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Sample records for feiii-reducing myxobacterium anaeromyxobacter

  1. Reductive Dehalogenation of Herbicides by Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the genus Anaeromyxobacter are well known for their versatile respiratory capabilities, including reductive dehalogenation of phenolic compounds. The widespread distribution of Anaeromyxobacter spp. in the environment suggests their potential significance in biogeochemical cycling includi...

  2. Nitrous Oxide Respiration in Non-Denitrifying Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the genus Anaeromyxobacter are versatile, facultative microaerophilic myxobacteria isolated from soils, aquifers and freshwater sediments. Anaeromyxobacter spp. grow with nitrate as electron acceptor, which is reduced via nitrite to ammonia. Interestingly, the analysis of the Anaeromyxo...

  3. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2005-06-01

    Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species The overarching goal of this 3-year project is to explore uranium reduction in Anaeromyxobacter species. Specifically, we explore the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, design molecular biology tools to detect and quantify Anaeromyxobacter in pure cultures, consortia, and environmental samples, assess their diversity, distribution, and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites, and attempt the isolation of additional Anaeromyxobacter species from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC). The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student with fellowship, no charges to NABIR project), Ivy Thomson (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project), and Ryan Wagner (''Special Topics'' bioinformatics undergraduate student, no charges to NABIR project). Exploratory MALDI-TOF MS experiments for the specific detection of Anaeromyxobacter species were performed by Kerry Preston (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project).

  4. The Mosaic Genome of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C Suggests an Aerobic Common Ancestor to the Delta-Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sara H.; Wagner, Ryan D.; Arakaki, Adrian K.; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Kirby, John R.; Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Sanford, Robert A.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C is a versaphilic delta-Proteobacterium distributed throughout many diverse soil and sediment environments. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis groups A. dehalogenans together with the myxobacteria, which have distinguishing characteristics including strictly aerobic metabolism, sporulation, fruiting body formation, and surface motility. Analysis of the 5.01 Mb strain 2CP-C genome substantiated that this organism is a myxobacterium but shares genotypic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria (i.e., the Desulfuromonadales). Reflective of its respiratory versatility, strain 2CP-C possesses 68 genes coding for putative c-type cytochromes, including one gene with 40 heme binding motifs. Consistent with its relatedness to the myxobacteria, surface motility was observed in strain 2CP-C and multiple types of motility genes are present, including 28 genes for gliding, adventurous (A-) motility and 17 genes for type IV pilus-based motility (i.e., social (S-) motility) that all have homologs in Myxococcus xanthus. Although A. dehalogenans shares many metabolic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria, strain 2CP-C grows under microaerophilic conditions and possesses detoxification systems for reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, two gene clusters coding for NADH dehydrogenase subunits and two cytochrome oxidase gene clusters in strain 2CP-C are similar to those in M. xanthus. Remarkably, strain 2CP-C possesses a third NADH dehydrogenase gene cluster and a cytochrome cbb3 oxidase gene cluster, apparently acquired through ancient horizontal gene transfer from a strictly anaerobic green sulfur bacterium. The mosaic nature of the A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C genome suggests that the metabolically versatile, anaerobic members of the delta-Proteobacteria may have descended from aerobic ancestors with complex lifestyles. PMID:18461135

  5. Biomolecular Mechanisms Controlling Metal and Radionuclide Transformations in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, Alexander S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Sanford, Robert A.

    2006-06-01

    Microbiological reduction and immobilization of U(VI) and Tc(VII) has been proposed as a strategy for remediating radionuclide-contaminated environments. Numerous studies focusing on the reduction kinetics and speciation of these metals have been carried out using contaminated sediment samples, microbial consortia, and pure bacterial cultures. While previous work with model organisms has increased the general understanding of radionuclide transformation processes, fundamental questions regarding radionuclide reduction mechanisms by indigenous microorganisms are poorly understood, especially under the commonly encountered scenario where multiple electron acceptors are present. Therefore, the overall goal of the proposed research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of radionuclide biotransformation by Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, a predominant member of indigenous microorganism commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments, and to assess the effects of relevant environmental factors affecting these transformation reactions.

  6. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 106 cells g dry sediment−1. In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 104, 3.1 × 102, and 4.4 × 104 g dry sediment−1, respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them. PMID:26682861

  7. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 10(6) cells g dry sediment(-1). In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 10(4), 3.1 × 10(2), and 4.4 × 10(4) g dry sediment(-1), respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them. PMID:26682861

  8. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2004-06-01

    We investigate the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, and assess their distribution and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites. The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student) and Cornell Gayle (undergraduate student). Year-1 efforts focused on method and tool development to address the research objectives. First, we compared different analytical assays (based on fluorescent light emission and calorimetric methods) to quantify U(VI) in cultures of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C. The assays were optimized to reflect specific culture conditions, and we found that a laser-excited spectrofluorescence assay provided reproducible and accurate information on the amount of U(VI) reduced in bacterial cultures. To demonstrate the ability of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C to reduce U(VI), washed suspensions of fumarate-grown cells were prepared. These experiments confirmed that the rapid reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) depended on the presence of live cells, and no U(VI) reduction occurred in cell-free controls. Additional experiments explored the ability of three different Anaeromyxobacter strains to grow with the mineral hematite, an insoluble form of ferric iron, as electron acceptor. All strain grew equally well with soluble ferric iron (provided as ferric citrate) but distinct differences were observed between strains when grown with hematite. All strains tested shared a 16S rRNA gene similarity of >99.5%, suggesting that closely related strains may differ in their ability to access insoluble forms of ferric iron.

  9. Diversity and distribution of anaeromyxobacter strains in a uranium-contaminated subsurface environment with a nonuniform groundwater flow.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sara H; Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Jardine, Phillip M; Sanford, Robert A; Löffler, Frank E

    2009-06-01

    Versaphilic Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains implicated in hexavalent uranium reduction and immobilization are present in the fractured saprolite subsurface environment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site near Oak Ridge, TN. To provide insight into the in situ distribution of Anaeromyxobacter strains in this system with a nonuniform groundwater flow, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers and linear hybridization (TaqMan) probes were designed for Oak Ridge IFC Anaeromyxobacter isolates FRC-D1 and FRC-W, along with an Anaeromyxobacter genus-targeted probe and primer set. Multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (mqPCR) was applied to samples collected from Oak Ridge IFC site areas 1 and 3, which are not connected by the primary groundwater flow paths; however, transport between them through cross-plane fractures is hypothesized. Strain FRC-W accounted for more than 10% of the total quantifiable Anaeromyxobacter community in area 1 soils, while strain FRC-D1 was not detected. In FeOOH-amended enrichment cultures derived from area 1 site materials, strain FRC-D1 accounted for 30 to 90% of the total Anaeromyxobacter community, demonstrating that this strain was present in situ in area 1. The area 3 total Anaeromyxobacter abundance exceeded that of area 1 by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude, but neither strain FRC-W- nor FRC-D1-like sequences were quantifiable in any of the 33 area 3 groundwater or sediment samples tested. The Anaeromyxobacter community in area 3 increased from <10(5) cells/g sediment outside the ethanol biostimulation treatment zone to 10(8) cells/g sediment near the injection well, and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis revealed that representatives of a novel phylogenetic cluster dominated the area 3 Anaeromyxobacter community inside the treatment loop. The combined applications of genus- and strain-level mqPCR approaches along with clone libraries provided novel information on patterns of microbial

  10. Aggregicoccus edonensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an unusually aggregating myxobacterium isolated from a soil sample.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sakshi; Awal, Ram Prasad; Wink, Joachim; Mohr, Kathrin I; Rohde, Manfred; Stadler, Marc; Kämpfer, Peter; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Schumann, Peter; Garcia, Ronald; Müller, Rolf

    2015-03-01

    A novel myxobacterium, MCy1366(T) (Ar1733), was isolated in 1981 from a soil sample collected from a region near Tokyo, Japan. It displayed general myxobacterial features like Gram-negative-staining, rod-shaped vegetative cells, gliding on solid surfaces, microbial lytic activity, fruiting-body-like aggregates and myxospore-like structures. The strain was mesophilic, aerobic and showed a chemoheterotrophic mode of nutrition. It was resistant to many antibiotics such as cephalosporin C, kanamycin, gentamicin, hygromycin B, polymyxin and bacitracin, and the key fatty acids of whole cell hydrolysates were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 2-OH. The genomic DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 65.6 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence showed highest similarity (97.60 %) to 'Stigmatella koreensis' strain KYC-1019 (GenBank accession no. EF112185). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and MALDI-TOF MS data revealed a novel branch in the family Myxococcaceae. DNA-DNA hybridization showed only 28 % relatedness between the novel strain and the closest recognized species, Corallococcus exiguus DSM 14696(T) (97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). A recent isolate from a soil sample collected in Switzerland, MCy10622, displayed 99.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with strain MCy1366(T) and showed almost the same characteristics. Since some morphological features like fruiting-body-like aggregates were barely reproducible in the type strain, the newly isolated strain, MCy10622, was also intensively studied. On the basis of a comprehensive taxonomic study, we propose a novel genus and species, Aggregicoccus edonensis gen. nov., sp. nov., for strains MCy1366(T) and MCy10622. The type strain of the type species is MCy1366(T) ( = DSM 27872(T) = NCCB 100468(T)). PMID:24591423

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  13. Release of Arsenic from Soil by a Novel Dissimilatory Arsenate-Reducing Bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Keitaro; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Makino, Tomoyuki; Ohtsuka, Toshihiko; Kimura, Kenta; Dong, Dian Tao

    2013-01-01

    A novel arsenate-reducing bacterium, designated strain PSR-1, was isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. Strain PSR-1 was phylogenetically closely related to Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1T with 16S rRNA gene similarity of 99.7% and coupled the oxidation of acetate with the reduction of arsenate. Arsenate reduction was inhibited almost completely by respiratory inhibitors such as dicumarol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide. Strain PSR-1 also utilized soluble Fe(III), ferrihydrite, nitrate, oxygen, and fumarate as electron acceptors. Strain PSR-1 catalyzed the release of arsenic from arsenate-adsorbed ferrihydrite. In addition, inoculation of washed cells of strain PSR-1 into sterilized soil successfully reproduced arsenic release. Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed that the proportion of arsenite in the soil solid phase actually increased from 20% to 50% during incubation with washed cells of strain PSR-1. These results suggest that strain PSR-1 is capable of reducing not only dissolved arsenate but also arsenate adsorbed on the soil mineral phase. Arsenate reduction by strain PSR-1 expands the metabolic versatility of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans. Considering its distribution throughout diverse soils and anoxic sediments, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans may play a role in arsenic release from these environments. PMID:23709511

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Glavina Del Rio, T; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Sims, D; Brettin, T; Bruce, D C; Detter, J C; Han, C S; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F W; Land, M L; Hauser, L J; Kyrpides, N; Lykidis, A; Richardson, P; Belieav, A; Sanford, R A; Löeffler, F E; Fields, M W

    2015-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium's genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation. PMID:25614562

  15. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  16. Identification of a Novel Antibiotic from Myxobacterium Stigmatella Eracta WXNXJ-B and Evaluation of its Antitumor Effects In-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dahong; Yuan, Jiangfeng; Tao, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    This work was to isolate and identify the bioactive secondary metabolite which was produced by myxobacterium Stigmatella eracta WXNXJ-B, and to evaluate its antitumor and apoptosis-inducing effects. The results showed that one novel compound (molecular formula C29H25NO3) was isolated, purified by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and preparative RP-HPLC, and identified as 5-(6-benzyl-quinolin-3-ylmethyl)-6- phenyl-3,7-dioxa- bicycle [4.1.0] heptan-3-one (named as quinoxalone) according to its UV, IR, HRMS and NMR spectra. The compound showed strong antitumor activity on B16, HepG2, MCF-7, SGC-7901, MDA-MB231 and CT-26 six tumor cell lines in-vitro. Nevertheless, it showed less cytotoxic to the mouse normal spleen cells (IC50 was 836.27 ± 13.02 µg mL-1). The cytotoxic study on HepG2 cells in-vitro showed that quinoxalone could induce the change of cell nuclear and arrested the cell division in the S and G2/M phase. Our results suggest that quinoxalone could be a potential anti-cancer agent. PMID:24734069

  17. Identification of a Novel Antibiotic from Myxobacterium Stigmatella Eracta WXNXJ-B and Evaluation of its Antitumor Effects I n - vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dahong; Yuan, Jiangfeng; Tao, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    This work was to isolate and identify the bioactive secondary metabolite which was produced by myxobacterium Stigmatella eracta WXNXJ-B, and to evaluate its antitumor and apoptosis-inducing effects. The results showed that one novel compound (molecular formula C29H25NO3) was isolated, purified by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and preparative RP-HPLC, and identified as 5-(6-benzyl-quinolin-3-ylmethyl)-6- phenyl-3,7-dioxa- bicycle [4.1.0] heptan-3-one (named as quinoxalone) according to its UV, IR, HRMS and NMR spectra. The compound showed strong antitumor activity on B16, HepG2, MCF-7, SGC-7901, MDA-MB231 and CT-26 six tumor cell lines in-vitro. Nevertheless, it showed less cytotoxic to the mouse normal spleen cells (IC50 was 836.27 ± 13.02 µg mL(-1)). The cytotoxic study on HepG2 cells in-vitro showed that quinoxalone could induce the change of cell nuclear and arrested the cell division in the S and G2/M phase. Our results suggest that quinoxalone could be a potential anti-cancer agent. PMID:24734069

  18. Quantitative frame analysis and the annotation of GC-rich (and other) prokaryotic genomes. An application to Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    PubMed Central

    Oden, Steve; Brocchieri, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Graphical representations of contrasts in GC usage among codon frame positions (frame analysis) provide evidence of genes missing from the annotations of prokaryotic genomes of high GC content but the qualitative approach of visual frame analysis prevents its applicability on a genomic scale. Results: We developed two quantitative methods for the identification and statistical characterization in sequence regions of three-base periodicity (hits) associated with open reading frame structures. The methods were implemented in the N-Profile Analysis Computational Tool (NPACT), which highlights in graphical representations inconsistencies between newly identified ORFs and pre-existing annotations of coding-regions. We applied the NPACT procedures to two recently annotated strains of the deltaproteobacterium Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, identifying in both genomes numerous conserved ORFs not included in the published annotation of coding regions. Availability and implementation: NPACT is available as a web-based service and for download at http://genome.ufl.edu/npact. Contact: lucianob@ufl.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26048600

  19. Identification of a c-Type Cytochrome Specific for Manganese Dioxide (MnO2) Reduction in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Nissen, S.; Liu, X.; Chourey, K.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Hettich, R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a metabolically versatile Deltaproteobacterium and conserves energy from the reduction of various electron acceptors, including insoluble MnO2 and ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides (FeOOH). The goal of this study was to identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to MnO2. The characterization of deletion mutants has revealed a number of c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid metal oxides in Shewanella spp. and Geobacter spp; however, a genetic system for Anaeromyxobacter is not available. The A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C genome encodes 68 putative c-type cytochromes, which all lack functional assignments. To identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid MnO2, protein expression profiles of A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C cells grown with acetate as electron donor and MnO2, ferric citrate, FeOOH, nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors were compared. Whole cell proteomes were analyzed after trypsin proteolysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed with cells grown with different electron acceptors. A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C grown with MnO2 expressed 25 out of the 68 c-type cytochromes encoded on the genome. The c-type cytochrome Adeh_1278 was only expressed in strain 2CP-C grown with MnO2. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed that the Adeh_1278 gene was transcribed in MnO2-grown cells but not in cells grown with other terminal electron acceptors. The expression of the Adeh_1278 gene correlated with Mn(IV) reduction activity. Adeh_1278 has three heme binding motifs and is predicted to be located in the periplasm. The identification of Adeh_1278 as a protein uniquely expressed when MnO2 serves as electron acceptor suggests its utility as a biomarker for MnO2 reduction. This example demonstrates the value of the LC-MS/MS approach for identifying specific proteins of interest and making functional assignments

  20. Analysis of periplasmic sensor domains from Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-C: structure of one sensor domain from a histidine kinase and another from a chemotaxis protein.

