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Sample records for female migraine patients

  1. Quality of Life and Migraine Disability among Female Migraine Patients in a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Hassan, Norul Badriah; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disability caused by migraine may be one of the main causes of burden contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) among migraine patients. Thus, this study aimed to measure QOL among migraine sufferers in comparison with healthy controls. Methods. Female diagnosed migraine patients (n= 100) and healthy controls (n=100) completed the Malay version of the World Health Organization QOL Brief (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Only migraine patients completed the Malay version of the Migraine Disability Assessment questionnaire. Results. Females with migraines had significantly lower total WHOQOL-BREF scores (84.3) than did healthy controls (91.9, P<0.001). Similarly, physical health (23.4 versus 27.7, P<0.001) and psychological health scores (21.7 versus 23.2, P< 0.001) were significantly lower than those for healthy controls. Seventy-three percent of patients experienced severe disability, with significantly higher number of days with headaches (13.8 days/3 months, P< 0.001) and pain scores (7.4, P< 0.013). Furthermore, migraine patients with lower total QOL scores had 1.2 times higher odds of having disability than patients with higher total QOL scores. Conclusions. The present study showed that migraine sufferers experienced significantly lower QOL than the control group from a similar population. Disability was severe and frequent and was associated with lower QOL among the migraine patients. PMID:25632394

  2. Decreased functional connectivity density in pain-related brain regions of female migraine patients without aura.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing; Xu, Fei; Jiang, Cui; Chen, Zhifeng; Chen, Huafu; Liao, Huaqiang; Zhao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders which is suggested to be associated with dysfunctions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to detect the altered functional connectivity architecture in the large-scale network of the whole brain in migraine without aura (MWoA). Meanwhile, the brain functional hubs which are targeted by MWoA could be identified. A new voxel-based method named functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping was applied to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 55 female MWoA patients and 44 age-matched female healthy controls (HC). Comparing to HC, MWoA patients showed abnormal short-range FCD values in bilateral hippocampus, bilateral insula, right amygdale, right anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral putamen, bilateral caudate nucleus and the prefrontal cortex. The results suggested decreased intraregional connectivity of these pain-related brain regions in female MWoA. In addition, short-range FCD values in left prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly negatively correlated with duration of disease in MWoA group, implying the repeated migraine attacks over time may consistently affect the resting-state functional connectivity architecture of these brain hubs. Our findings revealed the dysfunction of brain hubs in female MWoA, and suggested the left prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus served as sensitive neuroimaging markers for reflecting the disease duration of female MWoA. This may provide us new insights into the changes in the organization of the large-scale brain network in MWoA. PMID:26688226

  3. Dietary and Lifestyle Changes in the Treatment of a 23-Year-Old Female Patient With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brett R.; Seaman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with atypical migraine headache. Clinical Features A 23-year-old woman experienced migraines for 3 months. She had no previous history of migraines and was unresponsive to pharmaceutical and musculoskeletal therapies. The migraine headaches could not be classified according to the common categories associated with migraines. She had a change in diet due to severe gastroesophageal reflux causing her to reduce or avoid consuming foods. She also had a history of smoking and alcohol consumption. Intervention and Outcome Dietary and lifestyle changes were recommended in conjunction with the administration of a multivitamin, magnesium oxide, and Ulmus rubra. Her migraine headaches improved with the resolution of her gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Conclusion This patient with atypical migraines and a history of poor dietary and lifestyle choices improved using nutritional changes and supplementing with a multivitamin and magnesium oxide. PMID:26778934

  4. Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Todd A. Smitherman, PhD and ... if you experience these symptoms. Migraine, Depression, and Anxiety Many migraine patients suffer from symptoms of depression ...

  5. Migraine patients show increased platelet vasopressin receptors.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, J; Leppla-Wollsiffer, G; Nemeth, N; Nelson, K; Kirsten, R

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate vasopressin receptor status (Bmax and Kd) on platelets, vasopressin plasma levels, and vasopressin-induced platelet aggregation in migraine patients (21 females and 6 males) during a headache-free interval and in a matched control group. In the migraine group, Bmax was significantly higher (P = 0.02) at 53.9 +/- 20.6 fmol/mg than in the control group (36.8 +/- 21.0 fmol/mg). A correlation between Bmax and high or low sensitivity to vasopressin as an aggregator was evident in the control group, but not in the migraine group. No differences in Kd or in plasma levels of vasopressin between the migraine and control group were apparent. Men in both groups were much less sensitive to vasopressin as a platelet aggregator than were women (P < 0.01). Whether the higher Bmax in the migraine group is a reflection of temporarily higher vasopressin levels during headache or reflects a primary increase in sensitivity to vasopressin, remains to be clarified. The higher sensitivity of platelets (as a model for vessel wall receptors) from women may indicate why many more women than men suffer from migraine. Since the Bmax of the vasopressin receptor on platelets from migraine patients is increased compared to controls, treating migraine headache with vasopressin may deserve more attention. PMID:8990597

  6. Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Print Email Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients ACHE Newsletter Sign ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Todd A. Smitherman, ...

  7. Managing migraine by patient profile: role of frovatriptan

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Roger K; Farmer, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    For the last quarter of a century, triptans have been available for acute treatment of migraine but with little guidance on which of the different triptan products to use for which patient or which attack of migraine. In this article, we propose a structured approach to analysis of individual migraine attacks and patient characteristics as a means of defining and optimizing acute intervention. Assessment of patient and attack profiles includes the “5-Ps”: pattern, phenotype, patient, pharmacology, and precipitants. Attending to these five components of information can assist in developing an individualized behavioral, pharmacological, and nonpharmacological comprehensive treatment plan for most migraine patients. This clinical approach is then focused on frovatriptan because of its unique molecular signature and potential novel clinical applications. Frovatriptan like all triptans is indicated for acute treatment of migraine but its role has been explored in management of several unique migraine phenotypes. Frovatriptan has the longest half-life of any triptan and consequently is often promoted for acute treatment of migraine of longer duration. It has also been studied as a short-term preventive treatment in women with menstrual-related migraine. Given that 60% of female migraineurs suffer from menstrual-related migraine, this population is the obvious group for continued study. Small studies have also explored frovatriptan’s use in treating migraine predicted by premonitory symptoms as a preventive for the headache phase of migraine. By identifying patient and attack profiles, clinicians may effectively determine the viability of frovatriptan as an effective pharmacological intervention for migraine. PMID:27103792

  8. Osmophobia in migraine and tension-type headache and its clinical features in patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Zanchin, G; Dainese, F; Trucco, M; Mainardi, F; Mampreso, E; Maggioni, F

    2007-09-01

    Intolerance to smell is often reported by migraine patients. This study evaluates osmophobia in connection with the diagnosis of migraine and episodic tension-type headache (ETTH). The characteristics of this symptom are also investigated. We recruited from our Headache Centre 1005 patients (772 female, 233 male; age 37 +/- 11 years), of whom 677 were migraine without aura (MoA), 130 migraine with aura (MA) and 198 TTH. Patients with two or more forms of primary headache were excluded. Among migraine patients, 43.9% with MoA and 38.5% with MA reported osmophobia during the attacks; none of the 198 TTH patients suffered this symptom. Most frequently offending odours were scents (63.9%), food (55.2%) and cigarette smoke (54.8%). Osmophobia appears structurally integrated into the migraine history of the patient. It seems to be a peculiar symptom favouring the diagnosis of migraine (MoA and MA) in the differential diagnosis with ETTH. PMID:17681021

  9. Clinical profile and functional disability of patients with migraine

    PubMed Central

    Renjith, Vishnu; Pai, Mamatha Shivananda; Castelino, Flavia; Pai, Aparna; George, Anice

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Globally, migraine was ranked as the seventh highest cause of disability. Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the clinical profile and functional disability of patients with migraine. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Using a consecutive sampling technique, 60 patients were recruited for the study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: Majority of the participants were in the age group of 18–40 years with a mean age 35.22 years. There was a female preponderance with 70% of study participants being females. The various symptoms experienced by patients include throbbing pain (90%), photophobia (93.3%), phonophobia (85%), nausea (76.7%), and vomiting (41.7%). Most of the subjects (73.3%) under the study belonged to moderate to severe levels of functional disability. About 53.3% of patients were in the category of episodic migraine and 46.7% were in the category of chronic migraine. Conclusion: Migraine is associated with moderate to severe functional disability. Frequency of migraine has a positive correlation with the levels of disability/migraine disability assessment scores of migraineurs. PMID:27114657

  10. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials in a Female Population with Migraine.

    PubMed

    Yetiser, Sertac; Gok, Meltem Hale; Kutukcu, Yasar; Ince, Dilay

    2016-06-01

    The objective is to analyze the vestibular system by vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) in 30 female patients with migraine and balance problem in a controlled study. Thirty female patients with migraine and vestibular problems were enrolled in the study (2009-2012). Fifteen age-matched healthy subjects were selected as the controls. Air conduction cervical VEMP was used. Tone-burst sound stimuli of 95 dB nHL with rarefaction polarity, 5 Hz stimulus repetition rate, 1 ms rise/fall time and 2 ms plateau time were delivered at 500 Hz. 200 sweeps were averaged. Myogenic responses were amplified and band-pass filtered (800-10 Hz). The latency and the amplitude of p1 and n1 waves and interpeak amplitude and latency differences were measured. Results were given as mean and SDs. Interaural p1 and n1 amplitude greater than 30 % asymmetry was accepted as abnormal. VEMP results were compared with controls. The One-way ANOVA test was used. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. VEMP responses were elicited in all controls and the patients. Comparative analysis of p1 amplitude between the patients and the controls was statistically significant (P = 0.010). P1n1 interaural amplitude difference was greater than 30 % in 4 patients (13.4 %). No statistically significant difference was found when comparing latency of all wave forms between the patients and healthy controls (P > 0.05). VEMP is an useful tool to test the vestibular system in patients with migraine and balance problem at the very early period. Clinicians should always consider migraine in patients with vertigo. PMID:27340638

  11. Prophylactic treatment of migraine; the patient's view, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophylactic treatment is an important but under-utilised option for the management of migraine. Patients and physicians appear to have reservations about initiating this treatment option. This paper explores the opinions, motives and expectations of patients regarding prophylactic migraine therapy. Methods A qualitative focus group study in general practice in the Netherlands with twenty patients recruited from urban and rural general practices. Three focus group meetings were held with 6-7 migraine patients per group (2 female and 1 male group). All participants were migraine patients according to the IHS (International Headache Society); 9 had experience with prophylactic medication. The focus group meetings were analysed using a general thematic analysis. Results For patients several distinguished factors count when making a decision on prophylactic treatment. The decision of a patient on prophylactic medication is depending on experience and perspectives, grouped into five categories, namely the context of being active or passive in taking the initiative to start prophylaxis; assessing the advantages and disadvantages of prophylaxis; satisfaction with current migraine treatment; the relationship with the physician and the feeling to be heard; and previous steps taken to prevent migraine. Conclusion In addition to the functional impact of migraine, the decision to start prophylaxis is based on a complex of considerations from the patient's perspective (e.g. perceived burden of migraine, expected benefits or disadvantages, interaction with relatives, colleagues and physician). Therefore, when advising migraine patients about prophylaxis, their opinions should be taken into account. Patients need to be open to advice and information and intervention have to be offered at an appropriate moment in the course of migraine. PMID:22405186

  12. Suicidal ideation and risk factors in Korean migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Young; Park, Sung-Pa

    2014-10-01

    Population-based studies have reported an increased risk of suicidal ideation in patients with migraine. However, there is some controversy as to whether migraine itself is a risk factor for suicidal ideation after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities. We calculated the frequency of suicidal ideation among patients with migraine visiting a tertiary care hospital and determined its risk factors. Patients with migraine and healthy controls completed self-report questionnaires to assess depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation, and the frequency of suicidal ideation. Risk factors for suicidal ideation were investigated in terms of demographic, clinical, and psychiatric variables. One hundred eighty-five patients with migraine (156 females and 29 males; mean age 39.1 years) and 53 age and education-matched healthy controls participated in the study. The frequency of suicidal ideation was significantly greater in patients with migraine than healthy controls (odds ratio [OR]=5.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-22.10, p=0.003), but this significance was not sustained after adjusting for comorbid depression and anxiety. The risk of suicidal ideation in patients with migraine was associated with lower education levels, higher frequency of migraine attacks, stronger intensity of headaches, and presence of phonophobia, chronic migraine, depression, and anxiety. The strongest predictor was depression (OR=15.36, 95% CI 5.39-43.78, p<0.001), followed by the intensity of headache while completing the questionnaire (OR=1.293, 95% CI 1.077-1.553; p=0.006). The contribution of migraine-specific variables to suicidal ideation is trivial compared to that of depression and headache intensity. PMID:24998861

  13. Female-targeted drug therapies may propel migraine DM efforts.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    Julius Caesar, Thomas Jefferson, and even Sigmund Freud had this ailment, and Alice is thought to have described it in Wonderland. But make no mistake, migraine headaches are not the stuff of fairy tales for the 45 million migraine sufferers of the disabling and costly disorder. Here are the disease management guidelines you need to reduce migraine-related expense and minimize your patient's pain. PMID:10178017

  14. Risk of Migraine in Patients With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Kuan-Fei; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Hsia, Te-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hung; Liao, Wei-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Asthma has been described as an “acephalic migraine” and “pulmonary migraine.” However, no study has investigated the temporal frequency of migraine development in patients with asthma, and the results of previous studies may be difficult to generalize. We investigated the effect of asthma on the subsequent development of migraine by using a population-based data set in Taiwan. We retrieved our study sample from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Specifically, 25,560 patients aged 12 years and older with newly diagnosed asthma were identified as the asthma group, and 102,238 sex and age-matched patients without asthma were identified as the nonasthma group. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to measure the risk of migraine for the asthmatic group compared with that for the nonasthmatic group. The risk of migraine in the asthmatic group was 1.45-fold higher (95% confidence interval 1.33–1.59) than that in the nonasthmatic group after adjustment for sex, age, the Charlson comorbidity index, common medications prescribed for patients with asthma, and annual outpatient department visits. An additional stratified analysis revealed that the risk of migraine remained significantly higher in both sexes and all age groups older than 20 years. Asthma could be an independent predisposing risk factor for migraine development in adults. PMID:26945388

  15. Foveal Thickness Alterations in Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Cem; Tecellioglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the alterations in foveal retinal thickness (FT) values in patients with migraine and to reveal the correlations between FT and clinical characteristics of migraine disease. Methods: This study included sixty-eight eyes of 34 migraine patients [twenty-eight eyes of 14 patients with aura (group 1), and forty eyes of 20 patients without aura (group 2)] and forty eyes of 20 healthy volunteer who served as the control group (group 3). FT values were measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in each group. Results: Mean age of patients in group 1, 2, and 3 was 34.0± 6.82, 35.2±10.12, and 35.1± 6.85 years, respectively (p=0.84). Mean FT was 211.07±7.36, 220.0±12.01, and 221.85±12.27 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was statistically significance among the group 1-2 and 1-3 (p=0.002 and p< 0.001). There was no statistically significance between group 2-3 (p=0.88). Conclusion: This study suggests that in particular migraine with aura may lead to a reduction in FT values. This finding can be explained by the blood flow decrease theory in migraine; however larger studies seem mandatory. PMID:27147787

  16. Patient education and migraine: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Centonze, V; Polito, B M; Cassiano, M A; Albano, M G; Ricchetti, G; Bassi, A; Causarano, V; Dalfino, L; Albano, O

    1998-01-01

    Our study examines the effectiveness of an educational approach to migraine patients. A course in migraine education was set up for 30 patients suffering from this disease; meetings were structured taking into consideration specific educational aims, with parameters evaluated before the course, at the end of the course and at a 3-month follow-up. The results, particularly the increase in the migraineurs' knowledge of their disease and the decrease in the use of symptomatic drugs, suggest the effectiveness of the course. Furthermore, our study suggests that there is a need to build educational processes into therapeutic protocols, as they enable patients to manage their chronic diseases more correctly. PMID:9626596

  17. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Migraine Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... and Information Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Migraine? The pain of a migraine headache is often ...

  18. Assessment of pyridoxine and folate intake in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Omid; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Khorvash, Fariborz; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a highly prevalent disorder worldwide. It affects 10–20% of the population during their lifetime. Recent studies have indicated that supplementation with folate and pyridoxine improves migraine symptoms. This study was undertaken to evaluate dietary intake of folate and pyridoxine in migraine patients and assessed their association with the frequency of migraine attacks. Materials and Methods: This is a case–control study performed on 124 migraine patients and 130 non-migraine subjects. Individuals’ common dietary intake was determined by using a valid semi-quantitative 168-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Data had been analyzed using independent t-test using SPSS software (version 18). Results: In this study, we found that migraine patients had lower intake of dietary folate compared with control group, but energy and pyridoxine intake were not different between the two groups. Further analysis among men and women revealed no statistically significant changes in these relationships. In addition, we found no significant association between dietary intake of pyridoxine and folate with the frequency of migraine attacks. Conclusion: Migraine patients had lower dietary intake of folate, compared with non-migraine group subjects. There was no significant association between folate and pyridoxine intake with the frequency of migraine attacks. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27110544

  19. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... vomit. Migraine is three times more common in women than in men. Some people can tell when ... or sleep Exposure to light Hormonal changes (in women) Doctors used to believe migraines were linked to ...

  20. Increased Risk of Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Te-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest that an association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and migraine exists. However, population-based data are unavailable in Asian cohorts. Our study thus aims to evaluate the association between migraine and RLS in a nationwide, population-based cohort in Taiwan and to examine the effects of age, sex, migraine subtype, and comorbidities on RLS development. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used. Patients aged 20 years or older with newly diagnosed migraine from 2000 to 2008 were included; 23,641 patients with newly diagnosed migraine and 94,564 subjects without migraine were randomly selected and followed until RLS development, withdrawal from the National Health Insurance, or until the end of 2011. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore the risk of RLS in patients with migraine after adjustment for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. Both cohorts were followed for a mean of 7.38 years. After adjustment for covariates, the risk of RLS was 1.42-fold higher (95% confidence interval = 1.13–1.79) in the migraine cohort than in the nonmigraine cohort (7.19 versus 3.42 years per 10,000 person-years). The increased risk was more prominent in males in the migraine cohort (1.87-fold increased risk, 95% confidence interval 1.22–2.85). Neither comorbidity status nor migraine subtype influenced the RLS risk. This population-based study demonstrated that migraine is associated with an increased risk of RLS compared with those without migraine, particularly in male patients with migraine and regardless of the comorbidity status. PMID:26844484

  1. Migraine in older patients: a case report and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Rankin, L M; Bruhl, M

    2000-07-01

    Older patients can suffer from various forms of migraine. These patients should be educated regarding triggers and considered for prophylactic and acute treatments for frequent episodes. Practitioners should keep in mind the unique challenges of treating migraine in older persons and first search for other serious yet treatable causes for headache in these patients. PMID:10909408

  2. Altered processing of sensory stimuli in patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Ambrosini, Anna; Brighina, Filippo; Coppola, Gianluca; Perrotta, Armando; Pierelli, Francesco; Sandrini, Giorgio; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Marinazzo, Daniele; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Migraine is a cyclic disorder, in which functional and morphological brain changes fluctuate over time, culminating periodically in an attack. In the migrainous brain, temporal processing of external stimuli and sequential recruitment of neuronal networks are often dysfunctional. These changes reflect complex CNS dysfunction patterns. Assessment of multimodal evoked potentials and nociceptive reflex responses can reveal altered patterns of the brain's electrophysiological activity, thereby aiding our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine. In this Review, we summarize the most important findings on temporal processing of evoked and reflex responses in migraine. Considering these data, we propose that thalamocortical dysrhythmia may be responsible for the altered synchronicity in migraine. To test this hypothesis in future research, electrophysiological recordings should be combined with neuroimaging studies so that the temporal patterns of sensory processing in patients with migraine can be correlated with the accompanying anatomical and functional changes. PMID:24535465

  3. [Peculiarities of verbal activity in migraine patients].

    PubMed

    Latysheva, N V; Iakovlev, O N; Filatova, E G

    2003-01-01

    We applied associative verbal experiment to analyze verbal activity of migraineurs. A test group consisted of 49 patients with migraine, a control one--of 20 healthy people. Reliable decrease of free associations number, verbs and plants, semantic index and changes of non-productive association index and coefficient were observed. Average depression level, higher anxiety and negative correlations with indexes calculated were found. Verbal activity of migraineurs, their ability to concentrate and to control adequateness of task fulfillment were decreased. That was caused by pain, depression, anxiety and neurotization. Verbal activity is influenced by individual emotional features (calculated indexes do not correlate with the visual analogue scale). PMID:12938648

  4. What do patients want from acute migraine treatment?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rm

    2004-01-01

    Clinical observations have shown that migraine is a progressive disorder, both within an acute attack, and within the disease itself. Rates of diagnosis for migraine have increased in the last decade, but more than half of migraineurs remain undiagnosed. Patient expectations of migraine therapies have also increased (patients require rapid and sustained pain relief with a treatment that has good tolerability), and can differ greatly from those of physicians. Management decisions should be made with these expectations in mind, to enhance patient outcomes and compliance with treatment. Improved understanding of acute migraine attack pathophysiology has led to the strategy of early treatment to modify both the progression of the current attack and, potentially, the progression of the disease itself in the individual. The triptans are effective acute migraine therapies. Each agent has its own distinct profile of efficacy and tolerability, enabling individualization of treatment. PMID:15595989

  5. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity. PMID:25308111

  6. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 43. Marmura MJ, Silberstein SD, Schwedt TJ. The acute treatment of migraine in ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25600718 . Silberstein SD. Headache management. In: Benzon HT, Rathmell JP, Wu ...

  7. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... be triggered by many things. But the exact chain of events remains unclear. Most medical experts believe ... anxiety Migraines can also be triggered by certain foods. Most common are: Chocolate Dairy foods, especially certain ...

