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  1. Jacques Cousteau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Jacques Cousteau, the French undersea researcher, is shown addressing members of the press on his experiences during an Antarctic expedition with the oceanographic ship, Calypso. The Calypso used satellite communication and weather equipment provided by NASA to test the accuracy of satellite observations in relation to the ship's surface observations. Calypso used satellite observation information to navigate into safe waters after getting hit by an iceberg. Cousteau was born in Saint-Andre-de-Cubzac, France on June 11, 1910. He died on June 25, 1997, after contributing various books and hundreds of documents on the chartless realms that make up the planet's oceans. In 1956, with the help of Calypso and her crew, Cousteau received an Academy award for his undersea documentary, The Silent World, and cemented his position as one of the world's most famous marine biologists.

  2. Interview with Jacques Bwira Hope Primary School Kampala, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Educational Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Jacques Bwira arrived in Uganda in 2000, having fled the violent conflict in his native country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Though he had trained and worked as a teacher in Congo, he feared that speaking only French would prevent him from making a living in his new home. The police officer who interrogated Jacques on arrival in the capital…

  3. Joint venture: Jacques Giordano Industries, France and REEFCO, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, J. ); Saleh, M.I. )

    1992-03-01

    Joint venture arrangements can provide mutually advantageous links between developed and developing countries. Jacques Giordano, President of Jacques Giordano Industries and Mohamed Ibrahim Saleh of REEFCO, Egypt describe their successful partnership which brings quality solar water heaters to the Egyptian market. The topics include technology transfer, manufacturing, marketing, legal aspects, financing, and government policy.

  4. Jacques Monod and Chance and Necessity.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Charles Darwin proposed the theory that evolution of live organisms is based on random variation and natural selection. Jacques Monod, in his classic book Chance and Necessity, published 45 years ago, presented his thesis that the biosphere does not contain a predictable class of objects or events, but constitutes a particular occurrence, compatible indeed with the first principles but not deducible from those principles. The biosphere is therefore essentially unpredictable. In his book, Monod expounded at length on the conflict between science and religion. He saw religion as a collection of primitive myths that had been blown to shreds by science. At every turn, Monod emphasized the role of chance in human existence, an idea that is antithetical to essentially every religious doctrine that places humans as some inevitable intention of a Creator. PMID:26558946

  5. Controlling life: from Jacques Loeb to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Maienschein, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In his 1987 book Controlling Life: Jacques Loeb and the Engineering Ideal in Biology, Philip Pauly presented his readers with the biologist Jacques Loeb and his role in developing an emphasis on control of life processes. Loeb's work on artificial parthenogenesis, for example, provided an example of bioengineering at work. This paper revisits Pauly's study of Loeb and explores the way current research in regenerative medicine reflects the same tradition. A history of regeneration research reveals patterns of thinking and research methods that both echo Loeb's ideology and point the way to modern studies. Pauly's work revealed far more than we readers realized at the time of its publication. PMID:19852396

  6. Jacques Maritain and John Dewey on Education: A Reconsideration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutek, Gerald L.

    2005-01-01

    Jacques Maritain and John Dewey were two of the towering figures in philosophy of education. Maritain led an international revival of Aristotelian and Thomist philosophies known as Integral Humanism. Dewey, a founding figure of Pragmatism, exercised a significant influence on American education. Originating in very different philosophical…

  7. Under the Name of Method: On Jacques Ranciere's Presumptive Tautology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the philosophical method of Jacques Ranciere, with special attention to use of the "presumptive tautology". It distinguishes between the Enlightenment conception of method as universally applicable technique, and the philosophical conception of method as a certain style that has been invented by a certain person.…

  8. [Jacques Monod: some unpublished pages of his life].

    PubMed

    Gilgenkrantz, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The friendship and affinity of thought between Albert Camus and Jacques Monod were little highlighted in France. A book published in the U.S. in 2013 over the period of the Second World War in France shows their importance. It seemed useful to collect the elements of correspondence and writings reflecting their common concerns,frequent meetings and friendship. PMID:26050426

  9. Redistributing the Sensory: The Critical Pedagogy of Jacques Ranciere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Cath

    2012-01-01

    Jacques Ranciere remains neglected within educational debates. In this paper I examine the potential of his philosophies for enacting critical interventions in relation to contemporary (higher) educational concerns. Ranciere argues against the progressive temporality of pedagogic relations and provides an alternative thesis that equality is a…

  10. Use the Good Mind! An Interview with Freida Jacques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonelli, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Freida Jacques, Onondaga clan mother, discusses the discipline of the "good mind," which involves becoming aware of your thoughts, examining the intent of your actions, and deciding whether your intent is based on love or fear and anger. Peace and healing must be achieved through forgiveness and respect. Sidebars discuss Native American healing…

  11. Jacques Ranciere's Lesson on the Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the significance of Jacques Ranciere's work on pedagogy, and argues that to make sense of Ranciere's "lesson on the lesson" one must do more but also less than merely explicate Ranciere's texts. It steadfastly refuses to draw out the lessons of Ranciere's writings in the manner of a series of…

  12. Jacques Guillemeau's 16th-century account of ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Rodríguez, M Victoria; González-Hernández, Ayoze N

    2013-07-01

    In 1585, the renowned French royal surgeon Jacques Guillemeau published his Traité des maladies de l'oeil. The book is divided into 9 unequal sections devoted to the description of eye anatomy and ophthalmological diseases including muscle, membrane, and humor disorders; optic nerve damage; and eyelid affections. Section 3, in particular, focuses on a form of ophthalmoplegia involving progressive paralysis of extraocular muscles. Here we describe and discuss Guillemeau's theoretical framework and practical approach to this ophthalmological disorder. To determine whether this physician was possibly influenced by the thought of antique and contemporary learned men, we reviewed some fundamental ideas on cranial nerves and their paralysis as presented by authors such as Herophilus of Chalcedon, Erasistratus of Ceos, Claudius Galen, Andreas Vesalius, and Leonhard Fuchs. PMID:23700141

  13. From Mephistopheles to Isaiah: Jacques Loeb, technical biology and war.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, Heiner

    2009-04-01

    In 1917, the German-American scientist Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) published a short essay, entitled 'Biology and War', that summarized his disagreement with World War I. He was deeply saddened by the break-up of the international scientific community as a consequence of the actions of bellicose politicians. These actions were in direct opposition to his efforts to promote social reform, mechanistic biology and scientific internationalism. The aim of this paper is to examine Loeb's activities aimed at these efforts before, during and after the war. It attempts to explain how Loeb's scientific work was formed, what was special about it and why it was both successful and attacked. Particular emphasis is placed on how Loeb reacted to the War and the subsequent forced disintegration of his international scientific network. Loeb's attempts to integrate his interpretation of biology into post-war Europe's approach to the life sciences is analysed in connection with his social commitment. It is argued that his emigration to the USA, the circumstances of World War I, the reaction of his German colleagues to it and the demolition of the international scientific community changed: (1) Loeb's feelings towards his old home; (2) the direction of his scientific endeavours; and (3) his engagement in science politics. His correspondence with eminent scientists from all over the world serves as a key to Loeb's efforts in the context of the social elements of scientific networks and perceptions. PMID:19831222

  14. Condensed matter physics in the 21st century: The legacy of Jacques Friedel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Hélène; Villain, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this dossier of Comptes rendus Physique devoted to the memory of Jacques Friedel is to give a panorama of his exceptional and numerous contributions to modern condensed matter physics. Since it is not possible to cover all the domains he investigated in a single volume, we have selected only a limited number of topics. We have tried, when possible, to present a juxtaposition of articles written by his former students or colleagues with others written instead by younger researchers whose work is inspired by important concepts originating from the work of Jacques Friedel, but who may have never met him.

  15. A scientist born in amiens : jacques rohault (1620-1672) (French Title: Un savant amiénois : jacques rohault (1620-1672))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Boeuffle, A.

    2004-12-01

    Jacques Rohault is born in Amiens town at the beginning of the seventeen century. After the Middle Ages, science try to use nex methods and want to abandon Greek's dogmas. Rohault came to Paris to continue his studies and met J.B. Poquelin (Molière). He became a friend an a supporter of René Descartes. He was a very popular scientist. He practised many experiments in public and writed the book La physique to popularize science.

  16. Initiating "The Methodology of Jacques Ranciere": How Does It All Start?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2012-01-01

    Educationalists are currently engaging with Jacques Ranciere's thought on emancipation and equality. The focus of this paper is on what initiates the process that starts emancipation. With reference to teachers the question is: how do teachers become emancipated? This paper discusses how the teacher's life is made "sensible" and how sense is…

  17. Can You Hear Me Now? Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Listening Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, Megan J.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay Megan J. Laverty argues that Jean-Jacques Rousseau's conception of humane communication and his proposal for teaching it have implications for our understanding of the role of listening in education. She develops this argument through a close reading of Rousseau's most substantial work on education, "Emile: Or, On Education". Laverty…

  18. The Meaning of the Global City: Jacques Ellul's Continued Relevance to 21st-Century Urbanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toly, Noah

    2012-01-01

    Jacques Ellul's book, "The Meaning of the City," widely recognized as one of the most important twentieth century theological reflections on the city, was also one of his most controversial scholarly contributions. Many urbanists interpreted the book as demeaning the city and diminishing the importance of urban policy, planning, design,…

  19. The Essential Connection Between the Two Parts of the Work of Jacques Ellul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2004-01-01

    Almost without exception, interpretations of Jacques Ellul's work focus either on his sociopolitical thought or on his Christian reflections. However, each one drives the other, thereby exposing how we collectively journey through time and reality on a magic carpet of myths (in the sense of cultural anthropology). Ellul challenges us to give up…

  20. Emancipating Subjects in Science Education: Taking a Lesson from Patti Lather and Jacques Ranciere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzul, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the conversation started by Patti Lather in her forum response to "Neoliberal ideology, global capitalism, and science education: engaging the question of subjectivity", in terms of engaging the thought of Jacques Ranciere. Ranciere can offer (science) educators a more definitive example of (possible) emancipatory political…

  1. Curing Provincialism: Why We Educate the Way We Do. A Conversation with Jacques Barzun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This interview with author and cultural historian Jacques Barzun discusses the origins of history, science, art, literature, and math, calling them the core of intellectual inheritance. Notes how the frameworks they provide enable people to extend their understanding of the world and reach beyond natural, human parochialism. Discusses the…

  2. Educational Research and "Human Techniques" in the Global Technological System: The Theory of Jacques Ellul.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waks, Leonard J.

    The French sociologist Jacques Ellul has had great influence on contemporary thought about the role of science and technology in the emerging global society. His books "The Technological Society" (1954) and "The Technological System" (1980) characterize the new social context as a tightly interlocked global technological system increasingly…

  3. Jacques Maritain's Philosophy of History and Philosophy of Education: A Relationship Secured Through Experience and Reason.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Souza, Mario

    1997-01-01

    Jacques Maritain's philosophy of history and philosophy of education both deal with the singularity of experience and the universality of reason. The philosophy of history is subordinated to moral philosophy; the philosophy of education is subordinated to metaphysics. Although Maritain's philosophies reflect a Christian world view, they can make a…

  4. A Portrait of the Teacher as Friend and Artist: The Example of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2011-01-01

    The following is a reflection on the possibility of teaching by example, and especially as the idea of teaching by example is developed in the work of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. My thesis is that Rousseau created a literary version of himself in his writings as an embodiment of his philosophy, rather in the same way and with the same purpose that…

  5. Jacques Prevert: "Modernism"--Conception and Perception of His Contemporary Society through His Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzash, Michael D.

    Born in 1900, Jacques Prevert was destined to become one of the most popular poets of the twentieth century. After spending his young adulthood with artists linked with the surrealist movement, Prevert became a satirist, social critic, songwriter, writer of children's stories and television programs, and poet. Prevert's interests in the visual…

  6. Reconsidering Emancipatory Education: Staging a Conversation between Paulo Freire and Jacques Ranciere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Sarah Galloway considers emancipation as a purpose for education through examining the theories of Paulo Freire and Jacques Ranciere. Both theorists are concerned with the prospect of distinguishing between education that might socialize people into what is taken to be an inherently oppressive society and education with emancipation…

  7. Women In Space - Following Valentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayler, David; Moule, Ian A.

    Space exploration has developed from early, unmanned space probes through the pioneering years of the "Manned" Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions, to missions that now include women in the crew as a matter of course. Dave Shayler tells the story of the first woman balloonist in 1784 to their breakthrough as astronauts and cosmonauts in a range of professional roles. He coversthe contribution women have made to space exploration and draws on interviews with Shuttle and Mir crew members who were women.

  8. Ensaio de Pedagogia Comparada: Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) X Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) (Essay on Compared Pedagogy: Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) X Immanuel Kant (1724-1804).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontanella, Francisco Cock

    2000-01-01

    Finds that, although the thought of Jean Jacques Rousseau is frequently cited as an influence on Immanuel Kant, this has no basis regarding pedagogical influence. Compares the "Projecto" and "Emilio" of Rousseau with Kant's "Pedagogia." (BT)

  9. [Jean-Jacques Lefrère: A miscarried ambition for blood safety in francophone Africa].

    PubMed

    Tayou Tagny, C; Laperche, S; Murphy, E

    2016-02-01

    The announcement of the death of Professor Jean-Jacques Lefrère caused considerable emotion and surprise within the francophone Africa blood transfusion research network. The group was created in 2007 in Paris. Each member that works within this group wanted to pay their last respects through dedicated publication for a brilliant researcher and writer. The tribute describes the creation of the group, its goals, its operations, its achievements and the prospects of its activities while emphasizing the essential role that Professor Lefrère played within the group. PMID:26762688

  10. Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), and astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), and astronaut Kevin R. Kregel, pilot, perform a successful Inflight Maintenance (IFM) on the Bubble Drop Particle Unit (BDPU). The IFM technique was performed initially on the ground at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by alternate payload specialist Pedro Duque of the European Space Agency (ESA), with the procedure being recorded on video and uplinked to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia to aid in the repair.

  11. Science and the applications of science from Louis Pasteur to Jacques Monod.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Maxime

    2015-06-01

    Jacques Monod's ideas on the applications of science came within the scope of a long tradition at the Institut Pasteur. Louis Pasteur, whose scientific career was characterized by a permanent come and go between science and its applications, long opposed the idea of getting any income from his research, until the financial needs of the Institut Pasteur made him change his mind. As for Jacques Monod, he remained a fervent supporter of basic science during his whole scientific career. However, once he became director of the Institut Pasteur, he realized that the applications of research had to be developed to support the institute from a financial point of view. Thus, he reorganized the valorization of research in the institute, through an incitation of scientists to develop projects with possible applications, and by creating a company, Institut Pasteur Production, for which he had a factory built, and which was in charge of producing and commercializing the vaccines and reagents stemming from the research at the Institut Pasteur. PMID:25857816

  12. Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Adult Education and Revolution. Paradigma of Radical, Pedagogical Thought. 2nd Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dame, Frederick William

    This book explores Jean-Jacques Rousseau's educational philosophy, as expressed in his key works, and applies that philosophy to adult education and revolution. The titles and topics of the book's seven chapters are as follows: (1) "L'Invitation: Raison d'Etre" (prelude, statement, significance, the process, assumptions and limitations); (2) "Le…

  13. Moments with Jacques Rancière: Sketches from a Lived Pedagogical Experiment in an Elementary Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otoide, Lorraine; Alsop, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The work of Jacques Rancière has become rather popular of late, with a series of high-profile advocates. In this article, we reflect on an elementary classroom and an experiment with pedagogy inspired by Rancière's (1991) text, The "Ignorant Schoolmaster." The authors discuss the text, outline a 20-lesson response that emerged from the…

  14. How the Science versus Religion Debate Has Missed the Point of Genesis 1 and 2: Jacques Ellul (1912-1994)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2010-01-01

    From a social and historical perspective, the conflict between science and religion regarding the opening chapters of Genesis in the Jewish and Christian Bibles may have more to do with uncritically reading these texts through our "cultural glasses" than with what these texts actually say. Within the context of his work, Jacques Ellul read these…

  15. Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), prepares a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), prepares a sample for the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) while wearing instruments that measure upper body movement. The Torso Rotation Experiment (TRE) complements other vestibular studies that measure differences in the way human beings react physically to their surroundings in microgravity. This is a typical Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS-1) mission scene, with several experiments being performed. Astronaut Susan J. Helms, payload commander, assists Favier in the AGHF preparations. Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan (bottom right), mission specialist, tests his muscle response with the Handgrip Dynamometer. Astronaut Thomas T. (Tom) Henricks (far background), mission commander, offers assistance.

  16. Jacques-Joseph Ébelmen, the founder of earth system science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Robert A.

    2012-11-01

    The fundamental principles of the factors affecting the global carbon cycle, the global sulfur cycle and the levels of atmospheric CO2 and O2 over long-term (multimillion year) time scales were first elucidated by Jacques-Joseph Ébelmen in 1845. He covered all major processes in such a correct manner that no appreciable changes in them have been elucidated since then. Unfortunately, his ideas were forgotten and were independently deduced by others only 100 to 150 years later. In this article, his reasoning is shown in detail, via a number of original quotations, and the results of a mathematical model by the author for CO2 and O2 over the Phanerozoic Eon (past 542 million years) are presented. In agreement with Ébelmen's predictions, there apparently have been large changes in the levels of atmospheric CO2 and O2 over geologic time.

  17. Consciousness eclipsed: Jacques Loeb, Ivan P. Pavlov, and the rise of reductionistic biology after 1900.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Ralph J; Baars, Bernard J

    2005-03-01

    The life sciences in the 20th century were guided to a large extent by a reductionist program seeking to explain biological phenomena in terms of physics and chemistry. Two scientists who figured prominently in the establishment and dissemination of this program were Jacques Loeb in biology and Ivan P. Pavlov in psychological behaviorism. While neither succeeded in accounting for higher mental functions in physical-chemical terms, both adopted positions that reduced the problem of consciousness to the level of reflexes and associations. The intellectual origins of this view and the impediment to the study of consciousness as an object of inquiry in its own right that it may have imposed on peers, students, and those who followed is explored. PMID:15766898

  18. [Jean-Jacques Rosseau the vitalist. The moralization of medical hygiene between diet and ethical food].

    PubMed

    Menin, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The historiographical prejudice that sees in Jean-Jacques Rousseau an implacable opponent of scientific knowledge has long prevented an objective evaluation of the important influence that medical thought exerted over his philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show not only Rousseau's familiarity with the most important expressions of eighteenth-century medical literature, but also his willingness to incorporate some medical suggestions in his philosophical and literary production. In the first part of this article, I try to show how Rousseau's sensibility theory presupposes precise medical ideals, related to Montpellier School of vitalism. In the second part, I stress how Rousseau's philosophy of alimentation (which has clear anthropological and political implications) can be regarded as a genuine application of an ambition typical of vitalism: to use medical hygiene, also and above all, for moral purpose. PMID:23035396

  19. Jacques Loeb, B. F. Skinner, and the legacy of prediction and control.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, T D

    1995-01-01

    The biologist Jacques Loeb is an important figure in the history of behavior analysis. Between 1890 and 1915, Loeb championed an approach to experimental biology that would later exert substantial influence on the work of B. F. Skinner and behavior analysis. This paper examines some of these sources of influence, with a particular emphasis on Loeb's firm commitment to prediction and control as fundamental goals of an experimental life science, and how these goals were extended and broadened by Skinner. Both Loeb and Skinner adopted a pragmatic approach to science that put practical control of their subject matter above formal theory testing, both based their research programs on analyses of reproducible units involving the intact organism, and both strongly endorsed technological applications of basic laboratory science. For Loeb, but especially for Skinner, control came to mean something more than mere experimental or technological control for its own sake; it became synonomous with scientific understanding. This view follows from (a) the successful working model of science Loeb and Skinner inherited from Ernst Mach, in which science is viewed as human social activity, and effective practical action is taken as the basis of scientific knowledge, and (b) Skinner's analysis of scientific activity, situated in the world of direct experience and related to practices arranged by scientific verbal communities. From this perspective, prediction and control are human acts that arise from and are maintained by social circumstances in which such acts meet with effective consequences. PMID:22478220

  20. Broca and Charcot's research on Jacques Inaudi: the psychological and anthropological study of a mental calculator.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Guida, Alessandro; Levine, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, French scientific institutions became interested in young "mental calculators," arithmetical prodigies able to quickly and accurately perform complex mental calculations. The first scientists to study mental calculators were phrenologists who sought to prove the existence of a calculating organ in the frontal lobe. Paul Broca introduced one such mental calculator, Jacques Inaudi, to the Anthropological Society of Paris in 1880. Broca attributed extraordinary faculty for mental calculation to memory functioning (the psychological hypothesis) rather than physiological difference (the phrenological hypothesis). In 1892, prominent French Academy of Sciences member Jean-Martin Charcot produced a noteworthy study of Inaudi on the organization's behalf. Charcot observed that Inaudi called upon auditory memory rather than visual memory in his mental calculations, unlike most mental calculators who preceded him. Like Broca, Charcot was skeptical of the phrenological hypothesis, though he noted that Inaudi's skull was markedly plagiocephalic. Interestingly, anthropological examination of Inaudi is consistent with the themes of modern cognitive neuroscience. Thus, Charcot seems to have anticipated present research on the localization of mental calculation and memory for numbers. 1. (1)The Academy of Sciences, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV (1638-1715) with the goal of contributing to the advancement and application of the sciences in France, was one of the earliest European scientific institutions. As a prestigious society, it played an active role in defining scientific and technological research policy as well as drafting and publishing official reports. PMID:24697632

  1. Emancipating subjects in science education: taking a lesson from Patti Lather and Jacques Rancière

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzul, Jesse

    2013-03-01

    This paper extends the conversation started by Patti Lather in her forum response to "Neoliberal ideology, global capitalism, and science education: engaging the question of subjectivity", in terms of engaging the thought of Jacques Rancière. Rancière can offer (science) educators a more definitive example of (possible) emancipatory political subjectivities. His notion of radical equality can also aid in developing new pedagogical spaces in science education. This latter point is taken up in the concluding sections of this short essay.

  2. Scientific exchange: Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) and Emil Godlewski (1875-1944) as representatives of a transatlantic developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, Heiner; Müller, Irmgard

    2007-09-01

    The German-American physiologist Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) and the Polish embryologist Emil Godlewski, jr. (1875-1944) contributed many valuable works to the body of developmental biology. Jacques Loeb was world famous at the beginning of the twentieth century for his development and demonstration of artificial parthenogenesis in 1899 and his experiments on regeneration. He served as a role model for the younger Polish experimenter Emil Godlewski, who began his career as a researcher like Loeb at the Zoological Station in Naples. Following Godlewski's first visit to Naples in 1901 a close relationship between the two scientists developed. Until Loeb's death in 1924 the two exchanged ideas via correspondence that was only interrupted during the First World War. The aim of the paper is to examine the transatlantic transfer of knowledge in the field of biological experimentation that was fostered by these two protagonists. Using a modification of Bruno Latour's model of the 'Circulatory System of Science' as a heuristic tool, different mechanisms of scientific exchange are displayed. With the help of Loeb's and Godlewski's correspondence the role of scientific communities, methods, allies, the public and institutions in the process of knowledge transfer are analysed. Preconditions for success and failure in transferring science are examined. PMID:17893068

  3. An Introduction to the Tectonophysics Special Issue "Geodynamics and Environment in East Asia" — Tribute to Jacques Angelier (1947-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siame, Lionel L.; Chang, Chung-Pai

    2012-11-01

    We underline the general research context in the field of Earth Sciences in Taiwan. We briefly present the geodynamical setting of the Taiwan area. We present the contributions included in the Tectonophysics special issue "Geodynamics and Environment in East Asia" — Tribute to Jacques Angelier (1947-2010)"

  4. Volatile Abundances, Spin Temperatures, and Inner-Coma Physics in Comets C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden) and C/2014 E2 (Jacques)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiSanti, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Using NIRSPEC at Keck 2, we propose to measure parent volatiles in Oort cloud comets C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden) and C/2014 E2 (Jacques). We will: 1) determine or stringently constrain absolute abundances of multiple parent volatiles (H2O, CO, H2CO, CH3OH, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, HCN, NH3); 2) Determine or stringently constrain spin temperatures (Tspin) of H2O, H2CO and (in Oukaimeden) CH4; and 3) Use long-slit spectroscopy to measure the spatial variation of gas temperature and column density [molecules/cm2] for water.

  5. Métallurgie fondamentale et métallurgie numérique : l'héritage de Jacques Friedel dans la théorie de la plasticité des métaux et alliages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchet, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Jacques Friedel's contribution to the theory of plasticity is described, as well as the more recent developments it inspired. It involves the microscopic properties of dislocations as well as macroscopic effects. The evolution of fundamental metallurgy toward numerical metallurgy is discussed, and Friedel's point of view on numerical methods is analyzed.

  6. Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) and His Forgotten Contributions to Electrolyte and Acid-Base Physiology in The Organism as a Whole.

    PubMed

    Sgambato, Francesco; Sgambato, Ester; De Santo, Natale Gaspare

    2016-02-01

    Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) was the founder of the Journal of General Physiology which he co-directed in association with W.J.V. Osterhout in the years 1918-1924. Having worked (1889-1891)at the Marine Zoological Station of Naples, newly founded by Anton Dohrn, he was imprinted for life. A strong investigator used to perform the experiments personally. Loeb was engaged lifelong in the explanation of life on physico-chemical basis. He touched various fields (being a creative scientist full of ideas), and centered on the exchanges of electrolytes, acids and bases between the body and sea water in fish. He identified two equations: {[K+]+[Na+]}: {[Ca++]+[Mg++]} (Loebs 1st equation) {[K+]+[Na+]}: {[H+]+[Ca++]+[Mg++]} (Loebs final equation) Even nowadays these equations may have applications in a wide list of electrolyte and acid-base disturbances. Unfortunately his heredity has been dissipated. PMID:26913896

  7. The novel Arrowsmith, Paul de Kruif (1890-1971) and Jacques Loeb (1859-1924): a literary portrait of "medical science".

    PubMed

    Fangerau, H M

    2006-12-01

    Shortly after bacteriologist Paul de Kruif had been dismissed from a research position at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, he started contributing to a novel in collaboration with the future Nobel laureate Sinclair Lewis. The novel, Arrowsmith, would become one of the most famous satires on medicine and science. Using de Kruif's correspondence with his idol Jacques Loeb, this paper describes the many ways in which medical science is depicted in Arrowsmith. This article compares the novel with de Kruif's and Loeb's biographies, and (1) focuses on the struggles of the main character, Martin Arrowsmith, as an allegory of the institutionalisation of medical research in the US, (2) shows that (influenced by de Kruif) Sinclair's purpose is to caricaturise scientific work in modern medical research institutions anywhere and (3) shows that the novel depicts a reductionist philosophy of research that seems to contradict the "messiness" of medical practice. PMID:23673799

  8. A Smorgasbord of Comet Narrowband Photometry: Results from 209P/LINEAR, PanSTARRS (2012 K1), Jacques (2014 E2), and Siding Spring (2013 A1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    We report on narrowband filter observations of four comets obtained or scheduled to be obtained from Lowell Observatory in 2014. Comet 209P/LINEAR is a recently discovered Jupiter-family object -- implying it either has a very small size or has very low activity -- and our measurements reveal the latter option to be the case, with a water production rate near perihelion of only 2.5x1025 molecules/s, the smallest value we've detected. The associated active area is less than 0.01 km2 and, combined with a nucleus size based on radar measurements, the active fraction is only about 0.03%. Similar to several other heavily evolved Jupiter-family comets, LINEAR has a "typical" chemical composition, thus providing further evidence that carbon-chain depletion seen in other comets is not a consequence of evolution. Comet PanSTARRS (2012 K1) was observed four consecutive months prior to its conjunction with the Sun, with a final water production rate at 1.9 AU of 9x1028 molecules/s, along with a relatively low dust-to-gas ratio. Comet Jacques (2014 E2) was observed shortly after discovery in March and again in April, revealing a very low dust-to-gas ratio; further observations are scheduled for late August and September. Finally, while we have no data in-hand, measurements of Comet Siding-Spring (2013 A1) are planned for mid-October, including the nights surrounding its encounter with Mars. A summary of results from these campaigns will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  9. Coma Morphology of Recent Comets: C/ISON (2012 S1), C/Pan-STARRS (2012 K1), C/Jacques (2014 E2), and C/Siding Spring (2013 A1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    We will present preliminary results from recent and upcoming imaging campaigns of four comets using Lowell Observatory’s 4.3-m Discovery Channel Telescope, 42-in Hall Telescope, and/or 31-in telescope: 1. Observations of C/ISON (2012 S1) were carried out from January through November 2013. A small, sunward fan was detected in dust images acquired in March, April, May, and September. Two faint CN features approximately orthogonal to the tail appeared on November 1 and were visible until our final night of data on November 12. This significantly predates their first reported appearance in broadband images on November 14 (Boehnhard et al., CBET 3715; Ye et al., CBET 3718) and suggests that the features were not caused by a catastrophic disruption of the nucleus at that time.2. We observed C/Pan-STARRS (2012 K1) regularly from October 2013 through June 2014 when it entered solar conjunction. Enhanced CN images in May and June 2014 exhibited a side-on pinwheel morphology that varied from night to night; similar morphology was not seen in concurrent dust images. Analysis of the rotation period is underway. 3. C/Jacques (2014 E2) was observed in April, May, and August 2014, and additional observations are scheduled through September 2014. After enhancement of the August images, Jacques exhibited two side-on CN corkscrews roughly orthogonal to the tail. The CN morphology was different from night to night but did not vary noticeably during ~1 hr of observations on a given night. Jacques also exhibited a smaller sunward dust feature in August that did not appear to vary during the observations. We will combine these data with our scheduled observations to investigate periodicity and compare the spatial distribution of multiple gas species. 4. Observations of C/Siding Spring (2013 A1) are scheduled around its close approach to Mars on October 19, 2014. This work is supported by NASA’s Planetary Astronomy Program grants NNX09AB51G and NNX11AD95G.

  10. Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on adult education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, Frederick William

    1996-01-01

    Although Rousseau describes in Émile only his scheme for childhood education, he presents us in this work with some direct statements which can be applied to explain more fully the nature of adult education. The author surveys Rousseau's ideas on the role of the general will in adult educational philosophy, subject matter, methodology and negative education, as well as the relationships between the family, student, teacher, community and the state. He concludes that the modern Rousseau would not limit education to males and would recognize that the four Rousseauian periods of educational development — infancy, childhood, youngster, adolescence — is followed by a fifth: adulthood. Adult education is the logical continuation of the four previous phases. Throughout each phase education must permit intellectual and moral growth and always allow for creativity and diversity. Only then can adults become positive contributors to their society.

  11. Jacques Friedel and the physics of metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villain, Jacques; Lavagna, Mireille; Bruno, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    This is an introduction to the theoretical physics of metals for students and physicists from other specialities. Certain simple consequences of the Fermi statistics in pure metals are first addressed, namely the Peierls distortion, Kohn anomalies and the Labbé-Friedel distortion. Then the physics of dilute alloys is discussed. The analogy with nuclear collisions was a fruitful starting point, which suggested one should analyze the effects of impurities in terms of a scattering problem with the introduction of phase shifts. Starting from these concepts, Friedel derived a theory of the resistivity of alloys, and a celebrated sum rule relating the phase shifts at the Fermi level to the number of electrons in the impurity, which turned out to play a prominent role later in the context of correlated impurities, as for instance in the Kondo effect. Friedel oscillations are also an important result, related to incommensurate magnetic structures. It is shown how they can be derived in various ways: from collision theory, perturbation theory, self-consistent approximations and Green's function methods. While collision theory does not permit to take the crystal structure into account, which is responsible for electronic bands, those effects can be included in other descriptions, using for instance the tight binding approximation. xml:lang="fr"

  12. Alain Badiou, Jacques Lacan and the Ethics of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taubman, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that Badiou's and Lacan's theorizations of ethics offer a way to formulate an ethics of teaching and to explore what such an ethics might look like when teachers encounter events that disrupt their quotidian lives. Relying on the work of Badiou and Lacan, the paper critiques mainstream approaches to the ethics of teaching and…

  13. A New Logic of Emancipation: The Methodology of Jacques Ranciere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesta, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The idea of emancipation plays a central role in modern educational theories and practices. The emancipatory impetus is particularly prominent in critical traditions and approaches where the aim of education is conceived as that of emancipating students from oppressive structures in the name of social justice and human freedom. What is needed to…

  14. Education in the Realm of the Senses: Understanding Paulo Freire's Aesthetic Unconscious through Jacques Ranciere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tyson Edward

    2009-01-01

    In this article I re-examine the role that aesthetics play in Paulo Freire's pedagogy of the oppressed. As opposed to the vast majority of scholarship in this area, I suggest that aesthetics play a more centralised role in pedagogy above and beyond arts-based curricula. To help clarify Freire's position, I will argue that underlying the linguistic…

  15. Paulo Freire's Last Laugh: Rethinking Critical Pedagogy's Funny Bone through Jacques Ranciere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tyson Edward

    2010-01-01

    In several enigmatic passages, Paulo Freire describes the pedagogy of the oppressed as a "pedagogy of laughter". The inclusion of laughter alongside problem-posing dialogue might strike some as ambiguous, considering that the global exploitation of the poor is no laughing matter. And yet, laughter seems to be an important aspect of the pedagogy of…

  16. Jean-Jacques Is Alive and Well: Rousseau and Contemporary Sociobiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the author's personal fascination with and study of Rousseau's life. Discusses Rousseau's many questions that are relevant to evolutionary biology, sociobiology, anthropology, and ethology. Questions concern the nature of human nature, the origin of human society, nurture-nature influences on humans, and the nature of male-female…

  17. The longevity of Jacques Friedel's model of the virtual bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Peter M.; Fert, Albert

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate the continuing pertinence of Friedel's model of the virtual bound state to describe electron scattering in metals. This model has been applied to such disparate studies as the chirality of spin interactions in metals, and the spin Hall effect caused by scattering from impurities with spin-orbit coupling. xml:lang="fr"

  18. Human Unity and the Catholic University: Some Notes from the Philosophy of Jacques Maritain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Souza, Mario O.

    2008-01-01

    While focusing on the nature and mission of Catholic higher education, "Ex Corde Ecclesiae: The Apostolic Constitution on Catholic Universities and The Presence of the Church in the University and University Culture" are also interested in the relationship between the mission of the Catholic university and the nature of the student as a person.…

  19. Jacques Maritain and Some Christian Suggestions for the Education of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Wade A.

    2005-01-01

    "What indeed has Athens to do with Jerusalem? What concord is there between the Academy and the Church?" According to third-century Christian apologist Tertullian, not much. From precisely the opposite perspective, the twentieth-century "secular humanist" John Dewey would have echoed Tertullian, although he was as greatly indebted to Christian…

  20. Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Rancière on art/aesthetics and politics: the origins of disagreement, 1963-1985.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Derek

    2015-12-01

    Rancière published two substantial criticisms of the work of Bourdieu in the early 1980s. It is possible that these were provoked by his sense that he needed to oppose what he considered to be the sociological reduction of aesthetic taste offered by Bourdieu in Distinction (Bourdieu 1986 [1979]) at precisely the moment when he (Rancière) was beginning to articulate his commitment to the potential of aesthetic expression as a mode of political resistance. Except in so far as it draws upon some of the retrospective reflections offered by Rancière in his introductions to the re-issues of his early texts, this paper examines the parallel development of the thinking of the two men up to the mid-1980s--but not beyond. The discussion is situated socio-historically and, by definition, does not seek to offer comparatively any transhistorical assessment of the values of the positions adopted by the two men. I argue that Rancière misrepresented the character of Bourdieu's sociological work by failing to recognize the underlying phenomenological orientation of his thinking. Bourdieu suppressed this orientation in the 1960s but, after the May events of 1968, it enabled him to expose the extent to which the practices of both science and art operate within constructed 'fields' in strategic distinction from popular primary experience. The challenge is to introduce an ongoing dialogue between primary and constructed cultures rather than to suppose that either social science or art possesses intrinsic autonomy. PMID:26455436

  1. Jacques Lacan's theory of the subject as real, symbolic and imaginary: how can Lacanian theory be of help to mental health nursing practice?

    PubMed

    McSherry, A

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an outline of Lacan's theory of the human subject, in particular focusing on Lacan's concepts of the real, symbolic and imaginary registers, and how an understanding of these can inform change and practice in mental health nursing. Mental health nursing is under pressure to define itself as a practice distinct from other professions in the field, and to respond in new ways to promoting mental health to the individual and a wider public. Lacan's theory of the subject is of particular relevance to mental health nurses working with mental distress but has received little attention in mental health nursing literature. Six implications for practice are outlined in terms of: against normalization, the importance of the function of the symptom, what cannot be known, meaning as ever-changing, against empathy and against holistic ideas of the self. PMID:23145967

  2. 78 FR 4365 - Capital, Margin, and Segregation Requirements for Security-Based Swap Dealers and Major Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Friday, February 22, 2013. \\1\\ See Exchange Act Release No. 68071 (Oct. 18, 2012), 77 FR 70213 (Nov. 23...) 551-5545; Valentina M. Deng, Attorney, at (202) 551-5778; or Teen I. Sheng, Attorney, at 202-551-...

  3. 75 FR 6398 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ..., Rhett N. Willis, President/CEO, (Qualifying Individual), Richard E. Carter, Chairman. H T International..., COO, (Qualifying Individual), Jean Jacques Lalou, CEO. Geevee Enterprises Inc. dba Aerosend, 245...

  4. 76 FR 27175 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... HIRSCH COLETTE ROSANNE HO CHAK KIE HOFFMANN HERBERT HOLT MICHAEL LAWRENCE HOLTER KARL GUNNAR HOLTERMANN... PANAGIOTA SOWELL TIMOTHY SPENCER CAITLIN SARAH SPERLING JOERG JACQUES SRINIVASAN VENKATRAMAN...

  5. Moliere: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guicharnaud, Jacques, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Jacques Guicharnaud, Rene Bray, Gustave Lanson, Alfred Simon, Will G. Moore, Ramon Fernandez, Paul Benichou, Lionel Gossman, Andre Villiers, James Doolittle, H. Gaston Hall, Robert J. Nelson, Jacques Copeau, Charles…

  6. Languages in a Globalising World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurais, Jacques, Ed.; Morris, Michael A., Ed.

    This book offers 21 papers in three parts. After (1) "Introduction" (Jacques Maurais and Michael A. Morris), Part 1, "Global Communication Challenges," includes (2) "Towards a New Global Linguistic Order?" (Jacques Maurais); (3) "The Geostrategies of Interlingualism" (Mark Fettes); (4) "Language Policy and Linguistic Theory" (Douglas A Kibbee);…

  7. Literary Theory and the Notion of Difficulty. Report Series 4.7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touponce, William

    The works of French literary theorists Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Roland Barthes reflect a view of the text as the primary object of investigation for any discipline in the human sciences. Each of the three has been involved with pedagogical reforms within French cultural institutions: Derrida with the teaching of philosophy, Lacan with…

  8. 78 FR 24288 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Masterpieces of Modern Mexico: The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of... included in the exhibition ``Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico: The Jacques and...-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri, from on or about June 1, 2013, until on or about August...

  9. A salt bath will keep you going? Euryhalinity tests and genetic structure of caridean shrimps from Iberian rivers.

    PubMed

    González-Ortegón, Enrique; Palero, Ferran; Lejeusne, Christophe; Drake, Pilar; Cuesta, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the role of euryhalinity and life-history traits on the population genetic structure of the four main caridean shrimp species from the Iberian Peninsula (Atyaephyra desmarestii, Dugastella valentina, Palaemon varians and Palaemon zariquieyi) able to complete their life cycle in freshwater/oligohaline habitats. Seawater exposure experiments indicated that A. desmarestii, D. valentina and P. zariquieyi are more sensitive to high salinity waters than P. varians and confirm the relationship between osmolality regulation and spatial distribution of species. The limited or no survival in seawater could explain the restricted distributions observed in D. valentina and P. zariquieyi, whereas the current A. desmarestii distribution could be due to either past river dynamics and/or human-mediated water transfers. Conversely, the high tolerance of P. varians to a large salinity range (euryhalinity) could explain its capacity to colonize geographically distant estuaries. In agreement with osmoregulation results, the phylogeography patterns of the cytochrome oxidase 1 (Cox 1) gene fragment revealed significant genetic differentiation among river systems whatever the species considered. Atyidae species presented higher nucleotide diversity levels than Palaemonidae species, while isolation-by-distance patterns were only found for the latter. Our results have important implications for the management and conservation of freshwater species, since the inter-catchment connectivity may affect the speciation processes. PMID:26118862

  10. Gulf of Alaska, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image shows the Gulf of Alaska and Kodiak Island, the partially snow-covered island in roughly the center of the image. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  11. The Jouissance of English Department Politics: A Tale of Shem and Shaun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Henry R.

    1993-01-01

    Considers the role of the English department malcontent, who constantly seems to spoil any chance of departmental consensus. Discusses the typical life of the English department. Analyzes departmental disputes with the aid of Jacques Lacan's notion of "jouissance." (HB)

  12. Plato's Pharmacy and Derrida's Drugstore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, Chris

    2000-01-01

    In a long essay titled "Plato's Pharmacy, Jacques Derrida attacked Western metaphysics. This article undertakes to defend Western philosophy from Derrida's arguments. It is shown that Derrida's arguments are very unsatisfactory. (Author/VWL)

  13. Deconstruction and Linguistic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleifer, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Challenges a number of concepts in classical continental linguistics. Argues that a direct relationship exists between Jacques Derrida's procedures of deconstruction and the methods of linguistic analysis. Claims that deconstruction is the negation or denial of linguistic neutralization. (JD)

  14. The Mercury 13 and the Selection of Women Astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B.

    2000-12-01

    In the early 1960s a question arose over the role of women in the American space program. Rumors were circulating in the space community that the Soviets were training women cosmonauts and this prompted interest in determining whether women could serve in a similar capacity in the U.S. program. A group of women, later to be called the Mercury 13, passed the initial medical tests for astronaut training, but then their program was suddenly cancelled. The first woman to fly in space would be a Russian, Valentina Tereshkova. In this talk the story of the Mercury 13 will be reviewed and the reasons for their program's termination will be discussed.

  15. Press conference bring excitement of geophysical research to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifert, Harvey

    “A Flare to Remember.” “Starbucks for Starfish.” “Earth's Rotation Slows for El Niño.” What do these catchy headlines have in common? They all resulted from presentations at AGU's Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass. Yes, geophysical science can be big news when presented in a way that is interesting to general audiences.Proof? Well, the “Flare to Remember” headline (in the Dallas Morning News) reported the discovery, via the SOHO spacecraft, that a solar flare had produced, deep inside the Sun, seismic disturbances of a magnitude never experienced on Earth. Researchers Valentina Zharkova of Glasgow University and Alexander Kosovichev of Stanford gave media representatives a preview of their session, supported by visual aids, in the AGU press briefing room.