    PubMed

    Pokkuluri, P Raj; Dwulit-Smith, Jeff; Duke, Norma E; Wilton, Rosemarie; Mack, Jamey C; Bearden, Jessica; Rakowski, Ella; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Szurmant, Hendrik; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schiffer, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a δ-proteobacterium found in diverse soils and sediments. It is of interest in bioremediation efforts due to its dechlorination and metal-reducing capabilities. To gain an understanding on A. dehalogenans' abilities to adapt to diverse environments we analyzed its signal transduction proteins. The A. dehalogenans genome codes for a large number of sensor histidine kinases (HK) and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP); among these 23 HK and 11 MCP proteins have a sensor domain in the periplasm. These proteins most likely contribute to adaptation to the organism's surroundings. We predicted their three-dimensional folds and determined the structures of two of the periplasmic sensor domains by X-ray diffraction. Most of the domains are predicted to have either PAS-like or helical bundle structures, with two predicted to have solute-binding protein fold, and another predicted to have a 6-phosphogluconolactonase like fold. Atomic structures of two sensor domains confirmed the respective fold predictions. The Adeh_2942 sensor (HK) was found to have a helical bundle structure, and the Adeh_3718 sensor (MCP) has a PAS-like structure. Interestingly, the Adeh_3718 sensor has an acetate moiety bound in a binding site typical for PAS-like domains. Future work is needed to determine whether Adeh_3718 is involved in acetate sensing by A. dehalogenans. PMID:23897711

  1. Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Anaerolineae populations are enriched on anodes of root exudate-driven microbial fuel cells in rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Angela; Pommerenke, Bianca; Boon, Nico; Friedrich, Michael W

    2015-06-01

    Plant-based sediment microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) couple the oxidation of root exudates in living rice plants to current production. We analysed the composition of the microbial community on anodes from PMFC with natural rice field soil as substratum for rice by analysing 16S rRNA as an indicator of microbial activity and diversity. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis indicated that the active bacterial community on anodes from PMFCs differed strongly compared with controls. Moreover, clones related to Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly abundant (49% and 21%, respectively) on PMFCs anodes. Geobacter (19%), Anaeromyxobacter (15%) and Anaerolineae (17%) populations were predominant on anodes with natural rice field soil and differed strongly from those previously detected with potting soil. In open circuit (OC) control PMFCs, not allowing electron transfer, Deltaproteobacteria (33%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Chloroflexi (12%), Alphaproteobacteria (10%) and Firmicutes (10%) were detected. The presence of an electron accepting anode also had a strong influence on methanogenic archaea. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active on PMFC (21%) than on OC controls (10%), whereas acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae were more active on OC controls (31%) compared with PMFCs (9%). In conclusion, electron accepting anodes and rice root exudates selected for distinct potential anode-reducing microbial populations in rice soil inoculated PMFC. PMID:25683328

  2. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  3. Requirement for a microbial consortium to completely oxidize glucose in Fe(III)- reducing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    In various sediments in which Fe(III) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process, [14C]glucose was fermented to 14C-fatty acids in a manner similar to that observed in methanogenic sediments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in Fe(III)-reducing sediments, fermentable substrates are oxidized to carbon dioxide by the combined activity of fermentative bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria. PMID:26900859

  5. Genome Analysis of the Fruiting Body-Forming Myxobacterium Chondromyces crocatus Reveals High Potential for Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zaburannyi, Nestor; Bunk, Boyke; Maier, Josef; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the type strain of the myxobacterial genus Chondromyces, Chondromyces crocatus Cm c5. It presents one of the largest prokaryotic genomes featuring a single circular chromosome and no plasmids. Analysis revealed an enlarged set of tRNA genes, along with reduced pressure on preferred codon usage compared to that of other bacterial genomes. The large coding capacity and the plethora of encoded secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters are in line with the capability of Cm c5 to produce an arsenal of antibacterial, antifungal, and cytotoxic compounds. Known pathways of the ajudazol, chondramide, chondrochloren, crocacin, crocapeptin, and thuggacin compound families are complemented by many more natural compound biosynthetic gene clusters in the chromosome. Whole-genome comparison of the fruiting-body-forming type strain (Cm c5, DSM 14714) to an accustomed laboratory strain which has lost this ability (nonfruiting phenotype, Cm c5 fr−) revealed genetic changes in three loci. In addition to the low synteny found with the closest sequenced representative of the same family, Sorangium cellulosum, extensive genetic information duplication and broad application of eukaryotic-type signal transduction systems are hallmarks of this 11.3-Mbp prokaryotic genome. PMID:26773087

  6. INVESTIGATING ANAEROBIC MICROBIAL PROCESSES IN AGRICULTURAL SOILS USING ANAEROMYXOBACTER DEHALOGENANS AS A COSMOPOLITAN MODEL [ABSTRACT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic microbial processes have not been thoroughly studied in agricultural soils. Yet, anaerobic conditions may significantly impact agrochemical fate, nutrient cycling, and plant/seed-microbe interactions. As part of a broader weed ecology/weed management experimental program we have selected...

  7. Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Lainie; North, Nadia N.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Balkwill, David L.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2003-01-01

    Iron(III)-reducing bacteria have been demonstrated to rapidly catalyze the reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) from contaminated subsurface sediments. Thus, these organisms may aid in the development of bioremediation strategies for uranium contamination, which is prevalent in acidic subsurface sediments at U.S. government facilities. Iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures were initiated from pristine and contaminated (high in uranium, nitrate; low pH) subsurface sediments at pH 7 and pH 4 to 5. Enumeration of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria yielded cell counts of up to 240 cells ml−1 for the contaminated and background sediments at both pHs with a range of different carbon sources (glycerol, acetate, lactate, and glucose). In enrichments where nitrate contamination was removed from the sediment by washing, MPN counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria increased substantially. Sediments of lower pH typically yielded lower counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in lactate- and acetate-amended enrichments, but higher counts were observed when glucose was used as an electron donor in acidic enrichments. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences extracted from the highest positive MPN dilutions revealed that the predominant members of Fe(III)-reducing consortia from background sediments were closely related to members of the Geobacteraceae family, whereas a recently characterized Fe(III) reducer (Anaeromyxobacter sp.) and organisms not previously shown to reduce Fe(III) (Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus spp.) predominated in the Fe(III)-reducing consortia of contaminated sediments. Analysis of enrichment cultures by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strongly supported the cloning and sequencing results. Dominant members of the Fe(III)-reducing consortia were observed to be stable over several enrichment culture transfers by T-RFLP in conjunction with measurements of Fe(III) reduction activity and carbon substrate utilization. Enrichment

  8. Unexpected nondenitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene diversity and abundance in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the Anaeromyxobacter genus are versatile, facultative microaerophilic myxobacteria distributed in soils, aquifers and freshwater sediments. Anaeromyxobacter spp. grow with nitrate as electron acceptor via dissimilatory reduction to ammonium. Remarkably, the analysis of four available Anae...

  9. Myxothiazol, an antibiotic from Myxococcus fulvus (myxobacterales). I. Cultivation, isolation, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Gerth, K; Irschik, H; Reichenbach, H; Trowitzsch, W

    1980-12-01

    Myxothiazol (AB-Mx f16-1), a new antifungal antibiotic, is produced by the myxobacterium Myxococcus fulvus strain Mx f16. It is active against many filamentous fungi, and completely inhibits growth of Mucor hiemalis at a concentration of 2 micrograms/ml. The molecular formula of myxothiazol was determined to e C25H33N3O3S2. PMID:6788741

  10. Stigmatellin, a new antibiotic from Stigmatella aurantiaca (Myxobacterales). I. Production, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Kunze, B; Kemmer, T; Höfle, G; Reichenbach, H

    1984-05-01

    An antibiotic activity was extracted from the cell mass of the myxobacterium, Stigmatella aurantiaca strain Sg a15. The antibiotic was toxic for yeasts and filamentous fungi, but not for most bacteria. The compound had the molecular formula C30H42O7, appears to be a new antibiotic, and was named stigmatellin. In addition to stigmatellin, the strain produced relatively large quantities of a second, structurally unrelated antibiotic, a mixture of three myxalamid homologues. PMID:6429114

  11. Myxothiazol, a new antibiotic interfering with respiration.

    PubMed

    Thierbach, G; Reichenbach, H

    1981-04-01

    Myxothiazol, a new antibiotic from the myxobacterium Myxococcus fulvus, inhibited the growth of many yeasts and fungi at concentrations between 0.01 and 3 micrograms/ml. It was generally inactive against bacteria. The inhibitory effect was cytostatic. With Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Mucor hiemalis, the growth inhibition was neutralized by glucose. Soon after being added to a cell suspension, the compound almost completely blocked oxygen consumption. PMID:7247372

  12. Novel Insights Into Microbial Uranium Reduction and Immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, F. E.; Fletcher, K.; Thomas, S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Sanford, R.

    2010-12-01

    Many ferric iron- and manganese oxide-reducing bacteria affect the oxidation state and complexation of toxic radionuclides in subsurface environments. Relevant to uranium (U) speciation are bacteria that reduce predominantly water-soluble and mobile U(VI) to U(IV), which has reduced solubility and typically forms the uraninite (UO2) mineral. Gram-negative model organisms including Shewanella spp., Geobacter spp., and more recently Anaeromyxobacter spp. use U(VI) as growth-supporting electron acceptor; however, the biomass yields are lower than predicted based on the theoretical free energy changes associated with U(VI)-to-U(IV) reduction. Recent findings demonstrated that U(VI) reduction is not limited to Gram-negative bacteria, and members of the genus Desulfitobacterium, which are commonly found in soil and subsurface environments, share the ability to reduce U(VI). Interestingly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in cultures of five Desulfitobacterium spp. was not UO2 but rather a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms. Since the properties of the reduced product influence U(IV) fate, knowledge of the diversity of U reduction mechanisms and the stability of the end products is desirable for controlling and predicting U fate. For example, UO2 is susceptible to reoxidation by oxidants, and oxic/anoxic interface processes are controlling the stability of the precipitated material. In other words, metal reducers that thrive at the oxic/anoxic interface are likely key players affecting long-term U fate. Anaeromyxobacter spp. are facultative microaerophiles and grow with oxygen as electron acceptor at partial pressures equal to or below 0.18 atm. Thus, Anaeromyxobacter are uniquely adapted to life at the oxic-anoxic interface where they consume oxygen and take advantage of oxidized metal species including U(VI) as electron acceptors. The application of 16S rRNA gene-targeted qPCR approaches

  13. Epothilones: from discovery to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Forli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Epothilones are natural compounds isolated from a myxobacterium at the beginning of the 1990s, and showed a remarkable anti-neoplastic activity. They act through the same mechanism of action of paclitaxel, by stabilizing microtubules and inducing apoptosis. Although, their chemical structure, simpler than taxanes, makes them more suitable for derivatization. Their interesting pharmacokinetic and bioavailabilty profiles, and the activity against paclitaxel-resistant cell lines make them interesting therapeutic agents. Here a brief historical perspective of epothilones is presented, since their isolation, the identification of their mechanism of action and activity, to the recent clinical trials. PMID:25434353

  14. Cloning, sequence analysis and disruption of the mglA gene involved in swarming motility of Sorangium cellulosum So ce26, a producer of the antifungal polyketide antibiotic soraphen A.

    PubMed

    Zirkle, Ross; Ligon, James M; Molnár, István

    2004-01-01

    The myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce26, the producer of the agriculturally important fungicide antibiotic soraphen A, displays coordinated gliding motility (swarming) on agar surfaces. The consequent failure to form detached colonies represents a major obstacle for microbiological and genetic studies, since single cells representing discrete genetic events cannot be reliably separated and propagated as clones. The MglA protein, the product of the mglA gene, has been shown to be a central regulator of gliding motility and swarming in the related myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus. We have cloned and sequenced a chromosomal locus from S. cellulosum So ce26 that shows similarity to the M. xanthus mglA locus. Insertional inactivation of the chromosomal copy of the S. cellulosum So ce26 mglA homolog resulted in a strain with a non-swarming colony phenotype. This strain is able to form distinct colonies presumably derived from single cells. This is the first report on the characterization of a genetic element of the gliding motility system in the myxobacterial suborder Sorangineae. PMID:16233626

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lonergan, D.J.; Jenter, H.L.; Coates, J.D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Schmidt, T.M.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among strictly anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)- reducing bacteria obtained from a diversity of sedimentary environments were examined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Members of the genera Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, Pelobacter, and Desulfuromusa formed a monophyletic group within the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. On the basis of their common ancestry and the shared ability to reduce Fe(III) and/or S0, we propose that this group be considered a single family, Geobacteraceae. Bootstrap analysis, characteristic nucleotides, and higher- order secondary structures support the division of Geobacteraceae into two subgroups, designated the Geobacter and Desulfuromonas clusters. The genus Desulfuromusa and Pelobacter acidigallici make up a distinct branch with the Desulfuromonas cluster. Several members of the family Geobacteraceae, none of which reduce sulfate, were found to contain the target sequences of probes that have been previously used to define the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacterium-like microorganisms. The recent isolations of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms distributed throughout the domain Bacteria suggest that development of 16S rRNA probes that would specifically target all Fe(III) reducers may not be feasible. However, all of the evidence suggests that if a 16S rRNA sequence falls within the family Geobacteraceae, then the organism has the capacity for Fe(III) reduction. The suggestion, based on geological evidence, that Fe(III) reduction was the first globally significant process for oxidizing organic matter back to carbon dioxide is consistent with the finding that acetate-oxidizing Fe(III) reducers are phylogenetically diverse.

  16. Role of Humic-Bound Iron as an Electron Transfer Agent in Dissimilatory Fe(III) Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Blunt-Harris, Elizabeth L.

    1999-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens reduced Fe(III) bound in humic substances, but the concentrations of Fe(III) in a wide range of highly purified humic substances were too low to account for a significant portion of the electron-accepting capacities of the humic substances. Furthermore, once reduced, the iron in humic substances could not transfer electrons to Fe(III) oxide. These results suggest that other electron-accepting moieties in humic substances, such as quinones, are the important electron-accepting and shuttling agents under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. PMID:10473447

  17. Isolation, biology and chemistry of the disorazoles: new anti-cancer macrodiolides

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The disorazoles comprise a family of 29 closely related macrocyclic polyketides isolated in 1994 from the fermentation broth of the gliding myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Disorazoles A1, E and C1 have shown exceptional biological activities toward inhibiting the proliferation of human cancer cell lines in picomolar and nanomolar concentrations through the disruption of microtubule polymerization. This review gives a brief introduction describing the biosynthesis and the significance of the disorazoles as a new class of microtubulin disruptors. Another portion of the review focuses on the biology of the disorazoles, specifically disorazole A1 and C1, and their antiproliferative efficacy against animal and human tumor cell lines, as well as the available SAR data. The majority of the discussion addresses synthetic efforts, including partial syntheses of various disorazoles and a summary of the total synthesis of disorazole C1. PMID:19387496

  18. ANTIBIOTIC ACTIVITY OF MYXOBACTERIA IN RELATION TO THEIR BACTERIOLYTIC CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Norén, Börge; Raper, Kenneth B.

    1962-01-01

    Norén, Börge (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Kenneth B. Raper. Antibiotic activity of myxobacteria in relation to their bacteriolytic capacity. J. Bacteriol. 84:157–162. 1962—Myxococcus virescens, M. fulvus, M. stipitatus, M. lacteus, Chondrococcus blasticus, and Chondromyces crocatus were tested for antibacterial activity, and all were found to secrete products that inhibited the growth of gram-positive eubacteria. The amount of inhibition varied with the myxobacterium employed and with the eubacterium used as a test organism. The growth of gram-negative eubacteria was in no case visibly affected by the antibiotic products. The experiments performed failed to indicate any positive relationship between the antibacterial activity and the bacteriolytic capacity of the six myxobacteria investigated. PMID:14480333

  19. Unusual chemistry in the biosynthesis of the antibiotic chondrochlorens.

    PubMed

    Rachid, Shwan; Scharfe, Maren; Blöcker, Helmut; Weissman, Kira J; Müller, Rolf

    2009-01-30

    The antibiotic chondrochlorens A and B from the myxobacterium Chondromyces crocatus Cm c5 incorporate several unusual structural features, notable among them a shared chloro-hydroxy-styryl functionality and the ethoxy group of chondrochloren B. Our analysis of the chondrochloren gene cluster by targeted gene inactivation coupled with assays in vitro has shed significant light on the biosynthesis of these metabolites. Chlorination of tyrosine occurs early in the pathway, likely on a peptidyl carrier protein-bound intermediate, whereas decarboxylation to the styryl moiety appears to be accomplished by an unprecedented oxidative decarboxylase. We also show that the chondrochloren B ethoxy group arises from initial incorporation by the polyketide synthase of hydroxy malonate as an extender unit, methylation in cis by an O-methyltransferase, followed by a second methylation. This report therefore constitutes a direct demonstration of the involvement of a radical S-adenosylmethionine methylase in bacterial secondary metabolism. PMID:19171307

  20. The pyruvate kinase of Stigmatella aurantiaca is an indole binding protein and essential for development.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Irmela; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Plaga, Wulf

    2005-06-01

    Myxospore formation of the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca can be uncoupled from the cooperative development i.e. fruiting body formation, by low concentrations of indole. Two putative indole receptor proteins were isolated by their capacity to bind indole and identified as pyruvate kinase (PK) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. The PK activity of Stigmatella crude extracts was stimulated by indole. Cloning of the PK gene (pykA) and the construction of a pykA disruption mutant strikingly revealed that PK is essential for multicellular development: Fruiting body formation was abolished in the mutant strain and indole-induced spore formation was delayed. The developmental defects could be complemented by insertion of the pykA gene at the mtaB locus of the Stigmatella genome excluding any polar effects of the pykA disruption. PMID:15882428

  1. Uncovering the Mystery of Gliding Motility in the Myxobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gliding motility is the smooth movement of cells on solid surfaces unaided by flagella or pili. Many diverse groups of bacteria exhibit gliding, but the mechanism of gliding motility has remained a mystery since it was first observed more than a century ago. Recent studies on the motility of Myxococcus xanthus, a soil myxobacterium, suggest a likely mechanism for gliding in this organism. About forty M. xanthus genes were shown to be involved in gliding motility, and some of their protein products were labeled and localized within cells. These studies suggest that gliding motility in M. xanthus involves large multiprotein structural complexes, regulatory proteins, and cytoskeletal filaments. In this review, we summarize recent experiments that provide the basis for this emerging view of M. xanthus motility. We also discuss alternative models for gliding. PMID:21910630

  2. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  3. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  4. Total and semi-syntheses of antimicrobial thuggacin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Franke, Jana; Bock, Martin; Dehn, Richard; Fohrer, Jörg; Mhaske, Santosh B; Migliorini, Antonella; Kanakis, Argyrios A; Jansen, Rolf; Herrmann, Jennifer; Müller, Rolf; Kirschning, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    The total and semi-synthesis of 13 new macrolactones derived from thuggacin, which is a secondary metabolite from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, are reported. The thuggacins have attracted much attention due to their strong antibacterial activity, particularly towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study focuses on 1) thuggacin derivatives that cannot equilibrate by transacylation between the three natural thuggacins A-C, 2) the roles of the thiazole ring, and 3) the hexyl side chain at C2. Semi-synthetic O-methylation at C17 suppressed the transacylations without a substantial loss of antibacterial activity. Exchanging the C17-C25 side chain for simplified hydrophobic chains led to complete loss of antibacterial activity. Exchange of the thiazole by an oxazole ring or removal of the hexyl side chain at C2 had no substantial effect on the biological properties. PMID:25652819

  5. New Sesquiterpene Oxidations with CYP260A1 and CYP264B1 from Sorangium cellulosum So ce56.

    PubMed

    Schifrin, Alexander; Litzenburger, Martin; Ringle, Michael; Ly, Thuy T B; Bernhardt, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Sesquiterpenes are natural products derived from the common precursor farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) but are highly diverse in structure and function. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) exhibit the unique ability to introduce molecular oxygen into non-activated C-H bonds. In plant biosynthetic pathways, P450s commonly derivatize sesquiterpene hydrocarbons. However, the potential of bacterial P450s for terpene derivatization is still underinvestigated. This work compares the substrate specificities and regioselectivities of the sesquiterpene hydroxylases CYP260A1 and CYP264B1 from myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56. Four tested substrate classes (eremophilanes, humulanes, caryophyllanes, and cedranes) were converted by both P450s. The achievable variety of oxidations is demonstrated on the model substrates (+)-nootkatone and zerumbone. Increasing the number of functionally investigated P450s, this study represents a step towards the selective derivatization of sesquiterpenes. PMID:26449371

  6. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  7. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore » from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  8. pH gradient-induced heterogeneity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in coal mining-associated lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Blothe, M.; Akob, D.M.; Kostka, J.E.; Goschel, K.; Drake, H.L.; Kusel, K.

