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Sample records for fel design studies

  1. Design study of a longer wavelength FEL for FELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Oepts, D.; Meer, A.F.G. van der

    1995-12-31

    We present a design study of FEL3, which will extend the FELIX spectral range towards a few hundred microns. A rectangular waveguide will be used to reduce diffraction losses. Calculations show that with a waveguide gap of 1 cm, only one sinusoidal mode along the guided direction can exist within the FEL gain bandwidth, thus excluding group velocity dispersion and lengthening of short radiation pulses. To incorporate FEL3 in the existing FELIX facility, two options are being considered: to combine FEL3 with FEL1 by insertion of a waveguide into FEL1, and to build a dedicated third beam line for FEL3 after the two linacs. Expected FEL performance: gain, spectrum, power, pulse shape, etc., will be presented based on numerical simulations.

  2. Optimization Studies of the FERMI at ELETTRA FEL Design

    SciTech Connect

    De Ninno, Giovanni; Fawley, William M.; Penn, Gregory E.; Graves,William

    2005-08-25

    The FERMI at ELETTRA project at Sincotrone Trieste involves two FEL's, each based upon the principle of seeded harmonic generation and using the existing ELETTRA injection linac at 1.2 GeV beam energy. Scheduled to be completed in 2008, FEL-1 will operate in 40-100 nm wavelength range and will involve one stage of harmonic up-conversion. The second undulator line, FEL-2, will begin operation two years later in the 10-40 nm wavelength range and use two harmonic stages operating as a cascade. The FEL design assumes continuous wavelength tunability over the full wavelength range, and polarization tunability of the output radiation including vertical or horizontal linear as well as helical polarization. The design considers focusing properties and segmentation of realizable undulators and available input seed lasers. We review the studies that have led to our current design. We present results of simulations using GENESIS and GINGER simulation codes including studies of various shot-to-shot fluctuations and undulator errors. Findings for the expected output radiation in terms of the power, transverse and longitudinal coherence are reported.

  3. Design study of a 7 kW, visible wavelength FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.; Yang, B.

    1990-01-01

    The MIT Lincoln Laboratory is investigating the possibility of building a free electron laser (FEL) operating at an average power of about 7 kW at wavelengths of 500--600 nm. Additional specifications for the FEL include a bandwidth of less than 0.1 cm{sup {minus}1} and a micropulse separation of less than 10 ns. The design study has investigated the basic design parameters of the FEL including an analysis of the electron accelerator, beam line, wiggler and optical cavity. A nonlinear model of the FEL has been used to calculate the FEL gain and efficiency. The required output power appears achievable from an FEL operating at more than 1% efficiency with a conventional RF accelerator. Details of the FEL design are presented in this report which represent the final report for the year from September 1, 1989 to August 31, 1990. 28 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. A Design Study of a FIR/THz-FEL for High Magnetic Field Research

    SciTech Connect

    Tecimer, M; Brunel, L C; Tol, J van; Neil, G

    2006-09-01

    Presently a conceptual design work for a NIR-FIR FEL system at the NHMFL/FSU is being undertaken. The system is intended to combine high magnetic field research with an intense, tuneable photon source, spanning the spectral region ~2–1000 microns. Here, we present a design study involving the FIR/THz part of the NHMFL FEL design proposal. The suggested long-wavelength FEL encompasses in the first phase a thermionic injector (similar to that in use at the Forschungszentrum-Rossendorf ELBE facility) with a planned ~2 mA average current and a ~10 MeV superconducting rf linac module operating at 1.3 GHz. The broadband outcoupling over the envisaged FIR/THz spectral range (100–1100 microns) is accomplished by adopting a single (variable height slot) outcoupler in a waveguided cavity. Besides the performance predictions of the suggested long-wavelength FEL, techniques for the generation of high peak power, nanoseconds long THz pulses (for magnetic resonance applications) are also reported.

  5. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.; Corlett, J.N.; Fawley, W.M.; Zholents, A.; Wan, W.

    2004-07-16

    LUX is a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray science facility, based on an electron beam accelerated to GeV energies in are circulating linac. Included in the design are short duration (200 fs or shorter FWHM) light sources using multiple stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200-250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser modulates the energy of a group of electrons within the electron bunch; this section of the electron bunch then produces radiation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differently tuned undulator. Repeated stages in a cascade yield increasing photon energies up to 1 keV. Most of the undulators in the cascade operate in the low-gain FEL regime. Harmonic cascades have been designed for each pass of the recirculating linac up to a final electron beam energy of 3.1 GeV. For a given cascade, the photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser frequency and the field strength in the undulators. We present simulation results using the codes GENESIS and GINGER, as well as the results of analytical models which predict FEL performance. We discuss lattice considerations pertinent for harmonic cascade FELs, as well as sensitivity studies and requirements on the electron beam.

  6. DESIGN STUDY OF COMPACT MEGA-WATT CLASS FEL AMPLIFIER BASED ON THE VISA UNDULATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; PINAYEV, I.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; SKARITKA, J.; TANABE, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    The strong focusing VISA undulator is presented in this report. The proposed FEL will operate at the 1 {micro}m water window. Extensive simulations were performed to optimize an FEL amplifier based on the two-meter long VISA undulator which has a period of 1.8 cm and an undulator parameter K = 1.26. The betatron function inside the VISA undulator is about 30 cm. For an electron beam with a peak current {approx}1 kA and a normalized emittance of 5 mm-mrad, the FEL peak power can exceed 1 GW within the 2 m VISA undulator using a 5 kW peak power seed laser. Such a device can produce a megawatt of average power for a 700 MHz rep rate. The transverse distribution of the FEL radiation along the undulator, as well as after the undulator, is explored by numerical simulation. The FEL power density at 5 m downstream from the undulator is less than 100 kW/cm{sup 2} for this MW-class FEL. We will also discuss the feasibility of an experimental demonstration of the laser seeded FEL amplifier based on the 2-m VISA undulator at the NSLS Source Development Lab (SDL).

  7. Design study of the bending sections between harmonic cascade FEL stages

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Weishi; Corlett, John; Fawley, William; Zholents, A.

    2004-06-30

    The present design of LUX (linac based ultra-fast X-ray facility) includes a harmonic cascade FEL chain to generate coherent EUV and soft X-ray radiation. Four cascade stages, each consisting of two undulators acting as a modulator and a radiator, respectively, are envisioned to produce photons of approximate wavelengths 48 nm, 12 nm, 4 nm and 1 nm. Bending sections may be placed between the modulator and the radiator of each stage to adjust and maintain bunching of the electrons, to separate, in space, photons of different wavelengths and to optimize the use of real estate. In this note, the conceptual design of such a bending section, which may be used at all four stages, is presented. Preliminary tracking results show that it is possible to maintain bunch structure of nm length scale in the presence of errors, provided that there is adequate orbit correction and there are 2 families of trim quads and trim skew quads, respectively, in each bending section.

  8. Design Studies for a High-Repetition-Rate FEL Facility at LBNL.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT, J.; BELKACEM, A.; BYRD, J. M.; FAWLEY, W.; KIRZ, J.; LIDIA, S.; MCCURDY, W.; PADMORE, H.; PENN, G.; POGORELOV, I.; QIANG, J.; ROBIN, D.; SANNIBALE, F.; SCHOENLEIN, R.; STAPLES, J.; STEIER, C.; VENTURINI, M.; WAN, W.; WILCOX, R.; ZHOLENTS, A.

    2007-10-04

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working to address the needs of the primary scientific Grand Challenges now being considered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences: we are exploring scientific discovery opportunities, and new areas of science, to be unlocked with the use of advanced photon sources. A partnership of several divisions at LBNL is working to define the science and instruments needed in the future. To meet these needs, we propose a seeded, high-repetition-rate, free-electron laser (FEL) facility. Temporally and spatially coherent photon pulses, of controlled duration ranging from picosecond to sub-femtosecond, are within reach in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to soft X-ray regime, and LBNL is developing critical accelerator physics and technologies toward this goal. We envision a facility with an array of FELs, each independently configurable and tunable, providing a range of photon-beam properties with high average and peak flux and brightness.

  9. An FEL design code running on Mathcad(trademark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. C.; Gierman, S. M.; Oshea, P. G.

    We present a simple computer code called FEL-CAD that runs on the Mathcad(trademark) software. FEL-CAD gives estimates of the expected performance of a low-gain Compton FEL oscillator driven by an rf linac. The code provides fast, albeit approximate, answers to basic FEL design questions. Scaling can be done by varying the wiggler, the linac, the electron beam and the optical resonator parameters.

  10. FERMI@Elettra FEL Design Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Allaria, Enrico; De Ninno,Giovanni; Graves, William

    2006-07-31

    This is the final report of the FEL Design Group for the Technical Optimization Study for the FERMI{at}ELETTRA project. The FERMI{at}ELETTRA project is based on the principle of harmonic upshifting of an initial ''seed'' signal in a single pass, FEL amplifier employing multiple undulators. There are a number of FEL physics principles which underlie this approach to obtaining short wavelength output: (1) the energy modulation of the electron beam via the resonant interaction with an external laser seed (2) the use of a chromatic dispersive section to then develop a strong density modulation with large harmonic overtones (3) the production of coherent radiation by the microbunched beam in a downstream radiator. Within the context of the FERMI project, we discuss each of these elements in turn.

  11. Study of waveguide resonators for FEL operating at submillimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Yakover, I.M.; Pinhasi, Y.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents theoretical results of waveguide resonator study for FEL operating at the submillimeter wavelength region. Because of increased ohmic losses it is harder to obtain high Q waveguide cavities at these wavelengths. The following unconventional multimode waveguides: metal-dielectric, corrugated and curved parallel plates, were considered. The type and structure of the operating modes were determined and their attenuation constant, effective mode area and wave impedance were calculated. On the basis of this analysis small-signal gain simulations were made. We have performed a parametric study of the various FEL oscillator cavity designs based on the parameters of the Israeli Tandem FEL experiment. It was found that an FEL utilizing unconventional waveguides has much better performance in comparison to an FEL based on conventional multimode rectangular and circular waveguides. In particular, promising design parameters for a sub-mm wavelength FEL utilizing a metal-dielectric waveguide were identified: gain of 45%/Amp and ohmic losses of 2% at frequency 300 GHz, and gain of 20%/Amp and ohmic losses 1% at frequency 675 GHz.

  12. Optimisation of An HHG-Seeded Harmonic Cascade FEL Design for the NLS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, David; Thompson, Neil; Bartolini, Riccardo; Geng, Huiping; Huang, Zhirong; McNeil, Brian; /Strathclyde U.

    2012-06-25

    Optimization studies of an HHG-seeded harmonic cascade FEL design for the UK's proposed New Light Source (NLS) facility are presented. Three separate FELs are planned to meet the requirements for continuous coverage of the photon energy range 50-1000 eV with variable polarization, 20 fs pulse widths and good temporal coherence. The design uses an HHG seed source tuneable from 50-100 eV to provide direct FEL seeding in this range, and one or two stage harmonic cascades to reach the higher photon energies. Studies have been carried out to optimize a harmonic cascade FEL operating at 1 keV; topics investigated include modulator configuration, seed power level and ef- fects of the HHG seed structure. FEL simulations using realistic electron beam distributions are presented and tolerance to increased emittance has been considered.

  13. R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-StateStudies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary LayoutOption Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    This report constitutes the third deliverable of LBNLs contracted role in the FERMI {at} Elettra Technical Optimization study. It describes proposed R&D activities for the baseline design of the Technical Optimization Study, initial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potential effects on beam dynamics, steady-state studies of FEL-2 performance to 10 nm, preliminary studies of time-dependent FEL-1 performance using electron bunch distribution from the start-to-end studies, and a preliminary investigation of a configuration with FEL sinclined at a small angle from the line of the linac.

  14. NATIONAL HIGH MAGENTIC FIELD LABORATORY FEL INJECTOR DESIGN CONSIDERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Evtushenko; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; George Neil

    2007-06-25

    A Numerical study of beam dynamics was performed for two injector systems for the proposed National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at the Florida State University (FSU) Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility. The first considered a system consisting of a thermionic DC gun, two buncher cavities operated at 260 MHz and 1.3 GHz and two TESLA type cavities, and is very similar to the injector of the ELBE Radiation Source. The second system we studied uses a DC photogun (a copy of JLab FEL electron gun), one buncher cavity operated at 1.3 GHz and two TESLA type cavities. The study is based on PARMELA simulations and takes into account operational experience of both the JLab FEL and the Radiation Source ELBE. The simulations predict the second system will have a much smaller longitudinal emittance. For this reason the DC photo gun based injector is preferred for the proposed FSU FEL facility.

  15. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  16. Beam transport design for a recirculating-linac FEL driver

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.; Cornacchia, M.; Garren, A.

    1996-07-01

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF Industrial FEL includes a two-pass transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that context, the authors discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tunable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance transport systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Various possible designs are presented, and results of dynamic analyses are discussed.

  17. Feasibility studies of a compact mm-wave linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.; Song, J.

    1995-12-31

    Short wavelength FELs impose stringent requirements on the quality of the electron beams. The key factor in obtaining a single-pass UV or x-ray FEL is the generation of small emittance electron beams with ultra-high brightness. The pioneering work at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the last decade has resulted in a dramatic improvement in the production of high electron beam brightness and small beam emittance using rf photocathode gun. The lower bound on the emittance of a 1-nC bunch without any emittance compensation is on the order of 3 {pi} mm-mrad. This is well within the emittance requirement being considered here. Although the original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Wisconsin-Madison, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf structure design, x-ray mask fabrication, and LIGA processing (Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding), the goal to prove feasibility has not yet been achieved. In this paper, we will present feasibility studies for a compact single-pass mm-linac FEL based on LIGA technology. This system will consist of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period.

  18. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  19. Parameter study of the VUV-FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brefeld, W.; Faatz, B.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution we present a detailed study of the influence of the electron beam and machine parameters on the performance of the TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY. The TTF FEL will be a 6 nm SASE device operating with the beam provided by the Tesla Test Facility superconducting linac, driven by an rf photcathode gun. The FEL output power and saturation length have been assessed with the use of different 2D3-D steady state simulation codes. The parameter range over which the FEL would reach saturation within the specified undulator length of 25 to 30 m have been determined and checked against semi-analytical expressions.

  20. Design study of a G-band FEL amplifier for application to cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, H. P.; Read, M. E.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    A G-band (140-150 GHz) free-electron laser is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler. The CHI wiggler is produced by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring composed of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers. The position of the spacers is such that the ferrite (nonferrite) spacers on the central rod are opposite the nonferrite (ferrite) spacers on the outer ring. The field is cylindrically symmetric and exhibits minima in the center of the gap providing for enhanced beam focusing. We describe a tapered wiggler amplifier for plasma heating applications. Preliminary design studies using a nonlinear simulation indicates that output powers of 3.5 MW are possible using a 690 kV/40 A electron beam for a total efficiency of 13%. It is important to note that no beam loss was observed even for realistic values of beam energy spread.

  1. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  2. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX, a facility for ultrafast x-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John; Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Wan, Weishi; Zholents, A.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2004-08-25

    LUX is a design study to develop concepts for future ultrafast x-ray facilities. Presently, LUX is based on an electron beam accelerated to {approx}3-GeV energy in a superconducting, recirculating linac. Included in the design are multiple free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines which use the harmonic cascade approach to produce coherent XUV and soft X-ray emission beginning with a strong input seed at {approx}200-nm wavelength obtained from a ''conventional'' laser. Each cascade module generally operates in the low-gain regime and is composed of a radiator together with a modulator section, separated by a magnetic chicane. The chicane temporally delays the electron beam pulse in order that a ''virgin'' pulse region (with undegraded energy spread) be brought into synchronism with the radiation pulse. For a given cascade, the output photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser wavelength and the field strength in the undulators. We present numerical simulation results, as well as those from analytical models, to examine certain aspects of the predicted FEL performance. We also discuss lattice considerations pertinent to harmonic cascade FELs, some sensitivity studies and requirements on the undulator alignment, and temporal pulse evolution initiated by short input radiation seeds.

  3. High-power FEL design issues - a critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The high-average power capability of FELs has been much advertised but little realized. In this paper we provide a critical analysis of the technological and economic issues associated with high-average power FEL operation from the UV to near IR. The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  4. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  5. Design considerations on a high-power VUV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Angelis, A. De; Garosi, F.; Giannessi, L.; Torre, A.; Faatz, B.; Ottaviani, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    The authors explore the feasibility conditions of a high-power FEL operating in the VUV region (below 100 nm) and exploiting a coupled oscillator triplicator configuration. A high quality beam from a linac is passed through a FEL oscillator and produces laser radiation at 240 nm. The same beam is extracted and then injected into a second undulator tuned at the third harmonic of the first. The bunching produced in the oscillator allows the start up of the laser signal in the second section which operates as an amplifier. The authors discuss the dynamical behavior of the system and the dependence of the output power on the characteristics of the e-beam and of the oscillator. The possibility of enhancing the output power, adding a tapered section to the second undulator, is finally analyzed.

  6. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  7. Physical design of FEL injector based on the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Chen, Qu-Shan; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Li, Ji; Qin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high performance THz-FEL (Free Electron Laser), a compact scheme of FEL injector was proposed. A thermionic cathode was chosen to emit electrons instead of a photo-cathode with its complex structure and high cost. The effective bunch charge was improved to ~200 pC by adopting an enhanced EC-ITC (External Cathode Independently Tunable Cells) RF gun to extract micro-bunches; back bombardment effects were almost eliminated as well. Constant gradient accelerator structures were designed to improve energy to ~14 MeV, while the focusing system was applied for emittance suppressing and bunch state maintenance. The physical design and beam dynamics of the key components for the FEL injector were analyzed. Furthermore, start-to-end simulations with multi-pulses were performed using homemade MATLAB and Parmela. The results show that continual high brightness electron bunches with a low energy spread and emittance could be obtained stably.

  8. Numerical study of X-ray FELS including quantum fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, S.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-06-01

    One of the fundamental limitations towards achieving very short wavelength in a self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL) is connected with the energy diffusion in the electron beam due to quantum fluctuations of undulator radiation. Parameters of the LCLS and TESLA X-ray FEL projects are very close to this limit and there exists necessity in upgrading FEL simulation codes for optimization of SASE FEL for operation at a shortest possible wavelength. In this report we describe a one-dimensional FEL simulation code taking into account the effects of incoherent undulator radiation. Using similarity techniques we have calculated universal functions describing degradation of the FEL process due to quantum fluctuations of undulator radiation.

  9. Physics design for the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) tapered wiggler 10. 6. mu. FEL (Free-Electron Laser) amplifier experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1985-05-09

    The design and construction of a high-gain, tapered wiggler 10.6 ..mu.. Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier to operate with the 50 MeV e-beam is underway. This report discussed the FEL simulation and the physics motivations behind the tapered wiggler design and initial experimental diagnostics.

  10. Simulations of the LANL regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kesselring, M.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The LANL regenerative amplifier FEL is designed to produce an average output power of 1 kW. Simulations study the transverse effects due to guiding by the intense electron beam and feedback. These simulations coupled with experimental measurements can be used to improve future high-power FEL designs.

  11. Sensitivity and alternative operating point studies on a high charge CW FEL injector test stand at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Kehne, D.; Benson, S.

    1995-12-31

    A high charge CW FEL injector test stand is being built at CEBAF based on a 500 kV DC laser gun, a 1500 MHz room-temperature buncher, and a high-gradient ({approx}10 MV/m) CEBAF cryounit containing two 1500 MHz CEBAF SRF cavities. Space-charge-dominated beam dynamics simulations show that this injector should be an excellent high-brightness electron beam source for CW UV FELs if the nominal parameters assigned to each component of the system are experimentally achieved. Extensive sensitivity and alternative operating point studies have been conducted numerically to establish tolerances on the parameters of various injector system components. The consequences of degraded injector performance, due to failure to establish and/or maintain the nominal system design parameters, on the performance of the main accelerator and the FEL itself are discussed.

  12. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  13. Two FEL`s in one

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, V.; Nikitin, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new scheme for a FEL operation is proposed. The conventional principle of FEL operation is means that the electron bunch passes through the interaction area of FEL only in one direction. We suggest another possible layout which implies that the electron bunch makes a turn after leaving the wiggler and entries the wiggler at the same end. Actually the wiggler is a kind of a bridge between two storage rings. The electron bunches on the orbit are expected to be adjusted in the way that after one of them leaves the wiggler, another one enters in the opposite direction and in the proper phase with the wave pulse emitted by the previous bunch. So the electron bunch comes in interaction with the amplified electromagnetic wave in both directions i.e. twice per period. It is especially important for the short wavelength FELs, because each reflection from the mirror causes a significant losses of the wave magnitude. The proposed design gives one interaction per each reflection instead of one interaction per two reflections in the traditional scheme. Another way to realize the suggested principle of operating is to insert the wiggler in the electron-positron storage ring. But this layout can be less efficient because of low intensity of the positron beam. The comparison study of radiation from different types of described double wigglers is fulfilled. The synchronization problems are discussed in this paper.

  14. Optical design and performance of an XUV FEL (free-electron laser) oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Newnam, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the performance of a multifacet metal mirror ring resonator FEL is presented for several XUV wavelengths. Laser performance in the presence of mirror aberrations and thermal distortion is calculated for two different output coupling methods, a scraper mirror and a hole. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Design Concept for a Compact ERL to Drive a VUV/Soft X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Tennant ,David Douglas

    2011-03-01

    We explore possible upgrades of the existing Jefferson Laboratory IR/UV FEL driver to higher electron beam energy and shorter wavelength through use of multipass recirculation to drive an amplifier FEL. The system would require beam energy at the wiggler of 600 MeV with 1 mA of average current. The system must generate a high brightness beam, configure it appropriately, and preserve beam quality through the acceleration cycle ? including multiple recirculations ? and appropriately manage the phase space during energy recovery. The paper will discuss preliminary design analysis of the longitudinal match, space charge effects in the linac, and recirculator design issues, including the potential for the microbunching instability. A design concept for the low energy recirculator and an emittance preserving lattice solution will be presented.