  16. Alexander Meiklejohn in Search of Freedom and Dignity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tony W.

    1982-01-01

    Assesses the contributions of the philosopher/educator Alexander Meiklejohn. Discusses the influences of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and the U.S. Constitution on Meiklejohn's educational theories, which stressed that human freedom and dignity can be enhanced by rigorous examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the meaning of…

  17. Representational and Territorial Economies in Global Citizenship Education: Welcoming the Other at the Limit of Cosmopolitan Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langmann, Elisabet

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I argue that any success a discourse on cosmopolitan hospitality might have in global citizenship education depends on how it deals with its own limits, and I propose a way of responding to these limits that takes the cosmopolitan commitment to openness to the other seriously. Following Jacques Derrida, my point is that to teach…

  18. Educational Technology: A Presupposition of Equality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlando, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The work of philosopher Jacques Rancière is used conceptually and methodologically to frame an exploration of the driving interests in educational technology policy and the sanctioning of particular discursive constructions of pedagogy that result. In line with Rancière's thinking, the starting point for this analysis is that of…

  19. Freeze, Wait, Reanimate: Cryonic Suspension and Science Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoffstall, Grant

    2010-01-01

    This essay takes as its chief point of departure Jacques Ellul's contention that imaginative treatments of malevolent technology in antitechnological science fiction, by way of inviting rejection, refusal, dismissal, or condemnation, conspire in facilitating human acceptance of and adjustment to technology as it otherwise presently is. The author…

  20. What Kind of Education for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education International, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The report of UNESCO's International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first Century, chaired by Jacques Delors, is outlined and briefly discussed. This paper examines education in the context of lifelong learning, basic and university education, the political imperative, educational finance, and international cooperation. (SM)

  1. Enjoying God's Death: "The Passion of the Christ" and the Practices of an Evangelical Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Publics are not simply a product of common attention to texts, but are also animated by an economy of tropes and affects that relies on processes of metonymic connection, metaphorical condensation, and affective investment. Drawing on Jacques Lacan's theory of enjoyment and his treatments of metaphor and metonymy as rhetorical forms, this essay…

  2. Subjectivity as an Unlimited Semiosis: Lacan and Peirce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordtug, Birgit

    2004-01-01

    The discussion on subjectivity is based on the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan's understanding of subjectivity as constructed in and through language, and the philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce's general ideas of signifying construction as an unlimited sign-exchanging process--the idea of the unlimited semiosis. The article advocates combining…

  3. Thinking about the Nature and Role of Authority in Democratic Education with Rousseau's "Emile"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaud, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Educational authority is an issue in contemporary democracies. Surprisingly, little attention has been given to the problem of authority in Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Emile" and his work has not been addressed in the contemporary debate on the issue of authority in democratic education. Olivier Michaud's goals are, first, to address both of these…

  4. The Ethics of the "Real" In Levinas, Lacan, and Buddhism: Pedagogical Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagodzinski, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Explores the unstated ethics that exist in the silent space between teacher and students, highlighting Emmanuel Levinas, Jacques Lacan, and Buddhism. The paper uses the juxtaposition of west and east to help illuminate ethical pedagogy, and it argues that there is an unknowable dimension which raises the question of ethics in human relations that…

  5. Political and Cultural Nationalism in Education. The Ideas of Rousseau and Herder Concerning National Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Jean Jacques Rousseau in France and Johann Gottfied Herder in Germany both emphasized the role of education in building the nation-state. However, Rousseau focused on shaping the national character through citizenship education and political socialization in public schools, while Herder saw a national identity evolving from a common culture and…

  6. Rousseau's Imaginary Friend: Childhood, Play, and Suspicion of the Imagination in "Emile"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuffelton, Amy B.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Amy Shuffelton considers Jean-Jacques Rousseau's suspicion of imagination, which is, paradoxically, offered in the context of an imaginative construction of a child's upbringing. First, Shuffelton articulates Rousseau's reasons for opposing children's development of imagination and their engagement in the sort of imaginative play…

  7. History and the Curriculum in Rousseau's "Emile."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, David B.

    1982-01-01

    This essay considers Jean Jacques Rousseau's conception of history in "Emile" and its relationship to Rousseau's educational curriculum. History is, for Rousseau, at the heart of the curriculum and is one of the chief instruments for imparting knowledge of the world and encouraging moral behavior. (PP)

  8. Teaching Rousseau: Natural Man and Present Existence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Daryl H.

    1989-01-01

    Offers an interpretation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality" and provides examples of classroom exercises designed to make Rousseau's ideas and writings accessible to undergraduates. Stresses Rousseau's philosophy on natural man, language, ethics, and society. Includes interpretive references to…

  9. D&D of the French High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    BEHAR, Christophe; GUIBERTEAU, Philippe; DUPERRET, Bernard; TAUZIN, Claude

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the D&D program that is being implemented at France's High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which was designed to supply France's Military with Highly Enriched Uranium. This plant was definitively shut down in June 1996, following French President Jacques Chirac's decision to end production of Highly Enriched Uranium and dismantle the corresponding facilities.

  10. Outdoor Education--The Past Is Prologue to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    Although educators and philosophers such as Johann Amos Comenius, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Pestalozzi, and Froebel stressed the study of nature, outdoor education really began with the first teaching-learning act which occurred outdoors. The human being, physiologically and psychologically adapted for outdoor existence, has only been indoors for…

  11. The Question in Educational Leadership: For Whom and for What Are We Responsible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Jacques Derrida wrote about democratic leadership in educational institutions throughout his later work, but in this article the author notes the importance of Derrida's essays published as "Eyes of the University" (2004). Derrida begins by returning to questions raised by Immanuel Kant two centuries earlier with regard to the founding of the…

  12. Affordances of Equality: Rancière, Emerging Media, and the New Amateur

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thumlert, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    This article extends a recent educational engagement with the work of Jacques Rancière by linking his meditations on 19th-century worker emancipation to present cultural contexts and media forms. Taking Nick Prior's (2010) notion of the "new amateur" as point of departure, I argue that new media and attendant production contexts offer an…

  13. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    After a paper by Jacques Chevallier (Histoire des sciences médicales, XLIX, 2015, 179-188), the author presents two unpublished letters from Engène Brieux, a popular write, and amateur of cruises, to Dr. Édouard Toulouse, a famous psychiatrist. PMID:27349129

  14. Art, Politics, and the Pedagogical Relation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the French philosopher Jacques Ranciere has addressed the predicament of artists and curators who, in their eagerness to convey a critical message or engage their viewers in an emancipatory process, end up predetermining the outcomes of the experience, hence blocking its critical or emancipatory potential. In this essay I consider…

  15. Rival Visions: J.J. Rousseau and T.H. Huxley on the Nature (or Nurture) of Inequality and What It Means for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie-Knight, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Thomas Huxley (1852-1895) had different, but substantial, effects on the history of education. Rousseau's educational theories supplied the intellectual foundation for pedagogical progressivism. Huxley's educational writings helped to enlarge the scope of the British curriculum to include such things as…

  16. Problematizing Knowledge-Power Relationships: A Rancièrian Provocation for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper suggests a framework for re-thinking the relationships between power and knowledge in music education. Informed by Jacques Rancière's notion of equality it explores how a dialectic between knowledge/mastery and ignorance/equality effects a rupture in the canonical relationships between knowledge and authority. Further, and based on a…

  17. Quebec's Aboriginal Languages: History, Planning and Development. Multilingual Matters 107.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurais, Jacques, Ed.

    This book provides an overview of the history, present circumstances, and future prospects of the native languages of Quebec: Abenaki, Algonquin, Atikamekw, Cree, Inuktitut, Micmac, Mohawk, Montagnais, and Naskapi. Chapter 1, "The Situation of Aboriginal Languages in the Americas" (Jacques Maurais), discusses the linguistic demography of American…

  18. Whose Place Is This Anyway? Reflecting upon Hospitality and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this essay I propose that using online tools to connect geographically-separated classrooms for real-time collaborative learning experiences may effectively develop intercultural competency in the religious studies classroom. I explore personal examples from several international and inter-institutional collaborations with Jacques Derrida's…

  19. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part I: Business Needs/Educators Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part I of the proceedings includes seven presentations. They are: "International Language Evaluation and Professional Points of View" (M. Jacques Cartier); "Foreign Languages and International Businesses in Colorado: A Report and Assessment" (Alain W. D. Ranwez and Donald Schmidt); "The Use of Foreign Languages in International Banking: A Survey…

  20. L2 Reading Research and Pedagogical Considerations in the Teaching of French and Francophone Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Carole; Taylor, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Little research on improving second language (L2) reading comprehension of French and francophone theater has been conducted. This study provides insight into enhancing L2 comprehension of drama by combining L2 research with examples from L'accent grave by Jacques Prevert, Ton beau capitaine by Simone Schwarz-Bart (1987), Un Touareg s'est marie a…

  1. Don't Fence Me In: The Liberation of Undomesticated Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruitenberg, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    In response to Helmut Heid's critique of domesticated philosophical critique, I focus on the metaphor of domestication, which is central to his article. Drawing on the work of Jacques Derrida, I offer a deconstructive critique of the opposition between domesticated and undomesticated critique, arguing that a clear conceptual demarcation between…

  2. Our Brave New World Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Aldous Huxley is perhaps the only author to have written a work of science fiction and a work of nonfiction to ascertain whether fiction had become reality. Both "Brave New World" and "Brave New World Revisited" are discussed and compared with Jacques Ellul's work on technology.

  3. Creative Class, Dismissed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendrich, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Recently the author has been including in her undergraduate seminars Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Letter to d'Alembert on the Theatre" (1758), the most provocative essay on the arts ever written. It is about the unintended effects of theater--which, for Rousseau, stands in for all of the arts--on an audience. The essay is an impassioned rebuttal to…

  4. "Remediating Childhood Recollection": Facilitating Intermedial Theatre Based on Lived-Experience, Recollection and Remediation of Digital Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jem

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on an intermedial pedagogy informed by Jacques Rancière's "Ignorant Schoolmaster" (1991). Two case studies interrogate the creative application of notions found in intermedial practice, hypersurface and palimpsest, discussing student agency as rigorous, innovative and research-led. The emerging status of pedagogy in…

  5. Derrida, Friendship and Responsible Teaching in Contrast to Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Shilpi

    2013-01-01

    Educational theorists working within the tradition of Jacques Derrida and Emmanuel Levinas's thought, posit teaching to be a site of implied ethics, that is, a realm in which non-violent or less violent relations to the other are possible. Derrida links ethics to the realm of friendship, enabling one to understand teaching as a site of the…

  6. Google™ underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    The first underwater panoramic images were added to Google Maps™, the company announced on 25 September. This first “underwater Street View collection,” launched in partnership with the Caitlin Seaview Survey, provides people with the opportunity to “become the next virtual Jacques Cousteau.” For more information, see: maps.google.com/ocean.

  7. The Autonomy of Technique Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2004-01-01

    Jacques Ellul's claim that technique became an autonomous phenomenon during the middle of the 20th century, and subsequently a system, means that the influence people have on technique is much less decisive than the influence technique has on people. As a sociohistorical description of the relationship between technique and society, it can be…

  8. Reference Two. Does Foucault Kill Derrida in the Game of References? The Example of Master's Dissertations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a selection of ideas and writings by Michael Foucault into competition with those of Jacques Derrida. Consisted of a single game of references for which the references were those cited in a sample of master's theses produced recently at Queen's University. Examined master's dissertations, because these are the usual means by which…

  9. Open File: Education in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, Victor, Ed.; Maclean, Rupert, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This collection of scholarly essays on comparative education is divided into four sections. The first section, Viewpoints/Controversies, contains the essay "Educational Policies and Contents in Developing Countries" (Jacques Hallak). The second section, Open File: Education in Asia, contains the following essays: "Some Current Issues, Concerns and…

  10. In Search of the Modern Hero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugar, Carol E.

    1988-01-01

    Provides profiles of contemporary figures who can serve as appropriate role models (heroes and heroines) for today's young people. Profiled are Desmond Tutu, Neil Armstrong, Mother Teresa, Lech Walesa, Jesse Jackson, Jacques Cousteau, Sharon Christa McAuliffe, and Anatoly Shcharansky. (SKC)

  11. On the Borders: The Arrival of Irregular Immigrants in Malta--Some Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercieca, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns the issue of the continual arrival of irregular immigrants in Malta and the problems that ensue. The view generally held is that we need to respond to the needs of irregular immigrants by providing services. However, with reference to some of Jacques Derrida's ideas, I argue in this paper that the "other"/immigrant is not there…

  12. Who Won the Debate in Women Education? Rousseau or Wollstonecraft?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu-Gyamfi, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum framework in the education of children became debatable during the enlightenment. Jean-Jacque Rousseau's treatise, "Emile," outlined an educational curriculum based on natural rights. Rousseau thought education should be based on espousing and exploring the natural abilities of a person. Therefore, since women have a natural…

  13. "Hospes": The Wabash Center as a Site of Transformative Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Carolyn M.

    2007-01-01

    The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion is a place of hospitality and its staff the epitome of the "good host." This essay explores the meaning of hospitality, including its problematic dimensions, drawing on a number of voices and texts: Jacques Derrida's "Of Hospitality"; Henri M. Nouwen's "Reaching Out: The Three…

  14. Acceptance, Resistance and Educational Transformation: A Taoist Reading of "The First Man"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a Taoist reading of Camus' posthumously published novel, "The first man". With its focus on the early life of the central character, Jacques Cormery, "The first man" is a semi-autobiographical account of learning and transformation, but it is, like so many other stories of its kind, one sustained by…

  15. Papers on Educational Reform, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Open Court Publishing Co., La Salle, IL.

    The following nine papers were presented to the Open Court Editorial Advisory Board Meeting, 1974. In "National Assessment of Educational Progress" J. Stanley Ahmann provides an overview of assessment aims, construction, and results. Jacques Barzun discusses the history of educational theory in "The Use of Tradition in Educational Disputes". In…

  16. Two Cultures, Two Dialogists and Two Intersecting Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravenscroft, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some possibilities for applying the linguistic and psychological theories of two dialogists, Mikhail Bakhtin and Jacques Lacan, to the classroom. There is a short summary of how the two theories may interact with each other and then a discussion of their two opposing views of identity formation. Bakhtin was a Russian, coming…

  17. Critical Thinking and the Question of Critique: Some Lessons from Deconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesta, Gert J. J.; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Provides some philosophical groundwork for contemporary debates about the idea of critical thinking. Discusses three styles of critique: critical dogmatism, transcendental critique (Karl-Otto Apel), and deconstruction (Jacques Derrida). Argues that while transcendental critique is able to solve some of the problems of the dogmatic approach to…

  18. Lacan, Subjectivity and the Task of Mathematics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tony

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of subjectivity in the context of mathematics education research. It introduces the psychoanalyst and theorist Jacques Lacan whose work on subjectivity combined Freud's psychoanalytic theory with processes of signification as developed in the work of de Saussure and Peirce. The paper positions Lacan's subjectivity…

  19. Thanatos and Civilization: Lacan, Marcuse, and the Death Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s two thinkers, Herbert Marcuse and Jacques Lacan, were conducting a "return to Freud" for very similar reasons. If the differences between them are often advertised, their affinities are less so. In this article, I examine how their "return to Freud" and fidelity to psychoanalysis serves as a common ground to read each in…

  20. Best Practices in Marine and Coastal Science Education: Lessons Learned from a National Estuarine Research Reserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Janice D.

    The Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JC NERR) program has successfully capitalized on human fascination with the ocean by using the marine environment to develop interest and capability in science. The Institute of Marine & Coastal Sciences, as the managing agency of the JC NERR, makes its faculty, staff resources, and…

  1. Deconstruction Literary Theory and a Creative Reading of "The Great Gatsby."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Deborah; Trotman, Charlene C.

    Through the mid-1980s, resistance to contemporary literary theory (especially Jacques Derrida's philosophy of deconstruction) took the form of a bitter debate that enlivened literary journals and Modern Language Association meetings. The debate continues even today, with traditional literary critics rejecting deconstruction as nihilistic and…

  2. Education as Seance: Specters, Spirits, and the Expansion of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruitenberg, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    In this essay I propose that education be conceived as seance: a place where ghosts are summoned in order that we may come to (speaking) terms with them. Against the backdrop of my own summoning of the ghosts haunting my childhood visits to a nearby castle, I draw on the work of Jacques Derrida to provide a theoretical rationale for the importance…

  3. Pedagogies of Hauntology in History Education: Learning to Live with the Ghosts of Disappeared Victims of War and Dictatorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2013-01-01

    Michalinos Zembylas examines how history education can be reconceived in terms of Jacques Derrida's notion of "hauntology," that is, as an ongoing conversation with the "ghost"--in the case of this essay, the ghosts of disappeared victims of war and dictatorship. Here, Zembylas uses hauntology as both metaphor and pedagogical methodology for…

  4. Commodification of Ghana's Volta River: An Example of Ellul's Autonomy of Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbemabiese, Lawrence; Byrne, John

    2005-01-01

    Jacques Ellul argued that modernity's nearly exclusive reliance on science and technology to design society would threaten human freedom. Of particular concern for Ellul was the prospect of the technical milieu overwhelming culture. The commodification of the Volta River in order to modernize Ghana illustrates the Ellulian dilemma of the autonomy…

  5. Burke, Nietzsche, Lacan: Three Perspectives on the Rhetoric of Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Examines the complex relationship between rhetoric and order in the works of Kenneth Burke, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Jacques Lacan. Argues for three differing, yet complementary, views of rhetoric and order, each having a corresponding epistemology and axiology. Concludes with an analysis of the construction of order in Thomas Hobbe's "Leviathan."…

  6. Knowledge and the Curriculum: Derrida, Deconstruction and "Sustainable Development"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Christine

    2007-01-01

    This paper enquires into curriculum knowledge about sustainable development at advanced level in geography in English schools through a critical look at two concepts. The deconstructive perspective used is drawn from Jacques Derrida. The focus is on school knowledge and responsibility to other ways of knowing that may be neglected within…

  7. An Examination of Prepropaganda and Political Change in Afghanistan during a National Crisis--September, 1979-January, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Robert; Hayes, James

    Jacques Ellul defined "prepropaganda" as the subtle and sophisticated use of news services to improve an authoritarian government's public image. Because its value is directly related to its being used sparingly, he predicted that prepropaganda would increase when an authoritarian government felt threatened and decrease when it once more felt…

  8. "Listen Then, Or, Rather, Answer": Contemporary Challenges to Socratic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullam, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of Jacques Rancière in recent work in educational philosophy has rejuvenated discussion of the merits and weaknesses of Socratic education, both in Plato's dialogues and in invocations of Socrates in contemporary educational practice. In this essay Jordan Fullam explores the implications of this trend through comparing…

  9. Exploring Fear: Rousseau, Dewey, and Freire on Fear and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea; Stengel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Fear is not the first feature of educational experience associated with the best-known progressive educational theorists--Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Paolo Freire. But each of these important thinkers did, in fact, have something substantive to say about how fear functions in the processes of learning and growth. Andrea English and…

  10. "The Treasure Within: Learning to Know, Learning to Do, Learning to Live Together and Learning to Be." What Is the Value of that Treasure 15 Years after Its Publication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delors, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This is an English translation of a speech held by French economist and politician Jacques Delors, former President of the European Commission, on 7 November 2011 at the opening of the International Congress on Lifelong Learning in Donostia/San Sebastián, Spain. Fifteen years after the International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first…

  11. Educational Neocolonialism and the World Bank: A Rancièrean Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I employ Jacques Rancière's conception of an explicative order to explore how the World Bank contributes to the global project of educational neocolonialism. I argue that the Bank operates as a Master Explicator who taps into students' "inability" to learn by themselves. It explicates concepts such as…

  12. A Contrast in Schooling: The Natural Education of Emile vs. Giroux's Radical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's classic work "Emile" of 1762 is contrasted with Henry G. Giroux's 1981 book "Ideology Culture and the Process of Schooling." Although both Giroux and Rousseau are social critics, their notions about education and its outcome are contrary and not due to historical time alone. This comparative analysis characterizes…

  13. The Challenges Our Contemporary World Presents to Christian Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttloffel, Merylann J.

    2005-01-01

    This article explores Jacques Ellul's challenges to Christian educators in a society permeated with technique or technological thinking. Responses to the three challenges Ellul puts forth to believing Christians, and, specifically, to Catholic Christian school educators, integrate a process of contemplative practice. This process integrates…

  14. Uncommon Grounds: Preparing Students in Higher Music Education for the Unpredictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapidaki, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the contribution that Jacques Derrida's work "Of Hospitality" might make to higher music education as it unsettles the usual ascription of normative value to learning and teaching music at the university. Along these lines, what is most at issue in the encounter with Derrida's thinking is the concomitant notion of…

  15. Dissenting with Queer Theory: Reading Rancière Queerly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greteman, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author looks to the work of Jacques Rancière to engage the possibilities in dissensus in queer theory in education. Fatigued of Foucault, bored with Butler, disdainful of Derrida and dumbfounded by Deleuze and Guattari, and just generally tired of feeling bullied into citing particular people and not others, the author…

  16. International Reports on Literacy Research: France, United Kingdom, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botza, Stergios, Comp.

    2005-01-01

    This is a compilation of reports on international literacy research. The report includes 3 separate reports on France, United Kingdom and Brazil. In the first report, research correspondent Jacques Fijalkow presents research into variations of reading motivation related to students' socioeconomic status (SES), age, and gender. Three of these…

  17. Eyeless in America, the Sequel: Hollywood and Indiewood's Iraq War on Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This article builds on conclusions drawn in the article "Eyeless in America," by the same author and considers how 50 American films about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan intended to function as what Jacques Ellul called "integration propaganda" fared. This article considers and rejects a number of theories about why most feature war films failed…

  18. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domains

    Nathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*
    1Unit of Developme...

  19. An Act of Methodology: A Document in Madness--Writing Ophelia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinnes, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to stage some questions concerning methodology and education, inspired by Ophelia in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" and by Jacques Derrida's poetic philosophical oeuvres. What are at stake are the long traditions of preferences of sanity over madness, friend over enemy, male over female and of clean, unambiguous univocal language…

  20. Realizing the Natural Self: Rousseau and the Current System of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peckover, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau believed that Nature is master. Children acknowledge this truth perhaps better than most adults. Nature gives life to humanity and provides humans with the tools necessary to survive. Even as an infant, Nature urges the child to scream for nourishment. As children, humans trust their master. The idea of resisting their human…

  1. Plato, Derrida, and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Jasper

    This book discusses and evaluates the implications of the theory of deconstruction for composition and pedagogy. The book analyzes the emerging field of composition studies within the epistemological and ontological debate over writing precipitated by Plato (who would abandon writing entirely) and continued by Jacques Derrida, who argues that all…

  2. Scenes of Aesthetic Education: Ranciere, Oedipus, and "Notre Musique"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Boever, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In an interview titled "The Janus-Face of Politicized Art," Jacques Ranciere describes his methodology as follows: "I always try to think in terms of horizontal distributions, combinations between systems of possibilities, not in terms of surface and substratum. Where one searches for the hidden beneath the apparent, a position of mastery is…

  3. Choreographing Theory: An Analysis of Edouard Lock's "Amelia" (2002) Questioning the Limits of Feminist and Poststructuralist Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Ruby

    2009-01-01

    Edouard Lock's dance film "Amelia" (2002) is the focus of this essay. Second-wave feminist and poststructuralist perspectives inform the analysis of this piece of contemporary dance. Laura Mulvey's male gaze theory and Julia Kristeva's theory of the semiotic and symbolic realms of representation are explored and critiqued, whilst Jacques Derrida's…

  4. The Happy and Suffering Student? Rousseau's "Emile" and the Path Not Taken in Progressive Educational Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Avi I.

    2012-01-01

    One of the mantras of progressive education is that genuine learning ought to be exciting and pleasurable, rather than joyless and painful. To a significant extent, Jean-Jacques Rousseau is associated with this mantra. In a theme of "Emile" that is often neglected in the educational literature, however, Rousseau stated that "to suffer is the first…

  5. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Original Water Color in Wells ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Original Water Color in Wells Fargo Bank Historical Museum Capt. Jean Jacques Vioget, Artist Spring of 1837 FIRST WATER COLOR OF SAN FRANCISCO (JACOB LEESE HOUSE IN CENTER) - San Francisco, Historic View, 1837, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. Language and Being Human in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Laan, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay considers the analysis Jacques Ellul carried out about the devaluation of language. This investigation also explores the consequences of that devaluation (or humiliation as Ellul called it) wrought by our orientation to technology. Our existence in technology transforms language and our use of it, shifting emphasis as well to the visual…

  7. The Flemish Bastard and the Former Indians: Metis and Identity in Seventeenth-Century New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midtrod, Tom Arne

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the lives of three children of Dutch men and Mohawk women: the Mohawk leader Smits Jan and the siblings Jacques van Slyck and Hilletie van Olinda of the Dutch village of Schenectady. In recent years several historians have examined how cross-cultural settings enabled people to reshape their identities. William Hart sees the…

  8. SuperFreq: Numerical determination of fundamental frequencies of an orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.

    2015-11-01

    SuperFreq numerically estimates the fundamental frequencies and orbital actions of pre-computed orbital time series. It is an implementation of a version of the Numerical Analysis of Fundamental Frequencies close to that by Monica Valluri in NAFF, which itself is an implementation of an algorithm first used by Jacques Laskar.

  9. Psychologizing and the Anti-Psychologist: Dewey, Lacan, and Contemporary Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Art education throughout the 20th and into the 21st century has drawn on both psychology and psychoanalysis to support approaches to teaching and learning in the arts. This article examines the concept of "psychologizing" as it appears in the writing of psychologist/philosopher John Dewey (1859-1952) and psychiatrist/psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan…

  10. At the Intersection between the Subject and the Political: A Contribution to an Ongoing Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pais, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The issue of subjectivity has recently occasioned a lively discussion in this journal opposing socioculturalism and Lacanian psychoanalysis. By confronting Luis Radford's cultural theory with Jacques Lacan's psychoanalysis, Tony Brown sought to show the limitations of socioculturalism. This article takes advantage of that discussion to develop a…

  11. The History of the Present: Towards a Contemporary Phenomenology of the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peim, Nick

    2001-01-01

    Discusses phenomenology as it relates to the theory that radical distinction cannot be sustained for subject and object, based on our perceptions of the factors involved. Focuses on Michel Foucault's philosophy and Jacques Derrida's anti-essentialist phenomenology. States that potential exists for rethinking the politics of theory in education.…

  12. 'Administering the Medicine': Progressive Education, Colonialism, and the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Joost

    2001-01-01

    Draws comparisons between the Australian education directors, Frank Tate and Jacques Henry Abendanon. Discusses educational reform issues based on racial contexts and social, political, and cultural aspects in the British colony of Victoria and the Dutch colony of Java. Concludes that, though their politcal contexts are different, their views are…

  13. Eyeless in America: Hollywood and Indiewood's Iraq War on Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This article examines 50 films produced and released between the years 2001 and 2012 that are concerned with the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Using Jacques Ellul's theories set out in his book "Propaganda," the article argues that while the films have failed at the box office, they were intended to function as integration propaganda. The…

  14. Temptation and Seduction in the Technological Milieu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Laan, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Jacques Ellul's work on propaganda provides the basis for this analysis of life in technology. Advertising and the mass media rely on temptation and seduction and create a constant flow of propaganda, all of which serve the technological system. Propaganda aims to condition and regulate us so that we participate in and adapt ourselves to a desired…

  15. Why Man Explores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena.

    This document presents a transcript of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration panel discussion held on July 2, 1976, in conjunction with the Viking Mission to Mars. The panel consisted of Norman Cousins, Ray Bradbury, Jacques Cousteau, James Michener, and Philip Morrison, and the principal topic was a philosophical discussion of the…

  16. East Siberia and Bering Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On June 5, 2001 MODIS captured this true-color image of Eastern Siberia and the Bering Strait. To the right of the image is the western tip of Alaska's St. Lawrence Island. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  17. Aporias, Responsibility, and the Im/possibility of Teaching Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Drawing upon Jacques Derrida's notions of aporia and responsibility, this essay discusses the dilemmas of multicultural education and the pedagogical responsibility of multicultural educators. Derrida emphasizes that there is no responsibility without experiencing aporia as the possibility of the impossible. To promote personal transformation and…

  18. Rousseau, Happiness, and the Economic Approach to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilead, Tal

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the influence of economic thought on education has been steadily increasing. Taking Jean-Jacques Rousseau's educational thought as a point of departure, Tal Gilead critically inquires into the philosophical foundations of what can be termed the economic approach to education. Gilead's focus in this essay is on happiness and the…

  19. [The union of three families of apothecaries in Paris in the 17th and 18th centuries--The apothecaries François Pihoué, François Regnault, Henry Charas and Marie Fourneau].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The family network started with Marie Fourneau, daughter of the apothecary Jacques Fourneau, married successively two apothecaries first François Pihoué and then François Regnault and whose only daughter Marie Anne married the apothecary Henry Charas grandson of the famous apothecary Moyse Charas. PMID:26189312

  20. Les observateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsard, P.

    2014-09-01

    Nore observatoire de Nandrin vous attend - Comète Jacques (C/2014 E2) - Nuages noctulescents - L’observatoire de Cointe vu du monument interalliés - Orage sur la province de Liège - La police de Liège à l’heure des rendez-vous célestes

  1. Rousseau's "Emile" and its Contribution to the Development of Educational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, R. Graham

    1982-01-01

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's educational and political thought is compared to that of John Locke. Rousseau's theories, as expressed in "Emile," are placed in the context of some of that author's other works to show how his educational theories can seem practical in terms of his views on social and political inequality. (PP)

  2. In the Shadow of "Emile": Pedagogues, Pediatricians, Physical Education, 1686-1762

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosato-Rigo, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    This article takes as its starting point the commonplace that Rousseau's "Emile" enabled his contemporaries to discover not only childhood but physical education. Focused on what the pedestal erected for Jean-Jacques somewhat overshadows, a brief historiographic overview and a survey of some major writings on education before Rousseau (by the…

  3. The Growth of Democratic Tradition: The Age of Enlightenment. Tenth Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa, Marie A.

    This lesson plan begins with an overview of the age of enlightenment and those ideas that influenced the founders of the United States. The lesson plan provides information sheets about five enlightenment thinkers: John Locke (1632-1704), Mary Wolstonecraft (1759-1898), Baron de Montesquieu (1689-1755), Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1788), and John…

  4. The Writing Cure: Psychoanalysis, Composition, and the Aims of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracher, Mark

    Asserting that psychoanalysis and writing instruction have much to offer each other, this book examines the intersection between these two fields and proposes pedagogical uses of psychoanalytic technique for writing instruction. Articulating an approach based on the work of Jacques Lacan, the book shows how a psychoanalytic perspective can offer…

  5. [The sense of the senseless, psychoanalytic aspects of delusion in psychosis].

    PubMed

    Chaperot, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The psychoanalytic approach to delusion in psychosis leads us to examine the function of a "furrow". It is necessary to remain in the furrow in order not to become delusional. References to Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Mélanie Klein and Jean-Claude Maleval enlighten us as to the origin and the function of delusion as an attempt to give meaning. PMID:21416882

  6. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  7. Proust: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Rene, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Rene Girard, Robert Vigneron, Henri Peyre, Jacques Riviere, Albert Thibaudet, Walter A. Strauss, Germaine Bree, Georges Cattaui, Elliott Coleman, Leo Spitzer, Richard Macksey, Robert Champigny, Charles Du Bos, Ramon…

  8. Master Teachers at the Carnegie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Bay Hallowell

    1989-01-01

    Describes children's art education at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Museum of Art from 1928-1975. Discusses how the educational philosophy was influenced by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Franz Cizek, stating that the goal of art education was to build character, transmit culture, promote healthy competition, and develop moral values and…

  9. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  10. The Promise of Politics and Pedagogy in Derrida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author profiles Jacques Derrida, whose teaching activity made an invaluable and indelible contribution to the intellectual life of the University of California, Irvine (UCI). The question of pedagogy is central for Derrida, not only in terms of teaching people to read and write differently, but as a means for appreciating the…

  11. Music Education in the Sign of Deconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyndahl, Petter

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the aim is to address different forms of relationship between deconstruction, as coined by Jacques Derrida, and research perspectives on music education. Deconstruction represents a radical departure from Western ontology from Plato onward and its essentialistic notions of the metaphysics of presence. Instead, Derrida claims that…

  12. Out of the Ordinary: Incorporating Limits with Austin and Derrida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to open up a re-examination of the relationship between thought and language by reference to two philosophers: John Austin and Jacques Derrida. While in traditional philosophical terms these thinkers stand far apart, recent work in the philosophy of education has highlighted the importance of Austin's work in a way that has…

  13. "Technique" and Artistic Imitation and Invention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younes, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the general belief that modernist art and architecture reflect the technological society, Jacques Ellul maintains in his "L'empire du non-sens" that they are justifications for the integration of humankind into what he called the technicist complex. Modernism in art and architecture meant that every product must be qualified by a…

  14. The Public Library, Democracy and Rancière's Poetics of Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huzar, Timothy Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper applies the thought of Jacques Rancière to the concept of democracy as it is traditionally understood in library studies literature. Methods: The paper reviews a cross-section of instances of the link between democracy and the public library in library studies literature. It offers a close textual analysis of Michael…

  15. Technological Nihilism vs. Natural Law: Science, Morality, and the Law Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Peter Augustine

    2005-01-01

    The conflict between the followers of Jacques Maritain and the followers of John Dewey seems to amount to this: each group accuses the other of promoting education for tyranny. Pragmatism, for the Deweyans, frees human beings from the idea of a fixed human nature to pursue freely their ever-evolving ideas of happiness or fulfillment. According to…

  16. Aborigines of the Imaginary: Applying Lacan to Aboriginal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies the work of Jacques Lacan, a French psychoanalyst, to decipher the desire of the teacher in Aboriginal education. It argues that the images of Aboriginal people represented in Australian classrooms are effects of the teacher's Imaginary, the Imaginary being one of the three psychoanalytic domains theorised by Lacan over a period…

  17. Postmodern Philosophical Critique and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Higher Education. Critical Studies in Education and Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourad, Roger P., Jr.

    This book explores postmodern critique in scholarly inquiry in the context of the philosophies of Jean-Francois Lyotard, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Richard Rorty, and Calvin Schrag. Claiming that the overall course of inquiry is characterized by basic theoretical deficiencies, postmodern critique suggests a rethinking of the nature and aims…

  18. Sartre: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Edith, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Edith Kern, Claude-Edmonde Magny, Henri Peyre, Kenneth Douglas, Edmund Wilson, Theophil Spoerri, Jacques Guicharnaud, Eric Bentley, Robert Champigny, Oreste F. Pucciani, Frederic Jameson, Rene Girard, Guido…

  19. A history of research on yeasts 3: Emil Fischer, Eduard Buchner and their contemporaries, 1880-1900.

    PubMed

    Barnett, J A; Lichtenthaler, F W

    2001-03-15

    Through the discovery of Buchner, Biology was relieved of another fragment of mysticism. The splitting up of sugar into CO2 and alcohol is no more the effect of a "vital principle" than the splitting up of cane sugar by invertase. (Jacques Loeb 1906 [138] p.22.) PMID:11223946

  20. What I Talk about When I Talk about Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safstrom, Carl Anders

    2011-01-01

    In this text I discuss two events in which I learned something important about life and about education in order to formulate in a precise manner two propositions for my pedagogical creed. In focus for both are the interrelatedness of theory and life. The stories are told through the lenses of Emmanuel Levinas's and Jacques Ranciere's thinking,…

  1. Rousseau and the Fable: Rethinking the Fabulous Nature of Educational Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tyson E.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Tyson Lewis reevaluates Jean-Jacques Rousseau's assessment of the pedagogical value of fables in Emile's education using Giorgio Agamben's theory of poetic production and Thomas Keenan's theory of the inherent ambiguity of the fable. From this perspective, the "unreadable" nature of the fable that Rousseau exposed is not simply the…

  2. The Humanities without Condition: Derrida and the Singular "Oeuvre"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attridge, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In an important lecture on the function of the Humanities, "The University without Condition", Jacques Derrida asks what it means to "profess" the truth and advocates a commitment to the "oeuvre"--the work that constitutes an event rather than just a contribution to knowledge. I examine a few phrases from the lecture,…

  3. Lifelong Learning in the European Union: Whither the Lisbon Strategy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Hywel Ceri

    2005-01-01

    This article traces the Lisbon strategy back to the White Paper issued by President Jacques Delors in 1993 on "Growth, Competitiveness, and Jobs" as the launching point for the structural reform agenda needed to turn around the massive unemployment crisis and proposing a combination of policies for the structural reform of the labour market and…

  4. Towards a Politicized Notion of Citizenship for Science Education: Engaging the Social through Dissensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzul, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    This theoretical article draws from the political thought of Jacques Rancière to trouble some taken-for-granted conceptions of citizenship education. Rancière's notion of politics and dissensus (as opposed to consensus) can lay the groundwork for a version of citizenship that challenges what is deemed sensible, visible, who is counted in…

  5. International Reports on Literacy Research: France and Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This is a compilation of two separate reports on international literacy research from France and Argentina. In the reports from France, research correspondent Jacques Fijalkow detailed three research projects that included the following: (1) A description of adult literacy skills; (2) An investigation of how study-abroad students were integrated…

  6. Art, Society and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    In considering the relation of art with society the author comments on the ideas of the American philosopher, John Dewey, the art historian, Lord Kenneth Clark, a popular humanistic educator, Clifton Fadiman, and a major cultural critic, Jacques Barzun. (Author/RK)

  7. Metaphor and Metonymy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigg, Russell

    1994-01-01

    Describes in some detail the structure of metaphor and metonymy, reviewing three main structures of metaphor--supposition, extension, and apposition--and proposing a comprehensive definition of metaphor taking all three structures into account. Draws on Roman Jakobson when explaining Jacques Lacan's claim that condensation is metaphor and…

  8. "Committed": Feminist Spectatorship and the Logic of the Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Ruth D.

    1993-01-01

    Explains the concepts of spectator positioning, supplement (as defined by Jacques Derrida), and plenitude in relation to the study of woman's films, in general, and the film "Committed" (1984), in particular. Considers how the film's indirect mode of public address disturbs conventional gender alignments and the distinction between audience…

  9. Ambitions and Responsibilities: A Textual Analysis of the Norwegian National Curriculum Regulations for Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Heggen, Kristin; Engebretsen, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Society assigns professional educational programs the responsibility to aid students in learning and dedicate expert knowledge to furthering the well-being of citizens. This demand calls for addressing the how educational policies prioritize learning professionals' responsibility. Inspired by the theory of Jacques Derrida, we deconstruct the…

  10. "The Ignorant Schoolmaster": Jacotot/Rancière on Equality, Emancipation and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Rahul; Narayanan, Varadarajan

    2014-01-01

    Jacques Rancière (born 1940), much like his contemporary Michel Foucault, has an academic oeuvre that defies neat classification within established disciplinary boundaries. This is due to the cross-disciplinary nature of his work, with a strong orientation towards history and philosophy. Although he trained as a philosopher (studying with Louis…

  11. Education as Humanism of the Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarc, Aparna Mishra

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores how educators might intervene in canonized texts of the human subject on which a particular and exclusive kind of humanism rests. In imagining possible interventions educators might make, I turn to and trace Jacques Derrida's on-going deconstruction of the philosophical texts of subjectivity. In his body of work, Derrida…

  12. Behind the School Walls: The School Community in French and English Boarding Schools for Girls, 1810-1867

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bellaigue, Christina

    2004-01-01

    This article develops a comparative analysis of lay boarding schools for girls in France and England in the first part of the nineteenth century, demonstrating that the character of school life in the two countries differed markedly. Contemporary observers such as Matthew Arnold, Henry Montucci and Jacques Demogeot visited boys' schools on either…

  13. Opening Philosophy to the World: Derrida and Education in Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burik, Steven

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Steven Burik discusses Jacques Derrida's position with regard to the place of education in philosophy within the university system, and then relates these thoughts to comparative philosophy. Philosophers find themselves constantly having to defend philosophy and the importance of teaching philosophy against pressure from the powers…

  14. Derrida's Right to Philosophy, Then and Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willinsky, John

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, a tribute to Jacques Derrida's educational efforts at expanding access to current work in philosophy, John Willinsky examines his efforts as both a public right and an element of academic freedom that bear on the open access movement today. Willinsky covers Derrida's extension and outreach work with the Groupe de Recherches pour…

  15. Inventing the Educational Subject in the "Information Age"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bojesen, Emile

    2016-01-01

    This paper asks the question of how we can situate the educational subject in what Luciano Floridi has defined as an "informational ontology" (Floridi in "The philosophy of information." Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2011a). It will suggest that Jacques Derrida and Bernard Stiegler offer paths toward rethinking the…

  16. Citizen Hersant: The Rise to Power of a Contemporary French Press Lord.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliams, Alvi

    When the centrist government of Prime Minister Jacques Chirac chose 69-year-old Robert Hersant to buy the newspaper "France-Soir" (famous for its ties to the resistance to the Nazis) in 1976, journalists at many newspapers on the left fought the political move by reminding both the public and the government of Hersant's collaboration during the…

  17. Toward the sociopolitical in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Sara; Bazzul, Jesse

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we explore how Jacques Rancière's (The ignorant schoolmaster: five lessons in intellectual emancipation. Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1991) notions of radical equality and dissensus reveal horizons for activism and sociopolitical engagement in science education theory, research, and practice. Drawing on Rochelle Gutiérrez' (J Res Math Educ 44(1):37-68, 2013a. doi: 10.5951/jresematheduc.44.1.0037; J Urban Math Educ 6(2):7-19, b) "sociopolitical turn" for mathematics education, we identify how the field of science education can/is turning from more traditional notions of equity, achievement and access toward issues of systemic oppression, identity and power. Building on the conversation initiated by Lorraine Otoide who draws from French philosopher Jacques Rancière to experiment with a pedagogy of radical equality, we posit that a sociopolitical turn in science education is not only imminent, but necessary to meet twenty-first century crises.

  18. Ellen Weaver, Biologist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Ellen Weaver, an associate professor of biology from California State University is shown developing instrumentation to be used in satellites for ocean monitoring. In the early 1970s, NASA researchers and ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau formed a team to study productivity of the sea. The team devised a sensor system to monitor ocean temperatures and chlorophyll levels by aircraft. This sensor was used in the satellite communication and weather equipment provided by NASA to assist in the accuracy of satellite observation.