    2008-02-15

    Lakes formed because of coal mining are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of Fe(II) and sulfate. The anoxic sediment is often separated into an upper acidic zone (pH 3; zone 1) with large amounts of reactive iron and a deeper slightly acidic zone (pH 5.5; zone III) with smaller amounts of iron. In this study, the impact of pH on the Fe(III)-reducing activities in both of these sediment zones was investigated, and molecular analyses that elucidated the sediment microbial diversity were performed. The results demonstrated that the upper acidic sediment was inhabited by acidophiles or moderate acidophiles which can also reduce Fe(III) under slightly acidic conditions. The majority of Fe(III) reducers inhabiting the slightly acidic sediment had only minor capacities to be active under acidic conditions.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lonergan, D J; Jenter, H L; Coates, J D; Phillips, E J; Schmidt, T M; Lovley, D R

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among strictly anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria obtained from a diversity of sedimentary environments were examined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Members of the genera Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, Pelobacter, and Desulfuromusa formed a monophyletic group within the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. On the basis of their common ancestry and the shared ability to reduce Fe(III) and/or S0, we propose that this group be considered a single family, Geobacteraceae. Bootstrap analysis, characteristic nucleotides, and higher-order secondary structures support the division of Geobacteraceae into two subgroups, designated the Geobacter and Desulfuromonas clusters. The genus Desulfuromusa and Pelobacter acidigallici make up a distinct branch within the Desulfuromonas cluster. Several members of the family Geobacteraceae, none of which reduce sulfate, were found to contain the target sequences of probes that have been previously used to define the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacterium-like microorganisms. The recent isolations of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms distributed throughout the domain Bacteria suggest that development of 16S rRNA probes that would specifically target all Fe(III) reducers may not be feasible. However, all of the evidence suggests that if a 16S rRNA sequence falls within the family Geobacteraceae, then the organism has the capacity for Fe(III) reduction. The suggestion, based on geological evidence, that Fe(III) reduction was the first globally significant process for oxidizing organic matter back to carbon dioxide is consistent with the finding that acetate-oxidizing Fe(III) reducers are phylogenetically diverse. PMID:8636045

  10. Putative Mineral-Specific Proteins Synthesized by a Metal Reducing Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Hochella Jr., Michael F.; Lower, Steven K.

    2006-02-01

    Biological force microscopy (BFM) was combined with two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify outer membrane proteins (OM) from Shewanella oneidensis that are involved in anaerobic Fe(III) reduction. This is the first time that biophysical force measurements have been coupled with protein expression patterns to search for evidence of putative mineral-specific proteins synthesized by bacteria. BFM shows that S. oneidensis possess an affinity towards goethite (FeOOH) but not diaspore (AlOOH) under anaerobic conditions, despite the fact that diaspore is isostructural with goethite and has essentially the same surface charge. The worm-like chain model was used to identify force-signatures in BFM-derived force curves indicative of putative outer membrane (OM) polypeptides synthesized by S. oneidensis to form a bond with goethite. Protein expression patterns from OM extract of cells grown under anaerobic Fe(III) reducing versus aerobic conditions show that approximately 400 protein spots exhibit significant differences in abundance on 2D gels. Peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify several of the protein spots that were significantly more abundant in 2D gels from OM extract of cells grown under anaerobic Fe(III) reducing conditions. Among those identified were proteins involved in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, protein transport and secretion, polysaccharide biosynthesis and export, and hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Together, the BFM and proteomic data suggest that OM proteins are synthesized by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions to function in iron oxide binding and/or Fe(III) reduction. If this is the case, then it is possible that the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria like Shewanella, could have been, at least in part, driven by the binding/reduction ability of certain proteins to specific mineral phases.

  11. Complete Genome of the Starch-Degrading Myxobacteria Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria are members of δ-proteobacteria and are typified by large genomes, well-coordinated social behavior, gliding motility, and starvation-induced fruiting body formation. Here, we report the 10.33 Mb whole genome of a starch-degrading myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668(T) that encodes 8,962 proteins, 56 tRNA, and two rRNA operons. Phylogenetic analysis, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity reveal its divergence from other myxobacterial species and support its taxonomic characterization into a separate family Sandaracinaceae, within the suborder Sorangiineae. Sequence similarity searches using the Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZyme) database help identify the enzyme repertoire of S. amylolyticus involved in starch, agar, chitin, and cellulose degradation. We identified 16 α-amylases and two γ-amylases in the S. amylolyticus genome that likely play a role in starch degradation. While many of the amylases are seen conserved in other δ-proteobacteria, we notice several novel amylases acquired via horizontal transfer from members belonging to phylum Deinococcus-Thermus, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. No agar degrading enzyme(s) were identified in the S. amylolyticus genome. Interestingly, several putative β-glucosidases and endoglucanases proteins involved in cellulose degradation were identified. However, the absence of cellobiohydrolases/exoglucanases corroborates with the lack of cellulose degradation by this bacteria. PMID:27358428

  12. Complete Genome of the Starch-Degrading Myxobacteria Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria are members of δ-proteobacteria and are typified by large genomes, well-coordinated social behavior, gliding motility, and starvation-induced fruiting body formation. Here, we report the 10.33 Mb whole genome of a starch-degrading myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T that encodes 8,962 proteins, 56 tRNA, and two rRNA operons. Phylogenetic analysis, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity reveal its divergence from other myxobacterial species and support its taxonomic characterization into a separate family Sandaracinaceae, within the suborder Sorangiineae. Sequence similarity searches using the Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZyme) database help identify the enzyme repertoire of S. amylolyticus involved in starch, agar, chitin, and cellulose degradation. We identified 16 α-amylases and two γ-amylases in the S. amylolyticus genome that likely play a role in starch degradation. While many of the amylases are seen conserved in other δ-proteobacteria, we notice several novel amylases acquired via horizontal transfer from members belonging to phylum Deinococcus-Thermus, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. No agar degrading enzyme(s) were identified in the S. amylolyticus genome. Interestingly, several putative β-glucosidases and endoglucanases proteins involved in cellulose degradation were identified. However, the absence of cellobiohydrolases/exoglucanases corroborates with the lack of cellulose degradation by this bacteria. PMID:27358428

  13. SmI2-mediated dimerization of indolylbutenones and synthesis of the myxobacterial natural product indiacen B.

    PubMed

    Marsch, Nils; Jones, Peter G; Lindel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and reactivity of indole derivatives substituted in the benzene section was studied. Starting materials 4- and 6-iodoindole were conveniently prepared via the Batcho-Leimgruber route and purified by sublimation. Novel vicinally indolyl-substituted cyclopentanols with unexpected cis-configuration were formed by SmI2-mediated reductive dimerization of a 4-(indol-6-yl)butenone, obtained by Heck reaction. The two indolyl units appear to chelate Sm(II)/(III) leading to a gauche-type arrangement at the newly formed bond between the two β-carbons. Through a sequence of Sonogashira cross coupling and Meyer-Schuster rearrangement 6-prenoylindole was synthesized and reductively dimerized to a cyclopentane in a [3 + 2] cycloaddition by treatment with SmI2 in THF. From 4-iodoindole, the natural product indiacen B from the myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus was synthesized for the first time, confirming its antimicrobial activity. The E-configuration of the chloroalkene moiety of indiacen B was confirmed by X-ray analysis. PMID:26664588

  14. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation. PMID:26875499

  15. Phylogenomics of Sterol Synthesis: Insights into the Origin, Evolution, and Diversity of a Key Eukaryotic Feature

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, Elie

    2009-01-01

    The availability of complete genomes from a wide sampling of eukaryotic diversity has allowed the application of phylogenomics approaches to study the origin and evolution of unique eukaryotic cellular structures, but these are still poorly applied to study unique eukaryotic metabolic pathways. Sterols are a good example because they are an essential feature of eukaryotic membranes. The sterol pathway has been well dissected in vertebrates, fungi, and land plants. However, although different types of sterols have been identified in other eukaryotic lineages, their pathways have not been fully characterized. We have carried out an extensive analysis of the taxonomic distribution and phylogeny of the enzymes of the sterol pathway in a large sampling of eukaryotic lineages. This allowed us to tentatively indicate features of the sterol pathway in organisms where this has not been characterized and to point out a number of steps for which yet-to-discover enzymes may be at work. We also inferred that the last eukaryotic common ancestor already harbored a large panel of enzymes for sterol synthesis and that subsequent evolution over the eukaryotic tree occurred by tinkering, mainly by gene losses. We highlight a high capacity of sterol synthesis in the myxobacterium Plesiocystis pacifica, and we support the hypothesis that the few bacteria that harbor homologs of the sterol pathway have likely acquired these via horizontal gene transfer from eukaryotes. Finally, we propose a potential candidate for the elusive enzyme performing C-3 ketoreduction (ERG27 equivalent) in land plants and probably in other eukaryotic phyla. PMID:20333205

  16. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation. PMID:26875499

  17. New lessons for combinatorial biosynthesis from myxobacteria. The myxothiazol biosynthetic gene cluster of Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1.

    PubMed

    Silakowski, B; Schairer, H U; Ehret, H; Kunze, B; Weinig, S; Nordsiek, G; Brandt, P; Blöcker, H; Höfle, G; Beyer, S; Müller, R

    1999-12-24

    The biosynthetic mta gene cluster responsible for myxothiazol formation from the fruiting body forming myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1 was sequenced and analyzed. Myxothiazol, an inhibitor of the electron transport via the bc(1)-complex of the respiratory chain, is biosynthesized by a unique combination of several polyketide synthases (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), which are activated by the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase MtaA. Genomic replacement of a fragment of mtaB and insertion of a kanamycin resistance gene into mtaA both impaired myxothiazol synthesis. Genes mtaC and mtaD encode the enzymes for bis-thiazol(ine) formation and chain extension on one pure NRPS (MtaC) and on a unique combination of PKS and NRPS (MtaD). The genes mtaE and mtaF encode PKSs including peptide fragments with homology to methyltransferases. These methyltransferase modules are assumed to be necessary for the formation of the proposed methoxy- and beta-methoxy-acrylate intermediates of myxothiazol biosynthesis. The last gene of the cluster, mtaG, again resembles a NRPS and provides insight into the mechanism of the formation of the terminal amide of myxothiazol. The carbon backbone of an amino acid added to the myxothiazol-acid is assumed to be removed via an unprecedented module with homology to monooxygenases within MtaG. PMID:10601310

  18. The separation of β-glucanases produced by Cytophaga johnsonii and their role in the lysis of yeast cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, J. S. D.; Gordon, A. H.; Jones, D.; Tayor, Irene F.; Webley, D. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. When Cytophaga johnsonii was grown in the presence of suitable inducers the culture fluid was capable of lysing thiol-treated yeast cell walls in vitro. 2. Autoclaved or alkali-extracted cells, isolated cell walls and glucan preparations made from them were effective inducers, but living yeast cells or cells killed by minimal heat treatment were not. 3. Chromatographic fractionation of lytic culture fluids showed the presence of two types of endo-β-(1→3)-glucanase and several β-(1→6)-glucanases; the latter may be induced separately by growing the myxo-bacterium in the presence of lutean. 4. Extensive solubilization of yeast cell walls was obtained only with preparations of one of these glucanases, an endo-β-(1→3)-glucanase producing as end products mainly oligosaccharides having five or more residues. Lysis by the other endo-β-(1→3)-glucanase was incomplete. 5. The β-(1→6)-glucanases produced a uniform thinning of the cell walls, and mannan–peptide was found in the solution. 6. These results, and the actions of the enzyme preparations on a variety of wall-derived preparations made from baker's yeast, are discussed in the light of present conceptions of yeast cell-wall structure. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5494230

  19. Periodic reversal of direction allows Myxobacteria to swarm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yilin; Kaiser, A. Dale; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria can rapidly traverse surfaces from which they are extracting nutrient for growth. They generate flat, spreading colonies, called swarms because they resemble swarms of insects. We seek to understand how members of any dense swarm spread efficiently while being able to perceive and interfere minimally with the motion of others. To this end, we investigate swarms of the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus. Individual M. xanthus cells are elongated; they always move in the direction of their long axis; and they are in constant motion, repeatedly touching each other. Remarkably, they regularly reverse their gliding directions. We have constructed a detailed cell- and behavior-based computational model of M. xanthus swarming that allows the organization of cells to be computed. By using the model, we are able to show that reversals of gliding direction are essential for swarming and that reversals increase the outflow of cells across the edge of the swarm. Cells at the swarm edge gain maximum exposure to nutrient and oxygen. We also find that the reversal period predicted to maximize the outflow of cells is the same (within the errors of measurement) as the period observed in experiments with normal M. xanthus cells. This coincidence suggests that the circuit regulating reversals evolved to its current sensitivity under selection for growth achieved by swarming. Finally, we observe that, with time, reversals increase the cell alignment, and generate clusters of parallel cells. PMID:19164578

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Analogues of Ripostatins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wufeng; Liu, Shuang; Degen, David; Ebright, Richard H.; Prusov, Evgeny V.