  8. Migraines

    MedlinePlus

    ... except small amounts for flavoring Papaya Passion fruit Pea pods Pickled, preserved or marinated foods, such as ... foods Raisins Red plums Sauerkraut Seasoned salt Snow peas Soy sauce Diagnosis & Tests How is migraine diagnosed? ...

  9. Optimizing prophylactic treatment of migraine: Subtypes and patient matching

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine have resulted in important breakthroughs in treatment. For example, understanding of the role of serotonin in the cerebrovascular circulation has led to the development of triptans for the acute relief of migraine headaches, and the identification of cortical spreading depression as an early central event associated wih migraine has brought renewed interest in antiepileptic drugs for migraine prophylaxis. However, migraine still remains inadequately treated. Indeed, it is apparent that migraine is not a single disease but rather a syndrome that can manifest itself in a variety of pathological conditions. The consequences of this may be that treatment needs to be matched to particular patients. Clinical research needs to be devoted to identifying which sort of patients benefit best from which treatments, particularly in the field of prophylaxis. We propose four patterns of precipitating factors (adrenergic, serotoninergic, menstrual, and muscular) which may be used to structure migraine prophylaxis. Finally, little is known about long-term outcome in treated migraine. It is possible that appropriate early prophylaxis may modify the long-term course of the disease and avoid late complications. PMID:19209286

  10. Psychological aspects of weekend headache sufferers in comparison with migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Nattero, G; De Lorenzo, C; Biale, L; Allais, G; Torre, E; Ancona, M

    1989-02-01

    Sometimes the relaxation after stress may trigger a migraine attack. This is the principle that underlies that particular variant of migraine called "weekend headache". We hypothesize the presence in weekend headache prone subjects of a particular psychological background, different from that of common migraine sufferers. In order to detect possible differences supporting our hypothesis, we studied 104 new outpatients: 46 patients suffering from headache only on weekends (23 males and 23 females) and 58 matched common migraineurs (26 males and 32 females) with no weekend predilection. The psychological assessment was performed using the following psychometric tools: MMPI, BDI, STAIX1-X2. A clinical assessment of each patient was also carried out. Significant differences were found after statistically analyzing the test results. Most of the MMPI scales were found to be more elevated in both male and female weekend headache sufferers. From a clinical point of view, the weekend headache attacks proved to be similar to those of common migraine, but with a significantly higher incidence of concomitant symptoms. Our study confirms the important role that psychological factors play in the pathogenesis and clinical development of migraine and leads us to conclude that a psychic tension component is associated with the vascular one in weekend headache. PMID:2708043

  11. Chronic migraine: risk factors, mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    May, Arne; Schulte, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic migraine has a great detrimental influence on a patient's life, with a severe impact on socioeconomic functioning and quality of life. Chronic migraine affects 1-2% of the general population, and about 8% of patients with migraine; it usually develops from episodic migraine at an annual conversion rate of about 3%. The chronification is reversible: about 26% of patients with chronic migraine go into remission within 2 years of chronification. The most important modifiable risk factors for chronic migraine include overuse of acute migraine medication, ineffective acute treatment, obesity, depression and stressful life events. Moreover, age, female sex and low educational status increase the risk of chronic migraine. The pathophysiology of migraine chronification can be understood as a threshold problem: certain predisposing factors, combined with frequent headache pain, lower the threshold of migraine attacks, thereby increasing the risk of chronic migraine. Treatment options include oral medications, nerve blockade with local anaesthetics or corticoids, and neuromodulation. Well-defined diagnostic criteria are crucial for the identification of chronic migraine. The International Headache Society classification of chronic migraine was recently updated, and now allows co-diagnosis of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache. This Review provides an up-to-date overview of the classification of chronic migraine, basic mechanisms and risk factors of migraine chronification, and the currently established treatment options. PMID:27389092

  12. Central retinal vein occlusion in a migraine patient.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Felix; Saban, Tal; Steiner, Israel

    2015-11-01

    We describe a 31-year-old woman with a history of migraines without aura, who presented to our emergency department due to a monocular visual disturbance. This was misdiagnosed as being related to her migraine, however, it was subsequently found to be caused by a central retinal vein occlusion. Patients suffering from migraine can experience visual disturbances in the form of auras. The neuropathological basis for this phenomenon is thought to be a spreading depression in the visual cortex, causing a hemifield active visual phenomenon. Missing the diagnosis of central retinal vein occlusion is common, especially in the setting of an initially normal fundoscopy examination. PMID:26115899

  13. Current migraine management – patient acceptability and future approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fumal, Arnaud; Schoenen, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Despite its high prevalence and individual as well as societal burden, migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. In recent years, the options for the management of migraine patients have greatly expanded. A number of drugs belonging to various pharmacological classes and deliverable by several routes are now available both for the acute and the preventive treatments of migraine. Nevertheless, disability and satisfaction remain low in many subjects because treatments are not accessible, not optimized, not effective, or simply not tolerated. There is thus still considerable room for better education, for more efficient therapies and for greater support from national health systems. In spite of useful internationally accepted guidelines, anti-migraine treatment has to be individually tailored to each patient taking into account the migraine subtype, the ensuing disability, the patient’s previous history and present expectations, and the co-morbid disorders. In this article we will summarize the phenotypic presentations of migraine and review recommendations for acute and preventive treatment, highlighting recent advances which are relevant for clinical practice in terms of both diagnosis and management. PMID:19337450

  14. Combined therapy for migraine prevention? Clinical experience with a beta-blocker plus sodium valproate in 52 resistant migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Leira, R; Láinez, J M

    2003-12-01

    The aim was to explore whether combining a beta-blocker and sodium valproate could lead to an advantage in efficacy in patients with migraine previously resistant to the two medications in monotherapy. Fifty-two patients (43 women) with a history of episodic migraine with or without aura, and previously unresponsive to beta-blockers and sodium valproate in monotherapy, were treated with a combination of propranolol or nadolol and sodium valproate in an open-label fashion. Eight patients (15%) discontinued due to adverse events. Fifteen (29%) did not respond. The remaining 29 cases (56%) showed response (> 50% reduction in migraine days). The response was excellent in nine (17%). From this open trial, combination therapy with a beta-blocker and sodium valproate appears to be a good migraine preventative in some previously resistant migraine cases. Controlled trials are now necessary to determine the true advantage in efficacy of this combination in difficult to treat migraineurs. PMID:14984228

  15. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  16. Pathways to the best fit of triptans for migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M G

    2008-09-01

    Variability in drug response is a major barrier to the successful treatment of migraine, and most treatments are only optimal in a subset of patients. Although triptans provide the best therapeutic option for the treatment of acute migraine, it has not previously been possible to predict how well patients will respond to a specific triptan or whether they will experience unpleasant adverse events. Hence, it has been difficult for physicians to match individual patients with the most suitable agent to treat their migraine pain. Intrapatient variability has been associated with polymorphisms in genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and drug targets. Pharmacogenetics provides the possibility of tailoring the therapeutic approach to individual patients, in order to maximize treatment efficacy while minimizing the potential for unwanted side-effects. This review demonstrates how almotriptan may overcome genetically determined responses by utilizing diverse metabolic pathways to provide therapeutic benefit to many migraineurs. PMID:18715329

  17. A 'complex' of brain metabolites distinguish altered chemistry in the cingulate cortex of episodic migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Becerra, L; Veggeberg, R; Prescot, A; Jensen, J E; Renshaw, P; Scrivani, S; Spierings, E L H; Burstein, R; Borsook, D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of migraine, the pathophysiology of the disease remains unclear. Current understanding of migraine has alluded to the possibility of a hyperexcitable brain. The aim of the current study is to investigate human brain metabolite differences in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during the interictal phase in migraine patients. We hypothesized that there may be differences in levels of excitatory neurotransmitters and/or their derivatives in the migraine cohort in support of the theory of hyperexcitability in migraine. 2D J-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) data were acquired on a 3 Tesla (3 T) MRI from a voxel placed over the ACC of 32 migraine patients (MP; 23 females, 9 males, age 33 ± 9.6 years) and 33 healthy controls (HC; 25 females, 8 males, age 32 ± 9.6 years). Amplitude correlation matrices were constructed for each subject to evaluate metabolite discriminability. ProFit-estimated metabolite peak areas were normalized to a water reference signal to assess subject differences. The initial analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to test for group differences for all metabolites/creatine (Cre) ratios between healthy controls and migraineurs but showed no statistically significant differences. In addition, we used a multivariate approach to distinguish migraineurs from healthy subjects based on the metabolite/Cre ratio. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) model was used to identify 3 metabolite ratios sufficient to minimize minimum classification error (MCE). The 3 selected metabolite ratios were aspartate (Asp)/Cre, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/Cre, and glutamine (Gln)/Cre. These findings are in support of a 'complex' of metabolite alterations, which may underlie changes in neuronal chemistry in the migraine brain. Furthermore, the parallel changes in the three-metabolite 'complex' may confer more subtle but biological processes that are ongoing. The data also support the current theory that the

  18. Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials and Phase Synchronization in Migraine Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, L.; Tommaso, M. De; Guido, M.; Hu, K.; Ivanov, P. Ch.; Marinazzo, D.; Nardulli, G.; Nitti, L.; Pellicoro, M.; Pierro, C.; Stramaglia, S.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in the presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  19. Validity and reliability of Turkish translation of Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire in patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Gedikoglu, U; Coskun, O; Inan, L E; Ucler, S; Tunc, T; Emre, U

    2005-06-01

    The Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire is a brief, self-administered questionnaire which is designed to quantify headache-related disability in a 3-month period. We have tested a Turkish version of the MIDAS questionnaire in 60 migraine patients. Sixty of the clinically diagnosed migraine headache sufferers were enrolled in a 90-day diary study and completed the MIDAS questionnaire in the first, 21st and the last day of the 90-day study. The scores taken from the diary and the scores of the MIDAS taken at different times were evaluated by the correlation tests of both Pearson and Spearman for each question and total scores. Cronbach's scores taken from the diary and taken from the test of the MIDAS which was applied at different times were evaluated. Pearson's correlation on the responses in the initial MIDAS questions was between 0.44 (reduced productivity in household chores) and 0.78 (missed work or school days). The correlation of the Spearman was similar to the Pearson values. As a result, we found that the overall score of the MIDAS has a good reliability and its internal consistency is also good (Cronbach's alpha 0.87). These findings support the use of the MIDAS questionnaire as a clinical and research tool on Turkish patients. PMID:15910570

  20. Effects of pregnancy on slow cortical potentials in migraine patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Darabaneanu, S; Kropp, P; Niederberger, U; Strenge, H; Gerber, W-D

    2008-10-01

    Increased negative amplitudes and lack of habituation of contingent negative variation (CNV) in migraine are well established and are supposed to reflect an altered cortical excitability level. Migraine attacks occur less during pregnancy but often relapse after delivery. We investigated the effect of pregnancy on slow cortical potentials and reaction time in migraine patients and healthy controls. Four groups were examined: 14 pregnant migraine patients, 12 non-pregnant migraine patients, 15 pregnant healthy women and 16 non-pregnant healthy women aged 19-38 years. Two recordings were performed in the pregnant subjects: in the 36th week of gestation and 4 weeks after delivery. The non-pregnant subjects were recorded at the same time interval of 8 weeks. Pregnant migraine patients showed significantly fewer migraine days during the third trimester of pregnancy and returned to nearly the former level 4 weeks post delivery. Non-pregnant migraine patients demonstrated a significant reduction of migraine days at the second measurement. There was no effect of pregnancy on CNV amplitudes, but there was an effect of pregnancy on the habituation coefficient and reaction time of migraine patients. Faster habituation from a higher preactivation level was found. As an explanation for the changed habituation level we favour the model of correlation between preactivation level and habituation level, the so-called law of initial value. We found a correlation between preactivation level and habituation. Our study confirms a specific effect of pregnancy on slow cortical potentials in migraine patients. PMID:18624798

  1. How to Apply the AHS Evidence Assessment of the Acute Treatment of Migraine in Adults to your Patient with Migraine.

    PubMed

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Davenport, William Jeptha; Marmura, Michael J; Schwedt, Todd J; Silberstein, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The "Acute Treatment of Migraine in Adults: The American Headache Society Evidence Assessment of Migraine Pharmacotherapies" provides levels of evidence for medication efficacy for acute treatment of migraine. The goal of this companion paper is to provide guidance on how to choose between evidence-based treatment options, and, based on the clinical characteristics of the patient and their migraine attacks, to provide guidance on designing an individualized strategy for managing migraine attacks. The acute pharmacological treatments described in the American Headache Society evidence assessment can be divided into those initially taken by the patient during the headache phase of the migraine attack, those taken by the patient later in the attack when initial treatments fail, and those administered intravenously or intramuscularly in urgent care settings. Medications taken initially by patients in the headache phase include nonspecific analgesics such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), triptans, and dihydroergotamine (DHE). A stratified approach to treatment is advised, with the choice of medication based on the patient's treatment needs, taking into consideration the attack severity, presence of associated symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, and the degree of migraine-related disability. Individuals with migraine may find reassurance in having a "back-up plan" in the event of an initial acute treatment failure. For those individuals who had a partial response to the initial acute treatment, a second dose might be indicated. When the initial treatment does not provide meaningful and sustained benefits, a treatment from a different medication class is typically chosen. Depending upon the initial treatment used, this might include NSAIDs, triptans, or DHE. Opioids or acetaminophen in combination with codeine or tramadol can be considered as part of the "back-up plan," provided they are used infrequently. When all patient administered

  2. 3D-neuronavigation in vivo through a patient's brain during a spontaneous migraine headache.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Alexandre F; Nascimento, Thiago D; Love, Tiffany; DosSantos, Marcos F; Martikainen, Ilkka K; Cummiford, Chelsea M; DeBoer, Misty; Lucas, Sarah R; Bender, MaryCatherine A; Koeppe, Robert A; Hall, Theodore; Petty, Sean; Maslowski, Eric; Smith, Yolanda R; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research, generated primarily from MRI-based studies, shows that migraine appears to occur, and possibly endure, due to the alteration of specific neural processes in the central nervous system. However, information is lacking on the molecular impact of these changes, especially on the endogenous opioid system during migraine headaches, and neuronavigation through these changes has never been done. This study aimed to investigate, using a novel 3D immersive and interactive neuronavigation (3D-IIN) approach, the endogenous µ-opioid transmission in the brain during a migraine headache attack in vivo. This is arguably one of the most central neuromechanisms associated with pain regulation, affecting multiple elements of the pain experience and analgesia. A 36 year-old female, who has been suffering with migraine for 10 years, was scanned in the typical headache (ictal) and nonheadache (interictal) migraine phases using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the selective radiotracer [(11)C]carfentanil, which allowed us to measure µ-opioid receptor availability in the brain (non-displaceable binding potential - µOR BPND). The short-life radiotracer was produced by a cyclotron and chemical synthesis apparatus on campus located in close proximity to the imaging facility. Both PET scans, interictal and ictal, were scheduled during separate mid-late follicular phases of the patient's menstrual cycle. During the ictal PET session her spontaneous headache attack reached severe intensity levels; progressing to nausea and vomiting at the end of the scan session. There were reductions in µOR BPND in the pain-modulatory regions of the endogenous µ-opioid system during the ictal phase, including the cingulate cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), thalamus (Thal), and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG); indicating that µORs were already occupied by endogenous opioids released in response to the ongoing pain. To our knowledge, this is the first time that changes

  3. Migraine preventive therapy: selection of appropriate patients and general principles of management.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Domenico; Lanteri-Minet, Michel

    2006-08-01

    The goal of this review is to communicate the rationale and the possible benefits of migraine preventive treatments to clinicians and patients, and to address the many problematic issues created by missed diagnosis or misdiagnoses and inadequate migraine management. Successful implementation of migraine preventive treatment requires appropriate patient selection based on several factors, including the frequency of migraine attacks (> or =2-3 attacks/month), the level of disability incurred and the frequency of acute medication usage. Unfortunately, several epidemiologic surveys indicate that preventive therapies are significantly underutilized, which supports the need for greater dialog concerning migraine prevention between consumers and physicians. Effective migraine preventive therapy should reduce the frequency, duration, and severity of migraine, and also improve function, reduce disability, and possibly reduce the risk of worsening the headache syndrome, through acute medication overuse. PMID:16893343

  4. Abnormal Tilt Perception During Centrifugation in Patients with Vestibular Migraine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joanne; Lewis, Richard F

    2016-06-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM), defined as vestibular symptoms caused by migraine mechanisms, is very common but poorly understood. Because dizziness is often provoked in VM patients when the semicircular canals and otolith organs are stimulated concurrently (e.g., tilting the head relative to gravity), we measured tilt perception and eye movements in patients with VM and in migraine and normal control subjects during fixed-radius centrifugation, a paradigm that simultaneously modulates afferent signals from the semicircular canals and otoliths organs. Twenty-four patients (8 in each category) were tested with a motion paradigm that generated an inter-aural centrifugal force of 0.36 G, resulting in a 20° tilt of the gravito-inertial force in the roll plane. We found that percepts of roll tilt developed slower in VM patients than in the two control groups, but that eye movement responses, including the shift in the eye's rotational axis, were equivalent in all three groups. These results demonstrate a change in vestibular perception in VM that is unaccompanied by changes in vestibular-mediated eye movements and suggest that either the brain's integration of canal and otolith signals or the dynamics of otolith responses are aberrant in patients with VM. PMID:26956976

  5. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling neurologic condition that affects 2% of the general population. Patients with chronic migraine have headaches on at least 15 days a month, with at least eight days a month on which their headaches and associated symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for migraine. Chronic migraine places an enormous burden on patients owing to frequent headaches; hypersensitivity to visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli; nausea; and vomiting. It also affects society through direct and indirect medical costs. Chronic migraine typically develops after a slow increase in headache frequency over months to years. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of transforming to chronic migraine. The diagnosis requires a carefully performed patient interview and neurologic examination, sometimes combined with additional diagnostic tests, to differentiate chronic migraine from secondary headache disorders and other primary chronic headaches of long duration. Treatment takes a multifaceted approach that may include risk factor modification, avoidance of migraine triggers, drug and non-drug based prophylaxis, and abortive migraine treatment, the frequency of which is limited to avoid drug overuse. This article provides an overview of current knowledge regarding chronic migraine, including epidemiology, risk factors for its development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and guidelines. The future of chronic migraine treatment and research is also discussed. PMID:24662044

  6. Vascular responses in the hands of patients suffering from migraine

    PubMed Central

    Downey, J. A.; Frewin, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The response of the hand blood vessels to a measured, controlled cold stimulus was determined, using venous occlusion plethysmography, in normal subjects and patients who suffered from migraine. The resting level of hand blood flow was found to be higher in the patients, but the percentage fall in flow that resulted when the cold stimulus was applied was less than in the normal subjects. The hand blood vessels of the patients responded to intra-arterial noradrenaline and tyramine in a normal fashion. PMID:5037037

  7. Does Pramipexole Treatment Improve Headache in Patients with Concomitant Migraine and Restless Legs Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Suzuki, Shiho; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Numao, Ayaka; Watanabe, Yuka; Takashima, Ryotaro; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested a strong link between migraines and restless legs syndrome (RLS). It is possible that these disorders share a dopaminergic dysfunction in the hypothalamic A11 nucleus that contributes to this association. However, there have been no clinical studies to evaluate the effect of dopaminergic treatment on migraine symptoms in patients with concomitant migraines and RLS. Methods We present an illustrative patient with concomitant RLS and migraine who showed improvement in her headache frequency and RLS symptoms following immediate-release pramipexole (P-IR) treatment and provide review results from the medical records of patients who experienced both migraines and RLS in our previous cross-sectional study. Results Ten patients (nine patients from the previously completed single-center study) received P-IR treatment were included in the study. RLS symptoms improved markedly in all of the subjects. Five out of the 10 patients (50%) reported improvement in migraine headaches. Of these five patients, four (80%) had reported morning headaches before P-IR treatment. Discussion Our results indicate that the identification of RLS in migraine patients is clinically significant and that dopaminergic treatment may improve both migraines, particularly morning headache (80% improvement in this study), and RLS symptoms. However, further clinical studies are warranted to verify our results. PMID:24116342

  8. The Behavior of Migraine in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Vilaça, Celmir; de Souza, Jano Alves; Orsini, Marco; Pereira, João Santos; Amaral, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic systems in the central nervous system. In migraine it is supposed to occur hyperactivation of central dopaminergic pathways. We verified the hypothesis of improved migraine in patients who manifest PD. We evaluated 109 patients with PD over 40 years (57 men and 52 women) about the presence throughout the life of migraine, as well as the possibility of improvement in migraine after the onset of motor symptoms of PD. This group was compared to a control group of 152 people (41 men and 152 women) without PD regarding the presence of migraine and its improvement. Twenty-one patients manifested migraine in the group with PD (16 women and 5 men) in which 13 reported improvement in migraine after the onset of symptoms of PD. Among the controls, 37 interviewed had migraine history (32 women and 5 men) among which 20 showed improvement. There was no significant difference when comparing the two groups (χ21:0,05=0.337; P<0.382). We were unable to relate the improvement of migraine with the emergence of PD motor signs, despite the degeneration of dopaminergic pathways of the central nervous system. PMID:26788267

  9. A ‘complex’ of brain metabolites distinguish altered chemistry in the cingulate cortex of episodic migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, L.; Veggeberg, R.; Prescot, A.; Jensen, J.E.; Renshaw, P.; Scrivani, S.; Spierings, E.L.H.; Burstein, R.; Borsook, D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of migraine, the pathophysiology of the disease remains unclear. Current understanding of migraine has alluded to the possibility of a hyperexcitable brain. The aim of the current study is to investigate human brain metabolite differences in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during the interictal phase in migraine patients. We hypothesized that there may be differences in levels of excitatory neurotransmitters and/or their derivatives in the migraine cohort in support of the theory of hyperexcitability in migraine. 2D J-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) data were acquired on a 3 Tesla (3 T) MRI from a voxel placed over the ACC of 32 migraine patients (MP; 23 females, 9 males, age 33 ± 9.6 years) and 33 healthy controls (HC; 25 females, 8 males, age 32 ± 9.6 years). Amplitude correlation matrices were constructed for each subject to evaluate metabolite discriminability. ProFit-estimated metabolite peak areas were normalized to a water reference signal to assess subject differences. The initial analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to test for group differences for all metabolites/creatine (Cre) ratios between healthy controls and migraineurs but showed no statistically significant differences. In addition, we used a multivariate approach to distinguish migraineurs from healthy subjects based on the metabolite/Cre ratio. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) model was used to identify 3 metabolite ratios sufficient to minimize minimum classification error (MCE). The 3 selected metabolite ratios were aspartate (Asp)/Cre, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/Cre, and glutamine (Gln)/Cre. These findings are in support of a ‘complex’ of metabolite alterations, which may underlie changes in neuronal chemistry in the migraine brain. Furthermore, the parallel changes in the three-metabolite ‘complex’ may confer more subtle but biological processes that are ongoing. The data also support the current theory that the

  10. Genetics Home Reference: sporadic hemiplegic migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of sporadic hemiplegic migraine: Genetic Testing Registry: Migraine, sporadic hemiplegic Journal of the American Medical Association Patient Page: Migraine ...

