions, the degassed aspirate was re-introduced manually (and later automatically) via a separate feeding channel. Hourly assays were performed for nitrogen balance, serum amino acids, and for the presence of removed feedings in the aspirate. The colectomy patients had X-ray motility studies initiated 5 – 17 hours after surgery. Clinically normal motility and absorption

  2. Pharmacological therapy of feed intolerance in the critically ills

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q

    2014-01-01

    Feed intolerance in the setting of critical illness is associated with higher morbidity and mortality, and thus requires promptly and effective treatment. Prokinetic agents are currently considered as the first-line therapy given issues relating to parenteral nutrition and post-pyloric placement. Currently, the agents of choice are erythromycin and metoclopramide, either alone or in combination, which are highly effective with relatively low incidence of cardiac, hemodynamic or neurological adverse effects. Diarrhea, however, can occur in up to 49% of patients who are treated with the dual prokinetic therapy, which is not associated with Clostridium difficile infection and settled soon after the cessation of the drugs. Hence, the use of prokinetic therapy over a long period or for prophylactic purpose must be avoided, and the indication for ongoing use of the drug(s) must be reviewed frequently. Second line therapy, such as total parenteral nutrition and post-pyloric feeding, must be considered once adverse effects relating the prokinetic therapy develop. PMID:25133043

  3. Does the use of glycerin laxatives decrease feeding intolerance in preterm infants?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vibhuti; Chirinian, Nevart; Lee, Shoo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycerin laxatives are often prescribed in the neonatal population for meconium evacuation and to promote enteral feeding. However, the literature regarding their effectiveness has not been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of glycerin enema or suppository in preventing feeding intolerance in preterm infants at ≤32 weeks’ gestational age or weighing ≤1500 g at birth. METHODS: The Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched to identify studies that evaluated glycerin enemas/suppositories for feeding intolerance. Using the Evidence Evaluation Worksheet adapted from the American Heart Association’s International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, eligible studies were scored for quality, level of evidence and direction of support. RESULTS: Two clinical studies that evaluated meconium evacuation and feeding intolerance were included. One study showed no difference in the time to complete meconium evacuation or establishment of full enteral feeds, while the other showed that the times to first meconium passage and full enteral feeding were significantly shorter, and the rate of sepsis was lower in the glycerin enema group. CONCLUSION: The evidence regarding the effectiveness of glycerin laxatives for improving feeding tolerance is inconclusive in infants at ≤32 weeks’ gestational age or weighing ≤1500 g at birth. PMID:23115504

  4. Paralytic shellfish toxin concentration and cell density changes in Pyrodinium bahamense -Noctiluca scintillans feeding experiments.

    PubMed

    Azanza, Rhodora V; Cruz, Lourdes J; Cariño, Flerida A; Blanco, Alelea G; Butardo, Vito M

    2010-05-01

    For the first time the potential of Noctiluca scintillans, a non-toxic mixotrophic dinoflagellate, in bioconverting and/or excreting saxitoxin has been illustrated, thus contributing to the limited knowledge on the aspects of toxin pathways in the food chain/web and predator-prey preferences. Noctiluca growth rate increased with higher Pyrodinium concentration but the ratio of Noctiluca to Pyrodinium should at least be 1:250 cells per mL. Noctiluca fed with Pyrodinium alone was found to decrease in number suggesting that the nutrients from this prey were insufficient. This was confirmed by the improved cell density of Noctiluca upon addition of 0.01% casitone to the Pyrodinium-fed Noctiluca. The alternative prey (Gymnodinium sanguineum) slowed down the grazing impact of Noctiluca on Pyrodinium. Noctiluca depleted Gymnodinium earlier than Pyrodinium showing preference over a prey with less saxitoxin. After the feeding experiments, total saxitoxin levels decreased to 72% in the Noctiluca-Pyrodinium setup whereas no saxitoxin was detected in the Noctiluca culture fed with Pyrodinium and G. sanguineum. It is possible that Gymnodinium can provide some nutrients needed to make Noctiluca more efficient in bioconverting saxitoxin. PMID:19800907

  5. Glucose intolerance with low-, medium-, and high-carbohydrate formulas during nighttime enteral feedings in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kane, R E; Black, P

    1989-04-01

    Ten young adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients over 16 years of age (average 21.4 years) began nighttime enteral feedings as a method of nutritional rehabilitation to regain and maintain body weight. Patients received nighttime feedings of 1,000 kcal/M2 of a low- (Pulmocare), medium- (Ensure Plus), or high-carbohydrate (Vivonex) formula for at least 2 nights each with pancreatic enzyme therapy. Five of ten young adult CF patients developed nocturnal hyperglycemia (serum glucose greater than 300 mg/dl) and glucosuria (1-3% glucose) with varying degrees of polyuria during enteral feedings. No patient developed ketonuria despite serum glucoses at times greater than 600 mg %. There was no difference between the hyperglycemic and normoglycemic groups in median age, percent of ideal body weight, NIH score, Brasfield scores, pulmonary function tests, or family history of diabetes. All normoglycemic and four of five hyperglycemic patients had normal fasting blood sugars. The percent hemoglobin A1c was greater in the glucose intolerant group than the normoglycemic patients (11.2 +/- 0.8% vs. 6.8 +/- 1.1%, mean +/- SE, p less than 0.005). Twelve to 15 units of NPH insulin prior to initiation of feedings provided adequate therapy in most hyperglycemic patients. There was no apparent difference in the elevation of early morning serum glucoses with the low- medium- and high-carbohydrate formulas. We concluded that hyperglycemia requiring insulin therapy was common in young adult CF patients using nighttime enteral feedings. A hemoglobin A1c appeared to be a useful screening test before initiating such therapy. PMID:2496215

  6. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Lactose intolerance means that you cannot digest foods with lactose in them. Lactose is the sugar found in ... find out if your problems are due to lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance is not serious. Eating less food ...

  7. Lactose intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Lactase deficiency; Milk intolerance; Disaccharidase deficiency; Dairy product intolerance ... make the lactase enzyme so they can digest milk, including breast milk. Babies born too early (premature) ...

  8. Comparison of erythromycin versus metoclopramide for gastric feeding intolerance in patients with traumatic brain injury: A randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Makkar, Jeetinder Kaur; Gauli, Basanta; Jain, Kajal; Jain, Divya; Batra, Yatinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: No randomized controlled trial demonstrates the efficacy of erythromycin or metoclopramide in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of metoclopramide and erythromycin for improving gastric aspirate volume (GAV) in patients with TBI. Materials and Methods: Patients with Glasgow coma score more than 5 admitted to trauma Intensive Care Unit within 72 h of head injury were assessed for eligibility. 115 patients were prospectively randomized to receive metoclopramide, erythromycin, or placebo eighth hourly. Gastric feeding intolerance was defined as GAV more than 150 ml with abdominal symptoms. Two consecutive high GAV was defined as feeding failure. Feeding failure was treated by increasing the frequency of dose to 6 hourly in metoclopramide and erythromycin group. Combination therapy with both drugs was given as rescue in the placebo group. Results: Incidence of high GAV was as high as 60.5% in placebo group. Use of erythromycin was associated with a decrease in the incidence of feeding intolerance to 28.9% (P = 0.006). Although feed intolerance decreased to 43.6% in metoclopramide group, values did not reach statistical significance. The proportion of patients not having high GAV at different days were significantly higher in erythromycin group (P = 0.027, log-rank test). There was no difference in the proportion of patients not having feeding failure in three groups with increasing number of days. Conclusion: There was a significant decrease in the incidence of high GAV with the use of erythromycin when compared to metoclopramide and placebo. PMID:27375386

  9. Lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in infant feeding, but its impact decreases as the child gets older and consumes less milk and dairy products. Congenital lactose intolerance is a very rare condition. However, lactase activity may be low and need to mature during the first weeks of life in many infants. However, the evidence that unabsorbed lactose is causing infantile crying and colic is contradictory. Unabsorbed lactose has a bifidogenic effect and improves calcium absorption. Lactose malabsorption may occur secondary and thus temporally to other etiologies such as infectious gastroenteritis, cow's milk allergy and celiac disease. One the cause is treated, lactase activity will gradually return to normal. The vast majority of Asian children will develop late onset congenital lactase deficiency. However, this entity only exceptionally causes symptoms before the age of 4-5 years. Symptoms are abdominal cramps, flatulence and watery, acid stools, and decrease the quality of life but lactose intolerance is not associated with "true disease". The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds and confirmed with a lactose breath test, if needed. These patients need to have a lifetime long reduced lactose intake to improve their quality of life. PMID:26715083

  10. Insulin improves β-cell function in glucose-intolerant rat models induced by feeding a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-qing; Wang, Bao-ping; Deng, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Jiao-yue; Wang, Yong-bo; Zheng, Juan; Xia, Wen-fang; Zeng, Tian-shu; Chen, Lu-lu

    2011-11-01

    Insulin therapy has been shown to contribute to extended glycemia remission in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the effects of insulin treatment on pancreatic lipid content, and β-cell apoptosis and proliferation in glucose-intolerant rats to explore the protective role of insulin on β-cell function. A rat glucose-intolerant model was induced by streptozotocin and a high-fat diet. Plasma and pancreatic triglycerides, free fatty acids, and insulin were measured; and pancreatic β-cell cell apoptosis and proliferation were detected by a propidium iodide cell death assay and immunofluorescence for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Relative β-cell area was determined by immunohistochemistry for insulin, whereas insulin production in pancreas was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Islet β-cell secreting function was assessed by the index ΔI30/ΔG30. Glucose-intolerant rats had higher pancreatic lipid content, more islet β-cell apoptosis, lower β-cell proliferation, and reduced β-cell area in pancreas when compared with controls. Insulin therapy reduced blood glucose, inhibited pancreatic lipid accumulation and islet β-cell apoptosis, and increased β-cell proliferation and β-cell area in glucose-intolerant rats. Furthermore, impaired insulin secretion and insulin production in glucose-intolerant rats were improved by insulin therapy. Insulin can preserve β-cell function by protecting islets from glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. It can also ameliorate β-cell area by enhancing β-cell proliferation and reducing β-cell apoptosis. PMID:21550078

  11. [Metabolic changes in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance. A contribution to the topic of fructose administration for parenteral feeding].

    PubMed

    Sachs, M; Asskali, F; Encke, A; Förster, H

    1991-11-15

    The literature contains a number of reports of death following the intravenous administration of fructose in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate the metabolic changes occurring during intravenous administration of fructose to patients with HFI, with the aim of identifying metabolic parameters that would permit the early diagnosis of HFI. Also, the deaths reported in the literature were analyzed. In three of our own patients with fruit intolerance known since childhood, and in volunteers with normal metabolism, a one-hour intravenous fructose tolerance test (1.7 g fructose/min) was performed. An analysis was done using the usual enzymatic and chemical methods: blood glucose, fructose, lactic acid, serum uric acid, ammonia, free fatty acids, inorganic phosphate, and serum amino acids (ion exchange chromatography). During fructose infusion, the following metabolic changes were detected: hypoglycemia (20 to 60 mg/dl), increase in blood fructose levels (up to 350 mg/dl), hypophosphatemia (2 to 3 mg/dl), hyperlacticacidemia (up to 60 mg/dl), elevation of plasma ammonia levels (up to 120 mg/dl), increased serum glutamate, and a decrease in serum glutamine, as also hyperuricemia (up to 10 mg/dl). On termination of the fructose infusion, these changes were completely reversible. Analysis of the deaths reported in the literature revealed a known intolerance to fruit or sweets, and that no regular metabolic studies were apparently performed. Although HFI is rare, use should be made of the known advantages of sugar substitutes in post-aggression metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1770897

  12. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... consuming enough essential nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D. People with lactose intolerance may not get enough ... cause people to take in less calcium and vitamin D than they need. See the “Calcium and Vitamin ...

  13. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance is an abnormal sensitivity to a cold environment or cold temperatures. ... can be a symptom of a problem with metabolism. Some people (often very thin women) do not tolerate cold environments because they have very little body fat and ...

  14. Heat intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003094.htm Heat intolerance To use the sharing features on this ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  15. Cold Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Cold Intolerance Many polio ... index of Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Back to top Contact ...

  16. [Lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The most common problem limiting milk consumption worldwide is lactose intolerance (LI), which is defined as the experience of gastrointestinal symptoms due to the intake of lactose-containing food. When symptoms ensue the intake of milk, the condition is referred as milk intolerance, and it may or may not be due to LI. The most common cause of LI is primary lactase deficiency which occurs in 30% of Mexican adults when one glass of milk is consumed (12-18 g of lactose). LI occurs in less than 15% of adults after the intake of this dose of lactose. Another cause of lactose intolerance is due to secondary lactase deficiency, which occurs because lactase is reduced due to diseases that affect the intestinal mucosa. Lactose intolerance can be eliminated or significantly reduced by elimination or reduction of the intake of milk and milk containing products. Recent studies demonstrate that when β-casein-A1 contained in milk is hydrolyzed it produces β-casomorphine-7 which is an opioid associated with milk intolerance. PMID:27603891

  17. [Disaccharide intolerance].

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko

    2010-01-01

    Disaccharide intolerance presents a pathogenic heterogeneous and most complex clinical entity. It usually occurs due to primary or secondary deficit of disaccharide activity, and rarely because of disorders of absorption or monomer metabolism. Symptomatology of disaccharide maldigestion and/or malabsorption depends on the severity of the basic disorder, the level of its overload and the patient's age. In the youngest children, due to a rapid gastrointestinal transit and a low compensatory capacity of the colon, osmotic-fermentative diarrhoea forms the basis of clinical features. Diarrhoeal disorder can be occasionally so intensive that it disturbs not only water and electrolytic balance, but also the nutritive status of the child. In older children and adults, as well as in milder forms of the disorder, the symptomatology, most often without diarrhoea, is dominated by abdominal colic, loud peristaltic sounds, meteorism and increased flatulence. Metabolic disorders followed by conversion disorders of galactose and fructose into glucose are characterized by a hypoglycaemic crisis, as well as by various multisystemic damages due to the deposit of toxic metabolic products. The diagnosis of gastrointestinal forms of disaccharide intolerance is based on the pathologic clinical and laboratory response during the overload test, while that of the metabolic form is based on the confirmed presence of specific enzyme and/or genetic defect. Treatment of disaccharide intolerance is based on the elimination diet. Besides, in the secondary forms of the disorder, it is also necessary to apply the treatment of the basic disease. PMID:21365893

  18. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights. PMID:8051515

  19. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:24879397

  20. Red Tide and Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Barrie; Yentsch, Clarice M.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the nature and cause of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Includes toxic dinoflagellate ecology, taxonomy and life history, and chemistry of the toxins. Recent work with trace metals and directions of future research are also given. (MA)

  1. Use of neostigmine in capecitabine-induced paralytic ileus.

    PubMed

    Mak, Gabriel; Ward, Robyn; Shehabi, Yahya; Venkateswaran, Ramya; Chin, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    Paralytic ileus is a recognised side effect of the oral agent capecitabine. We present this report on a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer who was treated with capecitabine and presented with persistent paralytic ileus which did not respond to standard conservative measures. Neostigmine was administered safely, resulting in resolution of the paralytic ileus. This approach merits further investigation. PMID:24362874

  2. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs

    PubMed Central

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions. PMID:24357350

  3. [Ecological and epidemiologic aspects of the attacks by vampire bats and paralytic rabies in Argentina and analysis of the proposals carried out for their control].

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Russo, R G

    1996-09-01

    The authors describe the ecology of attacks by vampire bats and the epidemiology of rabies (paralytic rabies) transmitted by these bats in Argentina, based on data obtained from an epidemiological vigilance programme conducted between 1984 and 1993. It was found that rabies spread rapidly among vampire bats, causing high mortality (over 50%); subsequently, the population recovered slowly due to the low reproductive rate. This explains the features of paralytic rabies, such as high mortality among affected populations, brief duration and subsequent recurrence. Paralytic rabies occurs throughout the year without evidence of seasonal occurrence and with no relationship to rainfall. This is because vampire bats remain active within their habitat, neither hibernating nor migrating. The problem created by vampire bats depends on the ecosystem of their habitat. In the livestock ecosystem, the bats are synanthropic and their population is abundant. They feed almost exclusively on livestock and attacks on human beings are sporadic. In this ecosystem, paralytic rabies is a serious economic problem because of its frequency and readiness to spread (41 separate outbreaks were recorded in addition to an epidemic). On the contrary, in the scarcely populated livestock ecosystem, the vampire but population is much smaller; they feed on various species of animals, and attacks on human beings are more common, but paralytic rabies occurs only sporadically (one isolated outbreak). For overall control of paralytic rabies, the authors recommend reduction of the vampire bat population to a safe level, in order to break the chain of rabies transmission and diminish attacks by bats. PMID:9376648

  4. Lactose Intolerance (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors usually diagnose lactose intolerance through a simple hydrogen breath test. A person blows into a tube ... there is a higher than average level of hydrogen and methane in the breath. That's because undigested ...

  5. Non-traditional vectors for paralytic shellfish poisoning.

    PubMed

    Deeds, Jonathan R; Landsberg, Jan H; Etheridge, Stacey M; Pitcher, Grant C; Longan, Sara Watt

    2008-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), due to saxitoxin and related compounds, typically results from the consumption of filter-feeding molluscan shellfish that concentrate toxins from marine dinoflagellates. In addition to these microalgal sources, saxitoxin and related compounds, referred to in this review as STXs, are also produced in freshwater cyanobacteria and have been associated with calcareous red macroalgae. STXs are transferred and bioaccumulate throughout aquatic food webs, and can be vectored to terrestrial biota, including humans. Fisheries closures and human intoxications due to STXs have been documented in several non-traditional (i.e. non-filter-feeding) vectors. These include, but are not limited to, marine gastropods, both carnivorous and grazing, crustacea, and fish that acquire STXs through toxin transfer. Often due to spatial, temporal, or a species disconnection from the primary source of STXs (bloom forming dinoflagellates), monitoring and management of such non-traditional PSP vectors has been challenging. A brief literature review is provided for filter feeding (traditional) and non-filter feeding (non-traditional) vectors of STXs with specific reference to human effects. We include several case studies pertaining to management actions to prevent PSP, as well as food poisoning incidents from STX(s) accumulation in non-traditional PSP vectors. PMID:18728730

  6. Non-Traditional Vectors for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Deeds, Jonathan R.; Landsberg, Jan H.; Etheridge, Stacey M.; Pitcher, Grant C.; Longan, Sara Watt

    2008-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), due to saxitoxin and related compounds, typically results from the consumption of filter-feeding molluscan shellfish that concentrate toxins from marine dinoflagellates. In addition to these microalgal sources, saxitoxin and related compounds, referred to in this review as STXs, are also produced in freshwater cyanobacteria and have been associated with calcareous red macroalgae. STXs are transferred and bioaccumulate throughout aquatic food webs, and can be vectored to terrestrial biota, including humans. Fisheries closures and human intoxications due to STXs have been documented in several non-traditional (i.e. non-filter-feeding) vectors. These include, but are not limited to, marine gastropods, both carnivorous and grazing, crustacea, and fish that acquire STXs through toxin transfer. Often due to spatial, temporal, or a species disconnection from the primary source of STXs (bloom forming dinoflagellates), monitoring and management of such non-traditional PSP vectors has been challenging. A brief literature review is provided for filter feeding (traditional) and non-filter feeding (non-traditional) vectors of STXs with specific reference to human effects. We include several case studies pertaining to management actions to prevent PSP, as well as food poisoning incidents from STX(s) accumulation in non-traditional PSP vectors. PMID:18728730

  7. Paralytic Ileus and Prophylactic Gastrointestinal Motility Medication after Spinal Operation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Hyun, Dongkeun; Park, Hyeong-chun; Kim, Yeo Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prevalence of paralytic ileus after spinal operation in the supine or prone operative position and to determine the efficacy of prophylactic gastrointestinal motility medications in preventing symptomatic paralytic ileus after a spinal operation. Materials and Methods All patients received spinal surgery in the supine or prone operative position. The study period was divided into two phases: first, to analyze the prevalence of radiographic and symptomatic paralytic ileus after a spinal operation, and second, to determine the therapeutic effects of prophylactic gastrointestinal motility medications (postoperative intravenous injection of scopolamine butylbromide and metoclopramide hydrochloride) on symptomatic paralytic ileus after a spinal operation. Results Basic demographic data were not different. In the first phase of this study, 27 patients (32.9%) with radiographic paralytic ileus and 11 patients (13.4%) with symptomatic paralytic ileus were observed. Radiographic paralytic ileus was more often noted in patients who underwent an operation in the prone position (p=0.044); whereas the occurrence of symptomatic paralytic ileus was not different between the supine and prone positioned patients (p=0.385). In the second phase, prophylactic medications were shown to be ineffective in preventing symptomatic paralytic ileus after spinal surgery [symptomatic paralytic ileus was observed in 11.1% (4/36) with prophylactic medication and 16.7% (5/30) with a placebo, p=0.513]. Conclusion Spinal surgery in the prone position was shown to increase the likelihood of radiographic paralytic ileus occurrence, but not symptomatic paralytic ileus. Unfortunately, the prophylactic medications to prevent symptomatic paralytic ileus after spine surgery were shown to be ineffective. PMID:26446646

  8. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families. PMID:23495859

  9. Paralytic ileus in the orthopaedic patient.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Ritterman, Scott A; Rubin, Lee E

    2015-06-01

    Paralytic ileus is marked by the cessation of bowel motility. This condition is a major clinical concern that may lead to severe patient morbidity in orthopaedic surgery and trauma patients. Ileus most commonly occurs following spinal surgery, traumatic injury, or lower extremity joint reconstruction, but it may also occur following minor orthopaedic procedures. Possible consequences of ileus include abdominal pain, malnutrition, prolonged hospital stay, hospital readmission, bowel perforation, and death. Therapies used in the treatment of ileus include minimization of opioids, early patient mobilization, pharmacologic intervention, and multidisciplinary care. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of paralytic ileus and should understand treatment principles of this relatively common adverse event. PMID:25917235

  10. Injections and paralytic poliomyelitis in tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Bernard; Bisong, Andrew Atem Ebako; Gould, Judith; Brigaud, Maryse; Aymard, Michele

    1980-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted in Yaoundé, United Republic of Cameroon, to evaluate the hypothesis that intramuscular inoculations predisposed young children to paralysis if they were later exposed to poliomyelitis virus. Thirty-three cases with lower motor neuron disease and 66 neighbourhood controls were studied. Poliovirus was isolated from 39% of the paralytic cases but from only 18% of the comparison group. Controls were more likely to have had serological evidence of previous exposure to all three poliovirus types while most of the paralytic cases had been exposed to a poliovirus for the first time. Two-thirds of the paralytic cases but only 11% of the comparison group had been ill, visited a medical facility, and received multiple injections, primarily with quinine and penicillin, in the month prior to the onset of poliomyelitis. There was a strong temporal relationship between these injections and the onset of paralysis. The increased relative risks (15 and 32, respectively) of paralysis associated with inoculations in the two weeks immediately prior to onset of disease were felt to represent the treatment of symptoms related to poliomyelitis. However, the increased relative risks (13 and 27, respectively) three and four weeks prior to onset were felt to be consistent with the hypothesis that intramuscular injections provoked paralysis. Overestimation of this measure of the effect because of bias in the control group is discussed. PMID:6249510

  11. NON-PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS IN THE CHIMPANZEE

    PubMed Central

    Bodian, David; Howe, Howard A.

    1945-01-01

    1. Thirteen cases of non-paralytic poliomyelitis infection in chimpanzees are described. Nine of these animals were excreting virus in. their stools at periods of from 3 days to 8 weeks following inoculation. 2. All animals killed during the acute stage showed lesions in the brain distributed in centers usually involved in, and compatible with the presence of, poliomyelitic infection. In 2 chimpanzees typical cord lesions were also present. No lesions were found in the brains of 4 control chimpanzees which had had no virus contact as far as known. The occurrence of a purely systemic or peripheral form of poliomyelitis, without lesions in the central nervous system, has thus not been established. 3. Four instances of arrest of the pathological process near the portal of entry into the brain, indicating partial resistance, are included in this series. One was a chimpanzee inoculated intranasally (A1-75) who had severe tuberculosis at the time of inoculation. The second was an animal convalescent after intracerebral inoculation (A1-74), who sustained a second infection limited to the olfactory bulbs when inoculated intranasally 2 months later with homologous virus. The third (A5-01) was inoculated orally with human stool, but contammation of the olfactory area resulted with infection of the olfactory bulbs and of the forebrain; virus was present in the stools of this animal. The fourth chimpanzee (A48) had suffered an initial non-paralytic attack after stomach tube inoculation, followed by a second attack about 9 months later after oral inoculation with part of the same virus-containing pool (human stools). The second attack consisted of a facial paralysis, with arrest of the pathological process near the facial nucleus. 4. Although cerebral lesions were light in some of the non-paralytic and inapparent infections, their presence in all indicates the action of virus on the central nervous system with the possibihty of production of at least partial local resistance

  12. [Nutrition and gastrointestinal intolerance].

    PubMed

    Madl, C; Holzinger, U

    2013-06-01

    The functional integrity of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential prerequisite in intensive care patients for the sufficient administration of enteral nutrition. Up to 65% of patients in intensive care units develop symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction with high residual gastric volume, vomiting and abdominal distension. The pathophysiological alterations of gastrointestinal intolerance and the subsequent effect on the tolerance of enteral nutrition can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract. Gastroduodenal motility disorders in particular, with increased gastroesophageal reflux lead to intolerance. In more than 90% of intensive care patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders an adequate postpyloric enteral nutrition can be carried out using a jejunal tube. In addition to improved tolerance of enteral nutrition this leads to a reduction of gastroesophageal reflux and the incidence of ventilation-associated pneumonia. Apart from the possibility of endoscopic application of the jejunal tube, alternative techniques were developed which allow a faster positioning of the jejunal tube with less complications. Furthermore, there are therapeutic options for improvement of gastrointestinal motility disorders and apart from general measures, also medicinal options for treatment of gastrointestinal intolerance which allow a sufficient enteral nutrition for intensive care patients. PMID:23740106

  13. Occurrence of paralytic toxin in Taiwanese crab Atergatopsis germaini.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y H; Hwang, D F; Chai, T J; Jeng, S S

    1996-04-01

    Paralytic toxicity was detected by paralytic shellfish poison bioassay for all 17 specimens of the xanthid crab A. germaini collected from northern Taiwan in November 1993. The average toxicity of crab specimens was 3809 +/- 2591 mouse units (mean +/- S.D.). The toxin was partially purified from ethanolic extract of the crab by ultrafiltration and Bio-Gel P-2 column chromatography. Electrophoresis, TLC, HPLC, ultraviolet spectrum and GC-MS analyses indicated that the crab toxin was composed of gonyautoxin 3 (50%), neosaxitoxin and saxitoxin (7%), a novel paralytic shellfish poison-like toxin (40%) and tetrodotoxin (3%). PMID:8735246

  14. [Metabolic intolerance to exercise].