    2014-01-01

    Ripostatins are polyene macrolactones isolated from myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. They exhibit antibiotic activity by inhibiting bacterial RNA-polymerase through a binding site and mechanism different from those of current antibacterial drugs and thus serve as starting pointsfor the development of new anti-infective agents with a novel mode of action. In this work, several derivatives of ripostatins were produced. The 15-desoxy-ripostatin A was synthesized using one-pot carboalumination/cross-coupling. The 5,6-dihydro-ripostatin A was constructed utilizing an intramolecular Suzuki cross-coupling macrolactonization approach, and 14,14'-difluroripostatin A and both epimeric 14,14'-difluroripostatins B were synthesized using a Reformatsky-type aldol addition of haloketone, Stille cross-coupling and ring-closing metathesis. RNAP-inhibitrory and antibacterial activities are presented. Structure-activity relationships indicate that that the monocyclic keto-ol form of ripostatin A is the active form of ripostatin A, that the ripostatin 5-6 unsaturation is important for activity, and that C14 geminal difluorination can be introduced into ripostatin B without loss of activity PMID:25112727

  1. The Biofilm Inhibitor Carolacton Disturbs Membrane Integrity and Cell Division of Streptococcus mutans through the Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase PknB ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Michael; Rutz, Katrin; Kunze, Brigitte; Tomasch, Jürgen; Surapaneni, Subhash Kumar; Schulz, Stefan; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Carolacton, a secondary metabolite isolated from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, disturbs Streptococcus mutans biofilm viability at nanomolar concentrations. Here we show that carolacton causes leakage of cytoplasmic content (DNA and proteins) in growing cells at low pH and provide quantitative data on the membrane damage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the biofilm-specific activity of carolacton is due to the strong acidification occurring during biofilm growth. The chemical conversion of the ketocarbonic function of the molecule to a carolacton methylester did not impact its activity, indicating that carolacton is not functionally activated at low pH by a change of its net charge. A comparative time series microarray analysis identified the VicKRX and ComDE two-component signal transduction systems and genes involved in cell wall metabolism as playing essential roles in the response to carolacton treatment. A sensitivity testing of mutants with deletions of all 13 viable histidine kinases and the serine/threonine protein kinase PknB of S. mutans identified only the ΔpknB deletion mutant as being insensitive to carolacton treatment. A strong overlap between the regulon of PknB in S. mutans and the genes affected by carolacton treatment was found. The data suggest that carolacton acts by interfering with PknB-mediated signaling in growing cells. The resulting altered cell wall morphology causes membrane damage and cell death at low pH. PMID:21840978

  2. Chondramides, novel cyclodepsipeptides from myxobacteria, influence cell development and induce actin filament polymerization in the green alga Micrasterias.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, A; Lütz-Meindl, U

    2001-02-01

    The effects of chondramides A-D, new actin targeting cyclodepsipeptides from the myxobacterium Chondromyces crocatus, are probed on the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata, a model organism for studies on cytomorphogenesis. All four chondramides readily enter the cells and cause severe shape malformations when applied during growth. However, the four derivatives have different lowest effective concentrations. Chondramide A: 20 microM, chondramide B: 15 microM, chondramide C: 5 microM chondramide D: 10 microM. At the ultrastructural level, chondramide C, the most effective drug, causes the appearance of abnormal, dense F-actin bundles, and a substantial increase in ER, which covers large parts of the developing semicell. Also the secondary cell wall is malformed by the drug. When chondramide C effects are investigated by means of indirect immunofluorescence, alterations of the F-actin system are also visible. Instead of the cortical F-actin network of untreated controls, distinct parts of the cell are covered by abundant F-actin aggregations. Phalloidin staining of chondramide C treated cells results in a decreased fluorescence in a time-dependent manner due to binding competitions between these drugs. F-actin polymerizing and bundling capacities of chondramides A-D are presented in Micrasterias for the first time, and may in future make this substances a useful tool for cell biological research. PMID:11169761

  3. Purification and characterization of a novel lectin from a freshwater cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria agardhii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Murakami, M; Miyazawa, K; Hori, K

    2000-02-01

    In the survey of 14 species of laboratory-cultured cyanobacteria for hemagglutinins, we newly detected the activity in two species, Oscillatoria agardhii, strain NIES-204, and Phormidium foveolarum, strain NIES-503. From the extract of O. agardhii, which showed the highest activity with trypsin-treated erythrocytes of rabbit, a lectin was purified to homogeneity by the combination of precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel filtration, hydrophobic chromatography and reverse phase chromatography. The purified lectin, designated OAA, was a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular weight of 13,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 16,000 on gel filtration. The amino acid composition was rich in glycine and acidic amino acids. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by glycoproteins such as yeast mannan, but not by any of the monosaccharides tested. The activity was stable over a wide range of pH (4-11) and at a high temperature of 80 degrees C, and independent on the presence of divalent cations. The features of OAA resembled those of many of lectins from marine macroalgae. The sequence of amino-terminal residues of OAA was determined as ALYNVENQWGGSSAPWNEGG, which was highly homologous to those of lectins from macroalgae of the genus Eucheuma and that of a myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus hemagglutinin. PMID:10817903

  4. Assembly of Robust Bacterial Microcompartment Shells Using Building Blocks from an Organelle of Unknown Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, JK; Bernstein, SL; Kinney, JN; Axen, SD; Kerfeld, CA

    2014-05-29

    Bacterial microconnpartnnents (BMCs) sequester enzymes from the cytoplasmic environment by encapsulation inside a selectively permeable protein shell. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that many bacteria encode BMC clusters of unknown function and with diverse combinations of shell proteins. The genome of the halophilic myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum encodes one of the most atypical sets of shell proteins in terms of composition and primary structure. We found that microconnpartnnent shells could be purified in high yield when all seven H. ochraceum BMC shell genes were expressed from a synthetic operon in Escherichia coll. These shells differ substantially from previously isolated shell systems in that they are considerably smaller and more homogeneous, with measured diameters of 39 2 nm. The size and nearly uniform geometry allowed the development of a structural model for the shells composed of 260 hexagonal units and 13 hexagons per icosahedral face. We found that new proteins could be recruited to the shells by fusion to a predicted targeting peptide sequence, setting the stage for the use of these remarkably homogeneous shells for applications such as three-dimensional scaffolding and the construction of synthetic BMCs. Our results demonstrate the value of selecting from the diversity of BMC shell building blocks found in genomic sequence data for the construction of novel compartments. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolutionary Divergence of Sedoheptulose 7-phosphate Cyclases Leads to Several Distinct Cyclic Products

    PubMed Central

    Asamizu, Shumpei; Xie, Pengfei; Brumsted, Corey J.; Flatt, Patricia M.; Mahmud, Taifo

    2012-01-01

    Sedoheptulose 7-phosphate cyclases are enzymes that utilize the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate, sedoheptulose 7-phosphate, to generate cyclic precursors of many bioactive natural products, such as the antidiabetic drug acarbose, the crop protectant validamycin, and the natural sunscreens mycosporine-like amino acids. These proteins are phylogenetically related to the dehydroquinate (DHQ) synthases from the shikimate pathway, and are part of the more recently recognized superfamily of sugar phosphate cyclases, which includes DHQ synthases, aminoDHQ synthases and 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose synthases. Through genome mining and biochemical studies, we identified yet another subset of DHQS-like proteins in the actinomycete Actinosynnema mirum and the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3–1. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of sedoheptulose 7-phosphate to 2-epi-valiolone, which is predicted to be an alternative precursor for aminocyclitol biosynthesis. Comparative bioinformatics and biochemical analyses of these proteins with 2-epi-5-epi-valiolone synthases (EEVS) and desmethyl-4-deoxygadusol synthases (DDGS) provided further insights into their genetic diversity, conserved amino acid sequences, and plausible catalytic mechanisms. The results further highlight the uniquely diverse DHQS-like sugar phosphate cyclases, which may provide new tools for chemoenzymatic, stereospecific synthesis of various cyclic molecules. PMID:22741921

  6. Machine Learning Estimates of Natural Product Conformational Energies

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Matthias; Bauer, Matthias R.; Wilcken, Rainer; Lange, Andreas; Reutlinger, Michael; Boeckler, Frank M.; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning has been used for estimation of potential energy surfaces to speed up molecular dynamics simulations of small systems. We demonstrate that this approach is feasible for significantly larger, structurally complex molecules, taking the natural product Archazolid A, a potent inhibitor of vacuolar-type ATPase, from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra as an example. Our model estimates energies of new conformations by exploiting information from previous calculations via Gaussian process regression. Predictive variance is used to assess whether a conformation is in the interpolation region, allowing a controlled trade-off between prediction accuracy and computational speed-up. For energies of relaxed conformations at the density functional level of theory (implicit solvent, DFT/BLYP-disp3/def2-TZVP), mean absolute errors of less than 1 kcal/mol were achieved. The study demonstrates that predictive machine learning models can be developed for structurally complex, pharmaceutically relevant compounds, potentially enabling considerable speed-ups in simulations of larger molecular structures. PMID:24453952

  7. SmI2-mediated dimerization of indolylbutenones and synthesis of the myxobacterial natural product indiacen B

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Nils; Jones, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Summary The synthesis and reactivity of indole derivatives substituted in the benzene section was studied. Starting materials 4- and 6-iodoindole were conveniently prepared via the Batcho–Leimgruber route and purified by sublimation. Novel vicinally indolyl-substituted cyclopentanols with unexpected cis-configuration were formed by SmI2-mediated reductive dimerization of a 4-(indol-6-yl)butenone, obtained by Heck reaction. The two indolyl units appear to chelate Sm(II)/(III) leading to a gauche-type arrangement at the newly formed bond between the two β-carbons. Through a sequence of Sonogashira cross coupling and Meyer–Schuster rearrangement 6-prenoylindole was synthesized and reductively dimerized to a cyclopentane in a [3 + 2] cycloaddition by treatment with SmI2 in THF. From 4-iodoindole, the natural product indiacen B from the myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus was synthesized for the first time, confirming its antimicrobial activity. The E-configuration of the chloroalkene moiety of indiacen B was confirmed by X-ray analysis. PMID:26664588

  8. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular

  9. Microbial Community Structure in the Rhizosphere of Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbach, Björn; Pump, Judith; Dumont, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    The microbial community in the rhizosphere environment is critical for the health of land plants and the processing of soil organic matter. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which rice plants shape the microbial community in rice field soil over the course of a growing season. Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated under greenhouse conditions in rice field soil from Vercelli, Italy and the microbial community in the rhizosphere of planted soil microcosms was characterized at four plant growth stages using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis and compared to that of unplanted bulk soil. The abundances of 16S rRNA genes in the rice rhizosphere were on average twice that of unplanted bulk soil, indicating a stimulation of microbial growth in the rhizosphere. Soil environment type (i.e., rhizosphere versus bulk soil) had a greater effect on the community structure than did time (e.g., plant growth stage). Numerous phyla were affected by the presence of rice plants, but the strongest effects were observed for Gemmatimonadetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. With respect to functional groups of microorganisms, potential iron reducers (e.g., Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter) and fermenters (e.g., Clostridiaceae, Opitutaceae) were notably enriched in the rhizosphere environment. A Herbaspirillum species was always more abundant in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and was enriched in the rhizosphere during the early stage of plant growth. PMID:26793175

  10. Structural similarities between biogenic uraninites produced by phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Jonathan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Mehta, Apurva; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2009-11-01

    While the product of microbial uranium reduction is often reported to be“UO2”, a comprehensive characterization including stoichiometry and unit cell determination is available for only one Shewanella species. Here, we compare the products of batch uranyl reduction by a collection of dissimilatory metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Shewanella, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfovibrio under similar laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrate that U(VI) bioreduction by this assortment of commonly studied, environmentally relevant bacteria leads to the precipitation of uraninite with a composition between UO2.00 and UO2.075, regardless of phylogenetic or metabolic diversity. Coupled analyses, including electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and powder diffraction, confirm that structurally and chemically analogous uraninite solids are produced. These biogenic uraninites have particle diameters of about 2-3 nm and lattice constants consistent with UO2.0 and exhibit a high degree of intermediate-range order. Results indicate that phylogenetic and metabolic variability within delta- and gamma-proteobacteria has little effect on nascent biouraninite structure or crystal size under the investigated conditions.

  11. Complex Interactions Between the Macrophyte Acorus Calamus and Microbial Fuel Cells During Pyrene and Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Cai, Haiyuan; Zhou, Yanli; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction of the macrophyte Acorus calamus and sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFC) during the degradation of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) in sediments. Over 367-days, the combination of macrophyte and SMFC led to an increase in pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene degradation rates by at least 70% compared to SMFC or macrophyte alone. While either the macrophyte or SMFC increased redox potential in sediments, redox potentials near the anode (approximately 6 cm depth) in the macrophyte-SMFC combination were markedly lower than that in the only macrophyte treatment. Moreover, rhizospheric bacterial communities in macrophyte-SMFC and macrophyte treatments were distinctly different. Aerobic genera (Vogesella, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Rhizobium) and anaerobic genera (Longilinea, Bellilinea, Desulfobacca and Anaeromyxobacter) became dominant in the rhizosphere in macrophyte and macrophyte-SMFC treatments, respectively. In addition, the macrophyte-SMFC combination improved the numbers of not only aerobic but anaerobic PAHs degraders in sediments. So, the SMFC employment facilitated the formation of anoxic zones in sediments with oxygen loss and exudates from the roots. As a result, cooperation of anaerobic/aerobic microbial metabolism for accelerating HMW-PAHs removal occurred within sediments after combining macrophytes with SMFC. PMID:26023748

  12. Unique Organic Matter and Microbial Properties in the Rhizosphere of a Wetland Soil.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Xu, Chen; Huang, Shan; Lin, Youmin; Tolić, Nikola; Roscioli-Johnson, Kristyn M; Santschi, Peter H; Jaffé, Peter R

    2016-04-19

    Wetlands attenuate the migration of many contaminants through a wide range of biogeochemical reactions. Recent research has shown that the rhizosphere, the zone near plant roots, in wetlands is especially effective at promoting contaminant attenuation. The objective of this study was to compare the soil organic matter (OM) composition and microbial communities of a rhizosphere soil (primarily an oxidized environment) to that of the bulk wetland soil (primarily a reduced environment). The rhizosphere had elevated C, N, Mn, and Fe concentrations and total bacteria, including Anaeromyxobacter, counts (as identified by qPCR). Furthermore, the rhizosphere contained several organic molecules that were not identified in the nonrhizosphere soil (54% of the >2200 ESI-FTICR-MS identified compounds). The rhizosphere OM molecules generally had (1) greater overall molecular weights, (2) less aromaticity, (3) more carboxylate and N-containing COO functional groups, and (4) a greater hydrophilic character. These latter two OM properties typically promote metal binding. This study showed for the first time that not only the amount but also the molecular characteristics of OM in the rhizosphere may in part be responsible for the enhanced immobilization of contaminants in wetlands. These finding have implications on the stewardship and long-term management of contaminated wetlands. PMID:27091553

  13. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Pattaragulwanit, Kobchai; Punmatharith, Thantip; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak; Rachakornkij, Manaskorn; Champreda, Verawat

    2015-01-01

    The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas. PMID:26020967

  14. Complex Interactions Between the Macrophyte Acorus Calamus and Microbial Fuel Cells During Pyrene and Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation in Sediments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Cai, Haiyuan; Zhou, Yanli; Krumholz, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction of the macrophyte Acorus calamus and sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFC) during the degradation of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) in sediments. Over 367-days, the combination of macrophyte and SMFC led to an increase in pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene degradation rates by at least 70% compared to SMFC or macrophyte alone. While either the macrophyte or SMFC increased redox potential in sediments, redox potentials near the anode (approximately 6 cm depth) in the macrophyte-SMFC combination were markedly lower than that in the only macrophyte treatment. Moreover, rhizospheric bacterial communities in macrophyte-SMFC and macrophyte treatments were distinctly different. Aerobic genera (Vogesella, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Rhizobium) and anaerobic genera (Longilinea, Bellilinea, Desulfobacca and Anaeromyxobacter) became dominant in the rhizosphere in macrophyte and macrophyte-SMFC treatments, respectively. In addition, the macrophyte-SMFC combination improved the numbers of not only aerobic but anaerobic PAHs degraders in sediments. So, the SMFC employment facilitated the formation of anoxic zones in sediments with oxygen loss and exudates from the roots. As a result, cooperation of anaerobic/aerobic microbial metabolism for accelerating HMW-PAHs removal occurred within sediments after combining macrophytes with SMFC. PMID:26023748

  15. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Pattaragulwanit, Kobchai; Punmatharith, Thantip; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak; Rachakornkij, Manaskorn; Champreda, Verawat

    2015-01-01

    The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas. PMID:26020967

  16. Arsenic and radionuclide occurrence and relation to geochemistry in groundwater of the Gulf Coast Aquifer System in Houston, Texas, 2007–11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, Jeannette H.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Aquifer major-ion geochemistry was characterized and shown to contain three chemical types of water as grouped by a simplified predominant cation and anion classification system: (1) calcium- bicarbonate type, (2) sodium-bicarbonate type, and (3) sodium-chloride type. Aquifer geochemistry also was characterized into four reduction-oxidation (redox) categories: (1) oxic, (2) suboxic, (3) mixed, and (4) anoxic. Within the anoxic category, groundwater was further characterized into four presumed predominant reduction processes: (1) iron or sulfate or both [Fe(III)/SO4] reducing, (2) iron [Fe(III)] reducing, (3) iron and sulfate [Fe(III)-SO4] reducing, or (4) methanogenic, as defined by composition of redox species. The oxic category was associated with calcium-bicarbonate-type water, and the methanogenic-anoxic process was associated exclusively with the sodium-bicarbonate-type water. The species of arsenic and the dominant radionuclide present were associated with specific redox categories. Arsenate was associated primarily with oxic water and did not exceed 3.5 µg/L, whereas

  17. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Wilson, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biodegradability of vinyl chloride under anaerobic conditions. In this study, a combination of field geochemical analyses and laboratory radiotracer ([1,2-14C] vinyl chloride) experiments was utilized to assess the potential for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in an Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic aquifer. Microcosm experiments conducted under Fe(III)-reducing conditions with material from the Fe(III)-reducing, chlorinated-ethene contaminated aquifer demonstrated significant oxidation of [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride to 14CO2 with no detectable production of ethene or other reductive dehalogenation products. Rates of degradation derived from the microcosm experiments (0.9-1.3% d-1) were consistent with field-estimated rates (0.03-0.2% d-1) of apparent vinyl chloride degradation. Field estimates of apparent vinyl chloride biodegradation were calculated using two distinct approaches; 1) a solute dispersion model and 2) a mass balance assessment. These findings demonstrate that degradation under Fe(III) reducing conditions can be an environmentally significant mechanism for intrinsic bioremediation of vinyl chloride in anaerobic ground-water systems.