  11. [Coping with stress and pain in migraine patients.].

    PubMed

    Bornmann, M; Schneeberg-Kirchner, S; Weber, H

    1989-12-01

    During a semi-structured interview 82 migraine patients were asked biographical and illnessrelated questions. They completed psychological instruments on coping behavior (Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen), self-concept (Frankfurter Selbstkonzeptskalen), attributional style (IE-SV-F), illness behavior, and illness-related attributions (Tübinger Attributions-fragebogen). The theoretical background of this research is a cognitive model of coping with stress and illness. The results support the interrelations between coping with stress and coping with illness assumed in the model. They justify considering coping with illness to be scopespecific coping behavior. Furthermore, the results emphasize the importance of cognitive processes for stress-coping in general, as well as for illness-related coping behavior. With regard to personality variables, migraineurs, as compared with healthy persons, show to a larger extent coping strategies that are apt to maintain rather than to reduce stress, such as resignation, withdrawal, and avoidance behavior. They also have a more unfavorable selfconcept of achievement, emotional stability and selfassertiveness, lower self-esteem and a more external pattern of causal attributions. Some of the pain behavior strategies could be identified as being focused on illness (guarding behavior, avoidance and social withdrawal, resignation and complaint); only the attempt to relax is regarded as being focused on health. Migraine patients show a preference neither for medical nor psychological causal attributions of their illness but score significantly higher on medical than psychological control attributions. The results have implications for psychological therapy. PMID:18415375

  12. The Internet and migraine: headache resources for patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Genzen, J R

    1998-04-01

    The Internet enables distribution of headache-related resources to patients and physicians in a manner never before possible. While these opportunities for communication and education open many doors to an increased awareness of migraine, there are also dangers in the free flow of non-peer-reviewed information on the Internet. The practicing physician or headache specialist needs to be aware of what headache-related resources are available on the Internet, both to recommend information to patients and to know what false information is being spread to headache sufferers. The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to outline the types of headache-related information available on the Internet, including actual examples that the astute physician can view as time permits, and (2) to present examples of how such information can be biased, inaccurate, and potentially problematic for the curious patient or physician. PMID:9595873

  13. Therapeutic strategies in migraine patients with mood and anxiety disorders: clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Finocchi, Cinzia; Villani, Veronica; Casucci, Gerardo

    2010-06-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are comorbid with migraine. The coexistence of a psychiatric disorder alters the quality of life, the total disability, the course of migraine and the final prognosis; it increases the probability of central sensitization, other chronic pain conditions and the evolution to chronic migraine. All patients presenting with frequent episodic and chronic migraine should be screened for depression and anxiety. When these conditions are present, drugs for migraine prevention that may worsen the psychiatric comorbid disorder have to be avoided. When it is possible, both conditions should be treated with a single agent. Amitriptiline can be used both in mood disorders and migraine prevention. Flunarizine and beta-blockers may help if anxiety is present. Pregabalin has demonstrated efficacy in anxiety disorders and fibromyalgia. Divalproex sodium, topiramate and lamotrigine that have demonstrated efficacy in mood stabilization are also indicated in migraine without aura (divalproex sodium and topiramate) and with aura (lamotrigine). When a specific treatment for the comorbid psychiatric disorder is needed, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are the drugs of choice both in depression and anxiety, and the cognitive behavioural therapy has good evidence of efficacy in anxiety disorders. Vagal nerve stimulation may be an option in patients with refractory chronic migraine and depression. PMID:20464594

  14. Optimal management of severe nausea and vomiting in migraine: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Láinez, Miguel JA; García-Casado, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a common and potentially disabling disorder for patients, with wide-reaching implications for health care services, society, and the economy. Nausea and vomiting during migraine attacks are common symptoms that affect at least 60% of patients suffering from migraines. These symptoms are often more disabling than the headache itself, causing a great burden on the patient’s life. Nausea and vomiting may delay the use of oral abortive medication or interfere with oral drug absorption. Therefore, they can hinder significantly the management and treatment of migraine (which is usually given orally). The main treatment of pain-associated symptoms of migraine (such as nausea and vomiting) is to stop the migraine attack itself as soon as possible, with the effective drugs at the effective doses, seeking if necessary alternative routes of administration. In some cases, intravenous antiemetic drugs are able to relieve a migraine attack and associated symptoms like nausea and vomiting. We performed an exhaustive PubMed search of the English literature to find studies about management of migraine and its associated symptoms. Search terms were migraine, nausea, and vomiting. We did not limit our search to a specific time period. We focused on clinical efficacy and tolerance of the various drugs and procedures based on data from human studies. We included the best available studies for each discussed drug or procedure. These ranged from randomized controlled trials for some treatments to small case series for others. Recently updated books and manuals on neurology and headache were also consulted. We herein review the efficacy of the different approaches in order to manage nausea and vomiting for migraine patents. PMID:24143125

  15. Endolymphatic hydrops in patients with vestibular migraine and auditory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gürkov, Robert; Kantner, Claudia; Strupp, Michael; Flatz, W; Krause, Eike; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit

    2014-10-01

    Vertigo patients exhibiting features of vestibular migraine (VM) and Menière's disease (MD) present a difficult diagnostic challenge to the clinician, and the two entities are likely to overlap. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of endolymphatic hydrops in patients with VM and auditory symptoms. This was an observatory diagnostic study. At an academic interdisciplinary dizziness centre, nineteen consecutive patients with definite or probable VM and auditory symptoms were examined by locally enhanced inner ear MR imaging. MR images were evaluated for the presence of endolymphatic hydrops. Of the 19 included patients, four patients (21 %) demonstrated evidence of cochlear and vestibular endolymphatic hydrops on locally enhanced inner ear MR imaging (three with "definite VM", one with "probable VM"). Locally enhanced inner ear MR imaging may be useful in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with VM and auditory symptoms, as some of these patients have signs of endolymphatic hydrops. Whether these patients suffer from MD only and are misdiagnosed as VM or suffer from both, VM and MD or whether endolymphatic hydrops is a consequence of inner ear damage due to VM are clinically relevant questions that can be evaluated by application of this technique. PMID:24121780

  16. [Neurologic and mental disorders in patients with migraine and in their children].

    PubMed

    Sviridova, E I; Kalashnikova, L A; Asanova, L M

    1990-01-01

    To specify indications for differentiated therapy, a study was made of the characteristic features of the psychopathological picture of the interictal period of migraine in 50 women aged 28 to 60 years suffering from different forms of migrainous attacks. Besides, the neuropsychic disorders were also examined in those patients' children. The first group was made up of migraine patients in whom paroxysmal psychic disorders resembling convulsion-free epileptic attacks ranked first in the clinical structure of the interictal period. In the second group patients, of paramount importance was the hysterical symptomatology. The third group patients suffered from somatized depressions. The differentiated therapy of psychic disorders of the interictal period favoured the deceleration of migrainous attacks in all the three groups patients. PMID:2175132

  17. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset. PMID:15482352

  18. [Migraine therapy].

    PubMed

    Diener, H-C; Limmroth, V

    2005-10-01

    With more than 8 million sufferers in Germany alone, migraine is one of the most frequent medical disorders. Recent discoveries in the pathophysiology and genetics of headaches, as well as specific developments in pharmacology, have paved the way for a significant improvement in both acute migraine treatment and migraine prevention. Within the group of 5-HT(1B/D)-agonists (triptans), seven substances with 23 dosages and formulations have been approved in Germany that allow the customized treatment of migraine attacks. In addition, several new drugs such as valproic acid or topiramate are now available as drugs of first choice for migraine prevention, as well as the well established beta blockers, thus enabling the physician to tailor the preventative treatment according to the individual needs of the patient. PMID:15995849

  19. Oxidative stress and decreased thiol level in patients with migraine: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasemin; Dirik, Ebru; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan

    2015-12-01

    Although migraine is a neurological disorder known since long, its physiopathology remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that migraine is associated with oxidative stress; however, they report divergent results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and serum thiol level in migraine patients with or without aura. The study group consisted of 141 migraine patients. The control group included 70 healthy subjects. TAS, TOS, OSI were evaluated using a method developed by Erel. Serum thiol level was measured using the Hu method. No difference was found in TAS, TOS, OSI between the patients and controls. The level of thiol was significantly lower in patients than in controls. Negative correlations were detected between thiol level and Migraine Disability Assessment score in patients. Although TAS, TOS, and OSI were similar to those of the control group, serum thiol level, an important marker of antioxidant capacity, was significantly lower in migraines compared with controls, and caused more serious disability. Novel treatment approaches may be developed based on these data, and compounds containing thiol, such as alpha lipoic acid and N-acetyl cysteine, may be used in prophylaxis. PMID:25595415

  20. [Chronic migraine: its epidemiology and impact].

    PubMed

    Pozo-Rosich, Patricia

    2012-04-10

    Chronic migraine (that is to say, cases where migraine is suffered on 15 or more days per month) is an illness that affects approximately 0.5-2.5% of the population, depending on the statistics that are analysed and the definition of chronic migraine used. The incidence of transformation from episodic to chronic migraine is 3% per year, and 6% go from low-frequency (1-9 days/month) to high-frequency migraine (10-14 days/month). The risk factors for developing chronic migraine are genetic, frequent use of painkillers, being female, having poor hygienic-dietary habits, developing anxiety/depression, having a low socioeconomic status, suffering from obesity and being divorced or widowed. Despite the modification of the risk factors, it has still not been proved that the chances of developing chronic migraine can be lowered. Chronic migraine has an important impact on patients' quality of life, as measured on disability, quality of life and impact on daily activities scales. These patients have twice the chance of suffering from depression, anxiety and chronic pain, which means they therefore need greater health care. Many have still to be diagnosed and treated, however. In a Spanish epidemiological study, a follow-up was carried out on patients with chronic daily headache after undergoing a therapeutic intervention and up to 60% of the patients showed improvement. In other words, with increased interest and diagnosis of this illness, many patients would benefit from suitable treatments. PMID:22532240

  1. Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a.Migraine Associated Vertigo or [MAV])

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a Top Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a. Migraine Associated Vertigo or ... Wackym on his You Tube Channel. Migraine and vestibular dysfunction Approximately 40% of migraine patients have some ...

  2. Effects of pyridoxine supplementation on severity, frequency and duration of migraine attacks in migraine patients with aura: A double-blind randomized clinical trial study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Omid; Nasiri, Morteza; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Pahlavani, Naseh; Rezaie, Masoud; Askari, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a chronic disease that affects nearly 6% of men and 18% of women worldwide. There are various drugs, which can successfully decrease migraine symptoms and frequency of migraine attacks, but these drugs usually are expensive. Hence, this study aimed to assess the effects of pyridoxine supplementation on severity, frequency and duration of migraine attacks as well as headache diary results (HDR). Methods: This double-blind randomized clinical trial study was conducted on 66 patients with migraine with aura (MA) in Khorshid and Emam Mosa Sadr clinics of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either pyridoxine supplements (80 mg pyridoxine per day) or placebo. Severity, frequency and duration of migraine attacks and HDR were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Results: Mean age of patients was 34.24 ± 9.44 years old. Pyridoxine supplementation led to a significant decrease in headache severity (−2.20 ± 1.70 compared with −1 ± 1.50; P = 0.007), attacks duration (−8.30 ± 12.60 compared with −1.70 ± 9.60; P = 0.030) and HDR (−89.70 ± 134.60 compared with −6.10 ± 155.50; P = 0.040) compared with placebo, but was not effective on the frequency of migraine attacks (−2.30 ± 4 compared with −1.20 ± 7.80; P = 0.510). Conclusion: Pyridoxine supplementation in patients with MA was effective on headache severity, attacks duration and HDR, but did not affect the frequency of migraine attacks. PMID:26056551

  3. Non-linear electroencephalogram dynamics in patients with spontaneous nocturnal migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Fritzer, G; Göder, R; Niederberger, U; Gerber, W D; Aldenhoff, J

    2001-08-24

    The present study was conducted to examine non-linear electroencephalogram (EEG) measures during the development of a spontaneous migraine attack. We investigated the sleep EEG of five patients with migraine without aura in the pain-free interval and at the onset of a nocturnal attack. Sleep EEG recordings were analysed using the method of global dimensional complexity compared to conventional sleep scoring techniques. We found no divergence between classical sleep architecture and the estimated dimensional course nor any relevant short-term changes related to the onset of headache. There was, however, a loss of dimensional complexity in the first two non-rapid eye movement sleep states in the migraine night, with statistical significance during the second sleep cycle. For the first time, these results provide evidence of a global dimension decrease that is related to cortical network changes during a migraine attack. PMID:11502356

  4. Effect of migraine attacks on paracetamol absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Tokola, R A; Neuvonen, P J

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of effervescent paracetamol (1000 mg) was investigated in nine female patients during a migraine attack and in the same patients when headache free. Migraine attack decreased (P less than 0.05) the areas under the serum paracetamol concentration-time curves (AUC) of 0-2 h, 0-4 h and 0-6 h and the peak serum concentration. The severity of nausea correlated significantly with the decrease in the AUC values. Our results support findings of delayed gastric emptying in migraine attacks. Both a delay and an impairment of drug absorption may follow. PMID:6529526

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene deletion polymorphism determines an increase in frequency of migraine attacks in patients suffering from migraine without aura.

    PubMed

    Paterna, S; Di Pasquale, P; D'Angelo, A; Seidita, G; Tuttolomondo, A; Cardinale, A; Maniscalchi, T; Follone, G; Giubilato, A; Tarantello, M; Licata, G

    2000-01-01

    Many authors have reported an association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-D allele and coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. The mechanism underlying the positive associations between the ACE-D alleles and diseases are not yet clear. Previous reports showed an association between migraine without aura and ACE-D allele polymorphism. The study is aimed to evaluate if the DD genotype could also be associated with the frequency and duration of migraine without aura. In 302 patients suffering from migraine without aura (at least for 1 year), with no history of cardiovascular diseases and major risk factors for ischemic events, the genotypes of the ACE gene, plasma ACE activity, and the frequency (weekly) and duration of migraine attacks were evaluated. No drugs were given before (4 weeks) and during the study. The same evaluations were performed in 201 subjects without migraine. The molecular biologist and the physician evaluating the patient data were blinded to the clinical history and ACE-DD gene determination. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Plasma ACE activity was performed by the HPLC method. The groups were similar for sex, age and smoking habit (migraines: 302 patients (200 F/102 M), mean age 37.8 +/- 8.2 years; control: 201 subjects (127 F/74 M), mean age 37.5 +/- 9.3 years). Patients with migraine without aura showed higher incidence of the ACE-DD gene (48.34%) than control subjects (37.32%), p < 0.05. The frequency of migraine (average attacks per week) was higher in patients with DD (2.11 +/- 1.9) than in patients with ID (1.54 +/- 1. 44), p < 0.05. No difference in duration of migraine attacks (hours per week) was observed. Plasma ACE activity was increased in patients with the ACE-DD gene. Our data suggest that ACE-DD gene polymorphism could have an important role in determining migraine attacks and the frequency of these attacks. Further data are needed through further studies

  6. Sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system: a review of its use in patients with acute migraine.

    PubMed

    Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2013-09-01

    The sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system (ZECUITY®) [hereafter referred to as sumatriptan TDS] is the first transdermal treatment for migraine to be approved by the US FDA. This article reviews the available pharmacologic properties of sumatriptan TDS and its clinical efficacy and tolerability for the acute treatment of adult patients with migraine with or without aura. Sumatriptan, a selective 5-hydroxy-tryptamine receptor subtype 1 (5-HT₁) agonist, is presumed to exert its therapeutic effect on migraine patients by binding to the 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors on intracranial blood vessels and sensory nerves of the trigeminal system, resulting in cranial vessel constriction and the inhibition of the release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides and plasma extravasation. In a well designed, phase III clinical trial, sumatriptan TDS was shown to be more effective than placebo at treating a single migraine attack, with significantly more sumatriptan TDS than placebo recipients being headache pain free and nausea free at 2 hours. These data were supported by a long-term, repeat-use study over 12 months. Additionally, sumatriptan TDS was generally well tolerated in clinical trials; the most common adverse events were application-site reactions. The sumatriptan TDS formulation avoids the gastrointestinal tract, and has a controlled, sustained delivery, allowing for patients with migraine-associated nausea and vomiting to receive treatment without the risk of inconsistent absorption or avoidance of tablet use (associated with oral delivery of the drug in these patients). Moreover, it may offer a useful alternative to the nasal spray or subcutaneous sumatriptan formulations. However, definitive conclusions on the comparative efficacy and tolerability of sumatriptan TDS versus other sumatriptan formulations or other migraine drugs are not as yet possible, and data from comparative trials would be of great interest. Sumatriptan TDS is a useful addition to the treatment

  7. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  8. Occipital sulci patterns in patients with schizophrenia and migraine headache using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Sulejmanpašić, Gorana; Suljić, Enra; Šabanagić-Hajrić, Selma

    2016-08-01

    Aim To examine the presence of morphologic variations of occipital sulci patternsin patients with schizophrenia and migraine headacheregarding gender and laterality using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods This study included 80 patients and brain scans were performed to analyze interhemispheric symmetry and the sulcal patterns of the occipital region of both hemispheres. Average total volumes of both hemispheres of the healthy population were used for comparison. Results There was statistically significant difference between subjects considering gender (p=0.012)with no difference regarding age(p=0.1821). Parameters of parieto-occipital fissure (p=0.0314), body of the calcarine sulcus (p=0.0213), inferior sagittal sulcus (p=0.0443), and lateral occipital sulcus (p=0.0411) showed statistically significant difference only of left hemisphere in male patients with schizophrenia with shallowerdepth of the sulcus. Conclusion Representation of neuroanatomical structures suggests the existence of structural neuroanatomic disorders with focal brain changes. Comparative analysis of occipital lobe and their morphologic structures (cortical dysmorphology) in patients with schizophreniausing MRI, according to genderindicates a significant cortical reduction in the left hemisphere only in the group of male patients compared to female patients and the control group. PMID:27313112

  9. Characteristics of migraine in an out-patient population over 60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, G; Gallai, V; Alberti, A; Billeci, A M R; Coppola, F; Sarchielli, P

    2003-12-01

    One hundred and sixty-three consecutive patients (129 females and 34 males) over 60 years of age attending the Headache Centre of the University of Perugia in the period January 2000-December 2001 were included in the study. One hundred and fifty-two (93.3%) were affected by a primary headache disorder. According to the 1988 IHS Criteria, their prevailing attacks could be diagnosed as migraine without aura (MwoA) in 57.2% of cases (n = 87) and as migraine with aura (MwA) in 11.8% of cases (n = 18). Attacks both in MwoA and MwA were unilateral and of severe-to-moderate intensity in 45% and 50% of cases. Head pain was referred as pulsating by 56% and 38.9% of MwoA patients MwA patients, respectively. Aggravation with routine daily activities was present in 72.4% and 61.1% in MwoA and MwA patient groups. The most frequent accompanying symptoms were photophobia and phonophobia. Headache attacks were of shorter duration in MwA patients, but in 3.4% of MwoA patients attacks lasted between 2 and 4 h. Of patients affected by MwA, 55% referred, together with the typical attacks, symptoms of aura not followed by headache. A worsening of headache in the last 5 years was reported by 67.8% and 44.4% of MwoA and MwA patients, respectively. Of the patients with MwoA, 86.2% (n = 75), and 83.3% (n = 15) of those with MwA used symptomatic drugs for their attacks. In the majority of cases they took more than one analgesic or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. A total of 51.7% of patients with MwoA and 55.5% of patients with MwA were under prophylactic treatment. Preventive drugs included antidepressants, beta-blockers, calcium channel antagonists and antiepileptic drugs. The choice of symptomatic or prophylactic drugs was made, in the majority of cases, on the basis of concomitant diseases. PMID:14984227

  10. Personality profiles and coping styles in migraine patients with fibromyalgia comorbidity.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Federici, Antonio; Loiacono, Anna; Delussi, Marianna; Todarello, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is frequently associated with migraine. In this study we aimed to compare personality profiles and coping styles across 23 migraine without aura patients sharing FM comorbidity (MWA-FM), 28 migraine without aura patients without FM symptoms (MWA) and 51 age- and sex-matched controls, by means of Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ) and Coping Orientation to Problem Experienced (COPE), and to correlate main results with clinical features. The "Energy" personality factor was significantly reduced in patients presenting with FM symptoms, compared to both migraine without aura patients and controls. A low score in "Dynamism" sub-item with a high score in denial coping style was able to distinguish MWA from MW-FM groups with an accuracy of 82.35% (Wilks lambda=0.98; chi-square=8.99, DF=1, p=0.005). In particular, lower "Dynamism" scores corresponded to a major expression of allodynia, fatigue, anxiety, depression, headache frequency and poor quality of sleep and life. Avoidance from active coping with stressful events may facilitate worsening of migraine and fibromyalgia comorbidity. PMID:24138956

  11. MIDAS (The Migraine Disability Assessment Test)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Headache Experts Information for Patients American Headache & Migraine Association Articles Patient Handouts Kids Help Patient to ... and Support Sites Clinical Trials for Headache and Migraine Articles on the Web Publications on Migraine and ...