  16. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  17. Selected applications of planar permanent magnet multipoles in FEL insertion device design

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, a new class of magnetic multipoles based on planar configurations of permanent magnet (PM) material has been developed. These structures, in particular the quadrupole and sextupole, feature fully open horizontal apertures, and are comparable in effectiveness to conventional iron multipole structures. In this paper results of recent measurements of planar PM quadrupoles and sextupoles are reported and selected applications to FEL insertion device design are considered.

  18. Design of the SRF Driver ERL for the Jefferson Lab UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R; Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, Michael; Kortze, James; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Wilson, Frederick; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-03-01

    We describe the design of the SRF Energy-Recovering Linac (ERL) providing the CW electron drive beam at the Jefferson Lab UV FEL. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as and sharing portions of the recirculator with the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a novel bypass geometry to provide transverse phase space control, bunch length compression, and nonlinear aberration compensation (including correction of RF curvature effects) without the use of magnetic chicanes or harmonic RF. Stringent phase space requirements at the wiggler, low beam energy, high beam current, and use of a pre-existing facility and legacy hardware subject the design to numerous constraints. These are imposed not only by the need for both transverse and longitudinal phase space management, but also by the potential impact of collective phenomena (space charge, wakefields, beam break-up (BBU), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)), and by interactions between the FEL and the accelerator RF system. This report addresses these issues and presents the accelerator design solution that is now in operation.

  19. Validation of Maturity Offset in the Fels Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Malina, Robert M; Choh, Audrey C; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Chumlea, Wm Cameron

    2016-08-01

    Sex-specific equations for predicting maturity offset, time before or after peak height velocity (PHV), were evaluated in 63 girls and 74 boys from the Fels Longitudinal Study. Serially measured heights (0.1 cm), sitting heights (0.1 cm), weights (0.1 kg), and estimated leg lengths (0.1 cm) from 8 to 18 years were used. Predicted age at PHV (years) was calculated as the difference between chronological age (CA) and maturity offset. Actual age at PHV for each child was derived with a triple logistic model (Bock-Thissen-du Toit). Mean predicted maturity offset was negative and lowest at 8 years and increased linearly with increasing CA. Predicted ages at PHV increased linearly with CA from 8 to 18 years in girls and from 8 to 13 years in boys; predictions varied within relatively narrow limits from 12 to 15 years and then increased to 18 years in boys. Differences between predicted and actual ages at PHV among youth of contrasting maturity status were significant across the age range in both sexes. Dependence of predicted age at PHV upon CA at prediction and on actual age at PHV limits its utility as an indicator of maturity timing and in sport talent programs. PMID:26757350

  20. Design of RF chopper system for improving beam quality in FEL injector with thermionic gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Qin, B.; Tan, P.; Hu, T.; Pei, Y.; Zhang, F.

    2014-08-01

    For a linac-based Free Electron Laser (FEL), good beam quality largely contributes to the success of the final radiation. An imperfection confronted with the HUST THz-FEL facility is the long beam tail that emerges in the electron gun and exists through the whole beam line. This paper proposes to deploy a chopper system after the electron gun to truncate the beam tails before they enter into the linac. Physical dimensions of the chopper cavity are discussed in detail and we have developed and derived new analytical expressions applying to all frequencies for the optimal design. Also, technical issues of the cavity are considered. Beam dynamic simulation is performed to examine the truncation effect and the results show that more than 78% of the beam tail can be removed effectively, while preserving the emittance and energy spread in acceptable level.

  1. Coherence and linewidth studies of a 4-nm high power FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, W. M.; Sessler, A. M.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    1993-05-01

    Recently the SSRL/SLAC and its collaborators elsewhere have considered the merits of a 2 to 4-nm high power FEL utilizing the SLAC linac electron beam. The FEL would be a single pass amplifier excited by spontaneous emission rather than an oscillator, in order to eliminate the need for a soft X-ray resonant cavity. We have used GINGER, a multifrequency 2D FEL simulation code, to study the expected linewidth and coherence properties of the FEL, in both the exponential and saturated gain regimes. We present results concerning the effective shot noise input power and mode shape, the expected subpercent output line widths, photon flux, and the field temporal and spatial correlation functions. We also discuss the effects of tapering the wiggler upon the output power and line width.

  2. Design of broadly tuned FIR FEL based on a variable-period microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Qing-Xiang Liu |; Yong Xu

    1995-12-31

    A varible-period microwiggler is proposed and investigated. The fundamental period of the microwiggler is designed as {lambda}o=2mm, and the period of the microwiggler can be turned from {lambda}o to n{lambda}o (n=1,2,3,{hor_ellipsis}) The wiggler fields with the period 3{lambda}o, 4{lambda}o, and 5{lambda}o are measured and compared with the theoretical results. Finally, a broadly tuned FIR FEL is designed based on the performance of the variable-period microwiggler.

  3. 40- angstrom FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C. ); Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Pellegrini, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 40-{angstrom} FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H.; Pellegrini, C.

    1991-12-31

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Design and Start-to-End Simulation of an X-Band RF Driven Hard X-Ray FEL with LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-08-20

    In this note, it is briefly discussed the accelerator design and start-to-end 3D macro particles simulation (using ELEGANT and GENESIS) of an X-band RF driven hard X-ray FEL with LCLS injector. A preliminary design and LiTrack 1D simulation studies were presented before in an older publication [1]. In numerical simulations this X-band RF driven hard X-ray FEL achieves/exceeds LCLS-like performance in a much shorter overall length of 350 m, compared with 1200 m in the LCLS case. One key feature of this design is that it may achieve a higher final beam current of 5 kA plus a uniform energy profile, mainly due to the employment of stronger longitudinal wake fields in the last X-band RF linac [2].

  6. Optical Klystron Enhancement to SASE X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Kumar, Vinit

    2006-04-07

    The optical klystron enhancement to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron lasers (FELs) is studied in theory and in simulations. In contrast to a seeded FEL, the optical klystron gain in a SASE FEL is not sensitive to any phase mismatch between the radiation and the microbunched electron beam. The FEL performance with the addition of four optical klystrons located at the undulator long breaks in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) shows significant improvement if the uncorrelated energy spread at the undulator entrance can be controlled to a very small level. In addition, FEL saturation at shorter x-ray wavelengths (around 1.0 A) within the LCLS undulator length becomes possible. We also discuss the application of the optical klystron in a compact x-ray FEL design that employs relatively low electron beam energy together with a shorter-period undulator.

  7. Physics design for the ATA tapered wiggler 10. 6. mu. FEL amplifier experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1985-10-01

    We are presently designing and constructing a high-gain, tapered wiggler 10.6 ..mu.. FEL amplifier to operate with the 50 MeV ATA e-beam. The initial experiments will be done with a constant period (lambda /SUB w/ =8 cm), 5 m-long linear wiggler. For an input laser power of 800 MW and electron beam brightness of 2.10/sup 5/ A/(rad-cm)/sup 2/, we hope to achieve a trapped particle fraction about0.5 and an energy extraction efficiency of about2% with a about10% taper in the wiggler magnetic field. This taper corresponds to decelerating the trapped particle approximately two full ponderomotive well (i.e. bucket) heights. In this talk, we discuss the physics motivations behind our tapered wiggler design and initial experimental diagnostics.

  8. Numerical study of the 3-D effect on FEL performance and its application to the APS LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.C.

    1998-09-01

    A Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In LEUTL periodic focusing is provided by external quadrupoles. This results in an elliptical beam with its betatron oscillation envelope varying along the undulators. The free-electron laser (FEL) interaction with such a beam will exhibit truly 3-D effects. Thus the investigation of 3-D effects is important in optimizing the FEL performance. The programs GINGER and TDA3D, coupled with theoretically known facts, have been used for this purpose. Both programs are fully 3-D in moving the particle, but model the interaction between particles and axially symmetric electromagnetic waves. Even though TDA3D can include a few azimuthal modes in the interaction, it is still not a fully 3-D FEL code. However, they show that these 2-D programs can still be used for an elliptical beam whose aspect ratio is within certain limits. The author presents numerical results of FEL performance for the circular beam, the elliptical beam, and finally for the beam in the realistic LEUTL lattice.

  9. Progress at the Jefferson Laboratory FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    As the only currently operating free electron laser (FEL) based on a CW superconducting energy recovering linac (ERL), the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Upgrade remains unique as an FEL driver. The present system represents the culmination of years of effort in the areas of SRF technology, ERL operation, lattice design, high power optics and DC photocathode gun technology. In 2001 the FEL Demo generated 2.1 kW of laser power. Following extensive upgrades, in 2006 the FEL Upgrade generated 14.3 kW of laser power breaking the previous world record. The FEL Upgrade remains a valuable testbed for studying a variety of collective effects, such as the beam breakup instability, longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation. Additionally, there has been exploration of operation with lower injection energy and higher bunch charge. Recent progress and achievements in these areas will be presented, and two recent milestones â installation of a UV FEL and establishment of a DC gun test s

  10. Experimental study of the interaction of THz radiation FEL with the atmosphere and water droplet aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Lisenko, A. A.; Babchenko, S. V.; Kargin, B. A.; Kablukova, E. G.; Kubarev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of radiation of the Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser (FEL) at a wavelength of 130 μm in the atmospheric transmission window with a model aerosol cloud having the known droplet size distribution function has been studied experimentally. The experimental findings are compared with theoretical calculations obtained from solution of the lidar equation for the conditions of the experiment.

  11. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  12. Design of a high average-power FEL driven by an existing 20 MV electrostatic-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kimel, I.; Elias, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    There are some important applications where high average-power radiation is required. Two examples are industrial machining and space power-beaming. Unfortunately, up to date no FEL has been able to show more than 10 Watts of average power. To remedy this situation we started a program geared towards the development of high average-power FELs. As a first step we are building in our CREOL laboratory, a compact FEL which will generate close to 1 kW in CW operation. As the next step we are also engaged in the design of a much higher average-power system based on a 20 MV electrostatic accelerator. This FEL will be capable of operating CW with a power output of 60 kW. The idea is to perform a high power demonstration using the existing 20 MV electrostatic accelerator at the Tandar facility in Buenos Aires. This machine has been dedicated to accelerate heavy ions for experiments and applications in nuclear and atomic physics. The necessary adaptations required to utilize the machine to accelerate electrons will be described. An important aspect of the design of the 20 MV system, is the electron beam optics through almost 30 meters of accelerating and decelerating tubes as well as the undulator. Of equal importance is a careful design of the long resonator with mirrors able to withstand high power loading with proper heat dissipation features.

  13. Three-dimensional simulation of a hole-coupled FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.

    1991-08-01

    The performance of a two-mirror resonator with holes for out-coupling has been examined in a previous study in which the FEL gain was neglected, but the geometrical effect of the wiggler aperture was included in the optical calculation. The phenomenon of mode degeneracy was found to occur, that has serious implications for the stability of performance when the FEL gain is included. We have developed a FEL oscillator code based on TDA'', a three-dimensional FEL amplifier code, to study the mode characteristics in the presence of an FEL. We find that the interaction of the radiation and the FEL has an important, and positive, impact on the mode-profile and related cavity performance parameters. In particular, mode degeneracy is not expected to be a serious problem for reasonable FEL oscillator designs. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. High average power CW FELs (Free Electron Laser) for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Freund, H.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period {approximately} 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam ( body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation.

  15. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher D.; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  16. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  17. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  18. Technological Challenges to X-Ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    1999-09-16

    There is strong interest in the development of x-ray free electron lasers (x-ray FELs). The interest is driven by the scientific opportunities provided by intense, coherent x-rays. An x-ray FEL has all the characteristics of a fourth-generation source: brightness several orders of magnitude greater than presently achieved in third-generation sources, full transverse coherence, and sub-picosecond long pulses. The SLAC and DESY laboratories have presented detailed design studies for X-Ray FEL user facilities around the 0.1 nm wavelength-regime (LCLS at SLAC, TESLA X-Ray FEL at DESY). Both laboratories are engaged in proof-of-principle experiments are longer wavelengths (TTF FEL Phase I at 71 nm, VISA at 600-800 nm) with results expected in 1999. The technologies needed to achieve the proposed performances are those of bright electron sources, of acceleration systems capable of preserving the brightness of the source, and of undulators capable of meeting the magnetic and mechanical tolerances that are required for operation in the SASE mode. This paper discusses the technological challenges presented by the X-Ray FEL projects.

  19. Technological challenges to X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2000-05-01

    There is strong interest in the development of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). The interest is driven by the scientific opportunities provided by intense, coherent X-rays. An X-ray FEL has all the characteristics of a fourth-generation source: brightness several orders of magnitude greater than presently achieved in third-generation sources, full transverse coherence, and sub-picosecond long pulses. The SLAC and DESY laboratories have presented detailed design studies for X-ray FEL user-facilities around the 0.1 nm wavelength regime (LCLS at SLAC, TESLA X-ray FEL at DESY). Both laboratories are engaged in proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths (TTF FEL Phase I at 71 nm, VISA at 600-800 nm) with results expected in 1999. The technologies needed to achieve the proposed performances are those of bright electron sources, of acceleration systems capable of preserving the brightness of the source, and of undulators capable of meeting the magnetic and mechanical tolerances that are required for operation in the SASE mode. This paper discusses the technological challenges presented by the X-ray FEL projects.

  20. The BESSY FEL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Bakr, M.; Anders, W.; Bahrdt, J.; Bakker, R. J.; Eberhardt, W.; Faatz, B.; Follath, R.; Gaupp, A.; von Hartrott, M.; Jaeschke, E.; Krämer, D.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.; Müller, R.; Prange, H.; Reiche, S.; Sandner, W.; Senf, F.; Will, I.; Wüstefeld, G.

    2002-05-01

    Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung (BESSY) plans to construct a linac-based single-pass FEL as an addition to its existing third generation storage-ring-based light-source. The project aims to obtain an FEL-based user-facility that covers the VUV and soft X-ray spectral range (20 eV⩽ℏ ω⩽1 keV). At present, the design stage is funded as a collaboration between BESSY, DESY, the Hahn-Meitner-Institute in Berlin, and the Max-Born-Institute in Berlin. This stage focuses on optimization of the FEL as a user light-source, both with respect to its capabilities and in its performance. Important issues are: stability, seeding options of the SASE FEL, wavelength-tunability, synchronization with external laser sources and, on a longer time-scale, the generation of ultra-short (<20 fs RMS) optical pulses.

  1. Lattice design of a quasi-isochronous ring for a storage-ring FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Robin, D.; Yamazaki, T.

    1995-12-31

    Design work for a Quasi-Isochronous Ring (QI-Ring) dedicated to Storage Ring FELs in Electrotechnical Laboratory has been completed. The motivation for this work is to shorten the electron bunch length in order to get a high peak current in a compact Storage-Ring (SR). By placing an inverted dipole field in a location where the energy dispersion function is relatively large, one can reduce the momentum compaction factor ({alpha}) and shorten a bunch length in a SR. The main requirements for the QI-Ring are: 1.5GeV maximum beam energy; 80m circumference; two 10m-long dispersion free straight sections for insertion devices. A few meters dispersion free straight sections for RF cavities and injection bumpers; and a wide tune ability in betatron functions and momentum compaction factor ({alpha}). As shown in figure 1, the lattice includes two 49 degree, 3 T superconducting bending magnets to reduce the circumference of the ring, a -8 degree normal inverted dipole magnet (ID), 4 families quadrupole magnets (QF, QD, QFA, QDA), and 3 families sextupole magnets. Each quadrupole family has a specific function: QF & QD control the betatron tunes, and QFA & QDA control the {alpha} and suppress the energy dispersion in a straight section. In this type of ring it is important to compensate the second order momentum compaction factor ({alpha}{sub 2}), so at least three families of sextupoles are required.

  2. Three-dimensional study of the multi-cavity FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Kumar, V.

    1995-12-31

    The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser has been proposed earlier, as a new configuration to obtain short, intense pulses of radiation, the key idea being to pre-bunch the electron beam in a number of very short cavities. Those studies were one-dimensional. Here we use three-dimensional simulations to study the viability of this concept when three-dimensional effects are included, particularly with regard to the transverse modes of the optical beam.

  3. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization under XUV FEL radiation: a case study of the role of harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, G. M.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2015-12-01

    We provide a detailed quantitative study of the possible role of a small admixture of harmonics on resonant two-photon ionization. The motivation comes from the occasional presence of 2nd and 3rd harmonics in FEL radiation. We obtain the dependence of ionic yields on the intensity of the fundamental, the percentage of 2nd harmonic and the detuning of the fundamental from resonance. Having examined the cases of one and two intermediate resonances, we arrive at results of general validity and global behaviour, showing that even a small amount of harmonic may seem deceptively innocuous.

  4. Tapered undulator for SASE FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    2001-09-14

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth, limited temporal phase coherence, and large amplitude fluctuations. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of a tapered undulator for parameters corresponding to the existing Argonne low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL. We also study possible tapering options for proposed x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  5. Chirped pulse amplification at VISA-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustsson, R.; Andonian, G.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Frigola, P.; Huang, J.; Murokh, A.; Palumbo, L.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; Vicario, C.; Yakimenko, V.

    2004-08-01

    Chirped beam manipulations are of the great interest to the free electron laser (FEL) community as potential means of obtaining ultra short X-ray pulses. The experiment is under way at the accelerator test facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to study the FEL process limits with the under-compressed chirped electron beam. High gain near-saturation SASE operation was achieved with the strongly chirped beam (˜2.8% head-to-tail). The measured beam dynamics and SASE properties are presented, as well as the design parameters for the next round of experiment utilizing the newly installed UCLA/ATF chicane compressor.

  6. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  7. Simulation of a regenerative MW FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, R.T.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Both oscillator and regenerative amplifier configurations are being studied to optimize the design of a MW class FEL. The regenerative amplifier uses a longer undulator and relies on higher extraction efficiency to achieve high average power, whereas the oscillator is a more compact overall design requiring the transport of the high energy electron beam around bends for energy recovery. Using parameters extrapolated from the 1 kW LANL regenerative amplifier, simulations study the feasibility of achieving 1 MW average power.

  8. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  9. Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D. R.; Evtushenko, P.; Hannon, F. E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Klopf, J. M.; Legg, R. A.; Neil, G. R.; Shinn, M. D.; Tennant, C. D.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2013-03-22

    Jefferson Lab operates a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF and which powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with >10{sup 13} photons per pulse (1.0%BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Useful harmonics extend into the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). Based on FEL model calculations validated using this facility, we have designed both an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 10{sup12} coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. The VUV-FEL would utilize a novel high gain, low Q cavity, while the THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The THz source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. Such multiphoton capabilities would provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to 50 fs. The fully coherent nature of all these sources results in peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings. We acknowledge support from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Jefferson Lab is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

  10. The Stanford Picosecond FEL Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schwettman, H.A.; Smith, T.I.; Swent, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the past two years, FELs have decisively passed the threshold of scientific productivity. There are now six FEL facilities in the United States and Europe, each delivering more than 2000 hours of FEL beam time per year. at the present time approximately 100 papers are published each in referred journals describing optics experiments performed with FELs. Despite the recent success there are important challenges the FEL facilities must address. At Stanford these challenges include: (1) Providing sufficient experimental time at reasonable cost: At Stanford we provide 2000 hours of experimental time per year at a cost of approximately $500 per hour: We are now studying options for markedly increasing experimental time and decreasing cost per hour. (2) Competing effectively with conventional lasers in the mid-IR: Despite the NRC report we do not intend to concede the mid-IR to conventional lasers. FELs are capable of providing optical beams of exceptional quality and stability, and they can also be remarkable flexible devices. Improvements in our superconducting linac driver and our optical beam conditioning systems will dramatically enhance our FEL experimental capabilities. (3) making the transition from first generation to second generation experiments: Important pump-probe and photon echo experiments have been performed at Stanford and others are feasible using present capabilities. None-the-less we are now investing substantial experimental time to improving signal-to-noise and developing other optical cababilities. (4) Extending operation to the far-infrared where the FEL is unique inits capabilities: {open_quotes}FIREFLY{close_quotes} will extend our FEL capabilities to 100 microns. We are now seeking funds for optical instrumentation. (5) Creating and maintaining a good environment for graduate students.

  11. Design and TCAD simulation of planar p-on-n active-edge pixel sensors for the next generation of FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the design and TCAD simulations of planar p-on-n sensors with active edge aimed at a four-side buttable X-ray detector module for future FEL applications. Edge terminations with different number of guard rings were designed to find the best trade-off between breakdown voltage and border gap size. The methodology of the sensor design, the optimization of the most relevant parameters to maximize the breakdown voltage and the final layout are described.

  12. X-band prebunched FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kazuyoshi; Takayama, Ken; Ozaki, Toshiyuki

    1995-12-31

    Following the successful results of the ion-channel-guiding FEL experiments, we began a new experiment {open_quotes}prebunched FEL{close_quotes}. It is an FEL driven by prebunched beams, whose configuration is a normal FEL system with a prebuncher like the bunching section of a klystron. There are two purposes in this prebunched FEL system; (1) Demonstration of a compact/efficient FEL. Attaining the saturation power level with a short wiggler length (compact wiggler) and enhancing the power through the remaining wiggler length by wiggler tapering (high efficiency FEL). (2) Experimental simulation of multi-stage FELs in the FEL-TBA. Examination of FEL interactions with prebunched injection beams, especially, about the controllability of the output RF phase by changing the RF phase of the input seed power to the wiggler. Recent experimental results show: (1) The saturation power of 120MW has been attained at the wiggler length of 1.1m by 1.5MeV prebunched beams with a 45%-modulated 750A current. However, enhanced power has not been observed yet by wiggler tapering. (2) The current modulation of the injection beam (1.5MeV-500A) becoming higher than 30%, the adjustable range of the output RF phase was limitted less than 40 degrees by the input power of 60kW only. Detail explanations of design concept, theoretical and experimental results will be presented at the conference.

  13. Saturation Measurements of a Visible SASE FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Roger

    2002-08-14

    VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) is an FEL designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with the 71 MeV, high brightness beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and using a novel, strong focusing, 4 m long undulator with a gap of 6 mm and a period of 1.8 cm. We report measurements of exponential gain, saturation, and spectra of the FEL radiation intensity.

  14. Saturation Measurements of a Visible SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, A.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.