  18. Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Moberly, James G; Miller, Carrie L; Brown, Steven D; Biswas, Abir; Brandt, Craig C; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

  19. Biochemical Analyses of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis demonstrates respiratory flexibility by the transfer of electrons to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. Researchers postulate that the bacterium utilizes surface proteins to facilitate the respiratory mechanism for dissimilatory iron(III) reduction. Previous genetic and biochemical studies has shown that iron reduction is associated with the outer membrane of the cell. The identity of the terminal reductase is not yet known. S. oneidensis has been shown to use soluble extra-cellular compounds to facilitate iron(III) reduction as well as expression of novel proteins on the cell surface when interacting with iron(III) oxides. Our results show that the outer membrane fraction possess enzymatic activity for converting Fe(III) to Fe(II) as measured by ferrozine complexation. AQDS, extra-cellular organic extracts, and iron(III) both soluble and solid have been assayed for activity with outer membrane fractions. Zymograms of the membrane fractions separated by isoelectric focusing and native PAGE electrophoresis stained using ferrozine have implicated proteins that are directly involved in the Fe(III) reduction process. A proteomics analysis of outer membrane proteins has also been implemented to identify different expression patterns under Fe(III) reducing conditions. Proteins that are unique to Fe(III) reduction have been isolated and identified using N-terminal sequence analysis. We will also attempt to examine the effect of enzymatic iron(III) reduction on isotopic partitioning from in vitro assays.

  20. Redox conditions and the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation: Field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of redox conditions on the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation was investigated at two field sites. One site (NAS Cecil Field, FL) is characterized by predominantly Fe(III)-reducing conditions in the contaminant source area, grading to predominantly sulfate- reducing conditions downgradient. This sequence of redox conditions led to relatively inefficient biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes, with high concentrations of trichloroethene extending more than 400 meters downgradient of the source area. In contrast, a second site (NBS Kings Bay, GA) characterized by predominantly sulfate-reducing conditions in the source area followed by Fe(III)-reducing conditions downgradient. In this system perchloroethene (PCE) and TCE were rapidly biodegraded and extended less than 100 meters downgradient. Rates of ground- water transport are similar at the two sites (???0.2 m/d) indicating that the succession of redox processes, rather than other hydrologic factors, is the principal control on biodegradation. In particular, redox conditions that favor the initial reduction of highly chlorinated ethenes (methanogenic or sulfate-reducing conditions) followed by more oxidizing conditions (Fe(III)- reducing or oxic conditions) favors efficient biodegradation. Thus, documenting the succession of redox processes is an important step in understanding the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation in ground-water systems.

  1. Deep gold mines of South Africa: windows into the subsurface biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, Tullis C.; Tobin, K.; Dong, H.; Deflaun, M. F.; Fredrickson, James K.; Bailey, T.; Brockman, Fred J.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Peacock, A.; White, David C.; Balkwill, David; Phelps, Tommy J.; Boone, D. R.

    1997-07-01

    Recent investigations have identified microorganisms in various crustal environments to 2800 meters below the surface (mbls.). Relatively few deep samples of the continued crust (> 800 mbls.) have been collected for microbiological analyses, however, because coring is technically difficult and expensive. The gold mines into the 2.9 Ga Witwatersand Supergroup in South Africa may provide an alternative means of studying microbial communities at depths up to 3500 meters. Uranium-rich, Au-bearing, carbonaceous rock and water from a gallery borehole at a mined depth of 3200 mbls, and an ambient temperature of 50 degree(s)C were collected for microbial analyses. Measures were taken to avoid contamination during mining and sampling. Samples were shipped to the USA in sterile, anaerobic canisters on ice, processed under sterile anaerobic conditions and distributed to participating labs. Microscopic observations revealed the presence of intact cells including filamentous microorganisms. Phospholipid fatty acid and DNA analyses indicated that the samples contain cyanobacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron- reducing bacteria (IRB). The water sample yielded a strain of Thermus (IRB-SA) that is the first reported Thermus to reduce Fe(III) and the first facultative, thermophilic Fe(III) reducer.

  2. Physiological Characteristics of Fe Accumulation in the `Bronze' Mutant of Pisum sativum L., cv `Sparkle' E107 (brz brz) 1

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Ross M.; LaRue, Thomas A.

    1990-01-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutant, E107 (brz, brz) accumulated extremely high concentrations of Fe in its older leaves when grown in light rooms in either defined nutrient media or potting mix, or outdoors in soil. Leaf symptoms (bronze color and necrosis) were correlated with very high Fe concentrations. When E107 plants were grown in nutrient solutions supplied 10 μm Fe, as the Fe(III)-N,N′-ethylenebis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)glycine] chelate, their roots released higher concentrations of Fe(III) reducing substances to the nutrient media than did roots of the normal parent cv, `Sparkle.' Reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrated that the high concentrations of Fe in the shoot was controlled by the genotype of the root. In short-term 59Fe uptake studies, 15-day-old E107 seedlings exhibited higher rates of Fe absorption than did `Sparkle' seedlings under Fe-adequate growth conditions. Iron deficiency induced accelerated short-term Fe absorption rates in both mutant and normal genotypes. Iron-treated E107 roots also released larger amounts of both protons and Fe(III) reductants into their nutrient media than did iron-treated `Sparkle' roots. Furthermore, the mutant translocated proportionately more Fe to its shoot than did the parent regardless of Fe status. PMID:16667529

  3. K 3 Fe(CN) 6 under External Pressure: Dimerization of CN Coupled with Electron Transfer to Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kuo; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Lijuan; Tulk, Christopher A.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Hokwang

    2015-09-14

    The addition polymerization of charged monomers like C≡C2– and C≡N– is scarcely seen at ambient conditions but can progress under external pressure with their conductivity significantly enhanced, which expands the research field of polymer science to inorganic salts. Moreover, the reaction pressures of transition metal cyanides like Prussian blue and K3Fe(CN)6 are much lower than that of alkali cyanides. To figure out the effect of the transition metal on the reaction, the crystal structure and electronic structure of K3Fe(CN)6 under external pressure are investigated by in situ neutron diffraction, in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and neutron pair distribution functions (PDF) up to ~15 GPa. The cyanide anions react following a sequence of approaching–bonding–stabilizing. The Fe(III) brings the cyanides closer which makes the bonding progress at a low pressure (2–4 GPa). At ~8 GPa, an electron transfers from the CN to Fe(III), reduces the charge density on cyanide ions, and stabilizes the reaction product of cyanide. Finally, from this study we can conclude that bringing the monomers closer and reducing their charge density are two effective routes to decrease the reaction pressure, which is important for designing novel pressure induced conductor and excellent electrode materials.

  4. K 3 Fe(CN) 6 under External Pressure: Dimerization of CN – Coupled with Electron Transfer to Fe(III)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Kuo; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Lijuan; Tulk, Christopher A.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Hokwang

    2015-09-14

    The addition polymerization of charged monomers like C≡C2– and C≡N– is scarcely seen at ambient conditions but can progress under external pressure with their conductivity significantly enhanced, which expands the research field of polymer science to inorganic salts. Moreover, the reaction pressures of transition metal cyanides like Prussian blue and K3Fe(CN)6 are much lower than that of alkali cyanides. To figure out the effect of the transition metal on the reaction, the crystal structure and electronic structure of K3Fe(CN)6 under external pressure are investigated by in situ neutron diffraction, in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and neutron pair distributionmore » functions (PDF) up to ~15 GPa. The cyanide anions react following a sequence of approaching–bonding–stabilizing. The Fe(III) brings the cyanides closer which makes the bonding progress at a low pressure (2–4 GPa). At ~8 GPa, an electron transfers from the CN to Fe(III), reduces the charge density on cyanide ions, and stabilizes the reaction product of cyanide. Finally, from this study we can conclude that bringing the monomers closer and reducing their charge density are two effective routes to decrease the reaction pressure, which is important for designing novel pressure induced conductor and excellent electrode materials.« less

  5. Microbial Community Succession During Lactate Amendment of Chromium Contaminated Groundwater Reveals a Predominance of Pelosinus spp.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Jennifer J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Drake, Meghan M; Campbell, James H; Moberly, James G; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Podar, Mircea; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Faybishenko, Boris A; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure and metabolism in contaminated ecosystems are potentially controlled not only by the different populations within the community, but a myriad of dynamic physicochemical parameters as well. The goal of the current work was to determine the impact of organic acid enrichment, in this case lactate, on the succession of the native microbial community from a contaminated groundwater aquifer. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors were inoculated with Hanford 100-H groundwater and incubated for 95 days to obtain a stable, enriched community. The microbial community experienced a shift in the population dynamics over time to eventually form a community with far less diversity than the original. The final community was dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp. with small amounts of other bacteria and archaea including methanogens. The resultant diversity was far decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from three phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from one phylum). Isolation efforts were successful in attaining new species of Pelosinus and known members of Methanosarcina barkerii along with several sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing consortia members. The continuous-flow reactors allowed for testing physiochemical factors with microbial community dynamics on a smaller, replicable, scale while also facilitating the isolation of several previously uncultured community members. These lab-scale simulations will presumably allow for a deeper understanding of the community metabolism with specific carbon amendments that can inform future in situ efforts.

  6. A hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism from the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caccavo, F., Jr.; Blakemore, R.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing bacterium was isolated from bottom sediments of the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire. The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative rod which did not appear to fit into any previously described genus. It was temporarily designated strain BrY. BrY grew anaerobically in a defined medium with hydrogen or lactate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. BrY required citrate, fumarate, or malate as a carbon source for growth on H2 and Fe(III). With Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, BrY metabolized hydrogen to a minimum threshold at least 60-fold lower than the threshold reported for pure cultures of sulfate reducers. This finding supports the hypothesis that when Fe(III) is available, Fe(III) reducers can outcompete sulfate reducers for electron donors. Lactate was incompletely oxidized to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Lactate oxidation was also coupled to the reduction of Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, thiosulfate, or trimethylamine n-oxide under anaerobic conditions. BrY provides a model for how enzymatic metal reduction by respiratory metal-reducing microorganisms has the potential to contribute to the mobilization of iron and trace metals and to the immobilization of uranium in sediments of Great Bay Estuary.

  7. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M.; Monty, Chelsea N.

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms. PMID:26824529

  8. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms. PMID:26824529

  9. Establishment of a high content assay for the identification and characterisation of bioactivities in crude bacterial extracts that interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Nickels A; Gerth, Klaus; Grotjohann, Tim; Kapp, Dieter; Keck, Matthias; Niehaus, Karsten

    2009-03-10

    High content microscopy as a screening tool to identify bioactive agents has provided researchers with the ability to characterise biological activities at the level of single cells. Here, we describe the development and the application of a high content screening assay for the identification and characterisation of cytostatic bioactivities from Myxobacteria extracts. In an automated microscopy assay Sf9 insect cells were visualised utilising the stains bisbenzimide Hoechst 33342, calcein AM, and propidium iodide. Imaging data were processed by the ScanR Analysis-software to determine the ploidy and vitality of each cell and to quantify cell populations. More than 98% of the Sf9 cells were viable and the culture consisted of diploid ( approximately 30%), tetraploid ( approximately 60%), polyploidic (<10%) and apoptotic (<5%) cells. Treatment with the reference substances blasticidin, colchicine, paclitaxel, and cytochalasin D induced changes in ploidy and vitality, which were characteristic for the respective bioactive substance. Furthermore, crude extracts from the chivosazole producing Myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 induced an increase of polyploid cells and a decrease in total cell count, while a mutant producing nearly no chivosazole triggered none of these effects. Purified chivosazole induced the same effects as the wild type extract. Similar effects have been observed for the reference compound cytochalasin D. On the basis of this assay, crude extracts of ten different Myxobacteria cultures were screened. Three extracts exhibited strong cytotoxic activities, further five extracts induced weak changes in the ploidy distribution, and two extracts showed no detectable effect within the assay. Therefore, this robust assay provides the ability to discover and characterise cytotoxic and cytostatic bioactivities in crude bacterial extracts. PMID:19111838

  10. A Novel Cold-Adapted Lipase from Sorangium cellulosum Strain So0157-2: Gene Cloning, Expression, and Enzymatic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Qian, Yun-Kai; Li, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Hong; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Genome sequencing of cellulolytic myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum reveals many open-reading frames (ORFs) encoding various degradation enzymes with low sequence similarity to those reported, but none of them has been characterized. In this paper, a predicted lipase gene (lipA) was cloned from S. cellulosum strain So0157-2 and characterized. lipA is 981-bp in size, encoding a polypeptide of 326 amino acids that contains the pentapeptide (GHSMG) and catalytic triad residues (Ser114, Asp250 and His284). Searching in the GenBank database shows that the LipA protein has only the 30% maximal identity to a human monoglyceride lipase. The novel lipA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the recombinant protein (r-LipA) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed the p-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters of short or medium chain fatty acids (≤C10), and the maximal activity was on pNP acetate. The r- LipA is a cold-adapted lipase, with high enzymatic activity in a wide range of temperature and pH values. At 4 °C and 30 °C, the Km values of r-LipA on pNP acetate are 0.037 ± 0.001 and 0.174 ± 0.006 mM, respectively. Higher pH and temperature conditions promoted hydrolytic activity toward the pNP esters with longer chain fatty acids. Remarkably, this lipase retained much of its activity in the presence of commercial detergents and organic solvents. The results suggest that the r-LipA protein has some new characteristics potentially promising for industrial applications and S. cellulosum is an intriguing resource for lipase screening. PMID:22072918

  11. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker. PMID:27091556

  12. Primary structure and carbohydrate binding specificity of a potent anti-HIV lectin isolated from the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2007-04-13

    The primary structure of a lectin, designated Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA), isolated from the freshwater cyanobacterium O. agardhii NIES-204 was determined by the combination of Edman degradation and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry. OAA is a polypeptide (Mr 13,925) consisting of two tandem repeats. Interestingly, each repeat sequence of OAA showed a high degree of similarity to those of a myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus hemagglutinin, and a marine red alga Eucheuma serra lectin. A systematic binding assay with pyridylaminated oligosaccharides revealed that OAA exclusively binds to high mannose (HM)-type N-glycans but not to other N-glycans, including complex types, hybrid types, and the pentasaccharide core or oligosaccharides from glycolipids. OAA did not interact with any of free mono- and oligomannoses that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides. These results suggest that the core disaccharide, GlcNAc-GlcNAc, is also essential for binding to OAA. The binding activity of OAA to HM type N-glycans was dramatically decreased when alpha1-2 Man was attached to alpha1-3 Man branched from the alpha1-6 Man of the pentasaccharide core. This specificity of OAA for HM-type oligosaccharides is distinct from other HM-binding lectins. Kinetic analysis with an HM heptasaccharide revealed that OAA possesses two carbohydrate binding sites per molecule, with an association constant of 2.41x10(8) m-1. Furthermore, OAA potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus replication in MT-4 cells (EC50=44.5 nm). Thus, we have found a novel lectin family sharing similar structure and carbohydrate binding specificity among bacteria, cyanobacteria, and marine algae. PMID:17314091

  13. Differential assemblage of functional units in paddy soil microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are not only a global food source but also a major biogenic source of atmospheric methane. Using metatranscriptomics, we comparatively explored structural and functional succession of paddy soil microbiomes in the oxic surface layer and anoxic bulk soil. Cyanobacteria, Fungi, Xanthomonadales, Myxococcales, and Methylococcales were the most abundant and metabolically active groups in the oxic zone, while Clostridia, Actinobacteria, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Anaerolineae, and methanogenic archaea dominated the anoxic zone. The protein synthesis potential of these groups was about 75% and 50% of the entire community capacity, respectively. Their structure-function relationships in microbiome succession were revealed by classifying the protein-coding transcripts into core, non-core, and taxon-specific transcripts based on homologous gene distribution. The differential expression of core transcripts between the two microbiomes indicated that structural succession is primarily governed by the cellular ability to adapt to the given oxygen condition, involving oxidative stress, nitrogen/phosphorus metabolism, and fermentation. By contrast, the non-core transcripts were expressed from genes involved in the metabolism of various carbon sources. Among those, taxon-specific transcripts revealed highly specialized roles of the dominant groups in community-wide functioning. For instance, taxon-specific transcripts involved in photosynthesis and methane oxidation were a characteristic of the oxic zone, while those related to methane production and aromatic compound degradation were specific to the anoxic zone. Degradation of organic matters, antibiotics resistance, and secondary metabolite production were detected to be expressed in both the oxic and anoxic zones, but by different taxonomic groups. Cross-feeding of methanol between members of the Methylococcales and Xanthomonadales was suggested by the observation that in the oxic zone, they both

  14. Unexpected nondenitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene diversity and abundance in soils

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Robert A.; Wagner, Darlene D.; Wu, Qingzhong; Chee-Sanford, Joanne C.; Thomas, Sara H.; Cruz-García, Claribel; Rodríguez, Gina; Massol-Deyá, Arturo; Krishnani, Kishore K.; Ritalahti, Kirsti M.; Nissen, Silke; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural and industrial practices more than doubled the intrinsic rate of terrestrial N fixation over the past century with drastic consequences, including increased atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas and contributor to ozone layer destruction, and its release from fixed N is almost entirely controlled by microbial activities. Mitigation of N2O emissions to the atmosphere has been attributed exclusively to denitrifiers possessing NosZ, the enzyme system catalyzing N2O to N2 reduction. We demonstrate that diverse microbial taxa possess divergent nos clusters with genes that are related yet evolutionarily distinct from the typical nos genes of denitirifers. nos clusters with atypical nosZ occur in Bacteria and Archaea that denitrify (44% of genomes), do not possess other denitrification genes (56%), or perform dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA; (31%). Experiments with the DNRA soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans demonstrated that the atypical NosZ is an effective N2O reductase, and PCR-based surveys suggested that atypical nosZ are abundant in terrestrial environments. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that atypical nos clusters possess distinctive regulatory and functional components (e.g., Sec vs. Tat secretion pathway in typical nos), and that previous nosZ-targeted PCR primers do not capture the atypical nosZ diversity. Collectively, our results suggest that nondenitrifying populations with a broad range of metabolisms and habitats are potentially significant contributors to N2O consumption. Apparently, a large, previously unrecognized group of environmental nosZ has not been accounted for, and characterizing their contributions to N2O consumption will advance understanding of the ecological controls on N2O emissions and lead to refined greenhouse gas flux models. PMID:23150571

  15. Microbial communities in contaminated sediments, associated with bioremediation of uranium to submicromolar levels

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Weimin; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.