  12. Migraine and Meditation: Characteristics of Cortical Activity and Stress Coping in Migraine Patients, Meditators and Healthy Controls-An Exploratory Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Keller, Armin; Meyer, Bianca; Wöhlbier, Hans-Georg; Overath, Claudia Helene; Kropp, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to investigate the characteristics of cortical activity and stress coping in migraine patients, meditation experienced subjects, and healthy controls. 45 meditation experienced subjects, 46 migraine patients, and 46 healthy controls took part in the study. Cortical activity was measured with the contingent negative variation (CNV), a slow cortical event-related potential. Stress coping was examined with the standardized Stress Coping Questionnaire SVF-78. A one-way analysis of variance was used to investigate possible differences between the groups. CNV-amplitude was significantly higher in migraineurs than in controls. The meditators showed significantly lowest amplitudes. Migraine patients used negative stress-coping strategies significantly more often than meditators and healthy controls. Especially the application of the strategy "rumination" was most frequent in migraine patients and least frequent in meditators. Moreover, frequent rumination was significantly correlated with high CNV-amplitudes. Cortical and stress processing in people with meditation experience was improved compared to migraine patients and healthy controls. PMID:26984470

  13. Current perspectives on effective migraine treatments: are small clinical differences important for patients?

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michel D

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of 5-HT(1B/1D) agonists, i.e. triptans, the first drugs specifically developed for the treatment of acute migraine, has revolutionized the treatment of migraine attacks. Triptans have met the needs of many migraine patients, however given the lack of direct comparative trials including all triptans, a meta-analysis of results with all available triptans needed to be conducted. Similar clinical trial design, patient population characteristics and main endpoints certainly facilitated the performance of this meta-analysis. Results from 53 randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials on acute triptan therapy in 24,089 patients were compared with respect to the main efficacy and tolerability variables. At recommended doses, almotriptan 12.5 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg provided the highest likelihood of consistent success. PMID:15071619

  14. Effectiveness of flunarizine in altering electronystagmographic patterns in migraine patients: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Pini, L A; Ferrari, A; Guidetti, G; Galetti, G; Barbieri, L; Sternieri, E

    1986-01-01

    In this double-blind study versus placebo, the anti-migraine efficacy of flunarizine 20 mg/per os/day for 14 days, followed by 10 mg/per os/day up to 120 days has been evaluated in 30 patients suffering from common and classical migraine. During the trial the vestibular function (slow phase velocity (SPV) and number of spikes) was also studied. To date 18 patients have completed the study. The results show a significant difference before and after the treatment with flunarizine, while no difference was observed in the placebo group, with regard to headache unit indices. Flunarizine seems to increase SPV max, which is reduced between attacks in migraine patients; the number of spikes does not change significantly. PMID:3957502

  15. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Mehmet, Baykara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL) usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs). These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia. PMID:27433037

  16. Migraine: What Imaging Reveals.

    PubMed

    Chong, Catherine D; Schwedt, Todd J; Dodick, David W

    2016-07-01

    Although migraine symptomatology is well-defined, our understanding of migraine pathophysiology is incomplete. Structural and functional brain imaging can contribute to a greater understanding of migraine pathophysiology. Recent neuroimaging studies demonstrate that migraine is associated with structural and functional alterations of brain regions commonly implicated in pain processing. This review summarizes recent brain structural and functional imaging findings in migraine and highlights those that are associated with characteristics such as the presence or absence of aura, associated cognitive dysfunction, sex-differences (male vs. female migraineurs), age, and disease burden. PMID:27181270

  17. Disability and Functional Profiles of Patients with Migraine Measured with ICF Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    To describe the functional profiles of patients with migraine, and the relationships between symptoms, activities and environmental factors, using WHO's International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Patients were consecutively enrolled at the Besta Institute of Milan. The ICF checklist was administered and two count-based indexes developed:…

  18. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sujan, M. U.; Rao, M. Raghavendra; Kisan, Ravikiran; Abhishekh, Hulegar A.; Nalini, Atchayaram; Raju, Trichur R.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20) or conventional medication only (n = 20). Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F) and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT), visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV) before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017), increase in high frequency (HF) (P = 0.014) and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004) in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients. PMID:26933356

  19. Human factors validation study of 3 mg sumatriptan autoinjector, for migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Munjal, Sagar; Kumar, Rajesh; Andre, Anthony D; Valladao, Will; Ramirez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine pain relief is reported by more than 50% of patients who receive low dose (3 mg) of sumatriptan. Currently, there is no two-step autoinjector of low-dose sumatriptan available on the market for acute migraine treatment. To fulfill this need, a fully assembled, single-dose, subcutaneous autoinjector (sumatriptan 3 mg; product-code DFN-11) was developed. The device allows for injection with a simple two-step, push-to-inject process and provides feedback of the injection activation, progress, and completion. Objective To determine if DFN-11 autoinjector can be used correctly and safely by migraine patients. Methods and participants A human factors validation study was conducted with 45 migraine patients (30 oral-only medications users; 15 injectable sumatriptan users) who performed one unaided simulated injection. Two days prior, half the oral participants were briefly trained. All others were only given the device to inspect and written instructions to review. No injections were performed during the initial session. All participants received written instructions at the injection session. Results All participants (45/45; 100%) performed the injection without any errors. Objective measures included device removal from packaging, cap removal, expiration date check, inspection of fluid in window, identification of allowable injection site, proper device positioning, dose confirmation, and device disposal. All participants (45/45; 100%) reported no difficulty administering the injection and no concerns about using the autoinjector during a severe migraine onset. Conclusion The results showed that the DFN-11 autoinjector can be used with safe handling without patterns of confusion, failures, high-risk errors, wet injections, or patient safety risks. The DFN-11 autoinjector was validated to be used correctly and safely by migraine patients, whether they were injection experienced, unexperienced, trained, or self-trained. PMID:27313479

  20. Topiramate for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    About 14% of adults in the UK have migraines. Drugs used in migraine prophylaxis include beta-blockers (e.g. propranolol), 5HT antagonists (e.g. pizotifen), antidepressants (e.g. amitriptyline), antiepileptics (e.g. sodium valproate) and NSAIDs. The antiepileptic topiramate (Topamax-Janssen-Cilag) is licensed for the prophylaxis of migraine headache in patients aged over 16 years. Here we discuss the place of topiramate in migraine prophylaxis. PMID:16903488

  1. Efficacy and pharmacokinetic activity of frovatriptan compared to rizatriptan in patients with moderate-to-severe migraine

    PubMed Central

    Savi, Lidia; Mogavero, Selene; Egan, Colin Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a painful neurological disorder that affects over 10% of the general population. Frovatriptan and rizatriptan are antimigraine agents belonging to the triptan class. Although previous studies have independently compared the efficacy of these agents, contemporaneous data examining both pharmacokinetic (PK) properties and efficacy in parallel have not previously been available. Materials and methods In this single-center double-blind study, 18 subjects (ten female) were treated for a single migraine attack with frovatriptan 2.5 mg or rizatriptan 10 mg. Plasma concentrations were measured predose and at 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after drug administration. The primary end point of this study was to evaluate the association between PK parameters and efficacy measures and recurrence rate. Secondary end points were pain-free and pain-relief episodes at 2 and 4 hours, recurrent episodes within 48 hours, and cumulative hazard of recurrence within 72 hours. Results At baseline, approximately 17% of patients had mild migraine, while 83% had moderate–severe migraine. Although the time to maximum concentration was similar for both drugs (2.7 versus 2.3 hours), the terminal half-life for frovatriptan was longer than rizatriptan (29.3 versus 3.2 hours, P<0.0001). The proportion of patients who were pain-free at 4 hours without rescue medication was higher in the frovatriptan-treated group, (38.9 versus 5.6%, P=0.045). The cumulative hazard of recurrence over 72 h was reduced by frovatriptan compared to rizatriptan-treated patients (log-rank test, P=0.04). Pain-free and pain-relief episodes for the study period were positively correlated with the concentration:maximum concentration (Cmax) ratio for frovatriptan (r=0.52, P=0.028), but not rizatriptan. Recurrence rate was negatively correlated with the concentration:Cmax ratio for both frovatriptan (r=−0.96, P=0.0024) and rizatriptan (r=−0.98, P=0.0004). Fewer adverse events were observed for

  2. A systematic review of the psychosocial difficulties relevant to patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Giovannetti, Ambra Mara; Quintas, Rui; D'Amico, Domenico; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Bickenbach, Jerome Edmound; Leonardi, Matilde

    2012-11-01

    Migraine is a common disease which causes significant burden to individuals, in terms of personal suffering and activity reduction, and to societies, in terms of disease cost. The purpose of this study is to identify the most relevant psychosocial difficulties related to migraine, the variables associated with them and the most relevant determinants of their evolution over time. MEDLINE and PsychINFO were searched for studies published in English between 2000 and 2010 that examined psychosocial difficulties in persons with migraine with and without aura, from clinical trials and observational studies. Information on the description of each difficulty, its determinants of onset and change over time and associated variables were extracted and categorized at a higher level. In total, 34 difficulties have been collected from 51 papers: the most frequent were reduced vitality and fatigue, emotional problems, pain, difficulties at work, general physical and mental health, social functioning and global disability. Evidence exists that pharmacological treatments have an impact toward improvement in patients' difficulties, in particular emotional problems, physical and mental health, difficulties with employment and global disability. Migraine treatments and decreased headaches frequency are the major determinants of improvements in psychosocial difficulties, while no information is available for determinants of worsening; understanding the role of such factors is of primary public health relevance, given the high prevalence and the relevant personal and societal costs of migraine. PMID:23001069

  3. [A study to compare independent groups of patients with episodic migraine who were treated preventively with flunarizine or nadolol].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Naya, M; Huerta-Villanueva, M; Rios, C; Garcia-Gomara, M J; Artal-Roy, J; Sanchez-Valiente, S; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Mauri-Llerda, J A; Latorre-Jimenez, A M

    2012-03-01

    INTRODUCTION. Flunarizine, with level of evidence A, and nadolol, with evidence level C, would be indicated as preventive treatment of migraine. Yet, no previous studies have been conducted to compare the effectiveness of the two drugs. AIM. To compare the effectiveness parameters in independent groups of patients treated preventively with one of the pharmaceuticals from the study, the same protocol being applied in both cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS. The subjects selected for the study were patients with episodic migraine (according to 2004 International Headache Society criteria) who had undergone preventive treatment for the first time, with flunarizine (5 mg/day) or nadolol (20-40 mg/day). The main effectiveness variables (reduction in the number of seizures at four months of treatment and responder rates) were analysed. RESULTS. The study included 227 patients who intended to receive treatment: 155 with flunarizine (80.5% females; mean age: 38.3 ± 12.1 years) and 72 with nadolol (63.8% females; mean age: 37.1 ± 12.0 years). The mean number of seizures prior to treatment was 6.09 ± 2.6 in the flunarizine group and 5.1 ± 1.7 in the nadolol group (p = 0.0079); at four months of treatment it was 2.61 ± 2.4 in the flunarizine group and 2.77 ± 2.4 in the nadolol group (p = NS). Percentage of reduction of migraines: 55.2% with flunarizine and 50.4% with nadolol (p = NS). The responder rate was 69% with flunarizine and 67% with nadolol (p = NS). The excellent response rate (reduction in the number of seizures by 75% or more) was 52.2% with flunarizine and 36.1% with nadolol (p = 0.0077). Percentage of adverse side effects: 48.3% with flunarizine and 25% with nadolol (p = 0.0009). The satisfaction rate was similar in both groups, 68%. CONCLUSIONS. Both flunarizine and nadolol proved to be effective in the preventive treatment of episodic migraine. Flunarizine is used more often in our milieu and was less well tolerated. PMID:22362476

  4. Time-dependent post-imperative negative variation indicates adaptation and problem solving in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Peter; Brecht, Ines-Beatrice; Niederberger, Uwe; Kowalski, Jens; Schröder, Dietmar; Thome, Johannes; Meyer, Wolfgang; Wallasch, Thomas-Martin; Hilgendorf, Inken; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter

    2012-10-01

    According to the Seligman theory of learned helplessness, depression is caused by a repetitive experience of loss of control resulting in internal, stable and global attributional styles for negative events. In depressed patients and healthy controls experiencing such events, an increased amplitude of the post-imperative negative variation (PINV) has been described. The aim of the study was to investigate a possible correlation between migraine, depression, learned helplessness and PINV. 24 patients suffering from migraine without aura and 24 healthy controls were exposed to a situation of loss of control whilst the contingent negative variation (CNV) from C3, C4 and Cz were recorded. Before conducting the experiment, the subjects were asked to answer the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the German attributional style questionnaire (GASQ). Amplitudes of total CNV, early and late component and PINV were calculated in eight blocks of four recordings each. The results confirm findings of a pronounced PINV in situations of loss of control, though high amplitudes were not correlated with low values in the GASQ and therefore with learned helplessness. High PINV in migraine patients correlated with high scores in the BDI and the list of the complaints questionnaire. However, this was not the case in healthy controls. In this experimental situation, PINV in migraine patients can be interpreted as an expectancy potential in order to avoid failure and helplessness. PMID:22688673

  5. Meeting patient expectations in migraine treatment: what are the key endpoints?

    PubMed

    Antonaci, Fabio; Sances, Grazia; Guaschino, Elena; De Cillis, Ilaria; Bono, Giorgio; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2008-08-01

    Clinical outcomes of migraine treatment are generally based on two major endpoints: acute pain resolution and effects on quality of life (QOL). Resolution of acute pain can be evaluated in a number of ways, each increasingly challenging to achieve; pain relief, pain freedom at 2 h, sustained pain-freedom, and SPF plus no adverse events (SNAE, the most challenging). QOL questionnaires help assess the burden of migraine and identify optimal treatments. Pain resolution and improved QOL form the basis of the ultimate target-meeting patient expectations, to achieve patient satisfaction. To achieve this, it is crucial to choose appropriate endpoints that reflect realistic treatment goals for individual patients. Moreover, SNAE can help discriminate between triptans, with almotriptan having the highest SNAE score. Kaplan-Meier plots are also relevant when evaluating migraine treatments. The use of symptomatic medication may lead to the paradoxical development of medication-overuse headache. In general practice, patients should use simple tools for pain measurement (e.g. headache diary) and a QOL questionnaire. A composite endpoint of pain resolution and QOL restoration would constitute a step forward in migraine management. PMID:18607535

  6. [Local and general humoral immunity in patients with migraine, Horton's syndrome and autonomic pain].

    PubMed

    Puzin, M N; Kulakov, A V; Balashov, K E; Sharov, M N; Vodop'ianov, N P

    1989-01-01

    Patients with migraines, Horton syndrome and autonomic pains were subjected to immunological investigation that revealed different degrees of local and general immunity disorders: increase in blood serum IfA and salival IgAc concentrations. These changes are believed to be capable of serving as diagnostic and prognostic indices. PMID:2728720

  7. Migraine: Clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Gupta, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disorder which has psychiatric sequelae. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity of migraine. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of migraine seen over a period of one year were analysed to know the sociodemographic characteristics, clinical pattern and psychiatric morbidity. Results: Maximum patients were between 31-40 years of age group (40%), females (78.0%), married (76%) and housewives (56.0%). Family history of migraine was present in 12% cases. Average age of onset was 22 years. Unilateral and throbbing type of headache was most common. The commonest frequency was one to two per week. Migraine without aura was commonest sub-type (80%). Generalized anxiety disorder (F41.1) was the most common psychiatric disorder (34%), followed by mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (F41.2) (18%) and depressive episode (F32) (14%). In 22% cases, no psychiatric disorder could be elicited. Conclusion: The present study confirms that majority patients with migraine had psychiatric disorders. This needs timely detection and appropriate intervention to treat and control the migraine effectively. PMID:23766573

  8. Aerobic exercise and plasma beta endorphin levels in patients with migrainous headache without aura.

    PubMed

    Köseoglu, E; Akboyraz, A; Soyuer, A; Ersoy, A O

    2003-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of plasma beta endorphin level and exercise on migrainous headache. Forty patients with migrainous headache without aura (MWOA), firstly exercised on a treadmill and afterwards were asked to continue an aerobic home exercise program for six weeks. On evaluation, basal plasma beta endorphin level was negatively correlated with total duration of attacks in the last month period (P = 0.01). Exercise was found to have beneficial effects on all migraine parameters (P < 0.0001) and to increase beta endorphin levels after the treadmill practice (P < 0.0001) and after the home exercise program except four patients not regularly attended to the program (P < 0.0001). Any of the changes in headache parameters was not correlated with the change in beta endorphin level. However, pre-exercise beta endorphin level was found to be negatively correlated with the changes in the number of attacks (P < 0.05) and total duration of attacks (P = 0.01) and also with the change in beta endorphin level due to exercise (P < 0.0001). As a result, this study emphasizes the beneficial effect of exercise on migrainous headache, especially in patients with lower basal beta endorphin level. PMID:14984230

  9. Reduced Fractional Anisotropy of Corpus Callosum Modulates Inter-Hemispheric Resting State Functional Connectivity in Migraine Patients without Aura

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kai; Qin, Wei; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Ling; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; Liu, Jixin; Yang, Xuejuan; von Deneen, Karen M.; Liang, Fanrong; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the corpus callosum (CC) in migraine patients without aura. Abnormalities in white matter integrity, particularly in the CC, may affect inter-hemispheric resting state functional connectivity (RSFC). Unfortunately, relatively little is known about the alterations in functional interactions between the cerebral hemispheres during resting state in migraine patients without aura, and even less about how the inter-hemispheric RSFC are affected by the abnormalities of the CC. Methods and findings Twenty-one migraine patients without aura and 21 healthy controls participated in this study, age-, sex-, and education-matched. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was employed to investigate the white matter alterations of the CC. Meanwhile, voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) was used to compare the inter-hemispheric RSFC differences between the patients and controls. TBSS analysis revealed reduced FA values in the genu and the splenium of CC in patient group. VMHC analysis showed decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in migraine patients without aura relative to that of the controls. Furthermore, in migraine patients without aura, the reduced FA values of the genu of CC correlated with the decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of the ACC. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that the migraine patients without aura showed reduced FA values of the genu of CC and decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of the ACC. The correlation between the above structural and functional changes suggested that the reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) of CC modulates inter-hemispheric VMHC in migraine patients without aura. Our results demonstrated that the VMHC alterations of ACC can reflect the FA changes of the genu of CC in migraine patients without aura. PMID:23029036

  10. [Current pharmacotherapy in migraine].