    PubMed

    Arenas, J; Martín, M A

    2003-01-01

    Exercise intolerance (EI) is a frequent cause of medical attention, although it is sometimes difficult to come to a final diagnosis. However, there is a group of patients in whom EI is due to a metabolic dysfunction. McArdle's disease (type V glucogenosis) is due to myophosphorylase (MPL) deficiency. The ischemic exercise test shows a flat lactate curve. The most frequent mutations in the PYGM gene (MPL gene) in Spanish patients with MPL deficiency are R49X and W797R. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency is invariably associated to repetitive episodes of myoglobinuria triggered by exercise, cold, fever or fasting. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of CPT II deficiency in muscle. The most frequent mutation in the CPT2 gene is the S113L. Patients with muscle adenylate deaminase deficiency usually show either a mild myopathy or no symptom. The diagnosis is based on the absence of enzyme activity in muscle and the lack of rise of ammonia in the forearm ischemic exercise test. The mutation Q12X in the AMPD1 gene is strongly associated with the disease. Exercise intolerance is a common complaint in patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) deficiencies, although it is often overshadowed by other symptoms and signs. Only recently we have come to appreciate that exercise intolerance can be the sole presentation of defects in the mtDNA, particularly in complex I, complex III, complex IV, or in some tRNAs. In addition, myoglobinuria can be observed in patients under statin treatment, particularly if associated with fibrates, due to an alteration in the assembly of the complex IV of the MRC. PMID:12838448

  15. [Orthostatic intolerance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gónzalez-Hermosillo, J A

    2001-01-01

    In patients with an orthostatic intolerance, the hemodynamic response to standing, may identify an abnormality know as postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome or orthostatic hypotension, that can often be treated without further testing. When the response to standing is normal, tilt-table testing may be useful in making the diagnosis of vasovagal syncope or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and guiding treatment. In evaluating the results of tilt-table testing, an important consideration is the distinction between vasovagal syncope, and the dysautonomic response to tilt characterized by a gradual and progressive decrease in blood pressure that leads to syncope. Current practice patterns suggest that beta blockers, fludrocortisone, and midodrine are commonly used to treat patients with vasovagal syncope. These also suggest that patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and with the dysautonomic response, are better treated with fludrocortisone and midodrine. PMID:11565347

  16. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... following tests also can help diagnose lactose intolerance: Hydrogen breath test. For this test, a person drinks ... beverage that has lactose in it. Then, the hydrogen level in the breath is measured at set ...

  17. Hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M; Rellos, P; Cox, T M

    1998-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI, OMIM 22960), caused by catalytic deficiency of aldolase B (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, EC 4.1.2.13), is a recessively inherited condition in which affected homozygotes develop hypoglycaemic and severe abdominal symptoms after taking foods containing fructose and cognate sugars. Continued ingestion of noxious sugars leads to hepatic and renal injury and growth retardation; parenteral administration of fructose or sorbitol may be fatal. Direct detection of a few mutations in the human aldolase B gene on chromosome 9q facilitates the genetic diagnosis of HFI in many symptomatic patients. The severity of the disease phenotype appears to be independent of the nature of the aldolase B gene mutations so far identified. It appears that hitherto there has been little, if any, selection against mutant aldolase B alleles in the population: in the UK, approximately 1.3% of neonates harbour one copy of the prevalent A149P disease allele. The ascendance of sugar as a major dietary nutrient, especially in western societies, may account for the increasing recognition of HFI as a nutritional disease and has shown the prevalence of mutant aldolase B genes in the general population. The severity of clinical expression correlates well with the immediate nutritional environment, age, culture, and eating habits of affected subjects. Here we review the biochemical, genetic, and molecular basis of human aldolase B deficiency in HFI, a disorder which responds to dietary therapy and in which the principal manifestations of disease are thus preventable. Images PMID:9610797

  18. Gluten intolerance (coeliac disease).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A; Ziegler, K; Strobel, S

    1984-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a permanent condition of gluten intolerance associated with characteristic gluten-sensitive changes in the jejunal mucosa. In Edinburgh and the Lothians Region of Scotland, the prevalence of the disease is one in 1637 (61/100,000) with considerable variation in age, and sex-specific prevalence and incidence. Several lines of evidence indicate an immunologic basis for the gluten-sensitive enteropathy in coeliac disease. Animal models of intestinal T cell-mediated reactions in the gut have shown pathologic features similar to those of coeliac disease. These include changes in villus and crypt architecture with crypt hyperplasia, and increased numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes and of intraepithelial lymphocyte mitosis. Experimental CMI reactions also influence differentiation of goblet cells and expression of Ia antigen on epithelial cells, but these factors have not yet been reported for the coeliac mucosa. In addition to this circumstantial evidence, based on animal work, other factors which suggest that CMI reactions rather than antibodies are relevant to coeliac disease include the findings of antigliadin antibodies in a proportion of normal individuals, patients without gastrointestinal disease (seen in hospital), and patients with jejunal Crohn's disease. In addition, there is a well documented patient with adult onset primary hypogammaglobulinaemia and coeliac disease. The underlying pathogenesis in coeliac disease can be envisaged as failure of the normal inhibition of immune responses to this particular food antigen in the gut. Manipulation of immunoregulatory mechanisms would provide a new approach to treatment or cure of this disease and of other food protein-sensitive enteropathies. PMID:6391293

  19. Paralytic poliomyelitis in Ontario: laboratory studies of two recent cases.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyan, T P; Lesiak, J M; Appleton, F; Labzoffsky, N A

    1973-01-01

    Sporadic cases of paralytic poliomyelitis are being reported with increasing frequency, particularly in unvaccinated persons, in several countries in which the disease had been absent for several years following adequate initial vaccination programmes. In Ontario, two paralytic cases occurred in unvaccinated children after several disease-free years. Detailed studies of the strains of poliovirus type 1 isolated from these patients showed that they were not vaccine strains. Contact surveillance in one case showed that 21 originally unvaccinated contacts were also excreting virulent virus. PMID:4367777

  20. Assessment of sodium channel mutations in Makah Tribal members of the U.S. Pacific Northwest as a potential mechanism of resistance to paralytic shellfish poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nicolaus G.; Robertson, Alison; Grattan, Lynn M.; Pendleton, Steve; Roberts, Sparkle; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Trainer, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    The Makah Tribe of Neah Bay, Washington, has historically relied on the subsistence harvest of coastal seafood, including shellfish, which remains an important cultural and ceremonial resource. Tribal legend describes visitors from other tribes that died from eating shellfish collected on Makah lands. These deaths were believed to be caused by paralytic shellfish poisoning, a human illness caused by ingestion of shellfish contaminated with saxitoxins, which are produced by toxin-producing marine dinoflagellates on which the shellfish feed. These paralytic shellfish toxins include saxitoxin, a potent Na+ channel antagonist that binds to the pore region of voltage gated Na+ channels. Amino acid mutations in the Na+ channel pore have been demonstrated to confer resistance to saxitoxin in softshell clam populations exposed to paralytic shellfish toxins present in their environment. Because of the notion of resistance to paralytic shellfish toxins, we aimed to determine if a resistance strategy was possible in humans with historical exposure to toxins in shellfish. We collected, extracted and purified DNA from buccal swabs of 83 volunteer Makah tribal members and sequenced the skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4) at nine loci to characterize potential mutations in the relevant saxitoxin binding regions. No mutations of these specific regions were identified after comparison to a reference sequence. This study suggests that any resistance of Makah Tribal members to saxitoxin is not a function of Nav1.4 modification but may be due to mutations in neuronal or cardiac sodium channels or some other mechanism unrelated to sodium channel function.

  1. [Abdominal spasms, meteorism, diarrhea: fructose intolerance, lactose intolerance or IBS?].

    PubMed

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, Margaritha; El-Sayad, Sabine; Wantke, Felix; Fellinger, Christina; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2012-12-01

    Meteorism, abdominal spasms, diarrhea, casually obstipation, flatulence and nausea are symptoms of fructose malabsorption (FIT) and/or lactose intolerance (LIT), but are also symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore these diseases should be considered primarily in patients with digestive complaints. For diagnosis an H(2)-breath test is used.In 1,935 patients (526 m, 1,409 f) a fructose intolerance test and in 1,739 patients (518 m,1,221 f) a lactose intolerance test was done.FIT is found more frequently than LIT (57 versus 52 % in adults (p < 0,02) and in children 90 versus 62 % (p < 0,001)) and is in polyintolerances most frequently correlated to histamine intolerance (HIT). Headache (ca. 10 %), fatigue (ca. 5 %) and dizziness (ca. 3 %) may occur after the test, irrespective whether the test was positive or negative.In more than 2/3 of patients a diet reduced in fructose or lactose may lead to improvement or remission of these metabolic disorders. IBS, which is often correlated with FIT (183/221 patients = 83 %), can be improved by relevant but also not relevant diets indicating that irritable bowel disease seems to be caused primarily by psychological disorders. PMID:23224632

  2. Pseudoalteromonas bacteria are capable of degrading paralytic shellfish toxins.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Carrie J; Garduño, Rafael A; Kalmokoff, Martin; Ku, John C; Quilliam, Michael A; Gill, Tom A

    2009-11-01

    Marine bacterial isolates cultured from the digestive tracts of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) contaminated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) were screened for the ability to reduce the toxicity of a PST mixture. Seven isolates reduced the overall toxicity of the algal extract by > or = 90% within 3 days. These isolates shared at least 99% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with five Pseudoalteromonas spp. Phenotypic tests suggested that all are novel strains of Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis. PMID:19717625

  3. Pseudoalteromonas Bacteria Are Capable of Degrading Paralytic Shellfish Toxins▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Carrie J.; Garduño, Rafael A.; Kalmokoff, Martin; Ku, John C.; Quilliam, Michael A.; Gill, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Marine bacterial isolates cultured from the digestive tracts of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) contaminated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) were screened for the ability to reduce the toxicity of a PST mixture. Seven isolates reduced the overall toxicity of the algal extract by ≥90% within 3 days. These isolates shared at least 99% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with five Pseudoalteromonas spp. Phenotypic tests suggested that all are novel strains of Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis. PMID:19717625

  4. Food intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis. II. Clinical and histological aspects.

    PubMed Central

    van de Laar, M A; Aalbers, M; Bruins, F G; van Dinther-Janssen, A C; van der Korst, J K; Meijer, C J

    1992-01-01

    Six patients with rheumatoid factor positive rheumatoid arthritis who had shown a marked symptomatic improvement during four weeks of hypoallergic, artificial diet were studied in greater detail. Placebo controlled rechallenges showed intolerance for specific foodstuffs in four patients. In three of these patients biopsies of both the synovial membrane and of the proximal small intestine were carried out before and during allergen free feeding. In two patients, both with raised serum IgE concentrations and specific IgE antibodies to certain foods, a marked reduction of mast cells in the synovial membrane and proximal small intestine was demonstrated. Although the number of food intolerant patients with RA remains limited and markers of allergic activity are scanty, our observations suggest an underlying immunoallergological mechanism. PMID:1575572

  5. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24596060

  6. New paralytic alkaloids, asperparalines A, B and C, from Aspergillus japonicus JV-23.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Nishimoto, Y; Akiyama, K; Nozaki, H

    2000-01-01

    New paralytic alkaloids, asperparalines A (1), B (2) and C (3), were isolated from okara (the insoluble residue of whole soybean) that had been fermented with Aspergillus japonicus JV-23. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and X-ray crystallography. These asperparalines showed paralytic activity against silk worms. PMID:10705455

  7. Food intolerance and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M; Teahon, K; Levi, A J; Bjarnason, I

    1993-01-01

    It has been claimed that prolonged remissions of Crohn's disease can be achieved after enteral or parenteral nutrition, by identifying and excluding foods that exacerbate a patient's symptoms. The occurrence of food intolerances were assessed after induction of remission with elemental diet in 42 eligible patients to whom single foods were introduced over five days. Suspect foods were reinvestigated with open and if possible, double blind rechallenge. Fourteen patients (33%) dropped out of the study because of relapse of disease unrelated to food (n = 8) or because of difficulties in complying with the regimen (n = 6). Twenty (48%) of the patients identified food sensitivities whereas eight (19%) did not. Seventeen of the patients who identified food sensitivities had an open rechallenge with recurrence of symptoms in 10 (24% of total). Food sensitivity was confirmed in three patients on double blind challenge. There was no significant difference in the duration of remission between patients who did or did not identify food sensitivities. During the study three cases of intolerance to the formula diet, and one of severe salicylate sensitivity were encountered. In conclusion food sensitivities are evident after treatment of Crohn's disease with elemental diet but are variable, often do not persist, and are of insufficient importance to warrant putting all patients through elimination diets. PMID:8314511

  8. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life. PMID:26242570

  9. The Meaning of Gender while Aging with Paralytic Polio

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Walker, Janiece; Scott, Tiffany; Choban, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the influence of gender on aging with childhood onset paralytic polio. The hermeneutic phenomenological exploration of gender was done using multiple qualitative interviews with 25 women, age 55 to 75 years of age, who had polio since before 14 years of age. We noted three themes: 1) The movement of her body, 2) Integrating body and gender, and 3) Gender discrepancies. Findings are discussed in the context of gendered expectations and the women’s bodies. PMID:21240713

  10. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  11. Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luty, Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes investigations conducted on different orthostatic intolerance protection garments. This paper emphasizes on the engineering and operational aspects of the project. The current Shuttle pneumatic Anti-G Suit or AGS at 25 mmHg (0.5 psi) and customized medical mechanical compressive garments (20-30 mmHg) were tested on human subjects. The test process is presented. The preliminary results conclude that mechanical compressive garments can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in hypovolemic subjects. A mechanical compressive garment is light, small and works without external pressure gas source; however the current garment design does not provide an adjustment to compensate for the loss of mass and size in the lower torso during long term space missions. It is also difficult to don. Compression garments that do not include an abdominal component are less effective countermeasures than garments which do. An early investigation conducted by the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has shown there is no significant difference between the protection function of the AGS (at 77 mmHg or 1.5 psi) and the Russian anti-g suit, Kentavr (at 25 mmHg or 0.5 psi). Although both garments successfully countered hypovolemia-induced orthostatic intolerance, the Kentavr provided protection by using lower levels of compression pressure. This more recent study with a lower AGS pressure shows that pressures at 20-30 mmHg is acceptable but protection function is not as effective as higher pressure. In addition, a questionnaire survey with flight crewmembers who used both AGS and Kentavr during different missions was also performed.

  12. [Progress on the research of lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Sai, X Y

    2016-02-01

    Our group generalized the research development of lactose intolerance, both internationally and nationally. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis, genetic polymorphisms of lactase deficiency, relevant progress of diagnostic methods and treatment. Through this systematic review, we undedrstood that there were insufficient research efforts made on understanding the epidemiological feature of lactose intolerance in this country. Relevant genetic mutations of people were also not clear, neither the development of simple and effective diagnosis method made. We should continue to extensively and deeply carry out the study regarding methods for early prevention and intervention on lactose intolerance. PMID:26917535

  13. Mechanisms of post-flight orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Buckey, J. C.; Gaffney, F. A.; Lane, L. D.; Levine, B. D.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Post-flight orthostatic intolerance is a dramatic physiological consequence of human adaptation to microgravity made inappropriate by a sudden return to 1-G. The immediate mechanism is almost always a failure to maintain adequate tissue perfusion, specifically perfusion of the central nervous system, but vestibular dysfunction may occasionally be the primary cause. Orthostatic intolerance is present in a wide range of clinical disorders of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. The intolerance that is produced by spaceflight and 1-G analogs (bed rest, head-down tilt at a moderate angle, water immersion) is different from its clinical counterparts by being only transiently present in subjects who otherwise have normal cardiovascular and regulatory systems. However, the same set of basic pathophysiological elements should be considered in the analysis of any form of orthostatic intolerance.

  14. Lactose intolerance: from diagnosis to correct management.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, T; D'Angelo, G; D'Aversa, F; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Montalto, M; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses one of the most relevant problems in gastrointestinal clinical practice: lactose intolerance. The role of lactase-persistence alleles the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption the development of lactose intolerance symptoms and its management. Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately, 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and diarrhea with a considerable intraindividual and interindividual variability in the severity. Diagnosis is most commonly performed by the non invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Management of lactose intolerance consists of two possible clinical choice not mutually exclusive: alimentary restriction and drug therapy. PMID:24443063

  15. The paralytic poliomyelitis epidemic of 1978 in Jordan: epidemiological implications.

    PubMed

    Khuri-Bulos, N; Melnick, J L; Hatch, M H; Dawod, S T

    1984-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is endemic in Jordan, but until 1978 there were no epidemics. In that year, 66 children were admitted to the Jordan University Hospital with a paralytic illness, compared with 13 in 1979 and 11 in 1980. The epidemic reached a peak in the summer and fall of 1978. While 54% of the patients had not received any vaccine, 19% had received 3 doses of oral poliovaccine; 82% of the cases were in children less than 2 years of age, and all belonged to the lower socioeconomic group. There were 28 deaths with complications of the disease.Poliovirus was isolated from 10 out of 14 rectal swab samples examined (9 with poliovirus 1, 1 with poliovirus 2), and from 4 out of 13 throat specimens from the same patients. It is concluded that as a result of improving living standards in Jordan and neighbouring countries, more epidemics may occur unless immunization efforts against poliomyelitis are intensified. PMID:6609022

  16. The paralytic poliomyelitis epidemic of 1978 in Jordan: epidemiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Melnick, Joseph L.; Hatch, Milford H.; Dawod, Saleh T.

    1984-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is endemic in Jordan, but until 1978 there were no epidemics. In that year, 66 children were admitted to the Jordan University Hospital with a paralytic illness, compared with 13 in 1979 and 11 in 1980. The epidemic reached a peak in the summer and fall of 1978. While 54% of the patients had not received any vaccine, 19% had received 3 doses of oral poliovaccine; 82% of the cases were in children less than 2 years of age, and all belonged to the lower socioeconomic group. There were 28 deaths with complications of the disease. Poliovirus was isolated from 10 out of 14 rectal swab samples examined (9 with poliovirus 1, 1 with poliovirus 2), and from 4 out of 13 throat specimens from the same patients. It is concluded that as a result of improving living standards in Jordan and neighbouring countries, more epidemics may occur unless immunization efforts against poliomyelitis are intensified. PMID:6609022

  17. Paralytic shellfish poisoning --- southeast Alaska, May--June 2011.

    PubMed

    2011-11-18

    On June 6, 2011, the Section of Epidemiology (SOE) of the Alaska Division of Public Health was notified of a case of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in southeast Alaska. In collaboration with local partners, SOE investigated and identified a total of eight confirmed and 13 probable PSP cases that occurred during May--June 2011. Warnings to avoid noncommercially harvested shellfish were broadcast on local radio and television and displayed at beaches and in post offices, government offices, and businesses throughout the region. Commercially harvested shellfish, which are tested for the presence of PSP-causing toxins, were safe. Because the risk for PSP is unpredictable, persons who consume noncommercially harvested Alaskan shellfish should know that they are at risk for PSP, and suspected cases should be reported promptly to SOE to initiate control measures in the affected area. PMID:22089968

  18. Osteoporosis in lysinuric protein intolerance.

    PubMed

    Parto, K; Penttinen, R; Paronen, I; Pelliniemi, L; Simell, O

    1993-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by defective transport of cationic amino acids. Patients have an increased incidence of fractures and their skeletal radiographs show osteoporosis. The aim of the study was to characterize the osteopenia in LPI. Twenty-nine Finnish LPI patients (age range 3.7-44.4 years) were screened for parameters of bone metabolism. Morphometric analysis of bone was carried out in specimens of 9 patients. Collagen synthesis was studied with cultured skin fibroblasts (4 patients) and collagen fibril sizes (3 patients) were measured using electron microscopy. Most histological bone specimens (8/9) showed osteoporosis. Osteomalacia was excluded. Routine clinical laboratory tests were unrevealing. The concentrations of free hydroxyproline and type III procollagen N-propeptide in serum and the urinary excretion of hydroxyproline were increased in almost all patients during their growth and in about half of adult patients. Collagen synthesis in LPI fibroblast cultures was significantly decreased compared with that in age-matched controls at 5 (p < 0.01), 14 (p < 0.01) and still at 30 years (p < 0.01), whereas no difference was observed at the age of 44 years (p = N.S.). Osteoporosis in LPI might reflect defective matrix protein synthesis caused by protein deprivation and deficiency of cationic amino acids. Increased collagen turnover can also contribute to the osteoporosis. PMID:8412005

  19. Paralytic ileus as a complication of atropine therapy following severe organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Kraus, P; Lipman, J

    1994-09-01

    A 32-year-old man presented with symptoms of severe organophosphate poisoning and required an atropine infusion for 5 weeks. We believe the development of a paralytic ileus occurred as a rare feature of atropine toxicity when other signs were masked by the underlying condition. The onset of a paralytic ileus coincided with a spontaneous increase in red cell cholinesterase levels and may be an early sign of recovery from organophosphate poisoning. PMID:7978137

  20. Children with paralytic poliomyelitis: utilization of physiotherapy services in Zamfara State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogwumike, Omoyemi O; Kaka, Bashir; Adeniyi, Ade F

    2013-02-01

    Physiotherapy is usually indicated for health promotion and the rehabilitation of individuals with paralytic poliomyelitis. The endemic nature of this condition in children in Zamfara State, Nigeria necessitated investigation into the utilization of physiotherapy services by parents or primary caregivers of children affected with polio in this sub-region. Parents and primary caregivers of children with paralytic poliomyelitis were recruited using a purposive multi-stage sampling procedure in a cross-sectional survey. Factors associated with the utilization of physiotherapy services were assessed based on questions extracted from a 4-part, 52-item structured questionnaire originally designed for a study which investigated knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of parents of children with paralytic poliomyelitis. A total of 217 participants were included in this study. The mean age was 32.29 ± 9.89 years and the mean knowledge of polio score was 62.0 ± 17.3%. The mean age of the children with paralytic poliomyelitis was 6.41 ± 2.50 years. Only 27.2% of the parents or primary caregivers had utilized physiotherapy service for their children at some point. No association existed between utilization of physiotherapy service and 'knowledge of paralytic poliomyelitis', 'employment status', and 'family income' of respondents. Explanations for low utilization of physiotherapy services for children with paralytic poliomyelitis by parents or primary caregivers are discussed. PMID:22871225

  1. Dogs that develop rabies post-vaccination usually manifest the paralytic subtype.

    PubMed

    Tepsumethanon, Veera; Likitsuntonwong, Wanlop; Thorner, Paul Scott; Shuangshoti, Shanop

    2016-09-01

    Rabies infection can manifest as either encephalitic (furious) or paralytic (dumb) types, with a ratio of approximately 2:1 in dogs. The clinical type of rabies that develops post-vaccination has only been reported in studies from one country, all with similar findings. We report a study of 36 rabid dogs with obtainable vaccination history, presenting to The Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute, Bangkok, Thailand during 2002-2008. Dogs were classified into encephalitic or paralytic types. Of 22 non-vaccinated dogs, 16 (73%) had the encephalitic type. In contrast, of the 14 vaccinated dogs, 10 (71%) had the paralytic type, a difference that was significant (p=0.016). Recent studies on canine brains have shown that lymphocyte response is more pronounced in paralytic rabies at the brainstem level, whereas viral burden is greater in the encephalitic form. We postulate partial immune response in the vaccinated dogs might influence rabies to manifest as the paralytic type. These results can serve as a natural experiment that can help explain the basis for the differences between the paralytic and encephalitic forms of canine rabies. PMID:27544253

  2. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours. PMID:26715082

  3. Accumulation and depuration of cyanobacterial paralytic shellfish toxins by the freshwater mussel Anodonta cygnea.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paulo; Dias, Elsa; Franca, Susana; Pereira, Elisa; Carolino, Manuela; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2004-07-14

    The increasing frequency by which the production of paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) by freshwater bloom-forming cyanobacteria is being noticed world-wide raises the possibility of PST bioaccumulation by freshwater mussels. This study evaluates PST accumulation and depuration by the freshwater mussel Anodonta cygnea exposed over a 14-day period to high densities (mean = 1.4 x 10(9) cells1(-1), S.D. = 0.29 x 10(9) cellsl(-1)) of the toxic cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon issatschenkoi (corresponding to a mean toxin concentration of 25.5 nmol PSTl(-1), S.D. = 9.9 nmol PSTl(-1)). Mussels were subsequently detoxified either by starvation or by feeding on the non-toxic green-algae Ankistodesmus falcatus. Filter feeding activity and toxin uptake by the mussels were followed by cell counting and toxin analysis in water samples taken before and after each daily water renewal. The accumulation and depuration of PST as well as the anatomical distribution of toxins were monitored throughout the experiment by HPLC analysis of mussel extracts. Mussels fed the toxic cyanobacterium removed on average 65.3% of cells and 40.36% of total PST daily provided. Daily rates of cell clearance (% of initial) were negatively correlated with the amounts of PST daily provided (but not with the amount of cells). This suggests a negative effect of toxins on the feeding behaviour of mussels. Small amounts of toxins could be detected in the mussels after the second day of exposure, reaching a maximum of 26 microg PST100 g(-1) by day 7. The viscera contained the greatest proportion of toxins (78%) at the start of the toxification. However, increasing amounts of PST were found in the remaining tissues (gills, mantle and foot) over time. Toxins detected in the mussel extracts were the same provided in the dietary A. issatschenkoi. Nevertheless, mussels showed a higher proportion of saxitoxin and decarbomoylsaxitoxin and a lower proportion of gonyautoxin-5 than the fed cyanobacterium. Similar depuration

  4. Muscle Histidine-Containing Dipeptides Are Elevated by Glucose Intolerance in Both Rodents and Men

    PubMed Central

    Stegen, Sanne; Everaert, Inge; Deldicque, Louise; Vallova, Silvia; de Courten, Barbora; Ukropcova, Barbara; Ukropec, Jozef; Derave, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Objective Muscle carnosine and its methylated form anserine are histidine-containing dipeptides. Both dipeptides have the ability to quench reactive carbonyl species and previous studies have shown that endogenous tissue levels are decreased in chronic diseases, such as diabetes. Design and Methods Rodent study: Skeletal muscles of rats and mice were collected from 4 different diet-intervention studies, aiming to induce various degrees of glucose intolerance: 45% high-fat feeding (male rats), 60% high-fat feeding (male rats), cafeteria feeding (male rats), 70% high-fat feeding (female mice). Body weight, glucose-tolerance and muscle histidine-containing dipeptides were assessed. Human study: Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis in 35 males (9 lean, 8 obese, 9 prediabetic and 9 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients) and muscle carnosine and gene expression of muscle fiber type markers were measured. Results Diet interventions in rodents (cafeteria and 70% high-fat feeding) induced increases in body weight, glucose intolerance and levels of histidine-containing dipeptides in muscle. In humans, obese, prediabetic and diabetic men had increased muscle carnosine content compared to the lean (+21% (p>0.1), +30% (p<0.05) and +39% (p<0.05), respectively). The gene expression of fast-oxidative type 2A myosin heavy chain was increased in the prediabetic (1.8-fold, p<0.05) and tended to increase in the diabetic men (1.6-fold, p = 0.07), compared to healthy lean subjects. Conclusion Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides increases with progressive glucose intolerance, in male individuals (cross-sectional). In addition, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was associated with increased muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in female mice (interventional). Increased muscle carnosine content might reflect fiber type composition and/or act as a compensatory mechanism aimed at preventing cell damage in states of impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:25803044