  19. Give chance a chance.

    PubMed

    Nachury, Maxence V

    2011-11-01

    How did I get to become a cell biologist? Or, more generally, why do things happen the way they do? The answer provided by the philosopher Democritus and later adopted by Jacques Monod is "everything existing in the universe is the fruit of chance and necessity." While I read Monod's book Chance and Necessity as an undergraduate student, little did I appreciate the accuracy of this citation and how much of my scientific trajectory would be guided by chance. PMID:22039061

  20. Remnants of Tropical Storm Allison over Southeast United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On June 13, 2001 MODIS acquired this true-color image of Tropical Storm Allison over the Southeastern United States. Also pictured are a few wildfires burning in the stat of Florida. MODIS has thermal detectors uniquely designed to detect fires as hot as 500K without saturating, and it is being used by land managers throughout the U.S. to monitor and manage wildfires. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  1. Bering Strait, Alaska, United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Summer run off from the Yukon River, the source of which is hidden by clouds on image right, is filling the Norton Sound (image center) with brownish sediment. The Bering Sea (image left) appears to be supporting a large phytoplankton population, as blue-green swirls are evident from north to south in this true-color MODIS image of Alaska. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  2. Terrorism--A (Self) Love Story: Redirecting the Significance Quest Can End Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruglanski, Arie W.; Belanger, Jocelyn J.; Gelfand, Michele; Gunaratna, Rohan; Hettiarachchi, Malkanthi; Reinares, Fernando; Orehek, Edward; Sasota, Jo; Sharvit, Keren

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's concepts of self-love ("amour propre") and love of self ("amour de soi meme") are applied to the psychology of terrorism. Self-love is concern with one's image in the eyes of respected others, members of one's group. It denotes one's feeling of personal significance, the sense that…

  3. Jacobus Sylvius (1478-1555): physician, teacher, and anatomist.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Linganna, Sanjay; Loukas, Marios

    2007-11-01

    Jacques Dubois (1478-1555), better known by his Latin cognomen Jacobus Sylvius was one of the great anatomists and teachers of the Renaissance period. His legacy today, however, is marred by his feud with pupil Andreas Vesalius. The story of Sylvius's life provides the modern clinical anatomist with valuable lessons regarding the nature of orthodoxy, conflict, and the evolving nature of "truth." PMID:17948293

  4. Erratum

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective By Robert W. Johnston, Marie-José Alvarez-Pasquin, Marc Bijl, Elisabetta Franco, Jacques Gaillat, João G. Clara, Marc Labetoulle, Jean-Pierre Michel, Luigi Naldi, Luis S. Sanmarti and Thomas Weinke. Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines 2015, Vol. 3(4) 109–120. PMID:27551430

  5. Classical music and the teeth.

    PubMed

    Eramo, Stefano; Di Biase, Mary Jo; De Carolis, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Teeth and their pathologies are frequent themes in classical music. The teeth have inspired popular songwriters such as Thomas Crecquillon, Carl Loewe, Amilcare Ponchielli & Christian Sinding; as well as composers whose works are still played all over the world, such as Robert Schumann and Jacques Offenbach. This paper examines several selections in which the inspiring theme is the teeth and the pain they can cause, from the suffering of toothache, to the happier occasion of a baby's first tooth. PMID:23691776

  6. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. Insulating oxide surfaces and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniakowski, Jacek; Noguera, Claudine

    2016-03-01

    This contribution describes some peculiarities of the science of oxide surfaces and nanostructures and proposes a simple conceptual scheme to understand their electronic structure, in the spirit of Jacques Friedel's work. Major results on the effects of non-stoichiometry and polarity are presented, for both semi-infinite surfaces and ultra-thin films, and promising lines of research for the near future are sketched. xml:lang="fr"

  8. East Siberian Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The winter sea ice in the east Siberian Sea is looking a bit like a cracked windshield in these true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images from June 16 and 23, 2002. North of the thawing tundra, the sea ice takes on its cracked, bright blue appearance as it thins, which allows the reflection of the water to show through. Numerous still-frozen lakes dot the tundra. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Coast of the East Siberian Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sea ice is pulling away from the coastline of northeastern Siberia in the east Siberia Sea. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 26, 2002, also the thinning of ice in bays and coves, and the blue reflection of the water from beneath causes the ice to appear bright blue. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. In pursuit of the practice of radical equality: Rancière inspired pedagogical inquiries in elementary school science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otoide, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines a study of praxis. Inspired by my reading of Jacques Rancière's (The ignorant schoolmaster: Five lessons in intellectual emancipation, trans. K. Ross, Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1991) influential text, The Ignorant School Master, I explore the practical applications of his work for teaching and outline a pedagogical response that sought to effect educational change through a philosophically driven teacher inquiry.

  11. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. Flooding of the Ob and Irtysh Rivers, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images shows flooding along the Ob' (large east-west running river) and Irtysh (southern tributary of the Ob') on July 7, 2002. In the false-color image, land surfaces are orange-gold and flood waters are black or dark blue. Fires are marked with red dots in both images. Rivers Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Phytoplankton bloom all along the coast of Southeast United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    All along the eastern and southern coasts of the United States, marine plants seem impervious to the onslaught of winter weather further north. In this true-color image from January 9, 2002, phytoplankton can be seen growing in the nation's coastal waters; their characteristic blue-green swirls are especially visible off the west coast of Florida. Fire locations are marked with red dots. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. Phytoplankton off the Coast of Portugal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A large phytoplankton bloom off of the coast of Portugal can be seen in this true-color image taken on April 23, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The bloom is roughly half the size of Portugal and forms a bluish-green cloud in the water. The red spots in northwest Spain denote what are likely small agricultural fires. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. Victoria Land, Ross Sea, and Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On December 19, 2001, MODIS acquired data that produced this image of Antarctica's Victoria Land, Ross Ice Shelf, and the Ross Sea. The coastline that runs up and down along the left side of the image denotes where Victoria Land (left) meets the Ross Ice Shelf (right). The Ross Ice Shelf is the world's largest floating body of ice, approximately the same size as France. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  16. Dislocations and other topological oddities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieranski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    We will show that the book Dislocations by Jacques Friedel, published half a century ago, can still be recommended, in agreement with the author's intention, as a textbook "for research students at University and for students at engineering schools as well as for research engineers". Indeed, today dislocations are known to occur not only in solid crystals but also in many other systems discovered more recently such as colloidal crystals or liquid crystals having periodic structures. Moreover, the concept of dislocations is an excellent starting point for lectures on topological defects occurring in systems equipped with order parameters resulting from broken symmetries: disclinations in nematic or hexatic liquid crystals, dispirations in chiral smectics or disorientations in lyotropic liquid crystals. The discussion of dislocations in Blue Phases will give us an opportunity to call on mind Sir Charles Frank, friend of Jacques Friedel since his Bristol years, who called these ephemeral mesophases "topological oddities". Being made of networks of disclinations, Blue Phases are similar to Twist Grain Boundary (TGB) smectic phases, which are made of networks of screw dislocations and whose existence was predicted by de Gennes in 1972 on the basis of the analogy between smectics and superconductors. We will stress that the book by Jacques Friedel contains seeds of this analogy.

  17. Theoretical analysis of dynamic variation of temperature-dependent optical properties in the response of laser-irradiated tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Sohi; Motamedi, Massoud

    1990-06-01

    Theoretical modeling of the processes oflight and temperature distribution is rapidly developing both as a qualitative as well as a qtiantitative tool for the understanding of laser light interaction with tissue. Many applications oflasers in medicine involve volumetric coagulation of tissue. In these processes laser light incident on tissue is absorbed and scattered by tissue chromophores and subsequently converted to thermal energy resulting in a temperature rise in tissue. It is well known that elevation of temperature can cause tissue coagulation which is, in most tissues, accompanied by a change in optical properties of tissue (Gourgouliatos [1987], Spears et al. [1988]; Jacques and Gaeeni [1989]). The results by Jacques and Gaeeni [1989] provide a quantitative data for absorption and scattering coefficients of dog myocardium as a function of temperature at selected wavelengths. Parametric study of the effect of variation of optical properties on heat generation, temperature distribution, and ablation rate has been done by Motamedi et a! [1989] and Rastegar et al. [1989]. However, these and other analyses ( e.g. Armon and Laufer [1985], McKenzie [1986], Jacques and PraM [1987] )of temperature disiribution in tissue traditionally have not considered the role of dynamic variation of of the optical properties with temperature. This paper presents a method to analyze this effect and explores its potential impact on laser dosimetry prescription for laser applications involving coagulation of tissue.

  18. Biology and war--American biology and international science.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    The German-born American scientist Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) was one of the most important promoters of experimental biology around 1900. He was best known for his physico-chemical explanations of psychological processes and his biotechnological approach to artificial parthenogenesis. At the start of the First World War, Loeb was deeply troubled by the deterioration of the international scientific community and the growing alienation of his German and American colleagues. The aim of this paper is to examine Jacques Loeb's activities aimed at advancing scientific internationalism before, during, and after the war. Loeb, for example, tried to negotiate the publication of German authors in American journals during the war, at a time when this was categorically rejected by publishers. Immediately after the war, he tried to create a specific system aimed at disseminating scientific literature and funding selected European colleagues, in order to overcome what he considered reactionary and hegemonic forces within German scientific institutions. His correspondence with eminent scientists from all over the world (amongst them Albert Einstein, Richard Goldschmidt, Otto Meyerhof, Otto Warburg, Paul Ehrlich, Wolfgang Ostwald, Wilhelm Roux, and Ross Harrison) will serve as a source for the analysis. Special emphasis will be placed on the question how Jacques Loeb integrated epistemology, his particular world view, and his social commitment into the workings of his own life and how he tried to extend his scientific goal of controlling biological systems to the sphere of international science. PMID:18822662

  19. Forty Years of Research on Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J.

    2010-10-01

    Isolated galaxies have not been a hot topic over the past four decades. This is partly due to uncertainties about their existence. Are there galaxies isolated enough to be interesting? Do they exist in sufficient numbers to be statistically useful? Most attempts to compile isolated galaxy lists were marginally successful-too small number and not very isolated galaxies. If really isolated galaxies do exist then their value becomes obvious in a Universe where effects of interactions and environment (i.e. nurture) are important. They provide a means for better quantifying effects of nurture. The Catalog of Isolated Galaxies (CIG) compiled by Valentina Karachentseva appeared near the beginning of the review period. It becomes the focus of this review because of its obvious strengths and because the AMIGA project has increased its utility through a refinement (a vetted CIG). It contains almost 1000 galaxies with nearest neighbor crossing times of 1--3 Gyr. It is large enough to serve as a zero-point or control sample. The galaxies in the CIG (and the distribution of galaxy types) may be significantly different than those in even slightly richer environments. The AMIGA-CIG, and future iterations, may be able to tell us something about galaxy formation. It may also allow us to better define intrinsic (natural) correlations like e.g. Fisher-Tully and FIR-OPTICAL. Correlations can be better defined when the dispersion added by external stimuli (nurture) is minimized or removed.

  20. STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a payload Interface Verification Test (IVT) in the SPACEHAB Facility, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Tokarev of Russia (second from left) and Commander Kent Rominger learn about the Sequential Shunt Unit (SSU) in front of them from Lynn Ashby (far right), with Johnson Space Center. At the far left looking on is TTI interpreter Valentina Maydell. Other crew members at KSC for the IVT are Pilot Rick Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara Jernigan, Dan Barry and Julie Payette. The SSU is part of the cargo on Mission STS-96, which carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, with equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. The SPACEHAB carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m.

  1. Fires and Smoke in Central Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This year's fire season in central Africa may have been the most severe ever. This true-color image also shows the location of fires (red dots) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Angola, and Zambia. The image was taken by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA 's Terra spacecraft on August 23, 2000, and was produced using the MODIS Active Fire Detection product. NASA scientists studied these fires during the SAFARI 2000 field campaign. Image By Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Team

  2. Texas after Tropical Storm Allison (bands 2,1,3 in R,G,B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS image of Texas (left), Oklahoma (top left), Louisiana (bottom right) and Arkansas (upper right) makes use of band combinations (groups of wavelengths) that make water stand out against land. In this image, the dark blue/black squiggles indicate water. The bright green area along the Texas coast is Galveston Bay, southeast of Houston. Houston was devastated in the past week from the rains from Tropical Storm Allison. The brightness of the Bay may be due to sediment runoff from all the floodwaters. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  3. Harsh Winter in Turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The predominantly mountainous terrain of the Republic of Turkey is covered by snow in this Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image, produced from data collected on January 13, 2002. The snow-laced peaks of the Kure Daglari mountain range in the north can be seen as they range from the upper middle of the image to the upper right. The mountains parallel the northern coastline, which opens to the Black Sea. Also visible in this image, at the bottom right, is the island of Cyprus. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  4. Migration and its implications for urban development.

    PubMed

    Choguill, C L

    1983-01-01

    Four theoretical concepts frequently found in the migration literature are critically analyzed by applying them to the study of migration and urbanization patterns in Bangladesh. The theoretical concepts considered include the socioeconomic approach, the rural development approach, an approach based on the sexually selective nature of migration flows, and the primary event approach. The restricted validity of these theories for explaining migration patterns in Bangladesh is demonstrated, and a case is made for taking a broader approach to migration analysis. Comments by Jacques Ledent (pp. 82-4), Ingvar Holmberg (pp. 85-8), and Frans J. Willekens (p. 89) are included. PMID:12312867

  5. Memorial V.J.Glaser

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Plusieurs orateurs rendent hommage au grand physicien et scientifique Vladimir Jurko Glaser (1924 - 1984) qui travaillait au Ruder Boscovic Institut à Zagreb avant de venir au Cern en 1957 où il trouvait un poste permanent au département de physique théorique. Walter Tearing, Harry Lehmann,Henry Epstein, Jacques Bros et André Martin font des résumés biographiques de leurs collègue et ami en honorant ses grands qualités d'homme et ses remarquables conquêtes de la science et leurs accomplissement.

  6. Anticipating the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachtenberg, Zev

    2015-09-01

    There is an important precedent in the history of ideas for the Anthropocene proposal. This is not found in the precursors that have been proposed to the formal scientific concept, but rather in the work of the eighteenth-century social theorist Jean-Jacques Rousseau. I argue that Rousseau's speculative account of the development of human society models a way of viewing the condition of the physical environment as an expression of the social and economic institutions that support human beings' way of life.

  7. The beauty of impurities: Two revivals of Friedel's virtual bound-state concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Jacques Friedel pioneered the theoretical study of impurities and magnetic impurities in metals. He discovered Friedel oscillations, introduced the concept of virtual bound-state, and demonstrated that the charge on the impurity is related to the scattering phase-shift at the Fermi level (Friedel sum-rule). After a brief review of some of these concepts, I describe how they proved useful in two new contexts. The first one concerns the Coulomb blockade in quantum dots, and its suppression by the Kondo effect. The second one is the dynamical mean-field theory of strong electronic correlations. xml:lang="fr"

  8. Taking a geometric look at the socio-political functioning schemes of the living. Catastrophe theory and theoretical sociology.

    PubMed

    Morier, Clément

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this communication is to consider morphological processes in sociology, mainly through the study of the stability of forms of sociality. At the same time, it aims to study the regulation of constraints, related to an increasingly conflictual environment, through political organization. We use a specific theoretical framework: the catastrophe theory developed by René Thom in topology, further developed by Claude Bruter from a physics point of view, and reworked by Jacques Viret in biology. The idea is to show the existence of archetypal processes organizing social forms. PMID:23943093

  9. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: HLW management in France, by Michel Debes, EDF, France; Breakthroughs from future reactors, by Jacques Bouchard, CEA, France; 'MOX for peace' a reality, by Jean-Pierre Bariteau, AREVA Group, France; Swedish spent fuel and radwaste, by Per H. Grahn and Marie Skogsberg, SKB, Sweden; ENC2005 concluding remarks, by Larry Foulke, 'Nuclear Technology Matters'; Fuel crud formation and behavior, by Charles Turk, Entergy; and, Plant profile: major vote of confidence for NP, by Martti Katka, TVO, Finland.

  11. Eternal hate and conscience: on the filiation between Freudian psychoanalysis and sixteenth and early seventeenth century Protestant thought.

    PubMed

    Westerink, Herman

    2011-01-01

    In his seminar on ethics Jacques Lacan suggests there exists a "filiation or cultural paternity" between Freudian psychoanalysis and a "new direction of thought" that starts with Luther's conceptualization of God's eternal hate of man, and is then futher continued in Calvinism. In this article this thesis is explored. The author argues that there is not only a familiarity between the Protestant doctrines of predestination and Freud's reconstruction of prehistoric events and primal scenes, but also that Lacan's views on conscience formation and his elaborations of the complexity of moral decisions resembles Calvinist thought on civil and spiritual conscience, and the longing for restoration of a lost image of God. PMID:21473168

  12. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  13. Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of MODIS images shows the dwindling Aral Sea. Once one of the world's largest freshwater lakes, the Aral Sea has decreased by as much as 60% over the past few decades due to diversion of the water to grow cotton and rice. These diversion have dropped the lake levels, increased salinity, and nearly decimated the fishing industry. The previous extent of the lake is clearly visible as a whitish perimeter in these image from April 16, May 18, and June 3, 2002. s. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. Sushruta in 600 B.C. introduced extraocular expulsion of lens material.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Ascaso, Francisco J

    2014-03-01

    It is generally accepted that Jacques Daviel introduced in the 18th century the extracapsular technique of extraction of the lens while the couching method of cataract operation had already been practiced since ancient times. Present study analyses the first known cataract surgery description in three translations into English from the original Sanskrit Sushruta textbook and all the available literature on the subject. We found evidences that some sort of extraocular expulsion of lens material through a limbal puncture (paracentesis) was described by the Indian surgeon. Nevertheless, this incision cannot be considered as a classic extracapsular procedure because it was not large enough to allow the extraction of the entire lens. PMID:23464869

  15. One-dimensional physics in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giamarchi, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a brief introduction to some of the systems and questions concerning one-dimensional interacting quantum systems. Historically, organic conductors and superconductors - a field extremely active in the "Laboratoire de physique des solides" in Orsay, in a good part thanks to the influence of Jacques Friedel, played a crucial role in this field. I will describe some of the aspects of this physics and also review some of the very exciting theoretical and experimental developments that took place in the 1D world in the last 15 years or so. xml:lang="fr"

  16. Remains to be transmitted: Primo Levi's traumatic dream.

    PubMed

    Blévis, Jean-Jacques

    2004-07-01

    Drawing on the writings of Primo Levi and the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan, the author attempts to conceive psychic trauma as a coalescence of traumas, since this is perhaps the only way to prevent a subject from being forced back into identification with the catastrophic event, whatever that may have been. A recurrent dream of Primo Levi's suggests to the author the way that traumas may have coalesced within Levi. The hope would be to restore the entire significance of what remains from that traumatic event to the speech (parole) of the Other, to the speech of every human, even the most helpless, bruised, or destroyed among us. PMID:15287444

  17. Wildfires, smoke, and burn scars, near Yakutsk, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is hidden beneath a veil of smoke from multiple wildfires burning around the city of Yakutsk, Russia. Fires have been burning in the region off and on since late May 2002, and may be agricultural in cause. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on July 23, 2002. In the false=-color image, vegetation is bright green, smoke is blueish-white, and burned areas are reddish-brown. In both images, fire detections are marked with red outlines. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Love and/in psychoanalysis: a commentary on Lacan's reading of Plato's Symposium in Seminar VIII: Transference.

    PubMed

    Fink, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    What is love and what part does it play in psychoanalysis? Where are the analyst and the analysand situated in relation to the roles defined as those of the "lover" and the "beloved"? Jacques Lacan explores these and other questions in his soon-to-be-published Seminar VIII: Transference by providing an extensive commentary on Plato's most famous dialogue on love, the Symposium. This paper outlines some of the major points about love that grow out of Lacan's reading of the dialogue and examines their relevance to the analytic setting. Can the analyst be characterized as a sort of modern-day Socrates? PMID:25688680

  19. STS-78 Payload Specialist Thirsk and Favier at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-78 Payload Specialists Robert Brenton Thirsk (Canadian Space Agency) (left) and Jean-Jacques Favier (French Space Agency) are holding an Olympic torch presented to the crew after they arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The crew will take the torch with them on their upcoming spaceflight and then present it upon their return to a representative of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic games (ACOG). The countdown clock began ticking earlier today toward the June 20 launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS- 78, the fifth Shuttle flight of 1996.

  20. Tropical Cyclone Kesiny northeast of Madagascar, Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Tropical Cyclone Kesiny can be seen over the Indian Ocean in this true color image taken on May 6, 2002, at 6:45 UTC by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. When this image was taken, the cyclone was several hundred miles east of northern Madagascar and packing winds of up to 120 kilometers (75 miles) per hour. As the cyclone continues its approach southwest into Madagascar, it is forecast to increase in intensity and generate sustained winds of up to 139 kilometers (86 miles) per hour. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Floods in Central China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows flooding in central China on July 4, 2002. In the false-color image vegetation appears orange and water appears dark blue to black. Because of the cloud cover and the fact that some of the water is filled with sediment, the false-color image provides a clearer picture of where rivers have exceeded their banks and lakes have risen. The river in this image is the Yangtze River, and the large lake is the Poyang Hu. Credits: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Function(s) of religion in the contemporary world: psychoanalytic perspectives : about new types of religious conversions.

    PubMed

    Combres, Laurent; Askofaré, Sidi

    2013-12-01

    With respect to our psychoanalytic frame of reference allowing us to study the extent of the hypotheses concerning the religious phenomenon as formulated by Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan, in the context of a cross approach between the accuracy of the concept of conversion and of psychic mechanisms or phenomena at stake within conversions, and based on the testimonials of subjects acknowledging themselves in the experiment of conversion, we try to understand if and how religion is anchored in our cultural era through subversive effects it may have on the subject. PMID:23412649

  3. Doing justice to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Evelyn Fox

    2015-06-01

    Jacques Monod gave us not only our first regulatory system, but also our first smart molecules - i.e., he gave us allosteric proteins. But both of these contributions hung in a certain tension with his primary commitments. In particular, I focus here on the ways in which his ontological commitments constrained his thinking about the power of allostery. Although he wrote that "so far as regulation through allosteric interaction is concerned, everything is possible", for him, not everything was conceivable. In particular, what was not conceivable was a challenge to the primacy of DNA. PMID:25908117

  4. Flooding in Central Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of snowmelt and ice jams in late May and June of this year caused the Taz River (left) and the Yenisey River (right) in central Siberia to overflow their banks. The flooding can be seen in this image taken on June 11, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. Normally, the rivers would resemble thin black lines in MODIS imagery. In the false-color images sage green and rusty orange is land, and water is black. Clouds are white and pink. Credit: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  5. Flooding of the Taz, Pur, and Yenisey Rivers, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring and summer, rivers across Siberia experience flooding as the waters in the south begin to melt and run before the ice has retreated from the northern limits. The ice causes jams which are sometimes loosened up using explosives. This pair of MODIS images from June 18, 2002, shows flooding on the Pur (left), Taz (center), and Yenisey (right) Rivers in central Siberia. In the false-color image, ice and snow are red, clouds are white, water is black, and vegetation is green. Bare soil is brown. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  6. Flooding of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of heavy rainfall, snowmelt, and ice jams in late May and early June of this year caused the Ob River and surrounding tributaries in Western Siberia to overflow their banks. The flooding can be seen in thess image taken on June 16, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. Last year, the river flooded farther north. Normally, the river resembles a thin black line, but floods have swollen the river considerably. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, H

    2005-12-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis-obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs-seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859-1924), the founding father of artificial parthenogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  8. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fangerau, H

    2005-01-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis—obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs—seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859–1924), the founding father of artificial parthogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  9. Five NASA astronauts and two international payload specialists take a break from a Shuttle duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Five NASA astronauts and two international payload specialists take a break from a Shuttle duration record-breaker flight to pose for the traditional inflight crew portrait. The photograph should be oriented with payload commander Susan J. Helms at bottom center. Others, clockwise, are French payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, Canadian payload specialist Robert B. Thirsk; and astronauts Kevin R. Kregel, pilot; and Charles J. (Chuck) Brady and Richard M. Linnehan, both mission specialists, and Terence T. (Tom) Henricks, mission commander. The crew chose the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS-1) Science Module, situated in the Space Shuttle Columbias cargo bay, for the portrait setting.

  10. Scientific Misconduct and Theft: Case Report from 17th Century

    PubMed Central

    Fatović-Ferenčić, Stella

    2008-01-01

    Gjuro Armen Baglivi was one of the most famous medical authorities of the 17th century. Apart from his numerous books and publications, several extensive collections of his correspondence have been preserved and are available in libraries around the world. They provide new information about the 17th century scientific culture and place of Baglivi’s work in the scientific European context. Also, they shed light on his personality more than other writings intended for the public eye. In this paper I will present the case of a theft of intellectual property, which Baglivi described in one of his letters to Jean Jacques Manget. PMID:18293461

  11. A dream come true: being President of ASHRM.

    PubMed

    Oppenberg, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    During our 33rd Annual Conference of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management, I had the absolute honor and privilege to thank our 2013 ASHRM board and staff along with the ASHRM membership. On behalf of the membership I extended heartfelt thanks for a job well done to our retiring board members, friends, and colleagues: Faye Shepherd, Ellen Grady-Venditti, Michael Midgley, and Immediate Past President Mary Anne Hilliard. Together, we welcomed 2014 ASHRM board members and witnessed the oath of office to Hala Helm, David Sine, and Sherrill Peters, along with President-Elect Ellen Grady-Venditti and our 2014 President Jacque Mitchell. PMID:24549693

  12. The concept of brain plasticity--Paillard's systemic analysis and emphasis on structure and function (followed by the translation of a seminal paper by Paillard on plasticity).

    PubMed

    Will, Bruno; Dalrymple-Alford, John; Wolff, Mathieu; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2008-09-01

    Although rejected for the most part of the 20th Century, the idea of brain plasticity began to receive wide acceptance from the 1970s. Yet there has been relatively little theoretical comment on the definition and use of "plasticity" in the field of neurobiology. An early exception to this lack of critical reflection on neural plasticity was provided by Jacques Paillard in a seminal paper that he published in 1976 [Paillard J. Réflexions sur l'usage du concept de plasticité en neurobiology. J Psychol 1976;1:33-47]. As this valuable contribution was published in French, the present authors provide an English adaptation to help convey his ideas to an international audience, together with a contemporary commentary on this paper. Paillard's definition of the term "plasticity" is probably as pertinent today as it was 30 years ago, especially in terms of its relevance to multiple levels of analysis of brain function (molecular, cellular, systemic). Sadly, Jacques Paillard died in 2006; our comments therefore also include a brief biographical tribute to this outstanding neuroscientist. PMID:18222008

  13. Reducing CSOs and giving the river back to the public: innovative combined sewer overflow control and riverbanks restoration of the St. Charles River in Quebec City.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Olivier; Pleau, Martin; Marcoux, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    After the construction of its wastewater treatment plants, the City of Quebec began to implement overflow control in wet weather to ultimately meet the effluent discharge objectives, i.e. no more than two overflows per summer season in the St. Lawrence River and no more than four in the St-Charles River. After several years of studies to determine which management strategies would best suit the purpose, and to propose optimum solutions, a first project to implement optimal and predictive management in real time, called "Pilot", came to life in 1999. Construction in phases soon followed and the work was completed in the fall of 2009. As a result, requirements with regard to environmental rejects were met in two sectors, namely the St-Charles River and the Jacques-Cartier Beach, and aquatic recreational activities could resume. Meanwhile, the City also worked at giving back access to the water courses to the public by developing sites at the Jacques-Cartier Beach and in the Bay of Beauport, and by rehabilitating the banks of the St-Charles River. PMID:21252439

  14. Data, the last word: Keep “Data” for data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Ronald C.

    Marcia Neugebauer's letter (Eos, February 28, p. 129) is yet another reminder that we live in an age of declining literacy. As she correctly observes, the mistaken use of the word “data” for “numerical results” is now widespread, though her suggested solution may be misguided. I see no reason why those who are unable to use language properly should be rewarded with a special word unless it is intended to commemorate ignorance or enshrine slovenly habits o f thought in some novel way. Rather, I urge editors to sustain Neugebauer's preference for the use of existing language to clarify essential distinctions and I urge the rest of us to practice the good sense embodied in Jacque Barzun's essay, “On the Need of an Orderly Mind,” (by Willson Follett, in Modern American Usage, edited by Jacque Barzun, pp. 13-20, Hill and Wang, New York, 1966), or to adopt the trenchant advice of Schopenhauer in his essay “On Style,” in The Works of Schopenhauer, edited by Will Durant, pp. 507-521, Garden City Publishing Co., New York, 1928.

  15. LHC, le Big Bang en éprouvette

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Notre compréhension de l?Univers est en train de changer? Bar des Sciences - Tout public Débat modéré par Marie-Odile Montchicourt, journaliste de France Info. Evenement en vidéoconférence entre le Globe de la science et de l?innovation, le bar le Baloard de Montpellier et la Maison des Métallos à Paris. Intervenants au CERN : Philippe Charpentier et Daniel Froideveaux, physiciens au CERN. Intervenants à Paris : Vincent Bontemps, philosophe et chercheur au CEA ; Jacques Arnould, philosophe, historien des sciences et théologien, Jean-Jacques Beineix, réalisateur, producteur, scénariste de cinéma. Intervenants à Montpellier (LPTA) : André Neveu, physicien théoricien et directeur de recherche au CNRS ; Gilbert Moultaka, physicien théoricien et chargé de recherche au CNRS. Partenariat : CERN, CEA, IN2P3, Université MPL2 (LPTA) Dans le cadre de la Fête de la science 2008

  16. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows

    PubMed Central

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds. Figure 1 Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler. PMID:22408729

  17. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  18. SV-Bay: structural variant detection in cancer genomes using a Bayesian approach with correction for GC-content and read mappability

    PubMed Central

    Iakovishina, Daria; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Barillot, Emmanuel; Regnier, Mireille; Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Whole genome sequencing of paired-end reads can be applied to characterize the landscape of large somatic rearrangements of cancer genomes. Several methods for detecting structural variants with whole genome sequencing data have been developed. So far, none of these methods has combined information about abnormally mapped read pairs connecting rearranged regions and associated global copy number changes automatically inferred from the same sequencing data file. Our aim was to create a computational method that could use both types of information, i.e. normal and abnormal reads, and demonstrate that by doing so we can highly improve both sensitivity and specificity rates of structural variant prediction. Results: We developed a computational method, SV-Bay, to detect structural variants from whole genome sequencing mate-pair or paired-end data using a probabilistic Bayesian approach. This approach takes into account depth of coverage by normal reads and abnormalities in read pair mappings. To estimate the model likelihood, SV-Bay considers GC-content and read mappability of the genome, thus making important corrections to the expected read count. For the detection of somatic variants, SV-Bay makes use of a matched normal sample when it is available. We validated SV-Bay on simulated datasets and an experimental mate-pair dataset for the CLB-GA neuroblastoma cell line. The comparison of SV-Bay with several other methods for structural variant detection demonstrated that SV-Bay has better prediction accuracy both in terms of sensitivity and false-positive detection rate. Availability and implementation: https://github.com/InstitutCurie/SV-Bay Contact: valentina.boeva@inserm.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26740523

  19. Importance of holographic light in the emerging field of mind-body healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Roberta

    2000-10-01

    Healing with color has been researched and documented worldwide for centuries. Every single part of the brain and every cell in the body is effected by light. Chinese and Russian scientists demonstrated that the acupuncture meridians transmit light. Dr. Peter Mandel, German chiropractic physician and acupuncturist, states that the acupuncture points are especially sensitive to electromagnetic waves within the spectrum of visible light and microwave energy, and all cells constantly emit and absorb small pockets of electromagnetic radiation or light, called biophotons. The harmony or disharmony of cells has been documented. Kirlian photography, to photography the aura was invented by Russians Semyon and Valentina Kirlian. Photo therapy and light research are being practiced worldwide. In the United States, Dr. Jacob Lieberman has written an influential book Light Medicine of the Future. In 1992 the first Light Years Ahead conference was held. (#5 1996) Dr. Brian Breiling and Dr. Lee Hartley brought together experts in the field to discuss the many potentials of light therapy. My present research in this area has focused on narrow band frequencies through the use of holography. Its therapeutic applications of color healing in this research are both critical and fundamental. My current work, The Chakras, seven reflection holograms on silver halide, relate to the wheels of light described in the earliest recorded Indian history. I will discus the chakras, this ancient metaphysical system under the new light of popular western metaphors and visionary art, how the chakras relate to the seven colors of the rainbow, the electromagnetic waves, and the connection to color holography in healing light therapy. I will be citing concurrent research in color healing, and the important areas of research that are necessary to have significant impact on future directions. Holography in the future will constitute a major frontier in discovery.

  20. Genetic and environmental influences on individual differences in emotion regulation and its relation to working memory in toddlerhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Manjie; Saudino, Kimberly J

    2013-12-01

    This is the first study to explore genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in emotion regulation in toddlers, and the first to examine the genetic and environmental etiology underlying the association between emotion regulation and working memory. In a sample of 304 same-sex twin pairs (140 MZ, 164 DZ) at age 3, emotion regulation was assessed using the Behavior Rating Scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BRS; Bayley, 1993), and working memory was measured by the visually cued recall (VCR) task (Zelazo, Jacques, Burack, & Frye, 2002) and several memory tasks from the Mental Scale of the BSID. Based on model-fitting analyses, both emotion regulation and working memory were significantly influenced by genetic and nonshared environmental factors. Shared environmental effects were significant for working memory, but not for emotion regulation. Only genetic factors significantly contributed to the covariation between emotion regulation and working memory. PMID:24098922

  1. Wheeler thought experiment with delayed choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    This is an alternative interpretation of Jacques, et. al. (2007), Wheeler's thought experiment with delayed choice. The researchers find that the choice of observables changes the previous behavior of the photon inside the interferometer. Stepping outside the QM box, we propose that elementary waves from the detectors travel backwards through the interferometer, and the photon is following such a ray in the reverse direction. Thus a change in observables changes the behavior of the photon for the simple reason that the observable is transmitting information to the photon and the photon is able to change its polarization mid-stream in response to a change in that information. According to this explanation there is no delayed choice. It is an illusion.

  2. [The diseases of Bossuet].

    PubMed

    Charon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Jacques Bénigne Bossuet--nicknamed 'the Bright Eagle from Meaux' by Voltaire--died at 77, in his Parisian place of residence, on April 12th 1704. Which disease so took this robust prelate of Burgundian origin, bishop since he was 53 and whose active life had been filled with important duties and honours. If bibliography about his life is copious we owe before any trusting the testimony of his private secretary, priest François Le Dieu, whose diary describes everyday life in detail. Thus we know his fevers, skin rashes in 1699, and his bronchial and digestive problems and we can follow the evolution of his vesical lithiasis complicated with purulent, necrosing cystisis which led to the lethal evolution in spite of the efforts of renowned praticians. PMID:26050428

  3. Antarctic Peninsula and Weddell Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous icebergs are breaking out of the sea ice in the Southern Ocean surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula. This true-color MODIS image from November 13, 2001, shows several icebergs drifting out of the Weddell Sea. The Antarctic Peninsula (left) reaches out into the Drake Passage, which separates the southern tip of South America from Antarctica. Warmer temperatures have cleared a tiny patch of bare ground at the Peninsula's tip. The predominant ocean current in the area is the Antarctic Circumpolar Current ('circum' meaning 'around'), which is also the 'West Wind Drift.' The current is the largest permanent current in the world, and water is moved eastward by westerly winds. Icebergs leaving the Weddell Sea are likely to be moved north and east by the current. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. Pierre Curie, 1859–1906

    PubMed Central

    Mould, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 marked 100 years since the death of Pierre Curie. It is therefore appropriate that we remember his life and his work, which was cut short by his untimely death from an accident on the Pont Neuf, Paris, on April 19, 1906. He had already accomplished much during his life, both before the discovery of radium with Marie Curie, in work co-authored with his brother Jacques on piezoelectricity, and afterwards, when he published the results of several experimental studies with radium and radon. He came from a medical family, and his grandfather Pierre Curie was a famous homeopathic physician. He has, in print, unfairly been relegated to the background—his own scientific contributions having been overtaken by the fame of Marie Curie, probably because she outlived him by 28 years. PMID:17576470

  5. STS-78 Drag Chute Deploy (side view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The drag chute pops open as the orbiter Columbia glides down Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Main gear touchdown occurred at 8:36 a.m. EDT, July 7. A mission duration of 16 days, 21 hours and 47 minutes made STS-78 the longest Shuttle flight to date. The STS-78 crew numbered seven: Mission Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; Payload Commander Susan J. Helms; Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan and Charles E. Brady Jr.; and Payload Specialists Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES) and Robert Brent Thirsk, of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary payload of the 78th Shuttle flight was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS).

  6. STS-78 Drag Chute Deploy (front view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The drag chute pops open as the orbiter Columbia glides down Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Main gear touchdown occurred at 8:36 a.m. EDT, July 7. A mission duration of 16 days, 21 hours and 47 minutes made STS-78 the longest Shuttle flight to date. The STS-78 crew numbered seven: Mission Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; Payload Commander Susan J. Helms; Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan and Charles E. Brady Jr.; and Payload Specialists Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES) and Robert Brent Thirsk, of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary payload of the 78th Shuttle flight was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS).

  7. Lisfranc injuries.

    PubMed

    Welck, M J; Zinchenko, R; Rudge, B

    2015-04-01

    Lisfranc injuries are commonly asked about in FRCS Orthopaedic trauma vivas. The term "Lisfranc injury" strictly refers to an injury where one or more of the metatarsals are displaced from the tarsus. The term is more commonly used to describe an injury to the midfoot centred on the 2nd tarsometatarsal joint. The injury is named after Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin (1790-1847), a French surgeon and gynaecologist who first described the injury in 1815. 'Lisfranc injury' encompasses a broad spectrum of injuries, which can be purely ligamentous or involve the osseous and articular structures. They are often difficult to diagnose and treat, but if not detected and appropriately managed they can cause long-term disability. This review outlines the anatomy, epidemiology, classification, investigation and current evidence on management of this injury. PMID:25543185

  8. Jacob B. Winslow (1669-1760).

    PubMed

    Bellary, Sharath S; Walters, Andrew; Gielecki, Jerzy; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2012-07-01

    Jacob Winslow was a Dutch born, French naturalized anatomist and physician whose contributions to medicine are abundant. His importance to medicine is undisputed. His personal life included a religious crisis that resulted in his estrangement from his family, but afforded him patrons in Paris to continue his work. Following this conversion, he changed his name to that of his catechist and was rechristened Jacques Benigne Wilson. His respect as an expert was well deserved, and he held several prominent positions during his career in Paris. His main work, Exposition anatomique de la structure du corps humain, was published in 1732 and is considered the first purely anatomical treatise. This review highlights his contributions to anatomy and medicine through the course of his career. PMID:22294452

  9. [Art nouveau: pharmacy shops in Nancy].

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Florence; Labrude, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, an important artistic activity develops in Nancy. The "Ecole de Nancy" transforms a provincial city into one of the metropolis of "Art Nouveau". The pharmacists participate at the activity of their town and eight of them choose the new style for their pharmacy. In 1902, Rosfelder is the first to modify his shop, and later, Jacques, Delidon, Mouzin, Godfrin brothers, Monal and Fandre, before, during and after the First World War, have a same step. For the ornament, the artists use plants derived from local medicinal flora. "Art Nouveau", adept of curves, appears to be ideal to symbolize vegetable kingdom. In these pharmacy shops, fine arts join materia medica. PMID:12515268

  10. Assessing the Risks for Modern Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William, Jr.

    1998-05-01

    Some 35 years after Paul-Jacques and Pierre Curie discovered piezoelectricity, ultrasonic imaging was developed by Paul Langevin. During this work, ultrasonic energy was observed to have a detrimental biological effect. These observations were confirmed a decade later by R. W. Wood and A. L. Loomis. It was not until the early 1950s that ultrasonic exposure conditions were controlled and specified so that studies could focus on the mechanisms by which ultrasound influenced biological materials. In the late 1940s, pioneering work was initiated to image the human body by ultrasonic techniques. These engineers and physicians were aware of the deleterious ultrasound effects at sufficiently high levels; this endeavored them to keep the exposure levels reasonably low. Over the past three decades, diagnostic ultrasound has become a sophisticated technology. Yet, our understanding of the potential risks has not changed appreciably. It is very encouraging that human injury has never been attributed to clinical practice of diagnostic ultrasound.

  11. STS-78 crew holds up Olympic torch at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-78 Payload Commander Susan J. Helms (center) holds up an Olympic torch that was presented to the crew after they arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. With Helms are (from left) Payload Specialist Robert Brenton Thirsk (Canadian Space Agency); Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady; Mission Commander Terence T. 'Tom' Henricks; Helms; Mission Specialist Richard M. Linnehan; Pilot Keven R. Kregel; and Payload Specialist Jean-Jacques Favier (French Space Agency). The crew will take the torch with them on their upcoming spaceflight and then present it upon their return to a representative of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic games (ACOG). The countdown clock began ticking earlier today toward the June 20 launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS- 78, the fifth Shuttle flight of 1996.

  12. [The birth of the international conference "Biology and the future of man", Paris, 18-24 September 1974].

    PubMed

    Galperin, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In 1974, a symposium was organized in Paris entitled "Biology and the future of man". It was focused on the analysis of "new powers of science and new duties of man" in the field of medically assisted procreation, agriculture, demography, and environmental issues. This small introductory text begins by describing the circumstances that led to the organization of this prestigious conference. Then, in order to go further than the silent framework of the presentation of the themes, we will focus on the report of Dr. Robert Edwards on medically assisted procreation, we will recall the duel between Jacques Monod and Jérôme Lejeune on abortion, then we will give center stage to physicians like Jean Bernard and Alexandre Minkowski about the right to die, and finally we will remind the conclusion brought to the conference by Georges Canguilhem. PMID:26184345

  13. Saharan Dust over the Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Fierce winds ripped across the Sahara Desert this past weekend and blew a large plume of dust out over the Atlantic Ocean. This true color image of the dust event was acquired on February 11, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The light brown dust trail can be seen forming an arc a few hundred miles off the coast of Western Sahara and Mauritania. Northeasterly winds blowing across the Atlantic have redirected the dust towards Europe where it will likely settle. For more information and current images of dust storms, visit Natural Hazards on the Earth Observatory . Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. Dust Storm Hits Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A thick pall of sand and dust blew out from the Sahara Desert over the Atlantic Ocean yesterday (January 6, 2002), engulfing the Canary Islands in what has become one of the worst sand storms ever recorded there. In this scene, notice how the dust appears particularly thick in the downwind wake of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands. Perhaps the turbulence generated by the air currents flowing past the island's volcanic peaks is churning the dust back up into the atmosphere, rather than allowing it to settle toward the surface. This true-color image was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on January 7, 2002. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. Bryan Coast, English Coast, Alexander Island, Fallieres Coast, and Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Antarctica shows the Bryan Coast (lower left), the English Coast (lower central), Alexander Island (middle right), the Fallieres Coast (top right), and the Bellingshausen Sea. The entire continent has been dedicated to peaceful scientific investigation since 1961, with the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.The waters surrounding Antarctica are intensely cold. Salt water freezes at -2C, allowing sea ice to form. The middle left portion of the image shows quite a lot of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea. During the Antarctic winter, when data for this image was acquired, Antarctica doubles in size to about 28.5 million square km (or about 11 million square miles), and temperatures in the -60C range are common.This true-color image was compiled from MODIS data gathered March 29, 2002. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  16. Smog Obscures Chinese Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Most of southeastern China has been covered by a thick greyish shroud of aerosol pollution over the last few weeks. The smog is so thick it is difficult to see the surface in some regions of this scene, acquired on January 7, 2002. The city of Hong Kong is the large brown cluster of pixels toward the lower lefthand corner of the image (indicated by the faint black box). The island of Taiwan, due east of mainland China, is also blanketed by the smog. This true-color image was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  17. (Thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1990-07-19

    This report describes the Jacques Monod Conference on Intracellular Redox Control in Animals, Plants and Microrganisms by Thioredoxin and Glutaredoxin Systems,'' which was held in Roscoff, France, on July 1--7, 1990. I was given the opportunity to lecture on my group's work concerning chemical characterization of phosphoribulokinase and its regulation by thioredoxin. I was also asked to chair a half-day session on thioredoxin reductases, a family of regulatory proteins that are involved in processes as diverse as DNA replication in mammals and carbon fluxes through the Calvin cycle in plants. As a major theme of the conference was structure/function relationships of proteins, most topics were of direct relevance to many research endeavors in the Biology Division of ORNL.