    2002-08-01

    VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) is an FEL designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with the 71 MeV, high brightness beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and using a novel, strong focusing, 4m long undulator with a gap of 6 mm and a period of 1.8 cm. We report measurements of exponential gain, saturation, and spectra of the FEL radiation intensity.

  15. The VISA FEL undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Cornacchia, M.; Emma, P.

    1998-08-01

    The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) FEL is an experimental device designed to show Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) to saturation in the visible light energy range. It will generate a resonant wavelength output from 800--600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is the first SASE FEL designed to reach saturation, and its diagnostics will provide important checks of theory. This paper includes a description of the VISA undulator, the magnet measuring and shimming system, and the alignment strategy. VISA will have a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator comprising four 99 cm segments, each with 55 periods of 18 mm length. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70--85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walkoff, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, the authors expect to be able to control trajectory walkoff to less than {+-}50 {micro}m per field gain length.

  16. THE VISA FEL UNDULATOR

    SciTech Connect

    CARR,R.; CORNACCHIA,M.; EMMA,P.; NUHN,H.D.; FULAND,R.; JOHNSON,E.; RAKOWSKY,G.; LIDIA,S.; BERTOLINI,L.; LIBKIND,M.; FRIGOLA,P.; PELLEGRINI,C.; ROSENZWEIG,J.

    1998-08-16

    The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) FEL is an experimental device designed to show Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) to saturation in the visible light energy range. It will generate a resonant wavelength output from 800--600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is the first SASE FEL designed to reach saturation, and its diagnostics will provide important checks of theory. This paper includes a description of the VISA undulator, the magnet measuring and shimming system, and the alignment strategy. VISA will have a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator comprising four 99 cm segments, each with 55 periods of 18 mm length. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70--85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walkoff or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, the authors expect to be able to control trajectory walkoff to less than {+-}50 pm per field gain length.

  17. Transport studies of LPA electron beam towards the FEL amplification at COXINEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojoyan, M.; Briquez, F.; Labat, M.; Loulergue, A.; Marcouillé, O.; Marteau, F.; Sharma, G.; Couprie, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Plasma Acceleration (LPA) [1] is an emerging concept enabling to generate electron beams with high energy, high peak current and small transverse emittance within a very short distance. The use of LPA can be applied to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) [2] case in order to investigate whether it is suitable for the light amplification in the undulator. However, capturing and guiding of such beams to the undulator is very challenging, because of the large divergence and high energy spread of the electron beams at the plasma exit, leading to large chromatic emittances. A specific beam manipulation scheme was recently proposed for the COXINEL (Coherent X-ray source inferred from electrons accelerated by laser) setup, which makes an advantage from the intrinsically large chromatic emittance of such beams [3]. The electron beam transport is studied using two simulation codes: a SOLEIL in-house one and ASTRA [4]. The influence of the collective effects on the electron beam performance is also examined.

  18. Microbunching Instability Effect Studies and Laser Heater Optimization for the SPARX FEL Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarezza, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Giannessi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Venturini, C.; Migliorati, M.; Dattoli, G.

    2010-05-23

    The effects of microbunching instability for the SPARX accelerator have been analyzed by means of numerical simulations. The laser heater counteracting action has been addressed in order to optimize the parameters of the compression system, either hybrid RF plus magnetic chicane or only magnetic, and possibly enhance the FEL performance.

  19. An FEL design for gamma-gamma colliders based on chirped pulse amplification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Xie, M.; Sessler, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A next generation e{sup +}-e{sup -} linear collider in the TeV range can be converted into a {gamma}-{gamma} collider by converting it to e{sup -}-e{sup -} operation and then generating {gamma}-rays via Compton backscattering with optical beams. This provides unique access to some areas of fundamental physics as well as highly desirable redundancy to the collisions. The required optical beam (with a wavelength of about 1 micron) must have very high peak power, (about 1 TW) as well as average power (about 10 kW). To achieve a 1 : 1 conversion from an electron to {gamma}-quantum, each micropulse must contain about one Joule and must be about one picosecond long, the micropulse peak power being about one Terawatt. To match the electron beam pulse structure, a macropulse consists of a sequence of about one hundred micropulses separated by about one nanosecond, and the macropulses am repeated at a rate of about 100 Hz. Thus, the time average power is about 10 kW propose and analyze a promising scheme to produce the required optical beam based on the chirped pulse amplification technique. In this scheme, a low power optical beam of the same time structure required for the {gamma}-{gamma} collider is passed through a grating pair to stretch and chirp the picosecond micropulses to about one nanosecond, so that each macropulse will be an almost continuous, 100 nanosecond long pulse, but with chirps (from red to blue) within each nanosecond. The optical beam is then amplified in an FEL, driven by an intense electron beam from an induction linac. The amplified beam is then passed through another grating pair to compress the micropulses, thus recovering the original time structure, but containing about one Joule per micropulse. The requirements for electron beams, about 100 MeV energy, 1 kA current, 50 mm-mrad rms emittance, 10{sup -3} energy spread, are consistent with the state-of-the-art induction linac technology.

  20. Staged energy cascades for the LUX FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.

    2004-07-27

    Designs and simulation studies for harmonic cascades, consisting of multiple stages of harmonic generation in free electron lasers (FELs), are presented as part of the LUX R&D project to design ultrafast, high photon energy light sources for basic science. Beam energies of 1.1, 2.1, and 3.1 GeV, corresponding to each pass through a recirculating linac, have independent designs for the harmonic cascade. Simulations were performed using the GENESIS FEL code, to obtain predictions for the performance of these cascades over a wide range of photon energies in terms of the peak power and laser profile. The output laser beam consists of photon energies of up to 1 keV, with durations of the order of 200 fs or shorter. The contribution of shot noise to the laser output is minimal, however fluctuations in the laser and electron beam properties can lead to variations in the FEL output. The sensitivity of the cascade to electron beam properties and misalignments is studied, taking advantage of the fact that GENESIS is a fully 3-dimensional code.

  1. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  2. The APS SASE FEL : modeling and code comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.

    1999-04-20

    A self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Five FEL simulation codes were used in the design phase: GENESIS, GINGER, MEDUSA, RON, and TDA3D. Initial comparisons between each of these independent formulations show good agreement for the parameters of the APS SASE FEL.

  3. Secular Trends in Body Composition for Children and Young Adults: The Fels Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shumei S.; Deng, Xiaoyan; Sabo, Roy; Carrico, Robert; Schubert, Christine M.; Wan, Wen; Sabo, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine secular trends by birth decade in body mass index (BMI), waist circumference/height (W/Ht), percent body fat (PBF), and fat free mass adjusted for height squared (FFM/Ht2) in children and adolescents aged 8–18 years. Methods Serial data were analyzed from 628 boys and 591girls aged 8 to 18 years who participated in the Fels Longitudinal Study. Subjects were stratified by birth decade from 1960 through 1999. Means and standard deviations were computed for all measurements by birth decade, age and sex. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used data to ascertain secular trends separately for boys and girls. Results Boys and girls born in the 1990s had significantly higher mean BMI, W/Ht and PBF than did children born in previous decades. Mean FFM/Ht2 was significantly smaller in boys born in the 1990s than boys of the same age born in earlier decades. No secular trend was noted in FFM/ Ht2 in girls by decade of birth. Conclusion Our analysis of serial data collected over four decades confirms the secular trend in childhood BMI previously observed in successive cross-sectional studies. Our analysis discloses significant positive secular trends in W/Ht and PBF in both boys and girls and a significant negative secular trend in FFM/Ht2 in boys over the last four decades of the 20th century. The secular changes presage increases in the prevalence of conditions associated with childhood and adolescent obesity – such as hypertension, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia – that may appear as early as the second decade of life. PMID:22410970

  4. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Frequency-Chirped FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Frequency-chirped free-electron lasers (FELs) are useful to generate a large photon bandwidth or a shorter x-ray pulse duration. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional analysis of a high-gain FEL driven by the energy-chirped electron beam. We show that the FEL eigenmode equation is the same for a frequency-chirped FEL as for an undulator-tapered FEL. We study the transverse effects of such FELs including mode properties and transverse coherence.

  5. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V. V.; Yuan, S.; Baker, S.; Bozek, J.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; Goldberg, K. A.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Kelez, N.; Kunz, M.; McKinney, W. R.; Morrison, G.; Padmore, H. A.; Soufli, R.; Tamura, N.; Warwick, T.

    2010-06-02

    We review the recent development of bendable x-ray optics used for focusing of beams of soft and hard x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory. For simultaneous focusing in the tangential and sagittal directions, two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair, are used. Because fabrication of elliptical surfaces is complicated, the cost of directly fabricated tangential elliptical cylinders is often prohibitive. Moreover, such optics cannot be easily readjusted for use in multiple, different experimental arrangements, e.g. at different focal distances. This is in contrast to flat optics that are simpler to manufacture and easier to measure by conventional interferometry. The tangential figure of a flat substrate is changed by placing torques (couples) at each end. Depending on the applied couples, one can tune the shape close to a desired tangential cylinder, ellipse or parabola. We review the nature of the bending, requirements and approaches to the mechanical design, describe original optical and at-wavelength techniques for optimal tuning of bendable optics and alignment on the beamline, and provide beamline performance of the bendable optics used for sub-micro and nano focusing of soft x-rays.

  6. Wrist Breadth and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Youth: The Fels Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    MUELLER, NOEL T.; JOHNSON, WILLIAM; ODEGAARD, ANDREW O.; LEE, MIRYOUNG; CZERWINSKI, STEFAN A.; DEMERATH, ELLEN W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is biological crosstalk between insulin signaling and bone remodeling pathways, and wrist circumference and bone area were recently found to associate with insulin resistance independent of body mass index (BMI) in overweight/obese children. We aimed to expand on this work by using more specific measures of adiposity for adjustment and examining children with broader range of BMI. Methods We used serial data (1,051 total measures) on 313 non-Hispanic white youth (ages 8–18 y) from the Fels Longitudinal Study with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) as the outcome. Internal standard deviation score (SDS) for wrist breadth was evaluated as a predictor of HOMA-IR (log-transformed) before and after adjusting for internal-sample SDSs for BMI, waist circumference (WC), and total body fat (TBF) from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, in addition to age, sex, Tanner stage, and birth year, using generalized estimating equations. Results Before additional adiposity adjustment, we found a significant positive association between wrist breadth SDS and log-transformed HOMA-IR (β = 0.13; 95%CI: 0.09–0.17), which remained significant after adjusting for TBF SDS (β = 0.09; 95%CI: 0.05–0.13; P < 0.001), BMI SDS (β = 0.06; 95%CI: 0.02–0.10; P = 0.007), and WC SDS (β = 0.06; 95%CI: 0.02–0.09; P = 0.005). Conclusions Further work is needed to determine whether simple frame size measures such as wrist breadth may be useful markers of metabolic risk. PMID:23897560

  7. A Parameter Optimization for a National SASE FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, O.; Yigit, S.

    2007-04-23

    The parameter optimization for a national SASE FEL facility was studied. Turkish State Planing Organization (DPT) gave financial support as an inter-universities project to begin technical design studies and test facility of National Accelerator Complex starting from 2006. In addition to a particle factory, the complex will contain a linac based free electron laser, positron ring based synchrotron radiation facilities and a proton accelerator. In this paper, we have given some results of main parameters of SASE FEL facility based on 130 MeV linac, application potential in basic and applied research.

  8. Beam conditioning for FELs: Consequences and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.

    2004-06-29

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases (VISA, a Soft X-Ray FEL, LCLS and a ''Greenfield'' FEL) are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of two or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with ''matching conditions'' derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  9. An Experimental Study of an FEL Oscillator with a Linear Taper

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.; Gubeli, J.; Neil, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Saldin, Schneidmiller and Yurkov, we have measured the detuning curve widths, spectral characteristics, efficiency, and energy spread as a function of the taper for low and high Q resonators in the IR Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab. Both positive and negative tapers were used. Gain and frequency agreed reasonably well with the predictions of a single mode theory. The efficiency agreed reasonably well for a negative taper with a high Q resonator but disagreed for lower Q values due to the large slippage parameter and the non-ideal resonator Q. We saw better efficiency for a negative taper than for the same positive taper. The energy spread induced in the beam, normalized to the efficiency is larger for the positive taper than for the corresponding negative taper. This indicates that a negative taper is preferred over a positive taper in an energy recovery FEL.

  10. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics

  11. Simulation studies of a XUV/soft X-ray harmonic-cascade FEL for the proposed LBNL recirculating linac*

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Zholents, A.

    2003-06-02

    Presently there is significant interest at LBNL in designing and building a facility for ultrafast (i.e. femtosecond time scale) x-ray science based upon a superconducting, recirculating RF linac (see Corlett et al. for more details). In addition to producing synchrotron radiation pulses in the 1-15 keV energy range, we are also considering adding one or more free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines using a harmonic cascade approach to produce coherent XUV soft X-ray emission beginning with a strong input seed at {approx}200 nm wavelength obtained from a ''conventional'' laser. Each cascade is composed of a radiator together with a modulator section, separated by a magnetic chicane. The chicane temporally delays the electron beam pulse in order that a ''virgin'' pulse region (with undegraded energy spread) be brought into synchronism with the radiation pulse, which together then undergo FEL action in the modulator. We present various results obtained with the GINGER simulation code examining final output sensitivity to initial electron beam parameters. We also discuss the effects of spontaneous emission and shot noise upon this particular cascade approach which can limit the final output coherence.

  12. A high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortgang, C.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1997-08-01

    The Regenerative Amplifier FEL (RAFEL) is a new FEL approach aimed at achieving the highest optical power from a compact rf-linac FEL. The key idea is to feed back a small fraction (< 10%) of the optical power into a high-gain ({approximately}10{sup 5} in single pass) wiggler to enable the FEL to reach saturation in a few passes. This paper summarizes the design of a high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL and describes the first experimental demonstration of the RAFEL concept.

  13. Optics Design for a Soft X-ray FEL at the SLAC A-Line

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, H; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2009-05-15

    LCLS capabilities can be significantly extended with a second undulator aiming at the soft x-ray spectrum (1-5 nm). To allow for simultaneous hard and soft x-ray operations, 14 GeV beams at the end of the LCLS accelerator can be intermittently switched into the SLAC A-line (the beam transport line to End Station A) where the second undulator may be located. In this paper, we discuss the A-line optics design for transporting the high-brightness LCLS beams using the existing tunnel. To preserve the high brightness of the LCLS beams, special attention is paid to effects of incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation. Start-to-end simulations using realistic LCLS beam distributions are carried out.

  14. Concepts for UV-FEL optics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.

    1993-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a design for an ultra-violet free electron laser facility utilizing a seeded amplifier approach. Since the accelerator is a single pass device, resonator and outcoupler mirrors which are a difficult aspect of oscillator FEL designs are not required. The result is a source of high peak power VUV radiation with the mode structure, bandwidth and frequency stability of the input seed laser. The accelerator provides pulses of radiation at up to 10 kHz, so to maximize the utilization of the source, novel optical systems to share the radiation had to be developed. These include specialized alignment, beam transport, order sorting, and multiplexing optics. In addition, FEL on FEL pump-probe experiments are made possible by a variable optical delay of up to 10 ns operating in the wavelength range of 200 to 75 nm. Some aspects of the FEL design are also described to clarify the constraints and choices for the optical system.

  15. Experimental test of hole-coupled FEL resonator designs using a CW-HeNe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Wallace, E.W.; Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report on ongoing experiments and simulations which model the performance of hole-coupled resonators. We have previously studied a hole-coupled resonator which was well inside the stable region (stability parameter g = {minus}0.8). In the far field, good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the intracavity and outcoupled mode-profile. The present study involves a resonator with a stability parameter of {minus}0.987, identical to the stability parameter of the proposed Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The experiments were carried out with a frequency stabilized CW-HeNe laser beam at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Both intracavity and outcoupled mode profiles and power levels were measured. The simulations were done using the code HOLD, which is based on the Fresnel approximation for the Huygens kernel. Within the experimental uncertainties, magnified due to the 1/(1+g) dependence of the mode characteristics on errors in measured resonator parameters, we have obtained fair agreement between experiment and simulation.

  16. Experimental test of hole-coupled FEL resonator designs using a CW-HeNe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Wallace, E.W.; Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report on ongoing experiments and simulations which model the performance of hole-coupled resonators. We have previously studied a hole-coupled resonator which was well inside the stable region (stability parameter g = [minus]0.8). In the far field, good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the intracavity and outcoupled mode-profile. The present study involves a resonator with a stability parameter of [minus]0.987, identical to the stability parameter of the proposed Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The experiments were carried out with a frequency stabilized CW-HeNe laser beam at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Both intracavity and outcoupled mode profiles and power levels were measured. The simulations were done using the code HOLD, which is based on the Fresnel approximation for the Huygens kernel. Within the experimental uncertainties, magnified due to the 1/(1+g) dependence of the mode characteristics on errors in measured resonator parameters, we have obtained fair agreement between experiment and simulation.

  17. A novel IgE-binding epitope of cat major allergen, Fel d 1.

    PubMed

    Tasaniyananda, Natt; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Seesuay, Watee; Sakolvaree, Yuwaporn; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Sookrung, Nitat

    2016-02-12

    Information on the antigenic repertoire, especially the IgE-binding epitopes of an allergen is important for understanding the allergen induced immune response and cross-reactivity, as well as for generating the hypoallergenic variants for specific component resolved immunotherapy/diagnosis (CRIT and CRD). Data on the IgE-binding epitopes of cat allergens are scarce. In this study, a novel IgE-binding epitope of the cat major allergen, Fel d 1, was identified. Mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to the Fel d 1 was produced. Computerized intermolecular docking was used for determining the residues of the Fel d 1 bound by the specific MAb. The presumptive surface exposed residues of the Fel d 1 intrigued by the MAb are located on the chain 1. They are: L34 and T37 (helix 1); T39 (between helices 1 and 2); P40, E42 and E45 (helix 2); R61, K64, N65 and D68 (helix 3); and E73 and K76 (helix 4). The MAb competed efficiently with the cat allergic patients' serum IgE for Fel d 1 binding in the competitive IgE binding assay, indicating allergenicity of the MAb epitope. The newly identified allergenic epitope of the Fel d 1 is useful in a design of the CRIT and CRD for cat allergy. PMID:26797272

  18. Multidimensional simulation studies of the SELENE FEL oscillator/buncher followed by a radiator/amplifier output scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S.J.; Fawley, W.M.

    1995-02-01

    We analyze and present numerical simulations of the so-called electron output scheme [G. I. Erg et al., 15th Int. FEL Conf., The Hague, The Netherlands, 1993, Book of Abstracts p. 50; Preprint Budker INP 93-75] applied to the SELENE proposal of using a high power FEL to illuminate satellite solar cells. In this scheme, a first stage FEL oscillator bunches the electron beam while a second stage ``radiator`` extracts high power radiation. Our analysis suggests only in the case where the radiator employs a long, tapered undulator will the electron output scheme produce a significant increase in extraction efficiency over what is obtainable from a simple, single-stage oscillator. 1- and 2-D numerical simulations of a 1.7{mu}m FEL employing the electron output scheme show reasonably large bunching fractions ({approximately} 0.3--0.4) at the output of the oscillator stage but only {le}2% extraction efficiency from the radiator stage.

  19. Design considerations and analysis of potential applications of a high power ultraviolet FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, C.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1999-02-01

    A possibility of constructing a high power ultraviolet free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY is discussed. The proposed facility consists of a tunable master oscillator (P av˜10 mW, P peak˜10 kW, λ≃200-350 nm) and an FEL amplifier with a tapered undulator. The average and peak radiation power at the exit of the FEL amplifier is about 7 kW and 220 GW, respectively. Installation of such a facility can significantly extend scientific potential of the TESLA test facility. The UV free electron laser can be used to construct a polarized, monochromatic gamma-source with the ultimate yield up to 10 12 gamma-quanta per second and the maximal energy of about 100 MeV. An intensive gamma-source can also form the base for constructing the test facility for the TESLA positron generation system. Another accelerator application of the proposed facility is verification of the main technical solutions for the laser and the optical system to be used in the gamma-gamma option of the TESLA collider. A high average power UV laser is also promising for industrial applications.

  20. On a theory of an FEL oscillator with multicomponent undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Some novel results of a theory of an FEL oscillator with multicomponent undulator are presented. Two popular FEL oscillator configuration are under consideration: optical klystron and FEL oscillator with a prebuncher and tapered main undulator. Using similarity techniques, universal formulae and plots are obtained which allow one to calculate the FEL oscillator lasing conditions an output parameters at saturation. A one-dimensional analysis of an FEL oscillator with a linear undulator tapering is presented. Some principally novel results have been obtained. The origin of these results is in principal difference between the FEL oscillator and an FEL amplifier. In the case of the FEL amplifier the frequency of the amplified wave and all the other parameters are defined by an experimenter. Contrary to this, the case of the FEL oscillator with tapered undulator is more complicated. The lasing frequency is defined by the maximum of the small-signal gain and depends on the tapering depth in some complex way. In particular, at smooth increasing of the tapering depth, the lasing frequency may change by a leap and lasing occurs at another local maximum of the gain curve. This effect influences significantly on the FEL oscillator operation at saturation. As a result, generally accepted method of undulator tapering (for instance, by decreasing undulator field at fixed period) provides an efficiency increase only in a narrow range of the parameters of tapering. We show that in some cases, so called {open_quotes}negative tapering{close_quotes} (for instance, by increasing undulator field at fixed period) has a benefit against traditional tapering method. Ignoring of these basic features of the FEL oscillator with the tapered undulator have led many FEL research groups to nonoptimal design of the FEL experiments and incorrect interpretation of the obtained results.

  1. SASE FEL Polarization Control Using Crossed Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2008-09-30

    There is a growing interest in producing intense, coherent x-ray radiation with an adjustable and arbitrary polarization state. In this paper, we study the crossed undulator scheme for rapid polarization control in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL). Because a SASE source is a temporally chaotic light, we perform a statistical analysis on the state of polarization using FEL theory and simulations. We show that by adding a small phase shifter and a short (about 1.3 times the FEL power gain length), 90{sup o} rotated planar undulator after the main SASE planar undulator, one can obtain circularly polarized light--with over 80% polarization--near the FEL saturation.