  5. A feasibility study into the production of a freeze-dried oyster reference material for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; Hatfield, Robert G; Higman, Wendy A; Burrell, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Matrix reference materials are an essential component for the validation and quality control of analytical methodologies for the quantitation of marine biotoxins in shellfish. Given the potential advantages of reference materials in powder form, a study was conducted to assess the feasibility for the production of a freeze-dried oyster tissue reference material containing a range of important paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins. One bulk sample of a wet oyster tissue homogenate was generated following mass culturing of toxic Alexandrium and oyster feeding experiments. The bulk tissue was used to prepare untreated wet frozen aliquots with the remainder being freeze-dried and processed into appropriately-sized powder samples. A pre-column oxidation LC-FLD analysis was used to confirm the absence of any chromatographic artefacts resulting from the processing and to confirm acceptable homogeneity of the tissues. Excellent stability over both the short-term (1 month) and long-term (1 year) of the freeze-dried material was demonstrated as compared with the stability of the untreated wet tissue. A post-column oxidation LC-FLD method was used to confirm the absence of toxin epimerisation in freeze-dried tissues which were observed in the wet tissues. Overall the work showed the feasibility of an approach to produce a homogenous freeze-dried oyster matrix material with enhanced stability in comparison to the untreated wet tissue. The potential for use of the process for preparation of large scale production batches of a freeze-dried CRM for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins has therefore been demonstrated. PMID:23922056

  6. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy. PMID:26550699

  7. Total hip arthroplasty in paralytic dislocation from poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Rafael; Barrientos, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of a patient with degenerative hip disease in paralytic dislocation by poliomyelitis. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection disease caused by a group of neurotrophic viruses, which has a special affinity by the anterior horns cells of the spinal cord and for certain motor nuclei of the brain stem. Paralysis is a flaccid type and characteristically paralysis is asymmetrical. It is said that the joints of the affected limb by poliomyelitis are protected from the development of osteoarthritis. Hip dislocation in poliomyelitis is an acquired deformity caused by flaccid paralysis and the resulting muscular imbalance. In young children, when the gluteus maximus and medius muscles are paralyzed and the hip flexors and adductors are of normal strength, eventual luxation of the hip is almost inevitable. Hip osteoarthritis in a limb with poliomyelitis is an unusual entity because these limbs do not support excessive loads. In patients who present with the residual effects of poliomyelitis including degenerative disease and hip dysplastic, surgery is one of the most difficult challenges faced by reconstructive surgeons. In such cases, surgeons should attempt to optimize the component position and choice, surgical approach, and soft tissue tensioning because stability of the prosthesis can be problematic. PMID:19292189

  8. Paralytic illness resembling inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy in a chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Alford, P L; Satterfield, W C

    1995-07-01

    An adult male chimpanzee housed in an outdoor corral with a group of other chimpanzees had an acute onset of ascending motor paresis that progressed to flaccid tetraplegia over 3 days. Tendon reflexes were weak, and CSF protein concentration was high. The chimpanzee regained normal mobility over several months. This chimpanzee's ascending, symmetrical, monophasic, flaccid paralytic illness, with albuminocytologic dissociation in CSF, and recovery following supportive treatment, was characteristic of inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy, known as Guillain-Barré syndrome in human beings. Coonhound paralysis and experimentally induced allergic neuritis are the counterparts in dogs and laboratory animals, respectively, of the syndrome. In human beings, the syndrome is apparently immunologically mediated, as it is known to develop after bacterial and viral infections, vaccinations, and surgery or injury. The chimpanzee of this report had been given a rabies vaccination and had been treated for dental abscess 12 days prior to onset of signs, and had been inoculated with material containing neuronal antigens 20 years prior to onset of signs. PMID:7601702

  9. Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in Margarita Island, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    La Barbera-Sánchez, Amelia; Franco Soler, Jose; Rojas de Astudillo, Luisa; Chang-Yen, Ivan

    2004-09-01

    A severe outbreak of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) occurred in Manzanillo and Guayacán, northwestern coast of Margarita Island, Venezuela, between August and October 1991. A bloom of dinoflagellates including Prorocentrum gracile, Gymnodinium catenatum and Alexandrium tamarense seemed to be responsible for this outbreak. Levels of PSP toxins in mussels (Perna perna) exceeded the international safety limit of saxitoxin, 80 microg STX/100 microg meat. PSP toxin values varied between 2548 and 115 microg STX/100 g meat in Manzanillo, and between 1422 and 86 microg STX/100 g meat in Guayacán. At both locations, the highest levels were detected in August, when 24 patients exhibited typical symptoms of PSP toxicity after consuming cooked mussels (16 required hospitalization). A high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure was recently used on the 1991 samples. The major toxin detected in samples of both locations was decarbamoyl saxitoxin (dcSTX), but low concentrations of saxitoxin were also found in Manzanillo samples. Gonyautoxins GTX1, GTX2 and GTX3 were detected only at Guayacán, while in both locations, decarbamoylgonyatouxin (dcGTX2,3) toxins were detected. These findings represent the first time that causative toxins of PSP in Venezuela have been chemically identified, and confirm the presence of dcSTX and dcGTX in mussels from the Caribbean Sea. The presence of dcSTX and dcGTX in shellfish is indicative that Gymnodinium catenatum was a causative organism for outbreak of PSP. PMID:17465121

  10. Removal of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vasama, Mari; Kumar, Himanshu; Salminen, Seppo; Haskard, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms) to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX), neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3), C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2)) from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2) was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%–97.2%) was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%–49.7%). There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo. PMID:25046082

  11. Paralytic shellfish toxins in clinical matrices: Extension of AOAC official method 2005.06 to human urine and serum and application to a 2007 case study in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrasse, Stacey; Rivera, Victor; Roach, John; White, Kevin; Callahan, John; Couture, Darcie; Simone, Karen; Peredy, Tamas; Poli, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), a potentially fatal foodborne illness, is often diagnosed anecdotally based on symptoms and dietary history. The neurotoxins responsible for PSP, collectively referred to as the saxitoxins or paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are natural toxins, produced by certain dinoflagellates, that may accumulate in seafood, particularly filter-feeding bivalves. Illnesses are rare because of effective monitoring programs, yet occasional poisonings occur. Rarely are contaminated food and human clinical samples (e.g., urine and serum) available for testing. There are currently few methods, none of which are validated, for determining PSTs in clinical matrices. This study evaluated AOAC (Association of Analytical Communities) Official Method of Analysis (OMA) 2005.06. [AOAC Official Method 2005.06 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxins in Shellfish: Prechormatographic Oxidation and Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection. In Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International ], validated only for shellfish extracts, for its extension to human urine and serum samples. Initial assessment of control urine and serum matrices resulted in a sample cleanup modification when working with urine to remove hippuric acid, a natural urinary compound of environmental/dietary origin, which co-eluted with saxitoxin. Commercially available urine and serum matrices were then quantitatively spiked with PSTs that were available as certified reference materials (STX, dcSTX, B1, GTX2/3, C1/2, NEO, and GTX1/4) to assess method performance characteristics. The method was subsequently applied successfully to a PSP case study that occurred in July 2007 in Maine. Not only were PSTs identified in the patient urine and serum samples, the measured time series also led to the first report of human PST-specific urinary elimination rates. The LC-FD data generated from this case study compared remarkably well to results obtained using AOAC

  12. Tolerance and Intolerance in Multicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heslep, Robert D.

    This essay argues that some proponents of multicultural education (ME) appear to teach intolerance of certain kinds of speech. The essay argues, in support, the down-playing of tolerance in ME as cultural respect, accommodation, and harmony are stronger candidates as virtues. The essay goes on to point out that ME does not teach cultural…

  13. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-01-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows’ milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows’ milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows’ milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  14. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  15. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-09-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  16. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part II].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-10-25

    The author summarises the interrelations between lactose intolerance, calcium and vitamin D metabolism and osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance enhances the risk of forearm and hip fractures in some patients. Lactase gene genotype and fracture risk are related in some populations. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation increase bone mineral content and they are justified in children, during pregnancy and lactation, and in postmenopausal women. The intake of milk and milk products could increase the risk of ovarian carcinoma. CC genotype of the lactase gene increased the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Finns; no such effect was observed in British, Spanish and Italian patients. Even small quantities of lactose in drugs (10-750 mg) could elicit intolerance symptoms due to individual susceptibility. In spite of public knowledge and advertising, controlled studies did not prove the beneficial effect of either a lactose-free diet, enzyme supplementation or probiotics in an evidence-based manner. While accepted guidelines are lacking, a personalised therapy is mandatory. In spite of increasing public interest in lactose intolerance, many unknown factors must still be studied. PMID:26477616

  17. A developing country perspective on vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    John, T. Jacob

    2004-01-01

    When the Expanded Programme on Immunization was established and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) was introduced for developing countries to use exclusively, national leaders of public health had no opportunity to make an informed choice between OPV and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Today, as progress is made towards the goal of global eradication of poliomyelitis attributable to wild polioviruses, all developing countries where OPV is used face the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). Until recently, awareness of VAPP has been poor and quantitative risk analysis scanty but it is now well known that the continued use of OPV perpetuates the risk of VAPP. Discontinuation or declining immunization coverage of OPV will increase the risk of emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV) that re-acquire wild virus-like properties and may cause outbreaks of polio. To eliminate the risk of cVDPV, either very high immunization coverage must be maintained as long as OPV is in use, or IPV should replace OPV. Stopping OPV without first achieving high immunization coverage with IPV is unwise on account of the possibility of emergence of cVDPV. Increasing numbers of developed nations prefer IPV, and manufacturing capacities have not been scaled up, so its price remains prohibitively high and unaffordable by developing countries, where, in addition, large-scale field experience with IPV is lacking. Under these circumstances, a policy shift to increase the use of IPV in national immunization programmes in developing countries is a necessary first step; once IPV coverage reaches high levels (over 85%), the withdrawal of OPV may begin. PMID:15106301

  18. [Family study of patients with aspirin intolerance and rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    May, A; Wagner, D; Langenbeck, U; Weber, A

    2000-09-01

    The high prevalence of aspirin intolerance in asthmatics and patients with nasal polyps as well as reports of familial clustering suggest a genetic disposition of this disease. Our study aimed at obtaining further evidence of hereditary factors in this disease. We included 33 unselected patients from 28 families with aspirin intolerance and rhinosinusitis in this study. Controls were recruited from individuals treated in our ENT clinic for diseases other than aspirin intolerance (n = 52). A questionnaire focused on family histories as well as reports on diseases of the upper respiratory tract or allergies. ASS intolerance was verified either by bronchial or nasal provocation tests. We found cases of aspirin intolerance among parents, siblings, and children of ASS intolerant probands. The children of probands had nasal polyps and rhinosinusitis more often than the children of controls. We propose that ASS intolerance with nasal polyps and asthma represents a complex phenotype, with genetic and environmental factors contributing to its manifestation. PMID:11056852

  19. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Y. S.; Daamen, N.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients.

  20. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women.

    PubMed

    Ali, Y S; Daamen, N; Jacob, G; Jordan, J; Shannon, J R; Biaggioni, I; Robertson, D

    2000-04-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients. PMID:10758621

  1. Intolerance of uncertainty in body dysmorphic disorder.

    PubMed

    Summers, Berta J; Matheny, Natalie L; Sarawgi, Shivali; Cougle, Jesse R

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a transdiagnostic construct associated with several anxiety and related disorders. Three studies were conducted to explore the potential relationship between IU and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Study 1 revealed a positive relationship between IU and BDD symptoms above symptoms of anxiety and depression in an unselected student sample (N=88). Study 2 demonstrated a similar relationship between IU and BDD symptoms above negative affectivity and intolerance of ambiguity in a community sample (N=116). Study 3 found that a clinical BDD sample (N=23) reported greater IU than healthy controls (N=20), though this relationship was accounted for by symptoms of anxiety and depression. Greater IU predicted functional impairment in the clinical sample above BDD symptoms and past-week anxiety and depression. The observed relationship between IU and BDD symptoms provides preliminary support for the relevance of IU to this population. PMID:26688272

  2. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  3. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  4. Free anterolateral thigh flap harvesting from paralytic limbs in post-polio syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Chen; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report two cases of poliomyelitis in which an anterolateral thigh myocutaneous free flap was harvested from the paralytic limb for oral reconstruction. We observed a decrease in the pedicle diameter of the anterolateral thigh flap, but the blood supply to the skin paddle was adequate. PMID:27583272

  5. TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF PARALYTIC SHELLFISH POISONS (PSPS) USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most significant harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin in terms of public health is commonly known as paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs, "red tides" toxins). PSPs are neurotoxins produced by marine dinoflagellates and some cyanobacteria. PSPs comprise of over 21 natural toxins wi...

  6. Free anterolateral thigh flap harvesting from paralytic limbs in post-polio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Chen; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of poliomyelitis in which an anterolateral thigh myocutaneous free flap was harvested from the paralytic limb for oral reconstruction. We observed a decrease in the pedicle diameter of the anterolateral thigh flap, but the blood supply to the skin paddle was adequate. PMID:27583272

  7. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and exercise intolerance revealing dystrophinopathies.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Baeta Machado, A M; Putzu, G A; Malzac, P; Voelckel, M A; Pellissier, J F

    1997-07-01

    Exercise intolerance associated with myalgias, muscle cramps or myoglobinuria may be associated with a dystrophinopathy. A search for abnormal dystrophin expression (using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and DNA analysis) was carried out in a series of 15 patients. They were selected because they presented exercise intolerance, negative biochemical tests (lipid, glycogen and mitochondrial metabolism) and abnormal immunohistochemistry with at least one anti-dystrophin antibody (anti-Dys 1, rod domain; anti-Dys 2, C terminus; anti-Dys 3, N terminus). Lack of anti-Dys 1 immunoreactivity was seen in three patients and abnormal immunoreactivity with all three anti-dystrophin antibodies in two. Immunoblot confirmed the dystrophinopathy in these five patients only, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction DNA analysis revealed a deletion in the dystrophin gene in two of these patients, affecting the proximal part of the rod domain in one and the distal part of this domain in the other. The clinical, biological and histopathological features of the five patients reported here, together with the previous cases reported in the literature, are described and reveal that exercise intolerance associated with dystrophinopathy displays characteristic clinical, biological and immunohistochemical features and defines a new dystrophinopathy phenotype. The absence of staining in the rod domain provides a secure diagnosis of this syndrome. Dystrophinopathy is one etiology of idiopathic myoglobinuria, requiring genetic counseling. PMID:9224530

  8. Food intolerance and allergy--a review.

    PubMed

    Lessof, M H

    1983-01-01

    Specific food intolerance needs to be distinguished from obsessional states in which those who are affected have an aversion to numerous foods. Even in cases where specific food intolerance can be demonstrated, the diagnosis of food allergy depends on additional evidence that the patient's reaction is based on an abnormal immunological response. In food allergy, skin and laboratory tests may detect the presence of an IgE-mediated reaction, particularly in patients with asthma or eczema and especially where the foods involved are highly allergenic--such as egg, fish, nuts and milk. However, many patients with proven food intolerance have negative tests, suggesting that other immunological or non-immunological mechanisms are responsible. Laboratory tests for non-IgE reactions are unreliable. Where it is difficult to show a connection between individual foods and an allergic response--as in patients with urticaria provoked by food additives--one of the reasons for diagnostic difficulty is that the offending substances may be present in a wide range of common foods. If the diagnosis is to be firmly established in such cases, it is necessary to show that symptoms remit on an elimination diet and recur after a placebo-controlled challenge. PMID:6351151

  9. Seafood Allergy, Toxicity, and Intolerance: A Review.

    PubMed

    Prester, Ljerka

    2016-04-01

    Seafood allergies have been increasing their presence in the last 2 decades. Allergic reactions to seafood can range from mild urticarial and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Ingestion of seafood infested with Anisakis larvae can cause a disease known as anisakiasis with symptoms similar to true seafood allergy. Furthermore, some adverse reactions to seafood including histamine fish poisoning (HFP), and intolerance to histamine can trigger clinical symptoms, which, although nonallergic in origin, are similar to true immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Because seafood allergy usually remains a lifelong food allergy, this review focuses on the current knowledge on fish and shellfish allergens and emphasizes the importance of differentiating seafood allergy from other allergy-like reactions (anisakiasis, HFP, and intolerance to histamine). Key teaching points: • Fish and shellfish are potent allergens that can provoke serious IgE antibody-mediated adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. • Sensitization to seafood allergens can be achieved by ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. • Shellfish major allergen, tropomyosin, shares significant homology to arthropods (dust mites and cockroaches). • Accidental exposures to seafood products cross-contaminated with fish or shellfish allergens (hidden allergens) during processing may present a health risk for sensitive individuals. • Allergens of fish parasite A. simplex present common hidden allergens in seafood, particularly in raw and undercooked home-made fish dishes. • Symptoms caused by HFP, histamine intolerance, and anisakiasis are similar to true seafood allergy. PMID:26252073

  10. Idiopathic orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Upright posture imposes a substantial gravitational stress on the body, for which we are able to compensate, in large part because of the autonomic nervous system. Alteration in autonomic function, therefore, may lead to orthostatic intolerance. On one extreme, patients with autonomic failure caused by degenerative loss of autonomic function are severely disabled by orthostatic hypotension and may faint whenever they stand up. Fortunately, such patients are relatively rare. On the other hand, disabling orthostatic intolerance can develop in otherwise normal young people. These patients can be severely impaired by symptoms of fatigue, tachycardia, and shortness of breath when they stand up. The actual incidence of this disorder is unknown, but these patients make up the largest group of patients referred to centers that specialize in autonomic disorders. We will review recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to orthostatic intolerance, therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients, and areas in which more research is needed.

  11. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  12. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  13. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders. PMID:22461154

  14. Feasibility studies into the production of gamma-irradiated oyster tissue reference materials for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; Hatfield, Robert G; Powell, Andy L; Higman, Wendy A

    2013-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility for the production of sterile, stable and homogenous shellfish reference materials containing known concentrations of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins. Pacific oysters were contaminated with toxins following mass culturing of toxic algae and shellfish feeding experiments. Live oysters were shucked and tissues homogenised, before measuring into multiple aliquots, with one batch subjected to gamma irradiation treatment and the other remaining untreated. The homogeneity of both batches of samples was assessed using a pre-column oxidation liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (Pre-COX LC-FLD) method and shown to be within the limits of normal within-batch repeatability. A twelve-month stability experiment was conducted for both untreated and gamma irradiated batches, specifically examining the effects of long term storage at -20 °C, +4 °C and +40 °C. Results indicated mostly good stability of PSP toxins in both materials when stored frozen at -20 °C, but with the instability of GTX2&3 concentrations in the untreated tissues eliminated in the irradiated tissues. Analysis using a post-column oxidation (PCOX) LC-FLD method also showed epimerisation in both GTX1&4 and GTX2&3 epimeric pairs in untreated samples after only 6 months frozen storage. This issue was not present in the tissues irradiated before long term storage. Biological activity testing confirmed the absence of bacteria in the irradiated samples throughout the 12 month study period. With such results there was clear evidence for the potential of increasing the scale of the mass culturing and shellfish feeding for the production of large batches of tissue suitable for the preparation of a certified matrix reference material. Overall results demonstrated the feasibility for production of oyster reference materials for PSTs, with evidence for prolonged stability following gamma irradiation treatment and storage at -20 °C. PMID

  15. The red wine provocation test: intolerance to histamine as a model for food intolerance.

    PubMed

    Wantke, F; Götz, M; Jarisch, R

    1994-01-01

    Sneezing, flush, headache, diarrhea, skin itch, and shortness of breath are symptoms occurring in patients intolerant to wine after drinking one glass of red wine. The role of histamine in wine intolerance was evaluated by a red wine provocation test in 28 patients with a history of wine intolerance and in 10 controls with good tolerance of wine. Patients were challenged with 125 ml red wine (equivalent to 50 micrograms histamine); blood samples were drawn before and after 15 and 30 minutes. Plasma histamine was assessed by a radioimmunoassay. Lung function tests were performed before and after the wine test. Twenty-two of twenty-eight patients had symptoms showing significantly higher plasma histamine levels 30 minutes after wine challenge (p < .01) compared with asymptomatic controls. Basal histamine levels of patients were higher (p < .05) than in controls. A slight asthmatic attack as well as a 30% decrease of FEF 25 was seen in 2/22 patients. Terfenadine premedication significantly eliminated symptoms in 10/12 patients (p < .05) in a subsequent wine test. Histamine assessment was done in 52 wines (red, white, and champagne) and in 17 beers by radioimmunoassay. Histamine levels ranged from 3-120 micrograms/l in white wines; 15-670 micrograms/l in champagnes; 60-3800 micrograms/l in red wines; and 21-305 micrograms/l in beers. Histamine is causing wine intolerance. Patients intolerant to wine seem to have diminished histamine degradation probably based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. PMID:8005453

  16. Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Wilson, Thad E; Crandall, Craig G

    2016-04-01

    Heat stress profoundly and unanimously reduces orthostatic tolerance. This review aims to provide an overview of the numerous and multifactorial mechanisms by which this occurs in humans. Potential causal factors include changes in arterial and venous vascular resistance and blood distribution, and the modulation of cardiac output, all of which contribute to the inability to maintain cerebral perfusion during heat and orthostatic stress. A number of countermeasures have been established to improve orthostatic tolerance during heat stress, which alleviate heat stress induced central hypovolemia (e.g., volume expansion) and/or increase peripheral vascular resistance (e.g., skin cooling). Unfortunately, these countermeasures can often be cumbersome to use with populations prone to syncopal episodes. Identifying the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in orthostatic intolerance during heat stress has proven elusive, but could provide greater insights into the development of novel and personalized countermeasures for maintaining or improving orthostatic tolerance during heat stress. This development will be especially impactful in occuational settings and clinical situations that present with orthostatic intolerance and/or central hypovolemia. Such investigations should be considered of vital importance given the impending increased incidence of heat events, and associated cardiovascular challenges that are predicted to occur with the ensuing changes in climate. PMID:26723547

  17. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies. PMID:23814966

  18. Paralytic ileus due to a novel anticancer drug, nab-paclitaxel: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JIAO, XIAO-DONG; LUO, XIU; QIN, WEN-XING; YUAN, LING-YAN; ZANG, YUAN-SHENG

    2016-01-01

    Nab-paclitaxel is a recently emerged chemotherapy drug, which is widely used for the treatment of multiple types of cancer. The prospects of this novel drug are very bright as a result of its higher efficacy and lower toxicity compared with paclitaxel. Hence, the side effect, even if rare, require attention in clinical practice. The present study described an unusual case of nab-paclitaxel-associated paralytic ileus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that nab-paclitaxel may lead to acute intestinal obstruction. Since nab-paclitaxel will be used more frequently, this unusual side effect might be encountered by a clinical oncologist and must be treated correctly. This is the first reported case, to the best of our knowledge, of paralytic ileus caused by nab-paclitaxel, which will be widely used as a novel anticancer drug. PMID:27123288

  19. Synthesis of the Paralytic Shellfish Poisons (+)-Gonyautoxin 2, (+)-Gonyautoxin 3, and (+)-11,11-Dihydroxysaxitoxin.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, John V; Walker, James R; Merit, Jeffrey E; Whitehead, Alan; Du Bois, J

    2016-05-11

    The paralytic shellfish poisons are a collection of guanidine-containing natural products that are biosynthesized by prokaryote and eukaryote marine organisms. These compounds bind and inhibit isoforms of the mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) ion channel at concentrations ranging from 10(-11) to 10(-5) M. Here, we describe the de novo synthesis of three paralytic shellfish poisons, gonyautoxin 2, gonyautoxin 3, and 11,11-dihydroxysaxitoxin. Key steps include a diastereoselective Pictet-Spengler reaction and an intramolecular amination of an N-guanidyl pyrrole by a sulfonyl guanidine. The IC50's of GTX 2, GTX 3, and 11,11-dhSTX have been measured against rat NaV1.4, and are found to be 22 nM, 15 nM, and 2.2 μM, respectively. PMID:27138488

  20. Paralytic ileus following "subcutaneous bortezomib" therapy: focus on the clinical emergency-report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mele, Giuseppe; Coppi, Maria Rosaria; Melpignano, Angela; Quarta, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the medical history of 19 elderly myeloma patients treated with the "novel subcutaneous formulation of bortezomib." In our experience, two patients (10 %) discontinued treatment for paralytic ileus. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of toxic megacolon and paralytic ileus due to "novel subcutaneous formulation of bortezomib" are unclear. Probably, it may be related to possible damage of the autonomic nerve fibers that control organ functions. Adequate prevention and management of the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities with the use of fluid intake and prokinetic and laxative drugs (at least two types of agents in a suboptimal dose) especially in patients with risk factors for GI side effects (anti-myeloma novel agents, opioids or antiemetics, iron supplements, spinal and cord compression, immobility, history of constipation) can decrease the possibility of interruption of administration of drug and increase adherence to treatment. Clearly this complication must be borne in mind whenever a patient develops acute abdominal pain and distension. PMID:25600700

  1. The logic of causation and the risk of paralytic poliomyelitis for an American child.

    PubMed Central

    Ridgway, D.