    PubMed

    Csépány, Éva; Magyar, Máté; Gyüre, Tamás; Bozsik, György; Ertsey, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, currently there are no biomarkers for migraine diagnosis, and current animal models reflect only one aspect of migraine, therefore future migraine studies are necessary. The current treatment of migraine (both acute and preventive) is suboptimal. There are no specific preventive drugs for migraine, and current preventatives may become inefficient during long-term use. Triptans are useful abortive drugs, but not effective in some of the patients; severe cardio-or cerebrovascular side effects may occur. Triptans and ergot alkaloids (and also non-specific abortive agents) can cause medication overuse headache. A number of newly synthesized experimental drugs seem to be effective and promising for migraine therapy, but at present our experience with these is limited, therefore further studies are essential. PMID:26727720

  11. Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravenous Valproate (Orifil) and Dexamethasone in Patients with Migraine Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Foroughipour, Mohsen; Ghandehari, Kavian; Khazaei, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Fahimeh; Shariatinezhad, Keyvan; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intravenous Valproate (IVVP) has been used in the treatment of migraine in some studies; however, it is far better known in the management of status epilepticus. Methods: Consecutive patients with migraine in our Headache Clinic were enrolled in this prospective, randomized clinical trial in 2011. The patients were randomized into two therapeutic groups, one receiving 900 mg IVVP (Orifil) and the other 16 mg IV Dexamethasone (IVDEX) diluted in 150 CC normal saline and infused for 10 minutes. Worst severity of pain before treatment and least severity at 3 hours after the infusion using a 0-10 point numeric rating scale were recorded. An interview with the patient was performed 72 hours after treatment to detect a possible relapse of headache. Results: Thirty-one migraine status patients, comprising 28 women and 3 men at a mean±SD age of 33.355±12.373 SD, were investigated. Differences in the therapeutic effects of IVVP (Orifil) and IVDEX on pain score were not significant between the two groups (t=0.933, df=29; P=0.358). Relapse of headache occurred in 68.42% of the IVVP (Orifil) group and 66.67% of the IVDEX group. Distribution of relapse was not significantly different between the two therapeutic groups of patients (P=0.870). Conclusion: IVVP (Orifil) was similar in efficacy to IVDEX as abortive therapy in patients with migraine status. IVVP (Orifil) appears to offer a safe and well-tolerated abortive treatment. Trial Registration Number: IRCT13891146234N2 PMID:24031104

  12. In-office Discussions of Migraine: Results from the American Migraine Communication Study

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven R.; Cady, Roger K.; Brandes, Jan Lewis; Simons, Suzanne E.; Bain, Philip A.; Nelson, Meaghan R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Research indicates that successful migraine assessment and treatment depends on information obtained during patient and healthcare professional (HCP) discussions. However, no studies outline how migraine is actually discussed during clinical encounters. Objective Record naturally occurring HCP–migraineur interactions, analyzing frequency and impairment assessment, and preventive treatment discussions. Design HCPs seeing high volumes of migraineurs were recruited for a communication study. Patients likely to discuss migraine were recruited immediately before their normally scheduled appointment and, once consented, were audio- and video-recorded without a researcher present. Separate post-visit interviews were conducted with patients and HCPs. All interactions were transcribed. Participants Sixty patients (83% female; mean age 41.7) were analyzed. Patients were diagnosed with migraine 14 years and experienced 5 per month, on average. Approach Transcripts were analyzed using sociolinguistic techniques such as number and type of questions asked and post-visit alignment on migraine frequency and impairment. American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study guidelines were utilized. Results Ninety-one percent of HCP-initiated, migraine-specific questions were closed-ended/short answer; assessments focused on frequency and did not focus on attention on impairment. Open-ended questions in patient post-visit interviews yielded robust impairment-related information. Post-visit, 55% of HCP–patient pairs were misaligned regarding frequency; 51% on impairment. Of the 20 (33%) patients who were preventive medication candidates, 80% did not receive it and 50% of their visits lacked discussion of prevention. Conclusions Sociolinguistic analysis revealed that HCPs often used narrowly focused, closed-ended questions and were often unaware of how migraine affected patients’ lives as a result. It is recommended that HCPs assess impairment using open-ended questions

  13. Intravenous Valproate versus Subcutaneous Sumatriptan in Acute Migraine Attack.

    PubMed

    Ghaderibarmi, Fahmida; Tavakkoli, Nader; Togha, Mansoureh

    2015-10-01

    Migraine is a common and incapacitating neurologic disorder manifesting with episodic moderate to a severe headache and other symptoms such as photophobia, phonophobia, nausea, and vomiting. Triptans and ergot compounds have been used as treatment options for an acute migraine headache for many years. Triptans are considered the first line of treatment in patients with moderate to a severe migraine. Although the triptans are commonly used at any time during a migraine attack; they are more efficacious when used in the early stages of a migraine. Intravenous valproic acid has been shown to be well tolerated, safe, and with rapid onset of action in patients with acute moderate to severe and even refractory migraine. Sodium valproate is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug for prophylaxis of a migraine with and without aura. In this study, the main goal was to compare the effectiveness of sumatriptan versus valproate in an acute migraine. A randomized clinical trial including 37 patients with an acute migraine was considered to compare the effectiveness of sumatriptan versus valproate. The patients were divided into two groups. In first group, 6 mg subcutaneous of sumatriptan and in the second group 15 mg/Kg of valproate was administered. The outcomes including pain and drug adverse effects were compared across the groups. A total of 37 patients (7 male and 30 female) were evaluated in two groups. The difference between two groups regarding sex and age was not significant (P>0.05). The mean pain scores reduced from 8.3 to 4.7 and from 8.3 to 2.2 after one hour of treatment in sumatriptan and valproate groups, respectively. Response to treatment in valproate group was faster and more effective than sumatriptan group (P<0.05).The results indicated that valproate was more effective and with the faster response in patients with an acute migraine in comparison with sumatriptan without any recurrence and remarkable side effects. PMID:26615376

  14. Effectiveness of Combined Copying Skills Training and Pharmacological Therapy for Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Rashid-Tavalai, Zahra; Bakhshani, Nour-Mohammad; Amirifard, Hamed; Lashkaripour, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common complaints in neurological clinics. The current study carried out to determine the benefits of combined Coping Skills Training (CST) and Pharmacotherapy (Ph) for patients with migraine. Forty patients with migraine recruited from the outpatient clinics of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences(Iran) and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: the first group received combined coping skills training (CST) and pharmacotherapy(Ph); and the second group received the pharmacotherapy alone(Ph). Five patients due to lack of regular presence or filling out the questionnaires excluded from the study. Finally, the results of 35 subjects were analyzed. Data collection was done using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire, General Self-Efficacy Scale-Sherer, Ways of Coping Questionnaire and Migraine Headache Index. The results of ANCOVA on post-test, after controlling the pre-test scores, suggested a significant difference in self-efficacy scores between CST+Ph and Ph groups. Moreover, results of ANCOVA did not show significant differences between the two groups in the scores of pain severity, quality of life, and the use of coping strategies. Findings of the present study indicated that coping-skills training, as a psychological intervention, improved self-efficacy. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm this conclusion. PMID:26755464

  15. Effectiveness of Combined Copying Skills Training and Pharmacological Therapy for Patients with Migraine.

    PubMed

    Rashid-Tavalai, Zahra; Bakhshani, Nour-Mohammad; Amirifard, Hamed; Lashkaripour, Maryam

    2016-06-01

    Headache is one of the most common complaints in neurological clinics. The current study carried out to determine the benefits of combined Coping Skills Training (CST) and Pharmacotherapy (Ph) for patients with migraine. Forty patients with migraine recruited from the outpatient clinics of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences( Iran) and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: the first group received combined coping skills training (CST) and pharmacotherapy(Ph); and the second group received the pharmacotherapy alone(Ph). Five patients due to lack of regular presence or filling out the questionnaires excluded from the study. Finally, the results of 35 subjects were analyzed. Data collection was done using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire, General Self-Efficacy Scale-Sherer, Ways of Coping Questionnaire and Migraine Headache Index. The results of ANCOVA on post-test, after controlling the pre-test scores, suggested a significant difference in self-efficacy scores between CST+Ph and Ph groups. Moreover, results of ANCOVA did not show significant differences between the two groups in the scores of pain severity, quality of life, and the use of coping strategies. Findings of the present study indicated that coping-skills training, as a psychological intervention, improved self-efficacy. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm this conclusion. PMID:26755464

  16. The Migraine-Stroke Connection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-05-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like headache and cerebrovascular disease. Future studies should be targeted on bidirectional influence of migraine on different stroke mechanisms and optimal prevention of stroke in migraine patients. PMID:27283278

  17. Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms and C-reactive protein in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Tayebeh; Askari, Gholamreza; Khorvash, Fariborz; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migarine is the most common headache around the world including Iran. In recent years, Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to a global health problem. A few studies have been determined inverse association between serum levels of Vitamin D with a headache. So, in this study, we investigated the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms and C-reactive protein (CRP) among patients with migraine. Materials and Methods: This study was randomized, double-blind, and controlled-placebo clinical trial. Sixty-five migraine patients aged 10-61 years were included for analysis. Vitamin D was administrated for 10 weeks with 50,000 IU dosage of Vitamin D per week. Multivariate analysis of covariate and univariate analysis of covariate were done to determine the effects of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms, including severity, duration, frequency of headache, and the headache diary result (HDR). Results: Mean headache frequency and HDR had significant difference among two groups (5.9 ± 7.0 vs. 7.0 ± 6.0, P = 0.06 and 85.0 ± 134.2 vs. 132.1 ± 147.1, P = 0.04). But, a mean difference of headache frequency was marginally significant (P = 0.06). These values were lower among the intervention group compared to placebo group. The association was not observed between CRP with migraine disease. Conclusion: In this study, we shown Vitamin D supplementation may be useful in decreasing frequency of headache attacks and HDR among patients with migraine. PMID:26487877

  18. Migraine - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - migraine ... The following organizations are good resources for information on migraines : American Migraine Foundation -- www.americanmigrainefoundation.org National Headache Foundation -- www.headaches.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  19. Difficulties in work activities and the pervasive effect over disability in patients with episodic and chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, D; Grazzi, L; Curone, M; Di Fiore, P; Proietti Cecchini, A; Leonardi, M; Scaratti, C; Raggi, A

    2015-05-01

    Migraine is associated with reduced productivity in work-related activities. The degree to which problems with work are, in turn, associated to the level of migraine-related disability as well as to headache frequency has been poorly explored. The aim of the study was to assess if migraine patients with different degrees of work difficulties showed a different level of migraine-related disability. A consecutive sample of patients with episodic migraine (EM) or with chronic migraine (CM) with medication overuse (MO) attending the Headache Centre of the Neurological Institute C. Besta of Milan was studied. All patients completed the MIDAS and the WHODAS 2.0 questionnaires. The total scores of both questionnaires, frequency of headaches, average pain intensity, and the scores of each subscale of the WHODAS 2.0 were calculated separately for EM and CM patients. The score of WHODAS 2.0 "Work difficulties" subscale was used to divide the studied patients into two groups, i.e. those above and those below the median "Work difficulties" subscale score. Independent sample t test was used to compare these two groups as far as all the other studied variables. A total of 296 patients (102 with EM and 194 with CM-MO) were enrolled. Patients with higher work difficulties score also displayed higher scores in the other WHODAS 2.0 subscales; for those with CM-MO, the differences were significant. The results of this study indicate that having more and more severe workplace problems is associated to a higher disability level in migraineurs. Further studies are needed to better understand workplace disability in different migraine forms, particularly in a qualitative way. PMID:26017503

  20. Periictal and interictal headache including migraine in Dutch patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, W A; Hageman, G; de Weerd, A W

    2015-03-01

    As early as in 1898, it was noted that there was a need to find "a plausible explanation of the long recognized affinities of migraine and epilepsy". However, results of recent studies are clearly conflicting on this matter. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to define the prevalence and characteristics of both seizure-related and interictal headaches in patients with epilepsy (5-75years) seeking help in the tertiary epilepsy clinic SEIN in Zwolle. Using a questionnaire, subjects were surveyed on the existence of headaches including characteristics, duration, severity, and accompanying symptoms. Furthermore, details on epilepsy were retrieved from medical records (e.g., syndrome, seizure frequency, and use of drugs). Diagnoses of migraine, tension-type headache, or unclassifiable headache were made based on criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Between March and December 2013, 29 children and 226 adults were evaluated, 73% of whom indicated having current headaches, which is significantly more often when compared with the general population (p<0.001). Forty-nine percent indicated having solely interictal headache, while 29% had solely seizure-related headaches and 22% had both. Migraine occurs significantly more often in people with epilepsy in comparison with the general population (p<0.001), and the occurrence of tension-type headaches conforms to results in the general population. These results show that current headaches are a significantly more frequent problem amongst people with epilepsy than in people without epilepsy. When comparing migraine prevalence, this is significantly higher in the population of patients with epilepsy. PMID:25705827

  1. Resolution of chronic migraine headaches with intrathecal ziconotide: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narain, Sachin; Al-Khoury, Lama; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Migraine headaches are a common and functionally debilitating disorder affecting approximately 17% of women and 5.6% of men. Compared to episodic migraine patients, chronic migraineurs are more likely to be occupationally disabled, miss family activities, have comorbid anxiety and/or chronic pain disorders, and utilize significantly more health care dollars. Ziconotide is a calcium channel blocker used for the treatment of chronic severe pain without issues of tolerance or dependency found with opioid therapy. Case A 59-year-old female had an intrathecal baclofen pump placed for spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis. Her symptoms also included lower extremity neuropathic pain and severe migraine headaches with 22 migraine headache days per month. Prior treatments included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, triptans, anticonvulsants, antihypertensives, and Botox injections which reduced her symptoms to four migraine days per month at best. While her spasticity had markedly improved with intrathecal baclofen, ziconotide was added to help her neuropathic pain complaints. Following initiation of low-dose ziconotide (1 µg/day), the patient noted both lower extremity pain improvement and complete resolution of migraine headaches resulting in zero migraine days per month. She has now been migraine free for 8 months. Conclusion Upon review of the available literature, there are no published cases of migraine improvement with intrathecal ziconotide. This represents the first case describing resolution of migraine symptoms with low-dose ziconotide. PMID:26392785

  2. Trigger factors of migraine and tension-type headache: experience and knowledge of the patients.

    PubMed

    Wöber, Christian; Holzhammer, Julia; Zeitlhofer, Josef; Wessely, Peter; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek

    2006-09-01

    The objective was to examine potential trigger factors of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) in clinic patients and in subjects from the population and to compare the patients' personal experience with their theoretical knowledge. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a headache centre. There were 120 subjects comprising 66 patients with migraine and 22 with TTH from a headache outpatient clinic and 32 persons with headache (migraine or TTH) from the population. A semistructured interview covering biographic data, lifestyle, medical history, headache characteristics and 25 potential trigger factors differentiating between the patients' personal experience and their theoretical knowledge was used. The most common trigger factors experienced by the patients were weather (82.5%), stress (66.7%), menstruation (51.4%) and relaxation after stress (50%). The vast majority of triggers occurred occasionally and not consistently. The patients experienced 8.9+/-4.3 trigger factors (range 0-20) and they knew 13.2+/-6.0 (range 1-27). The number of experienced triggers was smallest in the population group (p=0.002), whereas the number of triggers known did not differ in the three study groups. Comparing theoretical knowledge with personal experience showed the largest differences for oral contraceptives (65.0 vs. 14.7%, p<0.001), chocolate (61.7 vs. 14.3%, p>0.001) and cheese (52.5 vs. 8.4%, p<0.001). In conclusion, almost all trigger factors are experienced occasionally and not consistently by the majority of patients. Subjects from the population experience trigger factors less often than clinic patients. The difference between theoretical knowledge and personal experience is largest for oral contraceptives, chocolate and cheese. PMID:16897622

  3. Pattern-Reversal Visual Evoked Potential Parameters and Migraine in the Teenage Population.

    PubMed

    Jancic, Jasna; Petrusic, Igor; Pavlovski, Vera; Savkovic, Zorica; Vucinic, Dragana; Martinovic, Zarko

    2016-05-01

    Although migraine represents one of the most common form of primary headache in the teenage population, most neurophysiologic studies are only on the adulthood. We investigated 38 teenage patients with migraine with aura, 17 male and 21 female, with a mean age of 16.2 years, comparing them with gender- and age-matched patients with migraine without aura and healthy subjects. Also, characteristics of aura were correlated with pattern-reversal visual evoked potential parameters. There was a significant difference in left and right eye N2 wave latencies between migraine with aura and migraine without aura patients or healthy controls. In migraine with aura and migraine without aura, 26.3% of patients had abnormal wave latency. Reported tunnel vision during the aura was correlated with lower N1P1 and/or P1N2 wave amplitudes. Also, higher amplitude in patients with migraine with aura correlated with younger age and earlier disease onset, whereas longer aura duration correlated with prolonged wave latency. Findings suggest that migraine subtypes may be differentiated on the basis of N2 wave latency prolongation. PMID:26542983

  4. Effects of betaxolol and flunarizine on visual fields and intraocular pressure in patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Yarangümeli, Alper; Comoglu, Selçuk; Köz, Ozlem Gürbüz; Elhan, Atilla Halil; Kural, Gülcan

    2003-05-01

    Fifty-one patients with migraine were divided into four groups to investigate the effects of topical betaxolol and systemic calcium channel blocker flunarizine on visual fields (VF) and intraocular pressure (IOP). The first group (Group 0) was followed with no medications, topical betaxolol (bid) was precribed to the second group (Group B), oral flunarizine (10 mg daily) was prescribed to the third group (Group F), and the last group (Group BF) was assigned for combined betaxolol and flunarizine treatment. After a mean follow-up time of 4.2 +/- 1.2 months (3-6 months), IOP measurements and VF tests were repeated. Group B and Group BF were found to be statistically different from the other groups in terms of IOP reduction and VF improvement according to mean deviation and corrected pattern standard deviation indices in the second examinations. On the other hand, Group F and Group BF differed from the other two groups considering the improvement in migrainous complaints. VF findings which are probably influenced by perfusion problems due to vasospastic mechanisms in migraineurs, improved following topical betaxolol treatment. However, systemic use of flunarizine--a calcium channel blocker--did not seem to be effective on visual fields although it had beneficial effects on migraine. PMID:12737504

  5. The cost effectiveness of Botox in Italian patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, M

    2014-05-01

    Migraine is a primary headache which World Health Organization ranks in 19th place in the list of disabling diseases. In Europe, in 2004, the total costs for migraine were quantified by Stovner and Berg, Eur J Neurol, 12(s1) (2005) at 27 billion. The objective of this study is to provide an estimate of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the treatment of chronic migraine with Botox compared to treatment with placebo in the perspective of the Italian National Health Service and society. To do this we studied the disease progression in a cohort of 688 individuals (patients enrolled in the study PREEMPT) via the application of a Markov model. Over a period of 2 years, the total costs of the experimental arm of the model amounted to 3,274 compared with a gain of 1.34 QALYs. In contrast, the costs of the control arm amounted to 2,395 with a gain of 1.24 QALYs. It follows that the incremental costs amounted to 889 compared to an incremental gain of 0.09 QALYs in favor of the experimental arm. The relationship between costs and incremental QALYs generated an ICER of 9,407/QALY. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, therefore, is favorable compared to the value usually considered by NICE as a threshold limit for reimbursement which ranges between 20,000 and 40,000/QALY. PMID:24867835

  6. [Psychosomatic approach for chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    From psychosomatic view point, the psychological or social stresses and depressive or anxiety disorders are very important factors in the course and the maintenance for migraine patients. These factors are very complex, and often lead the migraine becoming chronic. In the psychosomatic approach, not only the physical assessment for chronic migraine but also the assessments for stress and mental states are done. As the psychosomatic therapies for chronic migraine, autogenic training, biofeedback therapy and cognitive therapy are effective. PMID:22277516

  7. Endolymphatic space size in patients with vestibular migraine and Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takafumi; Yoshida, Tadao; Suga, Kenji; Kato, Masahiro; Otake, Hironao; Kato, Ken; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sone, Michihiko; Sugiura, Saiko; Kuno, Kayao; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Naganawa, Shinji; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    Ménière's disease (MD) is characterized by episodic vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and tinnitus. Vestibular migraine (VM) is a relatively new disorder that is characterized by episodic vertigo or dizziness, coexisting migraine and absence of hearing loss. It is occasionally difficult to distinguish between VM and vestibular MD with headache. Because endolymphatic hydrops (EH) is a characteristic sign of MD, we attempted to evaluate endolymphatic space size in both diseases. Endolymphatic space size in the vestibule and the cochlea was evaluated in seven patients with VM and in seven age- and sex-matched patients with vestibular MD. For visualization of the endolymphatic space, 3T magnetic resonance imaging was taken 4 h after intravenous injection of gadolinium contrast agents using three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and HYbriD of reversed image of positive endolymph signal and native image of positive perilymph signal techniques. In the vestibule of VM patients, EH was not observed, with the exception of two patients with unilateral or bilateral EH. In contrast, in the vestibule of patients with vestibular MD, all patients had significant EH, bilaterally or unilaterally. These results indicate that endolymphatic space size is significantly different between patients with VM and vestibular MD. PMID:25099513

  8. [Beta blockers in migraine prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko

    2009-10-01

    Beta blockers (beta-adrenoceptor blockers) are known to be used for the prophylactic treatment of migraine. The improvement of migraine in the patients who recieved propranolol for angina pectoris revealed the effectiveness of propranolol in migraine prophylaxis. Many clinical trials have confirmed that propranolol is effective in the prophylactic treatment of migraine. Other beta-blocking drugs, namely nadolol, metoprolol, atenolol, timolol and bisoprolol, have also been demonstrated to be effective in the prophylaxis of migraine. In contrast, several beta blockers with intrinsic sympathetic activity (ISA), such as alprenolol, oxprenolol, pindolol and acebutolol, have not been demonstrated to be effective in migraine prophylaxis. In this review, we have descrived the pharmacologic background and pharmacokinetics of the beta blockers that demonstrated a prophylactic effect for migraine will be described. We have also reviewed the results of clinical trials of beta-blocking drugs for migraine. PMID:19882938

  9. Evaluation of Ocular Side Effects in the Patients on Topiramate Therapy for Control of Migrainous Headache

    PubMed Central

    Hesami, Omid; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Moghaddam, Nahid Beladi; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Mokhtari, Sara; Fakhraee, Shahrzad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Topiramate, a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide, is an antiepileptic drug which is administered in the control of migraine. It is reported to cause various ocular side effects such as visual field defect and myopic shift. To investigate the alterations in refractive error, properties of the cornea and changes in the anterior chamber in patients that receive Topiramate for migraine control. Materials and Methods This is a hospital-based, non-interventional, observational study that is conducted at Imam Hossein Hospital, affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology, in collaboration with the department of Ophthalmology. Thirty three consecutive patients with the diagnosis of migraine that were candidate for Topiramate therapy were recruited. Patients with history of ocular trauma or surgery, keratoconus, glaucoma, congenital ocular malformations and any history of unexplained visual loss were excluded. After thorough ophthalmic examination, all the patients underwent central corneal thickness (CCT) measurement, and Pentacam imaging (Scheimpflug camera) at the baseline. Various parameters were extracted and used for analysis. Anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and anterior chamber angle (ACA) measurement was performed. These measurements were repeated on day 30th and 90th after the initiation of Topiramate therapy. According to the normality tests, parameters with normal distribution were analysed using the repeated measures test and the remaining parameters (with non-normal distribution) were analysed using the non-parametric k-sample test. A p-value< 0.05 was considered statistically significant, according to Bonferroni post hoc correction. Results There were 66 eyes of 33 patients under the diagnosis of migrainous headache, that Topiramate was initiated for headache control, included in the study. The mean value of refractive error had a statistically significant myopic change, from −0

  10. Management of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Graves, Barbara W

    2006-01-01

    With 17% to 18% of women suffering from migraine headaches, clinicians will often be asked by their patients to prescribe medication. Migraine is an episodic chronic disease that is best managed with an overall treatment plan, rather than treated as an acute illness that is managed with sporadic medications. Realistic goals for the long-term management of migraine are based on patient education and an ongoing discussion between patient and provider. This article reviews the clinical presentation of migraine and recommendations for both acute and preventive treatment, including complementary therapies. "Red flags" that could be signs of more serious neurologic illness are presented. The management of migraine in pregnancy is also reviewed. PMID:16647669

  11. Right-to-Left Shunt Does Not Increase the Incidence of Silent Lacunar Infarcts in Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xing, Yingqi; Geng, Yunlong; Bai, Jing; Song, Xiaonan