  2. Gain length dependence on phase shake in the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Pierini, P.

    1995-12-31

    The TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY, consists of a 30 m long SASE FEL which will radiate around 6 nm, driven by a superconducting linac with final energy of 1 GeV. One of the important issues in its design is the undulator performance, which is studied in this paper. The present setup, including FODO lattice, is discussed in this paper. Results of simulations, including the realistic wiggler field errors and beam stearing, are presented. Dependence of the performance, in particular the gain and saturation length as well as the saturation peak power, on the wiggler field errors is discussed.

  3. Ther FERMI FEL project at TRIESTE

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.P.; Bulfone, D.; Cargnello, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the FERMI project - Free Electron Radiation and Matching Instrumentation - is to construct a new user facility for FEL radiation beams covering a broad spectral range (2-250 {mu}m) to complement the high brightness VUV/Soft-Xray radiation available from the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility at Trieste. A unique feature of the project will be the possibility of carrying out {open_quote}pump-probe{close_quote} experiments using synchronized radiation beams from FERMI and ELETTRA on the same sample. The project was launched at a meeting with Italian FEL experts held in Trieste on the 18th November 1994, chaired by C. Rubbia, as a collaboration between Sincrotrone Trieste, ENEA (Frascati), INFN (Frascati) and the University of Naples (Department of Electronic Engineering). The facility will make use of an existing linac, that forms part of the ELETTRA injection system, and a hall into which the beam can be extracted. In addition, for the first phase of the project equipment will be used from the suspended INFN/ENEA {open_quote}SURF{close_quote} FEL experiment, including the undulator, beam transport magnets and optical cavity. In this first International FEL Conference report on the project, we summarize the main features of the project, concentrating in particular on the most recent activities, including: results of measurements of the linac beam in the FEL mode of operation, further studies of the electron beam transport system including possibilities for bunch length manipulations, and further numerical calculations of the FEL performance.

  4. Extending the History of Child Obesity in the United States: The Fels Longitudinal Study, Birth Years 1930 to 1993

    PubMed Central

    von Hippel, Paul T.; Nahhas, Ramzi W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the prevalence of child obesity in the U.S. before the first national survey in 1963. There is disagreement about whether the obesity epidemic is entirely a recent phenomenon or a continuation of longstanding trends. Methods We analyze the BMIs of 1,116 children who participated in the Fels Longitudinal Study near Dayton, Ohio. Children were born between 1930 and 1993 and measured between 3 and 18 years of age. Results Between the birth cohorts of 1930 and 1993, the prevalence of obesity rose from 0% to 14% among boys and from 2% to 12% among girls. The prevalence of overweight rose from 10% to 28% among boys and from 9% to 21% among girls. The mean BMI Z-score rose from +0.25 to +0.72 among boys and from −0.11 to +0.26 among girls. Among boys, all these increases began after birth year 1970. Among girls, obesity began to rise after birth year 1970, but overweight and BMI Z-scores were already rising as early as the 1930s and 1940s. Conclusions Most of the results suggest that the child obesity epidemic was recent and sudden. The recency of the epidemic offers some hope that it may be reversed. PMID:23512972

  5. COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT WAVELENGTH TUNING SCHEMES IN A SEEDED HIGH-GAIN FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN,T.; YU,L.H.

    2004-08-04

    In the following text we analyze and compare results of the two publications ([1], [2]), dedicated to development of the tunable high-gain Free Electron laser (FEL), seeded by an external source. As a conclusion we summarize similarities and differences between these concepts. This note is initiated by the polemics on the similarity of two different schemes of the wavelength tuning in a seeded high-gain FEL. Below we will be calling the scheme, presented by S. Biedron, S, Milton and H. Freund in Nuclear Instruments and Methods of 2001 ([1]), as the first (1st) scheme. The scheme that we developed and presented in the BNL preprint ([2]) will be called as the second (2nd) scheme. The following analysis provides important information on similarities and differences between both techniques. We start by considering the first approach. As we understand, the goal of the Modular Approach is to make X-ray FEL design more flexible [1]. Usual linac-based FELs begin from a long linac with bunch compressor(s) followed by an FEL magnetic system. The essence of the Modular Approach is to break a machine into modules and then recombine these modules in a more efficient way (from the point of view of monetary and/or time constraints). The chapter 3.5 of [1] presents some basic example of Modular Approach. We have studied the scheme, discussed in [1] and illustrated in Fig. 2. Even though very few details of the scheme were presented, it was still sufficient to obtain a complete qualitative picture. Let us begin with the usual phase space of the microbunched beam, which enters a radiator in a prebunched FEL (Fig. 1). The sharp spike (in blue) represents the longitudinal density bunching, which will be the main subject of interest in this discussion. The key principle of a seeded high-gain FEL optimization is to establish this kind of the electron beam phase space at the entrance of the radiator.

  6. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.

    1994-08-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  7. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  8. Photon Beam Diagnostics for VISA FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Tremaine, A.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Doyuran, A.; Johnson, E.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X.J.; Van Bibber, K.; Hill, J.M.; LeSage, G.P.; Nguyen, D.; Cornacchia, M.

    1999-11-05

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) project is designed to be a SASE-FEL driven to saturation in the sub-micron wavelength region. Its goal is to test various aspects of the existing theory of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission, as well as numerical codes. Measurements include: angular and spectral distribution of the FEL light at the exit and inside of the undulator; electron beam micro-bunching using CTR; single-shot time resolved measurements of the pulse profile, using auto-correlation technique and FROG algorithm. The diagnostics are designed to provide maximum information on the physics of the SASE-FEL process, to ensure a close comparison of the experimental results with theory and simulations.

  9. Optimization and Modeling of the Accelerator for the FERMI @ Elettra FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Wu, J.; Wang, D.; Zholents, A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-09-30

    Design studies are in progress to use the existing FERMI{at}Elettra linear accelerator for a seeded harmonic cascade free-electron laser (FEL) facility [1]. This accelerator will be upgraded to 1.2 GeV and equipped with a low-emittance RF photocathode gun, laser heater, two bunch compressors, and a beam delivery system. We present an optimization study of all the components downstream of the gun, aimed at achieving the high peak current, low energy spread and low emittance electron beam necessary for the FEL. Various operational scenarios are discussed. Results of accelerator simulations including effects of space charge, coherent synchrotron radiation and wakefields are reported.

  10. FEL phased array configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  11. Performance of the KHI FEL device at FEL-SUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Oda, F.; Nomaru, K.; Koike, H.; Sobajima, M.; Miura, H.; Kawai, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2002-05-01

    FEL lasing with the saturated power in the wavelength of 4-16 μm was achieved by using the KHI (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.) FEL device. The macro-pulse length of the electron beam was improved by using the LaB 6 cathode instead of the dispenser cathode as a cathode of the OCS RF-gun. The improvement yielded the saturated FEL power with the macro-pulse length of 0.5-1.5 μs. The FEL energy was 2-40 mJ. The measured FEL output powers were in agreement with the values which were taken into account Piovella's theory.

  12. An Analysis of Shot Noise Propagation and Amplificationin Harmonic Cascade FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-12-11

    The harmonic generation process in a harmonic cascade (HC) FEL is subject to noise degradation which is proportional to the square of the total harmonic order. In this paper, we study the shot noise evolution in the first-stage modulator and radiator of a HC FEL that produces the dominant noise contributions. We derive the effective input noise for a modulator operating in the low-gain regime, and analyze the radiator noise for a density-modulated beam. The significance of these noise sources in different harmonic cascade designs is also discussed.

  13. First Lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortang, C.M.; Goldstein, J.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.

    1998-08-17

    The Regenerative Amplifier Free-Electron Laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 {micro}m is 1.7 J over an 9-{micro}s macropulse, corresponding to an average power during the macropulse of 190 kW. They deduce an energy of 1.7 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 110 MW.

  14. Seeded FEL Microbunching Experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Musumeci, P.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Joshi, C.; Gottschalk, S. C.

    2010-11-04

    Seeded high-gain FELs, which can generate very powerful radiation pulses in a relatively compact undulator and simultaneously modulate the electron beam longitudinally at the seed wavelength, are important tools for advanced accelerator development. A single-pass 0.5-9 THz FEL amplifier-buncher driven by a regular photoinjector is being built at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory. FEL interactions at 340 {mu}m (1 THz) are considered for the first experiment, since time-resolved measurements of longitudinal current distribution of the bunched beam using the RF deflecting cavity are possible. A design of a 0.2-2.0 {mu}m FEL using the same undulators is presented. In this case the FEL is driven by a high-peak current beam from the laser-plasma accelerator tunable in the 100-300 MeV range.

  15. Users program for storage-ring based FEL and synchrotron sources of the Duke FEL Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, K.D.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring at the Duke FEL Laboratory was first operated with a stored e-beam in November, 1994. It has now achieved operation energies in excess 1 GeV with more than 100 mA current at 280 MeV. The ring has several ports for FEL and synchrotron light source research. The circulating ring current can be synchronized with the seperate Mark III FEL operating in the 2-9.5 {mu}m IR region. This allows low optical jitter (10-20 ps) between the two sources and thus pump-probe operation. The ring has been configured to drive a number of light sources including the OK-4 FEL system capable of FEL operation between 400 and 65 nm, an inverse Compton scattering source using this undulator which will yield 4-200 MeV gammas, an undulator source at approximately 40 {angstrom} (not an FEL), a mm FEL with inverse compton scattering providing 1-100 keV x-rays and two synchrotron ports from the bend magnets for which the {lambda}{sub c} = 11-12 {angstrom} for 1 GeV. The broadly tunable FEL sources and their associated inverse compton scattering are extremely bright. The initial research proposals, submitted to the Laboratory emphasizes photoelectron spectroscopy, PEEM, high resolution vacuum UV of gases, solid spectroscopy and photochemistry in the UV, X-ray microprobe studies, X-ray microscopy, X-ray holography, X-ray crystallography, Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron production, photon activation therapy and broadband synchrotron as a probe of fast reaction in the IR and near IR.

  16. FEL Beamline for Wide Tunable Range and Beam Sharing System at Kyoto University

    SciTech Connect

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Yoshida, K.; Higashimura, K.; Ueda, S.; Kinjo, R.; Sonobe, T.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.; Zen, H.

    2010-02-03

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL) facility (KU-FEL: Kyoto University Free Electron Laser) has been constructed for developing energy materials in Institute of Advanced Energy (IAE), Kyoto University. The tunable range of KU-FEL was estimated as 5-13.2 {mu}m by numerical calculation to design the MIR-FEL transport line for application purposes. Aiming to increase the number of FEL users with different desires we decided to develop an FEL beam sharing system that is useful for multi-utilization at different end-stations. The transport line and the beam sharing system has been designed and constructed to the user stations. Applications of the MIR-FEL in the renewable energy research at Kyoto University will start as well.

  17. CEBAF UV/IR FEL subsystem testing and validation program

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; S.V. Benson; H.F. Dylla; H. Liu

    1995-01-01

    A design has been established for IR and UV FELs within the Laser Processing Consortium's (LPC) program for development and application of high-average-power FELs for materials processing. Hardware prototyping and testing for the IR portion of the system are underway. The driver portion has been designed based on the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology now seeing large-scale application in the commissioning of CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, where LPC activities are centered. As of July 1994, measurements of beam performance confirm SRF's benefits in beam quality and stability, which are applicable to high-average-power FELs.

  18. Advanced studies at the VISA FEL in the SASE and seeded modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonian, G.; Dunning, M.; Hemsing, E.; Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Babzien, M.; Yakimenko, V.

    2008-08-01

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) program has been in operation at the BNL ATF since the year 2000. The program has produced numerous results including, demonstrated saturation at 840 nm with a gain length of 18 cm, chirped beam amplification with the observation of anomalously large bandwidth of the emitted radiation, and successful benchmarking of a start-to-end simulation suite to measured results. This paper will review the prior results of the VISA program and discuss planned novel measurements, including detuning studies of a 1 μm seeded amplifier, and measurements of the orbital angular momentum of the emitted radiation. The installation of a dedicated chicane bunch compressor followed by an x-band linac to mitigate energy spread will allow for high-current operations (reduced saturation length, and deep-saturation studies). Other measurements, such as coherent transition undulator radiation, are also proposed.

  19. Transverse-coherence properties of the FEL at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Ocko, Samuel A.; /MIT, Cambridge, Dept. Phys.

    2010-09-02

    The recently commissioned Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is now operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron sources. Understanding of coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs at LCLS is of great practical importance for some user experiments. We present the numerical analysis of the coherence properties at different wavelengths based on a fast algorithmusing ideal and start-end simulated FEL fields. The sucessful commissioning and operation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) [1] has demonstrated that the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) has come of age; these types of x-ray sources are poised to revolutionize the ultra-fast x-ray sciences. The LCLS and other hard x-ray FELs under construction are based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) [2, 3], where the amplification process starts from the shot noise in the electron beam. A large number of transverse radiation modes are also excited when the electron beam enters the undulator. The FEL collective instability in the electron beam causes the modulation of the electron density to increase exponentially, and after sufficient undulator distances, a single transverse mode starts to dominate. As a result, SASE FEL is almost fully coherent in the transverse dimension. Understanding of transverse coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs is of great practical importance. The longitudinal coherence properties of SASE FELs have been studied before [4]. Some studies on the transverse coherence can be found in previous papers, for example, in ref. [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. In this paper, we first discuss a new numerical algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the FEL transverse coherence. Then we focus on the numerical analysis of the LCLS FEL transverse coherence.

  20. FEL-accelerator related diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jordan; David Douglas; Stephen V. Benson; Pavel Evtuschenko

    2007-08-02

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) present a unique set of beam parameters to the diagnostics suite. The FEL requires characterization of the full six dimensional phase space of the electron beam at the wiggler and accurate alignment of the electron beam to the optical mode of the laser. In addition to the FEL requirements on the diagnostics suite, the Jefferson Lab FEL is operated as an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) which imposes additional requirements on the diagnostics. The ERL aspect of the Jefferson Lab FEL requires that diagnostics operate over a unique dynamic range and operate with simultaneous transport of the accelerated and energy recovered beams. This talk will present how these challenges are addressed at the Jefferson Lab FEL.

  1. Characterization of an 800 nm SASE FEL at Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2002-11-13

    VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) is an FEL (Free Electron Laser) designed to saturate at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm within a 4-m long, strong focusing undulator. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with the 72 MeV, high brightness beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). We present measurements that demonstrate saturation in addition to the frequency spectrum of the FEL radiation. Energy, gain length and spectral characteristics are compared and shown to agree with simulation and theoretical predictions.

  2. Tapered undulators for SASE FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission, where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth and limited temporal coherence. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of tapered undulators for parameters corresponding to the Argonne low-energy undulator test line FEL and the proposed linac coherent light source.

  3. Saturation and pulsed FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.

    1995-12-31

    The behavior of a FEL operating in the saturated pulsed regime, may be reproduced by the linear FEL integral equation, suitably modified to include saturation effects through a gain depression coefficient depending on the laser intensity. This simple method allows to evaluate several FEL parameters like gain, efficiency, band-width and optical pulse duration as functions of the optical cavity length, only with a numerical integration. The predictions have been compared with available experimental and numerical data, and the method has been applied to estimate the operating characteristics of some planned FEL experiments.

  4. Innovative uses of X-ray FEL and the pulsed magnets: High magnetic field X-ray scattering studies on quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Gerber, S.; Lee, W.-S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J.-S.; Kao, C.-C.

    X-ray scattering under high magnetic fields provides unique opportunities for solving many scientific puzzles in quantum materials, such as strongly correlated electron systems. Incorporating high magnetic field capability presents serious challenges at an x-ray facility, including the limitation on the maximum magnetic field even with a DC magnet (up to ~20 Tesla), expensive cost in development, radiation damage, and limited flexibility in the experimental configuration. These challenges are especially important when studying the symmetry broken state induced by the high magnetic field are necessary, for example, exploring intertwined orders between charge density wave (CDW) and high Tc superconductivity. Moreover, a gap in magnetic field strengths has led to many discrepancies and puzzling issues for understanding strongly correlated systems - is a CDW competing or more intimately intertwined with high-temperature superconductivity. To bridge this gap and resolve these experimental discrepancies, one needs an innovative experimental approach. Here, we will present a new approach to x-ray scattering under high magnetic field up to 28 Teals by taking advantage of brilliant x-ray free electron laser (FEL). The FEL generates sufficiently high photon flux for single shot x-ray scattering experiment. In this talk, we will also present the first demonstration about the field induced CDW order in YBCO Ortho-VIII with 28 Tesla, which show the totally unexpected three-dimensional behavior.

  5. The performance of the Duke FEL storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Burnham, B.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the Duke FEL storage ring has been completed. During commissioning, we have conducted a series of performance measurements on the storage ring lattice and the electron beam parameters. In this paper, we will discuss the techniques used in the measurements, present measurement results, and compare the measured parameters with the design specifications. In addition, we will present the expected OK-4 FEL performance based on the measured beam parameters.

  6. Optimization of high average power FEL beam for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira

    2015-05-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is entering into high volume manufacturing (HVM) stage, with high average power (250W) EUV source from laser produced plasma at 13.5nm. Semiconductor industry road map indicates a scaling of the source technology more than 1kW average power by high repetition rate FEL. This paper discusses on the lowest risk approach to construct a prototype based on superconducting linac and normal conducting undulator, to demonstrate a high average power 13.5nm FEL equipped with optimized optical components and solid state lasers, to study FEL application in EUV lithography.

  7. Experimental setups for FEL-based four-wave mixing experiments at FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Bencivenga, Filippo; Zangrando, Marco; Svetina, Cristian; Abrami, Alessandro; Battistoni, Andrea; Borghes, Roberto; Capotondi, Flavio; Cucini, Riccardo; Dallari, Francesco; Danailov, Miltcho; Demidovich, Alexander; Fava, Claudio; Gaio, Giulio; Gerusina, Simone; Gessini, Alessandro; Giacuzzo, Fabio; Gobessi, Riccardo; Godnig, Roberto; Grisonich, Riccardo; Kiskinova, Maya; Kurdi, Gabor; Loda, Giorgio; Lonza, Marco; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Pangon, Gianpiero; Parisse, Pietro; Passuello, Roberto; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Pivetta, Lorenzo; Prica, Milan; Principi, Emiliano; Rago, Ilaria; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Sauro, Roberto; Scarcia, Martin; Sigalotti, Paolo; Zaccaria, Maurizio; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources is driving the scientific community to extend table-top laser research to shorter wavelengths adding elemental selectivity and chemical state specificity. Both a compact setup (mini-TIMER) and a separate instrument (EIS-TIMER) dedicated to four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments has been designed and constructed, to be operated as a branch of the Elastic and Inelastic Scattering beamline: EIS. The FWM experiments that are planned at EIS-TIMER are based on the transient grating approach, where two crossed FEL pulses create a controlled modulation of the sample excitations while a third time-delayed pulse is used to monitor the dynamics of the excited state. This manuscript describes such experimental facilities, showing the preliminary results of the commissioning of the EIS-TIMER beamline, and discusses original experimental strategies being developed to study the dynamics of matter at the fs–nm time–length scales. In the near future such experimental tools will allow more sophisticated FEL-based FWM applications, that also include the use of multiple and multi-color FEL pulses.

  8. Experimental setups for FEL-based four-wave mixing experiments at FERMI.

    PubMed

    Bencivenga, Filippo; Zangrando, Marco; Svetina, Cristian; Abrami, Alessandro; Battistoni, Andrea; Borghes, Roberto; Capotondi, Flavio; Cucini, Riccardo; Dallari, Francesco; Danailov, Miltcho; Demidovich, Alexander; Fava, Claudio; Gaio, Giulio; Gerusina, Simone; Gessini, Alessandro; Giacuzzo, Fabio; Gobessi, Riccardo; Godnig, Roberto; Grisonich, Riccardo; Kiskinova, Maya; Kurdi, Gabor; Loda, Giorgio; Lonza, Marco; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Pangon, Gianpiero; Parisse, Pietro; Passuello, Roberto; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Pivetta, Lorenzo; Prica, Milan; Principi, Emiliano; Rago, Ilaria; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Sauro, Roberto; Scarcia, Martin; Sigalotti, Paolo; Zaccaria, Maurizio; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources is driving the scientific community to extend table-top laser research to shorter wavelengths adding elemental selectivity and chemical state specificity. Both a compact setup (mini-TIMER) and a separate instrument (EIS-TIMER) dedicated to four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments has been designed and constructed, to be operated as a branch of the Elastic and Inelastic Scattering beamline: EIS. The FWM experiments that are planned at EIS-TIMER are based on the transient grating approach, where two crossed FEL pulses create a controlled modulation of the sample excitations while a third time-delayed pulse is used to monitor the dynamics of the excited state. This manuscript describes such experimental facilities, showing the preliminary results of the commissioning of the EIS-TIMER beamline, and discusses original experimental strategies being developed to study the dynamics of matter at the fs-nm time-length scales. In the near future such experimental tools will allow more sophisticated FEL-based FWM applications, that also include the use of multiple and multi-color FEL pulses. PMID:26698055

  9. Numerical modeling of thermal loading of diamond crystal in X-ray FEL oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Qi; Zhang, Qing-Min; Guo, Yu-Hang; Li, Kai; Deng, Hai-Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Due to high reflectivity and high resolution of X-ray pulses, diamond is one of the most popular Bragg crystals serving as the reflecting mirror and mono–chromator in the next generation of free electron lasers (FELs). The energy deposition of X-rays will result in thermal heating, and thus lattice expansion of the diamond crystal, which may degrade the performance of X-ray FELs. In this paper, the thermal loading effect of diamond crystal for X-ray FEL oscillators has been systematically studied by combined simulation with Geant4 and ANSYS, and its dependence on the environmental temperature, crystal size, X-ray pulse repetition rate and pulse energy are presented. Our results show that taking the thermal loading effects into account, X-ray FEL oscillators are still robust and promising with an optimized design. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175240, 11205234, 11322550) and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (IRT1280)

  10. An induction linac developed for FEL application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mascureau, J.; Anthouard, Ph.; Bardy, J.; Eyharts, Ph.; Eyl, P.; Launspach, J.; Thevenot, M.; Villate, D.