    2000-01-01

    Beginning in January 1997, American immunization policy allowed parents and physicians to elect one of three approved infant vaccination strategies for preventing poliomyelitis. Although the three strategies likely have different outcomes with respect to prevention of paralytic poliomyelitis, the extreme rarity of the disease in the USA prevents any controlled comparison. In this paper, a formal inferential logic, originally described by Donald Rubin, is applied to the vaccination problem. Assumptions and indirect evidence are used to overcome the inability to observe the same subjects under varying conditions to allow the inference of causality from non-randomized observations. Using available epidemiologic information and explicit assumptions, it is possible to project the risk of paralytic polio for infants immunized with oral polio vaccine (1.3 cases per million vaccinees), inactivated polio vaccine (0.54 cases per million vaccinees), or a sequential schedule (0.54-0.92 cases per million vaccinees). PMID:10722138

  2. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  3. Warm temperature acclimation impacts metabolism of paralytic shellfish toxins from Alexandrium minutum in commercial oysters.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Hazel; Seebacher, Frank; O'Connor, Wayne; Zammit, Anthony; Harwood, D Tim; Murray, Shauna

    2015-09-01

    Species of Alexandrium produce potent neurotoxins termed paralytic shellfish toxins and are expanding their ranges worldwide, concurrent with increases in sea surface temperature. The metabolism of molluscs is temperature dependent, and increases in ocean temperature may influence both the abundance and distribution of Alexandrium and the dynamics of toxin uptake and depuration in shellfish. Here, we conducted a large-scale study of the effect of temperature on the uptake and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins in three commercial oysters (Saccostrea glomerata and diploid and triploid Crassostrea gigas, n = 252 per species/ploidy level). Oysters were acclimated to two constant temperatures, reflecting current and predicted climate scenarios (22 and 27 °C), and fed a diet including the paralytic shellfish toxin-producing species Alexandrium minutum. While the oysters fed on A. minutum in similar quantities, concentrations of the toxin analogue GTX1,4 were significantly lower in warm-acclimated S. glomerata and diploid C. gigas after 12 days. Following exposure to A. minutum, toxicity of triploid C. gigas was not affected by temperature. Generally, detoxification rates were reduced in warm-acclimated oysters. The routine metabolism of the oysters was not affected by the toxins, but a significant effect was found at a cellular level in diploid C. gigas. The increasing incidences of Alexandrium blooms worldwide are a challenge for shellfish food safety regulation. Our findings indicate that rising ocean temperatures may reduce paralytic shellfish toxin accumulation in two of the three oyster types; however, they may persist for longer periods in oyster tissue. PMID:26032975

  4. Ulcerative colitis presenting as acute infectious gastroenteritis with a paralytic ileus

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmaker, Suzanne Gerdien; Tjon a Ten, Walther E

    2012-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with signs of acute infectious gastroenteritis, just as two members of her family is described. As the patient did not improve, a sigmoidoscopy was performed and the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC) was made. Our hypothesis is that an infection triggered the development of UC. Her paralytic ileus was probably triggered by the increased nitric oxide produced in the macrophages and smooth muscles of the inflamed bowel. PMID:22605860

  5. Human intoxication with paralytic shellfish toxins: clinical parameters and toxin analysis in plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    García, Carlos; Lagos, Marcelo; Truan, Dominique; Lattes, Karinna; Véjar, Omar; Chamorro, Beatriz; Iglesias, Verónica; Andrinolo, Darío; Lagos, Néstor

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the data recorded from four patients intoxicated with shellfish during the summer 2002, after consuming ribbed mussels (Aulacomya ater) with paralytic shellfish toxin contents of 8,066 +/- 61.37 microg/100 gr of tissue. Data associated with clinical variables and paralytic shellfish toxins analysis in plasma and urine of the intoxicated patients are shown. For this purpose, the evolution of respiratory frequency, arterial blood pressure and heart rate of the poisoned patients were followed and recorded. The clinical treatment to reach a clinically stable condition and return to normal physiological parameters was a combination of hydration with saline solution supplemented with Dobutamine (vasoactive drug), Furosemide (diuretic) and Ranitidine (inhibitor of acid secretion). The physiological condition of patients began to improve after four hours of clinical treatment, and a stable condition was reached between 12 to 24 hours. The HPLC-FLD analysis showed only the GTX3/GTX2 epimers in the blood and urine samples. Also, these epimers were the only paralytic shellfish toxins found in the shellfish extract sample. PMID:16238098

  6. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  7. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, Vicki J.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  8. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests. PMID:26715078

  9. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time. PMID:27188621

  10. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    PubMed

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  11. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    PubMed Central

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  12. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (P<0.001) and cardiac outputs (P<0.01) than the control group. In response to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (P<0.001) and greater reductions in pulse pressure (P<0.01) and CO2 (P<0.001), but total systemic resistance failed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (P<0.01) compared with control subjects. In both groups, hyperventilation induced mild tachycardia (P<0.001), a significant reduction of BFV, and a significant increase of CVR associated with a fall in CO2. Hyperventilation during HUT reproduced hypocapnia, BFV reduction, and tachycardia and worsened symptoms of OI; these symptoms and indices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by

  13. What I Need to Know about Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to use these products. [ Top ] Calcium and Vitamin D If you are lactose intolerant, make sure you ... such as cereals, fruit juices, and soy milk Vitamin D helps the body absorb and use calcium. Be ...

  14. What I Need to Know about Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... and all foods made with milk, such as ice cream cream butter cheese cottage cheese yogurt Rarely, people ... lactose intolerance with a medical, family, and diet history; a physical exam; and medical tests. Most people ...

  15. Perceived lactose intolerance in adult Canadians: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Barr, Susan I

    2013-08-01

    Although double-blind studies show that lactose-intolerant individuals can consume moderate quantities of milk products without perceptible symptoms, many who perceive that they are lactose intolerant limit or avoid milk products, potentially compromising calcium and vitamin D intakes. Adult Canadians are at risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients, but no data exist on the prevalence, correlates, and potential impact of perceived lactose intolerance among Canadians. To address this, a Web-based survey of a population-representative sample of 2251 Canadians aged ≥19 years was conducted. Overall, 16% self-reported lactose intolerance. This was more common in women (odds ratio (OR), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46-2.33) and in nonwhites (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.24-2.58) and less common in those >50 years of age (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90) and in those completing the survey in French (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Those with self-reported lactose intolerance had lower covariate-adjusted milk product and alternative intakes (mean ± SE; 1.40 ± 0.08 servings·day(-1) vs. 2.33 ± 0.03 servings·day(-1), p < 0.001). A greater proportion used supplements containing calcium (52% vs. 37%, p < 0.001) and vitamin D (58% vs. 46%, p < 0.001), but calcium intakes from the combination of milk products, alternatives, and supplements were lower (739 ± 30 mg·day(-1) vs. 893 ± 13 mg·day(-1), p < 0.0001). Variation in self-reported lactose intolerance by sex, age, and language preference was unexpected and suggests that some groups may be more vulnerable to the perception that they are lactose intolerant. Regardless of whether lactose intolerance is physiologically based or perceptual, education is required to ensure that calcium intakes are not compromised. PMID:23855270

  16. Paralytic shellfish toxins in the freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, isolated from Montargil reservoir, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pereira, P; Onodera, H; Andrinolo, D; Franca, S; Araújo, F; Lagos, N; Oshima, Y

    2000-12-01

    Montargil reservoir, located in a dry flat area in the centre of Portugal, was filled in 1958 to fulfil agricultural, electric and industrial requirements. In May 1996, an intensive bloom of phytoplankton was detected. The algal community was strongly dominated by cyanobacteria with predominance of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae from May to June and Microcystis aeruginosa from July to August. Extracts of samples collected during the bloom period showed high toxicity by mouse bioassay. During the M. aeruginosa predominance period, the toxicity was ascribed to the presence of hepatotoxins, but clear symptoms of paralytic shellfish poison were observed when A. flos-aquae was the dominant species. In order to confirm the production of neurotoxins a strain of A. flos-aquae was isolated and established in culture. In this manuscript, we show the morphological characteristics and confirm paralytic shellfish toxins production by the strain isolated and maintained in culture. Identification of the saxitoxin analogs was achieved using high performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn fluorescence derivatization (HPLC-FLD) and liquid chromatographic mass spectrometry technique (LC-MS). The toxins found in the culture extract were GTX5 (64.5 mol%), neoSTX (23.0 mol%), dcSTX (6.1 mol%), STX (5.4 mol%) and GTX6 (1.1 mol%). This is, to our knowledge, the first report of unambiguous evidence of paralytic shellfish toxins produced by freshwater cyanobacteria in Portugal. The toxin profile is rather different from the previously reported PSP producing A. flos-aquae and demonstrates its diversity in terms of toxin production. PMID:10858510

  17. Occurrence of paralytic shellfish poison in the starfish, Asterias amurensis in Kure Bay, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, M; Nishimura, F; Miyazawa, K; Noguchi, T

    1997-07-01

    In May 1996, during surveillance on the toxicity of invertebrates such as bivalves inhabiting the coasts of Hiroshima Bay, the starfish Asterias amurensis collected in the estuary of the Nikoh River was found to contain toxins which showed strong paralytic action in mice; the maximum toxicity (as paralytic shellfish poison, PSP) was 8.0 MU/g for whole body and 28.7 MU/g for viscera throughout the monitoring period, March to July 1996. Attempts were made to identify the paralytic toxins in the starfish. They were extracted with 80% ethanol acidified with acetic acid, followed by defatting with dichloromethane. The aqueous layer obtained was treated with activated charcoal and then applied to a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge. The unbound toxic fraction was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. The starfish toxin was rather unexpectedly identified as PSP. It was comprised of high toxic components (gonyautoxin-1; GTX1, GTX2, GTX3, GTX4, decarbamoyl-GTX3; dcGTX3 and dcSTX) as the major components, which accounted for approximately 77 mole% of all components, along with protogonyautoxin-1, 2, 3 and 4 (PX1-4), which are N-sulfocarbamoyl derivatives. Of the high toxic components, GTX1 was present in the largest amounts. It was concluded that the toxin of starfish collected in the estuary of Nikoh River in May 1996 consisted of PSP, which supposedly came via the food chain from toxic bivalves living in the same area. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the occurrence of PSP in starfish. PMID:9248006

  18. Endogenous circulating sympatholytic factor in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, R. E.; Winters, B.; Hales, M.; Barnett, T.; Schwinn, D. A.; Flavahan, N.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathotonic orthostatic hypotension (SOH) is an idiopathic syndrome characterized by tachycardia, hypotension, elevated plasma norepinephrine, and symptoms of orthostatic intolerance provoked by assumption of an upright posture. We studied a woman with severe progressive SOH with blood pressure unresponsive to the pressor effects of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. We tested the hypothesis that a circulating factor in this patient interferes with vascular adrenergic neurotransmission. Preincubation of porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings with patient plasma produced a dose-dependent inhibition of vasoconstriction to phenylephrine in vitro, abolished vasoconstriction to direct electrical stimulation, and had no effect on nonadrenergic vasoconstrictive stimuli (endothelin-1), PGF-2alpha (or KCl). Preincubation of vessels with control plasma was devoid of these effects. SOH plasma inhibited the binding of an alpha(1)-selective antagonist radioligand ([(125)I]HEAT) to membrane fractions derived from porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings, rat liver, and cell lines selectively overexpressing human ARs of the alpha(1B) subtype but not other AR subtypes (alpha(1A) and alpha(1D)). We conclude that a factor in SOH plasma can selectively and irreversibly inhibit adrenergic ligand binding to alpha(1B) ARs. We propose that this factor contributes to a novel pathogenesis for SOH in this patient. This patient's syndrome represents a new disease entity, and her plasma may provide a unique tool for probing the selective functions of alpha(1)-ARs.

  19. Lysinuric Protein Intolerance Presenting with Multiple Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Jennifer E.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Miller, Marcus J.; Liu, Pengfei; Hardison, Matthew T.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Sun, Qin; Yang, Yaping; Willis, Alecia S.; Schlesinger, Alan E.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2014-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in SLC7A7, which encodes a component of the dibasic amino acid transporter found in intestinal and renal tubular cells. Patients typically present with vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, failure to thrive, and symptomatic hyperammonemia after protein-rich meals. Long-term complications may include pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, renal disease, and osteoporosis. We present a 5-year-old male who was followed in our skeletal dysplasia clinic for 3 years for multiple fractures, idiopathic osteoporosis, and short stature in the absence of typical features of LPI. Whole exome sequencing performed to determine the etiology of the osteoporosis and speech delay identified a nonsense mutation in SLC7A7. Chromosome microarray analysis identified a deletion involving the second allele of the same gene, and biochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of LPI. Our patient’s atypical presentation underscores the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for LPI in patients with unexplained fractures and idiopathic osteoporosis, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of hyperammonemia after protein rich meals or other systemic features of classical LPI. This case further demonstrates the utility of whole exome sequencing in diagnosis of unusual presentations of rare disorders for which early intervention may modify the clinical course. PMID:25419514

  20. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a "final common pathway" for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support. PMID:26198889

  1. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-01-01

    Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a “final common pathway” for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies, but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support. PMID:26198889

  2. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  3. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  4. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  5. Are herbs always good for you? A case of paralytic ileum using a herbal tisane.

    PubMed

    Sossai, Paolo; Nasone, Cinzia; Cantalamessa, Franco

    2007-06-01

    We believe that administration of phytotherapics ('herbal' medicines) should be managed by physicians and pharmacists who can monitor any adverse reactions including allergies in patients. This of course implies that physicians and pharmacists require adequate training at the university and post-university level regarding all aspects of medicinal plants. We report here a case of paralytic ileum occurring in an older self-medicated patient who acquired an herbal tisane composed of Cassia angustifolia, as well as other plant products, in an herbal shop, for chronic constipation. PMID:17397118

  6. Vincristine-induced paralytic ileus during induction therapy of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Yasu, Takeo; Ohno, Nobuhiro; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Kurokawa, Yosuke

    2016-06-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is an important drug used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR-induced neurotoxicity can manifest as peripheral neuropathy, constipation, or paralytic ileus. While there are some case reports describing VCR-induced paralytic ileus (VIPI) in pediatric ALL, there are fewer publication on adult ALL patients. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated VIPI during induction therapy of treatment protocols for ALL in 19 adult patients. The incidence of VIPI was 32%. VIPI was significantly increased in patients receiving concomitant itraconazole (ITCZ) (p = 0.04). We recommend avoidance of the combination of VCR and ITCZ. PMID:27087157

  7. [Special features of NSAID intolerance in children].

    PubMed

    Porto Arceo, J A

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reactions to acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second most important cause of adverse drug reactions (ARDs) after beta-lactams. They produce various clinical manifestations and can affect different organs. Gastrointestinal reactions (pyrosis, vomiting, gastralgia), neurological reactions (tinnitus, deafness, vertigo), blood dyscrasias, and nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic reactions are well known.NSAIDs are the drugs of choice in the treatment of chronic arthropathies and other childhood connective-tissue diseases and are also commonly used in the treatment of febrile and acute inflammatory processes. Not all NAIDs are authorized for use in the pediatric population but their spectrum of use varies according to the entity for which they are indicated and the legislation of the country. Published studies on the prevalence of aspirin intolerance in patients with bronchial asthma show a fair amount of disagreement. This may be due to (i) the method of selecting asthmatic patients for the study, which differs according to whether all asthmatic patients are included or only those dependent on corticoids; (ii) the diagnostic method used, whether based on clinical criteria or oral provocation tests, which will affect the number of patients with a diagnosis of intolerance. In children aged less than 10 years, including children with asthma, the prevalence is low, while among children and young adults aged 10-20 years old, the prevalence is estimated at 10 %. Some hypotheses attempt to explain the mechanisms through which adverse reactions to NAIDs take place. One hypothesis attributes the reaction to a reaginic immunological mechanism but this hypothesis has only been confirmed in exceptional cases. The theory of the cyclooxygenase pathway, currently the most widely accepted, is based on the ability of NSAIDs to inhibit the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, leading to prostaglandin

  8. Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Protogonyaulax tamarensis and Protogonyaulax catenella in Axenic Culture 1

    PubMed Central

    Boczar, Barbara A.; Beitler, Mark K.; Liston, John; Sullivan, John J.; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    1988-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxin concentrations were measured and individual toxin profiles were monitored in axenic batch cultures of Protogonyaulax tamarensis and Protogonyaulax catenella. High pressure liquid chromatographic methods were used that allowed the separation of all 12 known paralytic shellfish poisons, including toxins C1, C2, and C3, from a single sample. In isolates of both Protogonyaulax species, total toxin levels were relatively low after inoculation, increased rapidly in early to mid-exponential growth to a value 100 to 300% of that at the initial time point, then decreased by 86 to 95% as the culture aged. Although the concentrations of individual toxins per cell followed the same general pattern as that seen for total moles of toxin per cell, variability in toxin profile with culture age was observed. In P. tamarensis, the mole percent of neosaxitoxin increased substantially from 8 to 44% as total toxin levels per cell decreased. A concomitant decrease in the mole percent of saxitoxin with culture age was noted. Although not as precipitous, changes in the mole percent of specific toxins from P. catenella were also observed. The mole percent of gonyautoxins I and IV increased, while that of gonyautoxins II and III decreased. These data suggest that the toxin profile in isolates of Protogonyaulax can change, sometimes significantly, with changing environmental variables. PMID:16666456

  9. Temperature-sensitive paralytic mutants: insights into the synaptic vesicle cycle.

    PubMed

    Vijayakrishnan, N; Broadie, K

    2006-02-01

    Forward genetic screens have identified numerous proteins with critical roles in neurotransmission. One particularly fruitful screening target in Drosophila has been TS (temperature-sensitive) paralytic mutants, which have revealed proteins acutely required in neuronal signalling. In the present paper, we review recent insights and current questions from one recently cloned TS paralytic mutant, rbo (rolling blackout). The rbo mutant identifies a putative integral lipase of the pre-synaptic plasma membrane that is required for the SV (synaptic vesicle) cycle. Identification of this mutant adds to a growing body of evidence that lipid-modifying enzymes locally control specialized lipid microenvironments and lipid signalling pathways with key functions regulating neurotransmission strength. The RBO protein is absolutely required for phospholipase C signalling in phototransduction. We posit that RBO might be required to regulate the availability of fusogenic lipids such as phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and diacylglycerol that may directly modify membrane properties and/or activate lipid-binding fusogenic proteins mediating SV exocytosis. PMID:16417488

  10. Framework for evaluating the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis after global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, R. Bruce; Cochi, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    With the interruption of wild poliovirus transmission globally, the need for new policies to deal with the post-certification era will rapidly arise. New policies will be required in four areas: detection and notification of circulating polioviruses; biocontainment of wild, vaccine-derived and attenuated strains of poliovirus; vaccine stockpiles and response mechanisms; and routine immunization against polioviruses. A common understanding of the potential risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification period is essential to the development of these policies. Since 2000, there has been increasing international consensus that the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification era fall into two categories: those due to the continued use of the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and those due to future improper handling of wild polioviruses. The specific risks within both categories have now been defined, and an understanding of the frequency and potential burden of disease associated with each is rapidly improving. This knowledge and clarity have provided a framework that is already proving valuable for identifying research priorities and discussing potential policy options with national authorities. However, this framework must be regarded as a dynamic tool, requiring regular updating as additional information on these risks becomes available through further scientific research, programmatic work, and policy decisions. PMID:15106299

  11. The first evidence of paralytic shellfish toxins in the fresh water cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, isolated from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lagos, N; Onodera, H; Zagatto, P A; Andrinolo, D; Azevedo, S M; Oshima, Y

    1999-10-01

    The blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are causing problems in many countries. During a screening of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria in Brazil, three strains isolated from the State of Sao Paulo were found toxic by the mouse bioassay. They all were identified as Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii by a close morphological examination. Extracts of cultured cells caused acute death to mice when injected intraperitoneally after developing neurotoxic symptoms which resembled to those caused by paralytic shellfish toxins. The analysis of the sample by HPLC-FLD postcolumn derivatization method for paralytic shellfish toxins resulted in the detection of several saxitoxin analogs. To avoid being misled by false peaks, the sample was reanalyzed after purification and also under the different postcolumn derivatizing conditions. Finally, the newly developed LC-MS method for paralytic shellfish toxins was applied to unambiguously identify the toxins. One isolate produced neosaxitoxin predominantly with saxitoxin as a minor component. The other two showed identical toxin profiles containing saxitoxin and gonyautoxins 2/3 isomers in the ratio of 1:9. This is the first evidence of paralytic shellfish toxins in this species and also the occurrence of the toxin producing cyanobacterium in South American countries. PMID:10414862

  12. Occurrence of paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) in the starfish Asterina pectinifera collected from the Kure Bay, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsutoshi; Asakawa, Manabu; Sida, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Keisuke

    2003-03-01

    Assays were made for paralytic toxicity of marine invertebrates inhabiting at the coasts of Hiroshima Bay, where the infestation of bivalves such as cultured oysters with paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) has been occurred. The starfish Asterina pectinifera collected at the estuary of Nikoh River, Hiroshima Bay, was found to contain moderate levels of paralytic toxicity. Its highest toxicities as PSP found on July 30, 1999 were 12.5 MU/g for whole body, 11.0 MU/g for integument tissues and 3.9 MU/g for viscera, respectively. The toxicity of integument was changed from 3.6 to 11.0 MU/g in 1 year. Its paralytic toxin principles were identified as PSP toxins, composing mainly from saxitoxin (STX) group toxins such as carbamoyl-N-hydroxy neosaxitoxin (hyneoSTX), and STX, by HPLC and LC-MS, accounting for over 90 mol%. The PSP toxins contained in the starfish A. pectinifera considered to be transferred from bivalves or detritus living in the same area, which were contaminated with PSP. However, the involved pathway may be different from that of Asterias amurensis which was infested directly through food chain from its food bivalves, for its toxin pattern. PMID:12565751

  13. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  14. Familial aquagenic urticaria associated with familial lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Treudler, Regina; Tebbe, Beate; Steinhoff, Matthias; Orfanos, Constantin E

    2002-10-01

    Aquagenic urticaria is a rare disorder characterized by the occurrence of pruritus and wheals after temporary contact with water. The familial occurrence of aquagenic urticaria over 3 generations is reported here in association with familial lactose intolerance, a condition in which the enzyme lactase encoded on chromosome 2, is deficient. In two patients, a young man and his mother, we verified the appearance of pruritic hives 5 to 10 minutes after contact with water of any temperature. Other types of physical urticaria were absent, and mastocytosis was excluded by extensive laboratory investigations; lactose intolerance was confirmed in both patients by H(2)-exhalation test. In these patients the clinical symptoms did not respond to antihistamines or UV-radiation therapy. Four other members of the family had wheals from water contact, two of whom had lactose intolerance. Two other members had lactose intolerance only. Although the association of aquagenic urticaria with lactose intolerance may be coincidental, attention is drawn to the fact that the 2 conditions, known to be familial, may coexist in the same family, possibly based on an association of gene loci. PMID:12271310

  15. Overlap in prevalence between various types of environmental intolerance.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Eva; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Neely, Gregory; Stenberg, Berndt; Nordin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Environmental intolerance (EI) is characterized by attribution of several, multisystem symptoms to specific environmental exposures, such as exposure to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and everyday sounds. The symptoms are medically unexplained, non-specific and the symptoms overlap between different types of EI. To approach the issue of underlying mechanisms the matter of overlap in prevalence between intolerances can provide valuable information. The aim of the study was to examine if the overlap between intolerance to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, EMFs and sounds is larger than the expected overlap if no association would exist between them. The study was using cross-sectional data from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden; a large questionnaire-based survey. 8520 adults (18-79 years) were randomly selected after stratification for age and sex, of whom 3406 (40%) participated. Individuals with the four types of intolerance were identified either through self-report, or by having been physician-diagnosed with a specific EI. The overlaps between the four EIs were greater than predictions based on coincidence for both self-reported and diagnosed cases (except for the overlap between diagnosed intolerance to sounds and EMFs). The results raise the question whether different types of EI share similar underlying mechanisms, or at least that the sufferers of EI share some predisposition to acquire the conditions. PMID:24029726

  16. Intracellular Spread of Rabies Virus Is Reduced in the Paralytic Form of Canine Rabies Compared to the Furious Form.

    PubMed

    Shuangshoti, Shanop; Thorner, Paul Scott; Teerapakpinyo, Chinachote; Thepa, Nisachol; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Intarut, Nirun; Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Tepsumethanon, Veera; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-06-01

    Studies of the furious and paralytic forms of canine rabies at the early stage of disease have shown a more rapid viral colonization of the cerebral hemispheres in the furious form, as measured by viral antigen within neuronal cell bodies and viral RNA levels. Measurement of cellular processes separate from neuronal cell body provides a visual record of the spread of rabies virus which occurs across synapses. In this study, the amount of rabies viral antigen within cell processes was quantitatively assessed by image analysis in a cohort of naturally rabies infected non-vaccinated dogs (5 furious and 5 paralytic) that were sacrificed shortly after developing illness. Measurements were taken at different levels of the spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebrum. Results were compared to the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies. Generally, the amount of rabies viral antigen in cell processes decreased in a rostral direction, following the pattern for the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies and the percentage of involved cell bodies. However, there was a delay in cell process involvement following cell body involvement, consistent with replication occurring in the cell body region and subsequent transport out to cell processes. Greater amounts of antigen were seen in cell processes in dogs with the furious compared to paralytic form, at all anatomic levels examined. This difference was even evident when comparing (1) neurons with similar amounts of antigen, (2) similar percentages of involved neurons, and (3) anatomic levels that showed 100% positive neurons. These findings suggest that intracellular transport of the virus may be slower in the paralytic form, resulting in slower viral propagation. Possible mechanisms might involve host-specific differences in intracellular virus transport. The latter could be cytokine-mediated, since previous studies have documented greater inflammation in the paralytic form. PMID:27253394

  17. Intracellular Spread of Rabies Virus Is Reduced in the Paralytic Form of Canine Rabies Compared to the Furious Form

    PubMed Central

    Shuangshoti, Shanop; Thorner, Paul Scott; Teerapakpinyo, Chinachote; Thepa, Nisachol; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Intarut, Nirun; Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Tepsumethanon, Veera; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the furious and paralytic forms of canine rabies at the early stage of disease have shown a more rapid viral colonization of the cerebral hemispheres in the furious form, as measured by viral antigen within neuronal cell bodies and viral RNA levels. Measurement of cellular processes separate from neuronal cell body provides a visual record of the spread of rabies virus which occurs across synapses. In this study, the amount of rabies viral antigen within cell processes was quantitatively assessed by image analysis in a cohort of naturally rabies infected non-vaccinated dogs (5 furious and 5 paralytic) that were sacrificed shortly after developing illness. Measurements were taken at different levels of the spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebrum. Results were compared to the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies. Generally, the amount of rabies viral antigen in cell processes decreased in a rostral direction, following the pattern for the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies and the percentage of involved cell bodies. However, there was a delay in cell process involvement following cell body involvement, consistent with replication occurring in the cell body region and subsequent transport out to cell processes. Greater amounts of antigen were seen in cell processes in dogs with the furious compared to paralytic form, at all anatomic levels examined. This difference was even evident when comparing (1) neurons with similar amounts of antigen, (2) similar percentages of involved neurons, and (3) anatomic levels that showed 100% positive neurons. These findings suggest that intracellular transport of the virus may be slower in the paralytic form, resulting in slower viral propagation. Possible mechanisms might involve host-specific differences in intracellular virus transport. The latter could be cytokine-mediated, since previous studies have documented greater inflammation in the paralytic form. PMID:27253394

  18. Towards an ontological theory of substance intolerance and hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, William R

    2011-02-01

    A proper ontological treatment of intolerance--including hypersensitivity--to various substances is critical to patient care and research. However, existing methods and standards for documenting these conditions have flaws that inhibit these goals, especially translational research that bridges the two activities. In response, I outline a realist approach to the ontology of substance intolerance, including hypersensitivity conditions. I defend a view of these conditions as a subtype of disease. Specifically, a substance intolerance is a disease whose pathological process(es) are realized upon exposure to a quantity of substance of a particular type, and this quantity would normally not cause the realization of the pathological process(es). To develop this theory, it was necessary to build pieces of a theory of pathological processes. Overall, however, the framework of the Ontology for General Medical Science (which uses Basic Formal Ontology as its uppermost level) was a more-than-adequate foundation on which to build the theory. PMID:20152933

  19. Sodium Oxybate Intolerance Associated with Familial Serum Acylcarnitine Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Our case describes clinical features of two families defined by joint phenotypes: sodium oxybate intolerance and elevated serum acylcarnitines. Oxybate intolerance variably presents as either cervical dystonia or sleep-related eating disorder. Our objective is to identify biological markers which predict a poor response to sodium oxybate as a treatment for disturbed sleep. Familial inheritance pattern, genotype analysis, multiorgan system involvement, and response to treatment suggest the presence of a secondary cause of fatty oxidation defect, i.e., mitochondrial disorder. Our case report supports the possible conclusion that variance in human mitochondrial metabolism may affect sodium oxybate tolerability. Citation: Berner J. Sodium oxybate intolerance associated with familial serum acylcarnitine elevation. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(1):71-72. PMID:23319908

  20. [Pseudo-allergies are due to histamine intolerance].