    2015-01-01

    Right-to-left shunt (RLS) is associated with cryptogenic stroke and migraine. Herein we investigated the relationship between RLS and silent lacunar infarcts in patients with migraine. A total of 263 patients with migraine who met eligibility criteria were enrolled from January 2010 to December 2011, among which 127 subjects fell into RLS group. Baseline demographics were comparable between RLS and non-RLS groups (P > 0.05). The incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in RLS group was not significantly different from that of the non-RLS group (25.2% versus 21.3%, P > 0.05). Furthermore, we found that the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in permanent and latent RLS subgroups was comparable with non-shunt RLS subgroup (28.6% versus 24% versus 21.3%, P > 0.05). Similarly, the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in the non-RLS group, mild-shunt group, and large-shunt group was also comparable (21.3% versus 23.8% versus 29.3%, P > 0.05). In addition, RLS did not increase the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in migraine patients with elder age (<50 years age group: 15.8% versus 17.9%; ≥50 years age group: 53.1% versus 37.5%, both P > 0.05). In conclusion, RLS does not increase the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in patients with migraine. Further prospective studies are warranted to validate this finding. PMID:26266262

  12. Prophylactic activity of increasing doses of intravenous histamine in refractory migraine: Retrospective observations of a series of patients with migraine without aura

    PubMed Central

    Pietrini, Umberto; De Luca, Massimo; Del Bene, Enrico; De Cesaris, Francesco; Bertinotti, Luca; Colangelo, Nicola; Moggi Pignone, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Background: Histamine is thought to play a pivotal role in the modulation of peripheral and central pain. The administration of increasing doses of histamine may lead to desensitization of receptors of histamine types 1 and 2, causing meningeal vasodilation, and to depletion of neuropeptides in the trigeminal ganglion, thus inhibiting the initiation of migraine. Objective: In this study, the efficacy and tolerability of increasing doses of IV histamine in migraine prophylaxis were investigated. Methods: This single-center, open-label, retrospective, controlled study was conducted at the Headache Center (Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florence, Villa Monna Tessa, Italy). Patients included in the study had 3 to 6 migraines without aura per month that were refractory to common symptomatic and prophylactic agents in the 6 months preceding the study. Patients were treated with IV histamine hydrochloride for 21 days starting with a dosage of 0.5 mg/d and increasing to 4.0 mg/d. To assess the efficacy of the treatment, these patients were matched for age; sex; and frequency, duration, and severity of attacks with untreated migraineurs. Clinical benefit was defined as ⩽ 1 migraine of mild intensity per month. Tolerability was assessed during the hospitalization period, and patients were instructed to contact the Headache Center to report any adverse effects after hospital discharge. Results: The histamine group comprised 47 patients (40 women, 7 men; mean [SD] age, 42.0 [8.6] years) and the control group comprised 23 patients (20 women, 3 men; mean [SD] age, 38.8 [8.4] years). The histamine-treated patients showed a clinical benefit lasting for a mean of 10.4 (4.2) months, while the patients in the control group showed a clinical benefit of 3.8 (1.9) months. The difference in the duration of the clinical benefit between the 2 groups was 6.6 months (95% CI, 5.15-7.99). Adverse effects consisted of flushing, heat sensation during infusion, headache, and

  13. Not only headache: higher degree of sexual pain symptoms among migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Ifergane, Gal; Ben-Zion, Itzhak Z; Plakht, Ygal; Regev, Keren; Wirguin, Itzhak

    2008-04-01

    Chronic illness and chronic pain can have profound negative effects on relationship and sexual satisfaction, yet the influence of migraine on sexuality has not been previously evaluated. To assess sexual functions in subjects with migraine compared to those with no migraine. We evaluated female university students using the Israeli sexual behavior inventory (ISBI). Migraine was diagnosed according to self-reported symptoms according to the IHS criteria. Several dimensions of female sexuality--desire, orgasm, sexual avoidance, interpersonal sexual relationship, health influence, satisfaction and pain were evaluated using a structured questionnaire. Thirty-three (23.9%) of the participants met the IHS criteria for episodic migraine with and without aura. Sexual activity, desire, orgasm and satisfaction from sexual life did not differ significantly between migraine sufferers and non-sufferers. Migraine patients reported lower ISBI scores, higher health influence on sexual life, higher levels of sexual pain and lower sexual satisfaction. Migraine negatively affected the sexual life of sufferers. Sexual pain disorder is more common among migraine sufferers compared to non-migraineurs. PMID:18317864

  14. Fatigue, sleep-wake pattern, depressive and anxiety symptoms and body-mass index: analysis in a sample of episodic and chronic migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, Cinzia; Baldacci, Filippo; Cafalli, Martina; Dini, Elisa; Giampietri, Linda; Siciliano, Gabriele; Gori, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Migraine clinical presentation and life-time course can be highly heterogeneous, with a subgroup of patients developing chronic migraine; moreover, migraine clinical spectrum is expanded by the association with different coexisting conditions and interictal dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate migraine clinical features, daily functioning parameters, sleep pattern, presence of depressive-anxiety symptoms and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 75 episodic and 75 chronic migraine without aura patients. Migraine-related disability, fatigue, daily sleepiness, subjective sleep quality, anxiety and depressive symptoms were, respectively, evaluated using the following questionnaires: Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item Scale (PHQ-9). Mean FSS score (p < 0.001), PSQI score (p = 0.015), GAD-7 score (p = 0.019), PHQ-9 score (p < 0.001) and BMI score (p = 0.012) were significantly higher in chronic compared to episodic migraineurs. Additionally, a correlation analysis carried out in the total sample of 150 migraine patients documented a statistically significant, positive correlation between monthly frequency of migraine attacks and FSS score (p < 0.001), PSQI score (p = 0.006), GAD-7 score (p = 0.019), PHQ-9 score (p < 0.001) and BMI score (p = 0.049). Data from the present report seem to expand the concept of migraine as a continuum or spectrum, with greater occurrence of fatigue, poor sleep quality, anxiety-depressive symptoms and higher BMI score in chronic compared to episodic migraine patients; further investigation is certainly necessary to better define the biological basis and mechanisms associated with migraine transformation from episodic to chronic pattern. PMID:26879311

  15. [Current diagnosis and treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H-C; Katsarava, Z; Limmroth, V

    2008-02-01

    Headaches are one of the most common disorders and symptoms in daily medical practice. The prevalence of migraine is 8% in men and 12-15% in women. Dramatic progress in the areas of epidemiology, pathophysiology, and acute and preventive therapy of migraine has been made over the past 100 years, with triptans being the breakthrough for treating acute migraine attacks. Beta blockers, calcium antagonists, and neuromodulators are available for preventive migraine therapy. Nonpharmacologic treatment also plays an important role in migraine prevention. New medical care structures such as integrated headache care provide better support for patients with migraine, particularly those with chronic migraine. PMID:18219499

  16. [Current diagnosis and treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H-C; Katsarava, Z; Limmroth, V

    2008-05-01

    Headaches are one of the most common disorders and symptoms in daily medical practice. The prevalence of migraine is 8% in men and 12-15% in women. Dramatic progress in the areas of epidemiology, pathophysiology, and acute and preventive therapy of migraine has been made over the past 100 years, with triptans being the breakthrough for treating acute migraine attacks. Beta blockers, calcium antagonists, and neuromodulators are available for preventive migraine therapy. Nonpharmacologic treatment also plays an important role in migraine prevention. New medical care structures such as integrated headache care provide better support for patients with migraine, particularly those with chronic migraine. PMID:18483757

  17. An Association between Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Migraine Headaches—National Health Interview Survey, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Law, Huay-Zong; Amirlak, Bardia; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches have not historically been considered a compression neuropathy. Recent studies suggest that some migraines are successfully treated by targeted peripheral nerve decompression. Other compression neuropathies have previously been associated with one another. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether an association exists between migraines and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), the most common compression neuropathy. Methods: Data from 25,880 respondents of the cross-sectional 2010 National Health Interview Survey were used to calculate nationally representative prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of CTS and migraine headaches. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CI for the degree of association between migraines and CTS after controlling for known demographic and health-related factors. Results: CTS was associated with older age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and smoking. CTS was less common in Hispanics and Asians. Migraine was associated with younger age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and current smoking. Migraine was less common in Asians. Migraine prevalence was 34% in those with CTS compared with 16% in those without CTS (aOR, 2.60; 95% CI, 2.16–3.13). CTS prevalence in patients with migraine headache was 8% compared with 3% in those without migraine headache (aOR, 2.67; 95% CI, 2.22–3.22). Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate an association between CTS and migraine headache. Longitudinal and genetic studies with physician verification of migraine headaches and CTS are needed to further define this association. PMID:25878944

  18. Prospective analysis of the use of OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) in the treatment of chronic migraine; real-life data in 254 patients from Hull, UK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine affects 2% of the population. It results in substantial disability and reduced quality of life. Medications used for prophylaxis in episodic migraine may also work in chronic migraine. The efficacy and safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) in adults with chronic migraine was confirmed in the PREEMPT programme. However, there are few real-life data of its use. Method 254 adults with chronic migraine were injected with OnabotulinumtoxinA BOTOX as per PREEMPT Protocol between July 2010 and May 2013, their headache data were collected using the Hull headache diary and analysed to look for headache, migraine days decrements, crystal clear days increment in the month post treatment, we looked at the 50% responder rate as well. Results Our prospective analysis shows that OnabotulinumtoxinA, significantly, reduced the number of headache and migraine days, and increased the number of headache free days. OnabotulinumtoxinA Botox also improved patients’ quality of life. We believe that these results represent the largest post-marketing cohort of patients treated with OnabotulinumtoxinA in the real-life clinical setting. Conclusion OnabotulinumtoxinA is a valuable addition to current treatment options in patients with chronic migraine. Our results support findings of PREEMPT study in a large cohort of patients, we believe, is representative of the patients seen in an average tertiary headache centre. While it can be used as a first line prophylaxis its cost may restrict its use to more refractory patients who failed three oral preventive treatments. PMID:25178393

  19. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies. PMID:27269777

  20. Migraine, daily chronic headache and fibromyalgia in the same patient: an evolutive "continuum" of non organic chronic pain? About 100 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Centonze, V; Bassi, A; Cassiano, M A; Munno, I; Dalfino, L; Causarano, V

    2004-10-01

    Aim of this study is to evaluate if migraine, daily chronic headache and fibromyalgia in the same patient can be considered as an evolutive continuum of non organic chronic pain. Therefore, migraine, daily chronic headache and fibromyalgia should be considered the expression of chronic antinociceptive system alteration. PMID:15549565

  1. Prodromal Functioning of Migraine Patients Relative to Their Interictal State - An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Houtveen, Jan H.; Sorbi, Marjolijn J.

    2013-01-01

    Smartphones were used in an online Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) design to test prodromal functioning relative to the interictal state in migraine patients. Eighty-seven participants completed an electronic diary 4 times daily during 3-6 weeks to monitor their migraine attacks. Twice daily the diary additionally included 16 multi-answer questions covering physical symptoms (30 items), cognitive-affective functioning (25 items) and external factors (25 items). Eight clustered prodromal features were identified in the current study: sensory sensitivity, pain/stiffness, fatigue, cognitive functioning, positive affect, negative affect, effort spent and stressors encountered. Per feature, individual change scores with interictal control days - excluding 24-hour post-attack recovery - were computed for six 12-hour pre-attack time windows covering three prodromal days. Linear mixed model (fixed-effect) analysis established significant increases in sensory sensitivity, pain/stiffness and fatigue, and a tendency for increased negative affect, in the 12 hours prior to the attack. Positive affect and cognitive functioning were impaired both in the 25-36 hour and - more strongly - in the 12-hour time window before the attack. No effects were found for effort spent and stressors encountered. Exploratory (random effect) analysis revealed significant individual differences in the change scores in sensory sensitivity, pain/stiffness, fatigue and negative affect. It is concluded that the prodromal change in migraine - relative to interictal functioning - predominantly exists within the last 12 hours before attack onset. Individual diversity is large, however. Future research should zoom in to identify prodrome development within the 12 pre-attack hours as well as to isolate individual patterns. PMID:23977358

  2. Patient satisfaction with eletriptan in the acute treatment of migraine in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nett, R B; Tiseo, P J; Almas, M; Sikes, C R

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objective: The efficxacy of triptans for acute migraine has been well established in clinical trials but not in primary care, where they are most commonly prescribed. The aim of this open-label study was to evaluate the effectiveness of eletriptan 40 mg in primary care, using a patient-weighted satisfaction scale. Methods: Eligible patients met International Headache Society criteria for migraine, with 1–6 attacks per month. Patients completed questionnaires at screening and following a single eletriptan-treated attack. Treatment satisfaction was evaluated using a six-item Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). MSQ item scores were weighted, based on the important score ratings, to yield individualised satisfaction scores. The primary end-point was the difference in weighted satisfaction scores between the patient's previous treatment and eletriptan 40 mg. Secondary end-points assessed quality of life (QOL), functioning and efficacy of treatment. Results: Of 590 patients screened, 437 completed the study. Degree (95.2%), time (88.8%) and duration (83.8%) of headache pain relief were rated as most important by patients. The mean (±SD) total satisfaction score on the MSQ was higher for eletriptan than previous therapy (2.2 ± 3.0 vs. 0.6 ± 2.4; p < 0.001). The high level of satisfaction with eletriptan vs. previous treatment reflects the improvements in QOL and functioning observed, and the high headache and pain-free response rates. Conclusions: Patient-weighted satisfaction with eletriptan 40 mg was higher than with previous treatment for all items. The use of patient-weighted importance ratings of satisfaction is a promising approach for establishing effectiveness of treatment in primary care. PMID:17877653

  3. Migraine treatment: a chain of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Tiago Sousa; Cambão, Mariana Seixas

    2015-01-01

    This clinical vignette presents a 14 years old female, with a past medical history relevant only for migraine with typical aura of less than monthly frequency, complaining of a severe unilateral headache with rising intensity for the previous 4 h, associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. This episode of migraine with aura in a patient with recurrent migraine was complicated by side effects of medical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (extrapyramidal symptoms, delirium, post-lumbar puncture headache, hospital admission) all of which could have been prevented-quaternary prevention. This case illustrates several important messages in migraine management: (1) use of acetaminophen is not based in high-quality evidence and better options exist; (2) among youngsters, domperidone should be preferred over metoclopramide because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier; (3) moderate to severe migraine crisis can be managed with triptans in teenagers over 12 years old; (4) it is important to recognize adverse drug effects; (5) harmful consequences of medical interventions do occur; (6) the school community must be informed about chronic diseases of the young. PMID:26266080

  4. The impact of comorbid migraine on quality of life outcomes after endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeConde, Adam S.; Mace, Jess C.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and migraine are common entities with overlapping symptomatology yet little research exists which investigates the intersection of the two. This study seeks to investigate whether patients with CRS with and without a migraine history experience comparable quality-of-life (QOL) improvement after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Study Design Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort Methods An adult population (n=229) with medically refractory CRS was prospectively evaluated following ESS using disease-specific QOL surveys: the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI), the Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS), and the Sinonasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22). History of comorbid migraine was identified (n=46) and pre- and postoperative QOL was compared to patients without migraine (n=183). Results Patients migraine and CRS were more likely to be female (p=0.023), experience allergies (p=0.024), fibromyalgia (p=0.009), depression (p=0.010), and be less likely to have nasal polyposis (p=0.003). Objective measures of disease (endoscopy and computed tomography scores) were significantly lower in patients with migraine (p=0.027 and p=0.002, respectively), yet these patients scored lower on baseline RSDI and SNOT-22 scores (p=0.025 and p=0.019, respectively). QOL in both patients with and without migraine improved significantly after ESS (p<0.003) and by comparable magnitudes (p>0.062). Conclusion Patients with comorbid migraine and CRS are more likely to have less severe evidence of disease and worse preoperative baseline QOL scores. This may imply that comorbid migraine disorder, in the setting of CRS, compels these patients to seek surgical management earlier in the disease process. Regardless, ESS provides comparable improvement for both patients with and without comorbid migraine. PMID:24431279

  5. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray: A Review in Acute Migraine in Pediatric Patients 12 Years of Age or Older.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal formulation of zolmitriptan, a selective serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonist, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute migraine in pediatric patients 12 years of age or older. This article summarizes the efficacy and tolerability of zolmitriptan (Zomig(®)) nasal spray (NS) in acute migraine in this patient group. Zolmitriptan NS 5 mg was more effective in relieving headache pain than placebo in two double-blind studies in pediatric patients 12-17 years of age with acute migraine. Furthermore, zolmitriptan NS 2.5 and 5 mg effectively relieved photophobia and phonophobia, and was associated with a faster return to normal daily activities than placebo. Zolmitriptan NS is rapidly absorbed from the nasal mucosa and is associated with a fast onset of action, with one study showing a significant difference versus placebo with regard to headache response 15 min after administration. In both trials, zolmitriptan NS was generally well tolerated, with no serious adverse events. In conclusion, zolmitriptan NS provides rapid, effective and generally well tolerated treatment of acute migraine in pediatric patients 12 years of age or older and may be of particular benefit for those with nausea or not easily able to swallow tablets. PMID:26747634

  6. Engel's Model as a Conceptual Framework in Nursing Research: Well-being and Disability of Patients With Migraine.

    PubMed

    Renjith, Vishnu; Pai, Mamatha S; Castalino, Flavia; George, Anice; Pai, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Exploring, selecting, and utilizing an appropriate conceptual framework is a vital step in development of a research work. This article discusses the application of "Engel's model on biopsychosocial well-being," in exploring the relationship between biopsychosocial well-being and disability of patients with migraine headaches. PMID:26871247

  7. Cyclical migraine.

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; Diamond, S

    1981-06-01

    We have observed 27 migraineurs whose headaches occurred in groups separated by headache-free periods. Twenty-one of the patients were women. The headaches occurred on either side in most patients. The headaches were severe lasting for an average of 25.5 hours, often preceded by scintillating scotomas, and often associated with nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. The attacks occurred in cycles that lasted an average of six weeks. The cycles recurred an average of five times per year; during the cycles, severe migraine occurred several times per week. In many patients, the cycles were often accompanied by a constant, low-grade headaches and depression. Twenty-two patients were treated with lithium carbonate. Complete or partial control of the headaches was achieved in 19 patients. PMID:6786269

  8. [Diet and migraine].

    PubMed

    Leira, R; Rodríguez, R

    1996-05-01

    Some foods in our diet can spark off migraine attacks in susceptible individuals. Some foods can bring an attack on through an allergic reaction. A certain number such as citrus fruits, tea, coffee, pork, chocolate, milk, nuts, vegetables and cola drinks have been cited as possible allergens associated with migraine. This mechanism has however been criticized: an improvement in symptoms by eliminating some food(s) from our diet does not necessarily mean an immunologically based allergic reaction. The high IgE incidence rate is not greater in such patients than in the population at large. Other allergic reactions unrelated to diet may also be associated with migraine attacks. On the other hand substances in food may be the cause of modifications in vascular tone and bring migraine on in those so prone. Among such substances are tyramine, phenylalanine, phenolic flavonoids, alcohol, food additives (sodium nitrate, monosodium glutamate, aspartame) and caffeine. Another recognized trigger for migraine is hypoglycemia. Such foods as chocolate, cheese, citrus fruits, bananas, nuts, 'cured' meats, dairy products, cereals, beans, hot dogs, pizza, food additives (sodium nitrate, monosodium glutamate in Chinese restaurant food, aspartame as a sweetener), coffee, tea, cola drinks, alcoholic drinks such as red wine, beer or whisky distilled in copper stills, all may bring on a migraine attack. For every patient we have to assess which foodstuffs are involved in the attack (not necessarily produced by consuming the product concerned) in order to try to avoid their consumptions as a means of prophylaxis for migraine. PMID:8681169

  9. Migraine preventive treatment.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological disease. Preventive therapy is given in an attempt to reduce the frequency, duration, or severity of attacks. Circumstances that might warrant preventive treatment include recurring migraine attacks that significantly interfere with the patient's daily routines, despite appropriate acute treatment; frequent headaches; contraindication to, failure of, overuse of, or intolerance to acute therapies; patient preference; frequent, very long, or uncomfortable auras; and presence of uncommon migraine conditions. The major medication groups for preventive migraine treatment include beta-adrenergic blockers, antidepressants, calcium channel antagonists, serotonin antagonists, and anticonvulsants. The choice of preventive treatment depends on the individual drug's efficacy and adverse events, the patient's clinical features, frequency, and response to prior treatment, and the presence of any comorbid or coexistent disease. PMID:20816433

  10. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Engmann, Birk

    2012-01-01

    This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet. PMID:22649454

  11. Preliminary evidence of reduced brain network activation in patients with post-traumatic migraine following concussion.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Reches, Amit; Elbin, R J; Dickman, Dalia; Laufer, Ilan; Geva, Amir B; Shacham, Galit; DeWolf, Ryan; Collins, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic migraine (PTM) (i.e., headache, nausea, light and/or noise sensitivity) is an emerging risk factor for prolonged recovery following concussion. Concussions and migraine share similar pathophysiology characterized by specific ionic imbalances in the brain. Given these similarities, patients with PTM following concussion may exhibit distinct electrophysiological patterns, although researchers have yet to examine the electrophysiological brain activation in patients with PTM following concussion. A novel approach that may help differentiate brain activation in patients with and without PTM is brain network activation (BNA) analysis. BNA involves an algorithmic analysis applied to multichannel EEG-ERP data that provides a network map of cortical activity and quantitative data during specific tasks. A prospective, repeated measures design was used to evaluate BNA (during Go/NoGo task), EEG-ERP, cognitive performance, and concussion related symptoms at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post-injury intervals among athletes with a medically diagnosed concussion with PTM (n = 15) and without (NO-PTM) (n = 22); and age, sex, and concussion history matched controls without concussion (CONTROL) (n = 20). Participants with PTM had significantly reduced BNA compared to NO-PTM and CONTROLS for Go and NoGo components at 3 weeks and for NoGo component at 4 weeks post-injury. The PTM group also demonstrated a more prominent deviation of network activity compared to the other two groups over a longer period of time. The composite BNA algorithm may be a more sensitive measure of electrophysiological change in the brain that can augment established cognitive assessment tools for detecting impairment in individuals with PTM. PMID:26091725

  12. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of an experimental model of 'ice-cream headache' in migraine and episodic tension-type headache patients.