  18. Can specific biological signals be digitized?

    PubMed

    Jonas, Wayne B; Ives, John A; Rollwagen, Florence; Denman, Daniel W; Hintz, Kenneth; Hammer, Mitchell; Crawford, Cindy; Henry, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    At the request of the United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, we attempted to replicate the data of Professor Jacques Benveniste that digital signals recorded on a computer disc produce specific biological effects. The hypothesis was that a digitized thrombin inhibitor signal would inhibit the fibrinogen-thrombin coagulation pathway. Because of the controversies associated with previous research of Prof. Benveniste, we developed a system for the management of social controversy in science that incorporated an expert in social communication and conflict management. The social management approach was an adaptation of interactional communication theory, for management of areas that interfere with the conduct of good science. This process allowed us to successfully complete a coordinated effort by a multidisciplinary team, including Prof. Benveniste, a hematologist, engineer, skeptic, statistician, neuroscientist and conflict management expert. Our team found no replicable effects from digital signals. PMID:16394263

  19. Volga River Delta and Caspian Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color MODIS image from May 10, 2002, captures Russia's Volga River (running south through the center) emptying into the northern portion of the Caspian Sea. The waters of the Caspian Sea are quite murky in this image, highlighting the water quality problems plaguing the sea. The sea is inundated with sewage and industrial and agricultural waste, which is having measurable impact on human health and wildlife. According reports from the Department of Energy, in less than a decade the sturgeon catch dropped from 30,000 tons to just over 2,000 tons. National and international groups are currently joining together to find strategies of dealing with the environmental problems of the Caspian Sea. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  20. Beyond ion-conduction: Channel-dependent and -independent roles of TRP channels during development and tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vrenken, Kirsten S; Jalink, Kees; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Middelbeek, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels comprise a family of cation channels implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, cell migration and cell survival. As a consequence, members of this ion family play prominent roles during embryonic development, tissue maintenance and cancer progression. Although most TRP channels are non-selective, many cellular responses, mediated by TRP channels, appear to be calcium-dependent. In addition, there is mounting evidence for channel-independent roles for TRP channels. In this review, we will discuss how both these channel-dependent and -independent mechanisms affect cellular programs essential during embryonic development, and how perturbations in these pathways contribute to a variety of pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26585368

  1. Nelson River and Hudson Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Rivers that empty into large bodies of water can have a significant impact on the thawing of nearshore winter ice. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 18, 2001, shows the Nelson River emptying spring runoff from the Manitoba province to the south into the southwestern corner of Canada's Hudson Bay. The warmer waters from more southern latitudes hasten melting of ice near the shore, though some still remained, perhaps because in shallow coastal waters, the ice could have been anchored to the bottom. High volumes of sediment in the runoff turned the inflow brown, and the rim of the retreating ice has taken on a dirty appearance even far to the east of the river's entrance into the Bay. The sediment would have further hastened the melting of the ice because its darker color would have absorbed more solar radiation than cleaner, whiter ice. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. Getting ahead of one's self? The common culture of immunology and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Warwick

    2014-09-01

    During the past thirty years, immunological metaphors, motifs, and models have come to shape much social theory and philosophy. Immunology, so it seems, often has served to naturalize claims about self, identity, and sovereignty--perhaps most prominently in Jacques Derrida's later studies. Yet the immunological science that functions as "nature" in these social and philosophical arguments is derived from interwar and Cold War social theory and philosophy. Theoretical immunologists and social theorists knowingly participated in a common culture. Thus the "naturalistic fallacy" in this case might be reframed as an error of categorization: its conditions of possibility would require ceaseless effort to purify and separate out the categories of nature and culture. The problem--inasmuch as there is a problem-therefore is not so much the making of an appeal to nature as assuming privileged access to an independent, sovereign category called "nature". PMID:25816483

  3. Zach in Marseille

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, James; Prévot, Marie-Louise

    Franz Xaver von Zach (``le baron de Zach'') was a frequent visitor to the Marseille Observatory, starting in 1786, when he travelled to the south of France and to Italy with the Duke and Duchess of Saxe-Gotha. They were accompanied on their travels to Hyères and Italy by Jacques Thulis, who was to become director of the Marseille Observatory, and this voyage was apparently of fundamental importance for Thulis' astronomical education. Zach, along with the Duchess, returned to Marseille several times after Thulis had become director. In Zach's ``Attraction des Montagnes'' (1814), based on geodetic measurements near Marseille, considerable historical material is presented, along with the coordinates of various local observatories including the residences of Zach and the Duchess. The Marseille Observatory collection of Zach letters will be described.

  4. [Cataract surgery: institutions, techniques and scientific models from Brisseau to Daviel].

    PubMed

    Monti, M T

    1994-01-01

    The intellectual biography of Jacques Daviel (1693-1762) offers unexpected opportunities to recall fundamental steps in the history of scientific ideas, academic institutions and surgical techniques. Kepler had, in fact, ousted the crystalline lens from the full seat of the visual power to the refracting medium, but his work had no effect on the central core of the eye doctors' practice, namely, cataract surgery. Daviel's audacity, which was not to push down but to extract the lens with the cataract, brought the Keplerian revolution to a completion. In addition, physiologists and philsophers tried to befriend Daviel, and they made use of his exceptional manual dexterity to work out Molyneux's question, that is, the test of the man born blind who recovered his sight, which posed problems in the 18th century in the theory of knowledge. PMID:11640568

  5. Borrego Fire, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For the past week, the Borrego Fire in northern New Mexico has consumed over 12,000 acres of land in and around the Sante Fe National Forest. This true-color image of the fire was acquired on May 24, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The fire, which has been fueled by unseasonably dry mixed conifer and aspen forests, is reported to have spread very little in the past twenty-four hours. Eight hundred firefighters, four air tankers, and 12 helicopters have been employed to control the blaze. As of now, the cause of the fire is still under investigation, and no one has been seriously injured or killed. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  6. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

    PubMed

    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity. PMID:20141799

  7. Medical science, culture, and truth

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Grant

    2006-01-01

    There is a fairly closed circle between culture, language, meaning, and truth such that the world of a given culture is a world understood in terms of the meanings produced in that culture. Medicine is, in fact, a subculture of a powerful type and has its own language and understanding of the range of illnesses that affect human beings. So how does medicine get at the truth of people and their ills in such a way as to escape its own limited constructions? There is a way out of the closed circle implicit in the idea of a praxis and the engagement with reality that is central to it and the further possibility introduced by Jacques Lacan that signification is never comprehensive in relation to the subject's encounter with the real. I will explore both of these so as to develop a conception of truth that is apt for the knowledge that arises in the clinic. PMID:17178003

  8. Pyroelectricity in Polycrystalline Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, R.; Jiménez, B.

    The first reference to pyroelectric effect is by Theophrastus in 314 BC, who noted that tourmaline becomes charged because it attracted bits of straw and ash when heated. Tourmaline's properties were reintroduced in Europe in 1707 by Johann George Schmidt, who also noted the attractive properties of the mineral when heated. Pyroelectricity was first described by Louis Lemery in 1717. In 1747, Linnaeus first related the phenomenon to electricity, although this was not proven until 1756 by Franz Ulrich Thodor Aepinus. In 1824, Sir David Brewster gave the effect the name it has today. William Thomson in 1878 and Voight in 1897 helped develop a theory for the processes behind pyroelectricity. Pierre Curie and his brother, Jacques Curie, studied pyroelectricity in the 1880s, leading to their discovery of some of the mechanisms behind piezoelectricity.

  9. Type 2 local realism is alive and well in the quantum world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    It is often, but incorrectly said, that there is no local realism in the quantum world. This is wrong because there is a second type of local realism. Type two local realism is drastically different than how most people think of their world, including Einstein. It starts with the idea that we are immersed in a sea of invisible elementary waves, traveling in all directions, at all wavelengths. Whenever a photon or other particle moves, it follows one of these waves in the reverse direction. Although this may sound preposterous, this theory can explain several quantum experiments: Jacques (2007) Wheeler thought experiment with delayed choice, Kim (1999), Quantum eraser experiment with delayed choice, all the Bell test experiments with delayed choice, and the double slit experiment. Using the Theory of Elementary Waves (TEW), all these experiments can, surprisingly, be explained using this unconventional type of local realism, with time going forward.

  10. Nanocomposites with Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2015-03-01

    The creation of ordered (layered) biomimetic materials typically follows a series of steps: first mix nanoparticles with water, organize the NPs by ice templating, evaporate the ice and then back fill with metal or polymer. We propose a simple method exploiting the in situ self-assembly of a crystalline polymer in the presence of nanoparticles to facilitate this process, and provide a completely new pathway for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. A suite of complementary experimental tools are used in this analysis. In parallel, we are developing theoretical tools to a priori predict the morphologies adopted by semicrystalline polymers. The convergence of these novel experimental and theoretical developments in the venerable field of semicrystalline polymers could lead to new applications for this largest class of commercially relevant polymeric materials. With Jacques Jestin, Brian Benicewicz, Dan Zhao, Longxi Zhao

  11. James Cameron discusses record dive and science concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    James Cameron, the explorer and filmmaker, led a 4 December panel at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco to discuss his daring dive on 26 March to the bottom of the ocean in a one-person vertical "torpedo" submarine, the Deepsea Challenger, and to present some initial science findings from expedition samples and data. The dive touched the bottom of the Challenger Deep, a valley in the floor of the nearly 11-kilometer-deep Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean. The vessel landed close to the same depth and at a location similar to where Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard descended in the Trieste bathyscaphe on 23 January 1960 at a then record-setting depth of 10,911 meters.

  12. Quantum Supergroups III. Twistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Sean; Fan, Zhaobing; Li, Yiqiang; Wang, Weiqiang

    2014-11-01

    We establish direct connections at several levels between quantum groups and supergroups associated to bar-consistent anisotropic super Cartan datum by constructing an automorphism (called twistor) in the setting of covering quantum groups. The canonical bases of the halves of quantum groups and supergroups are shown to match under the twistor up to powers of . We further show that the modified quantum group and supergroup are isomorphic over the rational function field adjoined with , by constructing a twistor on the modified covering quantum group. An equivalence of categories of weight modules for quantum groups and supergroups follows. Le plus court chemin entre deux vérités dans le domaine réel passe par le domaine complexe. —Jacques Hadamard

  13. Re-reading "Little Hans": Freud's case study and the question of competing paradigms in psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Psychoanalysts have long recognized the complex interaction between clinical data and formal psychoanalytic theories. While clinical data are often used to provide "evidence" for psychoanalytic paradigms, the theoretical model used by the analyst also structures what can and cannot be seen in the data. This delicate interaction between theory and clinical data can be seen in the history of interpretations of Freud's "Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-Year-Old Boy" ("Little Hans"). Freud's himself revised his reading of the case in 1926, after which a number of psychoanalysts--including Melanie Klein, Jacques Lacan, and John Bowlby--reinterpreted the case in the light of their particular models of the mind. These analysts each found "evidence" for their theoretical model within this classic case study, and in doing so they illuminated aspects of the case that had previously been obscured, while also revealing a great deal about the shifting preoccupations of psychoanalysis as a field. PMID:16773821

  14. Fires in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous thermal anomalies were detected on the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia in late June and early July by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Some of the anomalies (red dots) were fires, but at least one was the result of ongoing volcanic activity at one of the Peninsula's numerous active volcanoes. The erupting volcano, called Sheveluch, can be seen most clearly in the image from July 8, 2002. It is located in the upper right quadrant of the image, and appears as a grayish circular patch amid the surrounding green vegetation. In its center is a red dot indicating that MODIS detected a thermal signature coming from the restless volcano. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  15. Lena River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from June 28, 2002, shows numerous burn scars dotting the northern Siberian landscape along the Lena River. In the true-color image, the burn scars appear dark grayish-brown, while in the false-color image they appear red, as does the bare exposed soil of the Verkhoyansk Mountain Range to the east of the north-flowing Lena. A tinge of blue along the mountains in the false-color image means there is some lingering snow or ice, and that the bare soil is due to spring's late arrival there, and not to burn scars. At the top, sea ice still fills the Laptev Sea. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  16. Dust storm in Chad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Chad (lower left) and the surrounding wetlands are under increasing pressure from desertification. The encroachment of the Sahara occurs with creeping sand dunes and major dust storms, such as the one pictured in this MODIS image from October 28, 2001. The amount of open water (lighter green patch within the darker one) has declined markedly over the last decades and the invasion of dunes is creating a rippled effect through the wetlands that is all too clear in the high-resolution images. Growing population and increasing demands on the lake give it an uncertain future. The loss of such an important natural resource will have profound effects on the people who depend on the rapidly diminishing source of fresh water. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  17. Symposium for Reimar Luest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdon, Norman

    1991-02-01

    The work of Reimar Luest is considered. The future of space research and global cooperation in science is discussed. After a welcome address by Francesco Carassa, papers with the following titles were presented: Reimar Luest: The Astronomer (Rudolf Kippenhahn); Reimar Luest: The Space Scientist (Jacques Blamont); The Political Point of View (Hans Hilger Hauschild); Reminiscences of a Fellow Scientist (Lodewijk Woltjer); The View from Industry (Hans L. Merkmle); Reimar Luest: De l'ESRO a l'ESA (Hubert Curien); The Future of Space Exploration of the Solar System (Roald Sagdeev); The Future of Astrophysics from Space (Martin J. Rees); The Outer Planets and the Heliosphere (James A. Van Allen); The International Cooperation for the Future of Space Science (Monoru Oda).

  18. The Balkans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Transylvanian Basin in Romania stands out in brilliant green in this image from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on May 3, 2002. Near the top of the image, the hilly, forested basin is tucked in between the Carpathian Mountains, running northwest-southeast, and the Transylvanian Alps, running west-east. To the right of the image is the Black Sea. The large patch of turquoise water in the Black Sea is a large phytoplankton bloom. At the bottom of the image, the Aegean Sea and the Sea of Marmara is ringed by Greece (left) and Turkey (right). Please note that the high-resolution scene provided here is 500 meters per pixel. For a copy of this scene at the sensor?s fullest (250-m) resolution, visit the MODIS Rapidfire site. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  19. Context for the cultural impact of the computer

    SciTech Connect

    Grabow, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    It is apparent that the computer has had and is having a profound effect on everyone`s life. However, it is not always apparent what these effects are, where they originate, what direction they are taking us, or what controls them. Unfortunately, discussions concerning these issues often lack needed context -- terminology and ideas that help one uncover the underlying reality. This paper attempts to provide some of that context by introducing Jacques Ellul`s concept of {open_quotes}technique{close_quotes} -- encompassing much more than the computer. Many of these ideas grew out of {open_quotes}The Cultural Impact of the Computer{close_quotes}, a senior-level course taught by the author at Baylor University. The need for such context became evident when preparing for that course.

  20. Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this spectacular MODIS image from November 7, 2001, the skies are clear over Alaska, revealing winter's advance. Perhaps the most interesting feature of the image is in its center; in blue against the rugged white backdrop of the Alaska Range, Denali, or Mt. McKinley, casts its massive shadow in the fading daylight. At 20,322 ft (6,194m), Denali is the highest point in North America. South of Denali, Cook Inlet appears flooded with sediment, turning the waters a muddy brown. To the east, where the Chugach Mountains meet the Gulf of Alaska, and to the west, across the Aleutian Range of the Alaska Peninsula, the bright blue and green swirls indicate populations of microscopic marine plants called phytoplankton. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Lewis Carroll and psychoanalysis: why nothing adds up in wonderland.

    PubMed

    Lane, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Each generation of psychoanalyst has found different things to value and sometimes to censure in Lewis Carroll's remarkable fiction and flights of fancy. But what does Carroll's almost 'surrealist' perspective in the Alice stories tell us about the rituals and symbols that govern life beyond Wonderland and Looking-Glass World? Arguing that Carroll's strong interest in meaning and nonsense in these and later works helps make the world strange to readers, the better to show it off-kilter, this essay focuses on Jacques Lacan's Carroll - the writer-logician who stressed, as Lacan did, the difficulty and price of adapting to the symbolic order. By reconsidering Lacan's 1966 homage to the eccentric Victorian, I argue that Carroll's insight into meaning and interpretation remains of key interest to psychoanalysts intent on hearing all that he had to say about psychic life. PMID:21843247

  2. Critique and cure: a dream of uniting psychoanalysis and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jamieson

    2013-06-01

    Critical theory, whose aim was to historicize philosophy through integrating it with the social sciences, turned to psychoanalysis to find its way through an accounting of philosophy after the Second World War. Over 50 years after this initial project, the rift between philosophy and psychoanalysis has never been greater. If Jacques Lacan could be considered one of the few psychoanalysts to maintain and foster links to philosophical thought in the latter half of the 20th century, his work has sadly remained marginal in the clinical field throughout America and Europe. Both critical theory and Lacan remain skeptical of the direction taken by psychoanalysis after Freud. Reflecting on the history of these two disciplines, as well as through an examination of Theodor Adorno's posthumously published dream journal, critique and cure emerge as two dialectically intertwined themes that gain momentum in the dream of the unification of the philosophical and psychoanalytic projects. PMID:23722399

  3. Fires in Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On February 5, 2002, the dense smoke from numerous forest fires stretched out over the Pacific Ocean about 400 miles south of Santiago, Chile. This true-color Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the fires, which are located near the city of Temuco. The fires are indicated with red dots (boxes in the high-resolution imagery). The fires were burning near several national parks and nature reserves in an area of the Chilean Andes where tourism is very popular. Southeast of the fires, the vegetation along the banks of the Rio Negro in Argentina stands out in dark green. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  4. The deconstructing angel: nursing, reflection and evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary

    2005-06-01

    This paper explores Jacques Derrida's strategy of deconstruction as a way of understanding and critiquing nursing theory and practice. Deconstruction has its origins in philosophy, but I argue that it is useful and relevant as a way of challenging the dominant paradigm of any discipline, including nursing. Because deconstruction is notoriously difficult to define, I offer a number of examples of deconstruction in action. In particular, I focus on three critiques of reflective practice by the meta-narrative of evidence-based practice (EBP) and attempt to show how those critiques can be directed back at EBP itself. I conclude with the observation that EBP is open to many of the criticisms that it directs at other discourses, including problems of a lack of empirical evidence, of distortions due to memory, and of falsification of the 'facts'. PMID:15892723

  5. MODIS Views the Middle-East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    To paraphrase English author T.H. White, borders are the one thing a man sees that a bird cannot see as it flies high overhead. For the 15th consecutive day, differences in ideology have sparked violence and tension in the middle-east as the rest of the world watches, concerned. This true-color image of the region was taken on September 10, 2000, by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows the lands of Israel along the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea, with the countries of Jordan to the southeast and Syria to the Northeast. Jerusalem, labeled, is Israel's capital city and Aman, labeled, is the capital of Jordan. The region known as the West Bank lies between the two countries. Running from north to south, the Jordan River links the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Group, NASA GSFC

  6. New pandemics: HIV and AIDS, HCV and chronic hepatitis, Influenza virus and flu

    PubMed Central

    Gatignol, Anne; Dubuisson, Jean; Wainberg, Mark A; Cohen, Éric A; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    New pandemics are a serious threat to the health of the entire world. They are essentially of viral origin and spread at large speed. A meeting on this topic was held in Lyon, France, within the XIXth Jacques Cartier Symposia, a series of France-Québec meetings held every year. New findings on HIV and AIDS, on HCV and chronic hepatitis, and an update on influenza virus and flu were covered during this meeting on December 4 and 5, 2006. Aspects of viral structure, virus-host interactions, antiviral defenses, drugs and vaccinations, and epidemiological aspects were discussed for HIV and HCV. Old and recent data on the flu epidemics ended this meeting. PMID:17270043

  7. Smoke from Fires in Central America Drifts over Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Smoke from widespread fires in tropical Mexico and Central America appears to be drifting over the U.S. Gulf States. In 1998 similar circumstances resulted in air-quality warnings being issued in several U.S. states, including Texas and Louisiana. The top image shows smoke and fires (red pixels) observed by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Possibly hundreds of small fires are scattered across Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The lower image, acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), shows smoke from these fires carried by the prevailing winds across the Gulf of Mexico and over the United States. Images courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the SeaWiFS Project, NASA GSFC, and ORBIMAGE

  8. STS-78 Crew and alternates arrive at the SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL. -- STS-78 Mission Commander Terence T. 'Tom' Henricks (third from left) displays an Olympic torch that was presented to the flight crew and their alternates after they arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. With Henricks are (from left) Payload Specialist Jean-Jacques Favier (French Space Agency); Alternate Payload Specialist Luca Urbani (Italian Space Agency); Henricks; Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady Jr.; Payload Commander Susan J. Helms; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; Mission Specialist Richard M. Linnehan; Alternate Payload Specialist Pedro Duque (European Space Agency); and Payload Specialist Robert Brenton Thirsk (Canadian Space Agency). The crew will take the torch with them on their upcoming spaceflight and then present it upon their return to a representative of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic games (ACOG). The countdown clock began ticking earlier today toward the June 20 launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS-78, the fifth Shuttle flight of 1996.

  9. [Moleschott and materialism].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Jacques Moleschott (1822-1893), born into a Dutch Roman Catholic family, attended secondary school in Cleve (Germany). There he became captivated by Hegelian philosophy and lost his faith. After medical studies in Heidelberg and a brief spell as physician in Utrecht, where he struck up a life-long friendship with the physiologists Franciscus Donders (1818-1889) and Izaak van Deen (1805-1869), he returned to Heidelberg as lecturer in physiology. In his textbooks and particularly in his book for the general public, 'The circulation of life' (in German), he attested to a strict physicochemical view of biological phenomena, in opposition to contemporary notions of vitalism and teleology. When the atheistic implications had caused a conflict with the authorities in Baden, he moved as professor of physiology to Zürich (1854) and subsequently to the emerging nation of Italy, as professor in Turin (1861) and finally in Rome (1878), where he became a senator. PMID:22929747

  10. STS-65 payload specialists Favier and Mukai on CCT middeck during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Attired in launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and seated on the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) middeck, payload specialists Jean-Jacques Favier and Chiaki Mukai rehearse launch and entry procedures. Favier of the French space agency, Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), is backup for Mukai, the payload specialist representing the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Favier will communicate with the International Microgravity Laboratory 2's (IML-2's) crew from the ground during the scheduled 13-day flight. The two joined six NASA astronauts at Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE for the training session. The STS-65 IML-2 mission will fly aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, next year.

  11. Flooding in Central China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, frequent, heavy rains gave rise to floods and landslides throughout China that have killed over 1,000 people and affected millions. This false-color image of the western Yangtze River and Dongting Lake in central China was acquired on August 21, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. (right) The latest flooding crisis in China centers on Dingtong Lake in the center of the image. Heavy rains have caused it to swell over its banks and swamp lakefront towns in the province of Hunan. As of August 23, 2002, more than 250,000 people have been evacuated, and over one million people have been brought in to fortify the dikes around the lake. Normally the lake would appear much smaller and more defined in the MODIS image. Credit: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC.

  12. Lashley's shift from bacteriology to neuropsychology, 1910-1917, and the influence of Jennings, Watson, and Franz.

    PubMed

    Bruce, D

    1986-01-01

    From 1910 to 1917, Karl S. Lashley's research moved from bacteriology to neuropsychology through intermediate stages of zoology, comparative psychology, and the psychology of learning. This shift is examined with particular reference to Lashley's associations with John B. Watson, Shepherd I. Franz, and Herbert S. Jennings. Watson's impact was substantial, for he attracted Lashley to comparative psychology and was the source of many of his later research interests. The bridge to neuropsychological research was provided by Franz who trained Lashley in the lesion method of investigating the brain bases of learning. The influence of Jennings, Lashley's Ph.D. supervisor, was most evident in the divergence of the post-1915 interests of Lashley and Watson. Lashley's search for brain mechanisms of learning, as contrasted with Watson's concern with behavioral prediction and control, mirrored a similar earlier difference between Jennings and Jacques Loeb. PMID:3511136

  13. STS-65 crewmembers and backup participate in bench review at Boeing Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 crewmembers, wearing clean suits, look over equipment to be carried aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, for the scheduled July flight of the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission. Surrounding a table full of equipment at Boeing's Flight Equipment Processing Facility near the Johnson Space Center (JSC), are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Leroy Chiao, MS Donald A. Thomas, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb, and backup (alternate) payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier. Mukai represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) and Favier represents France's Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. Photo taken by NASA JSC contract photographer Scott A. Wickes.

  14. STS-65 crewmembers and backup participate in bench review at Boeing Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Attired in clean suits, STS-65 Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb (left), backup (alternate) payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier (center), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai look over equipment to be carried aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, for the scheduled July flight of the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission. Hygiene supplies including plaid lintless towels are stacked on the table in front of the crewmembers. The bench review and equipment inspection took place at the Boeing Flight Equipment Processing Facility (FEPF) near the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Mukai represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) and Favier represents France's Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Photo taken by NASA JSC contract photographer Scott A. Wickes.

  15. Smoke and Sediments in Sicily

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The waters along the shoreline of Sicily appear bright aquamarine in this image from April 7, 2002. Although other satellite images occasionally show lightening along the coast of Sicily and southern Italy, the water is unusually bright in this image. The bright water may have been caused by a recent storm that either stirred up sediment from relatively shallow sea bottom, or could be a springtime phytoplankton bloom. (Distinguishing phytoplankton from sediment is one of the challenges facing NASA researchers who study life in the oceans from satellites.) Another interesting feature of this image is the smoke plume from Mount Etna that is streaming almost directly to the East (right). Mt. Etna is one of the world's most active volcanos, and erupts up to several times a year. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. Resistance, rupture and repetition: Civil society strategies against intimate partner violence in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Mona; Baaz, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a new interpretation of the 'resistance' carried out by local civil society organisations in Cambodia against intimate partner violence (IPV). In this, the paper explores the nexus between 'rupture', 'resistance' and 'repetition' and concludes that different 'repetitions' can contribute to acts of violence while simultaneously creating possibilities for resisting IPV. In regard to the latter, the concept of 'rupture' is investigated as a performative politics through which organisations try to disrupt the 'repetitions' of violent masculinities. Furthermore, it is argued that the importance of 'repetitions' and the concept of time should be acknowledged. The French criminal defence lawyer Jacques Vergès' understanding of 'rupture' and the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze's notions of 'repetition' inform the analysis. To exemplify our discussion and findings, the paper embraces stories of a number of civil society workers who facilitate various men's groups in Cambodia in order to negotiate the practice of IPV. PMID:25599422

  17. [The complex travel of cinchona barks between Peru and Québec Hôtel-Dieu, in the middle of the eighteenth century].

    PubMed

    Simon, Lorène; Lafont, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Duplessis sisters, who were religious nuns in Hôtel-Dieu (Quebec hospital), were exchanging letters with a French apothecary from Dieppe in Normandy, named Jacques-Tranquilain Féret. They asked him to send them in Quebec the drugs and medicines their apothecary needed. Amongst these drugs were cinchona barks that came from Callao in Peru by boat, passed Cape Horn and then sailed to Cadiz, the great Spanish port. Then they embarked to Rouen, which was the French port for goods coming from overseas. The goods from Peru had then to be transported on little fishing boats to Dieppe, where Féret received the barks. The apothecary sent these drugs to Quebec by boats sailing either from Rouen or from La Rochelle. So these Peruvian drugs had to cross two times the Ocean before accessing to North America. PMID:27281933

  18. Wildfires in Eastern U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Drought conditions have plagued the Appalachian Mountains in October and November, and low relative humidity combined with dry leaves on the ground has created extreme fire danger in many eastern states. This true-color MODIS image made from data collected on November 13, 2001, shows smoke from numerous fires (indicated in red), predominantly in southern West Virginia (image center), Kentucky (to the southwest), and Tennessee (south). The fires, at least some of which are likely the result of arson, have burned thousands of acres throughout the region. Unfortunately for those people fighting the fires, the fire danger is likely to remain high, with no significant rain expected in the near term. South of Lake Erie, the southernmost of the Great Lakes, numerous aircraft contrails crisscross Ohio. Water vapor emitted with engine exhaust condenses in the cold, dry air at high altitudes, leaving behind a trail of condensation--a contrail. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  19. Medical science, culture, and truth.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant

    2006-01-01

    There is a fairly closed circle between culture, language, meaning, and truth such that the world of a given culture is a world understood in terms of the meanings produced in that culture. Medicine is, in fact, a subculture of a powerful type and has its own language and understanding of the range of illnesses that affect human beings. So how does medicine get at the truth of people and their ills in such a way as to escape its own limited constructions? There is a way out of the closed circle implicit in the idea of a praxis and the engagement with reality that is central to it and the further possibility introduced by Jacques Lacan that signification is never comprehensive in relation to the subject's encounter with the real. I will explore both of these so as to develop a conception of truth that is apt for the knowledge that arises in the clinic. PMID:17178003

  20. Les Droits de l'Homme et l'Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Francine

    2002-07-01

    The 21st century will, we hope, be the century of education or, as Jacques Delors put it in his report for UNESCO, the century of "lifelong learning". But this hope will only be realised if education is the subject and aim of a universal right. This right is enshrined in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which ought to be recognised in all countries of the world as the set of principles that should guide human action. The recognition of these rights should lead to a functioning democracy within educational establishments, where the rules of life should be the same for all: pupils, teachers and administrators. It is no less essential that human rights should constitute guiding principles for educational practice. The United Nations Decade for Human Rights (1995-2004) is an outstanding opportunity for each state to establish a plan of action for a true programme of human rights education.

  1. Radio OH Observations of Recent Bright Comets from Arecibo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Howell, Ellen S.

    2014-11-01

    We obtained OH spectra of recent comets with the Arecibo 305m radiotelescope. C/2012 X1 LINEAR was observed between 03 November 2013 and 13 January 2014, C/2014 E2 Jacques on 14 dates between 10 May and 31 July 2014, and C/2012 K1 PANSTARRS on 12 dates between 16 June and 23 August 2014. Spectra at 1667 and 1665 MHz (18cm wavelength) were obtained with an on-sky beam size of 2.9 arcminutes, mapping 7 positions of the OH within 4 arcminutes of the nucleus when the coma is sufficiently large. Radio OH spectra are seen via a Λ-doublet, with the excitation of the lines depending on the heliocentric velocity of the comet. We interpret the spectra via a Monte Carlo model, taking into account the OH inversion predictions of Despois et al. (1981) or Schleicher & A'Hearn (1988). In highly productive comets, high densities thermalize the lines, reducing the line strength near the nucleus. Models of mapping observations can directly constrain the radius within which quenching is active, and thus yield a more accurate estimate of the gas production rate, while radio observations at high spectral resolution place excellent constraints on the gas outflow velocity whether or not the coma is resolved. We present gas production rates, quenching radius estimates and outflow velocities for comets C/2012 X1 LINEAR, C/2014 E2 Jacques and C/2012 K1 PANSTARRS. Near its noteworthy sungrazing perihelion, comet C/2012 S1 ISON presented too small a gas coma for mapping observations, so we present only estimated gas production rates and outflow velocities for these unresolved observations.

  2. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Schutkowski. "Diet and social status during the La Tène period in Bohemia: carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of bone collagen from Kutná Hora-Karlov and Radovesice." Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 24.2 (2005): 135-147. Schutkowski, Holger, et al. "Diet, status and decomposition at Weingarten: trace element and isotope analyses on early mediaeval skeletal material." Journal of Archaeological Science 26.6 (1999): 675-685. Zernitskaya, Valentina, et al. "Vegetation pattern and sedimentation changes in the context of the Lateglacial climatic events: Case study of Staroje Lake (Eastern Belarus)." Quaternary International (2014).

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  5. Modelling study on buffering pH and retaining U using a simplified uranium mill tailings pile example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Simunek, Jirka

    2014-05-01

    The hypothetical problem that is presented here considers the release and migration of uranium from a simplified uranium mill tailings pile towards a river. The modeling exercise with the coupled reactive transport model HP2 illustrates the effect of the geochemical conceptual model for sorption on (i) the buffering of the pH in the soil/aquifer system and (ii) the retention of U in the soil. The HP2 module, which couples the PHREEQC geochemical code with HYDRUS (2D/3D), is a two-dimensional equivalent of the one-dimensional HP1 program that was first released in 2005 (Jacques et al., 2008), and used successfully in many applications. Sorption of U is described using a multi-site cation exchange model (see Jacques et al., 2008). This sorption model also buffers the acid pH due to proton exchange. Two scenarios are considered: a soil with a relatively low (8.1 × 10-3 mol/kg) and relatively high (8.1 × 10-2 mol/kg) sorption capacity. In the third scenario, specific sorption of U and other cations and anions on Fe-oxides is described using a non-electrostatic surface complexation model with a very low capacity (8.1 × 10-4 mol/kg), in addition to low exchange complexation. Proton exchange on the cation exchanger buffers the acidity by replacing calcium with protons on the exchanger; the spatial extent of the pH-perturbed region is smaller in the scenario with the higher exchange capacity. Specific sorption has only a small effect on the pH-perturbed zone, although it is important to note that its capacity is one order of magnitude lower than in the scenario with the low sorption capacity. U reaches the river system within 1000 d in scenarios with low and high exchange capacities. Only in the scenario with specific sorption, U migration within the ground water system is retarded, compared to the other two cases. The results of the three scenarios do not seem to be intuitive, especially the equally fast movement of U in the scenario with a high exchange capacity

  6. The G8-global healthcare applications project (GHAP) - recommendations for the way into the information society

    PubMed

    Dietzel

    1999-12-16

    The Global Healthcare Applications Project has sought to demonstrate the potential of telematics in the field of medicine and healthcare and to promote joint approaches to issues such as the setting of standards. This has been done through 10 sub-projects covering a range of applications and issues: 1. Towards a global public health information network - Coordinator: Germany (Ulrich Laaser, ulaaser@mail.uni-bielefeld.de; URL: http://health.ibs.uni-bielefeld. de/i-jphe/database/documents/abstract/laaser-g7.htm(C45-60_laaser-g7. pdf) 2. Improving prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. - Coordinator: France (Gerard Brugal, gerard. brugal@imag.fr; URL: http://pathconsult.imag.fr/G7/G7_index.html) 3. Improving prevention, diagnosis and treatment of major cardiovascular diseases. - Coordinator: Italy (Attilio Maseri, amaseri@rm.unicatt.it; URL: http://www.g7cardio.org) 4. International concerted action for collaboration in telemedicine. - Coordinator: Canada (Andre Lacroix, lacroixa@ere.umontreal.ca; URL: http:// www.g7sp4.org) 5. Enabling mechanisms for a global healthcare network, including Internet connectivity. - Coordinator: UK (Ray Rogers, r.rogers@mcmail.com; URL: http://www.ehto.be/sp5) 6. International harmonisation of the use of data cards in healthcare: Internet Connectivity Coordinator: USA (Elliot R. Siegel, siegel@nlm.nih.gov; URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/) - Smart Cards and information exchange security in health care Joint Coordinators: France, European Commission, Italy and Germany (Jacques Sauret, jacques.sauret@sante.gouv.fr and G8-HC@sesam-vitale.fr; URL: http:/www.sesam-vitale.fr/Projects/Netlink-G7-En/) 7. Evidence and effectiveness. - Coordinator: Canada (Andrew Penn, andrew. penn@ualberta.ca; URL: http://www.medlib.com/spi/web.htm) 8. Multilingual anatomical digital database. - Coordinator: USA (Michael J. Ackermann; URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov) 9. Medical image reference centre. - Coordinator: Japan (Eturo Kashiwagi

  7. HPx - a tool for simulating interactive biohydrogeochemical processes in soil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Simunek, Jirka

    2014-05-01

    During the last two decades, different numerical codes have been developed capable of simulating interactive physical, hydrological, biological, and geochemical processes in porous media. The simulator HPx, which couples the HYDRUS codes with PHREEQC, is one of the state-of-the-art models, which specializes in variably-saturated soil systems and explicitly accounts for atmospheric boundary conditions (precipitation and potential evapotranspiration) and root water uptake. It combines most of the advanced features of the two individual codes (Jacques et al., 2008). The versatility of the HPx code is illustrated in this presentation using several examples. An overview of different physical and geochemical conceptual models is also provided. The first example shows the results of a benchmark test, in which combined effects of mineral dissolution and precipitation on changes in physical properties during both porosity increase and clogging were simulated. The second example illustrates the flexibility of the model to include a soil organic matter submodel when simultaneously simulating organic matter degradation and CO2 diffusion in a variably-saturated soil. Since the HPx codes also simulate heat transport in the soil, they can account for fluctuations of kinetic parameters throughout the year due to their temperature dependency. Global seasonal variations in soil pCO2 and soil organic pools followed expected behavior, whereas daily values of soil pCO2 clearly exhibited the effects of daily and spatially variable temperatures and water contents on the biologically-controlled kinetic parameters. The last example illustrates the inclusion of various conceptual models for root solute uptake into the HPx modeling framework. Due to close link with the chemistry of pore water, parameters needed in the uptake equations may depend, in addition to their dependency on root system and ion uptake characteristics, also on the geochemistry of the system, resulting in time

  8. Assessment of chemical element migration in soil-plant complex of Urov endemic localities of East Transbaikalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadim V., Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Sabsbakhor, Khushvakhtova; Aklexander, Degtyarev; Sergey, Tyutikov; Victor, Berezkin; Elena, Karpova

    2014-05-01

    - Salicaceae) and selenium (needles of larch - Larix sibirica L.) were found among the plants. References 1. Ermakov V., Jovanovic L. Characteristics of selenium migration in soil-plant system of East Meshchera and Transbaikalia// J. Geochem. Explor., 2010. Vol. 107, 200-205. 2. Ermakov Vadim, Jovanovic Larisa, Berezkin Victor, Tyutikov Sergey, Danilogorskaya Anastasiya, Danilova Valentina, Krechetova Elena, Degtyarev Alexander, Khushvakhtova Sabsbakhor. Chemical assessment of soil and water of Urov biogeochemical provinces of Eastern Transbaikalia// Ecologica, 2012. Vol. 19, 69, 5-9. 3. Ermakov V.V., Tuytikov S.F. Khushvakhtova S.D., Danilova V.N. Boev V.A., Barabanschikova R.N., Chudinova E.A. Peculiarities of quantitative determination of selenium in biological materials// Bulletin of the Tyumen State University Press, 2010, 3, 206-214. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant number 12-05-00141a.

  9. PREFACE: International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruccio, Giuseppe; Sanvito, Stefano; Hoffmann, Germar; Wiesendanger, Roland; Rowan, Alan

    2011-03-01

    Conference banner The International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010), was organized by partners of the EU-project SpiDME and held in the historical city of Lecce, Italy from 23-27 May 2010, at the Ecotekne Campus, University of Salento. The conference provided an international forum to discuss recent progress and future trends in the field. In particular, the aim was to bring together the community of more conventional spin-transport, with that of molecular and nano-magnetism. The main topics of TSN-2010 were: MATERIALSSPIN-PHYSICS AND THEORY - Molecular Magnets- Spin injection - Magnetic nanoparticles and nanowires- Domain walls, spin torque and vortex dynamics - Magnetic semiconductors- Numerical modeling of organic nanomagnetism - Multiferroics and transition metal oxides APPLICATIONSADVANCES IN CHARACTERIZATION - Magnetic Multilayers- Magneto-optical characterization and spin manipulation - Spin-photonics- Intrinsic spin transport mechanism in organics - Molecular and nano-spintronics- Organometallic molecules on surfaces - Spin-based quantum computation- Single molecular magnets on surfaces - Magnetism for sensing and nanomedicine- Nanoscale characterization and spin-sensitive SPM The scientific programme started on Monday 24 May and ended on Thursday 27 May. The Nobel Laureate A Fert attended the conference giving a plenary talk and the programme also featured invited presentations by (in alphabetical order): M Aeschlimann, M Affronte, N Atodiresei, P A Bobbert, A Dediu, N Kioussis, L W Molenkamp, J Moodera, V Prigodin, M Ruben, R Sessoli, R Tan, and H Wende. TSN2010 had 150 attendees who came from around the globe to present their latest research in 100 oral presentations. Contributed talks were selected by the program committee, composed of Giuseppe Maruccio, Ross Rinaldi, Valentina Arima, Fabio Della Sala, Maurizio Martino (Universitá del Salento, NNL Institute Nanoscience-CNR, Lecce, Italy), Stefano Sanvito (Trinity College

  10. 'We hold these truths to be self-evident': deconstructing 'evidence-based' medical practice.

    PubMed

    Devisch, Ignaas; Murray, Stuart J

    2009-12-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Evidence-based medicine (EBM) claims to be based on 'evidence', rather than 'intuition'. However, EBM's fundamental distinction between quantitative 'evidence' and qualitative 'intuition' is not self-evident. The meaning of 'evidence' is unclear and no studies of quality exist to demonstrate the superiority of EBM in health care settings. This paper argues that, despite itself, EBM holds out only the illusion of conclusive scientific rigour for clinical decision making, and that EBM ultimately is unable to fulfil its own structural criteria for 'evidence'. Methods Our deconstructive analysis of EBM draws on the work of the French philosopher, Jacques Derrida. Deconstruction works in the name of justice to lay bare, to expose what has been hidden from view. In plain language, we deconstruct EBM's paradigm of 'evidence', the randomized controlled trial (RCT), to demonstrate that there cannot be incontrovertible evidence for EBM as such. We argue that EBM therefore 'auto-deconstructs' its own paradigm, and that medical practitioners, policymakers and patients alike ought to be aware of this failure within EBM itself. Results EBM's strict distinction between admissible evidence (based on RCTs) and other supposedly inadmissible evidence is not itself based on evidence, but rather, on intuition. In other words, according to EBM's own logic, there can be no 'evidentiary' basis for its distinction between admissible and inadmissible evidence. Ultimately, to uphold this fundamental distinction, EBM must seek recourse in (bio)political ideology and an epistemology akin to faith. PMID:20367689

  11. Blanket of Snow Covers Salt Lake City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On December 23, 2001, less than two months before the start of the 2002 Winter Olympics, snow blankets Salt Lake City and the surrounding area. The Great Salt Lake, on the left hand side of the image above, often contributes to the region's snowfall through the 'lake-effect.' As cold air passes over a large body of water it both warms and absorbs moisture. The warm air then rises (like a hot air balloon) and cools again. As it cools, the water vapor condenses out, resulting in snowfall. Just to the east (right) of the Great Salt Lake the mountains of the Wasatch Range lift air from the lake even higher, enhancing the lake-effect, resulting in an average snowfall of 64 inches a year in Salt Lake City and 140 inches in Park City, which is located at the foot of the Wasatch Front. For more information about the lake-effect, read Lake-Effect Snowfalls. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  12. Ca(2+) microdomains, NAADP and type 1 ryanodine receptor in cell activation.