    PubMed

    Götz, M

    1996-01-01

    Numerous undesirable reactions to alcoholic beverages, foods, drugs and other substances are characterized by allergy-like signs and symptoms and yet show unambiguously negative allergy test results. Such persons should be assessed for evidence of histamine intolerance caused by histamine overload and/or diamine oxidase deficiency. Diamine oxidase is the main histamine degrading enzyme with a predominantly gut activity. This would explain why nutritional allergies are often primarily suspected. The clinical evidence for histamine intolerance is based on chronic headache, diarrhoea, vomiting, flush, urticaria, asthma-like symptoms, rhinitis and others. Histamine restricted food, supported if necessary by H1 antihistamine blockade are simple but highly efficacious measures as shown by us in large patient groups. Intolerance to red wine probably is the most outstanding clinical characteristic and a directed question must be included into any allergy history in order to avoid missing a very major diagnostic spectrum with good therapeutic maneuverability. PMID:9012205

  1. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Enzyme Catalysis; Enzyme Activity in Formulations for Lactose-Intolerant Infants.

    PubMed

    Altas, Margarida C; Kudryashov, Evgeny; Buckin, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    The paper introduces ultrasonic technology for real-time, nondestructive, precision monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in solutions and in complex opaque media. The capabilities of the technology are examined in a comprehensive analysis of the effects of a variety of diverse factors on the performance of enzyme β-galactosidase in formulations for reduction of levels of lactose in infant milks. These formulations are added to infant's milk bottles prior to feeding to overcome the frequently observed intolerance to lactose (a milk sugar), a serious issue in healthy development of infants. The results highlight important impediments in the development of these formulations and also illustrate the capability of the described ultrasonic tools in the assessment of the performance of enzymes in complex reaction media and in various environmental conditions. PMID:27018312

  2. [Usefulness of enteral feeding in surgery].

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, L; Czekalski, P; Bilski, D; Olejniczak, W

    1997-01-01

    Eighty malnourished patients with neoplasms, enteric fistulae, multiorgan trauma and septic complications administered food by means of enteral feeding (EF). It was found that EF prevents weight loss and even causes weight gain in patients, increases total protein and albumin concentrations and decreases urea and creatinine levels in blood which is a proof of catabolism fall. Patient condition improvement and healing of the majority of enteric fistulae was achieved after EF. Factory diet intolerance affected 5% of patients and diarrhoea-6%. Investigations prove that enteral feeding is a good alternative to parenteral nutrition. If enteral feeding follows proper indications, technique and route of administration are chosen the right way, it allows the surgeon to perform operation, decreases the number of complications and enables the patient's organism fight septic syndrome. Enteral feeding is a state of the art method of severely ill patient nutrition. PMID:9424919

  3. Fatal paralytic shellfish poisoning in Kittlitz's Murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) nestlings, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Lance, Ellen W.; Corcoran, Robin; Piatt, John; Bodenstein, Barbara; Frame, Elizabeth; Lawonn, James

    2014-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is an acute toxic illness in humans resulting from ingestion of shellfish contaminated with a suite of neurotoxins (saxitoxins) produced by marine dinoflagellates, most commonly in the genus Alexandrium. Poisoning also has been sporadically suspected and, less often, documented in marine wildlife, often in association with an outbreak in humans. Kittlitz's Murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) is a small, rare seabird of the Northern Pacific with a declining population. From 2008 to 2012, as part of a breeding ecology study, multiple Kittlitz's Murrelet nests on Kodiak Island, Alaska, were monitored by remote cameras. During the 2011 and 2012 breeding seasons, nestlings from several sites died during mild weather conditions. Remote camera observations revealed that the nestlings died shortly after consuming sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), a fish species known to biomagnify saxitoxin. High levels of saxitoxin were subsequently documented in crop content in 87% of nestling carcasses. Marine bird deaths from PSP may be underreported.

  4. Accumulation and depuration of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins by laboratory cultured purple clam Hiatula diphos Linnaeus.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hong Nong; Huang, Chen Ping; Chen, Chih Yu

    2005-10-01

    Purple clams (Hiatula diphos Linnaeus) accumulate paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins produced by a toxic strain of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum Halim in a laboratory study. The maximal toxicity of PSP toxins attained 31.3m MU/g after 20 days exposure. The toxin profile of H. diphos was similar to that reported for A. minutum at the end of the exposure period; and GTX1 was dominant. GTX congeners were found in muscle on day 16 and day 20, these substances could be detected during the depuration period as well. GTX1 was detected in the siphon only on day 32. The results show that H. diphos accumulates PSP toxins according to the amount and toxin profile of ingested A. minutum. PMID:16137734

  5. Virus isolation from saliva and salivary glands of cattle naturally infected with paralytic rabies.

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Larghi, O P; Russo, R G

    2001-02-16

    The infectivity of saliva, salivary and mammary glands, muscle, lung, kidney and liver of 87 cattle infected with paralytic rabies (positive viral isolation from brains) was studied. Fifty percent dilutions of saliva and tissue samples were inoculated intracerebrally into 10- to 15-day-old mice. Viral isolation in mice was confirmed by direct rabies fluorescent-antibody test and the antigenic variant of the isolates characterized by monoclonal antibodies. Rabies virus was isolated from 4.6% of salivary glands and from 1.6% of saliva samples. The rest of the peripheral tissues were negative. Cerebral and peripheral isolates belonged to vampire-bat antigenic variants. These results indicate that cattle infected by vampire bats may be a source of infection for man. The infection risk would depend on the type of contact between rabid cattle and man. PMID:11182465

  6. Evaluation of mouse bioassay results in an inter-laboratory comparison for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jijuan; Zheng, Jiang; Yu, Bing; Wang, Qiuyan; Xu, Junyi; Li, Aifeng

    2011-07-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of the AOAC mouse bioassay for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in shellfish was carried out among 25 Chinese laboratories to examine the overall performance for PSP testing in China, and to analyze the main factors affecting the performance of this method. The toxic scallop Patinopecten yessoensis collected from coast of Bohai Sea, China, was used as a test sample in the comparison study. The results were reported and evaluated using robust statistical methods. The z scores showed that 80%, 8%, and 12% of laboratories reported satisfactory results, unsatisfactory results, and questionable results, respectively. This evaluation demonstrates that the PSP mouse bioassay is an appropriate method for screening and testing PSP toxicity in shellfish. However, it was found that the experience and skill of technicians, as well as the body weight and health status of mice being used significantly affected the accuracy of the method.

  7. A new simple screening method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jinping; Pi, Shuaishuai; Ye, Shufeng; Gao, Haomin; Yao, Lei; Jiang, Zhenyi; Song, Yuling; Xi, Lei

    2012-09-01

    The current testing for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in shellfish is based on the mouse bioassay (MBA). To alleviate animal welfare concerns, we evaluated the utility of using sublethal indicators of toxicity as an alternative to measuring time to death. Live mice were injected with a PSP congener and the changes in neurotransmitter levels were measured 60, 90, and 120 min after injection. Acetylcholine (ACh) was the most sensitive marker for PSP toxicity. The changes in neurotransmitter levels were most pronounced in the blood. Thus, measurement of Ach levels in the blood may serve as a sensitive predictor for PSP that would not require sacrifice of the mice. This method was relatively simple, sensitive (less than 1 μg/kg weight, equivalent to 20 ng/mL), low maintenance, and rapid (less than 60 min).

  8. A Putative Gene Cluster from a Lyngbya wollei Bloom that Encodes Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mihali, Troco K.; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin and its analogs cause the paralytic shellfish-poisoning syndrome, adversely affecting human health and coastal shellfish industries worldwide. Here we report the isolation, sequencing, annotation, and predicted pathway of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The gene cluster spans 36 kb and encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis and export of the toxins. The Lyngbya wollei saxitoxin gene cluster differs from previously identified saxitoxin clusters as it contains genes that are unique to this cluster, whereby the carbamoyltransferase is truncated and replaced by an acyltransferase, explaining the unique toxin profile presented by Lyngbya wollei. These findings will enable the creation of toxin probes, for water monitoring purposes, as well as proof-of-concept for the combinatorial biosynthesis of these natural occurring alkaloids for the production of novel, biologically active compounds. PMID:21347365

  9. kappa-Carrageenan gel as agent to sequester paralytic shellfish poison.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Socrates Jose P; Montaño, Marco Nemesio E

    2002-12-01

    The action of k-carrageenan gel to sequester paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) was tested and characterized. When an extract from a Philippine strain of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum was used as PSP solution, the PSP-sequestering property of kappa-carrageenan gel was found to be dependent on gel surface area, interaction time, and polysaccharide concentration. The interaction was also found to be affected by high concentrations of monovalent cations. The characteristics of kappa-carrageenan as a PSP-sequestering agent all point to cation exchange as its mechanism of action. It is also proposed that the polysaccharide gel can be utilized as an agent to alleviate PSP intoxication. PMID:14961231

  10. [Oral exposure testing in non-aspirin-induced analgesic intolerance].

    PubMed

    Wiedow, O; Brasch, J; Christophers, E

    1996-12-01

    Although intolerance reaction to analgesics are not uncommon, there is still a lack of standardized procedures to diagnose the problem. We retrospectively analyzed results of scratch tests as well as oral challenges with analgesics in order to evaluate risk and diagnostic relevance of these procedures. In 1987-1992 a total of 650 patients with supposed intolerance to drugs were tested by oral challenge. Among them were 98 patients with a positive history of intolerance to non-aspirin analgesics. In 56 patients the intolerance could be verified by oral challenge. In order of decreasing frequency, the most likely agents were propyphenazone, diclofenac, metamizole, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, indomethacin, phenazone (antipyrine), and paracetamol (acteaminophen). Oral provocation showed clear dose-response relationships. For propyphenazone, the half-effective provocation dose was the same for all symptoms (cutaneous, nasal, bronchial, anaphylactoid). Scratch testing was not of diagnostic significance. Standardized test protocols starting with low dose oral challenges are suitable and helpful in minimizing the risk of severe side effects. PMID:9081936

  11. Orthostatic Intolerance and Motion Sickness After Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Brown, Troy E.; Wood, Scott J.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Bondar, Roberta L.; Stein, Flo; Moradshahi, Peyman; Harm, Deborah L.; Low, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common in astronauts after prolonged space flight. However, the "push-pull effect" in military aviators suggests that brief exposures to transitions between hypo- and hypergravity are sufficient to induce untoward autonomic cardiovascular physiology in susceptible individuals. We therefore investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy test subjects before and after a seated 2-hr parabolic flight. At the same time, we also investigated relationships between parabolic flight-induced vomiting and changes in orthostatic and autonomic cardiovascular function. After parabolic flight, 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate a 30-min upright tilt test, compared to 2 of 16 before flight. Whereas new intolerance in non-Vomiters resembled the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), new intolerance in Vomiters was characterized by comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction. As a group, Vomiters also had evidence for increased postflight fluctuations in efferent vagal-cardiac nerve traffic occurring independently of any superimposed change in respiration. Results suggest that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those occurring after space flight can occur after a brief (i.e., 2-hr) parabolic flight.

  12. Preliminary Investigation of Intolerance of Uncertainty Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Sarah N.; Egan, Sarah; Rees, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is the tendency to react negatively to uncertain situations or events, and it has been found to be an important maintaining factor in a number of different anxiety disorders. It is often included as a part of cognitive behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders but its specific contribution to treatment outcome…

  13. Tolerance of Intolerance: Values and Virtues at Stake in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlenius, Kennert

    2008-01-01

    The article addresses the issue of the tolerance of intolerance in an educational context. It concerns a real case in a Swedish upper secondary school some years ago, when a student was suspended from school owing to his sympathies with Nazi ideas. One hundred and twenty student teachers' responses to this decision were analysed in respect of the…

  14. Rainbow Visibility: How One Catholic University Responded to Intolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Cheryl; Kirkley, Evelyn A.

    2002-01-01

    When intolerance of gays and lesbians at the University of San Diego became a problem, a group of students, staff, and faculty decided to do something about it. The result was a project called Rainbow Visibility that works on many forms to educate the campus community. (Author)

  15. How to feed small for gestational age newborns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Feeding small for gestational age (SGA) newborns is extremely challenging and the neonatologist should be brave and cautious at the same time. Although these babies have a high risk of milk intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis, enteral feeding guidelines are not well established and practice varies widely among different neonatal units. Currently available studies on this topic include extremely and very low birth weight neonates, but are not focused specifically on small for gestational age infants. This review analyzes papers focused on feeding interventions in order to provide the best available evidences about the optimum timing for introduction of enteral feeding, how fast feed volume can be advanced, which milk and which feeding method is more appropriate in SGA infants. PMID:23663313

  16. Towards an Ontological Theory of Substance Intolerance and Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A proper ontological treatment of intolerance—including hypersensitivity—to various substances is critical to patient care and research. However, existing methods and standards for documenting these conditions have flaws that inhibit these goals, especially translational research that bridges the two activities. In response, I outline a realist approach to the ontology of substance intolerance, including hypersensitivity conditions. I defend a view of these conditions as a subtype of disease. Specifically, a substance intolerance is a disease whose pathological process(es) are realized upon exposure to a quantity of substance of a particular type, and this quantity would normally not cause the realization of the pathological process(es). To develop this theory, it was necessary to build pieces of a theory of pathological processes. Overall, however, the framework of the Ontology for General Medical Science (which uses Basic Formal Ontology as its uppermost level) was a more-than-adequate foundation on which to build the theory. PMID:20152933

  17. Orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia associated with norepinephrine-transporter deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Flattem, N. L.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Black, B. K.; Biaggioni, I.; Blakely, R. D.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic intolerance is a syndrome characterized by lightheadedness, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope and associated with postural tachycardia and plasma norepinephrine concentrations that are disproportionately high in relation to sympathetic outflow. We tested the hypothesis that impaired functioning of the norepinephrine transporter contributes to the pathophysiologic mechanism of orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: In a patient with orthostatic intolerance and her relatives, we measured postural blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamines, and systemic norepinephrine spillover and clearance, and we sequenced the norepinephrine-transporter gene and evaluated its function. RESULTS: The patient had a high mean plasma norepinephrine concentration while standing, as compared with the mean (+/-SD) concentration in normal subjects (923 vs. 439+/-129 pg per milliliter [5.46 vs. 2.59+/-0.76 nmol per liter]), reduced systemic norepinephrine clearance (1.56 vs. 2.42+/-0.71 liters per minute), impairment in the increase in the plasma norepinephrine concentration after the administration of tyramine (12 vs. 56+/-63 pg per milliliter [0.07 vs. 0.33+/-0.37 pmol per liter]), and a disproportionate increase in the concentration of plasma norepinephrine relative to that of dihydroxyphenylglycol. Analysis of the norepinephrine-transporter gene revealed that the proband was heterozygous for a mutation in exon 9 (encoding a change from guanine to cytosine at position 237) that resulted in more than a 98 percent loss of function as compared with that of the wild-type gene. Impairment of synaptic norepinephrine clearance may result in a syndrome characterized by excessive sympathetic activation in response to physiologic stimuli. The mutant allele in the proband's family segregated with the postural heart rate and abnormal plasma catecholamine homeostasis. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic or acquired deficits in norepinephrine inactivation may underlie hyperadrenergic

  18. Orthostatic intolerance and motion sickness after parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, T T; Brown, T E; Wood, S J; Benavides, E W; Bondar, R L; Stein, F; Moradshahi, P; Harm, D L; Fritsch-Yelle, J M; Low, P A

    2001-01-01

    Because it is not clear that the induction of orthostatic intolerance in returning astronauts always requires prolonged exposure to microgravity, we investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy subjects before and after the brief micro- and hypergravity of parabolic flight. Concomitantly, we investigated the effect of parabolic flight-induced vomiting on orthostatic tolerance, R-wave-R-wave interval and arterial pressure power spectra, and carotid-cardiac baroreflex and Valsalva responses. After parabolic flight 1) 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate 30 min of upright tilt (compared to 2 of 16 before flight); 2) 6 of 16 subjects vomited; 3) new intolerance to upright tilt was associated with exaggerated falls in total peripheral resistance, whereas vomiting was associated with increased R-wave-R-wave interval variability and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness; and 4) the proximate mode of new orthostatic failure differed in subjects who did and did not vomit, with vomiters experiencing comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction and nonvomiters experiencing signs and symptoms reminiscent of the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome. Results suggest, first, that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those developing after space flight can develop after a brief (i.e., 2-h) parabolic flight and, second, that recent vomiting can influence the results of tests of autonomic cardiovascular function commonly utilized in returning astronauts. PMID:11133895

  19. The nocebo effect in the context of statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B

    2016-01-01

    The nocebo effect, the inverse of the placebo effect, is a well-established phenomenon that is under-appreciated in cardiovascular medicine. It refers to adverse events, usually purely subjective, that result from expectations of harm from a drug, placebo, other therapeutic intervention or a nonmedical situation. These expectations can be driven by many factors including the informed consent form in a clinical trial, warnings about adverse effects communicated by clinicians when prescribing a drug, and information in the media about the dangers of certain treatments. The nocebo effect is the best explanation for the high rate of muscle and other symptoms attributed to statins in observational studies and clinical practice, but not in randomized controlled trials, where muscle symptoms, and rates of discontinuation due to any adverse event, are generally similar in the statin and placebo groups. Statin-intolerant patients usually tolerate statins under double-blind conditions, indicating that the intolerance has little if any pharmacological basis. Known techniques for minimizing the nocebo effect can be applied to the prevention and management of statin intolerance. PMID:27578103

  20. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Sundby, G. H.; Rostoft, S.; Sheynberg, N.; Aljuri, N.; Maa, M.; Mukkamala, R.; Sherman, D.; Toska, K.; Yelle, J.; Bloomfield, D.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight.

  1. Orthostatic intolerance and motion sickness after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Brown, T. E.; Wood, S. J.; Benavides, E. W.; Bondar, R. L.; Stein, F.; Moradshahi, P.; Harm, D. L.; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Low, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    Because it is not clear that the induction of orthostatic intolerance in returning astronauts always requires prolonged exposure to microgravity, we investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy subjects before and after the brief micro- and hypergravity of parabolic flight. Concomitantly, we investigated the effect of parabolic flight-induced vomiting on orthostatic tolerance, R-wave-R-wave interval and arterial pressure power spectra, and carotid-cardiac baroreflex and Valsalva responses. After parabolic flight 1) 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate 30 min of upright tilt (compared to 2 of 16 before flight); 2) 6 of 16 subjects vomited; 3) new intolerance to upright tilt was associated with exaggerated falls in total peripheral resistance, whereas vomiting was associated with increased R-wave-R-wave interval variability and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness; and 4) the proximate mode of new orthostatic failure differed in subjects who did and did not vomit, with vomiters experiencing comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction and nonvomiters experiencing signs and symptoms reminiscent of the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome. Results suggest, first, that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those developing after space flight can develop after a brief (i.e., 2-h) parabolic flight and, second, that recent vomiting can influence the results of tests of autonomic cardiovascular function commonly utilized in returning astronauts.

  2. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, “ambiguity aversion” and “ambiguity intolerance,” are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, “ambiguity aversion” represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, “ambiguity intolerance” describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  3. Drug effects on orthostatic intolerance induced by bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Van Loon, G.; Keil, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Effective and practical preventive procedures for postflight orthostatic intolerance are highly desirable. The current practice of attempts to expand plasma volume by ingestion of salt and fluids before reentry has proven benefits. This study evaluated alternative options using fludrocortisone (F) to expand plasma volume (PV), dextroamphetamine (Dex) to enhance norepinephrine (NE) release, and atropine (A) to reduce the effects of vagal stimulation. Seven subjects with proven post-bedrest orthostatic intolerance returned for a 7-day 6-deg head-down bedrest study. F (0.2 mg) was given at 8:00 AM and 8:00 PM the day before and 8:00 AM the day the subjects got out of bed (2 hours before standing). PV was measured before and 1 hour after the last dose of F. Dex (5 mg) and A (0.8 mg) were then taken orally 1 hour before the stand test. F expanded PV by 16 percent and caused sodium retention. Four of the 7 subjects stood for 1 hour post-bedrest and heart rate, plasma NE and plasma renin responses to standing were greatly enhanced and sustained. Although there was a narrowing of pulse pressure, the ability to overcome orthostatic intolerance with these countermeasures was largely due to vasoconstriction and sustained high heart rate.

  4. [Food Allergy and Intolerance : Distinction, Definitions and Delimitation].

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Waßmann-Otto, Anja; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Immunologically mediated hypersensitivity to foods is defined as food allergy, mainly due to immunglobulins of class E (IgE) triggering immediate reactions (type I hypersensitivity) with possible involvement of mucosa, skin, airways, intestinal tract, and the vascular system. Primary food allergy is based on (early) IgE sensitization against animal (e. g., cow's milk, hen's eggs) or plant proteins (e. g. peanut, hazelnut or wheat). In the case of secondary food allergies, IgE against pollen proteins (e. g., birch) reacts to structurally related food proteins (with cross-reactions to stone and pit fruits). Non-immunological food intolerance reactions are mostly based on carbohydrate malassimilation (e. g., lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption) and are rarely due to pseudo-allergies (e. g., flavors, dyes, preservatives) primarily in patients with chronic urticaria. Common intestinal symptoms are mainly due to functional disorders (e. g., irritable bowel disease), rarely because of inflammatory intestinal diseases (e. g., celiac disease). Histamine intolerance, gluten hypersensitivity, and so-called food type III hypersensitivities are controversial diagnoses. The aforementioned disease entities/models are of variable importance for the affected individuals, the public health system, and society in general. PMID:27215624

  5. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, C D; Mullen, T J; Sundby, G H; Rostoft, S; Sheynberg, N; Aljuri, N; Maa, M; Mukkamala, R; Sherman, D; Toska, K; Yelle, J; Bloomfield, D; Williams, G H; Cohen, R J

    2001-06-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. PMID:11356789

  6. Contrasting Physiological Responses of Two Populations of the Razor Clam Tagelus dombeii with Different Histories of Exposure to Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP)

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Jorge M.; González, Katerina; Cisternas, Barbara; López, Jorge A.; Chaparro, Oscar R.; Segura, Cristian J.; Córdova, Marco; Suárez-Isla, Benjamín; Fernandez-Reiriz, María J.; Labarta, Uxio

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the physiological performance of two populations of the razor clam Tagelus dombeii from two geographic areas with different histories of exposure to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) linked to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. Clams from Melinka-Aysén, which are frequently exposed to PSP, were not affected by the presence of toxins in the diet. However, clams from Corral-Valdivia, which have never been exposed to PSP, exhibited significantly reduced filtration activity and absorption, affecting the energy allocated to scope for growth (SFG). Ammonia excretion and oxygen uptake were not affected significantly by the presence of A. catenella in the diet. Measurements of energy acquisition and expenditure were performed during a 12-day intoxication period. According to three-way repeated measure ANOVAs, the origin of the clams had a highly significant effect on all physiological variables, and the interaction between diet and origin was significant for the clearance and absorption rates and for the scope for growth. The scope for growth index showed similar positive values for both the toxic and non-toxic individuals from the Melinka-Aysén population. However, it was significantly reduced in individuals from Corral-Valdivia when exposed to the diet containing A. catenella. The absence of differences between the physiological response of the toxic and non-toxic clams from Melinka-Aysén may be related to the frequent presence of A. catenella in the environment, indicating that this bivalve does not suffer negative consequences from PSP. By contrast, A. catenella has a negative effect on the physiological performance, primarily on the energy gained from the environment, on T. dombeii from Corral-Valdivia. This study supports the hypothesis that the history of PSP exposure plays an important role in the physiological performance and fitness of filter feeding bivalves. PMID:25153329

  7. HIV-related Social Intolerance and Risky Sexual Behavior in a High HIV Prevalence Environment

    PubMed Central

    Delavande, Adeline; Sampaio, Mafalda

    2014-01-01

    Although most countries state that fighting social intolerance against persons with HIV is part of their national HIV strategy, the impact of reducing intolerance on risky sexual behavior is largely unknown. In this paper, we estimate the effect of social intolerance against HIV+ persons on risky sexual behavior in rural Malawi using data from roughly 2,000 respondents from the 2004 and 2006 waves of the Malawi Longitudional Study of Families and Health (MLSFH). The effect of social intolerance on risky behavior is a priori ambiguous. On the one hand, higher social intolerance or stigma can lead people to disassociate from the stigmatized group and hence promote risky behavior. On the other hand, intolerance can be viewed as a social tax on being HIV+ and thus higher intolerance may reduce risky behavior. We find that a decrease in social intolerance is associated with a decrease in risky behavior, including fewer partners and a lower likelihood of having extra-marital relations. This effect is mainly driven by the impact of social intolerance on men. Overall the results suggests that reducing social intolerance might not only benefit the HIV positive but might also forestall the spread of HIV. PMID:24768779

  8. Predator lipids induce paralytic shellfish toxins in bloom-forming algae.

    PubMed

    Selander, Erik; Kubanek, Julia; Hamberg, Mats; Andersson, Mats X; Cervin, Gunnar; Pavia, Henrik

    2015-05-19

    Interactions among microscopic planktonic organisms underpin the functioning of open ocean ecosystems. With few exceptions, these organisms lack advanced eyes and thus rely largely on chemical sensing to perceive their surroundings. However, few of the signaling molecules involved in interactions among marine plankton have been identified. We report a group of eight small molecules released by copepods, the most abundant zooplankton in the sea, which play a central role in food webs and biogeochemical cycles. The compounds, named copepodamides, are polar lipids connecting taurine via an amide to isoprenoid fatty acid conjugate of varying composition. The bloom-forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum responds to pico- to nanomolar concentrations of copepodamides with up to a 20-fold increase in production of paralytic shellfish toxins. Different copepod species exude distinct copepodamide blends that contribute to the species-specific defensive responses observed in phytoplankton. The signaling system described here has far reaching implications for marine ecosystems by redirecting grazing pressure and facilitating the formation of large scale harmful algal blooms. PMID:25918403

  9. [Shellfish monitoring system for paralytic shellfish toxins using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay].