    2008-03-01

    Microbial enumeration, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and chemical analysis were used to evaluate the in situ biological reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) in a long-term experiment (more than 2 years) conducted at a highly uranium-contaminated site (up to 60 mg/liter and 800 mg/kg solids) of the U.S. Department of Energy in Oak Ridge, TN. Bioreduction was achieved by conditioning groundwater above ground and then stimulating growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria in situ through weekly injection of ethanol into the subsurface. After nearly 2 years of intermittent injection of ethanol, aqueous U levels fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level for drinking water and groundwater (<30 {micro}g/liter or 0.126 {micro}M). Sediment microbial communities from the treatment zone were compared with those from a control well without biostimulation. Most-probable-number estimations indicated that microorganisms implicated in bioremediation accumulated in the sediments of the treatment zone but were either absent or in very low numbers in an untreated control area. Organisms belonging to genera known to include U(VI) reducers were detected, including Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Acidovorax spp. The predominant sulfate-reducing bacterial species were Desulfovibrio spp., while the iron reducers were represented by Ferribacterium spp. and Geothrix spp. Diversity-based clustering revealed differences between treated and untreated zones and also within samples of the treated area. Spatial differences in community structure within the treatment zone were likely related to the hydraulic pathway and to electron donor metabolism during biostimulation.

  16. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  17. Significant Association between Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Uranium-Reducing Microbial Communities as Revealed by a Combined Massively Parallel Sequencing-Indicator Species Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.; Wu, Wei-min; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Criddle, Craig; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; Gentry, Terry J; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua; Jardine, Philip M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 M and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared.

  18. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  19. Significant association between sulfate-reducing bacteria and uranium-reducing microbial communities as revealed by a combined massively parallel sequencing-indicator species approach.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S; Marsh, Terence L; Tiedje, James M

    2010-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 μM and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared. PMID:20729318

  20. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiying; Wu, Wei-Min; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Deng, Ye; Luo, Jian; Carley, Jack; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Gentry, Terry J; Gu, Baouhua; Watson, David; Jardine, Philip M; Marsh, Terence L; Tiedje, James M; Hazen, Terry; Criddle, Craig S; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-08-01

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 microg l(-1)) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions. PMID:20237512

  1. Enhanced bioreduction of iron and arsenic in sediment by biochar amendment influencing microbial community composition and dissolved organic matter content and composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yuanpeng; Xia, Dong; Jiang, Xiuli; Fu, Dun; Shen, Liang; Wang, Haitao; Li, Qing Biao

    2016-07-01

    Biochar derived from the pyrolysis at 500 °C with fresh biogas slurry and residue, was conducted to investigate its potential role in mediating the speciation and mobilization of As(V) and Fe(III) from arsenic-contaminated tailing mine sediment, with consideration of the changes in microbial populations and dissolved organic matter (DOM). The reduction of As(V) (10-13%) and Fe(III) (12-17%) were partly in response to biochar abiotically causing desorption and reduction effect, but were predominantly (87-90% and 83-88% for As(V) and Fe(III)) attributed to biochar stimulating biological reduction. The level of As(III) released from sediment upon biochar amendment (656.35±89.25 μg L(-1)) was significantly higher than the level released without biochar amendment (98.06±19.38 μg L(-1)) after 49 days incubation. Although a low level of Fe(II) (0.81±0.07 mg L(-1)) was determined in the solution when amending with biochar, most of released Fe(II) (166.25±40.25 mg L(-1)) was formed as biochar-Fe(II)minerals composite. More importantly, biochar stimulated the DOM bioavailability in association with bacterial activities mediating As(V) and Fe(III) reduction. High-throughput sequencing results indicated biochar application shifted the soil microbial community and increased the relative abundance of As(V)-/Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, mostly Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfosporosinus and Pedobacter. The discovery of biochar-bacteria-DOM consortium may broaden new understanding into speciation and mobilization of metals, which arouses attention to exploit feasible bioremediation for metal-contaminated sediment. PMID:26954472

  2. The phylogeny of uptake hydrogenases in Frankia.

    PubMed

    Leul, Melakeselam; Normand, Philippe; Sellstedt, Anita

    2009-03-01

    Uptake hydrogenase is an enzyme that is beneficial for nitrogen fixation in bacteria. Recent studies have shown that Frankia sp. has two sets of uptake hydrogenase genes, organized in synton 1 and synton 2. In the present study, phylogenetic analysis of the structural subunits of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 showed a distinct clustering pattern between the proteins of Frankia strains that were isolated from different host plants and non-Frankia organisms. The structural subunits of hydrogenase synton 1 of Frankia sp. CpI1, Frankia alni ACN14a, and F. alni AvCI1 were grouped together while those of Frankia spp. CcI3, KB5, UGL140104, and UGL011102 formed another group. The structural subunits of hydrogenase synton 2 of F. alni ACN14a and Frankia spp. CcI3 and BCU110501 grouped together, but those of Frankia spp. KB5 and CpI1, F. alni ArI3, and F. alniAvCI1 comprised a separate group. The structural subunits of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 of Frankia sp. EAN1pec were more closely related to those of non-Frankia bacteria, i.e., Streptomyces avermitilis and Anaeromyxobacter sp., respectively, than to those of other Frankia strains, suggesting the occurrence of lateral gene transfer between these organisms. In addition, the accessory Hyp proteins of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 of F. alni ACN14a and Frankia sp. CcI3 were shown to be phylogenetically more related to each other than to those of Frankia EAN1pec. PMID:19440980

  3. Evaluation of in situ simulated dredging to reduce internal nitrogen flux across the sediment-water interface in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juhua; Fan, Chengxin; Zhong, Jicheng; Zhang, Yinlong; Wang, Changhui; Zhang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Sediment dredging is considered an effective restoration method to reduce internal loading of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in eutrophic lakes. However, the effect of dredging on N release from sediments to overlying water is not well understood. In this study, N exchange and regeneration across the sediment-water interface (SWI) were investigated based on a one-year simulated dredging study in Lake Taihu, China. The results showed low concentrations of inorganic N in pore water with low mobilization from the sediments after dredging. The calculated fluxes of NO3(-)-N from post-dredged sediments to overlying water significantly increased by 58% (p < 0.01), while those of NH4(+)-N dramatically decreased by 78.2% after dredging (p < 0.01). N fractionation tests demonstrated that the contents and lability of N generally declined in post-dredged sediments. Further high-throughput sequencing analysis indicated that relative abundance of the bacterial communities decreased, notably by 30% (compared with undredged sediments). The estimated abundance of Nitrospira enhanced, although the relative abundance of Thiobacillus, Sterolibacterium, Denitratisoma, Hyphomicrobium, Anaeromyxobacter and Caldithrix generally declined after dredging. Therefore, dredging reduced N mobilization from the sediments, which primarily due to decreases in N mobility, in organic matter (OM) mineralization potential and in the bacterial abundance of post-dredged sediments. Overall, to minimize internal N pollution, dredging is capable of effectively reducing N release from sediments. In addition, the negative side effect of dredging on removal of NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N from aquatic ecosystems should be paid much more attention in future. PMID:27161833

  4. Microbial and genetic ecology of tropical Vertisols under intensive chemical farming.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Jaya; Aparna, K; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Trimurtulu, N; Rao, D L N; Lal, Rup

    2015-01-01

    There are continued concerns on unscientific usage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, particularly in many developing countries leading to adverse consequences for soil biological quality and agricultural sustainability. In farmers' fields in tropical Vertisols of peninsular India, "high" fertilizer and pesticide usage at about 2.3 times the recommended rates in black gram (Vigna mungo) did not have a deleterious effect on the abundance of culturable microorganisms, associative nitrogen fixers, nitrifiers, and 16S rRNA gene diversity compared to normal rates. However, "very high" application at about five times the fertilizers and 1.5 times pesticides in chilies (Capsicum annuum) adversely affected the populations of fungi, actinomycetes, and ammonifiers, along with a drastic change in the eubacterial community profile and diversity over normal rates. Actinobacteria were dominant in black gram normal (BG1) (47%), black gram high (BG2) (36%), and chili normal (CH1) (30%) and were least in chili very high (CH2) (14%). Geodermatophilus formed 20% of Actinobacteria in BG1 but disappeared in BG2, CH1, and CH2. Asticcacaulis dominated at "very high" input site (CH2). Diversity of nitrogen fixers was completely altered; Dechloromonas and Anaeromyxobacter were absent in BG1 but proliferated well in BG2. There was reduction in rhizobial nifH sequences in BG2 by 46%. Phylogenetic differences characterized by UniFrac and principal coordinate analysis showed that BG2 and CH2 clustered together depicting a common pattern of genetic shift, while BG1 and CH1 fell at different axis. Overall, there were adverse consequences of "very high" fertilizer and pesticide usage on soil microbial diversity and function in tropical Vertisols. PMID:25384370

  5. Microbial Communities in Contaminated Sediments, Associated with Bioremediation of Uranium to Submicromolar Levels▿

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial enumeration, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and chemical analysis were used to evaluate the in situ biological reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) in a long-term experiment (more than 2 years) conducted at a highly uranium-contaminated site (up to 60 mg/liter and 800 mg/kg solids) of the U.S. Department of Energy in Oak Ridge, TN. Bioreduction was achieved by conditioning groundwater above ground and then stimulating growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria in situ through weekly injection of ethanol into the subsurface. After nearly 2 years of intermittent injection of ethanol, aqueous U levels fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level for drinking water and groundwater (<30 μg/liter or 0.126 μM). Sediment microbial communities from the treatment zone were compared with those from a control well without biostimulation. Most-probable-number estimations indicated that microorganisms implicated in bioremediation accumulated in the sediments of the treatment zone but were either absent or in very low numbers in an untreated control area. Organisms belonging to genera known to include U(VI) reducers were detected, including Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Acidovorax spp. The predominant sulfate-reducing bacterial species were Desulfovibrio spp., while the iron reducers were represented by Ferribacterium spp. and Geothrix spp. Diversity-based clustering revealed differences between treated and untreated zones and also within samples of the treated area. Spatial differences in community structure within the treatment zone were likely related to the hydraulic pathway and to electron donor metabolism during biostimulation. PMID:18456853

  6. Detecting Nitrous Oxide Reductase (nosZ) Genes in Soil Metagenomes: Method Development and Implications for the Nitrogen Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, L. H.; Rodriguez-R, L. M.; Higgins, S.; Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Sanford, R. A.; Ritalahti, K. M.; Löffler, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial activities in soils, such as (incomplete) denitrification, represent major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. The key enzyme for mitigating N2O emissions is NosZ, which catalyzes N2O reduction to N2. We recently described “atypical” functional NosZ proteins encoded by both denitrifiers and nondenitrifiers, which were missed in previous environmental surveys (R. A. Sanford et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:19709–19714, 2012, doi:10.1073/pnas.1211238109). Here, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of both nosZ types in whole-genome shotgun metagenomes from sandy and silty loam agricultural soils that typify the U.S. Midwest corn belt. First, different search algorithms and parameters for detecting nosZ metagenomic reads were evaluated based on in silico-generated (mock) metagenomes. Using the derived cutoffs, 71 distinct alleles (95% amino acid identity level) encoding typical or atypical NosZ proteins were detected in both soil types. Remarkably, more than 70% of the total nosZ reads in both soils were classified as atypical, emphasizing that prior surveys underestimated nosZ abundance. Approximately 15% of the total nosZ reads were taxonomically related to Anaeromyxobacter, which was the most abundant genus encoding atypical NosZ-type proteins in both soil types. Further analyses revealed that atypical nosZ genes outnumbered typical nosZ genes in most publicly available soil metagenomes, underscoring their potential role in mediating N2O consumption in soils. Therefore, this study provides a bioinformatics strategy to reliably detect target genes in complex short-read metagenomes and suggests that the analysis of both typical and atypical nosZ sequences is required to understand and predict N2O flux in soils. PMID:24895307

  7. Effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and prokaryotic communities in rice paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Byung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Sik; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Gun-Yeob; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    The effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and soil prokaryotic communities were investigated in an experimental rice field. The water layer was kept at 1-2 cm in the water-saving (WS) irrigation treatment and at 6 cm in the continuous flooding (CF) irrigation treatment. WS irrigation decreased CH(4) emissions by 78 % and increased N(2)O emissions by 533 %, resulting in 78 % reduction of global warming potential compared to the CF irrigation. WS irrigation did not affect the abundance or phylogenetic distribution of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the abundance of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNAs. The transcript abundance of CH(4) emission-related genes generally followed CH(4) emission patterns, but the difference in abundance between mcrA transcripts and amoA/pmoA transcripts best described the differences in CH(4) emissions between the two irrigation practices. WS irrigation increased the relative abundance of 16S rRNAs and functional gene transcripts associated with Anaeromyxobacter and Methylocystis spp., suggesting that their activities might be important in emissions of the greenhouse gases. The N(2)O emission patterns were not reflected in the abundance of N(2)O emission-related genes and transcripts. We showed that the alternative irrigation practice was effective for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields and that it did not affect the overall size and structure of the soil prokaryotic community but did affect the activity of some groups. PMID:24682309

  8. Change in Bacterial Community Structure during In Situ Biostimulation of Subsurface Sediment Cocontaminated with Uranium and Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    North, Nadia N.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Petrie, Lainie; Istok, Jonathan D.; Balkwill, David L.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that metal-reducing microorganisms can effectively promote the precipitation and removal of uranium from contaminated groundwater. Microbial communities were stimulated in the acidic subsurface by pH neutralization and addition of an electron donor to wells. In single-well push-pull tests at a number of treated sites, nitrate, Fe(III), and uranium were extensively reduced and electron donors (glucose, ethanol) were consumed. Examination of sediment chemistry in cores sampled immediately adjacent to treated wells 3.5 months after treatment revealed that sediment pH increased substantially (by 1 to 2 pH units) while nitrate was largely depleted. A large diversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from subsurface sediments, including species from the α, β, δ, and γ subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, as well as low- and high-G+C gram-positive species. Following in situ biostimulation of microbial communities within contaminated sediments, sequences related to previously cultured metal-reducing δ-Proteobacteria increased from 5% to nearly 40% of the clone libraries. Quantitative PCR revealed that Geobacter-type 16S rRNA gene sequences increased in biostimulated sediments by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude at two of the four sites tested. Evidence from the quantitative PCR analysis corroborated information obtained from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, indicating that members of the δ-Proteobacteria subdivision, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans-related and Geobacter-related sequences, are important metal-reducing organisms in acidic subsurface sediments. This study provides the first cultivation-independent analysis of the change in metal-reducing microbial communities in subsurface sediments during an in situ bioremediation experiment. PMID:15294831

  9. A combined massively parallel sequencing indicator species approach revealed significant association between sulfate-reducing bacteria and uranium-reducing microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip; Kelly, Shelly D; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James

    2010-08-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has been mostly used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium (VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee, USA. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 {micro}M, and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner loop injection well towards the outer loop and down-gradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical created conditions. Castellaniella, and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity; while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. Abundance of these bacteria as well as the Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducer Geobacter correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to the electron donor addition and by the groundwater flow path. A false discovery rate approach was implemented to discard false positives by chance given the large amount of data compared.

  10. Dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction by the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roden, E.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans to reduce Fe(III) was investigated because of its close phylogenetic relationship with the freshwater dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Washed cell suspensions of the type strain of D. acetoxidans reduced soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) complexed with nitriloacetic acid. The c-type cytochrome(s) of D. acetoxidans was oxidized by Fe(III)- citrate and Mn(IV)-oxalate, as well as by two electron acceptors known to support growth, colloidal sulfur and malate. D. acetoxidans grew in defined anoxic, bicarbonate-buffered medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and siderite (FeCO3) were the major end products of Fe(III) reduction, whereas rhodochrosite (MnCO3) was the end product of Mn(IV) reduction. Ethanol, propanol, pyruvate, and butanol also served as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. In contrast to D. acetoxidans, G. metallireducens could only grow in freshwater medium and it did not conserve energy to support growth from colloidal S0 reduction. D. acetoxidans is the first marine microorganism shown to conserve energy to support growth by coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). Thus, D. acetoxidans provides a model enzymatic mechanism for Fe(III) or Mn(IV) oxidation of organic compounds in marine and estuarine sediments. These findings demonstrate that 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses can suggest previously unrecognized metabolic capabilities of microorganisms.