    1992-07-01

    An induction linac is being studied and built at CESTA for FEL application. At first we studied the induction technology and namely the high-voltage (HV) generators and the induction cells. A HV generator designed to feed the cells with calibrated pulses (150 kV, 50 ns, δV/V < 1%) has been built using a resonant charging system and magnetic switches. This generator is planned for kHz repetition-rate operation. A prototype induction cell has also been built and tested with a cable generator. An electron injector (1.5 MeV, 1.5kA) has been designed and is now under test: it uses ten induction cells and a thermionic dispenser cathode. Numerical codes have been developed and simulations have been compared with experimental results for HV generators, induction cells, and the injector. An induction accelerating module has been studied and we plan to have the accelerator working at 3 MeV in 1992.

  11. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  12. X-ray FEL with a meV bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2001-08-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL was proposed in [1] and named two-stage SASE FEL. The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. For the Angström wavelength range the monochromator could be realized using Bragg reflections from crystals. Proposed scheme of monochromator is illustrated for the 14.4 keV X-ray SASE FEL being developed in the framework of the TESLA linear collider project. The spectral bandwidth of the radiation from the two-stage SASE FEL (20 meV) is defined by the finite duration of the electron pulse. The shot-to-shot fluctuations of energy spectral density are dramatically reduced in comparison with the 100% fluctuations in a SASE FEL. The peak and average brilliance are by three orders of magnitude higher than the values which could be reached by a conventional X-ray SASE FEL.

  13. X-ray FEL with a meV bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2001-12-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL was proposed by Feldhaus et al. (Opt. Commun. 140 (1997) 341) and named "two-stage SASE FEL". The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. For the Angström wavelength range the monochromator can be realized using Bragg reflections from crystals. We propose a scheme of monochromator with a bandwidth of 20 meV for the 14.4 keV X-ray SASE FEL being developed in the framework of the TESLA linear collider project. The spectral bandwidth of the radiation from the two-stage SASE FEL (20 meV) is determined by the finite duration of the electron pulse. The shot-to-shot fluctuations of energy spectral density are dramatically reduced in comparison with the 100% fluctuations in a SASE FEL. The peak and average brilliance are three orders of magnitude higher than the values which could be reached by a conventional X-ray SASE FEL.

  14. A helical optical for circular polarized UV-FEL project at the UVSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Hiroyuki

    1995-12-31

    Most of existing storage ring free electron lasers (SRFEL) are restricted those performances by degradation of mirrors in optical cavities. In general, the SRFEL gain at the short wavelength region with high energy electrons is quite low, and the high reflectivity mirrors such as dielectric multilayer mirrors are therefore required. The mirror degradation is considered as a result of irradiation of higher harmonic photons that are simultaneously emitted from planar optical klystron (OK) type undulators, which are commonly used in SRFEL. This problem is getting severer as the lasing wavelength becomes shorter. The UVSOR-FEL had been originally scheduled to be shutdown by 1996 because another undulator project for spectroscopic studies with circular polarized photon would take the FEL`s place. According to suggestion of the insertion device group of the SPring-8, we have designed a helical undulator that is able to vary degree and direction of the polarization easily. In addition, the undulator can be converted into a helical OK by replacing magnets at the center part of undulator in order to coexist with further FEL experiments. Using a calculated magnetic field for magnet configurations of the OK mode, the radiation spectrum at wide wavelength range was simulated by a Fourier transform of Lienard-Wiechert potentials. As a matter of course, some higher harmonics are radiated on the off-axis angle. However it was found out that the higher harmonics is almost negligible as far as inside a solid angle of the Gaussian laser mode. Moreover the gain at the UV region of 250 nm is expected to be much higher than our present FEL because of high brilliant fundamental radiation. The calculated spatial distribution of higher harmonics and the estimated instantaneous gain is presented. Advantages of the helical OK for SRFEL will be discussed in view of our experience, and a possibility of application two-color experiment with SR will be also mentioned.

  15. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  16. FEL Trajectory Analysis for the VISA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    1998-10-06

    The Visual to Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) [1] FEL is designed to achieve saturation at radiation wavelengths between 800 and 600 nm with a 4-m pure permanent magnet undulator. The undulator comprises four 99-cm segments each of which has four FODO focusing cells superposed on the beam by means of permanent magnets in the gap alongside the beam. Each segment will also have two beam position monitors and two sets of x-y dipole correctors. The trajectory walk-off in each segment will be reduced to a value smaller than the rms beam radius by means of magnet sorting, precise fabrication, and post-fabrication shimming and trim magnets. However, this leaves possible inter-segment alignment errors. A trajectory analysis code has been used in combination with the FRED3D [2] FEL code to simulate the effect of the shimming procedure and segment alignment errors on the electron beam trajectory and to determine the sensitivity of the FEL gain process to trajectory errors. The paper describes the technique used to establish tolerances for the segment alignment.

  17. JLab High-Current CW Cryomodules for ERL and FEL Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Richard Bundy; Guangfeng Cheng; Gianluigi Ciovati; Edward Daly; Richard Getz; William Hicks; James Henry; Peter Kneisel; Stephen Manning; Robert Manus; Karl Smith; Mircea Stirbet; Larry Turlington; Lynn Vogel; Haipeng Wang; Katherine Wilson; Frank

    2007-06-25

    We describe the activities underway at JLab to develop new CW cryomodules capable of transporting up to Ampere-levels of beam currents for use in ERLs and FELs. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping and ancillary components are optimized for this application. Designs are being developed for low-frequency (750 MHz), Ampere-class compact FELs and for high-frequency (1.5 GHz), 100 mA configurations. These designs and concepts can easily be scaled to other frequencies. We present the results of conceptual design studies, simulations and prototype measurements. These modules are being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as high energy light sources, electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  18. Beam Conditioning for FELs: Consequences and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Penn, Gregory; Sessler, Andrew; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2003-10-09

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases (VISA, a Soft X-Ray FEL, LCLS and a ''Greenfield'' FEL) are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance, and allows stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced up to a factor of two. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with ''matching conditions'' derived for achieving conditioning without growth in effective emittance. Various conditioners are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. We discuss the prospects for conditioners based on laser and plasma systems.

  19. Proposal for a IR waveguide SASE FEL at the PEGASUS injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Telfer, S.

    2001-12-01

    Free Electron Lasers up to the visible regime are dominated by diffraction effects, resulting in a radiation size much larger than the electron beam. Thus the effective field amplitude at the location of the electron beam, driving the FEL process, is reduced. By using a waveguide, the radiation field is confined within a smaller aperture and an enhancement of the FEL performance can be expected. The PEGASUS injector at UCLA will be capable to provide the brilliance needed for an IR SASE FEL. The experiment Power Enhanced Radiation Source Experiment Using Structures (PERSEUS) is proposed to study the physics of a waveguide SASE FEL in a quasi 1D environment, where diffraction effects are strongly reduced as it is the case only for future FELs operating in the VUV and X-ray regime. The expected FEL performance is given by this presentation.

  20. Development of a high average power, CW, MM-wave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramian, G.

    1995-12-31

    Important operational attributes of FELs remain to be demonstrated including high average power and single-frequency, extremely narrow-linewidth lasing. An FEL specifically designed to achieve these goals for scientific research applications is currently under construction. Its most salient feature is operation in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with an electrostatically generated, high-current, recirculating, DC electron beam.

  1. Real time diagnostic for operation at a CW low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Balfour, C.; Shaw, A.; Mayhew, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    At Liverpool University, a system for single user control of an FEL has been designed to satisfy the low voltage FEL (ie 200kV) operational requirements. This system incorporates many aspects of computer automation for beam diagnostics, radiation detection and vacuum system management. In this paper the results of the development of safety critical control systems critical control systems are reported.

  2. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  3. Undulators for the BESSY SASE-FEL Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Kuske, B.; Meseck, A.; Scheer, M.

    2004-05-12

    BESSY plans to build a SASE-FEL facility for the energy range from 20 eV to 1000 eV. The energy range will be covered by three APPLE II type undulators with a magnetic length of about 60 m each. This paper summarizes the basic parameters of the FEL-undulators. The magnetic design will be presented. A modified APPLE II design will be discussed which provides higher fields at the expense of reduced horizontal access. GENESIS simulations give an estimate on the tolerances for the beam wander and for gap errors.

  4. Nonlinear harmonic generation in the STARS FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Bakr, M.; Goldammer, K.; Kamps, T.; Knobloch, J.; Kuske, B.; Leitner, T.; Meseck, A.

    2008-08-01

    BESSY proposes to build STARS, an FEL to demonstrate cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG). In two HGHG stages, a laser source of 700-900 nm is converted down to a wavelength of 40-70 nm. The STARS facility consists of a normal-conducting RF photoinjector, three superconducting TESLA-type acceleration modules, a magnetic bunch compressor and two stages of HGHG, each consisting of a modulator, dispersive chicane and a radiator. At the entrance of the undulator section, the beam energy is 325 MeV and the peak current is about 500 A. With these parameters, the STARS FEL reaches saturation with a peak power of 100-350 MW. A superradiant mode is also foreseen which boosts the radiation power to the GW-level. Due to nonlinear harmonic generation (NHG), free electron lasers also radiate coherently at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. STARS can hence extend its output range to even shorter wavelengths. This paper presents studies of the STARS harmonic content in the wavelength range of 6-20 nm. Seeding with high harmonic generation pulses at 32 nm is also discussed.

  5. Future metrology needs for FEL reflective optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.

    2000-09-21

    An International Workshop on Metrology for X-ray and Neutron Optics has been held March 16-17, 2000, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, near Chicago, Illinois (USA). The workshop gathered engineers and scientists from both the U.S. and around the world to evaluate metrology instrumentation and methods used to characterize surface figure and finish for long grazing incidence optics used in beamlines at synchrotrons radiation sources. This two-day workshop was motivated by the rapid evolution in the performance of x-ray and neutron sources along with requirements in optics figure and finish. More specifically, the performance of future light sources, such as free-electron laser (FEL)-based x-ray sources, is being pushed to new limits in term of both brilliance and coherence. As a consequence, tolerances on surface figure and finish of the next generation of optics are expected to become tighter. The timing of the workshop provided an excellent opportunity to study the problem, evaluate the state of the art in metrology instrumentation, and stimulate innovation on future metrology instruments and techniques to be used to characterize these optics. This paper focuses on FEL optics and metrology needs. (A more comprehensive summary of the workshop can be found elsewhere.) The performance and limitations of current metrology instrumentation will be discussed and recommendations from the workshop on future metrology development to meet the FEL challenges will be detailed.

  6. The universal method for optimization of undulator tapering in FEL amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Technique of undulator tapering in the post-saturation regime is used at the existing x-ray FELs for increasing the radiation power. There are also discussions on the future of high peak and average power FELs for scientific and industrial applications. Diffraction effects essentially influence on the choice of the tapering strategy. Recent studies resulted in an general law of the undulator tapering for a seeded FEL amplifier. In this paper we extend these results for the case of the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL.

  7. The FERMI @ Elettra Technical Optimization Study: General Layoutand Parameters and Physics Studies of Longitudinal Space Charge, theSpreader, the Injector, and Preliminary FEL Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox,Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    The FERMI {at} Elettra facility will make use of the existing GeV linac at Sincrotrone Elettra, which will become available for dedicated FEL applications following the completion of construction of a new injector booster complex for the storage ring. With a new rf photocathode injector, and some additional accelerating sections, this linac will be capable of providing high brightness bunches at 1.2 GeV and up to 50 Hz repetition rates.

  8. Hypoallergenic derivatives of Fel d 1 obtained by rational reassembly for allergy vaccination and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Curin, M.; Weber, M.; Thalhamer, T.; Swoboda, I.; Focke-Tejkl, M.; Blatt, K.; Valent, P.; Marth, K.; Garmatiuk, T.; Grönlund, H.; Thalhamer, J.; Spitzauer, S.; Valenta, R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background and objective The major cat allergen Fel d 1 represents one of the most important respiratory allergens. Aim of this study was to engineer recombinant Fel d 1 derivatives with reduced IgE reactivity and preserved T cell epitopes for vaccination and tolerance induction. Methods Seven recombinant mosaic proteins were generated by reassembly of non-IgE-reactive peptides of Fel d 1 which contained the sequence elements for induction of allergen-specific blocking IgG antibodies and T cell epitopes. Mosaic proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli using codon-optimized synthetic genes and compared with Fel d 1 regarding structural fold by circular dichroism, IgE-binding capacity, activation of allergic patients’ basophils and ability to induce allergen-specific blocking IgG antibodies upon immunization. Results Although each of the mosaic proteins had lost the alpha-helical fold typical for Fel d 1, a strong reduction in IgE reactivity as well as allergenic activity in basophil activation assays was only obtained for three constructs, two reassembled fragments (Fel d 1 MB, Fel d 1 MC) and a fusion of the latter two (Fel d 1 MF) in which the cysteines of Fel d 1 MC were replaced by serines. Immunization of rabbits with Fel d 1 MB, MC and MF induced high levels of IgG antibodies that inhibited IgE reactivity of cat-allergic patients to Fel d 1 in a comparable manner as IgG induced with the wild-type allergen. Conclusions We report the development of hypoallergenic reassembled Fel d 1 proteins suitable for vaccination and tolerance induction in cat-allergic patients. PMID:24552249

  9. Design Studies for a VUV--Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Array

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.; Baptiste, K.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Falcone, R.; Kirz, J.; McCurdy, W.; Padmore, H.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Steier, C.; Venturnini, M.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2009-08-04

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft X-ray light source [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility responsive to them is being studied at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) [6]. The facility is based on a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on the experimental requirements, the individualFELs may be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded highgain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds. This new light source would serve a broad community of scientists in many areas of research, similar to existing utilization of storage ring based light sources. To reduce technical risks and constructioncosts, accelerator research, development, and design studies at LBNL target the most critical components and systems of the facility. We are developing a high-repetition-rate low-emittance electron gun, high quantum efficiency photocathodes, and have embarked on design and optimization of the electron beam accelerator, FEL switchyard, and array of FELs. We continue our work on precision timing and synchronization systems critical for time-resolved experiments using pump-probe techniques.

  10. Gain results for low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Al-Shamma`a, A.

    1995-12-31

    We have designed and constructed a low voltage (130 kV) FEL system capable of operating in the microwave frequency range for which the electron beam current is cw (rather than pulsed) in time at a level of {approximately} 12 mA. The gain of this system has been measured as a function of the electron beam accelerating voltage and current level, and the input microwave frequency (8-10 GHz). The results are compared with the predictions of a simple theoretical model.

  11. Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Seggebrock, T.; Habs, D.

    2012-07-09

    We present for the first time the concept of a seeded {gamma} quantum Free-Electron-Laser (QFEL) at 478 keV, which has very different properties compared to a classical. The basic concept is to produce a highly brilliant {gamma} beam via SASE. To produce highly intense and coherent {gamma} beam, we intend to use a seeded FEL scheme. Important for the production of such a {gamma} beam are novel refractive {gamma}-lenses for focusing and an efficient monochromator, allowing to generate a very intense and coherent seed beam. The energy of the {gamma} beam is 478 keV, corresponding to a wavelength in the sub-Angstrom regime (1/38 A). To realize a coherent {gamma} beam at 478 keV, it is necessary to use a quantum FEL design. At such high radiation energies a classical description of the {gamma}-FEL becomes wrong.

  12. Analysis of FEL optical systems with grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C.E.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Bender, S.C.; Appert, Q.D.; Lawrence, G.; Barnard, C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of grazing incidence optics in resonators alleviates the problem of damage to the optical elements and permits higher powers in cavities of reasonable dimensions for a free electron laser (FEL). The design and manufacture of a grazing incidence beam expander for the Los Alamos FEL mock-up has been completed. In this paper, we describe the analysis of a bare cavity, grazing incidence optical beam expander for an FEL system. Since the existing geometrical and physical optics codes were inadequate for such an analysis, the GLAD code was modified to include global coordinates, exact conic representation, raytracing, and exact aberration features to determine the alignment sensitivities of laser resonators. A resonator cavity has been manufactured and experimentally setup in the Optical Evaluation Laboratory at Los Alamos. Calculated performance is compared with the laboratory measurements obtained so far.

  13. A high-average-power FEL for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.

    1995-12-31

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt UV (150-1000 nm) and IR (2-25 micron) FEL driven by a recirculating, energy-recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users{endash}CEBAF`s partners in the Laser Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop-Grumman, 3M, and Xerox{endash}plan to develop applications such as polymer surface processing, metals and ceramics micromachining, and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability and pulse structure. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Quasi-isochronous storage ring for enhanced FEL performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Robin, D.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1995-08-01

    A compact storage ring is designed to be used as a driver for an FEL. This ring can be operated very close to zero momentum compaction factor ({alpha}) to increase the electron density and thus the gain of the FEL. In order to control {alpha} with zero dispersion in the straight sections the authors use an inverted dipole located between the bending magnets and 4-families of quadrupoles. By using 3-families of sextupoles they can control the 2 transverse chromaticities and 2nd order momentum compaction. They find that the ring has sufficient dynamic aperture for good performance.

  15. The Mark III IR FEL: Improvements in performance and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; Straub, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Mark III IR FEL has been upgraded by the installation of a new thermionic microwave gun. The new gun yields a reduced emittance and allows operation at a higher repetition rate and an increased electron macropulse length. The RF system of the Mark III has also been phase-locked to the RF systemof the adjacent storage ring driver for the laboratory`s short-wavelength FEL sources, making possible two-color UV-IR pump probe experiments. In this paper, the design and performance of the new gun are presented and the implications of the improvements investigated.

  16. Progress in the injector for FEL at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tianlu Yang; Wenzhen Zhou; Shinian Fu

    1995-12-31

    An intense current RF-linac for the far-infrared FEL is now under construction at CIAE. The normalized brightness of 3.4 x 10{sup 9} A/(m-rad) was obtained from the injector of the linac. An acceleration section with 9 cells will be connected with the injector to provide an electron beam for the 200 {mu}m FEL oscillator. In this paper, the late results from the injector beam test will be reported. The physical design and research progress in the acceleration section, beam transport, undulator as well as optical cavity will be introduced respectively.

  17. A Test of Superradiance in an FEL Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, R

    2004-12-14

    We describe the design of an FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE)1 to demonstrate the superradiant short bunch regime of a Free Electron Laser in the 1-3 {micro}m wavelength range starting from noise. The relevance to the LCLS X-ray FEL [1] proposal is discussed and numerical simulations are shown. It is numerically demonstrated for the first time with the 2-D code GINGER, that clean-up of noise in the superradiant regime occurs even at low power levels.

  18. INITIAL GAIN MEASUREMENTS OF A 800 NM SASE FEL, VISA.

    SciTech Connect

    FRIGOLA,P.; MUROKH,A.; ET AL; BABZIEN,M.; BEN-ZVI,I.; JOHNSON,E.; MALONE,R.

    2000-08-13

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focusing undulator with a gap of 6mm and a period of 1.8cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 50{micro}m. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  19. Initial Gain Measurements of a 800nm SASE FEL, VISA

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Roger

    2002-08-14

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focusing undulator with a gap of 6mm and a period of 1.8cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 50{micro}m. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  20. Initial Gain Measurements of a 800nmm SASE FEL, VISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, A.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.

    2002-08-01

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focussing undulator with a gap of 6mm and a period of 1.8cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 50mm. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  1. Initial gain measurements of an 800 nm SASE FEL, VISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Tremaine, A.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Johnson, E.; Malone, R.; Rakowsky, G.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X. J.; Van Bibber, K. A.; Bertolini, L.; Hill, J. M.; Le Sage, G. P.; Libkind, M.; Toor, A.; Carr, R.; Cornacchia, M.; Klaisner, L.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ruland, R.; Nguyen, D. C.

    2001-12-01

    The Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72 MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focusing undulator with a gap of 6 mm and a period of 1.8 cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 5 μm. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  2. Measuring FEL Radiation Properties at VISA-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, Massimo

    2002-08-21

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) SASE free electron laser has been successfully operated at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL. High gain and saturation were observed at 840 nm. We describe here the diagnostic system, experimental procedures and data reduction algorithms, as the FEL performance was measured along the length of the undulator. We also discuss selected spectral radiation measurements.

  3. Considerations on Beam Quality Control in MIT X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Graves, W.; Wang, D.; Zwart, T.; Emma, P.; Wu, J.; Huang, G.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-15

    The x-ray FEL at MIT is one example of a design for a new generation linac-based light source. Such a new machine requires very high quality electron beams. Besides the usual requirements on beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread, peak current, there are new challenges emerging in the design studies, e.g., the arrival timing of electron beam must reach precision below tens of femtoseconds level to ensure the laser seed overlaps the desired sections of electron bunch in the multiple-stage HGHG process. In this paper we report the progress on design optimization towards high quality and low sensitivity beams.

  4. Prospects for a soft x-ray FEL powered by a relativistic-klystron high-gradient accelerator (RK-HGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, H.D.; Barletta, W.A.; Yu, S.S.; Schlueter, R.; Deis, G.A.

    1989-09-28

    We present here the concept of x-ray FELs using high gain, single-pass amplifiers with electron beams accelerated in high gradient structures powered by relativistic klystrons. Other authors have also considered x-ray FELs; the unique aspect of this paper is the use of high gradient acceleration. One of the authors has previously presented preliminary studies on this concept. The intent in this paper is to display the results of a top level design study on a high gain FEL, to present its sensitivity to a variety of fabrication and tuning errors, to discuss several mechanisms for increasing gain yet more, and to present explicitly the output characteristics of such an FEL. The philosophy of the design study is to find a plausible operating point which employs existing or nearly existing state-of-the-art technologies while minimizing the accelerator and wiggler lengths. The notion is to distribute the technical risk as evenly as possible over the several technologies so that each must advance only slightly in order to make this design feasible. This study entailed no systematic investigation of possible costs so that, for example, the sole criterion for balancing the trade-off between beam energy and wiggler length is that the two components have comparable lengths. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. High harmonic generation in undulators for FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical study of the undulator radiation (UR), accounting for major sources of the spectral line broadening is presented. Analytical expressions for the UR spectrum and intensity are obtained. They demonstrate possibilities of the compensation of the divergency by the constant magnetic component. Some examples of single and double frequency undulators are considered. Generation of harmonics is studied with account for homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening in real devices. The obtained results with account for all broadening sources are applied for evaluation of free electron laser (FEL) performance and compared with those, obtained with the ideal undulator.