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Takashi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Sakurada, Kiyonari; Takahi, Shinya; Ueno, Ken-ichi; Matsushima, Ryoji; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the applicability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PSP-ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody against paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) for screening oysters collected at several coastal areas in Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Oysters collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed by PSP-ELISA. As an alternative calibrant, a naturally contaminated oyster extract was used to quantify toxins in the oyster samples. The toxicity of the calibrant oyster extract determined by the official testing method, mouse bioassay (MBA), was 4 MU/g. Oyster samples collected over 3 years showed a similar toxin profile to the alternative standard, resulting in good agreement between the PSP-ELISA and the MBA. The PSP-ELISA method was better than the MBA in terms of sensitivity, indicating that it may be useful for earlier warning of contamination of oysters by PST in the distinct coastal areas. To use the PSP-ELISA as a screening method prior to MBA, we finally set a screening level at 2 MU/g PSP-ELISA for oyster monitoring in Kumamoto prefecture. We confirmed that there were on samples exceeding the quarantine level (4 MU/g) in MBA among samples quantified as below the screening level by the PSP-ELISA. It was concluded that the use of PSP-ELISA could reduce the numbers of animals needed for MBA testing. PMID:24389470

  10. Predator lipids induce paralytic shellfish toxins in bloom-forming algae

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Erik; Kubanek, Julia; Hamberg, Mats; Andersson, Mats X.; Cervin, Gunnar; Pavia, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among microscopic planktonic organisms underpin the functioning of open ocean ecosystems. With few exceptions, these organisms lack advanced eyes and thus rely largely on chemical sensing to perceive their surroundings. However, few of the signaling molecules involved in interactions among marine plankton have been identified. We report a group of eight small molecules released by copepods, the most abundant zooplankton in the sea, which play a central role in food webs and biogeochemical cycles. The compounds, named copepodamides, are polar lipids connecting taurine via an amide to isoprenoid fatty acid conjugate of varying composition. The bloom-forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum responds to pico- to nanomolar concentrations of copepodamides with up to a 20-fold increase in production of paralytic shellfish toxins. Different copepod species exude distinct copepodamide blends that contribute to the species-specific defensive responses observed in phytoplankton. The signaling system described here has far reaching implications for marine ecosystems by redirecting grazing pressure and facilitating the formation of large scale harmful algal blooms. PMID:25918403

  11. Paralytic shellfish toxins, including deoxydecarbamoyl-STX, in wild-caught Tasmanian abalone (Haliotis rubra).

    PubMed

    Harwood, D Tim; Selwood, Andrew I; van Ginkel, Roel; Waugh, Craig; McNabb, Paul S; Munday, Rex; Hay, Brenda; Thomas, Krista; Quilliam, Michael A; Malhi, Navreet; Dowsett, Natalie; McLeod, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    For the first time wild-caught Tasmanian abalone, Haliotis rubra, have been reported to contain paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). This observation followed blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum. No illnesses were reported, but harvesting restrictions were enforced in commercial areas. Abalone were assayed using HPLC-FLD methodology based on AOAC official method 2005.06. An uncommon congener, deoxydecarbamoyl-STX (doSTX), was observed in addition to regulated PSTs as unassigned chromatographic peaks. A quantitative reference material was prepared from contaminated Tasmanian abalone viscera and ampouled at 54.2 μmol/L. The LD50 of doSTX via intraperitoneal injection was 1069 nmol/kg (95% confidence limits 983-1100 nmol/kg), indicating it is nearly 40 times less toxic than STX. A toxicity equivalence factor of 0.042 was generated using the mouse bioassay. Levels of PSTs varied among individuals from the same site, although the toxin profile remained relatively consistent. In the foot tissue, STX, decarbamoyl-STX and doSTX were identified. On a molar basis doSTX was the dominant congener in both foot and viscera samples. The viscera toxin profile was more complex, with other less toxic PST congeners observed and was similar to mussels from the same site. This finding implicates localised dinoflagellate blooms as the PST source in Tasmanian abalone. PMID:25157803

  12. Apparent bioaccumulation of cylindrospermopsin and paralytic shellfish toxins by finfish in Lake Catemaco (Veracruz, Mexico).

    PubMed

    Berry, J P; Jaja-Chimedza, A; Dávalos-Lind, L; Lind, O

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the well-characterized health threats associated with contamination of fish and shellfish by algal toxins in marine fisheries, the toxicological relevance of the bioaccumulation of toxins from cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), as the primary toxigenic algae in freshwater systems, remains relatively unknown. Lake Catemaco (Veracruz, Mexico) is a small, tropical lake system specifically characterized by a year-round dominance of the known toxigenic cyanobacterial genus, Cylindrospermopsis, and by low, but detectable, levels of both a cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, cylindrospermopsin (CYN), and paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). In the present study, we evaluated, using enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), levels of both toxins in several species of finfish caught and consumed locally in the region to investigate the bioaccumulation of, and possible health threats associated with, these toxins as potential foodborne contaminants. ELISA detected levels of both CYN and PSTs in fish tissues from the lake. Levels were generally low (≤ 1 ng g(-1) tissue); however, calculated bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) indicate that toxin levels exceed the rather low levels in the water column and, consequently, indicated bioaccumulation (BAF >1). A reasonable correlation was observed between measured bioaccumulation of CYN and PSTs, possibly indicating a mutual source of both toxins, and most likely cells of Cylindrospermopsis, the dominant cyanobacteria in the lake, and a known producer of both metabolites. The potential roles of trophic transport in the system, as well as possible implications for human health with regards to bioaccumulation, are discussed. PMID:21838624

  13. [Paralytic shellfish poisoning by Spondylus calcifer contaminated with Pyrodinium bahamense, Costa Rica, 1989-1990].

    PubMed

    Mata, L; Abarca, G; Marranghello, L; Víquez, R

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes an outbreak of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), affecting human populations on the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica in October 1989. Numbness in arms, face and legs occurred 30 to 45 minutes after ingestion of the large clam Spondylus calcifer. Paralysis of legs and respiratory symptoms followed, often persisting for one week. Large amounts of the dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense were found in the intestine of the mollusk. A toxin was detected in crude or filtered and heated macerates of intestine, muscle, mantle and hepatopancreas of S. calcifer, and to a lesser extent Tagelus sp., by injection of its crude or diluted extracts in white mice. The effects in mice consisted in paralysis and asphyxia generally leading to death in less than 5 minutes, compatible with saxitoxin. Mice were killed by the toxin in macerates diluted 1:100 to 1:1000. No toxin was detected in Anadara tuberculosa (Bivalvia) or in peneids. Prevention rests on intersectoral actions between state and private sectors in charge of fishing, distribution and marketing of shellfish, as well as on education of the population at large. PMID:2093952

  14. Feeding Problems in Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Yes These symptoms may be a sign of LACTOSE INTOLERANCE, the inability to digest lactose. Lactose is a ... allergy or more severe intolerance to cow's milk (LACTOSE INTOLERANCE) or wheat (CELIAC DISEASE). See your baby's doctor. ...

  15. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via ... down through the esophagus into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to empty the stomach ...

  16. Characterisation of the paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis gene clusters in Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C and Aphanizomenon sp. NH-5

    PubMed Central

    Mihali, Troco K; Kellmann, Ralf; Neilan, Brett A

    2009-01-01

    Background Saxitoxin and its analogues collectively known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are neurotoxic alkaloids and are the cause of the syndrome named paralytic shellfish poisoning. PSTs are produced by a unique biosynthetic pathway, which involves reactions that are rare in microbial metabolic pathways. Nevertheless, distantly related organisms such as dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria appear to produce these toxins using the same pathway. Hypothesised explanations for such an unusual phylogenetic distribution of this shared uncommon metabolic pathway, include a polyphyletic origin, an involvement of symbiotic bacteria, and horizontal gene transfer. Results We describe the identification, annotation and bioinformatic characterisation of the putative paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis clusters in an Australian isolate of Anabaena circinalis and an American isolate of Aphanizomenon sp., both members of the Nostocales. These putative PST gene clusters span approximately 28 kb and contain genes coding for the biosynthesis and export of the toxin. A putative insertion/excision site in the Australian Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C was identified, and the organization and evolution of the gene clusters are discussed. A biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of saxitoxin and its analogues in these organisms is proposed. Conclusion The PST biosynthesis gene cluster presents a mosaic structure, whereby genes have apparently transposed in segments of varying size, resulting in different gene arrangements in all three sxt clusters sequenced so far. The gene cluster organizational structure and sequence similarity seems to reflect the phylogeny of the producer organisms, indicating that the gene clusters have an ancient origin, or that their lateral transfer was also an ancient event. The knowledge we gain from the characterisation of the PST biosynthesis gene clusters, including the identity and sequence of the genes involved in the biosynthesis, may

  17. Glucose intolerance induced by a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet in rats effects of nonesterified fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kaneko, Takashi; Li, Jue; Qin, Li-Qiang; Wang, Pei-Yu; Matsui, Hisao; Sato, Akio

    2002-04-01

    We examined the time course of effects of a high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HF/LC) diet on the impairment of glucose tolerance in rats, clarified whether insulin secretion and sensitivity were impaired by the HF/LC diet, and investigated the relationship between the increased nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) after HF/LC diet feeding and insulin secretion and sensitivity. We found that glucose tolerance and the postglucose-loading insulin secretion were impaired after 3 and 7 d on the HF/LC diet. The glucose intolerance was accompanied by a rise in the fasting plasma NEFA level. When stimulated with 15 mmol/L of glucose, the insulin secretion was impaired in pancreatic islets from rats fed the HF/LC diet. Rats fed the HF/LC diet showed insulin resistance in vivo. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was inhibited in the islets following 24-h culture with palmitic acid. The 24-h infusion of palmitic acid decreased whole-body insulin sensitivity. In summary, at least 3 d on a HF/LC diet is needed to induce glucose intolerance in rats, and the impairment may be induced by decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity, which is related to the increase in the plasma NEFA level. PMID:12108518

  18. Applying the Implicit Association Test to Measure Intolerance of Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Oriana; Dentale, Francesco; Lauriola, Marco; Leone, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is a key trans-diagnostic personality construct strongly associated with anxiety symptoms. Traditionally, IU is measured through self-report measures that are prone to bias effects due to impression management concerns and introspective difficulties. Moreover, self-report scales are not able to intercept the automatic associations that are assumed to be main determinants of several spontaneous responses (e.g., emotional reactions). In order to overcome these limitations, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) was applied to measure IU, with a particular focus on reliability and criterion validity issues. The IU-IAT and the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory (IUI) were administered to an undergraduate student sample (54 females and 10 males) with a mean age of 23 years (SD = 1.7). Successively, participants were asked to provide an individually chosen uncertain event from their own lives that may occur in the future and were requested to identify a number of potential negative consequences of it. Participants' responses in terms of cognitive thoughts (i.e., cognitive appraisal) and worry reactions toward these events were assessed using the two subscales of the Worry and Intolerance of Uncertainty Beliefs Questionnaire. The IU-IAT showed an adequate level of internal consistency and a not significant correlation with the IUI. A path analysis model, accounting for 35% of event-related worry, revealed that IUI had a significant indirect effect on the dependent variable through event-related IU thoughts. By contrast, as expected, IU-IAT predicted event-related worry independently from IU thoughts. In accordance with dual models of social cognition, these findings suggest that IU can influence event-related worry through two different processing pathways (automatic vs. deliberative), supporting the criterion and construct validity of the IU-IAT. The potential role of the IU-IAT for clinical applications was discussed. PMID:27451266

  19. Observations of sylvatic rabies in Northern Argentina during outbreaks of paralytic cattle rabies transmitted by vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus).

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Lord, R D; Russo, R G; Gury-Dhomen, F

    2009-10-01

    During rabies outbreaks in cattle (paralytic rabies) in Argentina associated with the common vampire bat Desmodus rotundus, rabies was observed in marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus), red brocket deer (Mazama americana), capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), savanna fox (Cerdocyon thous), and great fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus). Rabies could constitute a threat to the survival of marsh deer in places where they live in small groups, and infection of both great fruit-eating bats and savanna fox represent a risk for humans; both species exhibit aggressiveness and fury when infected. PMID:19901391

  20. Treating the Golden Implant Visibility on a Paralytic Eye by Using the Capsule Shield Technique.

    PubMed

    Akcal, Arzu; Savas, Seckin Aydin; Ozkan, Ozlenen; Ogan, Onur; Ozkan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Static upper eyelid weight loading is a well known treatment option for patients who suffer from paralytic lagophtalmus. Golden implants may cause some complications such as extrusion, postoperative ptosis, visibility of the implant from the skin, infection, or dislocation. Our patients applied to our clinic with discomfort of the implant's easily noticeable visibility in their daily life. They were scheduled the operation programme for reducing visibility of implant.In operation, capsule formation has seen and dissection begun preserving the capsule formation. The capsule has opened on its cranial edge and implant has been removed. By this maneuver, 2 layers of capsule were dissected from surrounding tissues without separating its caudal edges from the upper tarsal fold. These 2 layers were sutured to each other providing strong fibrous shield with the aim of preventing implant visibility. A new pocket has been created under this fibrous shield.Capsule shield technique is provided to replace the implant and prevent revisibilation by using forceful fibrous and highly vascular 2 layers of capsule. This technique seems 1 step ahead than autogenous grafts that require secondary surgical area and bring donor site complications with itself. It does not contain any risk of developing foreign body response and graft infection, unlikely nonautogenous/autogenous graft materials. Also, in the capsule shield technique, operation duration will be shorter and hospitalization period will be shorter compared with techniques using barrier materials because it does not require any additional surgical intervention in donor area. In addition, the authors keep the apeuneurosis in anatomical position and no other new incisions are required. Since no biomaterials are required, this technique also avoids donor site morbidity. PMID:26703048

  1. Phylogeography of Cylindrospermopsin and Paralytic Shellfish Toxin-Producing Nostocales Cyanobacteria from Mediterranean Europe (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Cirés, Samuel; Wörmer, Lars; Ballot, Andreas; Agha, Ramsy; Wiedner, Claudia; Velázquez, David; Casero, María Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Planktonic Nostocales cyanobacteria represent a challenge for microbiological research because of the wide range of cyanotoxins that they synthesize and their invasive behavior, which is presumably enhanced by global warming. To gain insight into the phylogeography of potentially toxic Nostocales from Mediterranean Europe, 31 strains of Anabaena (Anabaena crassa, A. lemmermannii, A. mendotae, and A. planctonica), Aphanizomenon (Aphanizomenon gracile, A. ovalisporum), and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii were isolated from 14 freshwater bodies in Spain and polyphasically analyzed for their phylogeography, cyanotoxin production, and the presence of cyanotoxin biosynthesis genes. The potent cytotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) was produced by all 6 Aphanizomenon ovalisporum strains at high levels (5.7 to 9.1 μg CYN mg−1 [dry weight]) with low variation between strains (1.5 to 3.9-fold) and a marked extracellular release (19 to 41% dissolved CYN) during exponential growth. Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) neurotoxins (saxitoxin, neosaxitoxin, and decarbamoylsaxitoxin) were detected in 2 Aphanizomenon gracile strains, both containing the sxtA gene. This gene was also amplified in non-PSP toxin-producing Aphanizomenon gracile and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. Phylogenetic analyses supported the species identification and confirmed the high similarity of Spanish Anabaena and Aphanizomenon strains with other European strains. In contrast, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii from Spain grouped together with American strains and was clearly separate from the rest of the European strains, raising questions about the current assumptions of the phylogeography and spreading routes of C. raciborskii. The present study confirms that the nostocalean genus Aphanizomenon is a major source of CYN and PSP toxins in Europe and demonstrates the presence of the sxtA gene in CYN-producing Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. PMID:24334673

  2. Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxin-Producing Cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon gracile in Northeast Germany▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ballot, Andreas; Fastner, Jutta; Wiedner, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Neurotoxic paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, anatoxin-a (ATX), and hepatotoxic cylindrospermopsin (CYN) have been detected in several lakes in northeast Germany during the last 2 decades. They are produced worldwide by members of the nostocalean genera Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, and Aphanizomenon. Although no additional sources of PSP toxins and ATX have been identified in German water bodies to date, the observed CYN concentrations cannot be produced solely by Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, the only known CYN producer in Germany. Therefore, we attempted to identify PSP toxin, ATX, and CYN producers by isolating and characterizing 92 Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Anabaenopsis strains from five lakes in northeast Germany. In a polyphasic approach, all strains were morphologically and phylogenetically classified and then tested for PSP toxins, ATX, and CYN by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and screened for the presence of PSP toxin- and CYN-encoding gene fragments. As demonstrated by ELISA and LC-MS, 14 Aphanizomenon gracile strains from Lakes Melang and Scharmützel produced four PSP toxin variants (gonyautoxin 5 [GTX5], decarbamoylsaxitoxin [dcSTX], saxitoxin [STX], and neosaxitoxin [NEO]). GTX5 was the most prevalent PSP toxin variant among the seven strains from Lake Scharmützel, and NEO was the most prevalent among the seven strains from Lake Melang. The sxtA gene, which is part of the saxitoxin gene cluster, was found in the 14 PSP toxin-producing A. gracile strains and in 11 non-PSP toxin-producing Aphanizomenon issatschenkoi, A. flos-aquae, Anabaena planktonica, and Anabaenopsis elenkinii strains. ATX and CYN were not detected in any of the isolated strains. This study is the first confirming the role of A. gracile as a PSP toxin producer in German water bodies. PMID:20048055

  3. Lethal paralytic shellfish poisoning from consumption of green mussel broth, Western Samar, Philippines, August 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Ruth Alma; de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Background In July 2013, the Philippines’ Event-Based Surveillance & Response Unit received a paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) report from Tarangnan, Western Samar. A team from the Department of Health conducted an outbreak investigation to identify the implicated source and risk factors in coastal villages known for green mussel production and exportation. Methods A case was defined as a previously well individual from Tarangan, Western Samar who developed gastrointestinal symptoms and any motor and/or sensory symptoms after consumption of shellfish from 29 June to 4 July 2013 in the absence of any known cause. The team reviewed medical records, conducted active case finding and a case-control study. Relatives of cases who died were interviewed. Sera and urine specimens, green mussel and seawater samples were tested for saxitoxin levels using high performance liquid chromatography. Results Thirty-one cases and two deaths were identified. Consumption of > 1 cup of green mussel broth was associated with being a case. Seawater sample was positive for Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum and green mussel samples were positive for saxitoxin. Inspection revealed villagers practice open defecation and improper garbage disposal. Conclusion This PSP outbreak was caused by the consumption of the green mussel broth contaminated by saxitoxin. As a result of this outbreak, dinoflagellate and saxitoxin surveillance was established, and since the outbreak, there have been no harmful algal blooms event or PSP case reported since. A “Save Cambatutay Bay” movement, focusing on proper waste disposal practice and clean-up drives has been mobilized. PMID:26306212

  4. Uptake, transfer and elimination kinetics of paralytic shellfish toxins in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanessa M; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Rosa, Rui; Costa, Pedro Reis

    2014-01-01

    Marine phycotoxins derived from harmful algal blooms are known to be associated with mass mortalities in the higher trophic levels of marine food webs. Bivalve mollusks and planktivorous fish are the most studied vectors of marine phycotoxins. However, field surveys recently showed that cephalopod mollusks also constitute potential vectors of toxins. Thus, here we determine, for the first time, the time course of accumulation and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Concomitantly, the underlying kinetics of toxin transfer between tissue compartments was also calculated. Naturally contaminated clams were used to orally expose the octopus to PSTs during 6 days. Afterwards, octopus specimens were fed with non-contaminated shellfish during 10 days of depuration period. Toxins reached the highest concentrations in the digestive gland surpassing the levels in the kidney by three orders of magnitude. PSTs were not detected in any other tissue analyzed. Net accumulation efficiencies of 42% for GTX5, 36% for dcSTX and 23% for C1+2 were calculated for the digestive gland. These compounds were the most abundant toxins in both digestive gland and the contaminated shellfish diet. The small differences in relative abundance of each toxin observed between the prey and the cephalopod predator indicates low conversion rates of these toxins. The depuration period was better described using an exponential decay model comprising a single compartment - the entire viscera. It is worth noting that since octopuses' excretion and depuration rates are low, the digestive gland is able to accumulate very high toxin concentrations for long periods of time. Therefore, the present study clearly shows that O. vulgaris is a high-potential vector of PSTs during and even after the occurrence of these toxic algal blooms. PMID:24316438

  5. Atypical profiles of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish from Luanda and Mussulo bays, Angola.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo; Rangel, Isabel; Silva, Bárbara; Coelho, Paulo; Vilar, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Currently Angola does not possess a monitoring programme for shellfish contamination with marine biotoxins. Among other potentially toxic microalgae, the presence of Gymnodinium catenatum and Pyrodinium bahamense has been reported at the Angola coast, two species associated worldwide with production of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSTs). A preliminary assessment of contamination with PSTs was carried out by HPLC with pre-column derivatization in samples of Semele proficua from Luanda Bay and samples of Senilia senilis from Mussulo Bay, collected between June 2007 and February 2008. An unusual profile was found, not matching any of the 10 oxidation products expected from the known hydrophilic PSTs normally reported in marine dinoflagellates: the N-sulfocarbamoyl, the decarbamoyl or the carbamoyl analogues of saxitoxin (STX). Four major compounds were noted, and designated A through D. These were not autofluorescent, additionally A and D presented much stronger response after peroxide oxidation than after periodate oxidation. Fluorescence emission and ultraviolet absorption maxima were similar to oxidation products of STX analogues. Separation carried out in two different C18 columns clearly showed the retention times did not match the oxidation products of standards. In the period of August through October 2007, samples of S. proficua from Luanda Bay presented a strong cross-reaction with a commercial antibody towards STX, in the range of 2600-5800STXequiv./kg, while for the same period levels in the samples of S. senilis from Mussulo Bay ranged between <30 and 340STXequiv./kg. This reaction was directly proportional to the presence of the four unknown fluorescent peaks. The presence of these compounds was very persistent throughout the studied period, in particular in Luanda Bay. This contamination might not be characteristic of a dinoflagellate blooming, but could be related to a persistent cyanobacterial contamination, due to the strong sewage pollution

  6. Biotransformations of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Bacteria Isolated from Bivalve Molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth A.; Grant, Faye; Ferguson, Carolyn M. J.; Gallacher, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Due to the possibility that bacteria could be involved in the clearance of paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) from bivalve molluscs, investigations into which, if any, bacteria were able to grow at the expense of PST focused on several common shellfish species. These species were blue mussels, oysters, razor fish, cockles, and queen and king scallops. Bacteria associated with these shellfish were isolated on marine agar 2216 and characterized by their carbon utilization profiles (BIOLOG). Selected isolates from groups demonstrating 90% similarity were screened for their ability to metabolize a range of PST (gonyautoxins 1 and 4 [GTX 1/4], GTX 2/3, GTX 5, saxitoxin, and neosaxitoxin) using a novel screening method and confirming its results by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results suggest that molluscan bacteria have different capacities to utilize and transform PST analogues. For example, isolates M12 and R65 were able to reductively transform GTX 1/4 with concomitant production of GTX 2/3, while isolate Q5 apparently degraded GTX 1/4 without the appearance of other GTXs. Other observed possible mechanisms of PST transformations include decarbamoylation by isolate M12 and sulfation of GTXs by isolates Q5, R65, M12, and C3. These findings raise questions as to the possible role of bacteria resident in the shellfish food transport system. Some researchers have suggested that the microflora play a role in supplying nutritional requirements of the host. This study demonstrates that bacteria may also be involved in PST transformation and elimination in molluscan species. PMID:11319121

  7. Outbreak of paralytic poliomyelitis in Oman: evidence for widespread transmission among fully vaccinated children.

    PubMed

    Sutter, R W; Patriarca, P A; Brogan, S; Malankar, P G; Pallansch, M A; Kew, O M; Bass, A G; Cochi, S L; Alexander, J P; Hall, D B

    1991-09-21

    From January, 1988, to March, 1989, a widespread outbreak (118 cases) of poliomyelitis type 1 occurred in Oman. Incidence of paralytic disease was highest in children younger than 2 years (87/100,000) despite an immunisation programme that recently had raised coverage with 3 doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) among 12-month-old children from 67% to 87%. We did a case-control study (70 case-patients, 692 age-matched controls) to estimate the clinical efficacy of OPV, assessed the immunogenicity of OPV and extent of poliovirus spread by serology, retrospectively evaluated the cold chain and vaccine potency, and sought the origin of the outbreak strain by genomic sequencing. 3 doses of OPV reduced the risk of paralysis by 91%; vaccine failures could not be explained by failures in the cold chain nor on suboptimum vaccine potency. Cases and controls had virtually identical type 1 neutralising antibody profiles, suggesting that poliovirus type 1 circulation was widespread. Genomic sequencing indicated that the outbreak strain had been recently imported from South Asia and was distinguishable from isolates indigenous to the Middle East. Accumulation of enough children to sustain the outbreak seems to have been due to previous success of the immunisation programme in reducing spread of endemic strains, suboptimum efficacy of OPV, and delay in completing the primary immunisation series until 7 months of age. Additionally, the estimated attack rate of infection among children aged 9-23 months exceeded 25% in some regions, suggesting that a substantial proportion of fully vaccinated children had been involved in the chain of transmission. PMID:1679866

  8. Autogenic-feedback training: A countermeasure for orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Pickering, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has identified cardiovascular deconditioning as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder and the resulting orthostatic intolerance experienced by crewmembers upon their return to the 1g norm of Earth. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of training human subjects to control their own cardiovascular responses to gravitational stimulation (i.e., a tilt table). Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), we would determine if subjects could learn to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily.