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by the dissimilatory iron-reducing organism, GS-15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Lonergan, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth coincided with Fe(III) reduction. [ring-14C]toluene was oxidized to 14CO2, and the stoichiometry of 14CO2 production and Fe(III) reduction indicated that GS-15 completely oxidized toluene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Magnetite was the primary iron end product during toluene oxidation. Phenol and p-cresol were also completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, and GS-15 could obtain energy to support growth by oxidizing either of these compounds as the sole electron donor. p-Hydroxybenzoate was a transitory extracellular intermediate of phenol and p-cresol metabolism but not of toluene metabolism. GS-15 oxidized potential aromatic intermediates in the oxidation of toluene (benzylalcohol and benzaldehyde) and p-cresol (p-hydroxybenzylalcohol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). The metabolism described here provides a model for how aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols may be oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III) in contaminated aquifers and petroleum-containing sediments.

  12. Depth-dependent geochemical and microbiological gradients in Fe(III) deposits resulting from coal mine-derived acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Brantner, Justin S.; Haake, Zachary J.; Burwick, John E.; Menge, Christopher M.; Hotchkiss, Shane T.; Senko, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the depth-dependent geochemistry and microbiology of sediments that have developed via the microbially-mediated oxidation of Fe(II) dissolved in acid mine drainage (AMD), giving rise to a 8–10 cm deep “iron mound” that is composed primarily of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide phases. Chemical analyses of iron mound sediments indicated a zone of maximal Fe(III) reducing bacterial activity at a depth of approximately 2.5 cm despite the availability of dissolved O2 at this depth. Subsequently, Fe(II) was depleted at depths within the iron mound sediments that did not contain abundant O2. Evaluations of microbial communities at 1 cm depth intervals within the iron mound sediments using “next generation” nucleic acid sequencing approaches revealed an abundance of phylotypes attributable to acidophilic Fe(II) oxidizing Betaproteobacteria and the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microeukaryotic organisms in the upper 4 cm of the iron mound sediments. While we observed a depth-dependent transition in microbial community structure within the iron mound sediments, phylotypes attributable to Gammaproteobacterial lineages capable of both Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction were abundant in sequence libraries (comprising ≥20% of sequences) from all depths. Similarly, abundances of total cells and culturable Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria were uniform throughout the iron mound sediments. Our results indicate that O2 and Fe(III) reduction co-occur in AMD-induced iron mound sediments, but that Fe(II)-oxidizing activity may be sustained in regions of the sediments that are depleted in O2. PMID:24860562

  13. Bacterial reductive dissolution of crystalline Fe(III) oxide in continuous-flow column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.; Mann, C.J.

    2000-03-01

    Bacterial reductive dissolution of synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide-coated sand was studied in continuous-flow column reactors in comparison with parallel batch cultures. The cumulative amount of aqueous Fe(II) exported from the columns over a 6-month incubation period corresponded to (95.0 {+-} 3.7)% (n = 3) of their original Fe(III) content. Wet-chemical analysis revealed that only (6.5 {+-} 3.2)% of the initial Fe(III) content remained in the columns at the end of the experiment. The near-quantitative removal of Fe was visibly evidenced by extensive bleaching of color from the sand in the columns. In contrast to the column reactors, Fe(II) production quickly reached an asymptote in batch cultures, and only (13.0 {+-} 2.2)% (n = 3) of the Fe(III) oxide content was reduced. Sustained bacterial-cell growth occurred in the column reactors, leading to the production and export of a quantity of cells 100-fold greater than that added during inoculation. Indirect estimates of cell growth, based on the quantity of Fe(III) reduced, suggest that only an approximate doubling of initial cell abundance was likely to have occurred in the batch cultures. Their results indicate that removal of biogenic Fe(II) via aqueous-phase transport in the column reactors decreased the passivating influence of surface-bound Fe(II) on oxide reduction activity, thereby allowing a dramatic increase in the extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated bacterial growth. These findings have important implications for understanding the fate of organic and inorganic contaminants whose geochemical behavior is linked to Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  14. [Anaerobic reduction of humus/Fe (III) and electron transport mechanism of Fontibacter sp. SgZ-2].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chen; Yang, Gui-qin; Lu, Qin; Zhou, Shun-gui

    2014-09-01

    Humus and Fe(III) respiration are important extracellular respiration metabolism. Electron transport pathway is the key issue of extracellular respiration. To understand the electron transport properties and the environmental behavior of a novel Fe(III)- reducing bacterium, Fontibacter sp. SgZ-2, capacities of anaerobic humus/Fe(III) reduction and electron transport mechanisms with four electron acceptors were investigated in this study. The results of anaerobic batch experiments indicated that strain SgZ-2 had the ability to reduce humus analog [ 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS) and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS)], humic acids (HA), soluble Fe(III) (Fe-EDTA and Fe-citrate) and Fe(III) oxides [hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)]. Fermentative sugars (glucose and sucrose) were the most effective electron donors in the humus/Fe(III) reduction by strain SgZ-2. Additionally, differences of electron carrier participating in the process of electron transport with different electron acceptors (i. e. , oxygen, AQS, Fe-EDTA and HFO) were investigated using respiratory inhibitors. The results suggested that similar respiratory chain components were involved in the reducing process of oxygen and Fe-EDTA, including dehydrogenase, quinones and cytochromes b-c. In comparison, only dehydrogenase was found to participate in the reduction of AQS and HFO. In conclusion, different electron transport pathways may be employed by strain SgZ-2 between insoluble and soluble electron acceptors or among soluble electron acceptors. Preliminary models of electron transport pathway with four electron acceptors were proposed for strain SgZ-2, and the study of electron transport mechanism was explored to the genus Fontibacter. All the results from this study are expected to help understand the electron transport properties and the environmental behavior of the genus Fontibacter. PMID:25518675

  15. Development of Arsenic and Iron Biogeochemical Gradients upon Anaerobiosis at Soil Aggregate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Pallud, C.; Bedore, P.; Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2008-12-01

    In aerated soils, As release is limited due to the strong interaction between As(V) and soil minerals. However, under anaerobic conditions, As desorption is stimulated by As(V) reduction to As(III) and reductive dissolution/transformation of Fe (hydr)oxides, common hosts of As. The effect of As(V) and Fe(III) reduction on As release has been extensively studied in laboratory batch and column systems; correlation of apparent Fe and As reduction, with concomitant release to pore water, has also been noted under field conditions. What remains unresolved is the coupling of biogeochemical and physical processes that ultimately control As transport within structured media such as soils. Soils are heterogeneous porous media that are comprised of individual aggregates having pores that are dominated by diffusive (aggregate interiors) or advective (aggregate exteriors) transport. As a consequence of physical and chemical differences in the interior and the exterior of aggregates, As(III,V) and Fe(II,III) chemical gradients develop. Here, we examine As release from constructed aggregates exposed to fluctuating redox conditions. Artificial aggregates were made with As(V) adsorbed ferrihydrite-coated sand homogeneously inoculated with Shewanella sp. ANA-3 (model As(V) and Fe(III) reducer) and then fused using an agarose binder into spheres. Aggregates were placed in a flow reactor and saturated flow of aerobic or anaerobic artificial groundwater media was initiated. Redox fluctuated in select systems to examine changes in chemical gradient under changing aeration status. Our results show that within aerated solutions, oxidized aggregate exteriors provide a "gprotective barrier"h against As release despite anoxia within diffusively constrained aggregate interiors. During a transition to anaerobic conditions in advective zones, however, As is released and transport is promoted. Our study illustrates the microscale variation in biogeoechemical processes within soils and the importance of appreciating the spatial connection between reaction and transport fronts.

  16. Depth-dependent geochemical and microbiological gradients in Fe(III) deposits resulting from coal mine-derived acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Brantner, Justin S; Haake, Zachary J; Burwick, John E; Menge, Christopher M; Hotchkiss, Shane T; Senko, John M

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the depth-dependent geochemistry and microbiology of sediments that have developed via the microbially-mediated oxidation of Fe(II) dissolved in acid mine drainage (AMD), giving rise to a 8-10 cm deep "iron mound" that is composed primarily of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide phases. Chemical analyses of iron mound sediments indicated a zone of maximal Fe(III) reducing bacterial activity at a depth of approximately 2.5 cm despite the availability of dissolved O2 at this depth. Subsequently, Fe(II) was depleted at depths within the iron mound sediments that did not contain abundant O2. Evaluations of microbial communities at 1 cm depth intervals within the iron mound sediments using "next generation" nucleic acid sequencing approaches revealed an abundance of phylotypes attributable to acidophilic Fe(II) oxidizing Betaproteobacteria and the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microeukaryotic organisms in the upper 4 cm of the iron mound sediments. While we observed a depth-dependent transition in microbial community structure within the iron mound sediments, phylotypes attributable to Gammaproteobacterial lineages capable of both Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction were abundant in sequence libraries (comprising ≥20% of sequences) from all depths. Similarly, abundances of total cells and culturable Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria were uniform throughout the iron mound sediments. Our results indicate that O2 and Fe(III) reduction co-occur in AMD-induced iron mound sediments, but that Fe(II)-oxidizing activity may be sustained in regions of the sediments that are depleted in O2. PMID:24860562

  17. Long-term Fate of Arsenic under the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Prommer, H.; Siade, A. J.; Chillrud, S. N.; Mailloux, B. J.; Bostick, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ precipitation of iron (Fe) minerals can be an effective means of remediating groundwater arsenic (As) contamination. Among different Fe minerals, magnetite is promising as a host-mineral for As in situ immobilization in that it is stable under a wide range of geochemical conditions, including Fe(III) reducing conditions under which As are often mobilized. Our previous laboratory studies suggest that the formation of nanoparticulate magnetite can be achieved by the oxidation of ferrous Fe with nitrate. Magnetite can incorporate As into its structure during formation, in which case desorption and As(V) reduction are less likely. Nanoparticulate magnetite, once formed, can also immobilize As by surface adsorption, and thus serve as a reactive filter when contaminated groundwater migrates through the treatment zone. In this study, a reactive transport model is develop for the magnetite based As immobilization strategy. The initial numerical model development was guided by experimental data and hypothesized processes from the laboratory one-dimensional column studies. Our modeling results suggest that the ratio between Fe(II) and nitrate in the injectant regulates the extent and distribution of magnetite and ferrihydrite formation, and thus regulates the long-term potential of As immobilization. Based on these results, two-dimensional field-scale model scenarios were developed to predict and compare the impact of chemical and operational parameters on the efficiency of the remediation technology. The modeling results, which suggest that long-term groundwater As removal is feasible, favor scenarios that rely on the chromatographic mixing of Fe(II) and nitrate after injection. This study highlights the importance of combining laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling for elucidating the complex hydro-biogeochemical processes that control the fate of As and for up-scaling of the technology.

  18. Dissimilatory Fe(III) Reduction by the Marine Microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Eric E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans to reduce Fe(III) was investigated because of its close phylogenetic relationship with the freshwater dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Washed cell suspensions of the type strain of D. acetoxidans reduced soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) complexed with nitriloacetic acid. The c-type cytochrome(s) of D. acetoxidans was oxidized by Fe(III)-citrate and Mn(IV)-oxalate, as well as by two electron acceptors known to support growth, colloidal sulfur and malate. D. acetoxidans grew in defined anoxic, bicarbonate-buffered medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and siderite (FeCO3) were the major end products of Fe(III) reduction, whereas rhodochrosite (MnCO3) was the end product of Mn(IV) reduction. Ethanol, propanol, pyruvate, and butanol also served as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. In contrast to D. acetoxidans, G. metallireducens could only grow in freshwater medium and it did not conserve energy to support growth from colloidal S0 reduction. D. acetoxidans is the first marine microorganism shown to conserve energy to support growth by coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). Thus, D. acetoxidans provides a model enzymatic mechanism for Fe(III) or Mn(IV) oxidation of organic compounds in marine and estuarine sediments. These findings demonstrate that 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses can suggest previously unrecognized metabolic capabilities of microorganisms. Images PMID:16348888

  19. Biological Chlorine Cycling in Arctic Peat Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlamal, J. E.; Raab, T. K.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Soils of the Arctic tundra near Barrow, Alaska are waterlogged and anoxic throughout most of the profile due to underlying permafrost. Microbial communities in these soils are adapted for the dominant anaerobic conditions and are capable of a surprising diversity of metabolic pathways. Anaerobic respiration in this environment warrants further study, particularly in the realm of electron cycling involving chlorine, which preliminary data suggest may play an important role in arctic anaerobic soil respiration. For decades, Cl was rarely studied outside of the context of solvent-contaminated sites due to the widely held belief that it is an inert element. However, Cl has increasingly become recognized as a metabolic player in microbial communities and soil cycling processes. Organic chlorinated compounds (Clorg) can be made by various organisms and used metabolically by others, such as serving as electron acceptors for microbes performing organohalide respiration. Sequencing our arctic soil samples has uncovered multiple genera of microorganisms capable of participating in many Cl-cycling processes including organohalide respiration, chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation, and perchlorate reduction. Metagenomic analysis of these soils has revealed genes for key enzymes of Cl-related metabolic processes such as dehalogenases and haloperoxidases, and close matches to genomes of known organohalide respiring microorganisms from the Dehalococcoides, Dechloromonas, Carboxydothermus, and Anaeromyxobacter genera. A TOX-100 Chlorine Analyzer was used to quantify total Cl in arctic soils, and these data were examined further to separate levels of inorganic Cl compounds and Clorg. Levels of Clorg increased with soil organic matter content, although total Cl levels lack this trend. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was used to provide information on the structure of Clorg in arctic soils, showing great diversity with Cl bound to both aromatic and alkyl groups

  20. Passive methods for quantifying the In Situ Flux of Water, Uranium, and Microbial Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. A.; Peacock, A.; Hatfield, K.; Stucker, V.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.; Ranville, J. F.; Cabaniss, S.; Annable, M. D.; Perminova, I.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a novel sensor that incorporates field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter (PFM) to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly-sensor principles and design will apply to fluxes of other radionuclides, metals, and co-contaminants. Flux measurements will assist in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. Field tests in the La Quinta and Super 8 galleries at the Rifle IFRC site were conducted to assess ambient groundwater, uranium, and microbial biomass fluxes. The latter were determined using a newly designed Baffled Multilevel Sampling (BMLS) device installed in typical screened monitoring wells to provide aqueous concentrations of dissolved or suspended constituents over multiple isolated vertical sections of the well. Biomass mass fluxes were calculated from the product of BMLS data for microbial cell counts from PCR analyses and PFM water fluxes collected from coincident well sections. Expected microbial discharge for Eubacteria in the La Quinta gallery was estimated to be 1.7 x 1012 cells per day. The biomass discharges for Geobacter, Methanogens, and Anaeromyxobacter remain to be determined. Expected uranium discharges predicted from stochastic simulations using PFM measures of flux over the La Quinta gallery transect and the injection-well transect of the Super 8 gallery were 26 mg

  1. Water management impacts on arsenic behavior and rhizosphere bacterial communities and activities in a rice agro-ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Das, Suvendu; Chou, Mon-Lin; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-01-15

    Although rice cultivated under water-saturated conditions as opposed to submerged conditions has received considerable attention with regard to reducing As levels in rice grain, the rhizosphere microbiome potentially influencing As-biotransformation and bioavailability in a rice ecosystem has rarely been studied. In this study, the impacts of flooded, non-flooded and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) practices on rhizosphere bacterial composition and activities that could potentially impact As speciation and accumulation in rhizosphere soil and pore water, As fractions in rhizosphere soil and As speciation and distribution in plant parts were assessed. The results revealed that in addition to pore water As concentration, non-specifically sorbed As fraction, specifically sorbed As fraction and amorphous iron oxide bound As fraction in soil were bio-available to rice plants. In the flooded treatment, As(III) in the pore water was the predominant As species, accounting for 87.3-93.6% of the total As, whereas in the non-flooded and AWD treatments, As(V) was the dominant As species, accounting for 89.6-96.2% and 73.0-83.0%, respectively. The genera Ohtaekwangia, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfuromonas, Desulfocapsa, Desulfobulbus, and Lacibacter were found in relatively high abundance in the flooded soil, whereas the genera Acinetobacter, Ignavibacterium, Thiobacillus, and Lysobacter were detected in relatively high abundance in the non-flooded soil. Admittedly, the decrease in As level in rice cultivated under the non-flooded and AWD conditions was mostly linked to a relatively high soil redox potential, low As(III) concentration in the soil pore water, a decrease in the relative abundance of As-, Fe- and sulfur-reducing bacteria and an increase in the relative abundance of As-, Fe- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the rhizosphere soil of the rice. This study demonstrated that with substantial reduction in grain As levels and higher water productivity, AWD

  2. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and pattern of FeRB growth with different Fe(III) forms, a roughly consistent long-term biomass yield of 5 to 15 mg protein per mmol Fe(III) reduced was observed during growth on different forms of Fe(III). These results should prove useful for quantitative modeling of FeRB growth and metabolism in various types of experimental and in situ anaerobic sedimentary systems.'