  6. The GALAXIE all-optical FEL project

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Arab, E.; Andonian, G.; Cahill, A.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukusawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Jovanovic, I.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Ovodenko, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Putterman, S.; Roberts, K.; Shumail, M.; and others

    2012-12-21

    We describe a comprehensive project, funded under the DARPA AXiS program, to develop an all-optical table-top X-ray FEL based on dielectric acceleration and electromagnetic undulators, yielding a compact source of coherent X-rays for medical and related applications. The compactness of this source demands that high field (>GV/m) acceleration and undulation-inducing fields be employed, thus giving rise to the project's acronym: GV/m AcceLerator And X-ray Integrated Experiment (GALAXIE). There are numerous physics and technical hurdles to surmount in this ambitious scenario, and the integrated solutions include: a biharmonic photonic TW structure, 200 micron wavelength electromagnetic undulators, 5 {mu}m laser development, ultra-high brightness magnetized/asymmetric emittance electron beam generation, and SASE FEL operation. We describe the overall design philosophy of the project, the innovative approaches to addressing the challenges presented by the design, and the significant progress towards realization of these approaches in the nine months since project initialization.

  7. Free Electron Lasers - Proceedings of the Beijing Fel Seminar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaer; Xie, Jialin; Du, Xiangwan; Zhao, Kui

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface to the Series * Preface * Seminar Opening Speech * Seminar Closing Address * SECTION 1. RF LINAC BASED FEL * Richard H. Pantell * Free-Electron Lasers * Gas-Loading the FEL * High-Efficiency, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers * A Tunable Submillimeter-to-Far-Infrared Coherent Radiation Source * Kwok-Chi Dominic Chan * Recent Results from the Los Alamos Free Electron Laser * Short-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * Long-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * High-Brightness Injectors For RF-Driven Free-Electron Lasers * Computer Codes for Wakefield Analysis in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * George R. Neil * The TRW RF Accelerator FEL Program * Superconducting Linac FEL Technology * Design Considerations of RF Oscillators * Chun-Ching Shih * Development of Multicomponent Wiggler Free Electron Lasers * Free Electron Laser Resonator * SECTION 2. INDUCTION LINAC BASED FEL * Richard J. Briggs * Overview of FEL Development with Induction Linacs at LLNL * Overview of Linear Induction Accelerators * High Current Electron-Beam Transport in Induction Linacs * Thaddeus J. Orzechowski * An Introduction to the Physics of High-Gain Free-Electron Lasers * Harmonics and Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers * The Electron Laser Facility: A millimeter Wave Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * The Electron Laser Facility: Measurement of Modes, Harmonics, Parametric Dependence, and Phase Shift * Paladin: A 10.6 μm Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * Aspects of Linear Induction Accelerator Technology * List of Participants

  8. Presentation, heritability, and genome-wide linkage analysis of the midchildhood growth spurt in healthy children from the Fels Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Towne, Bradford; Williams, Kimberly D; Blangero, John; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demerath, Ellen W; Nahhas, Ramzi W; Dyer, Thomas D; Cole, Shelley A; Lee, Miryoung; Choh, Audrey C; Duren, Dana L; Sherwood, Richard J; Chumlea, William Cameron; Siervogel, Roger M

    2008-12-01

    Growth is a complex process composed of distinct phases over the course of childhood. Although the pubertal growth spurt has received the most attention from auxologists and pediatricians, the midchildhood growth spurt has been less well studied. The midchildhood growth spurt refers to a relatively small increase in growth velocity observed in some, but not necessarily all, children in early to middle childhood. If present, the midchildhood growth spurt typically occurs sometime between the ages of 4 and 8 years, well before the onset of the far more pronounced pubertal growth spurt. In this study we used a triple logistic curve-fitting method to fit individual growth curves to serial stature data from 579 healthy participants in the Fels Longitudinal Study, 479 of whom have been genotyped for about 400 short tandem repeat (STR) markers spanning the genome. We categorized individuals according to the presence or absence of a midchildhood growth spurt and then conducted heritability and genome-wide linkage analyses on the dichotomous trait. In the total sample of 579 individuals, 336 (58%) were found to have evidence of having had a midchildhood growth spurt. There was a marked sex difference in presence of the midchildhood growth spurt, however, with 232 of the 293 males (79%) having had a midchildhood growth spurt but just 104 of the 286 females (36%) having had one. Presence of a midchildhood growth spurt was found to have a significant heritability of 0.37 +/- 0.14 (p = 0.003). Two quantitative trait loci with suggestive LOD scores were found: one at 12 cM on chromosome 17p13.2 (LOD = 2.13) between markers D17S831 and D17S938 and one at 85 cM on chromosome 12q14 (LOD = 2.06) between markers D12S83 and D12S326. PMID:19728540

  9. Optimization of precursor synthesis, formulation and stability of 1′-[18 F] fluoroethyl-β-d-lactose ([18 F]FEL) for preclinical studies in detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paolillo, Vincenzo; De Palatis, Louis; Alauddin, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction 1′-[18 F]Fluoroethyl-β-d-lactose ([18 F]FEL) is a new PET imaging agent for early detection of pancreatic cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. We previously reported the syntheses of [18 F]FEL using a bromo- and a tosyl- precursor, followed by an improved method using a nosyl-precursor. However, some steps in the synthesis of the precursor appeared to be problematic producing low yields. Here, we report on an optimized method for synthesis of the precursor and production of [18 F]FEL; we also describe [18 F]FEL’s formulation and stability. Methods Acetylation of d-lactose 1 was performed following a literature procedure to obtain 1′,2′,3′,6′,2,3,4,6-d-lactose octa-acetate 2a/2b. Bromination of 2a/2b was performed using HBr/acetic acid to produce 1'-bromo-2′,3′,6′,2,3,4,6-hepta-O-acetyl-α-d-lactose 3. Coupling of 3 with ethylene glycol was performed in the presence of Ag-tosylate and an excess of ethylene glycol to produce 4a. Compound 4a was reacted with p-nitrophenylsulfonyl chloride to produce the nosyl derivative 5. Radiofluorination of 5 was performed using K[18 F]fluoride/kryptofix to obtain 6, which was purified by HPLC and hydrolyzed with Na-methoxide to produce 7. Results Compound 2 (2a/2b) was obtained in 83% yield as a mixture of two anomeric products. Compound 3 was obtained from the 2a/2b mixture in 80% yield as one product. Coupling of 3 with ethylene glycol produced 4a in 90% yield. Compound 5 was obtained in 64% yield, and radiofluorination of 5 produced 6 in 62.5% ± 7.5% yields (n = 8). Hydrolysis of 6 with Na-methoxide produced 7 in 42.0% ± 7.0% yield (n = 8) from the end of bombardment. Conclusions A simple 4-step synthesis of the precursor, compound 5, has been achieved with improved yields. A new formulation of [18 F]FEL has been developed that allows the product to remain stable at ambient temperature for use in animal studies. This improved synthesis of the precursor and stable formulation of [18 F]FEL should

  10. High-efficiency FEL-oscillator with Bragg resonator operated in reversed guide field regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, A.K.; Sedykh, S.N.; Sergeyev, A.P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the present work was to develop a narrow-band FEL-oscillator working in millimeter wavelength with, high efficiency. It looked promising to combine the high selective property of Bragg resonator with high efficiency and other advantages of FEL operation in the reversed guide-field regime. An experimental study of the FEL was performed using lilac LIU-3000 (JINR, Dubna) with the electron energy of 1 MeV, beam current up to 200 A and pulse duration of 200 ns. The beam was injected into the internction region with guide magnetic field of 2.9 kGs. Transverse oscillations of electrons were pumped by the helical wiggler with the period length of 6 cm and the field slowly up-tapering over the initial 6 periods. The FEI electrodynamic system consisted of a circular waveguide with diameter 20 mm and two Bragg reflectors. The H wave of the circular waveguide was shown for operation. Two effective feedback waves were observed in {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} electrodynamic measurement in correspondence with calculations; the E wave near the frequency of 31. 5 GHz and the E wave - 37.5 GHz. The width of the both reflection resonances was about 2%. In {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} experiments the radiation on the designed H wave and frequencies corresponding to the both feedback waves was registered separately. Selection of the frequency was realized by varying of the wiggler field strength. The spectrum was measured with a set of the cut--off waveguide filters with inaccuracy less than 2%. Calibrated Semiconductor detectors wire used to measure the radiation power. The radiation with the frequencies of 37.5 and 31.5 GHz was observed in vicinity of the wiggler field amplitude of 2.5 kGs. The measured spectrum width of the output FEL-oscillator radiation did not exceed the width of the Bragg reflector resonances for the both feedback waves.

  11. Free-electron-laser (FEL)-induced desorption of ions from tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1997-05-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) with the wide wavelength tunability has been developed and used for various applications. The FEL gives high efficiency for the photo- induced ablation when the laser is tuned to an absorption maximum of the target. This study investigates the FEL induced desorption of ions from tooth dentine to find new possibility for laser dentistry. The FEL was tuned to 9.4 (Mu) m, which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid ion known as major component of dentine. The FEL pulse length was several ps. The output average power was varied from 5 to 20mW by filters. A time-of-flight mass spectroscopy systems were developed for the purpose of analyzing the desorbed ions of varying masses. After the 9.4 micrometers FEL irradiation, the dentine surface was ablated, and visible light emission was observed. As a result, positive ions which correspond to Na+ and many phosphoric acid ions were measured. The positive ions, however were not observed when the FEL was not tuned to the absorption peak of the target. Therefore, this wavelength dependence points to resonant multiphoton vibrational excitation of molecules by the 9.4 micrometers FEL irradiation.

  12. Optimization of a high brightness photoinjector for a seeded FEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; Badano, L.; Cinquegrana, P.; Craievich, P.; Danailov, M.; Demidovich, A.; Ivanov, R.; Lutman, A.; Rumiz, L.; Sigalotti, P.; Spezzani, C.; Trovò, M.; Veronese, M.

    2013-05-01

    The FERMI@Elettra project is a seeded free electron laser (FEL) source, based on the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) scheme. It is designed to supply photons in a spectral range from 65 to 20 nm with the first undulator line (FEL-1) and from 20 nm to 4 nm with the second undulator line (FEL-2). After a first period of commissioning of the electron beam up to 100 MeV at low charge, started in August 2009, several phases of installations and beam commissioning periods have been alternated through the 2010. On December 2010 the first FEL light in the FEL-1 line was obtained at 65 nm and 43 nm by adopting as an initial seed the third harmonic of a TiSa laser. The complete optimization and commissioning of the photo-injector has been carried on in parallel with the Linac and FEL commissioning, from a conservative set-up to the final designed configuration. This paper reports the electron beam characterization in the injector area, the comparison with the theoretical expectations and the experimental process which resulted in a high brightness electron beam. This beam was optimized to be compressed and then transported through the undulators of FEL-1 where intense photons ranging from 65 nm to 20 nm were generated [1,2].

  13. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  14. Super ACO FEL oscillation at 300 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Renault, E.; Nahon, L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2000-05-01

    Some recent improvements, involving both the optical cavity mirrors and the positron beam dynamics in the storage ring, have allowed us to achieve a laser oscillation at 300 nm on the Super ACO Storage Ring FEL. The Super ACO storage ring is operated at 800 MeV which is the nominal energy for the usual synchrotron radiation users, and the highest energy for a storage ring FEL. The lasing at 300 nm could be kept during 2 h per injection, with a stored current ranging between 30 and 60 mA. The FEL characteristics are presented here. The longitudinal stability and the FEL optics behaviour are also discussed.

  15. Prospects for the FEL (Free Electron Laser)

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The future for FELs depends upon the very large number of applications which is envisioned for them. These grow out of the FEL extensive range of wavelengths, tunability, and high power capability. High power requires demonstration of optical guiding. Tunability has already been demonstrated. And the effort to extend the range of wavelengths is ever ongoing. The future will also bring more work on gas-loaded FELs, on electromagnetic wigglers, and on harmonic generation. We can, also, look forward to observation of various new effects, a few of which will be described. Finally, a list of various FEL projects around the world will be given. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.; Cobb, J.; Loew, G.; Morton, P.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Paterson, J.; Pianetta, P.; Raubenheimer, T.; Seeman, J.; Tatchyn, R.; Vylet, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E. T.; Halbach, K.; Kim, K.-J.; Schlueter, R.; Xie, M.; Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo, L.; Pierini, P.

    1994-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a linac coherent light source (LCLS) (C. Pellegrini et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 331 (1993) 223; H. Winick et al., Proc. IEEE 1993 Particle Accelerator Conf., Washington, DC, May 1993; C. Pellegrini, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 341 (1994) 326; J. Seeman, SPIE Meet. on Electron Beam Sources of High Brightness Radiation, San Diego, CA, July 1993 [1-4]); it would be a fourth-generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much shorter wavelength than the 240 nm that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3 to 100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high-energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low-gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by self-amplified-spontaneous-emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops (M. Cornacchia and H. Winick (eds.), SLAC Report 92/02; I. Ben-Zvi and H. Winick (eds.), BNL report 49651 [5,6]). The required low-emittance electron beam can be achieved with recently-developed rf photocathode electron guns (B.E. Carlsten, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 285 (1989) 313; J. Rosenzweig and L. Serafini, Proc. IEEE 1993 Particle Accelerator Conf., Washington, DC, 1993 [7,8]). The peak current is increased by about an

  17. Technical Design and Optimization Study for the FERMI@Elettra FELPhotoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.; Penco, Giuseppe; Trovo', Mauro

    2006-06-30

    The FERMI {at} Elettra FEL project will provide a novel, x-ray free electron laser user facility at Sincrotrone Trieste based on seeded and cascade FEL techniques. The electron beam source and injector systems play a crucial role in the success of the facility by providing the highest quality electron beams to the linac and FEL undulators. This Technical Note examines the critical technology components that make up the injector system, and demonstrates optimum beam dynamics solutions to achieve the required high quality electron beams. Section 2 provides an overview of the various systems and subsystems that comprise the photoinjector. The different operating modes of the injector are described as they pertain to the different linac configurations driven by the FEL and experimental design. For each mode, the required electron beam parameters are given. Sections 3 and 4 describe the critical beamline elements in the injector complex: the photocathode and drive laser, and the RF gun. The required drive laser parameters are given at the end of Section 3. Additional details on the design of the photoinjector drive laser systems are presented in a separate Technical Note. Design considerations for the RF gun are extensively presented in Section 4. There, we describe the variation of the cavity geometry to optimize the efficiency of the energy transfer to the electron beam. A study of the power coupling into the various cavity modes that interact within the bandwidth of the RF drive pulse is presented, followed by a study of the transient cavity response under several models and, finally, the effects on extracted beam quality. Section 5 describes the initial design for the low energy, off-axis diagnostic beamline. Beam dynamics simulations using ASTRA, elegant, and MAD are presented. Section 6 presents the optimization studies for the beam dynamics in the various operating modes. The optimized baseline configurations for the beamline and incident drive laser pulse are

  18. A Coherent Compton Backscattering High Gain FEL using an X-Band Microwave Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; Nantista, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; /UCLA

    2005-12-14

    High power microwave sources at X-Band, delivering 400 to 500 of megawatts for about 400 ns, have been recently developed. These sources can power a microwave undulator with short period and large gap, and can be used in short wavelength FELs reaching the nm region at a beam energy of about 1 GeV. We present here an experiment designed to demonstrate that microwave undulators have the field quality needed for high gain FELs.

  19. Technical report of biota, FEL Site 1, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.W.; Davilla, W.; Orloff, S.

    1986-09-26

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is considering an expansion of laser test facilities adjacent to its existing LLNL Site 300 test location. Construction of a free-electron laser, known as the FEL Project, is being considered on approximately 3900 hectates (10,500 acres) of land. We will refer to this proposed site as FEL Site 1. Knowledge of the flora and vegetation resources of the proposed FEL Site 1 is necessary in order to plan for construction, operation, and possible future expansion of the FEL facility. The purpose of botanical sections of this report is to quantitatively describe the variation of vegetation on FEL Site 1, and to relate the vegetation to potential environmental impacts associated with present operation and possible expansion of site facilities. The primary purpose of the wildlife studies was to determine the presence and status of any endangered, threatened, fully protected, or otherwise sensitive species on FEL Site 1 that might be affected by the proposed FEL project. We directed our studies mainly toward the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but also toward another 14 special status species that potentially occur on site, including the state threatened Alameda striped racer (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus).

  20. Compact FEL`s based on slow wave wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Riyopoulos, S.

    1995-12-31

    Slow waves excited in magnetron-type cavities are attractive canditates as wigglers for compact Free Electron Lasers. Because of group velocities much below the speed of light, slow waves offer an order of magnitude increase in FEL gain under given circulating power in the wiggler resonator, compared to fast wave wigglers of similar period. In addition, they offer the versatility of operation either at modest beam energy via upshifing of the fundamental wavelength, or at low beam energy benefiting from the submillimeter wiggler harmonics. Because the main electron undulation is in the transverse direction for all spatial harmonics, the radiated power is increased by a factor {gamma}{sup 2} relative to the Smith-Purcell approach that relies on axial electron undulation. Technical advantages offered by magnetron-type wiggles are: the generation of the wiggler microwaves and the FEL interaction take place inside the same cavity, avoiding the issue of high power coupling between cavities; the excitation of wiggler microwaves relies on distributed electron emission from the cavity wall and does not require separate beam injection.

  1. Start-to-end simulations of SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohlus, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Kozlov, O. S.; Limberg, T.; Piot, Ph.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2004-09-01

    Phase 1 of the vacuum ultra-violet free-electron laser (FEL) at the TESLA Test Facility recently concluded operation. It successfully demonstrated the saturation of a SASE FEL in the wavelength range of 80-120 nm. We present a posteriori start-to-end numerical simulations of this FEL. These simulations are based on the programs Astra and elegant for the generation and transport of the electron distribution. An independent simulation of the intricate beam dynamics in the magnetic bunch compressor is performed with the program CSRtrack. The SASE FEL process is simulated with the code FAST. From our detailed simulations and the resulting phase space distribution at the undulator entrance, we found that the FEL was driven only by a small fraction (slice) of the electron bunch. This "lasing slice" is located in the head of the bunch, and has a peak current of approximately 3 kA. A strong energy chirp (due to the space charge field after compression) within this slice had a significant influence on the FEL operation. Our study shows that the radiation pulse duration is about 40 fs (FWHM) with a corresponding peak power of 1.5 GW. The simulated FEL properties are compared with various experimental data and found to be in excellent agreement.

  2. Recent developments in CrystFEL 1

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.; Mariani, Valerio; Brehm, Wolfgang; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Chervinskii, Fedor; Galli, Lorenzo; Gati, Cornelius; Nakane, Takanori; Tolstikova, Alexandra; Yamashita, Keitaro; Yoon, Chun Hong; Diederichs, Kay; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    CrystFEL is a suite of programs for processing data from ‘serial crystallography’ experiments, which are usually performed using X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) but also increasingly with other X-ray sources. The CrystFEL software suite has been under development since 2009, just before the first hard FEL experiments were performed, and has been significantly updated and improved since then. This article describes the most important improvements which have been made to CrystFEL since the first release version. These changes include the addition of new programs to the suite, the ability to resolve ‘indexing ambiguities’ and several ways to improve the quality of the integrated data by more accurately modelling the underlying diffraction physics. PMID:27047311

  3. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  4. Polarization Analysis for Seeded FELs in a Crossed-Planar Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiping; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Bartolini, Riccardo; Dunning, David; Thompson, Neil; /Daresbury

    2012-06-25

    The crossed-planar undulator is a promising scheme for full polarization control in x-ray FELs. For SASE FELs, it has been shown a maximum degree of circular polarization of about 80% is achievable at fundamental wavelength just before saturation. In this paper, we study the effectiveness of a crossed undulator for a seeded x-ray FEL. The degree of circular polarization for both the fundamental and the harmonic radiation are considered. Simulations with realistic beam distributions show that a degree of circular polarization of over 90% and 80% is obtainable at the fundamental and 2nd harmonic frequencies, respectively.

  5. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  6. SIRIUS FEL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Michel; Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    1991-07-01

    This article presents a 6 MV electrostatic accelerator-driven free electron laser project, with a wavelength range of 80 to 1000 μm. The study of this facility, called SIRIUS (source intense de rayonnement infra-rouge pour utilisations scientifiques), is based on the facility realized by Elias at the University of California, Santa Barbara. We plan to improve some important technological features.

  7. Diffraction and pulse slippage in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, J.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    A four-dimensional simulation in x, y, z, and t, including betatron motion of the electrons, is used to study the combined effects of diffraction, pulse slippage and desynchronism in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator.

  8. Field Encapsulation Library The FEL 2.2 User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Henze, Chris; Ellsworth, David

    1999-01-01

    This document describes version 2.2 of the Field Encapsulation Library (FEL), a library of mesh and field classes. FEL is a library for programmers - it is a "building block" enabling the rapid development of applications by a user. Since FEL is a library intended for code development, it is essential that enough technical detail be provided so that one can make full use of the code. Providing such detail requires some assumptions with respect to the reader's familiarity with the library implementation language, C++, particularly C++ with templates. We have done our best to make the explanations accessible to those who may not be completely C++ literate. Nevertheless, familiarity with the language will certainly help one's understanding of how and why things work the way they do. One consolation is that the level of understanding essential for using the library is significantly less than the level that one should have in order to modify or extend the library. One more remark on C++ templates: Templates have been a source of both joy and frustration for us. The frustration stems from the lack of mature or complete implementations that one has to work with. Template problems rear their ugly head particularly when porting. When porting C code, successfully compiling to a set of object files typically means that one is almost done. With templated C++ and the current state of the compilers and linkers, generating the object files is often only the beginning of the fun. On the other hand, templates are quite powerful. Used judiciously, templates enable more succinct designs and more efficient code. Templates also help with code maintenance. Designers can avoid creating objects that are the same in many respects, but not exactly the same. For example, FEL fields are templated by node type, thus the code for scalar fields and vector fields is shared. Furthermore, node type templating allows the library user to instantiate fields with data types not provided by the FEL

  9. Comparison of integrated numerical experiments with accelerator and FEL experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.; Elliott, J.C.; Gitomer, S.J.; Goldstein, J.C.; Jones, M.E.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Takeda, H.; Tokar, R.L.; Wang, T.S.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Even at the conceptual level the strong coupling between the laser subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control, greatly complicates the understanding and design of an FEL. Given the requirements for a high-performance FEL, the coupling between the laser subsystems must be included in the design approach. To address the subsystem coupling the concept of an integrated numerical experiment (INEX) has been implemented. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostic. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. A complete INEX model has been applied to the 10{mu}m high-extraction-efficiency experiment at Los Alamos and the 0.6-{mu}m Burst Mode experiment at Boeing Aerospace. In addition, various subsets of the INEX model have been compared with a number of other experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. With the INEX approach, it now appears possible to design high-performance FELS for numerous applications. The first full-scale test of the INEX approach is the Los Alamos HIBAF experiment. The INEX concept, implementation, and validation with experiments are discussed. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Description of FEL3D: A three dimensional simulation code for TOK and FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.; Friedman, A.; Gover, A.