  9. Exercise Intolerance In Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of Americans with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of HFpEF, but the pathophysiology is not well understood. Diverse etiologies and incomplete mechanistic understanding have resulted in ineffective management strategies to improve the outcomes of HFpEF. Traditional therapies that have been beneficial in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), neurohormonal blockade in particular, have not been effective in treating HFpEF. In this review, we address underlying mechanisms of HFpEF and present the rationale supporting exercise as a component of comprehensive management. PMID:27486493

  10. Unemployment and civil commitment: a test of the intolerance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Ralph; Snowden, Lonnie; Shumway, Martha; Kessell, Eric

    2007-01-01

    We theorize that the reported association between economic indicators and the incidence of civil commitment for mental illness may result, at least in part, from reduced tolerance in the community for impaired behavior among minorities. Earlier work suggests that economically induced intolerance will be focused primarily on minority males. Based on this literature, we hypothesize that the median level of functioning among African-American males subjected to civil commitment will vary positively with earlier changes in the unemployment rate. The test applies Box-Jenkins methods to 156 months (August 1985-July 1998) of data from California. Consistent with theory, results support the hypothesis. PMID:17444533

  11. Intolerance to topical products may be due to dermographism.

    PubMed

    Watsky, Kalman L; McGovern, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Patients with reactions to topical products may be eliciting a physical urticaria, dermographism, by rubbing. These reactions may be misinterpreted as allergic, and three cases demonstrating this phenomenon were reviewed. All patients with reactions to topical products due to dermographism improved with counseling and antihistamine therapy. Repeat open application testing confirmed the safety of previously suspect medications in two of the three cases, preventing unnecessary changes in the medication regimens and inaccurate diagnoses of medication allergy. We observe that intolerance to topical medications due to dermographism can usually be managed without extensive testing or treatment. PMID:14744421

  12. Lactose intolerance in persistent diarrhoea during childhood: the role of a traditional rice-lentil (Khitchri) and yogurt diet in nutritional management.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Nizami, S Q; Isani, Z

    1997-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is frequently encountered in children with persistent diarrhoea (PD). Selection of an appropriate milk-based formulation is a major management problem in the developing world. In a consecutive series of studies, we evaluated the role of feeding a traditional rice-lentil (khitchri) diet alone (KY) or in combination with either soy formula (KY-Soy) a dilute buffalo milk (KY-B), in children (age 6 months-3 years) with PD. Serial observations of stool output, caloric intake and weight gain of these children over a 14 day period indicated satisfactory tolerance of the KY diet with adequate weight gain. The weight gain and stool output was however higher in lactose intolerant children, with the worst results seen with K-Y and buffalo milk combination. While lactose intolerant children with PD do have higher. rates of therapeutic failure, our data indicates that a traditional diet and yogurt combination can be used satisfactorily for nutritional rehabilitation in over 80% of such children. PMID:9056732

  13. Genetic Ablation of CD38 Protects against Western Diet-Induced Exercise Intolerance and Metabolic Inflexibility

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Shian-Huey; Harrington, W. Wallace; Luo, Guizhen; Milliken, Naphtali O.; Ulrich, John C.; Chen, Jing; Rajpal, Deepak K.; Qian, Ying; Carpenter, Tiffany; Murray, Rusty; Geske, Robert S.; Stimpson, Stephen A.; Kramer, Henning F.; Haffner, Curt D.; Becherer, J. David; Preugschat, Frank; Billin, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a key cofactor required for essential metabolic oxidation-reduction reactions. It also regulates various cellular activities, including gene expression, signaling, DNA repair and calcium homeostasis. Intracellular NAD+ levels are tightly regulated and often respond rapidly to nutritional and environmental changes. Numerous studies indicate that elevating NAD+ may be therapeutically beneficial in the context of numerous diseases. However, the role of NAD+ on skeletal muscle exercise performance is poorly understood. CD38, a multi-functional membrane receptor and enzyme, consumes NAD+ to generate products such as cyclic-ADP-ribose. CD38 knockout mice show elevated tissue and blood NAD+ level. Chronic feeding of high-fat, high-sucrose diet to wild type mice leads to exercise intolerance and reduced metabolic flexibility. Loss of CD38 by genetic mutation protects mice from diet-induced metabolic deficit. These animal model results suggest that elevation of tissue NAD+ through genetic ablation of CD38 can profoundly alter energy homeostasis in animals that are maintained on a calorically-excessive Western diet. PMID:26287487

  14. Feeding guilt.

    PubMed

    Byrom, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Breastfeeding is increasingly equated to ideologies of the 'good mother' in our society in response to a growing body of evidence identifying its benefits. Women who choose not to or are unable to breastfeed can experience a sense of guilt in response to cultural expectations that 'breast is best'. These negative feelings can impact upon their adaptation to and enjoyment of motherhood. This discussion paper examines the experience of maternal guilt with specific reference to infant feeding. An exploration of the reasons mothers may feel guilty about their feeding experiences is offered. Finally some suggestions are made about how midwives and breastfeeding advocates might improve care for mothers' emotional wellbeing. PMID:23590082

  15. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage. PMID:25231862

  16. Intolerance of sexy peers: intrasexual competition among women.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Sharma, Aanchal

    2011-01-01

    Intrasexual competition among males of different species, including humans, is well documented. Among females, far less is known. Recent nonexperimental studies suggest that women are intolerant of attractive females and use indirect aggression to derogate potential rivals. In Study 1, an experimental design was used to test the evolutionary-based hypothesis that women would be intolerant of sexy women and would censure those who seem to make sex too readily available. Results provide strong empirical support for intrasexual competition among women. Using independent raters, blind to condition, we found that almost all women were rated as reacting negatively ("bitchy") to an attractive female confederate when she was dressed in a sexually provocative manner. In contrast, when she was dressed conservatively, the same confederate was barely noticed by the participants. In Study 2, an experimental design was used to assess whether the sexy female confederate from Study 1 was viewed as a sexual rival by women. Results indicated that as hypothesized, women did not want to introduce her to their boyfriend, allow him to spend time alone with her, or be friends with her. Findings from both studies are discussed in terms of evolutionary theory. PMID:21932332

  17. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians. PMID:27177895

  18. Differentiating intolerance of uncertainty from three related but distinct constructs.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Natalie O; Ivanova, Elena; Knäuper, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in uncertainty have been associated with heightened anxiety, stress and approach-oriented coping. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a trait characteristic that arises from negative beliefs about uncertainty and its consequences. Researchers have established the central role of IU in the development of problematic worry and maladaptive coping, highlighting the importance of this construct to anxiety disorders. However, there is a need to improve our understanding of the phenomenology of IU. The goal of this paper was to present hypotheses regarding the similarities and differences between IU and three related constructs--intolerance of ambiguity, uncertainty orientation, and need for cognitive closure--and to call for future empirical studies to substantiate these hypotheses. To assist with achieving this goal, we conducted a systematic review of the literature, which also served to identify current gaps in knowledge. This paper differentiates these constructs by outlining each definition and general approaches to assessment, reviewing the existing empirical relations, and proposing theoretical similarities and distinctions. Findings may assist researchers in selecting the appropriate construct to address their research questions. Future research directions for the application of these constructs, particularly within the field of clinical and health psychology, are discussed. PMID:23849047

  19. Self-reported intolerance of uncertainty and behavioural decisions.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Shulman, Elizabeth P; Zerff, Marissa; Gonzales, Josh; Mishra, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) appears to be a robust transdiagnostic risk factor related to anxiety and depression. Most transdiagnostic IU research has used the self-report Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale-Short Form; however, there is comparatively little research exploring presumed behavioral correlates of IU. The current study was designed to assess relationships between self-reported IU and decisions in uncertainty-based behavioral tasks (specifically, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, the Risky Gains Task, and the Modified Iowa Gambling Task). Participants comprised compensated community members (n = 108; 69% women) and undergraduates (n = 98; 78% women). Community member compensation was not contingent on performance, but undergraduate compensation was partially contingent on performance. Results replicated prior research, with both samples producing small (r = .19) to moderate (r = -.29) correlations (ps < .05) between self-reported IU and outcome variables from each of the behavioral tasks. The relationships were larger in the undergraduate sample, likely due to the compensation incentive. In general, the results suggest that increasing IU is associated with increasingly risk adverse behaviors; however, the relationship appears complex and in need of substantial additional research to understand how clinically-significant IU would impact pathology-related behaviours. PMID:26788617

  20. Genetic analysis of a synaptic calcium channel in Drosophila: intragenic modifiers of a temperature-sensitive paralytic mutant of cacophony.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, I M; Felling, R; Kawasaki, F; Ordway, R W

    2003-01-01

    Our previous genetic analysis of synaptic mechanisms in Drosophila identified a temperature-sensitive paralytic mutant of the voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunit gene, cacophony (cac). Electrophysiological studies in this mutant, designated cac(TS2), indicated cac encodes a primary calcium channel alpha1 subunit functioning in neurotransmitter release. To further examine the functions and interactions of cac-encoded calcium channels, a genetic screen was performed to isolate new mutations that modify the cac(TS2) paralytic phenotype. The screen recovered 10 mutations that enhance or suppress cac(TS2), including second-site mutations in cac (intragenic modifiers) as well as mutations mapping to other genes (extragenic modifiers). Here we report molecular characterization of three intragenic modifiers and examine the consequences of these mutations for temperature-sensitive behavior, synaptic function, and processing of cac pre-mRNAs. These mutations may further define the structural basis of calcium channel alpha1 subunit function in neurotransmitter release. PMID:12750329

  1. Discomfort Intolerance: Evaluation of a Potential Risk Factor for Anxiety Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Richey, J. Anthony; Cromer, Kiara R.; Buckner, Julia D.

    2007-01-01

    Discomfort intolerance, defined as an individual difference in the capacity to tolerate unpleasant bodily sensations, is a construct recently posited as a risk factor for panic and anxiety psychopathology. The present report used a biological challenge procedure to evaluate whether discomfort intolerance predicts fearful responding beyond the…

  2. Relationships among Perceived Racial Stress, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Worry in a Black Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, LaTanya S.; West, Lindsey M.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely…

  3. Promoting Good Campus Relations: Dealing with Hate Crimes and Intolerance. Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guidance has been produced to help higher education institutions (HEIs) deal with hate crimes and intolerance. Aiming to replace the previous Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals' guidance on extremism and intolerance, this publication provides an overview of the ways in which HEIs can encourage tolerance and respect and ensure that…

  4. Lactose Intolerance: Exploring Reaction Kinetics Governing Lactose Conversion of Dairy Products within the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Jimmy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a condition suffered by an estimated 50 million Americans. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75 percent of all African-American, Jewish, Native American, and Mexican-American adults, and 90 percent of Asian-American adults are lactose intolerant. Some populations in Africa…

  5. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Index: Replication and Extension with an English Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, R. Nicholas; Gosselin, Patrick; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is related to anxiety, depression, worry, and anxiety sensitivity. Precedent IU measures were criticized for psychometric instability and redundancy; alternative measures include the novel 45-item measure (Intolerance of Uncertainty Index; IUI). The IUI was developed in French with 2 parts, assessing general…

  6. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in multiethnic sample of adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, between 30 and 50 million Americans have the potential for lactose-intolerance symptoms. However, lactose-intolerance prevalence rates in practical life settings may be lower than originally suggested. The goal of thi...

  7. A Comparison of the 27-Item and 12-Item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Yu, Lai Ngo Heidi

    2010-01-01

    The 27-item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS) has become one of the most frequently used measures of Intolerance of Uncertainty. More recently, an abridged, 12-item version of the IUS has been developed. The current research used clinical (n = 50) and non-clinical (n = 56) samples to examine and compare the psychometric properties of both…

  8. Studies on Intolerance in American Life. Program in American History and Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs.

    The narrative selected for this unit on intolerance illustrates the perennial and universal methods for scapegoating. The general teaching objectives are to lead the students: 1) to feelings of tolerance toward individuals and groups who are different; 2) to investigate intolerance in terms of some of its causes: fear, deprivation, threatened…

  9. Vitamin E and Vitamin C supplementation does not prevent glucose intolerance in obese-prone rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity-induced glucose intolerance affects over 70 million Americans. Elevated oxidative stress is associated with development of glucose intolerance. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation with the anti-oxidants vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol acetate; 0.4 g/kg diet) and vitamin...

  10. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  11. Breast Feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  12. The Development of Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance in C57Bl/6 Mice on a High-Fat Diet Consists of Distinct Phases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynda M.; Campbell, Fiona M.; Drew, Janice E.; Koch, Christiane; Hoggard, Nigel; Rees, William D.; Kamolrat, Torkamol; Thi Ngo, Ha; Steffensen, Inger-Lise; Gray, Stuart R.; Tups, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    High–fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and insulin insensitivity are associated with inflammation, particularly in white adipose tissue (WAT). However, insulin insensitivity is apparent within days of HF feeding when gains in adiposity and changes in markers of inflammation are relatively minor. To investigate further the effects of HF diet, C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a low (LF) or HF diet for 3 days to 16 weeks, or fed the HF-diet matched to the caloric intake of the LF diet (PF) for 3 days or 1 week, with the time course of glucose tolerance and inflammatory gene expression measured in liver, muscle and WAT. HF fed mice gained adiposity and liver lipid steadily over 16 weeks, but developed glucose intolerance, assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT), in two phases. The first phase, after 3 days, resulted in a 50% increase in area under the curve (AUC) for HF and PF mice, which improved to 30% after 1 week and remained stable until 12 weeks. Between 12 and 16 weeks the difference in AUC increased to 60%, when gene markers of inflammation appeared in WAT and muscle but not in liver. Plasma proteomics were used to reveal an acute phase response at day 3. Data from PF mice reveals that glucose intolerance and the acute phase response are the result of the HF composition of the diet and increased caloric intake respectively. Thus, the initial increase in glucose intolerance due to a HF diet occurs concurrently with an acute phase response but these effects are caused by different properties of the diet. The second increase in glucose intolerance occurs between 12 - 16 weeks of HF diet and is correlated with WAT and muscle inflammation. Between these times glucose tolerance remains stable and markers of inflammation are undetectable. PMID:25170916

  13. Cold intolerance of the hand measured by the CISS questionnaire in a normative study population.

    PubMed

    Ruijs, A C J; Jaquet, J-B; Daanen, H A M; Hovius, S E R

    2006-10-01

    Cold intolerance has been recognized as one of the most disabling sequelae of upper extremity trauma, especially when neurovascular structures are involved. In this study, we aimed to describe cold intolerance in a normative study population, validate the Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity (CISS) questionnaire and define the threshold for abnormal cold intolerance. One hundred and eight volunteers participated in our study. In addition to the CISS score, information about age, gender and previous surgery or trauma to the upper extremity was obtained. There were no volunteers with previous peripheral nerve injury and subjects with a history of Raynaud's disease, upper extremity injury or surgery were excluded (n=40). The CISS scores of the study population (n=68) averaged 12.9 (SD 8.2). Age and gender were not correlated with CISS score. The upper 95% confidence interval of the CISS scores for healthy subjects is about 30. We suggest this value as a threshold for pathological cold intolerance. PMID:16808991

  14. In Silico Analysis of Putative Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxins Export Proteins in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Liebe, Katia; López-Cortés, Xaviera A.; Fuentes-Valdes, Juan José; Stucken, Karina; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Vásquez, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSTs) are a family of more than 30 natural alkaloids synthesized by dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria whose toxicity in animals is mediated by voltage-gated Na+ channel blocking. The export of PST analogues may be through SxtF and SxtM, two putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) family transporters encoded in PSTs biosynthetic gene cluster (sxt). sxtM is present in every sxt cluster analyzed; however, sxtF is only present in the Cylindrospermopsis-Raphidiopsis clade. These transporters are energetically coupled with an electrochemical gradient of proton (H+) or sodium (Na+) ions across membranes. Because the functional role of PSTs remains unknown and methods for genetic manipulation in PST-producing organisms have not yet been developed, protein structure analyses will allow us to understand their function. By analyzing the sxt cluster of eight PST-producing cyanobacteria, we found no correlation between the presence of sxtF or sxtM and a specific PSTs profile. Phylogenetic analyses of SxtF/M showed a high conservation of SxtF in the Cylindrospermopsis-Raphidiopsis clade, suggesting conserved substrate affinity. Two domains involved in Na+ and drug recognition from NorM proteins (MATE family) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae are present in SxtF/M. The Na+ recognition domain was conserved in both SxtF/M, indicating that Na+ can maintain the role as a cation anti-transporter. Consensus motifs for toxin binding differed between SxtF and SxtM implying differential substrate binding. Through protein modeling and docking analysis, we found that there is no marked affinity between the recognition domain and a specific PST analogue. This agrees with our previous results of PST export in R. brookii D9, where we observed that the response to Na+ incubation was similar to different analogues. These results reassert the hypothesis regarding the involvement of Na+ in toxin export, as well as the motifs L398XGLQD

  15. Temperature effects on kinetics of paralytic shellfish toxin elimination in Atlantic surfclams, Spisula solidissima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monica Bricelj, V.; Cembella, Allan D.; Laby, David

    2014-05-01

    Surfclams, Spisula solidissima, pose a particular health risk for human consumption as they are characterized by accumulation of extremely high levels of toxins associated with paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), slow toxin elimination and an extremely high post-ingestive capacity for toxin bioconversion. Surfclam populations experience a wide range of temperatures along the NW Atlantic continental shelf, and are undergoing range contraction that has been attributed to global warming. In this study the influence of temperature (5, 12 and 21 °C) on detoxification kinetics of individual PSP toxins in two tissue compartments of juvenile surfclams (∼35 mm shell length) was determined under controlled laboratory conditions, over prolonged (2.4 months) depuration. Clams were toxified with a representative regional Gulf of Maine isolate of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense of known toxin profile, allowing tracking of changes in toxin composition and calculated toxicity in surfclam tissues. The visceral mass detoxified at all temperatures, although toxin loss rate increased with increasing temperature. In contrast, total toxin content and calculated toxicities in other tissues remained constant or even increased during depuration, suggesting a physiological or biochemical toxin-retention mechanism in this tissue pool and temperature-independent detoxification. In vivo toxin compositional changes in surfclam tissues found in this study provide evidence of specific toxin conversion pathways, involving both reductive and decarbamoylation pathways. We conclude that such toxin biotransformations, especially in non-visceral tissues, may introduce a discrepancy in describing kinetics of total toxicity (in saxitoxin equivalents [STXeq]) of S. solidissima over prolonged detoxification. Nevertheless, use of total toxicity values generated by routine regulatory monitoring based upon mouse bioassays or calculated from chemical analytical determination of molar toxin

  16. Immediate postoperative feeding in urological surgery.

    PubMed

    Seidmon, E J; Pizzimenti, K V; Blumenstock, F A; Huben, R P; Wajsman, Z; Pontes, J E

    1984-06-01

    The value of immediate postoperative enteral hyperalimentation with an elemental diet (high nitrogen Vivonex, full strength) at 125 cc per hour for 4 days was assessed in patients after radical urological surgery. Of 32 patients studied 21 received an elemental diet using a Vivonex Moss tube, which is a 3-lumen tube with esophagogastric decompression and simultaneous duodenal feeding, and the remaining 11 had a nasogastric tube only without nutritional support. We have used a selected group of parameters, including serum albumin, serum transferrin, creatinine height index, weight loss, total lymphocyte count, nitrogen balance and plasma fibronectin. All patients in the Moss tube group approached or achieved positive nitrogen balance by 4 days postoperatively, whereas the nasogastric tube group remained in negative nitrogen balance. Postoperative paralytic ileus was prevented in the majority of patients in the Moss tube group while receiving full nutritional support. We have found that the use of the Moss tube is a reasonable approach for postoperative alimentation. The tube is relatively easy to insert and well tolerated, and its use is a less expensive alternative to parenteral hyperalimentation. PMID:6427479

  17. Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Cotugno, Giovanna; Koch, Pierluigi; Dahdah, Lamia

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) symptoms develop at first introduction of fruit during weaning. We report on an infant with suspected HFI who presented with repeated episodes of vomiting and hypotension after ingestion of fruit-containing meals. The first episode occurred at age 4 months. Despite negative genetic testing for HFI, strict avoidance of fruit ingestion resulted in lack of recurrence of symptoms. Oral-fructose-tolerance testing conducted with an apple mousse did not determine hypoglycemia or fructosuria but caused severe hypotension. Allergy evaluations were negative, and the history was diagnostic for fruit-induced food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. Because this non-immunoglobulin E-mediated gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity manifests as profuse, repetitive vomiting, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration and lethargy, it may be misinterpreted as HFI. We advise pediatricians to consider food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in the differential diagnosis when there is a suspicion of HFI. PMID:25002667

  18. Mechanisms of Orthostatic Intolerance During Real and Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session MP1 includes short reports on: (1) Orthostatic Tests after 42 Days of Simulated Weightlessness; (2) Effects of 12 Days Exposure to Simulated Microgravity on Central Circulatory Hemodynamics in the Rhesus Monkey; (3) Increased Sensitivity and Resetting of Baroflex Control of Exercise Heart Rate After Prolonged Bed-Rest; (4) Complex Cardiovascular Dynamics and Deconditioning During Head-down Bed Rest; (5) The Cardiovascular Effects of 6 Hours of Head-down Tilt Upon Athletes and Non-athletes; (6) Individual Susceptibility to Post-spaceflight Orthostatic Intolerance: Contributions of Gender-related and Microgravity-related Factors; (7) Cassiopee Mission 1996: Comparison of Cardiovascular Alteration after Short and Long-term Spaceflights; (8) Cerebral and Femoral Flow Response to LBNP during 6 Month MIR Spaceflights (93-95); and (9) Cerebrovascular Changes due to Spaceflight and Postflight Presyncope.

  19. [Old age and illness--destroying the intolerable?].

    PubMed

    Heinrich, K

    1991-05-01

    The spectacular criminal case of a nurse who because of killing seven old patients in an intensive care ward had been sentenced to jail for 11 years is shown as example of radical thinking in the face of intolerability of serious illness and age. The deficit model of age is on the one hand justly criticized and called invalid, on the other hand negative aspects of age may not be concealed in the face of hedonistic principles of the present epoch. There is no doubt about the monstrosity of the case of the guilty nurse but it may be exemplary for a frequent defensive behaviour against the phenomena of age. If this is right this singular case may be characteristic of common thinking on the unbearable presumption of age. Self defense turning into aggressivity because of foreseeing the own fate of hopeless illness in moribund aged would then have to be seen as a socially significant attitude. PMID:1869232

  20. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated with the IEI variables, but there was no evidence of a role of the repressive coping construct. While the total alexithymia score was unrelated to IEI, the TAS-20 subscale of difficulties identifying feelings (DIF) was independently associated with symptoms attributed to IEI. Negative affectivity was a strong independent predictor of the IEI variables and a mediator of the association between DIF and IEI. Conclusion Our results provide no evidence for a role of repressive coping in IEI, and our hypothesis of an association with alexithymia was only partly supported. In contrast, strong associations between IEI and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI. PMID:21432559

  1. Intolerance of Uncertainty: A Temporary Experimental Induction Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Oriana; Lauriola, Marco; Carleton, R. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a trans-diagnostic construct involved in anxiety and related disorders. Research focused on cross-sectional reporting, manipulating attitudes toward objective and impersonal events or on treatments designed to reduce IU in clinical populations. The current paper presents an experimental procedure for laboratory manipulations of IU and tests mediation hypotheses following the Intolerance of Uncertainty Model. Methods On pre-test, undergraduate volunteers (Study 1, n = 43;68% women. Study 2, n = 169;83.8% women) were asked to provide an idiosyncratic future negative life event. State-IU, Worry, Positive and Negative Affect were assessed after that a standardized procedure was used to identify event’s potential negative consequences. The same variables were assessed on post-test, after that participants were asked to read-through increasing and decreasing IU statements. Results Temporary changes on IU were consistently reproduced in both studies. Participants receiving increasing IU instructions reported greater state-IU, Worry and Negative Affect than those receiving decreasing IU instructions. However, this latter condition was not different from a control one (Study 2). Both studies revealed significant indirect effects of IU induction instructions on Worry and Negative Affect through state-IU. Limitations Both studies used undergraduate psychology students samples, younger than average population and predominantly female. Experimental manipulation and outcome measures belongs to the same semantic domain, uncertainty, potentially limiting generalizability. Conclusions Results supported the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed IU manipulation for non-clinical sample. Findings parallel clinical research showing that state-IU preceded Worry and Negative Affect states. PMID:27254099

  2. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome versus Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle; Vernon, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine has recommended a change in the name and criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), renaming the illness Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). The new SEID case definition requires substantial reductions or impairments in the ability to engage in pre-illness activities, unrefreshing sleep, post-exertional malaise, and either cognitive impairment or orthostatic intolerance. Purpose In the current study, samples were generated through several different methods and were used to compare this new case definition to previous case definitions for CFS, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME-ICC), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), as well as a case definition developed through empirical methods. Methods We used a cross-sectional design with samples from tertiary care settings, a biobank sample, and other forums. 796 patients from the US, Great Britain, and Norway completed the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire. Results Findings indicated that the SEID criteria identified 88% of participants in the samples analyzed, which is comparable to the 92% that met the Fukuda criteria. The SEID case definition was compared to a four item empiric criteria, and findings indicated that the four item empiric criteria identified a smaller, more functionally limited and symptomatic group of patients. Conclusion The recently developed SEID criteria appears to identify a group comparable in size to the Fukuda et al. criteria, but a larger group of patients than the Canadian ME/CFS and ME criteria, and selects more patients who have less impairment and fewer symptoms than a four item empiric criteria. PMID:26345409

  3. Neuroleptic intolerance in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lejuste, Florian; Thomas, Laure; Picard, Géraldine; Desestret, Virginie; Ducray, François; Rogemond, Veronique; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Groc, Laurent; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To precisely describe the initial psychiatric presentation of patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) to identify potential clues enhancing its early diagnosis. Methods: We retrospectively studied the French Reference Centre medical records of every adult patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis to specify the patients' initial psychiatric symptoms leading to hospitalization in a psychiatric department and the reasons underlying the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Results: The medical records of 111 adult patients were reviewed. Psychiatric features were the initial presentation in 65 patients (59%). Among them, several psychiatric manifestations were observed, including visual and auditory hallucinations (n = 26, 40%), depression (n = 15, 23%), mania (n = 5, 8%), acute schizoaffective episode (n = 15, 23%), and eating disorder or addiction (n = 4; 6%). Forty-five patients (40% of total cohort) were first hospitalized in a psychiatric institution (91% women), with a median duration of stay of 9 days (range 0.25–239 days). Among them, 24 patients (53%) had associated discreet neurologic signs at the first evaluation, while 17 additional patients (38%) developed neurologic signs within a few days. Twenty-one patients (47%) were transferred to a medical unit for a suspicion of antipsychotic intolerance characterized by high temperature, muscle rigidity, mutism or coma, and biological results suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Conclusions: Several psychiatric presentations were observed in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although none was specific; however, patients, mostly women, also had discreet neurologic signs that should be carefully assessed as well as signs of antipsychotic intolerance that should raise suspicion for anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27606355

  4. Assessment of food chemical intolerance in adult asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, L.; Yan, K. Y.; Loblay, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of food chemical intolerance in asthmatic subjects can be reliably assessed by changes in the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in response to double blind, placebo controlled challenges on a strict elimination diet. However, this method is cumbersome and time consuming. A study was undertaken to determine whether changes in bronchial responsiveness to histamine following food chemical challenge without an elimination diet might be a faster, more convenient method. METHODS: Eleven adult asthmatic subjects were challenged twice with metabisulphite, aspirin, monosodium glutamate, artificial food colours, sodium nitrite/ nitrate, 0.5% citric acid solution (placebo), and sucrose (placebo) on separate days. During the first set of challenges subjects consumed a normal diet. Bronchial responsiveness to histamine was assessed 90 minutes after each challenge. A greater than twofold increase in bronchial responsiveness was considered positive. For one month prior to and during the second set of challenges subjects followed a strict elimination diet and FEV1 was monitored during and for two hours after each challenge. A fall in FEV1 of 20% or more was considered positive. RESULTS: Of the 77 food chemical challenges performed on an unmodified diet, 20 were positive (six placebo responses). In two subjects it was not possible to perform a histamine test after one of the chemical challenges because of poor spirometric function. Of the 77 food chemical challenges performed on an elimination diet, 11 were positive (no placebo responses). Excluding the two challenges in which there were no corresponding histamine tests, only on two occasions did the positive responses in both methods coincide, giving the unmodified diet method a sensitivity of 22%. CONCLUSIONS: Strict dietary elimination and measurement of FEV1 after double blind food chemical challenge remains the most reliable method for the detection of food chemical intolerance in

  5. Feed Formulation and Manufacture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter provides information on feed formulation and manufacture. To formulate and manufacture high quality fish feeds, including tilapia feeds, one should have knowledge of nutrient requirements, nutrient composition, digestibility, and availability of feed ingredients; impacts of manufacturin...