    PubMed

    Guse, Andreas H; Wolf, Insa M A

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger that belongs to the superfamily of regulatory adenine nucleotides. Though NAADP has been known since 20years, several aspects of its metabolism and molecular mode of action are still under discussion. Though the importance of the type 1 ryanodine receptor was discovered and published already in 2002 Hohenegger et al. (2002 Oct 15) , recent data re-emphasize these original findings in pancreatic acinar cells and in T-lymphocytes. Here we review recent developments in NAADP formation and metabolism, putative target Ca(2+) channels for NAADP with special emphasis on the type 1 ryanodine receptor, and NAADP binding proteins. The latter are basis for a unifying hypothesis for NAADP action. Finally, the role of NAADP in T cell Ca(2+) signaling and activation is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate . Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26804481

  13. Using yeast to model calcium-related diseases: example of the Hailey-Hailey disease.

    PubMed

    Voisset, Cécile; García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Birkmire, April; Blondel, Marc; Wellinger, Ralf Erik

    2014-10-01

    Cross-complementation studies offer the possibility to overcome limitations imposed by the inherent complexity of multicellular organisms in the study of human diseases, by taking advantage of simpler model organisms like the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review deals with, (1) the use of S. cerevisiae as a model organism to study human diseases, (2) yeast-based screening systems for the detection of disease modifiers, (3) Hailey-Hailey as an example of a calcium-related disease, and (4) the presentation of a yeast-based model to search for chemical modifiers of Hailey-Hailey disease. The preliminary experimental data presented and discussed here show that it is possible to use yeast as a model system for Hailey-Hailey disease and suggest that in all likelihood, yeast has the potential to reveal candidate drugs for the treatment of this disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium signaling in health and disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. PMID:24583118

  14. Open-cell cloud formation over the Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    What atmospheric scientists refer to as open cell cloud formation is a regular occurrence on the back side of a low-pressure system or cyclone in the mid-latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere, a low-pressure system will draw in surrounding air and spin it counterclockwise. That means that on the back side of the low-pressure center, cold air will be drawn in from the north, and on the front side, warm air will be drawn up from latitudes closer to the equator. This movement of an air mass is called advection, and when cold air advection occurs over warmer waters, open cell cloud formations often result. This MODIS image shows open cell cloud formation over the Atlantic Ocean off the southeast coast of the United States on February 19, 2002. This particular formation is the result of a low-pressure system sitting out in the North Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles east of Massachusetts. (The low can be seen as the comma-shaped figure in the GOES-8 Infrared image from February 19, 2002.) Cold air is being drawn down from the north on the western side of the low and the open cell cumulus clouds begin to form as the cold air passes over the warmer Caribbean waters. For another look at the scene, check out the MODIS Direct Broadcast Image from the University of Wisconsin. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. Healing pathways: longitudinal effects of religious coping and social support on PTSD symptoms in African American sexual assault survivors.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ullman, Sarah; Tsong, Yuying; Anderson, Gera; Counts, Pamela; Tillman, Shaquita; Bhang, Cecile; Gray, Anthea

    2015-01-01

    African American women are at a slightly increased risk for sexual assault (A. Abbey, A. Jacques-Tiaura, & M. Parkhill, 2010). However, because of stigma, experiences of racism, and historical oppression, African American women are less likely to seek help from formal agencies compared to White women (Lewis et al., 2005; S. E. Ullman & H. H. Filipas, 2001) and/or women of other ethnic backgrounds (C. Ahrens, S. Abeling, S. Ahmad, & J. Himman, 2010). Therefore, the provision of culturally appropriate services, such as the inclusion of religion and spiritual coping, may be necessary when working with African American women survivors of sexual assault. Controlling for age and education, the current study explores the impact of religious coping and social support over 1 year for 252 African American adult female sexual assault survivors recruited from the Chicago metropolitan area. Results from hierarchical linear regression analyses reveal that high endorsement of religious coping and social support at Time 1 does not predict a reduction in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at Time 2. However, high social support at Time 2 does predict lower PTSD at Time 2. Also, it is significant to note that survivors with high PTSD at Time 1 and Time 2 endorse greater use of social support and religious coping. Clinical and research implications are explored. PMID:25387044

  16. A fortunate journey on uneven grounds.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    I was surprised to be invited to write a prefatory chapter for the Annual Review of Microbiology. Indeed, I did not feel that I belonged to that class of eminent scientists who had written such chapters. Perhaps it is because I am a kind of mutant: In spite of having experienced war, both German and Soviet occupations, repeated bombardments, dictatorships, and a revolution, I managed nonetheless to engage in scientific research, thus realizing a childhood dream. After having obtained my Doctor Rerum Naturalium degree in Budapest, Hungary, I was fortunate to meet Jacques Monod at the Pasteur Institute, and this became a turning point in my scientific career. In his laboratory, I contributed to the definition of the lactose operon promoter, uncovered intracistronic complementation in β-galactosidase, and investigated the role of cAMP in Escherichia coli. In my own laboratory, together with many gifted students and collaborators, I studied the role of adenylate cyclase in bacterial virulence. This allowed the engineering of recombinant adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis for the development of protective and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:22994486

  17. Princess Astrid Coast, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The continent of Antarctica is almost completely covered by a thick blanket of ice, punctuated only by steep mountain peaks and a handful of dry valleys. Antarctica is also ringed by a permanent ice shelf, and that is surrounded by seasonal sea ice. The image above, acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on September 26, 2001, shows many of the types of ice found in Antarctica. At the bottom of the image is the ice of the continental glacier, which is up to 4,000 meters thick in the interior. These thick glaciers are held in place by coastal mountain ranges. Some ice does flow through the mountains, spilling onto the relatively flat land of the Princess Astrid Coast. Cold air also spills over the mountains, creating very strong and persistent 'katabatic' winds. These scour the snow off the tops of the glaciers, leaving pale blue patches of bare ice. Above the coastline is the ice shelf, which is much smoother. There, glacial ice actually floats on the sea surface. Beyond that is the chaotic surface of the sea ice, which has been solidifying all winter long. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Strategy and logistics for the New World Order. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gildersleeve, C.W.

    1990-12-01

    An interdisciplinary analysis of the post-Cold War world to determine the optimal strategy to attain the national interests of the United States, and the requisite logistic structure to support that strategy. The optimal solution is found to be a strategy based on multinational defense centered on a permanent force of United Nations garrison port complexes. This multilateral force would be augmented by as small a national defense force as necessary to ensure national security. The theses endeavors to reconnect the cultural and philosophical past of the United States with its immediate future. National interests are identified through examination of American Pragmatism and the philosophies of John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. To determine the current status of common defense, based upon the Foreign Military Sales system, and analysis of current data is accomplished. Future threats to the United States are examined with special emphasis on nuclear terrorism. The ability of Islamic nations in North Africa and the Middle East to produce significant quantities of uranium is demonstrated. The grave political as well as ongoing environmental consequences of this recent capability are discussed in detail.

  19. A Three-Planet Extrasolar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Pepe, Francesco; Queloz, Didier; Udry, Stéphane; Santos, Nuno C.; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy; Mordasini, Christoph; Bouchy, François; Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Laskar, Jacques; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sivan, Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Using the ultra-precise HARPS spectro-graph on ESO’s 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, a team of astronomers1 has discovered that a nearby star is host to three Neptune-mass planets. The in-nermost planet is most probably rocky, while the outermost is the first known Neptune-mass planet to reside in the habitable zone. This unique system is likely further enriched by an asteroid belt. Z% Lovis et al. 2006, Nature 441, 305. The team is composed of Christophe Lovis, Michel Mayor, Francesco Pepe, Didier Queloz, and Stéphane Udry (Observatoire de l’Université de Genève, Switzerland), Nuno C. Santos (Observatoire de l’Uni-versité de Genève, Switzerland, Centro de Astro-nomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa and Centro de Geofisica de Evora, Portugal), Yann Alibert, Willy Benz, Christoph Mordasini (Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern, Switzerland), François Bouchy (Observatoire de Haute-Provence and IAP, France), Alexandre C. M. Correia (Uni-versidade de Aveiro, Portugal), Jacques Laskar (IMCCE-CNRS, Paris, France), Jean-Loup Bertaux (Service d’Aéronomie du CNRS, France), and Jean-Pierre Sivan (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille, France).

  20. Dr. von Braun on top of the Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This photograph depicts Dr. von Braun (at right, showing his back) and other NASA officials surveying the deep-sea research submarine 'Ben Franklin.' Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  1. Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is an aerial view of the deep-sea research submarine 'Ben Franklin' at dock. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  2. Dr. von Braun on Top of the Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This photograph depicts Dr. von Braun (fourth from far right) and other NASA officials surveying the deep-sea research submarine 'Ben Franklin.' Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  3. Deep-Sea Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The deep-sea submarine 'Ben Franklin' is being docked in the harbor. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life. It also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effect of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  4. Interior View of the Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is an interior view of the living quarters of the deep-sea research submarine 'Ben Franklin.' Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep- ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effect of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  5. Fires in Thailand and Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Many fires (red pixels) were seen burning across Thailand and Southern Cambodia on January 8, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Almost the entire countries of Thailand (center) and Cambodia (lower right) were remarkably cloud-free in this true-color scene. Thailand is bordered by the countries of Myanmar to the west, Laos to the north and east, and Cambodia to the southeast. Thailand's capital city of Bangkok sits on its southern shore, where the Chao Phraya River flows into the large bay in the northern Gulf of Thailand. Moving eastward from Bangkok, one can see the Tonle Sap-Cambodia's largest inland body of water. Waters from the Tonle Sap flow southeastward and converge with the mighty Mekong River, just east of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital. The Mekong River defines much of the border between Thailand and Laos. The captal of Laos-Viangchan-is situated just across the Mekong from Thailand's northern border. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  6. Chance and Necessity in Eye Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Charles Darwin has proposed the theory that evolution of live organisms is based on random variation and natural selection. Jacques Monod in his classic book Chance and Necessity, published 40 years ago, presented his thesis “that the biosphere does not contain a predictable class of objects or events, but constitutes a particular occurrence, compatible indeed with the first principles, but not deducible from those principals and therefore, essentially unpredictable.” Recent discoveries in eye evolution are in agreement with both of these theses. They confirm Darwin's assumption of a simple eye prototype and lend strong support for the notion of a monophyletic origin of the various eye types. Considering the complexity of the underlying gene regulatory networks the unpredictability is obvious. The evolution of the Hox gene cluster and the specification of the body plan starting from an evolutionary prototype segment is discussed. In the course of evolution, a series of similar prototypic segments gradually undergoes cephalization anteriorly and caudalization posteriorly through diversification of the Hox genes. PMID:21979158

  7. Morocco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image over Morocco was acquired on April 23, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, flying aboard the Terra spacecraft. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution bands. Notice the exquisite detail in the colors and textures of the variety of land surface features in northwestern Africa. The heavily-vegetated (green pixels) peninsula in the top center of the image is the southern shore of the Strait of Gibralter--the passage between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Notice the patchy formation of low-level cumulus clouds (white pixels) over this region, suggesting a moister climate that contributes to better plant growth. On the tip of this peninsula is the coastal city of Tangier. Moving west along the coastline, the city of Casablanca lies about 200 miles (330 km) southwest of Tangier, and about 50 miles south of Rabat, the capital city. Both Casablanca and Rabat are visible as small grey clusters of pixels. About 200 miles due south of Casablanca, the Atlas Mountains (brownish pixels) are running in a northeasterly direction toward Algeria, Morocco's eastern neighbor. Toward the bottom right side of the image is a portion of the northwestern edge of the Sahara Desert. The most yellow pixels toward the southeast corner of the image is the region in the Sahara known as the Great Western Erg, in Algeria. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Group, NASA GSFC

  8. Odd cloud in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 28, 2002, MODIS captured this image of an interesting cloud formation in the boundary waters between Antarctica's Ross Sea and the Southern Ocean. A dragon? A snake? A fish? No, but it is an interesting example of the atmospheric physics of convection. The 'eye' of this dragon-looking cloud is likely a small spot of convection, the process by which hot moist air rises up into the atmosphere, often producing big, fluffy clouds as moisture in the air condenses as rises into the colder parts of the atmosphere. A false color analysis that shows different kinds of clouds in different colors reveals that the eye is composed of ice crystals while the 'body' is a liquid water cloud. This suggests that the eye is higher up in the atmosphere than the body. The most likely explanation for the eye feature is that the warm, rising air mass had enough buoyancy to punch through the liquid water cloud. As a convective parcel of air rises into the atmosphere, it pushes the colder air that is higher up out of its way. That cold air spills down over the sides of the convective air mass, and in this case has cleared away part of the liquid cloud layer below in the process. This spilling over of cold air from higher up in the atmosphere is the reason why thunderstorms are often accompanied by a cool breeze. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. The "Genetic Program": Behind the Genesis of an Influential Metaphor.

    PubMed

    Peluffo, Alexandre E

    2015-07-01

    The metaphor of the "genetic program," indicating the genome as a set of instructions required to build a phenotype, has been very influential in biology despite various criticisms over the years. This metaphor, first published in 1961, is thought to have been invented independently in two different articles, one by Ernst Mayr and the other by François Jacob and Jacques Monod. Here, after a detailed analysis of what both parties meant by "genetic program," I show, using unpublished archives, the strong resemblance between the ideas of Mayr and Monod and suggest that their idea of genetic program probably shares a common origin. I explore the possibility that the two men met before 1961 and also exchanged their ideas through common friends and colleagues in the field of molecular biology. Based on unpublished correspondence of Jacob and Monod, I highlight the important events that influenced the preparation of their influential paper, which introduced the concept of the genetic program. Finally, I suggest that the genetic program metaphor may have preceded both papers and that it was probably used informally before 1961. PMID:26170444

  10. The electron diffusion coefficient in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T.; Northrop, T.; Baxter, R.; Hess, W.; Lojko, M.

    1974-01-01

    A steady-state model of Jupiter's electron radiation belt is developed. The model includes injection from the solar wind, radial diffusion, energy degradation by synchrotron radiation, and absorption at Jupiter's surface. A diffusion coefficient of the form D sub RR/R sub J squared = k times R to the m-th power is assumed, and then observed data on synchrotron radiation are used to fit the model. The free parameters determined from this fit are m = 1.95 plus or minus 0.5, k = 1.7 plus or minus 0.5 x 10 to the 9th power per sec, and the magnetic moment of injected particles equals 770 plus or minus 300 MeV/G. The value of m shows quite clearly that the diffusion is not caused by magnetic pumping by a variable solar wind or by a fluctuating convection electric field. The process might be field line exchange driven by atmospheric-ionospheric winds; our diffusion coefficient has roughly the same radial dependence but is considerably smaller in magnitude than the upper bound diffusion coefficients recently suggested for this process by Brice and McDonough (1973) and Jacques and Davis (1972).

  11. Fires in South Africa, snow in Lesotho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The precipitation that brought snow fall to the Drakensberg Mountains in Lesotho in southern Africa was not enough to quench the numerous fires (marked with red dots) burning throughout the Republic of South Africa. These Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images from June 18, 2002, and July 2, 2002, show the snowfall in landlocked Lesotho contrasting sharply with the country's brown, mountainous terrain. (In the false-color image, vegetation is bright green, bare soil is brown, and burned areas are reddish-brown. In northeast Republic of South Africa, right along the border with Mozambique, the smooth, gray-brown terrain shows the boundaries of Kruger National Park. The Park was established in the late 1800s to protect game species, such as elephants, antelope, and bison, which were being hunted in great numbers. In this image, dark brown patches reveal the location of previous fires. The vegetation has yet to come back, and the landscape is virtually bare. NASA scientists study fire behavior in Kruger as part of the SAFARI field campaign. Running southward through Mozambique and into the Indian Ocean is the muddy Limpopo River--known to many through Rudyard Kipling's 'Just-so' story about how the elephant got its trunk. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. [Bachelard and the mathematical pulsation].

    PubMed

    Guitart, René

    2015-01-01

    The working mathematician knows a specific gesture named « mathematical pulsation », a necessary creative moving in diagrams of thoughts and interpretations of mathematical writings. In this perspective the fact of being an object is definitely undecided, and related to the game of relations. The purpose of this paper today is to construct this pulsation, starting from the epistemology of Bachelard, concerning mathematics as well as mathematical physics. On the way, we recover links between ideas of Bachelard and more recent specific propositions by Gilles Ch-let, Charles Alunni, or René Guitart. Also are used authors like Jacques Lacan, Arthur Koestler, Alfred N. Whitehead, Charles S. Peirce. We conclude that the mathematical work consists with pulsative moving in the space of diagrams; we claim that this view is well compatible with the Bachelard's analysis of scientific knowledge: the intellectual or formal mathematical data preceeds the empirical objects, and in some sense these objects result from the pulsative gestures of the thinkers. So we finish with a categorical scheme of the pulsation. PMID:26223414

  13. [Impact of synthetic biology on patent law in view of of European jurisprudence].

    PubMed

    Bernardo Alvarez, María Angela

    2014-01-01

    The roots of synthetic biology--the redesign of biological molecules, structures and organisms--can be traced to the research developed by Jacques L. Monod and François Jacob in 1961. This field has undergone significant growth in the past ten years and its emergence has raised the question of whether the patent system is suitable to protect inventions in emergent areas as synthetic biology. The article will analyze the numerous scientific, socio-economic, ethical and legal challenges faced by synthetic biology, introducing the European Patent Law related to biotechnology as the minimum common framework and considering if more changes are needed to adequately protect the inventor rights, while taking into account the arrival of a new research culture, characterized by embracing open-innovation and open-source initiatives. The discussion will review some biotechnological patent law cases and summarize questions as whether isolated molecules of DNA are eligible for patent or the patentability of living matter, under the terms of Directive 98/44/EC. The article will finally consider the impact of synthetic biology on the European patent system. PMID:25845209

  14. Characterization of Spatial and Temporal Variations in the Optical Properties of Tissuelike Media with Diffuse Reflectance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Francesco; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Fantini, Sergio

    2003-06-01

    We describe a method to characterize spatial or temporal changes in the optical properties of turbid media using diffuse reflectance images acquired under broad-beam illumination conditions. We performed experiments on liquid phantoms whose absorption (µa ) and reduced scattering (µs ') coefficients were representative of those of biological tissues in the near infrared. We found that the relative diffuse reflectance R depends on µa and µs ' only through the ratio µaµs ' and that dependence can be well described with an analytical expression previously reported in the literature [S. L. Jacques, Kluwer Academic Dordrecht (1996) . We have found that this expression for ]R deviates from experimental values by no more than 8% for various illumination and detection angles within the range 0 -30 °. Therefore, this analytical expression for R holds with good approximation even if the investigated medium presents curved or irregular surfaces. Using this expression, it is possible to translate spatial or temporal changes in the relative diffuse reflectance from a turbid medium into quantitative estimates of the corresponding changes of (µaµs ')1/2 . In the case of media with optical properties similar to those of tissue in the near infrared, we found that the changes of µaµs ' should occur over a volume approximately 2 mm deep and 4 mm x 4 mm wide to apply this expression.

  15. Overview of the space-based laser (SBL) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, James F.

    2002-06-01

    The Space Based Laser (SBL) program is concerned with both near-term feasibility of space lasers and also the desired operational capability for a robust SBL constellation. For the near term system, we have defined an Integrated Flight Experiment (IFX) that will integrate a high power laser device, a beam control system, and a large beam director, performing a lethal engagement against a boosting missile in the 2010-2014 time period. For the operational system, the program was conducted its Affordability and Architecture Study (AAS) for Dr. Jacques Gansler (former USD(AT&L)). We arrived at a particular set of solutions for a prescribed threat. These solutions include both pure SBL constellations and also combinations of SBL satellites and space-based relay mirrors (SBM). We also considered Air Borne Lasers (ABL) and Ground Based lasers (GBL) as complements to the SBL and SBM. In this paper, we describe the current status of both the IFX program, which is the principal recipient of current funding, and also a nascent SBL Technology program to address the needs of the operational system. For the technology program, we analyzed the specific technology areas we need to develop in order to realize the most pay off for operational SBL systems.

  16. The General History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2010-04-01

    Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. The Birth of Astrophysics and Other Late Nineteenth-Century Trends (c.1850-c.1920); 1. The origins of astrophysics A. J. Meadows; 2. The impact of photography on astronomy John Lankford; 3. Telescope building, 1850-1900 Albert Van Helden; 4. The new astronomy A. J. Meadows; 5. Variable stars Helen Sawyer Hogg; 6. Stellar evolution and the origin of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram David DeVorkin; Part II. Observatories and Instrumentation: 7. Astronomical institutions. Introduction Owen Gingerich, Greenwich Observatory Philip S. Laurie, Paris Observatory Jacques Lévy, Pulkovo Observatory Aleksandr A. Mikhailov, Harvard College Observatory Howard Plotkin, United States Naval Observatory Deborah Warner, Lick Observatory Trudy E. Bell, Potsdam Astrophysical Observatory Dieter B. Herrmann; 8. Building large telescopes, 1900-1950 Albert Van Helden; 9. Astronomical institutions in the southern hemisphere, 1850-1950 David S. Evans; 10. Twentieth-century instrumentation Charles Fehrenbach, with a section on 'Early rockets in astronomy' Herbert Friedman; 11. Early radio astronomy Woodruff T. Sullivan III; Appendix: The world's largest telescopes, 1850-1950 Barbara L. Welther; Illustrations: acknowledgements and sources; Index.

  17. Hurricane Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The first Atlantic hurricane of the 2001 season narrowly missed Bermuda yesterday (September 9) as it churned north-northwestward at a rate of 19 km per hour (12 miles per hour). Packing sustained winds of 195 km per hour (120 miles per hour), Hurricane Erin was located just east of Bermuda at the time NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image. The true-color image was produced using data from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The U.S. National Hurricane Center predicts that tonight the storm will shift to a more northerly path. The Center says there is still the possibility that Hurricane Erin could impact Canada, somewhere along the coast of Newfoundland, within three to four days. Hurricane Erin was upgraded from a tropical storm to hurricane status on September 8, and was listed as a Category 3 hurricane on September 10 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The storm's hurricane-force winds extend outward in a 75-km (45-mile) radius from its center, with tropical storm force winds extending to 280 km (175 miles) from center. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  18. Activities and Achievements of the Double Star Committee of the Socié té Astronomique de France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agati, Jean-Louis; Caille, Sébastien; Debackère, André; Durand, Pierre; Losse, Florent; Manté, René; Mauroy, Florence; Mauroy, Pascal; Morlet, Guy; Pinlou, Claude; Salaman, Maurice; Soulié, Edgar; Thorel, Yvonne; Thorel, Jean-Claude

    2007-08-01

    In a synthesis article (see ref. below), the double star expert Paul COUTEAU put the work of French pioneers of double stars observation in the perspective of the double star work carried in the world. After Antoine Yvon VILLARCEAU and Camille FLAMMARION, one prominent pioneer of double stars was Robert JONCKHEERE (1888toiles Doubles, Maurice DURUY (1894le with a 40-cm and later a 60-cm telescope at Le Rouret (Alpes1995) had started the measurement of double stars as an amateur. He was granted permission to measure them with the 38-cm of the Paris Observatory and made an impressive number of measures during his long 2006) made double star observations for the book which was then in preparation under the title La revue des constellations. Their measures remained unpublished; but publication of the measures made by Robert SAGOT is in preparation. At about the same time, the neurology professor Jacques LE BEAU (1908toiles doubles visuelles. That book triggered the interest of more amateur astronomers for double stars and indirectly influenced the creation of a group of double star observers which was transformed into the Commission des É toiles Doubles

  19. Obliquity Variations of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A planet's obliquity, which is the angle between its orbital angular momentum and its rotational angular momentum, is an important factor in determining its climate and habitability. For small obliquities, as well as obliquities close to 180 degrees, the planet receives more radiant energy from its star at equatorial latitudes than near its poles, whereas the poles are heated the most for obliquities near 90 degrees. Jacques Laskar has analyzed possible obliquity variations of the planets in our Solar System. His study also considers the same planets with different rotational periods, and the Earth without the Moon. He finds, using frequency map analysis, that the obliquity of the Earth is stabilized by the Moon, and can vary by at most a few degrees. In contrast, the obliquity of Mars can range from 0 to 60 degrees, and a hypothetical moonless Earth's axial tilt could be close to 0 degrees or as large as 85 degrees. Numerical integrations by Laskar and others have shown that Mars' obliquity indeed varies over most of its permitted range on time scales of tens of millions of years. In contrast, our analysis shows that the obliquity of a moonless Earth appears to be confined to the range of approximately 12 - 38 degrees over time scales of 100 million years. Results of ongoing longer integrations will be presented, and their implications discussed.

  20. Christmas on Mars: be there with ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    The exciting event can be followed at ESA’s European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, on Thursday, 25 December, from 01:30 to 14:00, together with the mission managers, the operation teams, scientists and top ESA management, including ESA’s Director-General Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA’s Director of Science David Southwood and ESA’s Director of Technical and Operational Support Gaele Winters. The highlights of the night will be also webcast over the internet http://mars.esa.int. As well as live streaming of key events, the Mars Express site will have daily news, features, images, videos and more. The ESA TV Service will provide live coverage of operations, from the Operations Control Centre at ESOC. All transmission and satellite details are published online at http://television.esa.int All live transmissions are also carried free-to-air on Astra 2 C at 19 degrees East, transponder 57, horizontal, (DVB-MPEG-2), frequency 10832 MHz, Symbol Rate 22000 MS/sec, FEC 5/6. The service name is ESA Media wishing to attend are asked to complete the attached reply form and fax it back to ESA Media Relations Service: +33 (0)1 53 69 76 90.

  1. Identification of the finishing technique of an early eighteenth century musical instrument using FTIR spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Loïc; Robinet, Laurianne; Cohen, Serge X; Sandt, Christophe; Le Hô, Anne-Solenn; Soulier, Balthazar; Lattuati-Derieux, Agnès; Echard, Jean-Philippe

    2011-03-01

    The study of varnishes from musical instruments presents the difficulty of analysing very thin layers of heterogeneous materials on samples most of which are generally brittle and difficult to prepare. Such study is crucial to the understanding of historical musical instrument varnishing practices since written sources before 1800 are very rare and not precise. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and imaging methods were applied to identify the major chemical components within the build-up of the varnish layers on a cello made by one of the most prominent French violin-makers of the eighteenth century (Jacques Boquay, ca. 1680-1730). Two types of FTIR imaging methods were used: scanning with a synchrotron-based microscope and full-field imaging using a 2D imager with a conventional source. An interpretation of the results obtained from these studies on the Boquay cello is that the maker first applied a proteinaceous layer, probably gelatine-based animal glue. He later applied a second layer based on a mixture of a drying oil and diterpenic resin from Pinaceae sp. From an historical perspective, the results complement previous studies by describing a second technique used for musical instrument finishes at the beginning of the eighteenth century in Europe. PMID:20963401

  2. Dislocations in a quantum crystal. Solid helium: A model and an exception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balibar, Sébastien; Beamish, John; Fefferman, Andrew; Haziot, Ariel; Rojas, Xavier; Souris, Fabien

    2016-03-01

    Solid helium is paradoxical: it is both a model and an exception. It is a model for crystal properties mainly because of its extreme purity which makes universal phenomena simpler and easier to identify. It is also exceptional because the large quantum fluctuations of atoms around the nodes in their crystal lattice allow these phenomena to occur at very low temperature with a large amplitude. As noticed by Jacques Friedel in 2013, the properties of helium 4 crystals illustrate how the motion of dislocations may reduce their shear elastic modulus, as it does in all hexagonal close packed (hcp) crystals including metals. But this motion takes place without any dissipation in the limit of T = 0 and in the absence of impurities, which is now exceptional and leads to an elastic anomaly at low temperature, which was called "giant plasticity" by Haziot et al. in 2013. More recently, we have discovered that, in helium-4 crystals, helium-3 impurities are not necessarily fixed pinning centers for dislocations. Even at relatively large velocities, dislocations are able to move dressed with impurities somehow as a necklace of atomic pearls through the periodic lattice. This illustrates what is really quantum in these crystals: it is mainly the dynamics of their dislocations and the behavior of impurities. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lane, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulation of autofluorescence in the retina to determine that noninvasive detection of nutritional iron deficiency is possible. Nutritional iron deficiency (which leads to iron deficiency anemia) affects more than 2 billion people worldwide, and there is an urgent need for a simple, noninvasive diagnostic test. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) is a fluorescent compound that accumulates in red blood cells and is used as a biomarker for nutritional iron deficiency. We developed a computational model of the eye, using parameters that were identified either by literature search, or by direct experimental measurement to test the possibility of detecting ZPP non-invasively in retina. By incorporating fluorescence into Steven Jacques' original code for multi-layered tissue, we performed Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence in the retina and determined that if the beam is not focused on a blood vessel in a neural retina layer or if part of light is hitting the vessel, ZPP fluorescence will be 10-200 times higher than background lipofuscin fluorescence coming from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer directly below. In addition we found that if the light can be focused entirely onto a blood vessel in the neural retina layer, the fluorescence signal comes only from ZPP. The fluorescence from layers below in this second situation does not contribute to the signal. Therefore, the possibility that a device could potentially be built and detect ZPP fluorescence in retina looks very promising.

  4. A versatile lab-on-chip test platform to characterize elementary deformation mechanisms and electromechanical couplings in nanoscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Colla, Marie-Sthéphane; Idrissi, Hosni; Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Wang, Binjie; Schryvers, Dominique; Bhaskar, Umesh K.; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    A nanomechanical on-chip test platform has recently been developed to deform under a variety of loading conditions freestanding thin films, ribbons and nanowires involving submicron dimensions. The lab-on-chip involves thousands of elementary test structures from which the elastic modulus, strength, strain hardening, fracture, creep properties can be extracted. The technique is amenable to in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations to unravel the fundamental underlying deformation and fracture mechanisms that often lead to size-dependent effects in small-scale samples. The method allows addressing electrical and magnetic couplings as well in order to evaluate the impact of large mechanical stress levels on different solid-state physics phenomena. We had the chance to present this technique in details to Jacques Friedel in 2012 who, unsurprisingly, made a series of critical and very relevant suggestions. In the spirit of his legacy, the paper will address both mechanics of materials related phenomena and couplings with solids state physics issues. xml:lang="fr"

  5. The store-operated Ca(2+) entry-mediated signaling is important for cancer spread.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yih-Fung; Hsu, Keng-Fu; Shen, Meng-Ru

    2016-06-01

    Tumor cell migration and invasion are essential steps in the metastatic cascade that has great impact on patient outcomes. Spatial and temporal organization of Ca(2+) signaling regulates the multiple aspects of migration machinery, including cytoskeletal reorganization, traction force generation, and focal adhesion dynamics. Stromal interaction molecules (STIM) and Orai proteins, recently identified as critical constituents of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), have been implicated in cancer cell migration and tumor metastasis. The clinical significance of STIM proteins and Orai Ca(2+) channels in tumor progression and their diagnostic and prognostic potentials have also been demonstrated in different types of cancers. Here we review the recent advances in understanding the important roles and regulatory mechanisms of STIM/Orai-mediated SOCE in cancer spread. The clinical implications and the emergence as a selective target for cancer therapeutics are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26643254

  6. Ethology and the origins of behavioral endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Marler, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The neurosciences embrace many disciplines, some long established, others of more recent origin. Behavioral endocrinology has only recently been fully acknowledged as a branch of neuroscience, distinctive for the determination of some of its exponents to remain integrative in the face of the many pressures towards reductionism that so dominate modern biology. One of its most characteristic features is a commitment to research at the whole-animal level on the physiological basis of complex behaviors, with a particular but by no means exclusive focus on reproductive behavior in all its aspects. The search for rigorously defined principles of behavioral organization that apply across species and the hormonal and neural mechanisms that sustain them underlies much of the research. Their aims are much like those put forth in the classical ethology of Lorenz and Tinbergen, one of the roots from which behavioral endocrinology has sprung. But there are others that can be traced back a century or more. Antecedents can be found in the work of such pioneers as Jakob von Uexküll, Jacques Loeb, Herbert Spencer Jennings, and particularly Charles Otis Whitman who launched a tradition that culminated in the classical contributions of Robert Hinde and Daniel Lehrman. William C. Young was another pioneer. His studies revolutionized thinking about the physiological mechanisms by which hormones influence behavior. An earlier potent influence was Karl Lashley who helped to shape the career of Frank Ambrose Beach who, more than anyone, has played a leading role in launching this new field. PMID:15777816

  7. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  8. Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, and Lake Mead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A snowfall in the American West provides contrast to the landscape's muted earth tones and indicates changes in topography and elevation across (clockwise from top left) Nevada, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and California. In Utah, the southern ranges of the Wasatch Mountains are covered in snow, and the Colorado River etches a dark ribbon across the red rock of the Colorado Plateau. In the center of the image is the reservoir created by the Glen Canyon Dam. To the east are the gray-colored slopes of Navaho Mountain, and to the southeast, dusted with snow is the region called Black Mesa. Southwest of Glen Canyon, the Colorado enters the Grand Canyon, which cuts westward through Arizona. At a deep bend in the river, the higher elevations of the Keibab Plateau have held onto snow. At the end of the Grand Canyon lies another large reservoir, Lake Mead, which is formed by the Hoover Dam. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Early ant trajectories: spatial behaviour before behaviourism.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In the beginning of the twentieth century, when Jacques Loeb's and John Watson's mechanistic view of life started to dominate animal physiology and behavioural biology, several scientists with different academic backgrounds got engaged in studying the wayfinding behaviour of ants. Largely unaffected by the scientific spirit of the time, they worked independently of each other in different countries: in Algeria, Tunisia, Spain, Switzerland and the United States of America. In the current literature on spatial cognition these early ant researchers--Victor Cornetz, Felix Santschi, Charles Turner and Rudolf Brun--are barely mentioned. Moreover, it is virtually unknown that the great neuroanatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal had also worked on spatial orientation in ants. This general neglect is certainly due to the fact that nearly all these ant researchers were scientific loners, who did their idiosyncratic investigations outside the realm of comparative physiology, neurobiology and the behavioural sciences of the time, and published their results in French, German, and Spanish at rather inaccessible places. Even though one might argue that much of their work resulted in mainly anecdotal evidence, the conceptual approaches of these early ant researchers preempt much of the present-day discussions on spatial representation in animals. PMID:26898725

  10. Libby South Fire, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 9, 2001, a fire burned about 15 miles south of Twisp, Washington, that officials believe was caused by human error. NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on the Terra satellite observed the fire, indicated with a red dot in this image, on July 10, after the fire had already consumed about 1,240 acres. On July 10, another fire-called the Thirty Mile Fire-trapped 21 firefighters and 2 civilians in a narrow canyon in the Chewuch River Valley, north of Winthrop, WA. (That fire did not erupt until later in the day after this image was acquired and is therefore not visible.) Tragically, four firefighters were killed and six people were injured, including the two civilians. Rolling debris, rugged and steep terrain, and limited access are impeding efforts to contain the now 8,200-acre fire, which according to current fire incident reports, is completely uncontained. Nearly all the areas in the full-size image, including Washington (center), Idaho (right), Oregon (bottom) are in a state of severe drought, which means the region could be in for another devastating fire season. Another fire is visible in Idaho in the full-size image just east of where Idaho borders with Washington and Oregon. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  11. The Sahara's Diverse Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast stretches of uninterrupted sand are only one kind of Saharan landscape. This true-color MODIS image from November 9, 2001, reveals a diversity of land surface features, including ancient lava flows and volcanoes. Beginning at upper left and moving clockwise are the countries of Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Chad, and Niger. Evidence of previous volcanic activity in the Sahara can be found in northeastern Chad, in particular, in a region known as Tibesti. Reaching up out of the surrounding desert, the dark rock of the Tibesti Plateau stands out in dark brown against the sand. Scattered throughout the region are the circular cones and calderas of several volcanoes. The dark remains of a lava flow mark the location of the Tousside volcano. North of Tibesti, in Libya, more dark-colored lava beds leave their mark on the landscape. Variety exists in Algeria, where the Grand Erg Oriental desert (far upper left) is hemmed in to the south by the Tinrhert Plateau. South of the Plateau, desert resumes briefly, only to give way to a mountainous region traced with impermanent rivers. In northern Niger, a sinuous gray-green line marks the edge of an escarpment that separates the Mangueni Plateau to the north from the rock deserts to the south. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  12. Blackjack Complex Fire, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For the past week, fires have raged across southeast Georgia, consuming nearly 40,000 acres of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. This true-color image of the largest fire near Blackjack Island, Georgia, was acquired on May 3, 2002 (top), by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiomter (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The fire was ignited by lightning strikes and has spread quickly over a large area of scrub brush in the swamp. Due to the unseasonably dry conditions and the difficult swamp terrain, firefighters have been struggling to keep the fire from spreading any further across the 400,000-acre refuge. Although the fire is now endangering some buildings in nearby Stephen Foster State Park, no one has been injured or killed. By May 8th (lower) the area covered by the fire itself-denoted by red pixels-had shrunk, but smoke continued to billow from the site. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. The Hipp chronoscope versus the d'Arsonval chronometer: laboratory instruments measuring reaction times that distinguish German and French orientations of psychology.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Thompson, Peter B

    2015-11-01

    Chronoscopes and chronographs were commonly used instruments that measured reaction times (RTs) in the first psychology laboratories. The Hipp chronoscope is commonly associated with the emergence of psychological laboratories in the late 19th century. This instrument is considered the key apparatus for the study of scientific psychology. Although German and American psychologists preferred the Hipp chronoscope, French psychologists of late 19th century favored another chronometer built by Jacques Arsène d'Arsonval (1851-1940). Unlike German and American psychologists, French psychologists demanded less precision in most experimental situations because they claimed that individual differences are very pronounced in a variety of situations. The advantage of the d'Arsonval chronometer was its portability and its simplicity. This article presents this chronometer and its advantages and drawbacks. The Hipp chronoscope and the d'Arsonval chronometer were the most commonly used apparatuses in Europe for the measurement of RTs until World War II, as is demonstrated by the catalogues of the time (Zimmermann and Boulitte). PMID:26551861

  14. Calcium-ATPases: Gene disorders and dysregulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Donna; Rao, Rajini

    2016-06-01

    Ca(2+)-ATPases belonging to the superfamily of P-type pumps play an important role in maintaining low, nanomolar cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels at rest and priming organellar stores, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and secretory vesicles with high levels of Ca(2+) for a wide range of signaling functions. In this review, we introduce the distinct subtypes of Ca(2+)-ATPases and their isoforms and splice variants and provide an overview of their specific cellular roles as they relate to genetic disorders and cancer, with a particular emphasis on recent findings on the secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPases (SPCA). Mutations in human ATP2A2, ATP2C1 genes, encoding housekeeping isoforms of the endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) and secretory pathway (SPCA1) pumps, respectively, confer autosomal dominant disorders of the skin, whereas mutations in other isoforms underlie various muscular, neurological, or developmental disorders. Emerging evidence points to an important function of dysregulated Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in cancers of the colon, lung, and breast where they may serve as markers of differentiation or novel targets for therapeutic intervention. We review the mechanisms underlying the link between calcium homeostasis and cancer and discuss the potential clinical relevance of these observations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26608610

  15. Two-photon deep imaging through skin and skull of Zebra finches: preliminary studies for in-vivo brain metabolism monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi-Haidar, D.; Olivier, T.; Mottin, S.; Vignal, C.; Mathevon, N.

    2007-02-01

    Zebra Finches are songbirds which constitute a model for neuro-ethologists to study the neuro-mechanisms of vocal recognition. For this purpose, in vivo and non invasive monitoring of brain activity is required during acoustical stimulation. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) or NIRS (Near InfraRed Spectroscopy) are suitable methods for these measurements, even though MRI is difficult to link quantitatively with neural activity and NIRS suffers from a poor resolution. In the particular case of songbirds (whose skin is thin and quite transparent and whose skull structure is hollow), two-photon microscopy enables a quite deep penetration in tissues and could be an alternative. We present here preliminary studies on the feasability of two-photon microscopy in these conditions. To do so, we chose to image hollow fibers, filled with Rhodamine B, through the skin of Zebra finches in order to evaluate the spatial resolution we may expect in future in vivo experiments. Moreover, we used the reflectance-mode confocal configuration to evaluate the exponential decrease of backreflected light in skin and in skull samples. Following this procedure recently proposed by S.L. Jacques and co-workers, we planned to determine the scattering coefficient μ s and the anisotropy g of these tissues and make a comparison between fixed and fresh skin and skull samples for future Monte Carlo simulations of the scattering in our particular multi-layered structure.

  16. Lineaments from airborne SAR images and the 1988 Saguenay earthquake, Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.W.; Schmitt, L.; Woussen, G.; Duberger, R. )

    1993-08-01

    Airborne SAR images provided essential clues to the tectonic setting of (1) the MbLg 6.5 Saguenay earthquake of 25 November 1988, (2) the Charlevoix-Kamouraska seismic source zone, and (3) some of the low *eve* seismic activity in the Eastern seismic background zone of Canada. The event occurred in the southeastern part of the Canadian Shield in an area where the boundary between the Saguenay graben and the Jacques Cartier horst is not well defined. These two tectonic blocks are both associated with the Iapetan St-Lawrence rift. These blocks exhibit several important structural breaks and distinct domains defined by the lineament orientations, densities, and habits. Outcrop observations confirm that several lineament sets correspond to Precambrian ductile shear zones reactivated as brittle faults during the Phanerozoic. In addition, the northeast and southwest limits of recent seismic activity in the Charlevoix-Kamouraska zone correspond to major elements of the fracture pattern identified on the SAR images. These fractures appear to be related to the interaction of the Charlevoix astrobleme with the tectonic features of the area. 20 refs.

  17. Gaspare Tagliacozzi, pioneer of plastic surgery and the spread of his technique throughout Europe in "De Curtorum Chirurgia per Insitionem".

    PubMed

    Tomba, P; Viganò, A; Ruggieri, P; Gasbarrini, A

    2014-01-01

    Gaspare Tagliacozzi's innovative surgical technique, which consisted of reconstructing parts of the face by grafting, was masterfully described in the work that made him famous, "De Curtorum Chirurgia per Insitionem." It was published by Gaspare Bindoni the Younger in 1597 in Venice, who was granted the exclusive right to print it by the Senate. However, in the same year in Venice Roberto Meietti published an unauthorized edition; nevertheless, this edition was soon discovered. The great demand for the text even abroad was soon testified by a 3rd edition published in Frankfurt in 1598, similar to the Bindoni edition but in another format and with a different title. This has caused confusion among bibliographers and Authors. Two centuries later, in 1831 in Berlin, a 4th edition was printed, thus suggesting renewed interest in rhinoplasty procedures, which surgeons Van Graefe and Dieffenbach promoted in Germany. However, few people know that the integral text of Tagliacozzi's De Curtorum was also published by Jacques Manget in his "Bibliotheca Chirurgica," printed in Venice in 1721. The name of the illustrator of the three fourteenth-century editions, whose illustrations in the text are compared, is not known. Instead the name of the artist, Tiburzio Passerotti, who painted Tagliacozzi's portrait holding his De Curtorum open at the ninth woodcut shortly before it was printed, is well known. The impact of Tagliacozzi's technique on modern surgery is supported by experience of the last century as well as recent years, mostly in musculoskeletal oncology reconstruction. PMID:24610608

  18. Long-Term Seeing Characteristics at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Espinosa, O. D.; Nenow, J.; Marquette, W. H.

    2003-05-01

    We present observations of long-term seeing characteristics from June 1997 to September 2002 obtained with Seykora-type scintillometers at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). BBSO is an ideal site for ground-based campaign-style observations. Since BBSO is situated on a small island in a 2,000 m high mountain lake in the cloudless mountains of Souther California, it benefits from excellent seeing conditions all day long. The atmospheric turbulence that degrades images originates primarily from two layers near the ground and at the level of the jet stream. BBSO's dome is located at the end of a 300 m long causeway jutting into the lake. Since the lake, with its cool waters, provides a natural inversion, and the dome has three kilometers of open water to its west, the boundary layer seeing is effectively suppressed. In addition, the east-west orientation of the Big Bear Valley provides a natural channel for the prevailing winds from the west resulting in a nearly laminar flow at the observatory site. We present a comparison of scintillometer data with climate data and analyze a one year long sub-set for local seeing variations near the lake shore and at the observatory island. We would like to thank Jacques Beckers and the National Solar Observatory for providing the scintillometer data. This work was supported by NSF under grant ATM 00-86999, ATM 00-76602, and ATM 02-36945 and by NASA under grant NAG 5-9682.

  19. Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin' at the East Coast of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In this photograph, the deep-sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin' drifts off the East Coast of the United States (U.S.) prior to submerging into the ocean. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  20. Unconditional hospitality: HIV, ethics and the refugee 'problem'.