    1988-10-20

    FEL3D is a three dimensional simulation code, written for the purpose of calculating the parameters of coherent radiation emitted by electrons in an undulator. The program was written predominantly for simulating the coherent super-radiant harmonic frequency emission of electrons which are being bunched by an external laser beam while propagating in an undulator magnet. This super-radiant emission is to be studied in the TOK (transverse optical klystron) experiment, which is under construction in the NSLS department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The program can also calculate the stimulated emission radiometric properties of a free electron laser (FEL) taking into account three dimensional effects. While this application is presently limited to the small gain operation regime of FEL's, extension to the high gain regime is expected to be relatively easy. The code is based on a semi-analytical concept. Instead of a full numerical solution of the Maxwell-Lorentz equations, the trajectories of the electron in the wiggler field are calculated analytically, and the radiation fields are expanded in terms of free space eigen-modes. This approach permits efficient computation, with a computation time of about 0.1 sec/electron on the BNL IBM 3090. The code reflects the important three dimensional features of the electron beam, the modulating laser beam, and the emitted radiation field. The statistical approach is based on averaging over the electron initial conditions according to a given distribution function in phase space, rather than via Monte-Carlo simulation. The present version of the program is written for uniform periodic wiggler field, but extension to nonuniform fields is straightforward. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. First lasing of the IR upgrade FEL at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Christopher Curtis; David Douglas; H. Dylla; L. Dillon-townes; Richard Evans; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; John Heckman; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Tommy Hiatt; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; George Neil; Joseph Preble; Harvey Rutt; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; Hiroyuki Toyokawa; David W. Waldman; Richard Walker; Neil Wilson; Byung Yunn; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We report initial lasing results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab[1]. The electron accelerator was operated with low average current beam at 80 MeV. The time structure of the beam was 120 pC bunches at 4.678 MHz with up to 750 {micro}sec pulses at 2Hz. Lasing was established over the entire wavelength range of the mirrors (5.5-6.6 {micro}m). The detuning curve length, turn-on time, and power were in agreement with modeling results assuming a 1 psec FWHM micropulse. The same model predicts over 10 kW of power output with 10 mA of beam and 10% output coupling, which is the ultimate design goal of the IR Upgrade FEL. The behavior of the laser while the dispersion section strength was varied was found to qualitatively match predictions. Initial CW lasing results also will be presented.

  12. Energy stability in a high average power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Mermings, L.; Bisognano, J.; Delayen, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields or beam current are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents are determined. Furthermore, the analytical model is extended to include feedback. Comparison with simulation results derived from direct integration of the equations of motion is presented. Design strategies to increase the instability threshold are discussed and the UV Demo FEL, proposed for construction at CEBAF, and the INP Recuperatron at Novosibirsk are used as examples.

  13. A wiggler magnet for FEL low voltage operation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shamma`a, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Lucas, J.

    1995-12-31

    In low voltage FELs (ie, 200kV), operation is necessarily in the microwave frequency range for wiggler periods of the order of cms., so that a waveguide system is mandatory. Also, because of the relatively low velocity of the electron beam, the wiggle amplitude of the electron beam can be much larger than is normal for highly relativistic FELs. Both these factors mean that the electron trajectory must be carefully controlled to avoid beam collision with the waveguide walls. A wiggler system with half poles at entrance and exit is not an acceptable solution because of the offset is gives rise to the electron trajectory. Consequently, we have designed and constructed a wiggler magnet with exponential entrance and exit tapers for a minimal deflection and displacement of the electron beam. Simulations and experimental measurements showed that an on axis trajectory is easily obtainable.

  14. LOXT mirror design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Antrim, W.; Boyd, D.; Giacconi, R.; Sinnamon, G.; Stille, F.

    1972-01-01

    The final report for the large orbiting X-ray telescope (LOXT) high resolution mirror design study is presented. The following tasks were performed: (1) Generation of a reference and alternate preliminary design for the LOXT high resolution mirror assembly, which will meet the LOXT scientific requirements, and are within the present state of the art of materials and fabrication techniques. (2) Measurement, in X-rays, of the scattering properties of a variety of optical flats, embodying materials, coatings, and polishing techniques which might be applicable to the flight configuration LOXT high resolution mirror. (3) Preparation of a procurement specification for a paraboloid test mirror of the size of the innermost paraboloid of the high resolution mirror assembly, including the design requirements for the reference design evolved from this preliminary design study. The results of the engineering and scientific analysis and the conclusions drawn are presented. The procurement specification for the test mirror is included.

  15. Enhancing FEL Power with Phase Shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2010-07-30

    Tapering the undulator parameter is a well-known method for maintaining the resonant condition past saturation, and increasing Free Electron Laser (FEL) efficiency. In this paper, we demonstrate that shifting the electron bunch phase relative to the radiation is equivalent to tapering the undulator parameter. Using discrete phase changes derived from optimized undulator tapers for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL, we show that appropriate phase shifts between undulator sections can reproduce the power enhancement of undulator tapers. Phase shifters are relatively easy to implement and operate, and could be used to aid or replace undulator tapers in optimizing FEL performance.

  16. Fused rock from Köfels, Tyrol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, Daniel J.

    1964-01-01

    The vesicular glass from Köfels, Tyrol, contains grains of quartz that have been partially melted but not dissolved in the matrix glass. This phenomenon has been observed in similar glasses formed by friction along a thrust fault and by meteorite impact, but not in volcanic glasses. The explosion of a small nuclear device buried behind a steep slope produced a geologic structure that is a good small-scale model of that at Köfels. Impact of a large meteorite would have an effect analogous to that of a subsurface nuclear explosion and is the probable cause of the Köfels feature.

  17. Optical alignment and diagnostics for the ATF microundulator FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fang, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The microundulator FEL oscillator has a wiggler period of 8.8 mm, and is designed for initial lasing at 0.5 microns with a 50 MeV electron beam. The design and performance of the optical diagnostics and alignment are discussed. A HeNe coalignment laser is mode-matched to the resonator cavity for transverse alignment. Interference fringes are observed in the cavity with a pellicle, allowing an alignment tolerance of +/- 10 micro-radians. The same pellicle is used to produce transition radiation by the electron beam. This enables precise transverse alignment of the electron beam to the resonator axis. The HeNe laser is also used to align the wiggler by backlighting its bore. This method aligns the wiggler to the optic axis to a tolerance of +/- 50 microns. A frequency-doubled,pulsed Nd:YAG laser that produces the electron bunch train is also mode-matched to the FEL cavity. The cavity length is adjusted to resonate with this pulse train. Light from the FEL is transported to the diagnostic room using two separate paths: one for the single pass spontaneous emission, and the second for the multipass cavity output. Several diagnostics (CCD camera, photodiode, photomultiplier tube, joulemeter, spectrometer, and streak camera) are used to characterize the light. These instruments measure light energy per micropulse ranging from 10 femto-Joules to 10 micro-Joules.

  18. Method for reducing the radiation bandwidth of an x-ray FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, Evgeny L.; Schneidmiller, Evgeny A.; Yurkov, Mikhail V.; Feldhaus, Josef; Schneider, Jochen R.

    1997-05-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray SASE FEL is proposed. The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. The first stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the SASE linear regime. After the exit of the first undulator, the electron bunch is guided through a non-isochronous bypass and the X-ray beam enters the monchromator. The mail function of the bypass is to suppress the modulation of the electron beam induced in the first undulator. This is possible because of the finite value of the natural energy spread in the bem. At the entrance to the second undulator, the radiation power from the monochromator dominates significantly over the shot noise and the residual electron bunching. As a result, the second stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the steady-state regime. The proposed scheme is illustrated for the example of the 6nm option SASE FEL at the TESLA TEst Facility under construction at DESY. The spectral bandwidth of such a two-stage SASE FEL (Δλ/λ~ 5 x 10-5) is close to the limit defined by the finite duration of the radiation pulse. The average spectral brilliance is equal to 7 x 1024 photons/(secxmrad2 x mm2 x 0.1 % bandw.) which is by two orders of magnitude higher than the value which could be reached by the conventional SASE FEL.

  19. In-pixel conversion with a 10 bit SAR ADC for next generation X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodola, L.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the design of an interleaved Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC, part of the readout channel for the PixFEL detector. The PixFEL project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging for applications at the next generation Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. For this purpose, the collaboration is developing the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for the readout channel. This work focuses on the design of the ADC carried out in a 65 nm CMOS technology. To obtain a good tradeoff between power consumption, conversion speed and area occupation, an interleaved SAR ADC architecture was adopted.

  20. Status report on the development of a high-power UV/IR FEL at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.; Bohn, C.; Dylla, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    Last year we presented a design for a kilowatt industrial UV FEL based on a superconducting RF accelerator delivering 5 mA of electron-beam current at 200 MeV with energy recovery to enhance efficiency. Since then, we have progressed toward resolving several issues associated with that design. More exact simulations of the injector have resulted in a more accurate estimate of the injector performance. A new injection method has reduced the longitudinal and transverse emittance at the linac entrance. A more compact lattice has been designed for the UV FEL, and a new recirculation scheme has been identified which greatly increases the threshold for longitudinal instabilities. We decided to use a wiggler from the Advanced Photon Source which leads to a robust high-gain FEL. Analysis of the stability of an RF control system based on CEBAF control modules indicates that only minor modifications will be needed to apply them to this FEL. Detailed magnet specifications, vacuum-chamber beam apertures, and diagnostic specifications have been developed for the recirculation arcs. The design of the optical cavity has been conceptualized, and control systems have been devised to regulate mirror distortion. A half-scale model of one of the end-corner cubes has been built and tested. Finally, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out which indicate that the FEL should exceed its minimum design goals with adequate performance margin.

  1. Statistical Analysis of Crossed Undulator for Polarization Control in a SASE FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    There is a growing interest in producing intense, coherent x-ray radiation with an adjustable and arbitrary polarization state. In this paper, we study the crossed undulator scheme (K.-J. Kim, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 445, 329 (2000)) for rapid polarization control in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL). Because a SASE source is a temporally chaotic light, we perform a statistical analysis on the state of polarization using FEL theory and simulations. We show that by adding a small phase shifter and a short (about 1.3 times the FEL power gain length), 90{sup o} rotated planar undulator after the main SASE planar undulator, one can obtain circularly polarized light--with over 80% polarization--near the FEL saturation.

  2. Possibility of a high-power, high-gain amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D. C.; Freund, H. P.

    2002-01-01

    High-gain amplifier FEL offer many unique advantages such as robust operation without a high-Q optical cavity and potentially high extraction eaciencies with the use of tapered wigglers. Although a high average power, cw amplifier FEL has not been demonstrated, many key physics issues such as electron beam brightness requirements, single-pass gains, saturation, etc. have been resolved. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a high-power FEL based on the high-gain amplifier concept. We show that with suitable electron beam parameters, i.e. high peak current, low emittance, low energy spread, and sufficient tapered wiggler length, peak output power of 1 QW and optical pulse energy of 8 mJ can be achieved. We also outline a possible configuration of a high-power, high-gain amplifier FEL with energy recovery.

  3. Proposed UV FEL user facility at BNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Di Mauro, L. F.; Krinsky, S.; White, M. G.; Yu, L. H.

    1991-07-01

    The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing the construction of an UV FEL operating in the wavelength range from visible to 1000 Å. Nanocoulomb electron pulses will be generated at a laser photocathode rf gun at a repetition rate of 10 kHz. The 6 ps pulses will be accelerated to 250 MeV in a superconducting linac. The FEL consists of an exponential growth section followed by a tapered section. The amplifier input is a harmonic of a tunable visible laser generated either by nonlinear optical material or the nonlinearity of the FEL itself. The FEL output in 10 -4 bandwidth is 1 mJ per pulse, resulting in an average power of 10 W. The availability of radiation with these characteristics would open up new opportunities in photochemistry, biology and nonlinear optics, as discussed in a recent workshop held at BNL.

  4. Temporal characteristics of a SASE FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y,; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J.; Milton, S. V.; Sajaev, V.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed a single-shot, time-resolved measurement of the output field of a SASE FEL using the frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. The measurement reveals the phase and the amplitude of the SASE output as functions of time and frequency, hence enables us to perform a full characterization of the SASE FEL output. We examined both the single-shot field evolution as well as the statistics over multiple shots on the phase and intensity evolution.

  5. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of data can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.

  6. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  7. Predicted performance of a multi-section VUV FEL with the Amsterdam pulse stretcher and storage ring AmPS

    SciTech Connect

    Bazylev, V.A.; Pitatelev, M.I.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A design is proposed to realize a VUV FEL with the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and Storage Ring (AmPS). The FEL is based on 4 identical undulator sections and 3 dispersive sections. The total magnetic system has a length of 12 m. 3 D simulations with the actual electron beam parameters of AmPS have been done with a version of TDA code modified for multi-sectional FELs. The spectral range between 50 and 100 nm has been considered. The simulations show that an amplification as large as 1*E5 - 1*E7 can be achieved. The amplification can be enhanced by a further optimisation procedure.

  8. FEL POTENTIAL OF THE HIGH CURRENT ERLs AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    KAYRAN,D.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; POZDEYEV, E.; MATVEENKO, A.; SHEVCHENKO, O.; VINOKUROV, N.

    2007-08-26

    An ampere class 20 MeV superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for testing concepts for high-energy electron cooling and electron-ion colliders. This ERL prototype will be used as a test bed to study issues relevant for very high current ERLs. High average current and high performance of electron beam with some additional components make this ERL an excellent driver for high power far infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL). A possibility for future up-grade to a two-pass ERL is considered. We present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of the ERL. We discus a FEL potential based on electron beam provided by BNL ERL.

  9. Electron bunch length measurement at the Vanderbilt FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Brau, C.A.; Mendenhall, M.

    1995-12-31

    During the past few years, a number of experiments have been performed to demonstrate the possibility to extract the longitudinal charge distribution from spectroscopic measurements of the coherent far-infrared radiation emitted as transition radiation or synchrotron radiation. Coherent emission occurs in a spectral region where the wavelength is comparable to or longer than the bunch length, leading to an enhancement of the radiation intensity that is on the order of the number of particles per bunch, as compared to incoherent radiation. This technique is particularly useful in the region of mm and sub-mm bunch lengths, a range where streak-cameras cannot be used for beam diagnostics due to their limited time resolution. Here we report on experiments that go beyond the proof of principle of this technique by applying it to the study and optimization of FEL performance. We investigated the longitudinal bunch length of the Vanderbilt FEL by analyzing the spectrum of coherent transition radiation emitted by the electron bunches. By monitoring the bunch length while applying a bunch-compression technique, the amount of the compression could be easily observed. This enabled us to perform a systematic study of the FEL performance, especially gain and optical pulse width, as a function of the longitudinal electron distribution in the bunch. The results of this study will be presented and discussed.

  10. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guimei

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  11. Low energy beam transport in the NSLS UV-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1993-06-01

    A design of the injection low energy transport line for the proposed NSLS UV-FEL is presented. The main concern is to control the beam transverse emittance dilution due to space charge, energy spread and non-linear forces introduced by magnetic elements. The design considerations to optimize the transport line are discussed including the deleterious effects of space charge and energy spread as modeled by the particle code PARMELA. The results from PARMELA are analyzed, and the concept of slice emittance is used to examine the causes of emittance growth.

  12. Low energy beam transport in the NSLS UV-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A design of the injection low energy transport line for the proposed NSLS UV-FEL is presented. The main concern is to control the beam transverse emittance dilution due to space charge, energy spread and non-linear forces introduced by magnetic elements. The design considerations to optimize the transport line are discussed including the deleterious effects of space charge and energy spread as modeled by the particle code PARMELA. The results from PARMELA are analyzed, and the concept of slice emittance is used to examine the causes of emittance growth.

  13. Study Design for Sequencing Studies.

    PubMed

    Honaas, Loren A; Altman, Naomi S; Krzywinski, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Once a biochemical method has been devised to sample RNA or DNA of interest, sequencing can be used to identify the sampled molecules with high fidelity and low bias. High-throughput sequencing has therefore become the primary data acquisition method for many genomics studies and is being used more and more to address molecular biology questions. By applying principles of statistical experimental design, sequencing experiments can be made more sensitive to the effects under study as well as more biologically sound, hence more replicable. PMID:27008009

  14. A high-average power tapered FEL amplifier at submillimeter frequencies using sheet electron beams and short-period wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Bidwell, S.W.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Booske, J.H.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Latham, P.E.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A high-average-power FEL amplifier operating at submillimeter frequencies is under development at the University of Maryland. Program goals are to produce a CW, {approximately}1 MW, FEL amplifier source at frequencies between 280 GHz and 560 GHz. To this end, a high-gain, high-efficiency, tapered FEL amplifier using a sheet electron beam and a short-period (superconducting) wiggler has been chosen. Development of this amplifier is progressing in three stages: (1) beam propagation through a long length ({approximately}1 m) of short period ({lambda}{sub {omega}} = 1 cm) wiggler, (2) demonstration of a proof-of-principle amplifier experiment at 98 GHz, and (3) designs of a superconducting tapered FEL amplifier meeting the ultimate design goal specifications. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Optical tailoring of xFEL beams

    SciTech Connect

    West, Gavin; Coffee, R.

    2015-08-20

    There is an inherent exibility unique to free electron lasers (FELs) that lends well to experimental approaches normally too difficult for other light sources to accomplish. This includes the ability to optically shape the electron bunch prior to final its acceleration for the final FEL process. Optical pulse shaping of the electron bunch can enable both femtosecond and attosecond level FEL pulse control. Pulse shaping is currently implemented, not optically but mechanically, in LCLS-I with an adjustable foil slit that physically spoils the momentum phase of the electron bunch. This selectively suppresses the downstream FEL process ofspoiled electrons. Such a mechanical spoiling method fails for both the soft x-ray regime as well as the high repetition rates that are planned in LCLS-II. Our proposed optical spoiling method circumvents this limitation by making use of the existing ultrafast laser beam that is typically used for adjusting the energy spread for the initial electron bunch. Using Fourier domain shaping we can nearly arbitrarily shape the laser pulses to affect the electron bunch. This can selectively spoil electrons within each bunch. Here we demonstrate the viability of this approach with a programmable acousto-optic dispersive filter. This method is not only well suited for LCLS-II but also has several advantages over mechanical spoiling, including lack of radiation concerns, experiment specific FEL pulse shapes, and real-time adjustment for applications that require high duty-cycle variation such as lock-in amplification of small signals.

  16. Preliminary study for the OFFELO

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-08-23

    X-ray Optics-Free FEL Oscillator (OFFELO) has potential of becoming a choice for next generation light sources. Using electron beam for the feedback allows OFFELO to be completely tunable and to combine the peak power of high-gain SASE FELs with extremely narrow bandwidth of the oscillator. While the high-gain X-ray FELs has been studied in depth and has been successfully demonstrated, two other concepts (the transport and the feed-back) involved in OFFELO still need detail studies. In this short paper we focus on the simulation of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. In our initial studies of OFFELO studied the saturation of the system and also its evolution using Genesis 2.0 code with a homemade wrapping code. While and lattice design from the modulator to the radiator, in order to minimize the feedback information loss in transporting the beam.

  17. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Seal design alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  19. Shuttle communications design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The design and development of a space shuttle communication system are discussed. The subjects considered include the following: (1) Ku-band satellite relay to shuttle, (2) phased arrays, (3) PN acquisition, (4) quadriplexing of direct link ranging and telemetry, (5) communications blackout on launch and reentry, (6) acquisition after blackout on reentry, (7) wideband communications interface with the Ku-Band rendezvous radar, (8) aeroflight capabilities of the space shuttle, (9) a triple multiplexing scheme equivalent to interplex, and (10) a study of staggered quadriphase for use on the space shuttle.

  20. Polarization control in X-ray FELs by reverse undulator tapering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate.

  1. Allergens as immunomodulatory proteins: the cat dander protein Fel d 1 enhances TLR activation by lipid ligands.

    PubMed

    Herre, Jurgen; Grönlund, Hans; Brooks, Heather; Hopkins, Lee; Waggoner, Lisa; Murton, Ben; Gangloff, Monique; Opaleye, Olaniyi; Chilvers, Edwin R; Fitzgerald, Kate; Gay, Nick; Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare

    2013-08-15

    Allergic responses can be triggered by structurally diverse allergens. Most allergens are proteins, yet extensive research has not revealed how they initiate the allergic response and why the myriad of other inhaled proteins do not. Among these allergens, the cat secretoglobulin protein Fel d 1 is a major allergen and is responsible for severe allergic responses. In this study, we show that similar to the mite dust allergen Der p 2, Fel d 1 substantially enhances signaling through the innate receptors TLR4 and TLR2. In contrast to Der p 2, however, Fel d 1 does not act by mimicking the TLR4 coreceptor MD2 and is not able to bind stably to the TLR4/MD2 complex in vitro. Fel d 1 does, however, bind to the TLR4 agonist LPS, suggesting that a lipid transfer mechanism may be involved in the Fel d 1 enhancement of TLR signaling. We also show that the dog allergen Can f 6, a member of a distinct class of lipocalin allergens, has very similar properties to Fel d 1. We propose that Fel d 1 and Can f 6 belong to a group of allergen immunomodulatory proteins that enhance innate immune signaling and promote airway hypersensitivity reactions in diseases such as asthma. PMID:23878318

  2. Scaling formulae for FEL operating in linear and non linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Segreto, A.