    PubMed

    Selekler, H M; Erdogan, M S; Budak, F

    2004-04-01

    This study was designed to compare the prevalence and clinical characteristics of 'cold-induced headache' between migraine and episodic tension-type headache patients. Seventy-six migraine and 38 episodic tension-type headache patients were included in the study. An experimental model of an 'ice-cream headache' was developed for the study. The pain occurrence period, its location and quality were recorded for each patient who felt pain in their head during the test procedure. Pain in the head occurred in 74% of migraine and 32% of 'tension-type headache' patients. Although the most frequent pain location was the temple in both groups of patients, this rate was greater than twofold in migraine patients when compared with episodic tension-type headache patients. While headache quality was throbbing in 71% of migraine patients, it was so in only 8% of the episodic tension-type headache patients. Considering all the results, it seems that 'cold-stimulus headache' is not only more frequent in migraine patients, but also its location and quality differ from 'tension-type headache'. PMID:15030539

  13. [Chronic migraine: treatment].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2012-04-10

    We define chronic migraine as that clinical situation in which migraine attacks appear 15 or more days per month. Until recently, and in spite of its negative impact, patients with chronic migraine were excluded of the clinical trials. This manuscript revises the current treatment of chronic migraine. The first step should include the avoidance of potential precipitating/aggravating factors for chronic migraine, mainly analgesic overuse and the treatment of comorbid disorders, such as anxiety and depression. The symptomatic treatment should be based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and triptans (in this case < 10 days per month). It is necessary to avoid the use of combined analgesics, opioids and ergotamine-containing medications. Preventive treatment includes a 'transitional' treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or steroids, while preventive treatment exerts its actions. Even though those medications efficacious in episodic migraine prevention are used, the only drugs with demonstrated efficacy in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine are topiramate and pericranial infiltrations of Onabotulinumtoxin A. PMID:22532241

  14. Paradoxical topiramate-induced hyperphagia successfully treated with phentermine in a woman with migraine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacinta L; Rolan, Paul E

    2015-08-01

    We report a 49-year-old female migraineur who experienced paradoxical hyperphagia and concurrent intrusive food thoughts leading to rapid weight gain and a substantial increase in waist circumference. A significant reduction in migraine frequency was also observed during topiramate treatment, a widely used migraine prophylactic agent which is generally associated with weight loss. Withdrawal of topiramate saw appetite return to baseline levels, however, migraine frequency was again increased. Topiramate was reinitiated in combination with phentermine, a drug indicated for weight management, without reoccurrence of adverse effects. Migraine control was maintained and progressive weight loss ensued. Combination treatment with phentermine may be a useful strategy should other patients experience this adverse reaction while gaining therapeutic anti-migraine benefit from topiramate. PMID:25911503

  15. The relation of PTSD symptoms to migraine and headache-related disability among substance dependent inpatients.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Michael J; Fulwiler, Joshua C; Smitherman, Todd A; Gratz, Kim L; Connolly, Kevin M; Tull, Matthew T

    2016-04-01

    Despite emerging evidence for the comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and migraine, few studies have examined the relation of PTSD and migraine, particularly among clinical populations at-risk for both conditions (e.g., substance-dependent patients). This study examined the role of PTSD symptoms in migraine and headache-related disability within a sample of 153 substance-dependent inpatients (37.25% female, Mean age 36.46). PTSD symptoms predicted both migraine and headache-related disability above and beyond gender, depression and anxiety symptoms, the experience of a Criterion A traumatic event, and current alcohol use disorder. Findings highlight the strong association between migraine and PTSD symptoms in a unique population at risk for both conditions. PMID:26611236

  16. Management of vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, Alexandre R

    2011-05-01

    Vestibular migraine is considered to be the second most common cause of vertigo and the most common cause of spontaneous episodic vertigo. The duration of attacks varies from seconds to days, usually lasting minutes to hours, and they mostly occur independently of headaches. Long-lasting individual attacks are treated with generic antivertiginous and antiemetic drugs. Specific antimigraine drugs are unlikely to be very effective for rescue. The mainstay of the management of vestibular migraine is prophylactic medication. To date, there are no controlled trials available; the body of knowledge builds on case series and retrospective or observational studies. Most drugs are also used for the prevention of migraine headaches. The choice of medication should be guided by its side effect profile and the comorbidities of patients. Betablockers such as propanolol or metoprolol are preferred in patients with hypertension but in the absence of asthma. Anticonvulsants include topiramate when patients are obese, valproic acid and lamotrigine. Lamotrigine is preferred if vertigo is more frequent than headaches. Calcium antagonists include verapamil and flunarizine. If patients have anxiety, tricyclic antidepressants such as amitryptiline or nortryptiline or SSRIs and benzodiazepines such as clonazepam are recommended. Acetazolamide is effective in rare genetic disorders related to migraine-like episodic ataxia; however, its place in vestibular migraine is still to be established. Nonpharmacological measures such as diet, sleep, hygiene and avoidance of triggers are recommended as they are for migraine. Vestibular rehabilitation might be useful when there are complications such as loss of confidence in balance or visual dependence. PMID:21694818

  17. Pilot study of MK-462 in migraine.

    PubMed

    Cutler, N R; Claghorn, J; Sramek, J J; Block, G; Panebianco, D; Cheng, H; Olah, T V; Reines, S A

    1996-04-01

    MK-462 is a potent, selective 5HT1D receptor agonist which may be useful in treating acute migraine. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study to assess the preliminary efficacy and safety of oral doses of MK-462 20 mg (n = 8) and 40 mg (n = 36) vs placebo (n = 21), administered to 65 male and post-menopausal female migraine patients aged 22-51 with moderate or severe migraine headache. Headache severity and functional disability were measured at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 h post-dose. The 20 mg dose was well tolerated and 4/8 patients obtained relief in headache severity at the 2 h time point. The 40 mg dose was well tolerated and was significantly (p < 0.05) superior to placebo at the 1.5 and 2 h time points (with 27/36 or 75% obtaining relief at 2 h compared to 7/21 or 33% for placebo). Adverse events occurred in 50% of patients on 20 mg MK-462, 72% of those on 40 mg MK-462, and in 52% of placebo-treated subjects. The most common adverse events associated with MK-462 were drowsiness (20 mg 12%; 40 mg 44%; placebo 24%), dry mouth (40 mg 36%; placebo 19%), and lightheadedness/dizziness (40 mg 17%; placebo 10%). Based on these preliminary results, MK-462 appears worthy of continued study for the treatment of acute migraine. PMID:8665577

  18. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  19. Does visual cortex lactate increase following photic stimulation in migraine without aura patients? A functional (1)H-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Reyngoudt, Harmen; Paemeleire, Koen; Dierickx, Anneloor; Descamps, Benedicte; Vandemaele, Pieter; De Deene, Yves; Achten, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) has been used in a number of studies to assess noninvasively the temporal changes of lactate (Lac) in the activated human brain. Migraine neurobiology involves lack of cortical habituation to repetitive stimuli and a mitochondrial component has been put forward. Our group has recently demonstrated a reduction in the high-energy phosphates adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in the occipital lobe of migraine without aura (MwoA) patients, at least in a subgroup, in a phosphorus MRS ((31)P-MRS) study. In previous studies, basal Lac levels or photic stimulation (PS)-induced Lac levels were found to be increased in patients with migraine with aura (MwA) and migraine patients with visual symptoms and paraesthesia, paresia and/or dysphasia, respectively. The aim of this study was to perform functional (1)H-MRS at 3 T in 20 MwoA patients and 20 control subjects. Repetitive visual stimulation was applied using MR-compatible goggles with 8 Hz checkerboard stimulation during 12 min. We did not observe any significant differences in signal integrals, ratios and absolute metabolite concentrations, including Lac, between MwoA patients and controls before PS. Lac also did not increase significantly during and following PS, both for MwoA patients and controls. Subtle Lac changes, smaller than the sensitivity threshold (i.e. estimated at 0.1-0.2 μmol/g at 3 T), cannot be detected by MRS. Our study does, however, argue against a significant switch to non-aerobic glucose metabolism during long-lasting PS of the visual cortex in MwoA patients. PMID:21301922

  20. Medications for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Modi, Seema; Lowder, Dionne M

    2006-01-01

    Sufficient evidence and consensus exist to recommend propranolol, timolol, amitriptyline, divalproex, sodium valproate, and topiramate as first-line agents for migraine prevention. There is fair evidence of effectiveness with gabapentin and naproxen sodium. Botulinum toxin also has demonstrated fair effectiveness, but further studies are needed to define its role in migraine prevention. Limited evidence is available to support the use of candesartan, lisinopril, atenolol, metoprolol, nadolol, fluoxetine, magnesium, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), coenzyme Q10, and hormone therapy in migraine prevention. Data and expert opinion are mixed regarding some agents, such as verapamil and feverfew; these can be considered in migraine prevention when other medications cannot be used. Evidence supports the use of timed-release dihydroergotamine mesylate, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects. PMID:16417067

  1. Chronic migraine with medication overuse: association between disability and quality of life measures, and impact of disease on patients' lives.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Schiavolin, Silvia; Leonardi, Matilde; Giovannetti, Ambra Mara; Bussone, Gennaro; Curone, Marcella; Di Fiore, Paola; Grazzi, Licia; Usai, Susanna; D'Amico, Domenico

    2015-01-15

    Patients with chronic migraine with medication overuse (CM-MO) have decreased quality of life (QoL) and increased disability: the degree to which these outcomes are connected to disease severity and the pattern of MO towards disease severity are unclear. Patients under withdrawal were administered the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS), the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), and the Migraine-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MSQ). They overused NSAIDs, triptans, NSAIDs and triptans, and other drugs (ergotamine, caffeine, opioids/barbiturates). We calculated the correlations between MIDAS, WHODAS, and MSQ; compared WHODAS to normative scores; compared MIDAS, WHODAS, and MSQ in patients with different CM-MO severity; and run a logistic regression to predict CM-MO severity based on overused drugs. One hundred ninety-four patients were enrolled: correlations between WHODAS, MSQ, and MIDAS were moderate; wide differences on WHODAS against normative were found; and no trend was found across severity groups. Compared to triptans overusers, patients overusing NSAID and other drugs had higher odds of severe CM-MO. Coupling different disability measures with QoL assessment offered different insights on the lived experience of CM-MO. Future studies are needed to clarify the relationship between overused drugs and CM-MO severity: we added evidence that NSAIDs do not have protective effect in high-frequency CM-MO. PMID:25434715

  2. Aerobic endurance training versus relaxation training in patients with migraine (ARMIG): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Migraine is one of the most frequent headache diseases and impairs patients’ quality of life. Up to now, many randomized studies reported efficacy of prophylactic therapy with medications such as beta-blockers or anti-epileptic drugs. Non-medical treatment, like aerobic endurance training, is considered to be an encouraging alternative in migraine prophylaxis. However, there is still a lack of prospective, high-quality randomized trials. We therefore designed a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic endurance training versus relaxation training in patients with migraine (ARMIG). Methods This is a single-center, open-label, prospective, randomized trial. Sixty participants with migraine are randomly allocated to either endurance training or a relaxation group. After baseline headache diary documentation over at least 4 weeks, participants in the exercise group will start moderate aerobic endurance training under a sport therapist’s supervision at least 3 times a week over a 12-week period. The second group will perform Jacobson’s progressive muscle relaxation training guided by a trained relaxation therapist, also at least 3 times a week over a 12-week period. Both study arms will train in groups of up to 10 participants. More frequent individual training is possible. The follow-up period will be 12 weeks after the training period. The general state of health, possible state of anxiety or depression, impairments due to the headache disorder, pain-related disabilities, the headache-specific locus of control, and the motor fitness status are measured with standardized questionnaires. Discussion The study design is adequate to generate meaningful results. The trial will be helpful in gaining important data on exercise training for non-medical migraine prophylaxis. Trial registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01407861. PMID:22540391

  3. 'Visual snow' - a disorder distinct from persistent migraine aura.

    PubMed

    Schankin, Christoph J; Maniyar, Farooq H; Digre, Kathleen B; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Patients with 'visual snow' report continuous tiny dots in the entire visual field similar to the noise of an analogue television. As they frequently have migraine as a comorbidity with ophthalmological, neurological and radiological studies being normal, they are offered various diagnoses, including persistent migraine aura, post-hallucinogen flashback, or psychogenic disorder. Our aim was to study patients with 'visual snow' to characterize the phenotype. A three-step approach was followed: (i) a chart review of patients referred to us identified 22 patients with 'visual snow'. Fifteen had additional visual symptoms, and 20 patients had comorbid migraine, five with aura; (ii) to identify systematically additional visual symptoms, an internet survey (n = 275) of self-assessed 'visual snow' subjects done by Eye On Vision Foundation was analysed. In two random samples from 235 complete data sets, the same eight additional visual symptoms were present in >33% of patients: palinopsia (trailing and afterimages), entoptic phenomena (floaters, blue field entoptic phenomenon, spontaneous photopsia, self-light of the eye), photophobia, and nyctalopia (impaired night vision); and (iii) a prospective semi-structured telephone interview in a further 142 patients identified 78 (41 female) with confirmed 'visual snow' and normal ophthalmological exams. Of these, 72 had at least three of the additional visual symptoms from step (ii). One-quarter of patients had 'visual snow' as long as they could remember, whereas for the others the mean age of onset was 21 ± 9 years. Thirty-two patients had constant visual symptoms, whereas the remainder experienced either progressive or stepwise worsening. Headache was the most frequent symptom associated with the beginning or a worsening of the visual disturbance (36%), whereas migraine aura (seven patients) and consumption of illicit drugs (five, no hallucinogens) were rare. Migraine (59%), migraine with aura (27%), anxiety and depression

  4. Roads Less Traveled: Sexual Dimorphism and Mast Cell Contributions to Migraine Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Loewendorf, Andrea I.; Matynia, Anna; Saribekyan, Hakob; Gross, Noah; Csete, Marie; Harrington, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common, little understood, and debilitating disease. It is much more prominent in women than in men (~2/3 are women) but the reasons for female preponderance are not clear. Migraineurs frequently experience severe comorbidities, such as allergies, depression, irritable bowel syndrome, and others; many of the comorbidities are more common in females. Current treatments for migraine are not gender specific, and rarely are migraine and its comorbidities considered and treated by the same specialist. Thus, migraine treatments represent a huge unmet medical need, which will only be addressed with greater understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. We discuss the current knowledge about sex differences in migraine and its comorbidities, and focus on the potential role of mast cells (MCs) in both. Sex-based differences in pain recognition and drug responses, fluid balance, and the blood–brain barrier are recognized but their impact on migraine is not well studied. Furthermore, MCs are well recognized for their prominent role in allergies but much less is known about their contributions to pain pathways in general and migraine specifically. MC-neuron bidirectional communication uniquely positions these cells as potential initiators and/or perpetuators of pain. MCs can secrete nociceptor sensitizing and activating agents, such as serotonin, prostaglandins, histamine, and proteolytic enzymes that can also activate the pain-mediating transient receptor potential vanilloid channels. MCs express receptors for both estrogen and progesterone that induce degranulation upon binding. Furthermore, environmental estrogens, such as Bisphenol A, activate MCs in preclinical models but their impact on pain pathways or migraine is understudied. We hope that this discussion will encourage scientists and physicians alike to bridge the knowledge gaps linking sex, MCs, and migraine to develop better, more comprehensive treatments for migraine patients. PMID:27148260

  5. Roads Less Traveled: Sexual Dimorphism and Mast Cell Contributions to Migraine Pathology.

    PubMed

    Loewendorf, Andrea I; Matynia, Anna; Saribekyan, Hakob; Gross, Noah; Csete, Marie; Harrington, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common, little understood, and debilitating disease. It is much more prominent in women than in men (~2/3 are women) but the reasons for female preponderance are not clear. Migraineurs frequently experience severe comorbidities, such as allergies, depression, irritable bowel syndrome, and others; many of the comorbidities are more common in females. Current treatments for migraine are not gender specific, and rarely are migraine and its comorbidities considered and treated by the same specialist. Thus, migraine treatments represent a huge unmet medical need, which will only be addressed with greater understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. We discuss the current knowledge about sex differences in migraine and its comorbidities, and focus on the potential role of mast cells (MCs) in both. Sex-based differences in pain recognition and drug responses, fluid balance, and the blood-brain barrier are recognized but their impact on migraine is not well studied. Furthermore, MCs are well recognized for their prominent role in allergies but much less is known about their contributions to pain pathways in general and migraine specifically. MC-neuron bidirectional communication uniquely positions these cells as potential initiators and/or perpetuators of pain. MCs can secrete nociceptor sensitizing and activating agents, such as serotonin, prostaglandins, histamine, and proteolytic enzymes that can also activate the pain-mediating transient receptor potential vanilloid channels. MCs express receptors for both estrogen and progesterone that induce degranulation upon binding. Furthermore, environmental estrogens, such as Bisphenol A, activate MCs in preclinical models but their impact on pain pathways or migraine is understudied. We hope that this discussion will encourage scientists and physicians alike to bridge the knowledge gaps linking sex, MCs, and migraine to develop better, more comprehensive treatments for migraine patients. PMID:27148260

  6. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; De Orbe, M Irene; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L; Mora, J Vivancos; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives. PMID:26134103

  7. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Josué; Irene De Orbe, M.; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L.; Vivancos Mora, J.; Moya, José M.; Ayala, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives. PMID:26134103

  8. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling brain disorder. Chronic migraine, a condition characterized by the experience of migrainous headache on at least 15 days per month, is highly disabling. Patients with chronic migraine present to primary care, are often referred for management to secondary care, and make up a large proportion of patients in specialist headache clinics. Many patients with chronic migraine also have medication overuse, defined as using a compound analgesic, opioid, triptan or ergot derivative on at least 10 days per month. All doctors will encounter patients with chronic headaches. A basic working knowledge of the common primary headaches, and a rational manner of approaching the patient with these conditions, allows a specific diagnosis of chronic migraine to be made quickly and safely, and by making this diagnosis one opens up a substantial number of acute and preventive treatment options. This article discusses the current state of management of chronic migraine. PMID:25954496

  9. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, Mark W

    2015-05-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling brain disorder. Chronic migraine, a condition characterized by the experience of migrainous headache on at least 15 days per month, is highly disabling. Patients with chronic migraine present to primary care, are often referred for management to secondary care, and make up a large proportion of patients in specialist headache clinics. Many patients with chronic migraine also have medication overuse, defined as using a compound analgesic, opioid, triptan or ergot derivative on at least 10 days per month. All doctors will encounter patients with chronic headaches. A basic working knowledge of the common primary headaches, and a rational manner of approaching the patient with these conditions, allows a specific diagnosis of chronic migraine to be made quickly and safely, and by making this diagnosis one opens up a substantial number of acute and preventive treatment options. This article discusses the current state of management of chronic migraine. PMID:25954496

  10. A preliminary study: validity and reliability of Turkish translation of migraine disability assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire in Turkish patients with chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Gedikoglu, Umit; Ucler, Serap; Inan, Levent E; Coskun, Ozlem; Tunc, Tugba

    2006-11-01

    We have tested Turkish version of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire in patients with tension type headache. Thirty-two patients who had a tension type headache were included. Turkish version of the MIDAS questionnaire was applied to all patients. Additionally, the patients were asked to keep a 90-day diary. The day diary and the MIDAS questionnaire were compared at the end of the study period. We found that cronbach's alpha 0.82 and had good reliability. Our findings suggest that the MIDAS questionnaire that was originally designed for patients with migraine may be used in patients with chronic tension type headache. PMID:17000534

  11. Vitamin Supplementation as Possible Prophylactic Treatment against Migraine with Aura and Menstrual Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common form of headache disorder globally. The etiology of migraine is multifactorial, with genetic components and environmental interactions considered to be the main causal factors. Some researchers postulate that deficits in mitochondrial energy reserves can cause migraine or an increase in homocysteine levels can lead to migraine attacks; therefore, vitamins could play a vital role in migraine prevention. For instance, riboflavin influences mitochondrial dysfunction and prevents migraine. Genes such as flavoenzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), especially the C677T variant, have been associated with elevated plasma levels of homocysteine and migraine with aura. Homocysteine catalyzation requires the presence of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid, which can decrease the severity of migraine with aura, making these vitamins potentially useful prophylactic agents for treating migraine with aura. Menstrual migraine, on the other hand, is associated with increased prostaglandin (PG) levels in the endometrium, indicating a role for vitamin E, which is an anti-PG. Vitamin C can also be used as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species for treating neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients. This paper reviews possible therapies based on vitamin supplementation for migraine prophylaxis, focusing on migraine with aura and menstrual migraine. PMID:25815319

  12. Analysis of the duration of migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Néto, Raimundo Pereira; Almeida, Kelson James; Bernardino, Silvya Neri

    2014-02-15

    To determine the minimum duration of migraine prophylaxis, after patients become pain-free. Migraine patients diagnosed according to criteria of International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 were treated prophylactically. After becoming pain-free, they were divided into two equal groups: in group 1, prophylaxis was maintained for another 12 months and in group 2, for 24 months. Each group was followed for more three years after prophylaxis period. Of the 50 patients, 39 (78%) were female and 11 (22%) were male. The age ranged from 18 to 50 years. Before treatment, the attack frequency for groups 1 and 2 was, respectively, 16.3 ± 12.8 and 16.4 ± 11.8 days per month (p = 0.769). Patients in groups 1 and 2 have become pain-free, respectively, with 21.4 ± 11.2 and 16.8 ± 9.9 months (p = 0.161). During three years without treatment, groups 1 and 2 maintained an annual frequency of respectively 3.2 and 0.5 headache days. Of the patients in group 2, 76.0% (19/25) remained pain-free during follow-up, versus 44.0% (11/25) of group 1, with a significant difference (p=0.001). The best results were obtained when migraine prophylaxis was maintained for 24 months after patients became pain-free. PMID:24308946

  13. [Prophylactic medicines for migraine].