    PubMed

    Worth, Heather

    2006-09-01

    Refugees, as forced migrants, have suffered displacement under conditions not of their own choosing. In 2000 there were thought to be 22 million refugees of whom 6 million were HIV positive. While the New Zealand government has accepted a number of HIV positive refugees from sub-Saharan Africa, this hospitality is under threat due to negative public and political opinion. Epidemic conditions raise the social stakes attached to sexual exchanges, contagion becomes a major figure in social relationships and social production, and the fears of the contagious nature of those 'just off the plane' connect refugees to an equally deep-seated fear of racial miscegenation. Jacques Derrida's notion of unconditional hospitality is a dream of a democracy which would have a cosmopolitan form. This means that one cannot decide in advance which refugees one might choose to resettle. This paper will use Derrida's notion of unconditional hospitality to emphasise the fragility of HIV positive refugees' position, caught between becoming newly made New Zealand subjects while at the same time having that subjecthood threatened. For Derrida, both ethics and politics demand both an action and a need for a thoughtful response (a questioning without limit). PMID:17100006

  1. Using Hubble to Measure Volatile Abundances and the D/H Ratio in a Bright ToO Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Harold

    2014-10-01

    We propose a 10-orbit program to observe any newly discovered bright cometas a non-disruptive Target of Opportunity during cycle 22.For a comet whose water production rate meets our basic ToO selection criterion, Hubble observations can be used to measure abundances of three highly volatile species (CO, CO2, and S2), providing critical information on the origin and evolution of the comet's nucleus. If the comet additionally has geocentric and heliocentricradial velocities in a favorable range, our Hubble observations will measureatomic deuterium emission, from which we can derive the D/H ratio for comparisonto the values measured in other comets and Earth's water. The D/H ratio in cometarywater is a key indicator of the role played by comets in the delivery of volatilesto the terrestrial planets. This is a non-disruptive ToO program because weanticipate that execution of the proposed observations need not be scheduleduntil at least 1 month after the triggering event. We have already identifiedfour potential targets (C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden), C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring), C/2014 E2 (Jacques)), but it is still too earlyto tell if any of these will meet our ToO selection criteria.

  2. The Peierls instability and charge density wave in one-dimensional electronic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouget, Jean-Paul

    2016-03-01

    We review salient structural and electronic features associated with the concomitant Peierls-charge density wave (CDW) instabilities observed in most one-dimensional (1D) inorganic and organic electronic conductors. First of all, the genesis of these concepts is placed in an historical perspective. We then present basic experimental facts supporting the general description of these 1D electron-phonon coupled systems developed in the 1970s. In this framework we shall consider in particular the role of 1D fluctuations on both lattice and electronic degrees of freedom, and of the inter-chain Coulomb coupling between CDWs in stabilizing in 3D the Peierls transition at finite temperature. We also clarify, in relation with experimental findings, the various conditions of adiabaticity of the electron-phonon coupling. Finally we illustrate by recent structural measurements the pioneering work of Jacques Friedel on CDW elasticity and plasticity and CDW pinning to defects through the appearance of Friedel oscillations. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Performance and Prospects of Khayyam, A Tunable Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) for High Spectral Resolving Power Observation of Extended Planetary Targets in Optical Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Harris, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present initial results, calibration and data reduction process from observations of wide-field targets using Khayyam at Mt. Hamilton, a new instrument based on a reflective spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) at the focus of the Coudé Auxiliary Telescope (CAT). SHS instruments are common path two-beam Fourier transform spectrometers that produce 2-D spatial interference patterns without the requirement for moving parts. The utility of SHS comes from its combination of a wide input acceptance angle (0.5-1°), high resolving power (of order ~105), compact format, high dynamic range, and relaxed optical tolerances compared with other interferometer designs. This combination makes them extremely useful for velocity resolved for observations of wide field targets from both small and large telescopes. This report focuses on the tunable instrument at Mt Hamilton, The CAT provides a test case for on-axis use of SHS, and the impact of the resulting field non-uniformity caused by the spider pattern will be discussed. Observations of several targets will be presented that demonstrate the capabilities of SHS, including comet C/2014 E2 (Jacques), Jupiter, and both the day sky and night glow. Raw interferometric data and transformed power spectra will be shown and evaluated in terms of instrumental stability.

  4. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  5. Coexistence of full which-path information and interference in Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, K.; Yuan, S.; Zhao, S.; Jin, F.; De Raedt, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present a computer simulation model that is a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment that employs a single photon source and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of a 50/50 input beam splitter and a variable output beam splitter with adjustable reflection coefficient R [V. Jacques, E. Wu, F. Grosshans, F. Treussart, P. Grangier, A. Aspect, J.-F. Roch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 220402]. For 0⩽R⩽0.5, experimentally measured values of the interference visibility V and the path distinguishability D, a parameter quantifying the which-path information (WPI), are found to fulfill the complementary relation V2+D2⩽1, thereby allowing to obtain partial WPI while keeping interference with limited visibility. The simulation model that is solely based on experimental facts that satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and that does not rely on any concept of quantum theory or of probability theory, reproduces quantitatively the averages calculated from quantum theory. Our results prove that it is possible to give a particle-only description of the experiment, that one can have full WPI even if D=0, V=1 and therefore that the relation V2+D2⩽1 cannot be regarded as quantifying the notion of complementarity.

  6. Bioelectromagnetic and subtle energy medicine: the interface between mind and matter.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Paul J

    2009-08-01

    The concept of a "life energy" can be found in many cultures in the present time, as well as in past eras reaching back to the ancients. Variously called qi (chi), ki, the "four humors,"prana, "archaeus,"cosmic aether,"universal fluid,"animal magnetism," and "odic force," among other names, this purported biofield is beginning to yield its properties and interactions to the scientific method. Subtle energy is the term used in this chapter, which traces the recent history of subtle energy studies from Harold Saxton Burr and Björn Nordenström to Jim Oschman and Jacques Benveniste. This work takes signaling in living systems from the chemical/molecular to the physical/atomic level of communication. Effects on heart rate variability, stress response, inflammation, and the vagus nerve have been demonstrated and raise the question--Can the power of subtle energies be harnessed for health enhancement? It is fully accepted that good health depends on good communication both within the organism and between the organism and its environment. Sophisticated imaging procedures brought to bear on telomere, stem cell, and genetic research are confirming the ability of meditation and some other traditional practices to promote optimal health through stress reduction. PMID:19735252

  7. METABOLIC REGULATION OF ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE SULFURYLASE IN YEAST

    PubMed Central

    de Vito, Peter C.; Dreyfuss, Jacques

    1964-01-01

    de Vito, Peter C. (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), and Jacques Dreyfuss. Metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 88:1341–1348. 1964.—The metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATP-sulfurylase) from baker's yeast was studied. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by low concentrations of adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, and sulfide. Sulfide ion was a competitive inhibitor of ATP-sulfurylase. Cysteine, methionine, sulfite, and thiosulfate were not inhibitors of the enzyme. ATP-sulfurylase was repressed when yeast was grown in the presence of methionine, and derepressed when yeast was grown in the presence of cysteine. In contrast to these results, the enzyme sulfite reductase was repressed in cysteine-grown cells. Thus, the sulfate-reducing pathway in yeast appears to be regulated at its first step both by feedback inhibition (by sulfide) and by repression (by methionine). Other known controls in the cysteine biosynthetic pathway are discussed. PMID:14234791

  8. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2015-11-01

    Ever since the days of William Blake there has been an underground resistance against the soulless yet triumphant science and its unholy alliance with money, technology and political power. With the nearly undisputed hegemony that science and technological innovation has attained in the post-World War II era, this kind of resistance has resulted in numerous books and articles that in different ways warn against the dark sides of science and the socio-economic system that nourishes a science in degeneration. Classical examples include Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man (1964), Jacques Ellul's The Technological Society (1965), Theodore Roszak's The Making of a Counter Culture (1968), and Paul Feyerabend's Science in a Free Society (1978). A fair part of the literature written by sociologists and philosophers is not only critical to trends in modern science, but tends to or is overtly anti-science. The book under review belongs in some respects to this heterogeneous literary tradition, but Twilight of the Scientific Age is primarily directed against the institutional system of science and its associated ideology and not against science itself. Indeed, the author is himself a practicing scientist, an astrophysicist, and he emphasizes several times that he firmly believes in science, even that he loves it. He is not a "stupid cultural relativist," he asserts (p. 11), but a critical freethinker independent of dogmatic beliefs.

  9. Fires in Tanzania and Mozambique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like many countries, the southeastern African country of Malawi faces the challenge of balancing a growing population's need for food and energy with preservation of natural resources. This MODIS image from November 8, 2001, shows Malawi surrounded by (starting from top and moving clockwise) Tanzania, Mozambique, and northern Zambia. Lake Malawi runs north-south through the eastern part of the country, and is the southern-most of Africa's Great Rift Lakes, a series of deep lakes that run roughly north-south along the Great Rift Valley in eastern Africa, formed when the Earth buckled and then sank after the collision of Africa and Eurasia millions of years ago. Most of the land around the lake and throughout the country has been cleared of its natural vegetation and converted to agricultural land. This causes soil erosion problems and sedimentation in the lake, which affects the sustainability of fishing in the lake. In this image, greenish swirls in the water around the shores could indicate a mixture of sediment and phytoplankton or algae. Deforestation is also a major issue, especially since wood for fuel is the primary source of the country's energy. The difference between the lands protected by parks and preserves stand out dramatically. The largest protected area is halfway down the western border of the country-Kasungu National Park. Several smaller preserves also exist, and where they do, they stand out in green against the paler landscape. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  10. France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every July, the world's best cyclists race more than 3500 km around France, and sometimes the surrounding countries, in the Tour de France. This image from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows the varied terrain which challenges the riders. The race started in western France at Futuroscope, and headed toward Brittany. In these mostly flat 'stages' (as each day's race is called) sprinting specialists usually dash for the finish out of the main pack of riders. The race then moved to the Pyrenees mountains, in southern France along the border with Spain. Climbers and the overall favorites shine in the mountains, often gaining 10 minutes or more on their rivals. Only a few days after the Pyrenees climbs the race was again in the mountains. First Mont Ventoux, an extinct volcano in Provence, and then the massive Alps, with altitudes as high as 2,645 meters, challenged the racers. Finally the race headed toward Paris and a July 23rd finish in Paris. Go Lance! To learn more about MODIS, visit the MODIS web. Image by Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land group, NASA GSFC

  11. Nursing intuition: a valid form of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Green, Catherine

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of the nature and development of nursing intuition can help nurse educators foster it in young nurses and give clinicians more confidence in this aspect of their knowledge, allowing them to respond with greater assurance to their intuitions. In this paper, accounts from philosophy and neurophysiology are used to argue that intuition, specifically nursing intuition, is a valid form of knowledge. The paper argues that nursing intuition, a kind of practical intuition, is composed of four distinct aspects that include: (1) embodied knowledge rather like that knowledge we have when we have learned to ride a bicycle; (2) well-trained sensory perceptions attentive to subtle details of complex, often rapidly changing situations; (3) a significant store of pertinent conceptual knowledge; and (4) a history of habitual actions intentionally directed towards achieving the best outcomes for our patients. Contemporary neurophysiology research strongly suggests that human persons experience other persons such that they directly understand the meaning of a variety of different human actions, intentions, emotions, and sensations in immediate, non-reflective, and non-conceptual perceptions. This research is supported by the philosophical theories of Jacques Maritain and Yves R. Simon found in their accounts of practical knowledge. Together, these accounts offer us a rich view of the reality of nursing intuition that helps us understand why we find intuitive actions in some but not all nurses and gives us some specific information about how to develop intuition in young nurses. Finally, this research shows us a path for further research. PMID:22405017

  12. Pharmacological targeting of ion channels for cancer therapy: In vivo evidences.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; Managò, Antonella; Zoratti, Mario; Gulbins, Erich; Szabo, Ildiko

    2016-06-01

    Since the discovery of the participation of various ion channels in the regulation of cell proliferation and programmed cell death two decades ago, the field exploring ion channel function in relation to cancer has undergone rapid development. Although the mechanisms accounting for the impact of ion channel modulators on cancer growth have not been fully clarified in all cases, numerous in vivo experiments targeting diverse ion channels in various cancer models illustrate the great potentiality of this approach and promote ion channels to the class of oncological targets. In the present review we give an updated overview of the field and critically discuss the promising results obtained in pre-clinical models using specific pharmacological modulators of calcium, sodium, potassium and anion-permeable ion channels, whose expression is often altered in tumor cells and tissues. The most, especially critical issues are specificity of action and side-effects. Interestingly, some of the most potent drugs are natural products, and several of the active compounds are already used in the clinic for other purposes. In these latter cases involving drug repositioning we may expect a faster progression from preclinical to clinical studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26658642

  13. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Temperate and green in the summer, the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia freezes over completely in the winter. This true-color image of the Kamchatka Peninsula was acquired on December 12, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The peninsula is surrounded by the Sea of Okhotsk to the west and by the Bering Sea to the east. The ice and snow highlight the stunning valleys and tall peaks of the Sredinnyy Khrebet, which is the volcanic mountain range running down the center of the peninsula. The mountains along the range reach heights of over 3500 meters (11,484 feet). Many of the volcanoes are still active, and ash and volcanic rock has turned the snow a dark gray on the eastern side of the range. The light blue latticework of ridges, valleys, and alluvial fans extending from the center of the range were likely carved out by past and present glaciers and by run-off from spring snowmelt. The small island that extends off of the tip of the peninsula is Ostrov Paramushir (Paramushir Island). Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. Cartier, Champlain, and the fruits of the New World: botanical exchange in the 16th and 17th centuries.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Much has been written of the Columbian exchange, the transfer between New World and Old of people, pathogens, flora and fauna. The biota of two hemispheres, once seemingly irredeemably separated, were interpenetrated, both through accident and through human agency. Part of this exchange involved medicinal and food plants, discovered in the New World and adopted into the Old. This paper examines the translation of a number of New World plants that were part of the 'Cartierian' or 'Champlinian' exchange that followed the voyages to North America by Jacques Cartier (1491-1557) between 1534 and 1541, and the explorations and settlements undertaken by Samuel de Champlain (1580?-1635) from 1603 to his death at Quebec in 1635. During this period, a number of North American plants were propagated in European nurseries and even found their way into everyday use in gardens or kitchens. How were these new plants viewed on their introduction and how were they incorporated into Europe's "vegetable" consciousness? Where did these new plants fit in the classification of the edible and the exotic? PMID:19569386

  17. [The disfigured men represented by the great painters (O. Dix - G. Grosz - R. Freida.) Disfiguration in the history of art].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Louis-Paul; Méroc, Nicolas; Frapat, Jean; Chauvin, Frédéric; Rousset, Chantal

    2007-01-01

    Sophie Delaporte's book, Philippe Paillard's, Chantal Roussels's novels and Dupeyron's movie underline the difficulties of repairing physical and moral sufferings of the "disfigured men" wounded during the Great War. Beside medical and technical didactic aimed drawings the exhibition of wasted, mutilated or out of repair faces remains little known. In France, Germany or Great Britain there are many artists who took part in war. Among the artists the French painter Raphael Freida and some German expressionists like Otto Dix, Max Beckmann or George Grosz are the most famous. Their works are often confidential, set apart in the museums and showed in rare exhibitions in Great Britain and the United States of America. The sight of ruined faces inspired such horror that the artists depicted it only exceptionally and with discretion, before 1914. Without doubt it is the fear of touching the privacy of the face which is a part of the human identity. There are no "disfigured men" in the countless religious paintings of torture, neither in the Disasters of Warfrom painters or engravers like Goya or Jacques Callot. PMID:18450292

  18. Sediment from the Tigris and Euphrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    There is a large amount of sediment clearly visible in the true-color image of the Persian Gulf, acquired on November 1, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Carried by the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers (at center), the sediment-laden waters appear light brown where they enter the northern end of the Persian Gulf and then gradually dissipate into turquoise swirls as they drift southward. The nutrients these sediments carry are helping to support a phytoplankton bloom in the region, which adds some darker green hues in the rich kaleidoscope of colors on the surface (see the high resolution image). The confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers marks the southernmost boundary between Iran (upper right) and Iraq (upper left). South of Iraq are the countries of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. The red dots indicate the probable locations of fires burning at oil refineries. Thin black plumes of smoke can be seen streaming away from several of these. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  19. The calcium-signaling toolkit: Updates needed.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Charlotte; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Vanden Abeele, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Here, we review the role of Ca(2+) in apoptosis, namely that ER Ca(2+) depletion or a sustained elevation of cytosolic or mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration are sufficient to trigger apoptosis. These concepts have emerged by the use of ER stressor agents that decrease the ER Ca(2+) pool by inhibiting SERCA pumps. However, aside from their well-known actions on Ca(2+) homeostasis disruption leading to apoptosis, new evidence show that some ER Ca(2+) modulators have significant implications in other Ca(2+)-mediated or Ca(2+)-independent pathways determining cell fate suggesting a more complex regulation of apoptosis by intracellular Ca(2+). Here, we discuss the crucial interplay between Ca(2+) mediated apoptosis, the Unfold Protein Response and autophagy determining cell fate, and the molecular compounds that have been used to depict these pathways. This review of the literature clearly shows the need for new inhibitors that do not interfere concomitantly with autophagy and Ca(2+) signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26658643

  20. Healing Pathways: Longitudinal Effects of Religious Coping and Social Support on PTSD symptoms in African American Sexual Assault Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ullman, Sarah; Tsong, Yuying; Anderson, Gera; Counts, Pamela; Tillman, Shaquita; Bhang, Cecile; Gray, Anthea

    2014-01-01

    African American women are at slightly increased risk for sexual assault (Abbey, Jacques-Tiaura, & Parkhill, 2010). However, due to stigma, experiences of racism, and historical oppression, African American women are less likely to seek help from formal agencies when compared to White women (Ullman & Filipas, 2001; Lewis, Resnick, Smith, Best, & Saunders, 2005) and/or women of other ethnic backgrounds (Ahrens, Abeling, Ahmad, & Himman, 2010). Therefore, the provision of culturally appropriate services, such as the inclusion of religion and spiritual coping, may be necessary when working with African American women survivors of sexual assault. The current study, controlling for age and education, explores the impact of religious coping and social support over one year for 252 African American adult female sexual assault survivors recruited from the Chicago metropolitan area. Results from hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed high endorsement of religious coping and social support at Time 1 does not predict a reduction of PTSD symptoms at Time 2. However, high social support at Time 2 does predict lower PTSD at Time 2. Also it is significant to note, survivors with high PTSD at Time 1 and Time 2 endorse greater use of social support and religious coping. Clinical and research implications are explored. PMID:25387044

  1. Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean's floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean's floor off of Namibia. As the bacteria ingest the algae husks, they produce hydrogen sulfide, which slowly builds up in the sea-floor sediments. Eventually, the hydrogen sulfide reaches the point where the sediment can no longer contain it, and it bubbles forth. When this poisonous chemical reaches the surface, it combines with the oxygen in the upper layers of the ocean to create clouds of pure sulfur. The sulfur causes the Namibian coast to smell like rotten eggs, and the hydrogen sulfide will often kill fish and drive lobsters away. For more information, read: A Bloom By Any Other Name A high-resolution (250 meters per pixel) image earlier on the 24th taken from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows additional detail in the plumes. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. [Genealogical study of the Pijart dynasty, goldsmiths or apothecaries in Paris in the 16th and 17th centuries].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The Pijart dynasty, established in Paris during the 16th and 17th centuries, included apothecaries and goldsmiths who had a common ancestor, Michel Pijart, warden of the goldsmith's guild (garde de l'orfèvrerie) in 1507. He was married to Jehanne Daumont and died 23rd July 1524. This couple had four sons, all goldsmiths, Pierre, Michel, Jehan and Nicolas. Pierre married twice. His first wife, Philippe Dusseau, was the sister of a famous apothecary. Only their eldest son, François, chose the profession of apothecary; the other three, Jacques, Jehan and Philibert, all followed their father's profession. By his second marriage to Marie de Mézières, Pierre had two sons, Claude the elder and Claude the younger, who both became goldsmiths. Thus, the goldsmith's trade became the favoured profession of the Pijart family. Professional endogamy prevailed in this dynasty, after the fashion of merchants belonging to the six most prestigious guilds (Six-Corps de métiers). Goldsmiths and apothecaries retained strong family ties, demonstrated by family reunions (baptisms, betrothals, etc.). It is undisputable that the renown of this dynasty is based on the fame of its goldsmiths. However, through marriage, the Pijart's developed links with other families of apothecaries, of which the most outstanding were the Boulduc's. PMID:18348497

  3. [The family relationships of Antoine Brulon, apothecary to the king, and his wife, Anne de Furnes, in Auvergne and Paris in the 17th century. Anne de Furnes and Molière in Paris and the village of Auteuil].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2011-07-01

    This article presents the biography of Anne de Fumes, wife of Antoine Brulon, the king's apothecary. Due to the successive deaths of her husband and her only daughter, Geneviève, her sisters-in-law, Géraude and Anne Brulon, living in Auvergne, inherited the property of their niece. Anne de Fumes, who inherited the movable assets, carried out a series of transactions to acquire the totality of the property rights, which she obtained, but at the considerable cost of 100,000 pounds. After her death, her five nephews and nieces, her sole legatees, inherited her estate. From 1666, Molière was the tenant of an apartment in a building in the Rue Saint-Thomas-du-Louvre, Place du Palais-Royal, in Paris, which belonged to Anne de Fumes. She lived in the neighbouring house in the Rue Saint-Honoré of which she was also the owner. Three apothecaries, Philibert Boudin, Jean Morel and Pierre Frapin, successively rented the shop and entresol of the house in the Rue Saint-Thomas-du-Louvre. Pierre Frapin, tenant of the shop from 1668, supplied Molière with medicine. Like Molière, Anne de Fumes rented accommodation in a house in the village of Auteuil belonging to Jacques de Grout de Beaufort and his wife Marie Filz. Reports show that the famous actor and Anne de Fumes cohabited in Auteuil during the period 1667 to 1672. PMID:21998974

  4. Flooding on Elbe River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further downriver in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea. Credit:Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  5. The memory of two great mental calculators: Charcot and Binet's neglected 1893 experiments.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Gounden, Yannick; Levine, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    French neurologist Jean Martin Charcot (1825-1893) and French psychologist Alfred Binet (1857-1911) are almost unknown as investigators who conducted original and fascinating studies in the area of memory. In a series of 1893 experiments, they compared the performance of two expert mental calculators, Jacques Inaudi and Périclès Diamandi, in tasks that consisted of recalling digits. Inspired by Ribot's psychological work (1881), they believed in the existence of not one type of memory but several partial, special, and local memories, each devoted to a particular domain. In all arithmetical prodigies, memory for digits is abnormally developed compared with other memories. Inaudi was considered to be an auditory memory-based mental calculator; when memorizing digits, he did not rely onthe appearance of the items or create visual imagery of any kind. Rather, he remembered digits principally by their sounds. Inaudi's methods of calculation and memorization were original and different from those used by Diamandi, who was a typical visual memory-based mental calculator. The experiments presented in the 1893 article were among the first scientific demonstrations of the importance to psychology of studying different types of memory. The present work gives a translation of this pioneering experimental article on expert calculators by Charcot and Binet, instructive for the comprehension of normal memory. PMID:21834408

  6. Terrorism--a (self) love story: redirecting the significance quest can end violence.

    PubMed

    Kruglanski, Arie W; Bélanger, Jocelyn J; Gelfand, Michele; Gunaratna, Rohan; Hettiarachchi, Malkanthi; Reinares, Fernando; Orehek, Edward; Sasota, Jo; Sharvit, Keren

    2013-10-01

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's concepts of self-love (amour propre) and love of self (amour de soi même) are applied to the psychology of terrorism. Self-love is concern with one's image in the eyes of respected others, members of one's group. It denotes one's feeling of personal significance, the sense that one's life has meaning in accordance with the values of one's society. Love of self, in contrast, is individualistic concern with self-preservation, comfort, safety, and the survival of self and loved ones. We suggest that self-love defines a motivational force that when awakened arouses the goal of a significance quest. When a group perceives itself in conflict with dangerous detractors, its ideology may prescribe violence and terrorism against the enemy as a means of significance gain that gratifies self-love concerns. This may involve sacrificing one's self-preservation goals, encapsulated in Rousseau's concept of love of self. The foregoing notions afford the integration of diverse quantitative and qualitative findings on individuals' road to terrorism and back. Understanding the significance quest and the conditions of its constructive fulfillment may be crucial to reversing the current tide of global terrorism. PMID:24128318

  7. The effects of age on second language grammar and speech production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Becky H

    2014-08-01

    The current study examined the age of learning effect on second language (L2) acquisition. The research goals of the study were twofold: to test whether there is an independent age effect controlling for other potentially confounding variables, and to clarify the age effect across L2 grammar and speech production domains. The study included 118 Mandarin-speaking immigrants and 24 native English speakers. Grammar knowledge was assessed by a grammaticality judgment task, and speech production was measured by native English speaking raters' ratings of participants' foreign accents. Results from the study revealed that the age of learning effect was robust for both L2 domains even after controlling for the influences of other variables, such as length of residence and years of education in the United States. However, the age of learning variable had a stronger impact on speech production than on grammar. The current results support the framework of multiple critical/sensitive periods (Long in Int Rev Appl Linguist 43(4):287-317, 2005; Newport et al. in Language, brain and cognitive development: Essays in honor of Jacques Mehler. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2001; Werker and Tees in Dev Psychobiol 46(3):233-251, 2005). PMID:23975257

  8. Lacan’s Construction and Deconstruction of the Double-Mirror Device

    PubMed Central

    Vanheule, Stijn

    2011-01-01

    In the 1950s Jacques Lacan developed a set-up with a concave mirror and a plane mirror, based on which he described the nature of human identification. He also formulated ideas on how psychoanalysis, qua clinical practice, responds to identification. In this paper Lacan’s schema of the two mirrors is described in detail and the theoretical line of reasoning he aimed to articulate with aid of this spatial model is discussed. It is argued that Lacan developed his double-mirror device to clarify the relationship between the drive, the ego, the ideal ego, the ego-ideal, the other, and the Other. This model helped Lacan describe the dynamics of identification and explain how psychoanalytic treatment works. He argued that by working with free association, psychoanalysis aims to articulate unconscious desire, and bypass the tendency of the ego for misrecognition. The reasons why Lacan stressed the limits of his double-mirror model and no longer considered it useful from the early 1960s onward are examined. It is argued that his concept of the gaze, which he qualifies as a so-called “object a,” prompted Lacan move away from his double-mirror set-up. In those years Lacan gradually began to study the tension between drive and signifier. The schema of the two mirrors, by contrast, focused on the tension between image and signifier, and missed the point Lacan aimed to address in this new era of his work. PMID:21949511

  9. Metaphor in psychosis: on the possible convergence of Lacanian theory and neuro-scientific research.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Feyaerts, Jasper; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the theories of leading psychiatrists, like Kraepelin and de Clérambault, the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan (1901-1981) formulated an original theory of psychosis, focusing on the subject and on the structuring role of language. In particular, he postulated that language makes up the experience of subjectivity and that psychosis is marked by the absence of a crucial metaphorization process. Interestingly, in contemporary psychiatry there is growing empirical evidence that schizophrenia is characterized by abnormal interpretation of verbal and non-verbal information, with a great difficulty to put such information in the appropriate context. Neuro-scientific contributions have investigated this difficulty suggesting the possibility of interpreting schizophrenia as a semiotic disorder which makes the patients incapable of understanding the figurative meaning of the metaphoric speech, probably due to a dysfunction of certain right hemisphere areas, such as the right temporoparietal junction and the right superior/middle temporal gyrus. In this paper we first review the Lacanian theory of psychosis and neuro-scientific research in the field of symbolization and metaphoric speech. Next, we discuss possible convergences between both approaches, exploring how they might join and inspire one another. Clinical and neurophysiological research implications are discussed. PMID:26089805

  10. The subject in an uproar: a Lacanian perspective on panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Strubbe, Glenn; Vanheule, Stijn

    2014-04-01

    From Jacques Lacan's theory of anxiety, principles are deduced for a Lacanian-oriented treatment of panic disorder. This Lacanian approach is related to Freud's theory of the actual neuroses, and is comparable in some ways with the approach taken in Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (PFPP). The Lacanian conceptualization of panic retains the idea that both repressed material and unsymbolized mental states lie at its basis. People suffering from panic attacks are overwhelmed by signifiers, aspects of corporeal excitation, and/or existential questions that remain too Real. Psychoanalytic therapy aims to create a name for such Real elements. The three registers that Lacan situates at the basis of his psychoanalytic approach (the Symbolic, the Imaginary, and the Real) are discussed, as well as the treatment principles for conducting this clinical work. The case study of a young woman with panic disorder is presented to illustrate how a brief, Lacanian-oriented treatment (forty-eight sessions) progressed, and where the patient managed to both name and find a symbolic place for psychic experiences that were too Real. During this treatment, the patient overcame her avoidant-defensive mode of functioning and her persistent difficulties related to separation. PMID:24651266

  11. A historical perspective on the collaboration between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Sauvagnat, François; Wiss, Matthias; Clément, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present and discuss the connections between psychoanalysis and neuroscience from a historical viewpoint. We start by examining how Sigmund Freud can be viewed as a pioneer in the interaction between these two fields. Freud was himself a neurologist and had maintained an interest in biology as he developed the key concepts of psychoanalysis. His ideas regarding psychosomatics are described. We will also explore how the concept of drive is essential to the connection between psychoanalysis and neuroscience. Then, we describe several key actors and historical events and characters at the interface of these two fields, namely Sándor Radó Lawrence S. Kubie and Mc Culloch, the debates that took place during the Macy conferences, as well as the positions of Jacques Lacan, George L. Engel, and Eric Kandel. Finally, we present a synthesis of the main fields in which the connections between psychoanalysis and neuroscience are already fruitful, and those where they should be developed: the classification of mental diseases, the link between the scientific and psychic dimensions, therapeutics, the organization of the body, intersubjectivity, the subjective division and ambivalence, as well as transferential effects like such as the placebo and nocebo effects. In the conclusion, we advocate several strategic alliances and underscore the complementarity between rigorous scientific experimentation and the individualized psychoanalytic approach. PMID:20951802

  12. Lacan's Construction and Deconstruction of the Double-Mirror Device.

    PubMed

    Vanheule, Stijn

    2011-01-01

    In the 1950s Jacques Lacan developed a set-up with a concave mirror and a plane mirror, based on which he described the nature of human identification. He also formulated ideas on how psychoanalysis, qua clinical practice, responds to identification. In this paper Lacan's schema of the two mirrors is described in detail and the theoretical line of reasoning he aimed to articulate with aid of this spatial model is discussed. It is argued that Lacan developed his double-mirror device to clarify the relationship between the drive, the ego, the ideal ego, the ego-ideal, the other, and the Other. This model helped Lacan describe the dynamics of identification and explain how psychoanalytic treatment works. He argued that by working with free association, psychoanalysis aims to articulate unconscious desire, and bypass the tendency of the ego for misrecognition. The reasons why Lacan stressed the limits of his double-mirror model and no longer considered it useful from the early 1960s onward are examined. It is argued that his concept of the gaze, which he qualifies as a so-called "object a," prompted Lacan move away from his double-mirror set-up. In those years Lacan gradually began to study the tension between drive and signifier. The schema of the two mirrors, by contrast, focused on the tension between image and signifier, and missed the point Lacan aimed to address in this new era of his work. PMID:21949511

  13. Global predictive real-time control of Quebec Urban Community's westerly sewer network.

    PubMed

    Pleau, M; Pelletier, G; Colas, H; Lavallée, P; Bonin, R

    2001-01-01

    Quebec Urban Community (QUC) has selected Global Predictive Real-Time Control (GP-RTC) as the most efficient approach to achieve environmental objectives defined by the Ministry of Environment. QUC wants to reduce combined sewer overflows (CSOs) frequency to the St Lawrence river to two events per summer period in order to reclaim the use of Jacques-Cartier Beach for recreational activities and sports of primary contact. QUC's control scheme is based on the Certainty Equivalent Control Open Loop Feedback (CEOLF) strategy which permits one to introduce, at each control period, updated measurements and meteorological predictions. A non-linear programming package is used to find the flow set points that minimise a multi-objective (cost) function, subjected to linear equality and inequality constraints representing the physical and operational constraints on the sewer network. Implementation of GP-RTC on QUC's westerly network was performed in the summer of 1999 and was operational by mid-August. Reductions in overflow volumes with GP-RTC compared to static control are attributed to the optimal use of two existing tunnels as retention facilities as well as the maximal use of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) capacity. PMID:11385838

  14. Metaphor in psychosis: on the possible convergence of Lacanian theory and neuro-scientific research

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Michele; Feyaerts, Jasper; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the theories of leading psychiatrists, like Kraepelin and de Clérambault, the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan (1901–1981) formulated an original theory of psychosis, focusing on the subject and on the structuring role of language. In particular, he postulated that language makes up the experience of subjectivity and that psychosis is marked by the absence of a crucial metaphorization process. Interestingly, in contemporary psychiatry there is growing empirical evidence that schizophrenia is characterized by abnormal interpretation of verbal and non-verbal information, with a great difficulty to put such information in the appropriate context. Neuro-scientific contributions have investigated this difficulty suggesting the possibility of interpreting schizophrenia as a semiotic disorder which makes the patients incapable of understanding the figurative meaning of the metaphoric speech, probably due to a dysfunction of certain right hemisphere areas, such as the right temporoparietal junction and the right superior/middle temporal gyrus. In this paper we first review the Lacanian theory of psychosis and neuro-scientific research in the field of symbolization and metaphoric speech. Next, we discuss possible convergences between both approaches, exploring how they might join and inspire one another. Clinical and neurophysiological research implications are discussed. PMID:26089805

  15. Abyssal intimacies and temporalities of care: How (not) to care about deformed leaf bugs in the aftermath of Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Astrid

    2015-10-01

    Prompted by a classroom discussion on knowledge politics in the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster, this article offers a reading of Hugh Raffles' Insectopedia entry on Chernobyl. In that entry, Raffles describes how Swiss science-artist and environmental activist Cornelia Hesse-Honegger collects, studies, and paints morphologically deformed leaf bugs that she finds in the proximity of nuclear power plants. In exploring how to begin to care about beings, such as leaf bugs, this article proposes a notion of care that combines an intimate knowledge practice with an ethical relationship to more-than-human others. Jacques Derrida's notion of 'abyssal intimacy' is central to such a combination. Hesse-Honegger's research practices enact and her paintings depict an 'abyssal intimacy' that deconstructs the oppositions between concerns about human suffering and compassion for seemingly irrelevant insects and between knowledge politics and ethics. At the heart of such a careful knowledge production is a fundamental passivity, based on a shared vulnerability. An abyssal intimacy is not something we ought to recognize; rather, it issues from particular practices of care that do not identify their subjects of care in advance. Caring or becoming affected thus entails the dissociation of affection not only from the humanist subject, but also from movements in time: from direct helping action and from the assumption that advocacy necessarily means speaking for an other, usually assumed to be inferior. PMID:26630816

  16. Time to Separate the Men From the Beasts: Symbolic Anticipation as the Typically Human Subjective Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Grave, Dieter

    2004-08-01

    In this paper it is argued that the dividing line that runs between the human psyche as opposed to any other complex system is made up by symbolic anticipation. The functionality of the human mind as an anticipatory system is entirely caught up in the crucial role that finiteness, shortage or lack plays for human beings. Anticipation for us is the way by which this negative finiteness or lack is translated into a positive longing, want or desire. We take a look at the three dimensional view of Jacques Lacan regarding these matters in a sophistical example and we illustrate how anticipation as a Symbolic phenomenon is distinct from the Imaginary or the Real register. As Lacan points out anticipation creates a symbolic social link which binds two or more interacting humans together in an anticipatory relationship. Beliefs, expectations and convictions are the typically human social links which ground human interaction and set it apart from other forms of social interaction we can observe in other complex biological entities.

  17. United States West Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday (Feb. 14, 2002), the cloud cover that often overshadows the western United States this time of year broke to provide those at the Olympic Games with a beautiful day. The nearly cloud-free day was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra spacecraft. A thick layer of snow blankets northernmost Nevada, northern Utah, most of Idaho and western Wyoming. The snow surrounds and highlights Utahs Great Salt Lake. Just south of the lake, clouds can be seen hovering over southern Utah. (In general, clouds appear streaky and uneven on a satellite image, and snow cover appears solid with definable borders.) North of the Great Salt Lake, one can clearly discern the light gray Northern Rocky Mountains cutting through Idaho and up into Canada. Moving southwest, the spine-like Sierra Nevada mountains separate the greenery of Southern California from the brown deserts of Arizona and Nevada. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Wintertime in the Western U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday (Feb. 14, 2002), the cloud cover that often overshadows the western United States this time of year broke to provide those at the Olympic Games with a beautiful day. The nearly cloud-free day was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. A thick layer of snow blankets northernmost Nevada, northern Utah, most of Idaho and western Wyoming. The snow surrounds and highlights Utah's Great Salt Lake. Just south of the lake, clouds can be seen hovering over southern Utah. (In general, clouds appear streaky and uneven on a satellite image, and snow cover appears solid with definable borders.) North of the Great Salt Lake, one can clearly discern the light gray Northern Rocky Mountains cutting through Idaho and up into Canada. Moving southwest, the spine-like Sierra Nevada mountains separate the greenery of Southern California from the brown deserts of Arizona and Nevada. For an interesting contrast, compare this MODIS image to the MISR mosaic image of the Western United States during the summer (See Western United States Beyond the Four Corners). To access this image at a resolution of 500 meters per pixel, click on the image above. To access a full-resolution image at 250 meters per pixel, visit the MODIS Rapidfire Image Gallery. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  19. Proving communal warfare among hunter-gatherers: The Quasi-Rousseauan error.

    PubMed

    Gat, Azar

    2015-01-01

    Was human fighting always there, as old as our species? Or is it a late cultural invention, emerging after the transition to agriculture and the rise of the state, which began, respectively, only around ten thousand and five thousand years ago? Viewed against the life span of our species, Homo sapiens, stretching back 150,000-200,000 years, let alone the roughly two million years of our genus Homo, this is the tip of the iceberg. We now have a temporal frame and plenty of empirical evidence for the "state of nature" that Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacque Rousseau discussed in the abstract and described in diametrically opposed terms. All human populations during the Pleistocene, until about 12,000 years ago, were hunter-gatherers, or foragers, of the simple, mobile sort that lacked accumulated resources. Studying such human populations that survived until recently or still survive in remote corners of the world, anthropology should have been uniquely positioned to answer the question of aboriginal human fighting or lack thereof. Yet access to, and the interpretation of, that information has been intrinsically problematic. The main problem has been the "contact paradox." Prestate societies have no written records of their own. Therefore, documenting them requires contact with literate state societies that necessarily affects the former and potentially changes their behavior, including fighting. PMID:26081116

  20. Super Typhoon Halong off Taiwan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 14, 2002, Super Typhoon Halong was east of Taiwan (left edge) in the western Pacific Ocean. At the time this image was taken the storm was a Category 4 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 115 knots (132 miles per hour), but as recently as July 12, winds were at 135 knots (155 miles per hour). Halong has moved northwards and pounded Okinawa, Japan, with heavy rain and high winds, just days after tropical Storm Chataan hit the country, creating flooding and killing several people. The storm is expected to be a continuing threat on Monday and Tuesday. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on July 14, 2002. Please note that the high-resolution scene provided here is 500 meters per pixel. For a copy of the scene at the sensor's fullest resolution, visit the MODIS Rapid Response Image Gallery. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Floods in Northeast India and Bangladesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For the past two weeks floods have ravaged Bangladesh (center) and eastern India (draped around Bangladesh to the north), killing over 50 people and displacing hundreds of thousands from their homes. These false-color images acquired on July 15 and 16, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite show some of the worst flooding. The dark brown, swollen river in the images (top right on July 16; center on July 15) is the Brahmaputra River, which flows through the middle of the Indian state of Assam at the foothills of the Himalaya Mountains. A large, black area south of the Brahmaputra (partially obscured by clouds) shows flooded areas in Bangladesh. Floods of this magnitude have been known to occur in southern Bangladesh and are caused by storms washing seawater over coastal regions. This year, however, unrelenting torrential rains across the entire eastern sub-continent gave rise to the deluge. The massive amounts of rainwater that fell on Nepal and Assam drained into an already waterlogged eastern Bangladesh. Normally, the Brahmaputra River and its tributaries would resemble a tangle of thin lines, and the large black patches in Bangladesh would be the color of the rest of the land surface, tan. In these false-color images, land is tan, and clouds are pink and white. Water comes across as black or dark brown, depending on its sediment level, with clearer water being closer to black. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Floods in Canada and Northern Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During the first half of June, heavy rains inundated northern Minnesota and southern Canada, giving rise to floods that drove hundreds of people from their homes and drenched more than 300,000 acres of prime farmland. This false-color image of the flood (right) was acquired on June 15, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The worst of the flooding occurred on the border of Canada and Minnesota along the Roseau River, which now resembles a lake in the center of the image. The town of Roseau, Minnesota, which sits in the eastern end of the newly formed lake, was hit the hardest. Nearly all the buildings in the town took heavy water damage and many residents were forced to leave. Widespread flooding across an eight county region in Minnesota has drenched nearly 300,000 to 500,000 acres of farmland altogether. Many of the farmers hit lost 100 percent of their crops and will be unable to plant again for the season. Last week, President Bush declared northern Minnesota a disaster area. Normally, the Roseau River cannot even be seen on a MODIS image (left, acquired May 21, 2002), and the surrounding area is dry. In the false-color images, sage green, rusty orange, and blue is land, and water is black. Clouds are white and pink. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  3. Floods in Bangladesh and Northeast India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For the past month heavy monsoon rains have led to massive flooding in eastern India, Nepal, and Bangladesh, which have killed over 500 people and left millions homeless. This false-color image acquired on August 5, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft shows the extent of this flooding. In the upper right-hand corner of the image, the swollen Brahmaputra River runs east to west through the Indian state of Assam. Normally, the river and its tributaries would resemble a tangle of thin lines. Moving to the upper left-hand corner, flooding can be seen along the Ganges River in the state of Bihar, India. Both of these rivers flow into Bangladesh along with many others from India and Nepal. Heavy monsoon rains from all across the region have inundated the small country with water this year. Floodwaters have all but covered northeastern Bangladesh, which is usually dry. The Jamuna River, which runs down the center of the country off of the Brahmaputra River, now resembles a narrow lake. Millions of dollars in crops have been destroyed and thousands have been left stranded in their villages or on rafts. Forecasters are warning that flooding could get worse. In the false-color image, land is green, and water is black and dark brown. Clouds appear pink, red and white. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. Assessing Flood Risks and Planning for Resiliency in New Jersey: A Case Study on the Use of Online Flood Mapping and Resilience Planning Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auermuller, L. M.; Gatto, J.; Huch, C.

    2015-12-01

    The highly developed nature of New Jersey's coastline, barrier island and lagoon communities make them particularly vulnerable to storm surge, sea level rise and flooding. The impacts of Hurricane Sandy have enlightened coastal communities to these realities. Recognizing these vulnerabilities, the Jacques Cousteau National Research Reserve (JC NERR), Rutgers Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers Bloustein School and the Barnegat Bay Partnership (BBP) have developed web-based tools to assist NJ's coastal communities in visualizing and planning for future local impacts. NJFloodMapper and NJAdapt are two complementary interactive mapping websites that visualize different current and future flood hazards. These hazard layers can be combined with additional data including critical facilities, evacuation routes, socioeconomic and environmental data. Getting to Resilience is an online self-assessment tool developed to assist communities reduce vulnerability and increase preparedness by linking planning, mitigation, and adaptation. Through this interactive process communities will learn how their preparedness can yield valuable points through voluntary programs like FEMA's Community Rating System and Sustainable Jersey. The assessment process can also increase the community's understanding of where future vulnerabilities should be addressed through hazard mitigation planning. Since Superstorm Sandy, more than thirty communities in New Jersey have been provided technical assistance in assessing their risks and vulnerabilities to coastal hazards, and have begun to understand how to better plan and prepare for short and long-term changes along their shorelines.