  3. Enhancement of wheat grain antioxidant activity by solid state fermentation with Grifola spp.

    PubMed

    Postemsky, Pablo; Curvetto, Néstor

    2014-05-01

    Grifola frondosa, Grifola gargal, and Grifola sordulenta are edible and medicinal mushrooms with antioxidant properties. To obtain wheat flour (Wf ) with a higher antioxidant activity than the one exhibited by regular Wf, solid state fermentation (SSF) of wheat grains with mycelia of those Grifola spp. was used to obtain biotransformed wheat grain (BWG) flour. The methanolic extract of control Wf and BWG flour of G. gargal, G. sordulenta, and G. frondosa (GfWG, GgWG, and GsWG, respectively) were studied for their radical scavenging (RS) activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydracyl (DPPH) and their Fe(III) reducing power (RP). The values for RS-EC50 decreased in BWG flour, therefore presenting a higher antioxidant activity: GgWG (0.56 mg/mL), GfWG (0.81 mg/mL), and GsWG (5.80 mg/mL) in comparison to Wf (57.60 mg/mL). The antioxidant content for this RS activity in terms of ascorbic acid content (RS-EQAA) was highest in GfWG, followed by GgWG and GsWG (71.73, 14.46, and 3.02 mg/g, respectively) and lowest in Wf (0.25 mg/g). The RP-EC50 values in GgWG, GfWG, and GsWG were low (0.55, 0.64, and 4.20 mg/mL, respectively) with respect to Wf (55.00 mg/mL). Compared with Wf (0.56 mg/g), the RP capacity in terms of ascorbic acid content (RP-EQAA) was very high in GfWG (193.67 mg/g) followed by GgWG and GsWG (31.42 and 8.74 mg/g, respectively). The high content in gallic acid equivalents was consistent with RS-EQ(AA) and RP-EQ(AA) contents. TLC revealed that antioxidant activity in BWG could be related to the presence of phenolic compounds. Thus, a valuable food alternative can easily be obtained with wheat grains, that is, by markedly increasing their antioxidant value through SSF with Grifola spp. PMID:24552201

  4. Reduction of Fe(III), Mn(IV), and Toxic Metals at 100°C by Pyrobaculum islandicum

    PubMed Central

    Kashefi, Kazem; Lovley, Derek R.

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been noted that a diversity of hyperthermophilic microorganisms have the ability to reduce Fe(III) with hydrogen as the electron donor, but the reduction of Fe(III) or other metals by these organisms has not been previously examined in detail. When Pyrobaculum islandicum was grown at 100°C in a medium with hydrogen as the electron donor and Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor, the increase in cell numbers of P. islandicum per mole of Fe(III) reduced was found to be ca. 10-fold higher than previously reported. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide could also serve as the electron acceptor for growth on hydrogen. The stoichiometry of hydrogen uptake and Fe(III) oxide reduction was consistent with the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen resulting in the reduction of 2 mol of Fe(III). The poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide was reduced to extracellular magnetite. P. islandicum could not effectively reduce the crystalline Fe(III) oxide minerals goethite and hematite. In addition to using hydrogen as an electron donor for Fe(III) reduction, P. islandicum grew via Fe(III) reduction in media in which peptone and yeast extract served as potential electron donors. The closely related species P. aerophilum grew via Fe(III) reduction in a similar complex medium. Cell suspensions of P. islandicum reduced the following metals with hydrogen as the electron donor: U(VI), Tc(VII), Cr(VI), Co(III), and Mn(IV). The reduction of these metals was dependent upon the presence of cells and hydrogen. The metalloids arsenate and selenate were not reduced. U(VI) was reduced to the insoluble U(IV) mineral uraninite, which was extracellular. Tc(VII) was reduced to insoluble Tc(IV) or Tc(V). Cr(VI) was reduced to the less toxic, less soluble Cr(III). Co(III) was reduced to Co(II). Mn(IV) was reduced to Mn(II) with the formation of manganese carbonate. These results demonstrate that biological reduction may contribute to the speciation of metals in hydrothermal environments and could account for such phenomena as magnetite accumulation and the formation of uranium deposits at ca. 100°C. Reduction of toxic metals with hyperthermophilic microorganisms or their enzymes might be applied to the remediation of metal-contaminated waters or waste streams. PMID:10698770

  5. Use of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor to recover previously uncultured hyperthermophiles: isolation and characterization of Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kashefi, Kazem; Holmes, Dawn E; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-04-01

    It has recently been recognized that the ability to use Fe(III) as a terminal electron acceptor is a highly conserved characteristic in hyperthermophilic microorganisms. This suggests that it may be possible to recover as-yet-uncultured hyperthermophiles in pure culture if Fe(III) is used as an electron acceptor. As part of a study of the microbial diversity of the Obsidian Pool area in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., hot sediment samples were used as the inoculum for enrichment cultures in media containing hydrogen as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. A pure culture was recovered on solidified, Fe(III) oxide medium. The isolate, designated FW-1a, is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that grows exclusively by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide. Organic carbon is not required for growth. Magnetite is the end product of Fe(III) oxide reduction under the culture conditions evaluated. The cells are rod shaped, about 0.5 microm by 1.0 to 1.2 microm, and motile and have a single flagellum. Strain FW-1a grows at circumneutral pH, at freshwater salinities, and at temperatures of between 65 and 100 degrees C with an optimum of 85 to 90 degrees C. To our knowledge this is the highest temperature optimum of any organism in the Bacteria. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of strain FW-1a places it within the Bacteria, most closely related to abundant but uncultured microorganisms whose 16S rDNA sequences have been previously recovered from Obsidian Pool and a terrestrial hot spring in Iceland. While previous studies inferred that the uncultured microorganisms with these 16S rDNA sequences were sulfate-reducing organisms, the physiology of the strain FW-1a, which does not reduce sulfate, indicates that these organisms are just as likely to be Fe(III) reducers. These results further demonstrate that Fe(III) may be helpful for recovering as-yet-uncultured microorganisms from hydrothermal environments and illustrate that caution must be used in inferring the physiological characteristics of at least some thermophilic microorganisms solely from 16S rDNA sequences. Based on both its 16S rDNA sequence and physiological characteristics, strain FW-1a represents a new genus among the Bacteria. The name Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed (ATCC BAA-426). PMID:11916691

  6. Use of Fe(III) as an Electron Acceptor To Recover Previously Uncultured Hyperthermophiles: Isolation and Characterization of Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Kashefi, Kazem; Holmes, Dawn E.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Lovley, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that the ability to use Fe(III) as a terminal electron acceptor is a highly conserved characteristic in hyperthermophilic microorganisms. This suggests that it may be possible to recover as-yet-uncultured hyperthermophiles in pure culture if Fe(III) is used as an electron acceptor. As part of a study of the microbial diversity of the Obsidian Pool area in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., hot sediment samples were used as the inoculum for enrichment cultures in media containing hydrogen as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. A pure culture was recovered on solidified, Fe(III) oxide medium. The isolate, designated FW-1a, is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that grows exclusively by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide. Organic carbon is not required for growth. Magnetite is the end product of Fe(III) oxide reduction under the culture conditions evaluated. The cells are rod shaped, about 0.5 μm by 1.0 to 1.2 μm, and motile and have a single flagellum. Strain FW-1a grows at circumneutral pH, at freshwater salinities, and at temperatures of between 65 and 100°C with an optimum of 85 to 90°C. To our knowledge this is the highest temperature optimum of any organism in the Bacteria. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of strain FW-1a places it within the Bacteria, most closely related to abundant but uncultured microorganisms whose 16S rDNA sequences have been previously recovered from Obsidian Pool and a terrestrial hot spring in Iceland. While previous studies inferred that the uncultured microorganisms with these 16S rDNA sequences were sulfate-reducing organisms, the physiology of the strain FW-1a, which does not reduce sulfate, indicates that these organisms are just as likely to be Fe(III) reducers. These results further demonstrate that Fe(III) may be helpful for recovering as-yet-uncultured microorganisms from hydrothermal environments and illustrate that caution must be used in inferring the physiological characteristics of at least some thermophilic microorganisms solely from 16S rDNA sequences. Based on both its 16S rDNA sequence and physiological characteristics, strain FW-1a represents a new genus among the Bacteria. The name Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed (ATCC BAA-426). PMID:11916691

  7. Low molecular weight carboxylic acids in oxidizing porphyry copper tailings.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Blowes, David W; Dickhout, Ralph; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2005-04-15

    The distribution of low molecular weight carboxylic acids (LMWCA) was investigated in pore water profiles from two porphyry copper tailings impoundments in Chile (Piuquenes at La Andina and Cauquenes at El Teniente mine). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the distribution of LMWCA, which are interpreted to be the metabolic byproducts of the autotroph microbial community in this low organic carbon system, and (2) to infer the potential role of these acids in cycling of Fe and other elements in the tailings impoundments. The speciation and mobility of iron, and potential for the release of H+ via hydrolysis of the ferric iron, are key factors in the formation of acid mine drainage in sulfidic mine wastes. In the low-pH oxidation zone of the Piuquenes tailings, Fe(III) is the dominant iron species and shows high mobility. LMWCA, which occur mainly between the oxidation front down to 300 cm below the tailings surface at both locations (e.g., max concentrations of 0.12 mmol/L formate, 0.17 mmol/L acetate, and 0.01 mmol/L pyruvate at Piuquenes and 0.14 mmol/L formate, 0.14 mmol/L acetate, and 0.006 mmol/L pyruvate at Cauquenes), are observed at the same location as high Fe concentrations (up to 71.2 mmol/L Fe(II) and 16.1 mmol/L Fe(III), respectively). In this zone, secondary Fe(III) hydroxides are depleted. Our data suggest that LMWCA may influence the mobility of iron in two ways. First, complexation of Fe(III), through formation of bidentate Fe(III)-LMWCA complexes (e.g., pyruvate, oxalate), may enhance the dissolution of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides or may prevent precipitation of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides. Soluble Fe(III) chelate complexes which may be mobilized downward and convert to Fe(II) by Fe(III) reducing bacteria. Second, monodentate LMWCA (e.g., acetate and formate) can be used by iron-reducing bacteria as electron donors (e.g., Acidophilum spp.), with ferric iron as the electron acceptor. These processes may, in part, explain the low abundances of secondary Fe(III) hydroxide precipitates below the oxidation front and the high concentrations of Fe(II) observed in the pore waters of some low-sulfide systems. The reduction of Fe(III) and the subsequent increase of iron mobility and potential acidity transfer (Fe(II) oxidation can result in the release of H+ in an oxic environment) should be taken in account in mine waste management strategies. PMID:15884343

  8. Influence of Seasonal and Geochemical Changes on the Geomicrobiology of an Iron Carbonate Mineral Water Spring

    PubMed Central

    Hegler, Florian; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Hanselmann, Kurt; Behrens, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Fuschna Spring in the Swiss Alps (Engadin region) is a bicarbonate iron(II)-rich, pH-neutral mineral water spring that is dominated visually by dark green microbial mats at the side of the flow channel and orange iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in the flow channel. Gradients of O2, dissolved iron(II), and bicarbonate establish in the water. Our goals were to identify the dominating biogeochemical processes and to determine to which extent changing geochemical conditions along the flow path and seasonal changes influence mineral identity, crystallinity, and microbial diversity. Geochemical analysis showed microoxic water at the spring outlet which became fully oxygenated within 2.3 m downstream. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed calcite (CaCO3) and ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)3] to be the dominant minerals which increased in crystallinity with increasing distance from the spring outlet. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis banding pattern cluster analysis revealed that the microbial community composition shifted mainly with seasons and to a lesser extent along the flow path. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that microbial communities differ between the flow channel and the flanking microbial mat. Microbial community analysis in combination with most-probable-number analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that the mat was dominated by cyanobacteria and the channel was dominated by microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (1.97 × 107 ± 4.36 × 106 16S rRNA gene copies g−1 using Gallionella-specific qPCR primers), while high numbers of Fe(III) reducers (109 cells/g) were identified in both the mat and the flow channel. Phototrophic and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers were present as well, although in lower numbers (103 to 104 cells/g). In summary, our data suggest that mainly seasonal changes caused microbial community shifts, while geochemical gradients along the flow path influenced mineral crystallinity. PMID:22865064

  9. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a detailed understanding of the vertical and longitudinal distribution of microbial taxa throughout CP. These studies will provide insight into the operation of the microbial Fe redox cycle, demonstrating how genomic properties relate to and control geochemical conditions with depth and distance in a Fe-rich, neutral pH geothermal environment.

  10. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.; Löffler, Frank; Ritalahti, Kirsti; Sayler, Gary; Layton, Alice; Hettich, Robert

    2015-08-31

    analyses, and gene expression studies to support the metaproteomics characterizations. Growth experiments of target microorganisms (Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella, Geobacter) revealed tremendous respiratory versatility, as evidenced by the ability to utilize a range of electron donors (e.g. acetate, hydrogen, pyruvate, lactate, succinate, formate) and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate, fumarate, halogenated phenols, ferric iron, nitrous oxide, etc.). In particular, the dissimilatory metabolic reduction of metals, including radionuclides, by target microorganisms spurred interest for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and sediments. Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed in target microorganisms grown with the different electron acceptors. For each target microorganism, the core proteome covered almost all metabolic pathways represented by their corresponding pan-proteomes. Unique proteins were detected for each target microorganism, and their expression and possible functionalities were linked to specific growth conditions through proteomics measurements. Optimization of the proteomic tools included in-depth comprehensive metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses on a limited number of samples. The optimized metaproteomic analyses were then applied to Oak Ridge IFRC field samples from the slow-release substrate biostimulation. Metaproteomic analysis and pathway mapping results demonstrated the distinct effects of metal and non-metal growth conditions on the proteome expression. With these metaproteomic tools, we identified which previously hypothetical metabolic pathways were active during the analyzed time points of the slow release substrate biostimulation. Thus, we demonstrated the utility of these tools for site assessment, efficient implementation of bioremediation and long-term monitoring. This research of detailed protein analysis linked with metal reduction activity did (1) show that c-type cytochrome isoforms, previously associated with

  11. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox potential (-250 mV) than the other incubations (-50-50 mV) caused by microbial sulphidisation may benefit microbial As methylation. However, incubations manipulated with 10 mM NaSO4 decreased As volatilisation to 0.8 ng As in accompany with the very low As concentrations in porewater (~1 ppb), since sulphidisation may trap solution As by forming AsS precipitates. In addition, the presence of O2 in headspace had no significant influence on the amounts and speciation of As volatilisation. This study evidenced the strong linkage between the microorganism and As volatilisation from wetland soils and furthermore highlighted the potential utilising microbial As volatilisation to remediate As polluted soils. Further studies will focus on investigating the correlations between As volatilisation and microbial As methylation by quantifying the arsenite methyltransferase (arsM) gene-containing microbial communities in treatments mentioned above, using quantitative PCR assay with arsM-specific primer set.

  12. Sulfur Biogeochemistry of Athabasca Oilsands Composite Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. A.; Kendra, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands tailings are important, globally relevant, S reservoirs, known to contain active and diverse microbial communities. As evidenced by increasing S emissions from the oil sands, active biogeochemical S cycling within composite tailings (CT, a mixture of tailings, post-processed sand and gypsum, used for dry reclamation), is likely; however the S biogeochemistry of these residues has not been investigated to date. With surface mining of Alberta's oil sands spanning over 142,000 square km and accelerated production, these tailings-based landscapes will become increasingly prevalent with the potential for significant environmental impacts. The objectives here, were thus to characterize depth dependent S biogeochemistry of a 40 meter CT deposit (Fort McMurray, AB, CANADA). Drill samples were collected in December of 2012 from 5 depths spanning 36 m in the CT deposit, for geochemical, metagenomic and functional enrichment analyses. Results establish widespread microbial S biogeochemical cycling within the CT deposit. Porewater H2S was detected extensively throughout the deposit with background levels ranging from 14-23 μM and a concentrated pocket of 300 μM occurring at depth. Porewater Fe(II) (1-40 μM) was detected only within surficial depth samples. Current Fe(II) concentrations are not sufficient to sequester the levels of H2S generated by CT, indicating CT may become a net source of S emissions, as generated H2S at depth migrates to the surface, in untreated CT deposits. Metagenomic (454 pyrosequencing) characterization revealed highly diverse CT microbial communities, with 21 different phyla encountered overall and 1/3 of these presenting as candidate divisions. The cultivation independent identification of several known IRB and sulphate (SRB) reducing bacteria within these communities was consistent with observed positive growth in IRB and SRB functional metabolic enrichments. Furthermore, two depth dependent structurally distinct communities emerged: a surficial CT zone of Fe(III) reduction and an underlying zone of sulphate reduction, from multivariate statistical analyses of phylogenetic data (UniFrac http://bmf.colorado.edu/unifrac). The emergence of a distinct IRB surficial zone, despite ~65% of the total bacterial community putatively having the capacity for Fe(III) reduction over the entire deposit depth and evident and increasing Fe(III) sources down core, suggests limitation of Fe(III) reducing bacteria (IRB) through some other factor. Indeed UniFrac analyses identified that the differentiation in microbial communities occurring in these Fe and S zones was driven by environmental parameters of DOC, ORP and salinity; revealing that IRB may be unable to access the more complex OC constituents of these materials. Pilot reclamation for CT is currently focusing on capping CT with a freshwater fen, which may provide a more labile OC source for CT associated IRB, potentially stimulating greater H2S sequestration through FeS formation. These processes will be evaluated in the on-going assessment of S biogeochemistry within untreated and treated CT as pilot reclamation proceeds.