    1995-12-31

    Scaling relations for the FEL gain, including the e-beam quality effects, have been usefully exploited to design FEL devices. We propose further extension of the above formulae including high gain, inhomogeneous broadening and saturation effects. A crucial role to get these relations is the use of approximant methods generalizing the Pade procedure. We derive gain equations containing the corrections due to energy spread, emittances and field intensity. It is shown that these equations can be exploited to {open_quotes}simulate{close_quotes} the FEL evolution with an almost negligible computational effort. Comments on the role of the saturation intensity and its dependence on the e-beam quality, high gain corrections etc. are also presented.

  3. Beam Line Commissioning of a UV/VUV FEL at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Blackburn, Keith; Bullard, Daniel; Clavero Perez, Cesar; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hardy, David; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; James, Kortze; Legg, Robert; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn; Wilson, Frederick; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-08-01

    Many novel applications in photon sciences require very high brightness and/or short pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). Jefferson Lab has commissioned a UV oscillator with high gain and has transported the third harmonic of the UV to a user lab. The experimental performance of the UV FEL is much better than simulated performance in both gain and efficiency. This success is important for efforts to push towards higher gain FELs at short wavelengths where mirrors absorb strongly. We will report on efforts to characterize the UV laser and the VUV coherent harmonics as well as designs to lase directly in the VUV wavelength range.

  4. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  5. The DarkLight Experiment at the JLab FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Peter

    2013-10-01

    DarkLight will study the production of gauge bosons associated with Dark Forces theories in the scattering of 100 MeV electrons on proton a target. DarkLight is a spectrometer to measure all the final state particles in e- + p -->e- + p +e- +e+ . QED allows this process and the invariant mass distribution of the e+e- pair is a continuum from nearly zero to nearly the electron beam energy. Dark Forces theories, which allow the dark matter mass scale to be over 1 TeV, predict a gauge boson A' in the mass range of 10-1,000 MeV and decays to an electron-positron pair with an invariant mass of mA'. We aim to search for this process using the 100 MeV, 10 mA electron beam at the JLab Free Electron Laser impinging on a hydrogen target with a 1019 cm-2 density. The resulting luminosity of 6 ×1035/cm2-s gives the experiment enough sensitivity to probe A' couplings of 10-9 α . DarkLight is unique in its design to detect all four particles in the final state. The leptons will be measured in a large high-rate TPC and a silicon sensor will measure the protons. A 0.5 T solenoidal magnetic field provides the momentum resolution and focuses the copious Møller scattering background down the beam line, away from the detectors. A first beam test has shown the FEL beam is compatible with the target design and that the hall backgrounds are manageable. The experiment has been approved by Jefferson Lab for first running in 2017.

  6. BWID System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Rudin, M.J.; Morrison, J.L.; Richardson, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) System Design Study is to identify and evaluate technology process options for the cradle-to-grave remediation of Transuranic (TRU)-Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Emphasis is placed upon evaluating system configuration options and associated functional and operational requirements for retrieving and treating the buried wastes. A Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter was developed to evaluate the identified remediation systems and their enabling technologies based upon system requirements and quantification of technical Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) balancing criteria. Remediation systems will also be evaluated with respect to regulatory and institutional acceptance and cost-effectiveness.

  7. BWID System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M.C.; Rudin, M.J.; Morrison, J.L.; Richardson, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) System Design Study is to identify and evaluate technology process options for the cradle-to-grave remediation of Transuranic (TRU)-Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Emphasis is placed upon evaluating system configuration options and associated functional and operational requirements for retrieving and treating the buried wastes. A Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter was developed to evaluate the identified remediation systems and their enabling technologies based upon system requirements and quantification of technical Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) balancing criteria. Remediation systems will also be evaluated with respect to regulatory and institutional acceptance and cost-effectiveness.

  8. Conceptual design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollowell, S. J.; Beeman, E. R., II; Hiyama, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of applying multilevel functional decomposition and optimization techniques to conceptual design of advanced fighter aircraft was investigated. Applying the functional decomposition techniques to the conceptual design phase appears to be feasible. The initial implementation of the modified design process will optimize wing design variables. A hybrid approach, combining functional decomposition techniques for generation of aerodynamic and mass properties linear sensitivity derivatives with existing techniques for sizing mission performance and optimization, is proposed.

  9. Longitudinal stabilisation of bunched beams in a FEL storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Voykov, G. K.

    1997-02-01

    Experimental observations on FEL Storage Rings (Aco, Super-Aco, VEPP3, TERAS) have shown that in a storage ring with an operating FEL there is a mutual effect between the FEL operational mode and the beam longitudinal distribution. The main effects are the birth of a macro-temporal structure of the FEL radiation and a suppression of the synchrotron sidebands, evidence of beam stabilisation against the microwave instabilities. In this paper we discuss the main features of the beam dynamics analysed with a simulation code recently developed, which includes the FEL-beam interaction. Furtherly, we propose an heuristic model which enable to describe in a simple way the overall system.

  10. Some novel features of an FEL oscillator with tapered undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    A one-dimensional analysis of an FEL oscillator with a linear undulator tapering is presented. Some principally novel results have been obtained. The origin of these results is in principal difference between the FEL oscillator and an FEL amplifier. In the case of the FEL amplifier the frequency of the amplified wave and all the other parameters are defined by an experimenter. Contrary to this, the case of the FEL oscillator with tapered undulator is more complicated. The lasing frequency is defined by the maximum of the small-signal gain and depends on the tapering depth in some complex way.

  11. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic losses in the electrodes of full

  12. Powerful electrostatic FEL: Regime of operation, recovery of the spent electron beam and high voltage generator

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo, I.; Gong, J.

    1995-02-01

    FEL, driven by a Cockcroft-Walton electrostatic accelerator with the recovery of the spent electron beam, is proposed as powerful radiation source for plasma heating. The low gain and high gain regimes are compared in view of the recovery problem and the high gain regime is shown to be much more favourable. A new design of the onion Cockcroft-Walton is presented.

  13. FELS FOUNDATION PROJECT FOR DEVELOPING YOUTH POTENTIAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, ROBERT A.; AND OTHERS

    THE OPERATION OF THE FELS FOUNDATION PROJECT FOR DEVELOPING YOUTH POTENTIAL IN HANFORD, CALIFORNIA, IS DESCRIBED. OF GENERAL CONCERN WAS THE PREPARATION OF CULTURALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN FOR SCHOOL EXPERIENCES AND FOR FUTURE EMPLOYMENT. A MAJOR GOAL WAS TO IMPROVE THE SELF-IMAGE OF THE CHILDREN AND TO ASSIST THE PARENTS AND CHILDREN IN PROVIDING…

  14. Evaluation of the FEL+ Program, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evaluation and Training Inst., Los Angeles, CA.

    An external evaluation of the Family English Literacy, Plus (FEL+) program of the Sweetwater Union High School District (California) is presented. Program objectives included: (1) development and implementation of curriculum and activities integrating technology-assisted instruction into the existing literacy program; (2) increasing parent/child…

  15. FEL-based transient grating spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencivenga, F.; Cucini, R.; Capotondi, F.; Battistoni, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Gessini, A.; Manfredda, M.; Nikolov, I. P.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Svetina, C.; Parisse, P.; Casolari, F.; Danailov, M. B.; Kiskinova, M.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-05-01

    In this manuscript we report on a compact experimental set-up ("mini-TIMER") conceived for transient grating (TG) experiments based on free electron laser (FEL) radiation. This set-up has been tested at the seeded FEL facility FERMI (Elettra, Trieste, Italy) and allowed us to observe the first FEL-stimulated TG signal. This experimental result is of the greatest relevance in the context of developing coherent non-linear optical methods into the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) range. Such a challenging task will be addressed in the next future at FERMI by using the present set-up and the forthcoming EIS-TIMER beamline, which is being installed at FERMI and will start the commissioning phase in the second semester 2015. The possibility to use TGs generated by FEL radiation at sub-optical wavelengths would allow developing EUV/SXR four-wave-mixing (FWM) applications, so far considered only theoretically and widely believed to be potentially able to provide major breakthroughs in several fields of science.

  16. A compact FEL upconverter of coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Marshall, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    The objective is to generate a powerful millimeter-wave FEL signal in a single pass, using a coherent microwave source (24GHz) to prebunch the electron beam for a harmonically-related wave (72GHz). We use the Columbia FEL facility, operating the electron beam at 600kV, 100A; undulator period = 1.85cm and 250G (K = 0.25); electron beam diameter = 3mm inside a 8.5 mm ID drift tube; guiding field of 8800G. Under these conditions, both the microwave signal (5kW input) and the millimeter signal will show travelling-wave gain in the TE11 mode. We report initial experimental results for the millimeter wave spectrum and find an overall power gain of {approximately}20 for the 24GHz input wave. Also presented will be numerical solutions of the wave growth using the FEL equations with slippage. This device has the advantage of producing a high-power FEL output in a single-pass travelling-wave configuration, obtaining a millimeter wave which is phase-referenced to a coherent laboratory source.

  17. UCSB FEL user mode adaption project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccarino, Vincent

    1992-04-01

    This research sponsored by the SDIO Biomedical and Materials Sciences FEL Program held the following objectives: Provide a facility in which in-house and outside user research in the materials and biological sciences can be carried out in the Far Infrared using-the unique properties of the UCSB electrostatic accelerator-driven FEL; Develop and implement new FEL concepts and FIR technology and encourage the transfer and application of this research; Train graduate students, post doctoral researchers and technical personnel in varied aspects of scientific user disciplines, FEL science and FIR technology in a cooperative, interdisciplinary environment. In summary, a free electron laser facility has been developed which is operational from 200 GHz, (6.6 cm exp -1), to 4.8 THz, (160 cm exp -1) tunable under computer control and able to deliver kilowatts of millimeter wave and far-infrared power. This facility has a well equipped user lab that has been used to perform ground breaking experiments in scientific areas as diverse as bio-physics. Nine graduate students and post doctoral researchers have been trained in the operation, use and application of these free-electron lasers.

  18. FULL ELECTROMAGNETIC FEL SIMULATION VIA THE LORENTZ-BOOSTED FRAME TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-08-16

    Numerical electromagnetic simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz-boosted frame. A particularly good application for calculation in a boosted frame isthat of short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) where a high energy electron beam with small fractional energy spread interacts with a static magnetic undulator. In the optimal boost frame (i.e., the ponderomotive rest frame), the red-shifted FEL radiation and blue-shifted undulator field have identical wavelengths and the number of required longitudinal grid cells and time-steps for fully electromagnetic simulation (relative to the laboratory frame) decrease by factors of gamma^2 each. In theory, boosted frame EM codes permit direct study of FEL problems for which the eikonal approximation for propagation of the radiation field and wiggler-period-averaging for the particle-field interaction may be suspect. We have adapted the WARP code to apply this method to several electromagnetic FEL problems including spontaneous emission, strong exponential gain in a seeded, single pass amplifier configuration, and emission from e-beams in undulators with multiple harmonic components. WARP has a standard relativistic macroparticle mover and a fully 3-D electromagnetic field solver. We discuss our boosted frame results and compare with those obtained using the ?standard? eikonal FEL simulation approach.

  19. FEL potential of eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kao, C-C.; Kayran, D.; Murphy, J.B.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2010-08-23

    Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a 5-to-30 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) for its future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. In past few months, the Laboratory turned its attention to the potential of this unique machine for free electron lasers (FELS), which we initially assessed earlier. In this paper, we present our current vision of a possible FEL farm, and of narrow-band FEL-oscillators driven by this accelerator. eRHIC, the proposed electron-ion collider at BNL, takes advantage of the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) complex. Plans call for adding a six-pass super-conducting (SRF) ERL to this complex to collide polarized- and unpolarized- electron beams with heavy ions (with energies up to 130 GeV per nucleon) and with polarized protons (with energies up to 325 GeV). RHIC, with a circumference of 3.834 km, has three-fold symmetry and six straight sections each {approx} 250 m long. Two of these straight sections will accommodate 703-MHz SRF linacs. The maximum energy of the electron beam in eRHIC will be reached in stages, from 5 GeV to 30 GeV, by increasing the lengths of its SRF linacs. We plan to install at the start the six-pass magnetic system with small gap magnets. The structure of the eRHIC's electron beam will be identical with that of its hadron beam, viz., 166 bunches will be filled, reserving about a one-microsecond gap for the abort kicker. With modest modifications, we can assure that eRHIC's ERL will become an excellent driver for continuous wave (CW) FELs (see Fig.1). The eRHIC's beam structure will support the operation of several such FELs in parasitic mode.

  20. Partial covariance mapping techniques at FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    The development of free-electron lasers (FELs) is driven by the desire to access the structure and chemical dynamics of biomolecules with atomic resolution. Short, intense FEL pulses have the potential to record x-ray diffraction images before the molecular structure is destroyed by radiation damage. However, even during the shortest, few-femtosecond pulses currently available, there are some significant changes induced by massive ionisation and onset of Coulomb explosion. To interpret the diffraction images it is vital to gain insight into the electronic and nuclear dynamics during multiple core and valence ionisations that compete with Auger cascades. This paper focuses on a technique that is capable to probe these processes. The covariance mapping technique is well suited to the high intensity and low repetition rate of FEL pulses. While the multitude of charges ejected at each pulse overwhelm conventional coincidence methods, an improved technique of partial covariance mapping can cope with hundreds of photoelectrons or photoions detected at each FEL shot. The technique, however, often reveals spurious, uninteresting correlations that spoil the maps. This work will discuss the strengths and limitations of various forms of covariance mapping techniques. Quantitative information extracted from the maps will be linked to theoretical modelling of ionisation and fragmentation paths. Special attention will be given to critical experimental parameters, such as counting rate, FEL intensity fluctuations, vacuum impurities or detector efficiency and nonlinearities. Methods of assessing and optimising signal-to-noise ratio will be described. Emphasis will be put on possible future developments such as multidimensional covariance mapping, compensation for various experimental instabilities and improvements in the detector response. This work has been supported the EPSRC, UK (grants EP/F021232/1 and EP/I032517/1).

  1. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  2. Possible application of X-ray optical elements for reducing the spectral bandwidth of an X-ray SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaus, J.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneider, J. R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-02-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray SASE FEL is proposed. The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. The first stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the SASE linear regime. After the exit of the first undulator the electron bunch is guided through a non-isochronous bypass and the X-ray beam enters the monochromator. The main function of the bypass is to suppress the modulation of the electron beam induced in the first undulator. This is possible because of the finite value of the natural energy spread in the beam. At the entrance to the second undulator the radiation power from the monochromator dominates significantly over the shot noise and the residual electron bunching. As a result, the second stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the steady-state regime. The proposed scheme is illustrated for the example of the 6 nm option SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility under construction at DESY. The spectral bandwidth of such a two-stage SASE FEL ( {Δλ}/{λ} ⋍ 5 × 10 -5) is close to the limit defined by the finite duration of the radiation pulse. The average spectral brilliance is equal to 2 × 10 24 photons/(sec×mrad 2×mm 2×0.1% bandwidth) which is by two orders of magnitude higher than the value which could be reached by the conventional SASE FEL.

  3. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  4. Start-to-End Simulations of the LCLS Accelerator and FEL Performance at Very Low Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2009-05-26

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray Free-electron Laser (FEL) being commissioned at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Recent beam measurements have shown that, using the LCLS injector-linac-compressors, the beam emittance is very small at 20 pC. In this paper we perform start-to-end simulations of the entire accelerator including the FEL undulator and study the FEL performance versus the bunch charge. At 20 pC charge, these calculations associated with the measured beam parameters suggest the possibility of generating a longitudinally coherent single x-ray spike with 2-femtosecond (fs) duration at a wavelength of 1.5 nm. At 100 pC charge level, our simulations show an x-ray pulse with 10 femtosecond duration and up to 10{sup 12} photons at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}. These results open exciting possibilities for ultrafast science and single shot molecular imaging.

  5. Suppression of mode-beating in a saturated hole-coupled FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    In a hole-coupled resonator, either empty or loaded with a linear FEL gain medium, the phenomenon of mode-degeneracy and mode-beating have been studied. When the magnitudes of the eigenvalues, derived from a linear analysis, are equal for two or more dominant eigenmodes, the system cannot achieve a stable beam-profile. We investigate this phenomenon when a saturated FEL is present within the cavity, thus introducing non-linearity. We use a three-dimensional FEL oscillator code, based on the amplifier code TDA, and show that mode-beating is completely suppressed in the nonlinear saturated regime. We suggest a simple, qualitative model for the mechanism responsible for this suppression.

  6. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  7. High flux and high quality FEL resonator mirrors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, F.M.; Mistretta, A.L.; Tonnessen, T.W.

    1989-08-01

    The Free Electron Laser Cooled Mirror Technology Development Program was highly successful; this technology can be applied to cooled silicon mirror requirements for RF linac FEL`s. Designs were developed for a 100 cm hyperboloid subjected to a peak absorbed flux of 1000 w/cm{sup 2} and for a 50 cm paraboloid with an absorbed peak flux of 500 w/cm{sup 2}. Although the design concepts were essentially the same detailed implementation was somewhat different for each of the mirrors. Both designs incorporated variable geometry and internal flow tailoring over the planform area so as to produce a near spherical distortion response to the input Gaussian power distribution. This enhanced correctability of the overall distortion such that the net distortion was only 0.2 A/(w/cm{sup 2}) after correction for sphere, piston and bit as compared to a design goal of 0.5 A/(w/cm{sup 2}). Structural integrity testing of small samples, that incorporated internal geometries of both types of mirrors, verified the adequacy of the designs. Fabrication of the different types of test specimens demonstrated the producibility of the configurations. Planform bonding of manifold simulations was successful; they type of bonding is required to produce a 50 cm diameter circular silicon mirror from boules that are somewhat smaller in diameter. After planform bonding of preforms they were machined, etched, assembled into pressure test specimens, and burst pressure tested. The average burst pressure of 1550 psig was somewhat stronger than early SHOP specimens of the same configuration but somewhat lower than more recently produced specimens which evidenced burst pressure strengths of 2500 psig. Demonstrated planform bond strengths are more than adequate for the mirrors of interest, better performance can be expected as the bonding precess is refined. These, and the other experimental results indicate the large factor of safety provided by the designs.

  8. Options for the Cryogenic System for the BESSY-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzschbach, A.; Quack, H.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Knobloch, J.; Anders, W.; Pflueckhahn, D.

    2004-06-01

    The Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung (BESSY GmbH), in January 1999, started operation of BESSY II, a third-generation synchrotron light source delivering world-class, high-brilliance photon beams in the VUV to XUV spectral range. Based on this experience, BESSY has recently proposed the construction of a free-electron laser (FEL), covering a photon-energy range from 20 eV to 1 keV. To reduce the development time and cost, BESSY intends to use proven cavity and cryostat technology developed for the TESLA linear collider. However, the cryogenic load per cavity is approximately 15 to 20 times higher than that anticipated for the (pulsed) TESLA operation. This paper describes possible modifications of the cryostat design to accommodate these additional losses. Superconducting RF cavities are the basis of the FEL accelerator providing the driving electron beam with 2.25 GeV. The accelerator consists of five cold sections separated by warm sections reserved for bunch compression and beam extraction. The total refrigeration load will be covered by a single refrigerator. Several possible layouts of the cryogenic system are described and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  9. Segmented undulator operation at the SPARC-FEL test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci, Franco; Anania, Maria Pia; Artioli, Marcello; Bellaveglia, Marco; Carpanese, Mariano; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Dattoli, Giuseppe; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Palma, Emanuele; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Mostacci, Andrea; Petralia, Alberto; Petrillo, Vittoria; Pompili, Riccardo; Sabia, Elio; Spassovsky, Ivan; Surrenti, Vincenzo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    A short period undulator (1.4 cm) has been designed for the SPARC-FEL test facility and has been realized in collaboration with KYMA Srl. It has been installed on the undulator line at SPARC. The undulator, operating in a delta like mode, has been used as radiator in a segmented configuration. The first stage being provided by the five undulators of the SPARC FEL source "old" chain, with period 2.8 cm. The KYMA undulator has a quatrefoil structure, a high magnetic field homogeneity and focuses both in vertical and radial directions. The two sections, namely the bunching and radiating parts, are arranged in such a way that the second is adjusted on a harmonic of the first. Laser action occurring in the second part, is due to the bunching acquired in the first. Simulations of the temporal and spectral profiles in different electron beam operating conditions are reported, as well as the evolution of the longitudinal phase space. The agreement with the experimental results is discussed The importance of this experiment is at least threefold: 1) It proves that the segmented undulator can successfully be operated 2) It proves that the laser emission in the last undulator is entirely due to the bunching mechanism, being no second harmonic signal present in the first segment 3) Encourages various improvements of the configuration itself, as e.g. the use of a further undulator with variable magnetic field configuration in order to obtain a laser field with adjustable polarization.

  10. First lasing of the IR upgrade FEL at Jefferson lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behre, C.; Benson, S.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Curtis, C.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, H. F.; Dillon-Townes, L.; Evans, R.; Grippo, A.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Heckman, J.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Hiatt, T.; Jordan, K.; Merminga, L.; Neil, G.; Preble, J.; Rutt, H.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Waldman, D. W.; Walker, R.; Wilson, N.; Yunn, B.; Zhang, S.

    2004-08-01

    We report initial lasing results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab (Proceedings: 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001). The electron accelerator was operated with low average current beam at 80 MeV. The time structure of the beam was 120 pC bunches at 4.678 MHz with up to 750 μs pulses at 2 Hz. Lasing was established over the entire wavelength range of the mirrors (5.5-6.6 μm). The detuning curve length, turn-on time, and power were in agreement with modeling results assuming a 1 ps FWHM micropulse. The same model predicts over 10 kW of power output with 10 mA of beam and 10% output coupling, which is the ultimate design goal of the IR Upgrade FEL. The behavior of the laser while the dispersion section strength was varied was found to qualitatively match predictions. Initial CW lasing results also will be presented.