  5. Monod before Monod: enzymatic adaptation, Lwoff, and the legacy of general biology.

    PubMed

    Loison, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    For most of his scientific career, Jacques Monod appeared to be a man of a single problem: the formation of enzymes and the regulation of their properties. His ability to produce theoretical models led him to play a major role in both the discovery of the operon regulation and the model of allosteric transitions. The successes of Monod, from the 1950s to the Noble Prize (1965), are already well documented. In this paper, I will focus on the Monod before Monod, that is, the Monod who, during the 1940s, tried to explain the fundamental phenomenon of enzymatic adaptation. To begin with, however, I will survey how this phenomenon was discovered and explained by French Pasteurians at the very beginning of the twentieth century. This first explanation took place amidst an entrenched Lamarckian atmosphere in French thought, which was still alive during the 1920s and the 1930s, when Monod commenced the study of biology at the Sorbonne. Because of his will to construct a scientific biology free from teleology, Monod always tried to break from the legacy of this traditional background of Lamarckism, and he consequently developed ways of thinking that, in the main, were not part of the French biological tradition. Nevertheless, one point did link Monod to French history: his fruitful interactions with André Lwoff. As we shall see, these interactions were necessary for the development of Monod's science, both technically and intellectually speaking. PMID:24466631

  6. The “Genetic Program”: Behind the Genesis of an Influential Metaphor

    PubMed Central

    Peluffo, Alexandre E.

    2015-01-01

    The metaphor of the “genetic program,” indicating the genome as a set of instructions required to build a phenotype, has been very influential in biology despite various criticisms over the years. This metaphor, first published in 1961, is thought to have been invented independently in two different articles, one by Ernst Mayr and the other by François Jacob and Jacques Monod. Here, after a detailed analysis of what both parties meant by “genetic program,” I show, using unpublished archives, the strong resemblance between the ideas of Mayr and Monod and suggest that their idea of genetic program probably shares a common origin. I explore the possibility that the two men met before 1961 and also exchanged their ideas through common friends and colleagues in the field of molecular biology. Based on unpublished correspondence of Jacob and Monod, I highlight the important events that influenced the preparation of their influential paper, which introduced the concept of the genetic program. Finally, I suggest that the genetic program metaphor may have preceded both papers and that it was probably used informally before 1961. PMID:26170444

  7. Enduring Influence of Elizabethan Ophthalmic Texts of the 1580s: Bailey, Grassus, and Guillemeau

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G; Davenport, Byrd; Randolph, Jessica; Busscher, Joshua; Hadi, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    Three English ophthalmic texts of the 1580s were frequently republished: 1) Walter Bailey’s A Briefe Treatise Touching the Preseruation of the Eie Sight, 2) The Method of Phisicke, an adaptation of the medieval treatise of Benevenutus Grassus, and 3) A Worthy Treatise of the Eyes, a translation of Jacques Guillemeau’s treatise. Their history is intertwined through composite publications, some of which lacked clear attribution. At least 21 editions incorporated these texts. Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616. To preserve eyesight, Bailey recommended eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis), fennel (Fæniculum vulgare), and a moderate lifestyle incorporating wine. In the works of Grassus and Guillemeau, cataracts were believed to lie anterior to the ‘crystalline humor,’ and were treated by the ‘art of the needle,’ or couching. Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts. Although one of his students has traditionally received credit, it was English oculist John Thomas Woolhouse who first combined the early concepts and used the term glaucoma to describe the palpably hard eye in the early eighteenth century. The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century. PMID:24959303

  8. Enduring influence of elizabethan ophthalmic texts of the 1580s: bailey, grassus, and guillemeau.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G; Davenport, Byrd; Randolph, Jessica; Busscher, Joshua; Hadi, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    Three English ophthalmic texts of the 1580s were frequently republished: 1) Walter Bailey's A Briefe Treatise Touching the Preseruation of the Eie Sight, 2) The Method of Phisicke, an adaptation of the medieval treatise of Benevenutus Grassus, and 3) A Worthy Treatise of the Eyes, a translation of Jacques Guillemeau's treatise. Their history is intertwined through composite publications, some of which lacked clear attribution. At least 21 editions incorporated these texts. Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616. To preserve eyesight, Bailey recommended eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis), fennel (Fæniculum vulgare), and a moderate lifestyle incorporating wine. In the works of Grassus and Guillemeau, cataracts were believed to lie anterior to the 'crystalline humor,' and were treated by the 'art of the needle,' or couching. Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts. Although one of his students has traditionally received credit, it was English oculist John Thomas Woolhouse who first combined the early concepts and used the term glaucoma to describe the palpably hard eye in the early eighteenth century. The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century. PMID:24959303

  9. Flooding on Russia's Lena River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nearly every year in the late spring, ice blocks the flow of water at the mouth of the Lena River in northeastern Russia and gives rise to floods across the Siberian plains. This year's floods can be seen in this image taken on June 2, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. The river runs down the left side of the image, and its delta is shrouded in ice (red) at the top of the image. Normally, the river would resemble a thin black line in MODIS imagery. The river, which is Russia's longest, flows 2,641 miles (4,250 kilometers) south to north through Siberia and into the Laptev Sea. In the winter, the river becomes nearly frozen. In the spring, however, water upstream thaws earlier than water at the mouth of the river. As the southern end of the river begins to melt, blocks of ice travel downstream to the still frozen delta, pile up, and often obstruct the flow of water. Flooding doesn't always occur on the same parts of the river. The floods hit further south last year. If the flooding grows severe enough, explosive charges are typically used to break up the ice jams. In these false-color images land areas are a dull, light green or tan, and water is black. Clouds appear pink, and ice comes across as bright red. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  10. Flooding Caused by the Collapse of the Zeyzoun Dam, Syria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Tuesday the Zeyzoun dam in northern Syria ruptured and collapsed, killing 20 people and leaving thousands more homeless. This false-color image taken on June 5, 2002, (bottom) by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite shows the extent of the flooding. Normally, there would be no water present in the center of the image (top, acquired on June 3, 2002). After the dam burst, 71 million cubic meters flowed onto the surrounding landscape and washed over an area of 20,000 acres. Hundreds of homes were destroyed in and around the villages of Zeyzoun, Qastoun, and Ziara, roughly 220 miles (350 kilometers) north of Damascus. Most of the residents fled to higher ground with the help of two helicopters. The Syrians originally constructed the dam to contain the Orontes River and provide a steady flow of water to the surrounding farms, many of which were lost. Rescue workers worry that more bodies may be found as the waters of the dam recede. The Japanese government issued more than $40,000 in aid for the victims, and the Syrian government is petitioning international aid agencies for further assistance. In this false-color image, the ground is sage green and rusty orange, and water is black. Clouds appear pink. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. Flooding along Danube River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Heavy rains in Central and Eastern Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in over a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Danube River and its tributaries was taken on August 19, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Budapest, the capital of Hungary, sits just south of the large bend in the river at the top of the image. Here the water reached levels not seen since 1965. Fortunately, the riverbanks are lined with 33-foot retainer walls throughout the city, so it did not face the same fate as Dresden or Prague along the Elbe River. But as one can see, the floodwaters hit many rural areas farther south. As last reported, the water was receding along the Danube. Credit: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC.

  12. Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. Multifaceted plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps: From structure to intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cancer.

    PubMed

    Padányi, Rita; Pászty, Katalin; Hegedűs, Luca; Varga, Karolina; Papp, Béla; Penniston, John T; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2016-06-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCAs) are intimately involved in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. They reduce Ca(2+) in the cytosol not only by direct ejection, but also by controlling the formation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and decreasing Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pool. In mammals four genes (PMCA1-4) are expressed, and alternative RNA splicing generates more than twenty variants. The variants differ in their regulatory characteristics. They localize into highly specialized membrane compartments and respond to the incoming Ca(2+) with distinct temporal resolution. The expression pattern of variants depends on cell type; a change in this pattern can result in perturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis and thus altered cell function. Indeed, PMCAs undergo remarkable changes in their expression pattern during tumorigenesis that might significantly contribute to the unbalanced Ca(2+) homeostasis of cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26707182

  14. Mechanism, vitalism and organicism in late nineteenth and twentieth-century biology: the importance of historical context.

    PubMed

    Allen, Garland E

    2005-06-01

    The term 'mechanism' has been used in two quite different ways in the history of biology. Operative, or explanatory mechanism refers to the step-by-step description or explanation of how components in a system interact to yield a particular outcome (as in the 'mechanism of enzyme action' or the 'mechanism of synaptic transmission'). Philosophical Mechanism, on the other hand, refers to a broad view of organisms as material entities, functioning in ways similar to machines--that is, carrying out a variety of activities based on known chemical and physical processes. In the early twentieth century philosophical Mechanism became the foundation of a 'new biology' that sought to establish the life sciences on the same solid and rigorous foundation as the physical sciences, including a strong emphasis on experimentation. In the context of the times this campaign was particularly aimed at combating the reintroduction of more holistic, non-mechanical approaches into the life sciences (organicism, vitalism). In so doing, Mechanists failed to see some of the strong points of non-vitalistic holistic thinking. The two approaches are illustrated in the work of Jacques Loeb and Hans Spemann. PMID:19260192

  15. Different methods and metaphysics in early molecular genetics--a case of disparity of research?

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Ute

    2008-01-01

    The encounter between two fundamentally different approaches in seminal research in molecular biology--the problems, aims, methods and metaphysics--is delineated and analyzed. They are exemplified by the microbiologist Oswald T. Avery who, in line with the reductionist mechanistic metaphysics of Jacques Loeb, attempted to explain basic life phenomena through chemistry; and the theoretical physicist Max Delbrück who, influenced by Bohr's antimechanistic views, preferred to explain these phenomena without chemistry. Avery's and Delbrück's most important studies took place concurrently. Thus analysis of their contrasting approaches lends itself to examination of the Weltanschauungen view concerning the role of fundamental (metaphysical) assumptions in scientific change, that is, the view that empirical research cannot be neutral in regard to the worldviews of the researchers. This study shows that the initial ostensible disparity (non-integratibility) of the two approaches lasted for just a short time. Ironically it was a student of Delbrück's school, James Watson, who (with Crick) proposed a chemical model, the DNA double helix, as a solution to Delbrück's problem. The structure of DNA has not been seriously challenged over the past half century Moreover, Watson's and Crick's work did not call into question the validity of Delbrück's research, but opened it up to entirely new approaches. The case of Avery and Delbrück demonstrates that after initial obstacles were overcome the different fundamental attitudes and the resulting research practices were capable of integration. PMID:19203011

  16. Life in the laboratory: public responses to experimental biology.

    PubMed

    Turney, J

    1995-04-01

    Present-day public attitudes to biological manipulation are ambivalent, many surveys show. This paper explores evidence of earlier attitudes to experimental biology, before survey data exists, by examining published responses in the press to the idea that biologists would 'create life'. This remarkable claim achieved wide currency in the early years of this century, particularly linked to the work of two prototypical 'visible scientists': Jacques Loeb and Alexis Carrel. Analysis of press responses to accounts of their work reveals deep disquiet about its possible implications, at a time when science and technology in general were regarded very positively. The evidence is augmented by studying commentary on a Presidential Address by Edward Schafer to the British Association meeting of 1912. It is concluded that feelings of ambivalence toward the manipulative power of biology are apparent at a very early stage in the development of modern biology, and that this makes it implausible that more recent manifestations of such ambivalence can be ascribed to some generalized 'anti-science' sentiment which has gathered strength in recent years. PMID:11640027

  17. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    PubMed Central

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-01-01

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors. PMID:19187550

  18. The anatomy of a forbidden desire: men, penetration and semen exchange.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dave; Warner, Dan

    2005-03-01

    The rising popularity of unprotected anal sex (bareback sex) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is perplexing healthcare providers working in sexual health clinics. Epidemiological research on the topic overlooks several socio-cultural and psychological dimensions. Our research attempts to construct an appropriate theoretical edifice by which we can understand this sexual practice. In order to achieve this objective, a qualitative design was selected and 18 semiconductive in-depth interviews were carried out with barebackers from five European and North American cities. We then analyzed the data using two theoretical approaches that were sensitive to the issues of desire, transgression and pleasure. These theories are those of the late French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, and those of poststructural thinkers, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. These theoretical frameworks helped shed light on the significance of bareback sex, and can potentially influence healthcare providers in gaining a better understanding not only of their clients, but also of their own role in the circuitry of desire at work within bareback. We found that while the exchange of semen constitutes a dangerous and irrational practice to healthcare professionals, it is nevertheless a significant variable in the sexual lives of barebackers that needs to be taken into consideration in the provision of healthcare services. PMID:15743438

  19. Capacity building and collaborative research on cross-national studies in the Asian region

    PubMed Central

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Chang, Linda; Wang, Gene-Jack; Li, Ming D.; Rawson, Richard; Shoptaw, Steve; Normand, Jacques; Tai, Betty

    2013-01-01

    To build capacity and collaborative research for future cross-national studies in the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) region, priority research topics were identified and discussed at the April 2013 Conference to Promote Global Health in Taipei. These topics included (1) Neuroscience on HIV/HCV and amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS), led by Drs. Linda Chang, Gene-Jack Wang, and Betty Tai; (2) ATS and mental health disorders, led by Drs. Richard Rawson and Wilson Compton; and (3) HIV/HCV transmission and social networks, led by Drs. Steven Shoptaw and Jacques Normand. Potential genetic studies spanning these topical areas as well as the importance of smoking cessation were further discussed, led by Dr. Ming Li. Additional priority research topics were also identified: (4) Drug use prevention, and (5) Family involvement to improve treatment adherence and recovery. Workgroups on these topics will be formed to prioritize research questions within the respective topical area and to determine the next steps. The ultimate goal of these workgroups is to stimulate collaboration that will eventually lead to research studies addressing critical issues related to the rising substance abuse and HIV infection rates in many Asian countries and, at the same time, to advance the scientific knowledge of substance abuse and HIV infection. PMID:24567700

  20. World Cup Hopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    From May 31 to June 30 the biggest single-sport event in the world, the 2002 FIFA World Cup (tm), will be taking place in Asia. South Korea and Japan are acting as hosts for the event which is being held in Asia for the first time. This true-color image of the southern Korean peninsula and southern Japan was acquired on May 25, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Thirty-two nations are represented at this year's Finals including the 1998 champion France, European powers England and Italy, tournament favorite Argentina, and the United States. The finals are the culmination of a 2-year qualifying process which started with 132 nations competing in regional qualification tournaments. In the round-robin first round of the World Cup, the U.S. team will be competing against teams from Portugal, Poland, and South Korea. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Problems with the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Hans-Peter; Liaschenko, Joan; Angus, Jan

    2016-01-01

    One of the most significant changes in modern healthcare delivery has been the evolution of the paper record to the electronic health record (EHR). In this paper we argue that the primary change has been a shift in the focus of documentation from monitoring individual patient progress to recording data pertinent to Institutional Priorities (IPs). The specific IPs to which we refer include: finance/reimbursement; risk management/legal considerations; quality improvement/safety initiatives; meeting regulatory and accreditation standards; and patient care delivery/evidence based practice. Following a brief history of the transition from the paper record to the EHR, the authors discuss unintended or contested consequences resulting from this change. These changes primarily reflect changes in the organization and amount of clinician work and clinician-patient relationships. The paper is not a research report but was informed by an institutional ethnography the aim of which was to understand how the EHR impacted clinicians and administrators in a large, urban hospital in the United States. The paper was also informed by other sources, including the philosophies of Jacques Ellul, Don Idhe, and Langdon Winner. PMID:26603947

  2. ESA proposes Moon initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    Upon the invitation of the Swiss Government, the European Space Agency (ESA) is organising from Tuesday 31 May to Friday 3 June 1994 an international workshop on present and future plans for study and exploration of the Moon. This meeting will be held in Beatenberg, Switzerland, and attended by European, Russian and Japanese national space agencies as well as by NASA, the National Aeraunotics & Space Administration. For the media : * - a presentation will be held by Prof. Roger M. Bonnet, ESA Director of Science, and Mr. Jean-Jacques Dordain, Associate Director for Strategy, Planning and International Policy, at ESA Headquarters (8-10, rue Mario Nikis - 75015-PARIS) at 09h00 during a press breakfast on Monday 30 May. An info note describing the main lunar studies which will be presented at the Beatenberg workshop will be distributed on this occasion. * - On Friday 3 June, the press is invited to attend the closing session of the Beatenberg workshop starting at 09h30. This session will be followed by a briefing with the chairmen of the working groups and a lunch.

  3. New look at population-food nexus.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Tim Dyson, professor of Population Studies at the London School of Economics, in his book entitled "Population and Food -- Global Trends and Future Prospects," claims the world will be able to feed its rapidly expanding population in 25 years, if fertilizer use doubles and world trade grows rapidly. He bases this conclusion on population, grain trade, and production data from UN sources and on the assumption that the world population is expanding at the rate of 1 billion people every 12 years. His prediction that several world regions will have great difficulty producing enough food to meet the demands of growing populations is more optimistic than that of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the UN, which believes a world disaster is impending. FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf, while speaking at the opening session of the FAO Asia and the Pacific regional conference at Apia, Samoa, stated that "extremely violent and serious conflict" was possible if food security was not improved. He said that the prime responsibility of the FAO was to alert world opinion and world leaders to the food situation: although world population has grown substantially per capita, arable land continues to diminish; current modes of exploitation are degrading the environment; fishery resources are over-exploited; and the current distribution of food is skewed. PMID:12291708

  4. Salt RNA protection against thermodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2003-04-01

    We shown the structural integrity of tRNA at high temperature, 82^oC for 30h, in high salt concentrations (Tehei et al, 2002). Stability were also performed by measuring the residual specific tRNA charge capacity after heat treatment for 30 h at 82^oC. We have undertaken in vitro selection of RNA molecules at high temperature in presence of an ancient halite (NaCl) sample (reference : EZ08-K6-C9). This sample, collected in a borehole at 720.15 m depth, belongs to the Rupelian Upper Salt Formation of the Bresse salt basin (France). Its age is estimated to about 31±3 millions years. These studies provide support for the importance of salt to protect macromolecules against thermal degradation allowing activity to be recovered. These could be useful for searching traces of life in ancient sediments and in planetary exploration. Reference: Tehei Moeva, Franzetti Bruno, Maurel Marie-Christine, Vergne Jacques, Hountondji Codjo and Zaccai Giuseppe, Extremophiles, (2002), 6: 427-430.

  5. Greece and Turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Summer is in full swing in this stunning true-color image of the southeastern European countries and Turkey captured by MODIS on June 29, 2002. Clockwise from left, the mountains of Greece, Albania, Macedonia, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Turkey are swathed in brilliant greens and shades of golden brown; meanwhile (counterclockwise from left) the Ionian, Mediterranean, Aegean, and Black Seas are beautifully blue and green.Running diagonally across the image from the bottom middle to the top right is a gray streak that is caused by the angle of reflection of the sun on the water (called sun glint). The darker areas within this gray swath denote calmer water, and make visible currents that would not otherwise be noticeable.Surprisingly few fires were burning hot enough to be detectable by MODIS when this image was acquired during the height of the summer dry season. A single fire is visible burning in mainland Greece, six are visible in northwestern Turkey, and one burns on the western coast (marked with red outlines). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  6. South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pale green vegetation and red-brown deserts dominate this MODIS image of Namibia (left), Botswana (upper right), and the Republic of South Africa (bottom) acquired on June3, 2002. In central Namibia the mountainous terrain of Namaqualand is sandwiched between the Namib Desert on the Atlantic Coast and the Kalahari Desert to the interior, where white dots mark the location of small, impermanent lakes and ponds. Namaqualand is home to numerous rare succulent plants that can survive on the region.s scant rainfall as well as fog that blows in off the ocean. Namaqualand extends south of the Orange River, which runs along the border of Namibia and South Africa and into that country.s Northern Cape region. The Orange River extends almost all the way back through the country, and where it makes a sharp southward dip in this image (at lower right), it runs through the Asbestos Mountains, names for the naturally-occurring asbestos they contain. In southwestern South Africa, high plateaus, such as the Great Karoo become mountain ridges near the coast, and the city of Cape Town is visible as a grayish area of pixels on the north shores of the horseshoe-shaped False Bay at the Cape of Good Hope. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. [Stent, endovascular prosthesis, net or strut? What would British dentist Charles Stent (1807-1885) have to say on all this?].

    PubMed

    Lukenda, Josip; Biocina-Lukenda, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The word stent appears in the Index Medicus as of 1952, while in Croatian articles as of 1993. The origin of the word has been attributed to British dentist Charles. T. Stent (1807-1885), maker of the compound for dental impressions (Stent's compound). Viennese surgeon, Johannes F. S. Esser (1877-1946) used the compound in plastic surgery of the face calling it an eponym Stent's mould. During the 1950's, William H. ReMine and John H. Grindlay used Stent's principle for omentum lined plastic tubes in the bile duct of a dog. The development of today's vascular stents began in 1912 when French Nobel Prize winner Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) implanted glass tubes in the arteries of dogs. The first metal spirals were implanted in the arteries of dogs by Charles T. Dotter (1920-1985), while the first stents in human arteries were implanted by French doctors Ulrich Sigwart and Jacques Puel in Toulouse in 1986. Some authors claim that the origin of the word stent is associated with the Scotish word stynt or stent, meaning stretched out river fishing nets. PMID:19348354

  8. High-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharides are involved in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae adherence to porcine respiratory tract cells.

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, S E; Dubreuil, D; Rioux, S; Gottschalk, M; Jacques, M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. The major adhesin of A. pleuropneumoniae has been identified as the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, J. Harel, C. Girard, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 58:3523-3530, 1990). Using immunoelectron microscopy and flow cytometry, we showed in the present study that LPSs were well exposed at the surface of this encapsulated microorganism. Immunolocalization with porcine lung and tracheal frozen sections showed that extracted LPS bound to the lung mesenchyme and vascular endothelium and to the tracheal epithelium, respectively. Inhibition of adherence of A. pleuropneumoniae with extracted LPS was also performed with lung and tracheal frozen sections. Acid hydrolysis of LPS revealed that the active component of LPS was not lipid A but the polysaccharides. LPSs from A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 2 were separated by chromatography on Sephacryl S-300 SF, in the presence of sodium deoxycholate, according to their molecular masses. The adherence-inhibitory activity was found in the high-molecular-mass fractions. These high-molecular-mass fractions contained 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and neutral sugars, and they were recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against A. pleuropneumoniae O antigen but not recognized by a monoclonal antibody against capsular antigen. Images PMID:8039902

  9. Planck satellite to be presented to media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    at Orsay (France) in the case of HFI, and by the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica (IASF) in Bologna (Italy) in that of LFI. There are also numerous subcontractors spread throughout Europe, with several more in the USA. For further information, please contact: ESA Media Relations Office Tel: +33(0)1.53.69.7155 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.7690 Press event programme 1 February 2007, 10:00 am Alcatel Alenia Space 100 Boulevard du Midi, Cannes (France) 10:00 - 10:05 - Opening address, by Patrick Maute - Head of Optical Observation and Science Programmes - Alcatel Alenia Space, and by Jacques Louet - Head of Science Projects - ESA 10:05 - 10:15 - Herschel/Planck Mission overview, by Thomas Passvogel - Planck Project Manager - ESA 10:15 - 10:25 - Planck satellite, by Jean-Jacques Juillet - Programme Manager - Alcatel Alenia Space 10:25 - 10:35 - The scientific mission, by Jan Tauber - Planck Project Scientist - ESA 10:35 - 10:45 - The High-Frequency Instrument, by Jean-Loup Puget - HFI Principal Investigator 10:45 - 10:55 - The Low-Frequency Instrument, by Reno Mandolesi - LFI Principal Investigator 10:55 - 11:05 - Special guest - Nobel prize winner G.F. Smoot 11:05 - 11:25 - Questions and answers 11:25 - 12:35 - Visit of the integration room to see Planck spacecraft and face-to-face interviews 12:45 - 14:30 - Lunch hosted by Alcatel Alenia Space.

  10. Impact of water quality and irrigation management on soil salinization in the Drâa valley of Morocco.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beff, L.; Descamps, C.; Dufey, J.; Bielders, C.

    2009-04-01

    Under the arid climatic conditions of the Drâa valley in southern Morocco, irrigation is essential for crop production. Two sources of water are available to farmers: (1) moderate salinity water from the Oued Drâa (classified as C3-S1 in the USDA irrigation water classification diagram) which is available only a few times per year following discrete releases from the Mansour Eddahbi dam, and (2) high salinity water from wells (C4-S2). Soil salinization is frequently observed, principally on plots irrigated with well water. As Oued water is available in insufficient amounts, strategies must be devised to use well and Oued water judiciously, without inducing severe salinization. The salinization risk under wheat production was evaluated using the HP1 program (Jacques and Šimůnek, 2005) for different combinations of the two main water sources, different irrigation frequencies and irrigation volumes. The soil was a sandy clay loam (topsoil) to sandy loam (40 cm depth). Soil hydrodynamic properties were derived from in situ measurements and lab measurements on undisturbed soil samples. The HP1 model was parameterized for wheat growth and 12 scenarios were run for 10 year periods using local climatic data. Water quality was measured or estimated on the basis of water samples in wells and various Oueds, and the soil chemical properties were determined. Depending on the scenario, soil salinity in the mean root zone increased from less than 1 meq/100g of soil to more than 5 meq/100g of soil over a ten year period. Salt accumulation was more pronounced at 45 cm soil depth, which is half of the maximum rooting depth, and when well water was preferentially used. Maximum crop yield (water transpired / potential water transpired) was achieved for five scenarios but this implied the use of well water to satisfy the crop water requirements. The usual Drâa Valley irrigation scenario, with five, 84 mm dam water applications per year, lead to a 25% yield loss. Adding the amount

  11. Europe reaches new frontier - Huygens lands on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    The first scientific data arrived at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, this afternoon at 17:19 CET. Huygens is mankind’s first successful attempt to land a probe on another world in the outer Solar System. “This is a great achievement for Europe and its US partners in this ambitious international endeavour to explore Saturn system,” said Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA’s Director General. Following its release from the Cassini mothership on 25 December, Huygens reached Titan’s outer atmosphere after 20 days and a 4 million km cruise. The probe started its descent through Titan’s hazy cloud layers from an altitude of about 1270 km at 11:13 CET. During the following three minutes Huygens had to decelerate from 18 000 to 1400 km per hour. A sequence of parachutes then slowed it down to less than 300 km per hour. At a height of about 160 km the probe’s scientific instruments were exposed to Titan’s atmosphere. At about 120 km, the main parachute was replaced by a smaller one to complete the descent, with an expected touchdown at 13:34 CET. Preliminary data indicate that the probe landed safely, likely on a solid surface. The probe began transmitting data to Cassini four minutes into its descent and continued to transmit data after landing at least as long as Cassini was above Titan’s horizon. The certainty that Huygens was alive came already at 11:25 CET today, when the Green Bank radio telescope in West Virginia, USA, picked up a fain but unmistakable radio signal from the probe. Radio telescopes on Earth continued to receive this signal well past the expected lifetime of Huygens. Huygens data, relayed by Cassini, were picked up by NASA’s Deep Space Network and delivered immediately to ESA’s European Space Operation Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, where the scientific analysis is currently taking place. “Titan was always the target in the Saturn system where the need for ‘ground truth’ from a probe was critical. It

  12. Tectonic conditions of hydrothermal polymetallic vein-type mineralization, Sainte Marie-aux-Mines, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeznia, Y.; Bourlange, S.; Ohnenstetter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines (SMM) mines host one of the most famous and oldest silver deposits in Europe. The SMM district is located in the central part of the Vosges mountains, France, within gneiss and granites of the Moldanubian zone. The SMM district includes the Neuenberg E-W vein-type Cu-Ag-As/Pb-Zn deposit and the Altenberg N-S vein-type Pb-Zn-Ag deposit. Deposition of the SMM hydrothermal mineralization occurred under a brittle tectonic regime that might be connected to neo-Variscan and/or post-Variscan tectonics, in a similar way as the polymetallic vein deposits of the Black Forest, Germany. A structural study was done in the Neuenberg area, in the vicinity of the Saint-Jacques vein, and within the Gabe Gottes mine, considering the orientation, extent, chronology and density of faults as well as the nature of the infilling minerals. In the Gabe-Gottes mine, the Saint-Jacques vein comprises multiple successive, sub-parallel subvertical veinlets with gangue minerals, mostly carbonates and quartz, and metal-bearing phases, sulfides and sulfosalts. The veinlets are 2 to 50 cm thick and strike N80° to N110°, the earlier veins slightly dipping towards the north, and the latest one, to the south. Seven systems of faults were identified, which may be classified into three major groups formed respectively before, during and after the main stage of ore deposition: a) Pre-mineralization faults - These consist of sinistral NE-SW strike-slip faults, and NW-SE and NE-SW steeply dipping normal faults. These could be related to Carboniferous events considering their relationships with the granitoid intrusives present in the mine area (Brézouard leucogranite ~329 Ma), and the extensional tectonics developed during exhumation processes. b) Faults associated with the main ore-deposition - These faults could be related to late-Hercynian processes from compressional to extensional tectonic regimes. Mineralization controlling faults consist of dextral and sinistral E

  13. Using vein fabric and fluid inclusion characteristics as an integrated proxy to constrain the relative timing of non cross-cutting, syn- to late-orogenic quartz vein generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Dominique; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Research on ancient fluid systems mainly focuses on veins, because they offer the opportunity to combine macro- and microstructural data with geochemical data to gain insight into the P-T-X conditions present during veining. By applying such an integrated petrographic and microthermometric methodology to syn- to late-orogenic quartz veins in the Palaeozoic High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium), we were able to define the relative timing and related P-T-X conditions of different quartz vein generations, despite of the absence of any mutual cross-cutting relationships in the field (Jacques et al., 2014). The different quartz vein generations represent the meso-scale brittle accommodation during fold initiation, amplification and locking. The presence of free polycrystal growth in cavities at a midcrustal depth, and fluid-assisted brecciation indicate that veining occurred under overpressured fluid conditions during the orogeny. Significant differences in crystal-plastic deformation microstructures and P-T trapping conditions indicate that the different processes accommodating folding occurred in a progressive manner along a retrograde deformation path. While vein quartz in an extrados vein and in the peripheral part of a lenticular, fault-accommodating vein shows moderate crystal-plastic deformation (e.g. bulging recrystallisation, deformation lamellae, shear bands), crystal-plastic deformation is relatively absent in the vein quartz of a saddle reef and the core of the lenticular vein (i.e. no to minor undulose extinction). Successive veining occurred from peak metamorphic conditions (ca. 300 ° C and 190 MPa), measured in the extrados vein, to lower P-T conditions in the periphery of the lenticular vein (ca. 275 ° C and 180 MPa), the late-orogenic saddle reef (ca. 245 ° C and 160 MPa) and the core of the lenticular vein (ca. 220 ° C and 150 MPa). The relative timing and accompanying decrease in P-T conditions of the different quartz vein generations reflect the

  14. Isotopic compositions of volcanic arc rocks in the Southern Volcanic Zone (33°-43°S), Chile: along- and across-arc variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Guillaume; Hoernle, Kaj; Gill, Jim; Wehrmann, Heidi

    2014-05-01

    We investigate young, olivine-bearing volcanic arc (VA) rocks from the Southern Volcanic Zone (33-43°S; SVZ) in Chile, and from the backarc (BA) in Argentina for their major and trace element, and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-O isotope geochemistry. The compositional data are processed to identify the source components contributing to the arc magmas and to estimate their proportions, with the aim to better understand the effects of the large-scale along-arc tectonic variations onto melt generation and erupted compositions. The Transitional (T) SVZ (34.5-38°S; Jacques et al., 2013) samples overlap the BA samples in Sr and Nd isotopes, whereas the Central (C) SVZ (38-43°S; Jacques et al., submitted, Chemical Geology) samples are shifted to slightly higher Sr and/or Nd isotope ratios. All samples form a tight correlation on the Pb isotope diagrams. The VA samples plot at the radiogenic end of the positive BA array and overlap trench sediment, indicating mixing between a South Atlantic MORB-type source and a slab component derived from subducted trench sediments and altered oceanic crust. On the Nd versus Hf isotope diagram, the VA and BA form two sub parallel linear trends, neither pointing to subducting sediment. The VA may display an asthenospheric mantle array, whereas enriched Proterozoic lithospheric mantle may be involved in the BA. The CSVZ samples have higher fluid-mobile to fluid-immobile element ratios and lower more- to less-incompatible fluid-immobile element ratios than the TSVZ samples, consistent with higher hydrous melt flux and higher degrees of melting resulting in higher magma production and eruption rates in the CSVZ. Low δ18O(melt) of CSVZ lavas suggests that the source of the enhanced water flux is likely to be hydrated lower crust and serpentinized upper mantle of the incoming plate, resulting from the multiple large fracture zones in this part of the SVZ. The δ18O(melt) values of the NSVZ, TSVZ and BA, on the other hand, largely overlap the MORB mantle

  15. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes: A Summary of the BOPPS Mission and the Planetary Science that may be Possible Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremic, T.; Cheng, A.; Hibbitts, K.; Young, E. F.

    2015-09-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the planetary science community have recently been exploring the potential contributions of stratospheric balloons to the planetary science field. A study that was recently concluded explored the roughly 200 or so science questions raised in the Planetary Decadal Survey report and found that about 45 of those questions are suited to stratospheric balloon based observations. In September of 2014, a stratospheric balloon mission called BOPPS (which stands for Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science) was flown out of Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The mission had two main objectives, first, to observe a number of planetary targets including one or more Oort cloud comets and second, to demonstrate the applicability and performance of the platform, instruments, and subsystems for making scientific measurements in support of planetary science objectives. BOPPS carried two science instruments, BIRC and UVVis. BIRC is a cryogenic infrared multispectral imager which can image in the 0.6-5 ~im range using an HgCdTe detector. Narrow band filters were used to allow detection of water and CO2 emission features of the observed targets. The UVVis is an imager with the science range of 300 to 600 nm. A main feature of the UVVis instrument is the incorporation of a guide camera and a Fine-Steering Mirror (FSM) system to reduce image jitter to less than 100 milliarcsecond. The BIRC instrument was used to image targets including Oort cloud comets Siding Spring and Jacques, and the dwarf planet 1 Ceres. BOPPS achieved the first ever earth based CO2 observation of a comet and the first images of water and CO2 of an Oort cloud comet (Jacques). It also made the first ever measurement of 1 Ceres at 2.73 ~tm to refine the shape of the infrared water absorption feature on that body. The UVVis instrument, mounted on its own optics bench, demonstrated the capability for image correction both from atmospheric disturbances as

  16. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremic, Tibor; Cheng, Andy; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the planetary science community have recently been exploring the potential contributions of stratospheric balloons to the planetary science field. A study that was recently concluded explored the roughly 200 or so science questions raised in the Planetary Decadal Survey report and found that about 45 of those questions are suited to stratospheric balloon based observations. In September of 2014, a stratospheric balloon mission called BOPPS (which stands for Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science) was flown out of Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The mission had two main objectives, first, to observe a number of planetary targets including one or more Oort cloud comets and second, to demonstrate the applicability and performance of the platform, instruments, and subsystems for making scientific measurements in support planetary science objectives. BOPPS carried two science instruments, BIRC and UVVis. BIRC is a cryogenic infrared multispectral imager which can image in the.6-5 m range using an HgCdTe detector. Narrow band filters were used to allow detection of water and CO2 emission features of the observed targets. The UVVis is an imager with the science range of 300 to 600 nm. A main feature of the UVVis instrument is the incorporation of a guide camera and a Fine Steering Mirror (FSM) system to reduce image jitter to less than 100 milliarcseconds. The BIRC instrument was used to image targets including Oort cloud comets Siding Spring and Jacques, and the dwarf planet 1 Ceres. BOPPS achieved the first ever earth based CO2 observation of a comet and the first images of water and CO2 of an Oort cloud comet (Jacques). It also made the first ever measurement of 1Ceres at 2.73 m to refine the shape of the infrared water absorption feature on that body. The UVVis instrument, mounted on its own optics bench, demonstrated the capability for image correction both from atmospheric disturbances as well as some

  17. STIM and calcium channel complexes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Isaac; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    The ion Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger that mediates a variety of cellular functions. Dysfunction of the mechanisms involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis underlies a number of pathological processes, including cancer. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a major mechanism for Ca(2+) entry modulated by the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The Ca(2+)-selective store-operated current (ICRAC) is mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and the store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channel Orai1, while other non-selective cation currents (ISOC) involves the participation of members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel family, including TRPC1. Distinct isoforms of the key components of SOCE have been described in mammalian cells, STIM1 and 2, Orai1-3 and TRPC1-7. In cancer cells, SOCE has been reported to play an important role in cell cycle progression and proliferation, migration, metastasis and evasion of apoptosis. Changes in the expression of the key elements of SOCE and Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling have been account to play important roles in the phenotypic changes observed in transformed cells. Despite there are differences in the expression level of the molecular components of SOCE, as well as in the relevance of the STIM, Orai and TRPC isoforms in SOCE and tumorigenesis among cancer cell types, there is a body of evidence supporting an important role for SOCE underlying the phenotypic modifications of cancer cells that propose STIM and the SOC channels as suitable candidate targets for future prognostic or therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26455959

  18. Canyon Disposal Initiative - Numerical Modeling of Contaminant Transport from Grouted Residual Waste in the 221-U Facility (U Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2004-10-12

    This letter report documents initial numerical analyses conducted by PNNL to provide support for a feasibility study on decommissioning of the canyon buildings at Hanford. The 221-U facility is the first of the major canyon buildings to be decommissioned. The specific objective of this modeling effort was to provide estimates of potential rates of migration of residual contaminants out of the 221-U facility during the first 40 years after decommissioning. If minimal contaminant migration is predicted to occur from the facility during this time period, then the structure may be deemed to provide a level of groundwater protection that is essentially equivalent to the liner and leachate collection systems that are required at conventional landfills. The STOMP code was used to simulate transport of selected radionuclides out of a canyon building, representative of the 221-U facility after decommissioning, for a period of 40 years. Simulation results indicate that none of the selected radionuclides that were modeled migrated beyond the concrete structure of the facility during the 40-year period of interest. Jacques (2001) identified other potential contaminants in the 221-U facility that were not modeled, however, including kerosene, phenol, and various metals. Modeling of these contaminants was beyond the scope of this preliminary effort due to increased complexity. Simulation results indicate that contaminant release from the canyon buildings will be diffusion controlled at early times. Advection is expected to become much more important at later times, after contaminants have diffused out of the facility and into the surrounding soil environment. After contaminants have diffused out of the facility, surface infiltration covers will become very important for mitigating further transport of contaminants in the underlying vadose zone and groundwater.

  19. From high dilutions to digital biology: the physical nature of the biological signal.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yolène

    2015-10-01

    The memory of water was a radical idea that arose in the laboratory of Jacques Benveniste in the late 1980s. Twenty-five years have passed and yet the often angry debate on its merits continues despite the increasing number of scientists who have reported confirmation of the basic results. One working hypothesis was that molecules can communicate with each other, exchanging information without being in physical contact and that at least some biological functions can be mimicked by certain energetic modes characteristics of a given molecule. These considerations informed exploratory research which led to the speculation that biological signaling might be transmissible by electromagnetic means. Around 1991, the transfer of specific molecular signals to sensitive biological systems was achieved using an amplifier and electromagnetic coils. In 1995, a more sophisticated procedure was established to record, digitize and replay these signals using a multimedia computer. From a physical and chemical perspective, these experiments pose a riddle, since it is not clear what mechanism can sustain such 'water memory' of the exposure to molecular signals. From a biological perspective, the puzzle is what nature of imprinted effect (water structure) can impact biological function. A parallel can be drawn between this debate on the memory of water, which presumes that the action of molecules is mediated by an electromagnetic phenomenon, and the often acrimonious debate on the transmission of nerve influxes via synaptic transfer of specific molecules, neurotransmitters. The latter debate began in 1921 with the first experiments by Loewi and was still active in 1949, 28 years later. A strong reluctance to accept research that questions basic aspects of long-accepted biochemical paradigms is to be expected. In this paper we will provide a brief summary of experiments relating to the memory of water: the earlier work on high dilutions (HD) and then the experiments, which followed and

  20. Escherichia coli and the French School of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2010-09-01

    André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial conjugation that enabled them to construct a map of the E. coli chromosome and to demonstrate its circularity. The genetic analysis of the lactose system led Monod and Jacob to elucidate the mechanism of the regulation of gene expression and to propose the operon model: a unit of coordinate transcription. One of the new concepts that emerged from the operon model was messenger RNA. In 1963, Monod developed one of the most elegant concepts of molecular biology, the theory of allostery. In 1965, Lwoff, Monod and Jacob were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26443784

  1. Ice in Caspian Sea and Aral Sea, Kazakhstan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this MODIS image from December 3, 2001, winter sea ice can be seen forming in the shallow waters of the northern Caspian (left) and Aral (upper right) Seas. Despite the inflow of the Volga River (upper left), the northern portion of the Caspian Sea averages only 17 ft in depth, and responds to the region's continental climate, which is cold in winter and hot and dry in the summer. The southern part of the Sea is deeper and remains ice-free throughout the winter. The dirty appearance of the ice may be due to sediment in the water, but may also be due to wind-driven dust. The wind in the region can blow at hurricane-force strength and can cause the ice to pile up in hummocks that are anchored to the sea bottom. The eastern portion of the Aral Sea is also beginning to freeze. At least two characteristics of the Aral Sea 'compete' in determining whether its waters will freeze. The Sea is shallow, which increases the likelihood of freezing, but it is also very salty, which means that lower temperatures are required to freeze it than would be required for fresh water. With average December temperatures of 18o F, it's clearly cold enough to allow ice to form. As the waters that feed the Aral Sea continue to be diverted for agriculture, the Sea becomes shallower and the regional climate becomes even more continental. This is because large bodies of water absorb and retain heat, moderating seasonal changes in temperature. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. On the meaning of chance in biology

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Chance has somewhat different meanings in different contexts, and can be taken to be either ontological (as in quantum indeterminacy) or epistemological (as in stochastic uncertainty). Here I argue that, whether or not it stems from physical indeterminacy, chance is a fundamental biological reality that is meaningless outside the context of knowledge. To say that something happened by chance means that it did not happen by design. This of course is a cornerstone of Darwin’s theory of evolution: random undirected variation is the creative wellspring upon which natural selection acts to sculpt the functional form (and hence apparent design) of organisms. In his essay Chance & Necessity, Jacques Monod argued that an intellectually honest commitment to objectivity requires that we accord chance a central role in an otherwise mechanistic biology, and suggested that doing so may well place the origin of life outside the realm of scientific tractability. While that may be true, ongoing research on the origin of life problem suggests that abiogenesis may have been possible, and perhaps even probable, under the conditions that existed on primordial earth. Following others, I argue that the world should be viewed as causally open, i.e. primordially indeterminate or vague. Accordingly, chance ought to be the default scientific explanation for origination, a universal ‘null hypothesis’ to be assumed until disproven. In this framework, creation of anything new manifests freedom (allowing for chance), and causation manifests constraint, the developmental emergence of which establishes the space of possibilities that may by chance be realized. PMID:25870720

  3. Arago's best paper.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Bart; Arteaga, Oriol

    2012-01-16

    The year 2011 is the bicentennial of François Arago's discovery of optical rotation. The immediate usurpation of the study of optical activity by Jean-Baptiste Biot led to the first well-known judgments of the arrangements of atoms in space. Scientists are less aware that Arago achieved something far greater than his contributions to optics, by signing the 1848 decree that abolished slavery throughout the French Empire. Opposing attitudes of Arago and Biot toward abolition, foreshadowed in their early rift over optical rotation, were surprisingly exposed in mid-century developments in chiroptics. As shown in a recent book by Levitt, Arago sought a reinvention of the whole colonial plantation system consistent with Republican principles, while Biot tried to place the cane sugar industry and slave-based economy on the quantitative foundation of saccharimetry. A reevaluation of the circumstances of abolition can celebrate both societal evolution and optical rotation on the 200th birthday of the latter. Episodes from Arago's life that arguably created his predisposition toward abolition are emphasized: He was imprisoned several times as a young man and knew the loss of liberty, his brother Jacques witnessed slavery in Brazil and advocated abolition in travel books prepared with François, and finally, in writing the biography of the Marquis de Condorcet, the spirit behind the first, albeit impermanent French abolition of slavery in 1794, Arago found proof of concept for his comparable challenge. Curiously, the measurement of the optical rotation of crystals and sugar, the foci of Arago and Biot, respectively, remain among the greatest challenges in polarimetry. Current developments are reviewed with respect to chiroptical anisotropy and in vivo glucose detection driven by the pandemic of diabetes, a disease diagnosed polarimetrically by Biot that claimed the life of Arago. PMID:22086755

  4. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition and its Potential Effects on the Mullica River-Great Bay Ecosystem in Southern New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, J. E.; Gao, Y.