  6. Glucose intolerance in early postpartum in women with gestational diabetes: Who is at increased risk?

    PubMed

    Leuridan, Liesbeth; Wens, Johan; Devlieger, Roland; Verhaeghe, Johan; Mathieu, Chantal; Benhalima, Katrien

    2015-08-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the years after the index pregnancy. Some women with GDM already develop glucose intolerance in early postpartum. The best screening strategy for glucose intolerance in early postpartum among women with a history of GDM is still debated. We review the most important risk factors of women with GDM to develop glucose intolerance within one year postpartum. We also discuss the current recommendations for screening in early postpartum and the many challenges to organize postpartum follow up in primary care. PMID:25899304

  7. The occurrence of paralytic shellfish toxins in two species of xanthid crab from Suva barrier reef, Fiji Islands.

    PubMed

    Raj, U; Haq, H; Oshima, Y; Yasumoto, T

    1983-01-01

    Five species of crabs commonly occurring on Suva barrier reef, Fiji Islands, were tested for the presence of paralytic shellfish toxins. All 35 specimens of Atergatis floridus and all 18 specimens of Zosimus aeneus tested were lethal to mice, whilst none of 12 specimens of Carpilius maculatus, 8 of C. convexus and 10 of Eriphia sebana tested were lethal. A. floridus contained saxitoxin (55--60%), neosaxitoxin (35--40%), gonyautoxin-II (less than 5%) and a new toxin previously found in a toxic dinoflagellate, Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressa, and tentatively coded PBT (1%). Z. aeneus contained the same components, with additional trace amounts of gonyautoxin-I and III, but neosaxitoxin was the major component in this species. Comparison with the results of testing Okinawan specimens of Z. aeneus, A. floridus and Platipodia granulosa suggests that the toxin profile is specific to species. PMID:6623494

  8. New pharmacological approaches against chronic bowel and bladder problems in paralytics.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads generally to an irreversible loss of sensory functions and voluntary motor control below injury level. Cures that could repair SCI and/or restore voluntary walking have not been yet developed nor commercialized. Beyond the well-known loss of walking capabilities, most SCI patients experience also a plethora of motor problems and health concerns including specific bladder and bowel dysfunctions. Indeed, chronic constipation and urinary retention, two significant life-threatening complications, are typically found in patients suffering of traumatic (e.g., falls or car accidents) or non-traumatic SCI (e.g., multiple sclerosis, spinal tumors). Secondary health concerns associated with these dysfunctions include hemorrhoids, abdominal distention, altered visceral sensitivity, hydronephrosis, kidney failure, urinary tract infections, sepsis and, in some cases, cardiac arrest. Consequently, individuals with chronic SCI are forced to regularly seek emergency and critical care treatments when some of these conditions occur or become intolerable. Increasing evidence supports the existence of a novel experimental approach that may be capable of preventing the occurrence or severity of bladder and bowel problems. Indeed, recent findings in animal models of SCI have revealed that, despite paraplegia or tetraplegia, it remains possible to elicit episodes of micturition and defecation by acting pharmacologically or electrically upon specialized lumbosacral neuronal networks, namely the spinal or sacral micturition center (SMC) and lumbosacral defecation center (LDC). Daily activation of SMC and LDC neurons could potentially become, new classes of minimally invasive treatments (i.e., if orally active) against these dysfunctions and their many life-threatening complications. PMID:26855887

  9. New pharmacological approaches against chronic bowel and bladder problems in paralytics

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads generally to an irreversible loss of sensory functions and voluntary motor control below injury level. Cures that could repair SCI and/or restore voluntary walking have not been yet developed nor commercialized. Beyond the well-known loss of walking capabilities, most SCI patients experience also a plethora of motor problems and health concerns including specific bladder and bowel dysfunctions. Indeed, chronic constipation and urinary retention, two significant life-threatening complications, are typically found in patients suffering of traumatic (e.g., falls or car accidents) or non-traumatic SCI (e.g., multiple sclerosis, spinal tumors). Secondary health concerns associated with these dysfunctions include hemorrhoids, abdominal distention, altered visceral sensitivity, hydronephrosis, kidney failure, urinary tract infections, sepsis and, in some cases, cardiac arrest. Consequently, individuals with chronic SCI are forced to regularly seek emergency and critical care treatments when some of these conditions occur or become intolerable. Increasing evidence supports the existence of a novel experimental approach that may be capable of preventing the occurrence or severity of bladder and bowel problems. Indeed, recent findings in animal models of SCI have revealed that, despite paraplegia or tetraplegia, it remains possible to elicit episodes of micturition and defecation by acting pharmacologically or electrically upon specialized lumbosacral neuronal networks, namely the spinal or sacral micturition center (SMC) and lumbosacral defecation center (LDC). Daily activation of SMC and LDC neurons could potentially become, new classes of minimally invasive treatments (i.e., if orally active) against these dysfunctions and their many life-threatening complications. PMID:26855887

  10. Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and nonallergic food intolerance: FODMAPs or food chemicals?

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jacqueline S; Gibson, Peter R

    2012-07-01

    Food intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is increasingly being recognized, with patients convinced that diet plays a role in symptom induction. Evidence is building to implicate fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in the onset of abdominal pain, bloating, wind and altered bowel habit through their fermentation and osmotic effects. Hypersensitivity to normal levels of luminal distension is known to occur in patients with IBS, with consideration of food chemical intolerance likely to answer many questions about this physiological process. This paper summarizes the evidence and application of the most common approaches to managing food intolerance in IBS: the low-FODMAP diet, the elimination diet for food chemical sensitivity and others including possible noncoeliac gluten intolerance. PMID:22778791

  11. The Relationship Between Intolerance of Uncertainty, Sensory Sensitivities, and Anxiety in Autistic and Typically Developing Children.

    PubMed

    Neil, Louise; Olsson, Nora Choque; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Guided by a recent theory that proposes fundamental differences in how autistic individuals deal with uncertainty, we investigated the extent to which the cognitive construct 'intolerance of uncertainty' and anxiety were related to parental reports of sensory sensitivities in 64 autistic and 85 typically developing children aged 6-14 years. Intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety explained approximately half the variance in autistic children's sensory sensitivities, but only around a fifth of the variance in typical children's sensory sensitivities. In children with autism only, intolerance of uncertainty remained a significant predictor of children's sensory sensitivities once the effects of anxiety were adjusted for. Our results suggest intolerance of uncertainty is a relevant construct to sensory sensitivities in children with and without autism. PMID:26864157

  12. Abnormal pulmonary macrophages in lysinuric protein intolerance. Ultrastructural, morphometric, and x-ray microanalytic study.

    PubMed

    Parto, K; Mäki, J; Pelliniemi, L J; Simell, O

    1994-05-01

    Pediatric patients with lysinuric protein intolerance are predisposed to develop alveolar hemorrhage and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. We evaluated the ultrastructural features of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and the potential abnormality of pulmonary macrophages in lysinuric protein intolerance. Lung tissue specimens obtained at autopsy were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Pulmonary macrophages from bronchoalveolar lavages were studied by electron microscopy, morphometry, and x-ray microanalysis and compared with control cells. The macrophages of patients with lysinuric protein intolerance contained significantly more multilamellar structures than did control cells and showed electron-dense material identified to contain excess iron. The predisposition to develop alveolar proteinosis and the abnormal ultrastructure of pulmonary macrophages suggest altered phospholipid metabolism in patients with lysinuric protein intolerance. The marked intramacrophageal accumulations of iron might indicate altered iron metabolism or subclinical hemorrhages in lung tissue. PMID:8192561

  13. Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and nonallergic food intolerance: FODMAPs or food chemicals?

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Food intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is increasingly being recognized, with patients convinced that diet plays a role in symptom induction. Evidence is building to implicate fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in the onset of abdominal pain, bloating, wind and altered bowel habit through their fermentation and osmotic effects. Hypersensitivity to normal levels of luminal distension is known to occur in patients with IBS, with consideration of food chemical intolerance likely to answer many questions about this physiological process. This paper summarizes the evidence and application of the most common approaches to managing food intolerance in IBS: the low-FODMAP diet, the elimination diet for food chemical sensitivity and others including possible noncoeliac gluten intolerance. PMID:22778791

  14. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Management of Statin Adverse Effects and Intolerance: Canadian Consensus Working Group Update (2016).

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet; Tashakkor, A Yashar

    2016-07-01

    The Canadian Consensus Working Group has updated its evaluation of the literature pertaining to statin intolerance and adverse effects. This overview introduces a pragmatic definition of statin intolerance (goal-inhibiting statin intolerance) that emphasizes the effects of symptoms on achieving nationally vetted goals in patients fulfilling indications for lipid-lowering therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction. The Canadian Consensus Working Group provides a structured framework for avoiding, evaluating and managing goal-inhibiting statin intolerance. Particularly difficult practice situations are reviewed, including management in young and elderly individuals, and in athletes and labourers. Finally, targeted at specialty practitioners, more detailed analyses of specific but more unusual adverse effects ascribed to statins are updated including evidence regarding new-onset diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, cataracts, and the rare but important immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. PMID:27342697

  15. Wheat Allergy and Intolerence; Recent Updates and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Imran; Saeed, Farhan; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Batool, Rizwana; Aziz, Mahwash; Ahmed, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    The current review paper highlights the complicacies associated with communities relying on wheat as their dietary staple. Although, wheat is an important source of nutrients but is also linked with allergenic responses in genetically susceptible subjects. The wheat proteins especially α-amylase inhibitors, ω-5 gliadins, prolamins, nonprolamin, glucoprotein, and profilins are of significance importance. The allergenic responses are further categorized into IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions. Conjugation and degranulation of the IgEs with the allergens results in release of several mediators. In contrary, non-IgE-mediated wheat allergy depends on immune complexes formed by food and food antibodies and cell-mediated immunity. As results, different diseases tend to occur on the completion of these reactions, i.e., celiac disease, baker's asthma, diarrhea, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria. This instant paper highlighted the concept of food allergy with special reference to wheat. The models are developed that are included in this paper showing the wheat allergen, their possible routes, impact on human health, and indeed possible remedies. The paper would provide the basic information for the researchers, common man, and allied stakeholders to cater the issue in details. However, the issue needs the attention of the researchers as there is a need to clarify the issues of wheat allergy and wheat intolerance. PMID:24915366

  16. Systemic exercise intolerance disease: What's in a name?

    PubMed

    Sen, Mahadev Singh; Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Aggarwal, Shivali; Singh, Shubh Mohan

    2016-08-01

    The syndrome characterized primarily by chronic, disabling fatigue without adequate explanation has been of interest to patients, clinicians and researchers. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a widely used term for this condition in scientific and lay literature but is not acceptable to many patients because of perceived stigma due to implied psychological causation. CFS has recently been replaced by systemic exercise intolerance disease (SEID) by the Institute of medicine with the objectives of providing and disseminating evidence-based criteria and to provide a more acceptable name for this condition. Simultaneously, changes have taken place in DSM-5 with regards to this condition. Mental health professionals need to be aware of this change in the interests of patient care. The need to replace CFS with SEID and the nosological changes also indicate an inability to do away with the Descartian mind-body dualism despite efforts to the contrary and a need to debate the failure of the bio-psycho-social model to 'mainstream' and destigmatize psychiatry. PMID:27520920

  17. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  18. Contextual Influences on Distress Intolerance: Priming Effects on Behavioral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Szuhany, Kristin L.; Otto, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Distress intolerance (DI), the inability to tolerate stressful experiences, has been linked to multiple psychiatric conditions and maladaptive coping patterns. Although DI is often considered a trait-like variable, evidence indicates that self-report and behavioral indices of DI can be manipulated by contextual factors. Understanding such contextual influences is important given evidence of unexpected variability in these presumed trait-like measures over brief intervals. The current study examined the influence of context (manipulated by priming concepts of “Interminability” and “Brevity”) in predicting behavioral persistence, in relation to self-reported DI. Results indicated that priming Brevity was associated with terminating a cold-pressor task more quickly. Self-reported DI was linked to earlier termination, but there was no interaction between self-reported DI and priming condition. Results indicate that contextual cues modulate performance on behavioral measures of DI. Hence, models of DI should consider both trait-like and contextual factors in understanding variability in DI measures. PMID:26366022

  19. Nutritional support of malnourished lactose intolerant African patients.

    PubMed Central

    O'Keefe, S J; Adam, J K; Cakata, E; Epstein, S

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of two commonly available liquid diets was assessed in 40 severely malnourished black African patients. All patients were shown to have normal xylose absorption. The diets were given according to the manufacturer's recommendations. One diet was lactose containing (LC diet) (150 g/d) and high protein (112 g/d), the other normal protein and lactose free (LF diet) (protein 67 g/d), total energy content being similar. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups and allocated (blind) to one of the diets. Tolerance and nitrogen balance were assessed over two three day periods on half and then full strength formulations. Severe intolerant symptoms were observed in 50% of patients on half strength and 94% of patients on full strength lactose containing diet with evidence of malabsorption of fluid, nitrogen, and fat. Despite high stool nitrogen losses (3.75 +/- 1.04 g/d), however, positive nitrogen balance was achieved in most patients receiving the full strength LC formulation. On the other hand, the full strength LF diet was generally well tolerated and was associated with significantly lower faecal losses and positive nitrogen balance. The results indicate that high density lactose containing liquid formulae are poorly tolerated by severely malnourished black African patients, while lactose free formulae containing approximately 10 g nitrogen/d are well tolerated and result in positive nitrogen balance. PMID:6469079

  20. Neuropeptides and peptide hormones in syncope and orthostatic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Balaji; Benditt, David G

    2014-01-01

    Syncope and orthostatic intolerance (OI) are common clinical syndromes often requiring medical attention. The former is defined as transient loss of consciousness and postural tone due to self-limited cerebral hypoperfusion, while the latter consists of inappropriate cardiovascular responses to upright posture such as occur with orthostatic hypotension (OH) or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. The most frequent causes of syncope and OI are conditions that temporarily disrupt essential moment-to-moment interaction between the autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular system. In this regard, many neuropeptides (NPs) or peptide hormones (PH) exert cardioactive effects that might contribute to the pathophysiology of certain forms of syncope or OI. To date, the principal peptides that have been studied in this context are: atrial and B-type-neuropeptides, adrenomedullin, endothelin-1 (ET-1), galanin, and vasopressin. While definitive conclusions cannot yet be drawn, the intrinsic vasoconstrictor ET-1 appears to be elevated in OH, presumably to compensate for vasodilation and hypotension of other etiologies. As such elevated ET-1 may become a marker for OH. Further, elevated NT-proBNP may play a role in causing vasodilation and hypotension in some forms of OH of previously unknown cause, and may be a marker in other patients of a cardiovascular cause of syncope and OI. In the end, the study of the role of NPs and PHs in syncope and OI syndromes is at an early stage, and considerable further future effort is needed. PMID:25299506

  1. Mechanisms of microgravity induced orthostatic intolerance: implications for effective countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of orthostatic hypotension and instability immediately after return from spaceflight has been a significant operational problem to astronauts for more than four decades. Significant reductions in stroke volume and peripheral vascular resistance contribute to ineffective maintenance of systemic arterial blood pressure during standing after spaceflight despite compensatory elevations in heart rate. The primary mechanism underlying reduced stroke volume appears to be a reduction in preload associated with reduced circulating blood volume, although cardiac atrophy might also contribute. Space flight and ground based experiments have demonstrated that an inability to provide adequate peripheral vasoconstriction in astronauts that become presyncopal may be associated with several mechanisms including reduced sympathetic nerve activity, arterial smooth muscle atrophy and/or hyporeactivity, hypersensitivity of beta-adrenergic receptors, etc. In addition, an inability to provide adequate tachycardia in presyncopal subjects may be associated with reduced carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Based on the current knowledge and understanding of cardiovascular mechanisms that are altered during exposure to microgravity, a major focus of future research should be directed to the systematic evaluation of potential countermeasures that specifically target and restore the function of these mechanisms. Based on a preliminary systematic evaluation presented in this review, acute physical exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, G-suit inflation, artificial gravity, and specific pharmacological interventions, alone or in combination, have shown promise as successful countermeasures that provide protection against post-flight orthostatic intolerance.

  2. Novel epoxy activated hydrogels for solving lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Magdy M M; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2014-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance" is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 5-10% w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3 U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11 U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel's mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme's -SH, -NH, and -OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme's -NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, K m and V max, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2 h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel. PMID:25013804

  3. Salicylate intolerance: a masquerader of multiple adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Suran Loshana; Clarke, Lesley R

    2009-01-01

    A female in her early 50s presented with a long-standing history of episodic urticaria and angioedema. She also reported urticarial reactions after ingestion of aspirin, prednisone and multiple antibiotics. These medications were all taken during upper respiratory tract infections. An elimination diet followed by a series of open challenges to food chemicals demonstrated an urticarial eruption following the ingestion of mints, which contain high levels of salicylates. A double-blinded placebo-controlled challenge to salicylate confirmed her sensitivity and explained her reaction to aspirin. The patient informed her treating physician of her copious ingestion of mints during upper respiratory tract infections. Drug hypersensitivity to antibiotics and prednisone was excluded on the basis of negative radioallergosorbent tests (RASTs) and/or absent skin-test responses and/or tolerance to oral challenges. This patient had a salicylate intolerance that caused her episodic urticaria and angioedema, and also masqueraded as a drug allergy due to the concurrent ingestion of mints. PMID:21918670

  4. Lactose intolerance and health disparities among African Americans and Hispanic Americans: an updated consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rahn K; Fileti, Cecelia Pozo; Keith, Jeanette; Tropez-Sims, Susanne; Price, Winston; Allison-Ottey, Sharon Denise

    2013-01-01

    Dairy foods contribute nine essential nutrients to the diet including calcium, potassium and vitamin D; nutrients identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as being "of public health concern" within the U.S. population. Milk and milk product intake is associated with better diet quality and has been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases or conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and osteoporosis. Some research also indicates dairy food intake may be linked to reduced body fat, when accompanied by energy-restriction. On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake. True lactose intolerance prevalence is not known because healthcare providers do not routinely measure for it, and no standardized assessment method exists. Avoiding dairy may lead to shortfalls of essential nutrients and increased susceptibility to chronic disease. This updated Consensus Statement aims to provide the most current information about lactose intolerance and health, with specific relevance to the African American and Hispanic American communities. Topics covered include diagnostic considerations, actual and recommended dairy food intake and levels of consumption of key dairy nutrients among African Americans and Hispanic Americans; prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance among various racial/ethnic groups; the association between dairy food intake, lactose intolerance and chronic disease; and research-based management recommendations for those with lactose intolerance. PMID:24079212

  5. Long-Term Outcome of Combined Lateral Tarsal Strip With Temporal Permanent Tarsorrhaphy for Correction of Paralytic Ectropion Caused By Facial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye Yoon; Jang, Sun Young; Yoon, Jin Sook

    2015-07-01

    Paralytic ectropion caused by facial nerve palsy often requires surgical intervention for cornea protection. In this study, the authors intended to investigate the long-term surgical outcome of their surgical technique of correcting paralytic ectropion, which is a combined lateral tarsal strip and minimal temporal permanent tarsorrhaphy. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent paralytic ectropion repair by combined lateral tarsal strip with minimal temporal permanent tarsorrhaphy (5  mm) from January 2010 to December 2012. Patients with at least 1 year of follow-up were included. An analysis of preoperative and postoperative measurements included the extent of lagophthalmos, grade of superficial punctate keratopathy (SPK), and tear break-up time (tBUT). The study included 22 patients and a total of 22 eyes. The lagophthalmos, grade of SPK, and tBUT at both 1 month and 1 year of postoperative follow-up were all significantly improved compared with preoperatively (all P < 0.01). At 1 year after surgery, the mean SPK grade and tBUT were slightly, but not significantly, worse than at 1 month after surgery (P = 0.716 and P = 0.632, retrospectively). Three patients were not satisfied with the aesthetic appearance; however, no patient required additional surgery to enhance eyelid closure because of ectropion recurrence or to reopen the tarsorrhaphy during long-term follow-up. Combined lateral tarsal strip with minimal temporal permanent tarsorrhaphy is a quick, safe, and effective surgical technique for the treatment of lower eyelid paralytic ectropion. It produces minimal cosmetic disfigurement and low morbidity during long-term follow-up. PMID:26086924

  6. Development of a sensitive and selective liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for high throughput analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using graphitised carbon solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Boundy, Michael J; Selwood, Andrew I; Harwood, D Tim; McNabb, Paul S; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-03-27

    Routine regulatory monitoring of paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) commonly employs oxidative derivitisation and complex liquid chromatography fluorescence detection methods (LC-FL). The pre-column oxidation LC-FL method is currently implemented in New Zealand and the United Kingdom. When using this method positive samples are fractionated and two different oxidations are required to confirm the identity and quantity of each PST analogue present. There is a need for alternative methods that are simpler, provide faster turnaround times and have improved detection limits. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) HPLC-MS/MS analysis of PST has been used for research purposes, but high detection limits and substantial sample matrix issues have prevented it from becoming a viable alternative for routine monitoring purposes. We have developed a HILIC UPLC-MS/MS method for paralytic shellfish toxins with an optimised desalting clean-up procedure on inexpensive carbon solid phase extraction cartridges for reduction of matrix interferences. This represents a major technical breakthrough and allows sensitive, selective and rapid analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins from a variety of sample types, including many commercially produced bivalve molluscan shellfish species. Additionally, this analytical approach avoids the need for complex calculations to determine sample toxicity, as unlike other methods each PST analogue is able to be quantified as a single resolved peak. This article presents the method development and optimisation information. A thorough single laboratory validation study has subsequently been performed and this data will be presented elsewhere. PMID:25704772

  7. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Fitz, Werner; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to determine their anxious and depressive comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted within a German population-based cross-sectional telephone survey. A representative sample of 2,012 individuals aged 14 and above was selected. Defined neurological conditions (migraine, Menière's disease, motion sickness), symptom pattern, age of first manifestation, precipitating height stimuli, course of illness, psychosocial impairment, and comorbidity patterns (anxiety conditions, depressive disorders according to DSM-IV-TR) for vHI and acrophobia were assessed. The lifetime prevalence of vHI was 28.5% (women 32.4%, men 24.5%). Initial attacks occurred predominantly (36%) in the second decade. A rapid generalization to other height stimuli and a chronic course of illness with at least moderate impairment were observed. A total of 22.5% of individuals with vHI experienced the intensity of panic attacks. The lifetime prevalence of acrophobia was 6.4% (women 8.6%, men 4.1%), and point prevalence was 2.0% (women 2.8%; men 1.1%). VHI and even more acrophobia were associated with high rates of comorbid anxious and depressive conditions. Migraine was both a significant predictor of later acrophobia and a significant consequence of previous acrophobia. VHI affects nearly a third of the general population; in more than 20% of these persons, vHI occasionally develops into panic attacks and in 6.4%, it escalates to acrophobia. Symptoms and degree of social impairment form a continuum of mild to seriously distressing conditions in susceptible subjects. PMID:25262317

  8. Idiopathic environmental intolerances (IEI): from molecular epidemiology to molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    De Luca, C; Scordo, G; Cesareo, E; Raskovic, D; Genovesi, G; Korkina, L

    2010-07-01

    Inherited or acquired impairment of xenobiotics metabolism is a postulated mechanism underlying environment-associated pathologies such as multiple chemical sensitivity, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, dental amalgam disease, and others, also collectively named idiopathic environmental intolerances (IEI). In view of the poor current knowledge of their etiology and pathogenesis, and the absence of recognised genetic and metabolic markers of the diseases. They are often considered "medically unexplained syndromes",. These disabling conditions share the features of polysymptomatic multi-organ syndromes, considered by part of the medical community to be aberrant responses triggered by exposure to low-dose organic and inorganic chemicals and metals, in concentrations far below average reference levels admitted for environmental toxicants. A genetic predisposition to altered biotransformation of environmental chemicals, drugs, and metals, and of endogenous low-molecular weight metabolites, caused by polymorphisms of genes coding for xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, their receptors and transcription factors appears to be involved in the susceptibility to these environment-associated pathologies, along with epigenetic factors. Free radical/antioxidant homeostasis may also be heavily implicated, indirectly by affecting the regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and directly by causing increased levels of oxidative products, implicated in the chronic damage of cells and tissues, which is in part correlated with clinical symptoms. More systematic studies of molecular epidemiology, toxico- and pharmaco-genomics, elucidating the mechanisms of regulation, expression, induction, and activity of antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes, and the possible role of inflammatory mediators, promise a better understanding of this pathologically increased sensitivity to low-level chemical stimuli, and a solid basis for effective individualized antioxidant- and/or chelator

  9. Utility of Corrected QT Interval in Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Bin; Hong, Soonwoong; Park, Jin-Woo; Cho, Dong-Hyuk; Park, Ki-Jong; Kim, Byung-Jo

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to determine whether electrocardiographic corrected QT (QTc) interval predicts alterations in sympathovagal balance during orthostatic intolerance (OI). We reviewed 1,368 patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of OI who underwent electrocardiography and composite autonomic function tests (AFTs). Patients with a positive response to the head-up tilt test were classified into orthostatic hypotension (OH), neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS), or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) groups. A total of 275 patients (159 OH, 54 NCS, and 62 POTS) were included in the final analysis. Between-group comparisons of OI symptom grade, QTc interval, QTc dispersion, and each AFT measure were performed. QTc interval and dispersion were correlated with AFT measures. OH Patients had the most severe OI symptom grade and NCS patients the mildest. Patients with OH showed the longest QTc interval (448.8±33.6 msec), QTc dispersion (59.5±30.3 msec) and the lowest values in heart rate response to deep breathing (HRDB) (10.3±6.0 beats/min) and Valsalva ratio (1.3±0.2). Patients with POTS showed the shortest QTc interval (421.7±28.6 msec), the highest HRDB values (24.5±9.2 beats/min), Valsalva ratio (1.8±0.3), and proximal and distal leg sweat volumes in the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test. QTc interval correlated negatively with HRDB (r = −0.443, p<0.001) and Valsalva ratio (r = −0.425, p<0.001). We found negative correlations between QTc interval and AFT values representing cardiovagal function in patients with OI. Our findings suggest that prolonged QTc interval may be considered to be a biomarker for detecting alterations in sympathovagal balance, especially cardiovagal dysfunction in OH. PMID:25180969

  10. Cerebral vasoconstriction precedes orthostatic intolerance after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Brown, T. E.; Kassam, M. S.; Bondar, R. L.; Schlegel, T. T.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of brief but repeated bouts of micro- and hypergravity on cerebrovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) were examined in 13 individuals after (compared to before) parabolic flight. Middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA MFV; transcranial Doppler ultrasound), eye level blood pressure (BP) and end tidal CO(2) (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured while supine and during 80 degrees HUT for 30 min or until presyncope. In the postflight tests subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT) (n = 7) or intolerant (OI) (n = 6). BP was diminished with HUT in the OT group in both tests (p < 0.05) whereas postflight BP was not different from supine in the OI group. Postflight compared to preflight, the reduction in P(ET)CO(2) with HUT (p < 0.05) increased in both groups, although significantly so only in the OI group (p < 0.05). The OI group also had a significant decrease in supine MCA MFV postflight (p < 0.05) that was unaccompanied by a change in supine P(ET)CO(2). The decrease in MCA MFV that occurred during HUT in both groups preflight (p < 0.05) was accentuated only in the OI group postflight, particularly during the final 30 s of HUT (p < 0.05). However, this accentuated decrease in MCA MFV was not correlated to the greater decrease in P(ET)CO(2) during the same period (R = 0.20, p = 0.42). Although cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) also increased in the OI group during the last 30 s of HUT postflight (p < 0.05), the dynamic autoregulatory gain was not simultaneously changed. Therefore, we conclude that in the OI individuals, parabolic flight was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion following a paradoxical augmentation of CVR by a mechanism that was not related to changes in autoregulation nor strictly to changes in P(ET)CO(2).