    2005-05-01

    To characterize atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition to the Mullica River-Great Bay Estuary and to examine its impact on the coastal ecosystem, atmospheric sampling has been conducted at Tuckerton in southern New Jersey since March 2004. A total of 43 precipitation samples have been collected on an event basis using a wet-only automatic precipitation sampler. A total of 23 aerosol samples were also taken during this period of time with a high-volume aerosol sampler. Chemical analysis was performed using a Dionex Ion Chromatograph to determine the concentrations of nitrate and ammonium in precipitation and associated with aerosols. Atmospheric deposition of nitrate and ammonium were calculated using simple wet and dry atmospheric deposition models. The results show that nitrate and ammonium concentrations vary strongly with season, and the highest concentrations were observed during the spring. The average concentrations in precipitation for nitrate and ammonium in the samples collected to date are 2.41 mg l-1 and 0.56 mg l-1, respectively. The average aerosol concentrations are 3.7 μg m-3 for nitrate and 1.5 μg m-3 for ammonium. The results also indicate that wet deposition is the main contributor to the atmospheric nitrogen entering the Mullica River-Great Bay Estuary. High wet deposition rates of nitrogen were seen in the spring and summer with total average values of 429.08 mg m-2 month-1 for the spring and 229.28 mg m-2 month-1 for the summer. These results will be combined with satellite ocean color to investigate the effect of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on coastal primary productivity in this ecosystem. The atmospheric nitrogen data can also be combined with water column nutrient data that is being collected at the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve, to assist in generating a nutrient budget to better manage the coastal resources of the Mullica River-Great Bay Estuary.

  6. Growth and Maximum Size of Tiger Sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Carl G.; O'Malley, Joseph M.; Papastamatiou, Yannis P.; Dale, Jonathan J.; Hutchinson, Melanie R.; Anderson, James M.; Royer, Mark A.; Holland, Kim N.

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier) are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL), with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts) compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (24°13′17″N 109°52′14″W), in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites  =  approximately 5,000 km), after 366 days at liberty (DAL). We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured). We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates. PMID:24416287

  7. Difructose Dianhydrides (DFAs) and DFA-Enriched Products as Functional Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellet, Carmen Ortiz; Fernández, José M. García

    This review provides an overview of the current status of the chemistry and biology of di-d-fructose dianhydrides (DFAs) with a focus on their potential as functional foods. The history of this family of cyclic ketodisaccharides has expanded for almost 100 years and offers a paradigmatic example of artificial synthetic molecules that were identified as natural products later on and finally encountered in our own table. Issued from fundamental investigations on the reactivity of carbohydrates in strongly acidic media, DFAs remained laboratory curiosities for decades. Early reports on their isolation from plants raised doubts, until the formation of some DFA representatives by the action of microorganisms on fructans was reported in the middle 1980s. Since then, research on DFAs has run in parallel in the areas of microbiology and carbohydrate chemistry. Evidence of the potential of these compounds as functional food was accumulated from both sides, with the development of biotechnological processes for mass production of selected candidates and of chemical methodologies to prepare DFA-enriched products from sucrose or inulin. In 1994 a decisive discovery in the field took place in the laboratory of Jacques Defaye in Grenoble, France: the presence of DFAs in a commercial sucrose caramel was evidenced in a quite significant 18% mass proportion! The development of an efficient analytical protocol for DFAs and the stereoselective synthesis of individual standards allowed one to demonstrate that DFAs and their glycosylated derivatives (glycosyl-DFAs) are universally formed during caramelization reactions. They are not potential food products; they have actually always been in our daily food. Most important, they seem to exert beneficial effects: they are acariogenic, low-caloric, and promote the growth of beneficial microflora in the gut.

  8. Search for Signatures of Life in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, M.; Schwehm, G.; Arnould, J.; Dawson, S.; Devore, E.; Evans, D.; Ferrazzani, M.; Shostak, S.

    The search for evidence of extraterrestrial life is an important scientific theme that fascinates the public and encourages interest in space exploration, both within the solar system and beyond. The rapid pace of mass media communication allows the public to share mission results and new discoveries almost simultaneously with the scientific community. The public can read about proposed sample return missions to Mars, listen as scientists debate about in situ exploration of the oceans on Europa, learn about the growing number of extrasolar planets, or use their personal computers to participate in searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). As the science community continues its multi-pronged efforts to detect evidence of extraterrestrial life, it must be mindful of more than just science and technology. It is important to understand public perceptions, misperceptions, beliefs, concerns and potential complications associated with the search for life beyond our home planet. This panel is designed to provide brief overviews of some important non-scientific areas with the potential to impact future astrobiological exploration. The presentations will be followed by open discussion and audience participation. Invited panelists and their topical areas include: SCIENCE FICTION AND MISPERCEPTIONS: Seth Shostak, Dylan EvansBattling Pseudo-Science, Hollywood and Alien Abductions LEGAL ISSUES: Marcus FerrazzaniLooming Complications for Future Missions and Exploration RISK COMMUNICATION: Sandra DawsonEngaging the Public, Explaining the Risks, and Encouraging Long-Term Interestin Mission Science EDUCATION: Edna DeVoreUsing the Search for Life as a Motivating Theme in Teaching Basic Science andCritical Thinking. ETHICAL ISSUES AND CONCERNS: Jacques ArnouldWhat Will it Mean if We Find "ET"? PANEL MODERATORS: Margaret Race, Gerhard Schwehm

  9. The calcium-sensing receptor and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Samawansha; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-06-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) plays a pivotal role in systemic calcium metabolism by regulating parathyroid hormone secretion and urinary calcium excretion. The CaSR is ubiquitously expressed, implying a wide range of functions regulated by this receptor. Abnormal CaSR function affects the development of both calciotropic disorders such as hyperparathyroidism, and non-calciotropic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, which are the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The CaSR is able to bind a plethora of ligands; it interacts with multiple G protein subtypes, and regulates highly divergent downstream signalling pathways, depending on the cellular context. The CaSR is a key regulator for such diverse processes as hormone secretion, gene expression, inflammation, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Due to this pleiotropy, the CaSR is able to regulate cell fate and is implicated in the development of many types of benign or malignant tumours of the breast, prostate, parathyroid, and colon. In cancer, the CaSR appears to have paradoxical roles, and depending on the tissue involved, it is able to prevent or promote tumour growth. In tissues like the parathyroid or colon, the CaSR inhibits proliferation and induces terminal differentiation of the cells. Therefore, loss of the receptor, as seen in colorectal or parathyroid tumours, confers malignant potential, suggestive of a tumour suppressor role. In contrast, in prostate and breast tumours the expression of the CaSR is increased and it seems that it favours metastasis to the bone, acting as an oncogene. Deciphering the molecular mechanism driving the CaSR in the different tissues could lead to development of new allosteric drug compounds that selectively target the CaSR and have therapeutic potential for cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate . Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen

  10. Calcium signaling orchestrates glioblastoma development: Facts and conjunctures.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Catherine; Haeich, Jacques; Aulestia, Francisco J; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Miller, Andrew L; Néant, Isabelle; Webb, Sarah E; Schaeffer, Etienne; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Moreau, Marc

    2016-06-01

    While it is a relatively rare disease, glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is one of the more deadly adult cancers. Following current interventions, the tumor is never eliminated whatever the treatment performed; whether it is radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or surgery. One hypothesis to explain this poor outcome is the "cancer stem cell" hypothesis. This concept proposes that a minority of cells within the tumor mass share many of the properties of adult neural stem cells and it is these that are responsible for the growth of the tumor and its resistance to existing therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that Ca(2+) might also be an important positive regulator of tumorigenesis in GBM, in processes involving quiescence, maintenance, proliferation, or migration. Glioblastoma tumors are generally thought to develop by co-opting pathways that are involved in the formation of an organ. We propose that the cells initiating the tumor, and subsequently the cells of the tumor mass, must hijack the different checkpoints that evolution has selected in order to prevent the pathological development of an organ. In this article, two main points are discussed. (i) The first is the establishment of a so-called "cellular society," which is required to create a favorable microenvironment. (ii) The second is that GBM can be considered to be an organism, which fights to survive and develop. Since GBM evolves in a limited space, its only chance of development is to overcome the evolutionary checkpoints. For example, the deregulation of the normal Ca(2+) signaling elements contributes to the progression of the disease. Thus, by manipulating the Ca(2+) signaling, the GBM cells might not be killed, but might be reprogrammed toward a new fate that is either easy to cure or that has no aberrant functioning. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26826650

  11. Early 20th-century research at the interfaces of genetics, development, and evolution: reflections on progress and dead ends.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Ute

    2011-09-01

    Three early 20th-century attempts at unifying separate areas of biology, in particular development, genetics, physiology, and evolution, are compared in regard to their success and fruitfulness for further research: Jacques Loeb's reductionist project of unifying approaches by physico-chemical explanations; Richard Goldschmidt's anti-reductionist attempts to unify by integration; and Sewall Wright's combination of reductionist research and vision of hierarchical genetic systems. Loeb's program, demanding that all aspects of biology, including evolution, be studied by the methods of the experimental sciences, proved highly successful and indispensible for higher level investigations, even though evolutionary change and properties of biological systems up to now cannot be fully explained on the molecular level alone. Goldschmidt has been appraised as pioneer of physiological and developmental genetics and of a new evolutionary synthesis which transcended neo-Darwinism. However, this study concludes that his anti-reductionist attempts to integrate genetics, development and evolution have to be regarded as failures or dead ends. His grand speculations were based on the one hand on concepts and experimental systems that were too vague in order to stimulate further research, and on the other on experiments which in their core parts turned out not to be reproducible. In contrast, Sewall Wright, apart from being one of the architects of the neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1930s, opened up new paths of testable quantitative developmental genetic investigations. He placed his research within a framework of logical reasoning, which resulted in the farsighted speculation that examinations of biological systems should be related to the regulation of hierarchical genetic subsystems, possibly providing a mechanism for development and evolution. I argue that his suggestion of basing the study of systems on clearly defined properties of the components has proved superior to

  12. Nyiragongo Volcano Erupts in the Congo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Nyiragongo, located in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, erupted today (January 17, 2002), ejecting a large cloud of smoke and ash high into the sky and spewing lava down three sides of the volcano. Mount Nyiragongo is located roughly 10 km (6 miles) north of the town of Goma, near the Congo's border with Rwanda. According to news reports, one river of lava is headed straight toward Goma, where international aid teams are evacuating residents. Already, the lava flows have burned through large swaths of the surrounding jungle and have destroyed dozens of homes. This false-color image was acquired today (January 17) by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) roughly 5 hours after the eruption began. Notice Mount Nyiragongo's large plume (bright white) can be seen streaming westward in this scene. The plume appears to be higher than the immediately adjacent clouds and so it is colder in temperature, making it easy for MODIS to distinguish the volcanic plume from the clouds by using image bands sensitive to thermal radiation. Images of the eruption using other band combinations are located on the MODIS Rapid Response System. Nyiragongo eruptions are extremely hazardous because the lava tends to be very fluid and travels down the slopes of the volcano quickly. Eruptions can be large and spectacular, and flows can reach up to 10s of kilometers from the volcano very quickly. Also, biomass burned from Nyriagongo, and nearby Mount Nyamuragira, eruptions tends to create clouds of smoke that adversely affect the Mountain Gorillas living in the adjacent mountain chain. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. Chance of Necessity: Modeling Origins of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental nature of processes that led to the emergence of life has been a subject of long-standing debate. One view holds that the origin of life is an event governed by chance, and the result of so many random events is unpredictable. This view was eloquently expressed by Jacques Monod in his book Chance or Necessity. In an alternative view, the origin of life is considered a deterministic event. Its details need not be deterministic in every respect, but the overall behavior is predictable. A corollary to the deterministic view is that the emergence of life must have been determined primarily by universal chemistry and biochemistry rather than by subtle details of environmental conditions. In my lecture I will explore two different paradigms for the emergence of life and discuss their implications for predictability and universality of life-forming processes. The dominant approach is that the origin of life was guided by information stored in nucleic acids (the RNA World hypothesis). In this view, selection of improved combinations of nucleic acids obtained through random mutations drove evolution of biological systems from their conception. An alternative hypothesis states that the formation of protocellular metabolism was driven by non-genomic processes. Even though these processes were highly stochastic the outcome was largely deterministic, strongly constrained by laws of chemistry. I will argue that self-replication of macromolecules was not required at the early stages of evolution; the reproduction of cellular functions alone was sufficient for self-maintenance of protocells. In fact, the precise transfer of information between successive generations of the earliest protocells was unnecessary and could have impeded the discovery of cellular metabolism. I will also show that such concepts as speciation and fitness to the environment, developed in the context of genomic evolution also hold in the absence of a genome.

  14. Mekong Floods Fill Tonle Sap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The monsoon season in Southeast Asia brings recurring, often devastating floods to countries in the region, but these floods also play a necessary role in the region's water cycle. These MODIS images centered on Cambodia reveal extensive flooding of the Mekong River, which comes in from Laos in the north, to the right of center in the images, and flows south through Cambodia and southeast through Vietnam to empty into the South China Sea. The true-color image shows the brownish, sediment-laden floodwaters filling the Mekong Delta in southern Cambodia and Vietnam on September 15, 2001. The false color image above has been enhanced to bring out the contrast between the floodwaters and the lands, with sediment-carrying floodwaters in purple. Sediment can be seen flowing into the South China Sea as well. This year's floods have affected over a million people, and 100 people have been killed in Vietnam alone. The monsoon floods bring not only devastation, but renewal. The large body of water just left of center in Cambodia is the Tonle Sap. This shallow lake plays a changing role in the regional water cycle. During the dry season, the stream-fed Tonle Sap drains via the Tonle Sab River into the Mekong River. During the wet season (June-November), flooding of the Mekong reverses the course of the Tonle Sab, roughly tripling the lake's size from about 3000 km2 to about 10,000. When the dry season returns, the lake once again begins to drain into the Mekong Delta, where it provides a flow of fresh water that balances the intrusion of salty seawater into the delta's agricultural lands. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. ER functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressors: Modulators of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Bittremieux, Mart; Parys, Jan B; Pinton, Paolo; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signals that arise from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the major intracellular Ca(2+)-storage organelle, impact several mitochondrial functions and dictate cell survival and cell death processes. Furthermore, alterations in Ca(2+) signaling in cancer cells promote survival and establish a high tolerance towards cell stress and damage, so that the on-going oncogenic stress does not result in the activation of cell death. Over the last years, the mechanisms underlying these oncogenic alterations in Ca(2+) signaling have started to emerge. An important aspect of this is the identification of several major oncogenes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Mcl-1, PKB/Akt, and Ras, and tumor suppressors, such as p53, PTEN, PML, BRCA1, and Beclin 1, as direct and critical regulators of Ca(2+)-transport systems located at the ER membranes, including IP3 receptors and SERCA Ca(2+) pumps. In this way, these proteins execute part of their function by controlling the ER-mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes, favoring either survival (oncogenes) or cell death (tumor suppressors). Oncogenic mutations, gene deletions or amplifications alter the expression and/or function of these proteins, thereby changing the delicate balance between oncogenes and tumor suppressors, impacting oncogenesis and favoring malignant cell function and behavior. In this review, we provided an integrated overview of the impact of the major oncogenes and tumor suppressors, often altered in cancer cells, on Ca(2+) signaling from the ER Ca(2+) stores. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26772784

  16. [Homage to Kraepelin, honouring his 150th birthday--"Zerfahrenheit", Kraepelin's specific symptom for schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Peters, U H

    2006-11-01

    Kraepelin described but one single specific sign for all forms of dementia praecox (later: schizophrenia) and coined a new word for it, "Zerfahrenheit" (various translations: distraction, dilapidation, incoherence, among others). What he meant by it, clearly results from Kraepelin's description even now. The origin of the idea could been found in German philosophy of the times of enlightenment, when it had been described already in a distinct way. That time coined the word "Verrücktheit" for it (usual translation: mental derangement; better translations would be the same as for "Zerfahrenheit"). Because of the influence of French psychiatry with its quite different background and the hurly burly about paranoia (Heinroth's Greek translation for "Verrücktheit") the knowledge of the sign got lost. Kraepelin restored the original meaning, without referring however to the sources directly. In spite of having been acknowledged as a specific sign for dementia praecox by all German psychiatrists, only one decade after the first description a new process of unclearing recommenced. This bow curved from Eugen Bleuler via Kurt Schneider and others to DSM III/IV and ICD-10. In the current paper we follow Kraepelin's process of clearing via all 9 editions of his textbook of psychiatry. Since the German original of Kraepelin's first extended description currently can be found only in larger libraries, the integral text of it is being reprinted (in English a recent translation by Jacques M. Quen is available). No corrections or changes are necessary. Kraepelin's 150th birthday is the best occasion for reminding of what remains unique in the clinical unity of schizophrenia, which for ever is linked to his name. It still is a solid sign for schizophrenia, for all its various forms. PMID:17103366

  17. The TRAPPIST comet survey in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehin, Emmanuel; Opitom, Cyrielle; Manfroid, Jean; Hutsemékers, Damien; Gillon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that has been installed in June 2010 at the ESO La Silla Observatory [1]. Operated from Liège (Belgium) it is devoted to the detection and characterisation of exoplanets and to the study of comets and other small bodies in the Solar System. A set of narrowband cometary filters designed by the NASA for the Hale-Bopp Observing Campaign [2] is permanently mounted on the telescope along with classic Johnson-Cousins filters. We describe here the hardware and the goals of the project. For relatively bright comets (V < 12) we measure several times a week the gaseous production rates (using a Haser model) and the spatial distribution of several species among which OH, NH, CN, C2 and C3 as well as ions like CO+. The dust production rates (Afrho) and color of the dust aredetermined through four dust continuum bands from the UV to the red (UC, BC, GC, RC filters). We will present the dust and gas production rates of the brightest comets observed in 2014: C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS), C/2014 E2 (Jacques), C/2013 A1 (Siding Springs) and C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden). Each of these comets have been observed at least once a week for several weeks to several months. Light curves with respect to the heliocentric distance will be presented and discussed. [1] Jehin et al., The Messenger, 145, 2-6, 2011.[2] Farnham et al., Icarus, 147, 180-204, 2000.

  18. Biophotonics of skin: method for correction of deep Raman spectra distorted by elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Blandine; Koenig, Anne; Perraut, François; Piot, Olivier; Gobinet, Cyril; Manfait, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy allows in-depth molecular and conformational characterization of biological tissues non-invasively. Unfortunately, spectral distortions occur due to elastic scattering. Our objective is to correct the attenuation of in-depth Raman peaks intensity by considering this phenomenon, enabling thus quantitative diagnosis. In this purpose, we developed PDMS phantoms mimicking skin optical properties used as tools for instrument calibration and data processing method validation. An optical system based on a fibers bundle has been previously developed for in vivo skin characterization with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS). Used on our phantoms, this technique allows checking their optical properties: the targeted ones were retrieved. Raman microspectroscopy was performed using a commercial confocal microscope. Depth profiles were constructed from integrated intensity of some specific PDMS Raman vibrations. Acquired on monolayer phantoms, they display a decline which is increasing with the scattering coefficient. Furthermore, when acquiring Raman spectra on multilayered phantoms, the signal attenuation through each single layer is directly dependent on its own scattering property. Therefore, determining the optical properties of any biological sample, obtained with DRS for example, is crucial to correct properly Raman depth profiles. A model, inspired from S.L. Jacques's expression for Confocal Reflectance Microscopy and modified at some points, is proposed and tested to fit the depth profiles obtained on the phantoms as function of the reduced scattering coefficient. Consequently, once the optical properties of a biological sample are known, the intensity of deep Raman spectra distorted by elastic scattering can be corrected with our reliable model, permitting thus to consider quantitative studies for purposes of characterization or diagnosis.

  19. Growth and maximum size of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carl G; O'Malley, Joseph M; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Dale, Jonathan J; Hutchinson, Melanie R; Anderson, James M; Royer, Mark A; Holland, Kim N

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier) are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL), with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts) compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (24°13'17″N 109°52'14″W), in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites  =  approximately 5,000 km), after 366 days at liberty (DAL). We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured). We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates. PMID:24416287

  20. Micro, meso, macro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljenström, Hans; Svedin, Uno

    1. System features, dynamics, and resilience - some introductory remarks / Hans Liljenström & Uno Svedin -- pt. I. The "vertical" system structure and meso-level characteristics. 2. Mesoscopic levels in science - some comments / Hermann Haken. 3. The necessity for mesoscopic organization to connect neural function to brain function / Walter J. Freeman. 4. Dynamic state transitions in the nervous system: from ion channels to neurons to networks / Peter Århem ... [et al.]. 5. A revolution in the Middle Kingdom / Robert E. Ulanowicz. 6. The meso-scale level of self-maintained reflective systems / Abir U. Igamberdiev -- pt. II. Inner and outer dynamics. 7. Time rescaling and generalized entropy in relation to the internal measurement concept / Igor Rojdestvenski & Michael G. Cottam. 8. Studying dynamic and stochastic systems using Poisson simulation / Leif Gustafsson. 9. Resource dynamics, social interactions, and the tragedy of the commons / Alia Mashanova & Richard Law. 10. Stability of social interaction / Sjur D. Flåm -- pt. III. Resilience and shocks. 11. Systems, shocks and time bombs / Nick Winder. 12. Biodiversity decreases the risk of collapse in model food webs / Charlotte Borrvall, Maria Christianou & Bo Ebenman. 13. A long-term perspective on resilience in socio-natural systems / Sander E. van der Leeuw & Christina Aschan-Leygonie. 14. Resilience in utility technologies / Roger Seaton. 15. Economic growth under shocks: path dependencies and stabilization / Yuri M. Ermoliev, Tatiana Y. Ermolieva & Vladimir I. Norkin. 16. Risk and crises management in complex systems / Koen Bertels, Jean-Marie Jacques & Magnus Boman. 17. Bridges, connections and interfaces - reflections over the meso theme / Uno Svedin & Hans Liljenström.

  1. Spotlight Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  2. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization. PMID:27060485

  3. Mouth of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. The history of the Memory of Water.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yolène

    2007-07-01

    'Homeopathic dilutions' and 'Memory of Water' are two expressions capable of turning a peaceful and intelligent person into a violently irrational one,' as Michel Schiff points out in the introduction of his book 'The Memory of Water'. The idea of the memory of water arose in the laboratory of Jacques Benveniste in the late 1980s and 20 years later the debate is still ongoing even though an increasing number of scientists report they have confirmed the basic results. This paper, first provides a brief historical overview of the context of the high dilution experiments then moves on to digital biology. One working hypothesis was that molecules can communicate with each other, exchanging information without being in physical contact and that at least some biological functions can be mimicked by certain energetic modes characteristics of a given molecule. These considerations informed exploratory research which led to the speculation that biological signaling might be transmissible by electromagnetic means. Around 1991, the transfer of specific molecular signals to sensitive biological systems was achieved using an amplifier and electromagnetic coils. In 1995, a more sophisticated procedure was established to record, digitize and replay these signals using a multimedia computer. From a physical and chemical perspective, these experiments pose a riddle, since it is not clear what mechanism can sustain such 'water memory' of the exposure to molecular signals. From a biological perspective, the puzzle is what nature of imprinted effect (water structure) can impact biological function. Also, the far-reaching implications of these observations require numerous and repeated experimental tests to rule out overlooked artifacts. Perhaps more important is to have the experiments repeated by other groups and with other models to explore the generality of the effect. In conclusion, we will present some of this emerging independent experimental work. PMID:17678810

  5. Hearing the inaudible experimental subject: Echoes of Inaudi, Binet's calculating prodigy.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan; Guida, Alessandro; Nicolas, Serge

    2015-02-01

    Historians of psychology have traditionally focused on ideas (intellectual history), the "great men" who produced them (an older style of biography sometimes called "hagiography"), or-more recently-the influence of the contexts that shaped them (social and cultural history). A still more recent approach is to bring in those invisible subjects whose experiences have previously been ignored, most often through histories focusing on the discipline's forgotten women or minority contributors: "history from below" (subaltern history). A variation on this was popularized in the history of psychiatry (viz., "patient voices") and has since been carried into the history of psychology (e.g., "feminist voices"). The latest innovation is to focus on what Jill Morawski has referred to as "the discipline's experimental subjects." (These are the collective done-to, rather than the doers, of psychological research.) This history is one of those: an attempt to look behind Alfred Binet to find an influence that shaped his work. The purpose is thus to "give voice" to this unheard-from subject-the until-now inaudible Jacques Inaudi (including excerpts from newspaper interviews and translations from his recently discovered autobiography)-and at the same time advance Morawski's historiographical project. We then get a glimpse of what it was like to be a child prodigy in France in the 1880s, as well as what securing scientific patrons could do for one's prospects. By focusing specifically on Binet's unheard-from experimental subject, we are also afforded new perspectives of the history of late-19th century French psychology (reflecting another emerging interest, "international history"), and we gain new insights into the prehistory of contemporary Binet-style intelligence testing. PMID:25664885

  6. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  7. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  8. Flooding of the Ob and Irtysh Rivers, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. [Metallic biomaterials for coronary stents].

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Wieneke, H; Brauer, H; Erbel, R

    2001-04-01

    The introduction of coronary stents is a milestone in interventional cardiology. Two landmark studies have shown that stainless steel stents significantly decrease the restenosis rate as compared to balloon angioplasty. This fact led to a marked increase of stent implantation since the first stent implantation by Jacques Puel in 1986. Although the concept of coronary stenting significantly improved the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease, restenosis remains a major unsolved drawback of this technique. In addition to procedure and disease related factors like implantation pressure and plaque burden, data suggest that the stent as a medical implant plays a crucial role in the process of neointima formation. Since its introduction in cardiology, more than 50 different stents of different configuration and material have been developed. Although recent publications report of promising results using biodegradable materials, almost all coronary stents commercially available at the moment are made of metallic alloys. Whereas first generation stents were made exclusively from stainless steel and only minor interest was focussed on the stent material in the manufacture of coronary stents, recent studies strongly suggest that the metallic alloy used has a direct impact on the extent of neointima formation. Thus, metallic alloys differ not only with respect to mechanical features, but also by their biocompatible properties. These two factors are of major importance in the induction of vessel wall injury, inflammatory processes and cell proliferation. In the first part, the present paper reviews the metallurgic characteristics of metallic materials, which are currently used or under investigation in the production of coronary stents. In the second part, clinical and experimental results are summarized with respect to their biocompatibility and impact on the process of restenosis formation. PMID:11381573

  10. Structure of covalently bonded materials: From the Peierls distortion to Phase-Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    The relation between electronic structure and cohesion of materials has been a permanent quest of Jacques Friedel and his school. He developed simple models that are of great value as guidelines in conjunction with ab initio calculations. His local approach of bonding has both the advantages of a large field of applications including non-crystalline materials and a common language with chemists. Along this line, we review some fascinating behaviors of covalent materials, most of them showing a Peierls (symmetry breaking) instability mechanism, even in liquid and amorphous materials. We analyze the effect of external parameters such as pressure and temperature. In some temperature ranges, the Peierls distortion disappears and a negative thermal expansion is observed. In addition, the Peierls distortion plays a central role in Phase-Change Materials, which are very promising non-volatile memories. xml:lang="fr" Son approche locale de la liaison chimique s'applique à un vaste champ de systèmes, incluant les matériaux non cristallins et permis un langage commun avec les chimistes. Dans cet axe nous passons en revue quelques comportements fascinants des matériaux covalents, la plupart d'entre eux présentant un mécanisme d'instabilité de Peierls (brisure de symétrie), même les liquides et les amorphes, étonnamment. Nous analysons aussi l'effet de parame'tres externes tels que la pression et la température. Dans un certain domaine de température, la distorsion de Peierls disparaît et une dilatation thermique négative est observée. Enfin, la distorsion de Peierls joue un rôle central dans les matériaux à changement de phase (PC materials), qui sont très prometteurs pour la réalisation de mémoires non volatiles.

  11. New HYDRUS Modules for Simulating Preferential Flow, Colloid-Facilitated Contaminant Transport, and Various Biogeochemical Processes in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, J.; Sejna, M.; Jacques, D.; Langergraber, G.; Bradford, S. A.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    2012-04-01

    We have dramatically expanded the capabilities of the HYDRUS (2D/3D) software package by developing new modules to account for processes not available in the standard HYDRUS version. These new modules include the DualPerm, C-Hitch, HP2/3, Wetland, and Unsatchem modules. The dual-permeability modeling approach of Gerke and van Genuchten [1993] simulating preferential flow and transport is implemented into the DualPerm module. Colloid transport and colloid-facilitated solute transport, the latter often observed for many contaminants, such as heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and explosives [Šimůnek et al., 2006] are implemented into the C-Hitch module. HP2 and HP3 are the two and three-dimensional alternatives of the HP1 module, currently available with HYDRUS-1D [Jacques and Šimůnek, 2005], that couple HYDRUS flow and transport routines with the generic geochemical model PHREEQC of Parkhurst and Appelo [1999]. The Wetland module includes two alternative approaches (CW2D of Langergraber and Šimůnek [2005] and CWM1 of Langergraber et al. [2009]) for modeling aerobic, anaerobic, and anoxic biogeochemical processes in natural and constructed wetlands. Finally, the Unsatchem module simulates the transport and reactions of major ions in a soil profile. Brief descriptions and an application of each module will be presented. Except for HP3, all modules simulate flow and transport processes in two-dimensional transport domains. All modules are fully supported by the HYDRUS graphical user interface. Further development of these modules, as well as of several other new modules (such as Overland), is still envisioned. Continued feedback from the research community is encouraged.

  12. Proteins found within porcine respiratory tract secretions bind lipopolysaccharides of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, M; Dubreuil, D; Jacques, M

    1994-01-01

    Affinity for porcine respiratory tract secretions was found in some isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and involved lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (M. Bélanger, S. Rioux, B. Foiry, and M. Jacques, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 97:119-126, 1992). In the present study, the affinity for a crude preparation of porcine respiratory tract mucus of isolates of the Pasteurellaceae family, i.e., Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella spp., and of some unrelated gram-negative bacteria was examined. Affinity for crude porcine respiratory tract mucus was not a property shared by all Pasteurellaceae isolates tested. Furthermore, affinity for the porcine crude mucus preparation was not unique to the Pasteurellaceae group and did not seem to be restricted to bacteria originating from pigs. Different surface properties of A. pleuropneumoniae isolates in relation to their adherence to crude mucus were examined. The capsular layer seemed to mask the adhesin and interfered with adherence to crude mucus. Two poorly capsulated isolates, which had a more hydrophobic surface and bound Congo red, were also heavily labeled by gold particles coated with polymyxin, which is known to interact with the lipid A-core region of LPS, and adhered strongly to respiratory tract secretions. Tetramethylurea, charged polymers, divalent cations, chelators, monosaccharides and amino sugars, or lectins were unable to inhibit adherence of A. pleuropneumoniae to the crude mucus preparation. To identify the receptor(s) recognized by the lipopolysaccharidic adhesin of A. pleuropneumoniae, affinity chromatography was used. Two bands, which were proteinaceous in nature, of 10 and 11 kDa were recovered. Our results suggest that two low-molecular-mass proteins present in porcine respiratory tract secretions bind A. pleuropneumoniae LPS. Images PMID:8112857

  13. Heron Island, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The skies over Northern India are filled with a thick soup of aerosol particles all along the southern edge of the Himalayan Mountains, and streaming southward over Bangladesh and the Bay of Bengal. Notice that the air over the Tibetan Plateau to the north of the Himalayas is very clear, whereas the view of the land surface south of the mountains is obstructed by the brownish haze. Most of this air pollution comes from human activities. The aerosol over this region is notoriously rich in sulfates, nitrates, organic and black carbon, and fly ash. These particles not only represent a health hazard to those people living in the region, but scientists have also recently found that they can have a significant impact on the region's hydrological cycle and climate (click to read the relevant NASA press release). This true-color image was acquired on December 4, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. It is interesting to compare the image above with this earlier MODIS image over the region, acquired on October 23, 2001. Notice the difference in the clarity of the air over the region in the earlier image. Under the thick plume of aerosol, the Brahmaputra (upper right) and Ganges Rivers are still visible. The many mouths of the Ganges have turned the northern waters of the Bay of Bengal a murky brown as they empty their sediment-laden waters into the bay. Toward the upper lefthand corner of the image, there appears to be a fresh swath of snow on the ground just south of the Himalayas. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. From discovery to encounter: international conference on Saturn's moon Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Christiaan Huygens, one of the leading European scientists of the 17th century, discovered Saturn's rings and its largest moon, Titan. Exploration of Saturn and its satellites is the main objective of the joint ESA/NASA mission Cassini/Huygens. The spacecraft arrives at Saturn on 1 July and the Huygens probe will descend into the atmosphere of Titan in January next year. The conference will bring together an international team of space scientists and historians to discuss topics such as: - Christiaan Huygens and his relations with other 17th century scientists, such as Cassini, Descartes and Newton; - observation of Saturn and its moons from the 17th century to today; - the scientific objectives of the Cassini/Huygens mission and its latest observations on the way to the Saturnian system. The conference opens on Tuesday 13 April at 13:30 hours with speeches by Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA Director General, and Maria van der Hoeven, Dutch Minister for Education, Culture and Science. Members of the media wishing to attend the opening session and other parts of the conference should complete and return the attached form. Those interested in the scientific aspects of the Cassini/Huygens mission should consider the sessions on Thursday and Friday, 15/16 April, devoted to the exploration of Saturn and Titan. Those wishing to interview European and American scientists involved in the mission should indicate this on the registration form. A detailed programme of the conference can be found at: http://sci2.esa.int/huygens/conference

  15. UAVSAR's first campaign over temperate and boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, M.; Pinto, N.; Dubayah, R.; Hensley, S.

    2009-12-01

    We present the first analysis and results of the August 2009 UAVSAR and field campaign in temperate and boreal forests. UAVSAR is an airborne fully polarimetric L-band radar capable of repeat-pass interferometry (inSAR). We focus on 3 sites located in New Hampshire, Maine and Québec. The UAVSAR sites covered Bartlett, Hubbard Brook, Penobscot, Howland and Mont-Morency experimental forests in addition to covering part of White Mountain National Forest, Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, Jacques-Cartier and Grand-Jardins National Parks. We collected field data on forest structure in a total of 50 plots with measurements including tree height, DBH, species as well as crown sizes. We compiled the field data to derive canopy structure metrics such as canopy height and tree size class distribution. UAVSAR collected data over the 3 sites on 4 different days spread throughout the 11-day campaign. This timing strategy was to enable us to investigate the impact of temporal change on inSAR coherence. However, in this presentation, we focus on the analysis of single coherence measurements and polarimetric radar backscatter. We investigate their dependence on vegetation type, slope as well as weather. This is achieved by direct comparison with field, forestry and lidar data, and with a 3D vegetation model. We use a "Regression Tree" model with explicit relationships between field- and lidar-estimated canopy heights, environmental variables, radar backscatter and coherence, and MODIS percent tree cover. We assess the potential of this approach and the usefulness of each input datasets. Finally, we report on the specific accuracy of L-band radar polarimetry to estimate biomass throughout the UAVSAR sites. UAVSAR first image near Quebec city.

  16. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen pools and surface flux under different brackish marsh vegetation types, common reed (Phragmites australis) and salt hay (Spartina patens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The current expansion of Phragmites australis into the high marsh shortgrass (Spartina patens, Distichlis spicata) communities of eastern U.S. salt marshes provided an opportunity to identify the influence of vegetation types on pools and fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). Two brackish tidal marshes of the National Estuarine Research Reserve system were examined, Piermont Marsh of the Hudson River NERR in New York and Hog Island in the Jacques Coustaeu NERR of New Jersey. Pools of DIN in porewater and rates of DIN surface flux were compared in replicated pairs of recently-expanded P. australis and neighboring S. patens-dominated patches on the high marsh surface. Both marshes generally imported nitrate (NO3-) and exported ammonium (NH4+), such that overall DIN was exported. No differences in surface exchange of NO3- or NH4+ were observed between vegetation types. Depth-averaged porewater NH4+ concentrations over the entire growing season were 56% lower under P. australis than under S. patens (average 1.4 vs. 3.2 mg NH4+ L-1) with the most profound differences in November. Porewater profiles showed an accumulation of NH4+ at depth in S. patens and constant low concentrations in P. australis from the soil surface to 50 cm depth, with no significant differences in porewater salinity. Despite these profound differences in porewater, NH 4+ diffusion from soils of P. australis and S. patens were not measurably different, were similar to other published rates, and were well below estimated rates based on passive diffusion alone. Rapid adsorption and uptake by litter and microbes in surface soils of both communities may buffer NH4+ loss to flooding tides in both communities, thereby reducing the impact of P. australis invasion on NH4+ flux to flooding waters. ?? Springer 2005.

  17. Lacan.

    PubMed

    Diatkine, Gilbert

    2007-06-01

    Jacques Lacan belonged to the second generation of French psychoanalysts which, thanks to the arrival in France of Rudolf Loewenstein, was the first to benefit from a training analysis of sufficient quality and duration. Lacan left the Société Psychanalytique de Paris and the International Psychoanalytic Association in 1953, following a controversy over the short sessions he gave his patients. For Lacan, the anxiety of being absorbed by the object is the principal anxiety from which the anxieties of separation, castration or fragmentation are derived, which may explain why he did not keep his patients for a sufficient length of time. Lacan transformed his difficulty into an advocated technique, which he justified by making a critique of the classical technique. He founded his own international psychoanalytic association, in which selection only occurs when the analyst is already at a very advanced stage in his career ("the authorization of an analyst can only come from himself"). We are indebted to Lacan for having drawn the attention of analysts to the role of language, and especially of words with a double meaning, in the genesis of interpretation, but his theory of language, founded on the assimilation of psychoanalysis to structural linguistics and anthropology, has collapsed. Many of Lacan's other theoretical contributions, such as the renewed interest in the après-coup, the place of mirror relations in narcissism, the distinction between what he calls jouissance and the orgasm, or between the "real" and reality, have been gradually integrated by analysts who accept neither his technique nor his laxity in training. PMID:17537697

  18. Lipopolysaccharides of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind pig hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, M; Bégin, C; Jacques, M

    1995-01-01

    A previous study indicated that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind two low-molecular-mass proteins, of approximately 10 and 11 kDa, present in porcine respiratory tract secretions (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 62:868-873, 1994). In the present study, we determined the N-terminal amino acid sequences of these two proteins, which revealed high homology with the alpha and beta chains of pig hemoglobin. Some isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were able to use hemoglobin from various animal species as well as other heme compounds as sole sources of iron for growth, while other isolates were unable to use them. Immunoelectron microscopy showed binding of pig hemoglobin at the surface of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates as well as labeling of outer membrane blebs. We observed, using Western blotting (immunoblotting), that the lipid A-core region of LPS of all isolates was binding pig hemoglobin. Furthermore, lipid A obtained after acid hydrolysis of LPS extracted from A. pleuropneumoniae was able to bind pig hemoglobin and this binding was completely abolished by preincubation of lipid A with polymyxin B but was not inhibited by preincubation with glucosamines. Fatty acids constituting the lipid A of A. pleuropneumoniae, namely, dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, and octadecanoic acid, were also binding pig hemoglobin. Our results indicate that LPS of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates tested bind pig hemoglobin and that lipid A is involved in this binding. Our results also indicate that some A. pleuropneumoniae isolates are, in addition, able to use hemoglobin for growth. Binding of hemoglobin to LPS might represent an important means by which A. pleuropneumoniae acquires iron in vivo from hemoglobin released from erythrocytes lysed by the action of its hemolysins. PMID:7822035

  19. [Umeko TSUDA and biology: a historical perspective of science and gender].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yasu

    2010-01-01

    Umeko Tsuda (1864-1929), a pioneering educator for Japanese women and the founder of Tsuda College, was a scientist. As an English teacher at the Peeresses School in Tokyo, the young Tsuda was granted a leave of absence by the government to study "teaching method" at Bryn Mawr College, a women's college near Philadelphia. During her stay in Bryn Mawr(1889-1892), however, she majored not in pedagogy but in biology, despite the fact that the Peeresses School officially banned science education for noble women. Following the vision of the feminist Dean Carrey Thomas, Bryn Mawr College offered full-fledged professional education in science comparable to that of Johns Hopkins University. Bryn Mawr's Biology Department was growing; there, Tsuda took courses from such notable biologists as Edmund B. Wilson, Jacques Loeb, and the future Nobel Laureate Thomas H. Morgan. In her third year, under Morgan, she carried out experimental research on the development of the frog's egg, which was published in a British scientific journal as their joint paper two years later. Tsuda was considered one of the best students in the department, and Bryn Mawr offered her opportunities for further study. However, after much consideration, she chose to return to Japan. Although Tsuda gave up a possibly great career as a biologist in American academe, she knew that it was almost impossible for a woman to pursue a scientific career in Meiji Japan and wanted to develop her dream of establishing an English school for women. Her experience of "forbidden" scientific study at Bryn Mawr seems to have given her great confidence in realizing her feminist ideal of enlightening Japanese women at the women's school she founded in 1900, the forerunner of Tsuda College. PMID:20533730

  20. The ego, the ocular, and the uncanny: why are metaphors of vision central in accounts of the uncanny?

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Sadeq

    2013-06-01

    I am my own twin, Always with me, same as me, and always watching me! From interview with a psychotic patient Every man carries with him through life a mirror, as unique and impossible to get rid of as his shadow W.H. Auden, 1989, p.93 I cannot urge you too strongly to a meditation on optics. Jacques Lacan, 1991, p.76 This paper outlines the basic arguments for a reading of the notion of the uncanny that draws on direct and metaphorical significances of the ocular in the development of human ego. It is argued that a specular-oriented reading of the uncanny as made possible through Lacan's model for ego development introduces a significant analytic device capable of explaining diverse features of the uncanny experience that escaped the traditional phallic/castration-based reading. To examine this claim, evidence is presented from a number of contexts to demonstrate how uncanny experiences are typically constructed through and associated with themes and metaphors of vision, blindness, mirrors and other optical tropes. Evidence is also presented from a historical point of view to demonstrate the strong presence of ocular and specular themes, devices and associations in a tradition of literary and psychological writing out of which the notion of 'the uncanny' (including Freud's own formulation) emerged. It is demonstrated that the main instances of the uncanny, such as doppelgangers, ghosts, déjà vu, alter egos, self-alienations and split personhoods, phantoms, twins, living dolls and many more in the list of 'things of terror' typically share two important features: they are closely tied with visual tropes, and they are variations on the theme of doubling. It is then argued that both of these features are integrally associated with the developmental processes of ego formation and self-identity, thus explaining the strong association of the uncanny accounts and experiences with ocular and specular motifs and metaphors. PMID:23781831