    PubMed

    Stovner, Lars Jacob; Tronvik, Erling; Hagen, Knut

    2012-05-15

    Migraine patients with frequent and disabling attacks should be given the opportunity to test prophylactic medicines, and general practitioners should know the indications and the main principles of treatment. When testing a preventative drug, it is important that the patient has realistic expectations, keeps a headache diary, increases the doses gradually, and takes an adequate dose for at least two months before the effect is assessed. Drugs licensed in Norway with adequate scientific documentation for use as migraine prophylactics include some antihypertensives (beta-blockers, candesartan and lisinopril), antiepileptics (topiramate, valproate and gabapentin), an antidepressant (amitriptyline), and botulinum toxin for chronic migraine. In the choice of medicine, one should consider scientific evidence, side effects and contraindications, effect on comorbid conditions, simplicity of use, and price. Patients who are severely affected should try at least three different drugs in succession. PMID:22614308

  14. Migraine headache and labor market outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rees, Daniel I; Sabia, Joseph J

    2015-06-01

    While migraine headache can be physically debilitating, no study has attempted to estimate its effects on labor market outcomes. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the effect of being diagnosed with migraine headache on labor force participation, hours worked, and wages. Ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates suggest that migraines are associated with reduced labor force participation and lower wages among females. A negative association between migraine headache and the wages of female respondents is also obtained using an instrumental variables (IV) approach, although the IV estimates are imprecise relative to the OLS estimates. PMID:24711105

  15. Alcohol and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Alcohol and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their ... to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache Alcohol and Migraine Anxiety and Depression Caffeine and Migraine ...

  16. Recent advances in migraine therapy.

    PubMed

    Antonaci, Fabio; Ghiotto, Natascia; Wu, Shizheng; Pucci, Ennio; Costa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common and highly disabling neurological disorder associated with a high socioeconomic burden. Effective migraine management depends on adequate patient education: to avoid unrealistic expectations, the condition must be carefully explained to the patient soon as it is diagnosed. The range of available acute treatments has increased over time. At present, abortive migraine therapy can be classed as specific (ergot derivatives and triptans) or non-specific (analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Even though acute symptomatic therapy can be optimised, migraine continues to be a chronic and potentially progressive condition. In addition to the drugs officially approved for migraine prevention by international governmental regulatory agencies, numerous different agents are commonly used for this indication, showing various levels of evidence of efficacy and tolerability. Guidelines published in recent years, based on evidence-based medicine data on migraine prophylaxis, are a useful source of guidance, especially for primary care physicians and neurologists without specific expertise in headache medicine. Although the field of pharmacological migraine prevention has seen few advances in recent years, potential novel approaches are now being developed. This review looks at emerging pharmacological strategies for acute and preventive migraine treatment that are nearing or have already entered the clinical trial phase. Specifically, it discusses preclinical and clinical data on compounds acting on calcitonin gene-related peptide or its receptor, the serotonin 5-HT1F receptor, nitric oxide synthase, and acid-sensing ion channel blockers. PMID:27330903

  17. The pathophysiological and pharmacological basis of current drug treatment of migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2013-05-01

    Migraine is a common neurological syndrome that affects approximately 10-20% of the population. The pathophysiology of migraine is unclear. 5-hydroxytriptamine is a key mediator in the pathogenesis of migraine and thus 5-HT1-receptor agonists are the principal drugs for acute migraine therapy. There are three classes of drugs for migraine: over-the-counter analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for acute mild migraine, specific prescription drugs (triptans and ergot alkaloids) for acute severe migraine and pharmacological agents for prophylaxis of migraine. Sumatriptan, naratriptan and others, referred to as 'triptans', are the mainstay for acute treatment of migraine. Ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine) are used in patients with frequent, moderate migraine, but are less effective than triptans. There are several agents for prevention of migraine occurrence in patients with frequent or severe disabling migraine attacks. New drugs with improved efficacy and reduced side effects are needed for effective treatment and prevention of migraine. PMID:23656340

  18. Lifestyle Factors and Migraine in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonio; Bruno, Antonio; Trojsi, Francesca; Tessitore, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common pain symptoms in children. Indeed, a high percentage of adult migraine patients report to have suffered from recurrent headache during the childhood. In particular, children could experience the so-called childhood periodic syndromes (such as cyclic vomiting, abdominal migraine, and benign paroxysmal vertigo) that have been usually considered precursors of migraine or they could develop overt migraine headaches. However, typical cohort of migraine symptoms could be absent and children could not achieve all clinical features necessary for a migraine attack diagnosis according to classification criteria. Nevertheless, migraine is characterized also in childhood by a significant negative impact on the quality of life and a high risk of developing chronic and persistent headache in adulthood. Several studies have emphasized the role of different risk factors for migraine in children. Among these, obesity and overweight, particular food or the regular consumption of alcohol or caffeine, dysfunctional family situation, low level of physical activity, physical or emotional abuse, bullying by peers, unfair treatment in school, and insufficient leisure time seem to be strictly related to migraine onset or progression. Consequently, both identification and avoidance of triggers seem to be mandatory in children with migraine and could represent an alternative approach to the treatment of migraine abstaining from pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26757711

  19. Almotriptan in the acute treatment of migraine in patients 11-17 years old: an open-label pilot study of efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Charles, James A

    2006-04-01

    The objective was to investigate the safety and efficacy of almotriptan in patients aged 11-17 years old with acute migraine. Fifteen patients aged 11-17 with a history of migraine with or without aura were treated with almotriptan. Reduction in headache severity, disability and adverse effects were studied. Almotriptan in doses ranging from 6.25 to 12.5 mg was well tolerated. There were virtually no adverse effects except for one case of transient mild stiffness. Of the 15 patients, only 2 demonstrated no efficacy without adverse effects. In the other 13 patients, not only was almotriptan effective, but again, no significant adverse effects were reported. Almotriptan is probably safe and effective in patients aged 11-17. This small open-label pilot study should support the feasibility of a large randomised controlled study to demonstrate tolerability and efficacy of almotriptan in children and adolescents with episodic migraine. PMID:16688412

  20. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Migraine 101 Quiz Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... the facts when it comes to headaches and migraines? Test your knowledge with this quick quiz. True/ ...

  1. Primary Headache Disorders: Focus on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling headache disorder. Most patients with disabling tension-type headache are likely to have migraine and accordingly respond to treatments efficacious in migraine. Individuals are genetically predisposed to experiencing recurrent migraine. Evidence supports migraine to be a primarily neural and not vascular mediated disorder. 1–2% of the population have chronic daily headache associated with acute-relief medication overuse; the majority are migraineurs. The presence of acute-relief medication overuse renders preventative medication less adequately efficacious. PMID:26525886

  2. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Proposal of a model for multidisciplinary treatment program of chronic migraine with medication overuse: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Grazzi, L; Prunesti, A; Bussone, G

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic migraine associated with medication overuse is challenging in clinical practice; different strategies of treatment have been recently developed, multidisciplinary treatment approaches have been developed in academic headache centers. Education and support of patients are necessary to improve patients' adherence to pharmacological treatments as well as to non-pharmacological therapies. This study reports a clinical experience conducted at our Headache center with a group of female patients, suffering from chronic migraine complicated by medication overuse, treated by a multidisciplinary approach and followed for a period of 1 year after withdrawal. Results confirm the efficacy of a multifaceted treatment to manage this problematic category of patients. PMID:26017536

  4. Acute management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    Migraine is a brain disease whose principal symptom is episodic intense throbbing pain in the head which is often accompanied by photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Primary objectives of migraine treatment are to abort the acute attacks, treat associated symptoms and prevent future attacks. With a majority of migraine patients being young, they will need a treatment plan to suit their professional work, leisure and reproductive concerns. Non specific anti-migraine drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-emetics, narcotics, and sympathomimetics are usually helpful in mild to moderate attacks. Specific drugs like triptans and ergots are useful for moderate to severe attacks. In step care approach, the patients are started with the simplest options like simple analgesics first followed by non-steroidal agents, then ergot preparations and eventually triptans if they do not respond. In stratified care approach, the attacks and the patients are stratified according to the severity and therapeutic response. Those with severe disabling episodes are given specific anti-migraine medications like triptans whereas patients with mild or low disability are treated with simple analgesics. Currently, the most favored acute anti-migraine medication is a triptan. At marketed doses all triptans are effective as compared to placebos and generally well tolerated. Amongst them however, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg provide the highest likelihood of consistent success. Triptan related adverse events are usually short lived, mild and clinically insignificant. Ergots are slowly being replaced by triptans. This is because of their adverse side-effects, low bioavailability and high potential for abuse that can lead to overuse headache. PMID:21049703

  5. Per cent of patients with chronic migraine who responded per onabotulinumtoxinA treatment cycle: PREEMPT

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Stephen D; Dodick, David W; Aurora, Sheena K; Diener, Hans-Christoph; DeGryse, Ronald E; Lipton, Richard B; Turkel, Catherine C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The approved use of onabotulinumtoxinA for prophylaxis of headaches in patients with chronic migraine (CM) involves treatment every 12 weeks. It is currently unknown whether patients who fail to respond to the first onabotulinumtoxinA treatment cycle will respond to subsequent treatment cycles. To help inform decisions about treating non-responders, we examined the probability of treatment cycle 1 non-responders responding in cycle 2, and cycle 1 and 2 non-responders responding in cycle 3. Methods Pooled PREEMPT data (two studies: a 24-week, 2-cycle, double-blind, randomised (1:1), placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase, followed by a 32-week, 3-cycle, open-label phase) evaluated onabotulinumtoxinA (155–195 U) for prophylaxis of headaches in persons with CM (≥15 days/month with headache ≥4 h/day). End points of interest included the proportion of study patients who first achieved a ≥50% reduction in headache days, moderate/severe headache days, total cumulative hours of headache on headache days, or a ≥5-point improvement in Headache Impact Test (HIT)-6. For treatment cycle 1, all eligible participants were included. For subsequent cycles, responders in a previous cycle were no longer considered first responders. Results Among onabotulinumtoxinA-treated patients (n=688) 49.3% had a ≥50% reduction in headache-day frequency during treatment cycle 1, with 11.3% and 10.3% of patients first responding during cycles 2 and 3, respectively. 54.2%, 11.6% and 7.4% of patients first responded with a ≥50% reduction in cumulative hours of headache, and 56.3%, 14.5% and 7.7% of patients first responded with a ≥5-point improvement in total HIT-6 during treatment cycles 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Conclusions A meaningful proportion of patients with CM treated with onabotulinumtoxinA who did not respond to the first treatment cycle responded in the second and third cycles of treatment. Trial registration number NCT00156910, NCT00168428. PMID

  6. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  7. Vestibular migraine: a critical review of treatment trials.

    PubMed

    Fotuhi, Majid; Glaun, Braeme; Quan, Susan Y; Sofare, Tzipora

    2009-05-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM), also known as migraine-associated vertigo, is a common cause of dizziness in adults. We performed a comprehensive literature search regarding treatment for VM or migraine-associated vertigo during the period of 1990-2008 and used, individually or in combination, the search terms VM, migraine-associated vertigo, migraine-associated dizziness, migrainous vertigo, migraine and vertigo, migraine and disequilibrium, and headache and vertigo. We found nine publications that address treatment strategies for VM. One small randomized clinical trial found some benefit from the use of zolmitriptan for abortive treatment of VM. The other eight observational studies showed marginal improvement with migraine prophylactic medications such as nortriptyline, verapamil, or metoprolol. Until more specific treatment options become available, patients with VM need to be managed with similar prophylactic and abortive strategies as those used for migraine in adults. PMID:19252785

  8. Pathophysiological basis of migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Francesca; Cupini, Letizia Maria; Corbelli, Ilenia; Calabresi, Paolo; Sarchielli, Paola

    2009-10-01

    Several cellular and molecular mechanisms have been implicated in migraine pathophysiology including abnormal neuronal excitability and vascular events. Drugs from different pharmacological classes are used for migraine prophylaxis. These agents may normalize neuronal excitability by modulating distinct ionic channels and various neurotransmitter systems. They can also block cortical spreading depression, prevent peripheral and/or central pain sensitization, and normalize brainstem function. Most of the drugs recently used in migraine prophylaxis have been identified by serendipidy and they have been originally approved for other indications. Subsequently, their use has been extended to migraine prevention, according to their putative mechanisms of action. More recently, trials on adequate samples of migraine patients have been conducted for several drugs. In the present review, we will present and discuss the pathophysiological bases for the use of antidepressants, beta-adrenergic blockers, calcium channel blockers and antiepileptic drugs in migraine prevention. Currently, the major classes of conventional migraine preventive drugs include the antidepressant amitriptyline, the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol, and the antiepileptic drugs topiramate and valproic acid. Promising results have recently been obtained for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers. Some limited clinical findings have also been reported for atypical antipsychotic agents, nutritional supplements and also botulinum toxin. Targets of migraine preventive treatment are to reduce frequency and intensity of attacks and to decrease disability related to chronic headache. PMID:19654035

  9. [Prophylactic drug management of migraine].

    PubMed

    Göbel, H; Heinze, A

    2003-10-01

    Migraine prophylaxis with drugs is still an essential part of migraine therapy. This is especially true for those patients with frequent migraines who are in danger of developing drug-induced headaches. Migraine prophylaxis should be taken in consideration in patients who suffer from 7 or more migraine days per month in spite of all non-pharmacological efforts. When choosing a prophylactic drug not only efficacy but tolerability and safety for long-term intake should be considered. Prophylactic drugs used to be classified as drugs of first, second and third choice. According to this step care model treatment was started with a drug of first choice and only in case of lack of efficacy or adverse events a drug of lower choice was selected. Today, in contrast to the traditional step care a stratified care is favored. Treatment is individualized based on an assessment of the patients' medical needs, on comorbidity, the migraine phenotype and most importantly the individual situation of the patient in life. The paper gives an overview of the efficacy and tolerability of drugs used in migraine prophylaxis. PMID:14655662

  10. [Prophylactic drug management of migraine].

    PubMed

    Göbel, H; Heinze, A

    2002-06-01

    Migraine prophylaxis with drugs is still an essential part of migraine therapy. This is especially true for those patients with frequent migraines who are in danger of developing drug-induced headaches. Migraine prophylaxis should be taken in consideration in patients who suffer from 7 or more migraine days per months in spite of all non-pharmacological efforts. When choosing a prophylactic drug not only efficacy but tolerability and safety for long-term intake should be considered. Prophylactic drugs used to be classified as drugs of first, second and third choice. According to this step care model treatment was started with a drug of first choice and only in case of lack of efficacy or adverse events a drug of lower choice was selected. Today, in contrast to the traditional step care a stratified care is favored. Treatment is individualized based on an assessment of the patients' medical needs, on comorbidity, the migraine phenotype and most important the individual situation of the patient in life. The paper gives an overview of the efficacy and tolerability of drugs used in migraine prophylaxis. PMID:12077682

  11. Palinopsia induced by topiramate and zonisamide in a patient with migraine.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando; de Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Palinopsia is an illusory visual phenomenon consisting in the persistence or recurrence of visual images after the exciting stimulus object has been removed. It has been reported in association with parietal and occipital lobe lesions, migraine auras, and related to the use of several drugs and illicit drugs. Here, we report the case of a 23-year-old woman with a 4-year history of episodic migraine with aura who developed palinopsia during sequential prophylactic therapies with topiramate and zonisamide. Although the exact physiopathology of this phenomenon remains unknown, topiramate- and zonisamide-induced palinopsia support an increase on serotonergic activity as a possible mechanism for this visual disorder. PMID:23503550

  12. Association of ACE Gene I/D polymorphism with migraine in Kashmiri population

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Sheikh, Saleem; Shah, Zafar Amin; Pandith, Arshid A.; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Mehraj, Iqra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a complex, recurrent headache disorder that is one of the most common complaints in neurology practice. The role of various genes in its pathogenesis is being studied. We did this study to see whether an association exists between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and migraine in our region. Materials and Methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with migraine and 121 healthy controls. The study subject were age and gender matched. The analysis was based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and included following steps: DNA extraction from blood, PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Results: Out of 100 cases, 69 were females and 31 were males. Fifty-seven were having migraine without aura and 43 had migraine with aura. 45 of the cases had II polymorphism, 40 had ID polymorphism and 15 had DD polymorphism in ACE gene. Conclusion: We were not able to find a statistically significant association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism with migraine. The reason for difference in results between our study and other studies could be because of different ethnicity in study populations. So a continuous research is needed in this regard in order to find the genes and different polymorphism that increase the susceptibility of Kashmiri population to migraine. PMID:27011636

  13. The migraine postdrome

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Olesen, Jes

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report migraine postdrome symptoms in patients who report nonheadache symptoms as part of their attacks. Methods: A prospective daily electronic diary study was conducted over 3 months in 120 patients with migraine. Nonheadache symptoms before, during, and after headache were collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesome headache to return to normal. Results: Of 120 evaluable patients, 97 (81%) reported at least one nonheadache symptom in the postdrome. Postdrome symptoms, in order of frequency, included feeling tired/weary and having difficulty concentrating and stiff neck. Many patients also reported a mild residual head discomfort. In most attacks (93%), there was return to normal within 24 hours after spontaneous pain resolved. There was no relationship between medication taken for the headache and the duration of the postdrome. The severity of the migraine was not associated with the duration of the postdrome. Overall state of health scores remained low during the postdrome. Conclusion: Nonheadache symptoms in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments. PMID:27335112

  14. Preventive treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Steven D

    2005-01-01

    Migraine preventive therapy, even in the absence of a headache, is given in an attempt to reduce the frequency, duration, or severity of attacks. Circumstances that might warrant preventive treatment include disabling migraine attacks, the overuse of acute medications or failure of or contraindication to acute medications, troublesome side effects from medication, hemiplegic migraine, or very frequent headaches (more than 2 a week). The major medication groups for preventive treatment include anticonvulsants, antidepressants, b-adrenergic blockers, calcium channel antagonists, serotonin antagonists, neurotoxins, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and others. If preventive medication is indicated, the agent preferentially should be chosen from one of the first-line categories, based on the drug's side-effect profile and the patient's coexistent and comorbid conditions. PMID:16622394

  15. Rizatriptan in migraine.

    PubMed

    Krymchantowski, Abouch Valenty; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of migraine is high, affecting a significant proportion of the adult population during their most productive years of life and promoting impairment of their normal daily activities. Although guidelines for the acute treatment of migraine are available, outcome parameters are sometimes still below the expectations of both patients and physicians. Triptans represented an advance in clinical practice and have become the most well-studied class of medication for migraine. These agents present class I evidence for efficacy. However, they differ with regard to several of their clinical parameters, including onset of relief and consistency of response. Rizatriptan is a selective agonist of the 5-hydroxytryptophan(1B/1D )receptors, with proven superiority over placebo, ergotamine and selected oral triptans, demonstrating a good profile of safety and tolerability. PMID:16162083

  16. [Headache and migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Slomke, M A; Limmroth, V

    2007-09-01

    Headaches are one of the most common disorders and symptoms in daily medical practice. There has been dramatic progress of knowledge in the fields of epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute treatment, and preventive therapy over the past 100 years. Triptans have been the breakthrough in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. Beta blockers, calcium antagonists, and neuromodulators are available for preventive migraine therapy. Treatment for chronic tension headache is still unsatisfying. Cluster headache is part of the group of trigemino-autonomic headaches. Headache from medication overuse plays an increasingly important role. New medical care structures such as integrated headache care provide better support for patients with chronic headache disorders. PMID:17687534

  17. Contribution of polymorphisms in ESR1, ESR2, FSHR, CYP19A1, SHBG, and NRIP1 genes to migraine susceptibility in Turkish population.

    PubMed

    CoŞkun, Salih; Yůcel, Yavuz; Çim, Abdullah; Cengiz, Beyhan; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Varol, Sefer; Özdemir, Hasan H; Uzar, ErtuĞrul

    2016-03-01

    Migraine, a highly prevalent headache disorder, is regarded as a polygenic multifactorial disease. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes that involved in sex hormone metabolism may comprise risk for migraine, but the results of previous genetic association studies are conflicting. The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic variants in genes involved in oestrogen receptor and oestrogen hormone metabolism in a Turkish population. A total of 12 SNPs in the ESR1, ESR2, FSHR, CYP19A1, SHBG and NRIP1 genes were genotyped in 142 migraine cases and 141 nonmigraine controls, using a BioMark 96.96 dynamic array system. In addition, gene-gene interactions were analysed using generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) methods. According to GMDR analysis, our results indicated that there was a significant association between migraine and gene-gene interaction among the CYP19A1, FSHR, ESR1 and NRIP1. Single-gene variant analysis showed that a significant association was observed between the TT genotype of rs10046 and migraine susceptibility.When the analysis was performed only in women, the GG genotype of rs2229741 was different between migraineurs and controls.When the female migraine patients were divided into two groups, migraine related to menstruation (MRM) or migraine not related to menstruation (MNRM), GG genotype of rs726281 was significantly associated with MRM. These results suggested that rs10046 could play a potential role in migraine susceptibility in Turkish population. Also, the rare GG genotype of rs726281 appears to influence migraine susceptibility in a recessive manner in MRM subgroup of female patients. In addition, variant GG genotype of rs2229741 may reduce the risk of migraine in Turkish women. PMID:27019440

  18. Migraine in the era of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lv-Ming; Dong, Zhao; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder in the neurologic clinics whose mechanisms have been explored for several years. The aura has been considered to be attributed to cortical spreading depression (CSD) and dysfunction of the trigeminovascular system is the key factor that has been considered in the pathogenesis of migraine pain. Moreover, three genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A) have come from studies performed in individuals with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic form of migraine with aura. Therapies targeting on the neuropeptids and genes may be helpful in the precision medicine of migraineurs. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonists and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated efficacy in the acute specific treatment of migraine attacks. Therefore, ongoing and future efforts to find new vulnerabilities of migraine, unravel the complexity of drug therapy, and perform biomarker-driven clinical trials are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with migraine. PMID:27127758

  19. Managing Migraine During Pregnancy and Lactation.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Turner, Dana P; Lee, Michelle; Bishop, Laura; Strauss, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    While over half of women with migraine report improvement during pregnancy, having a history of migraine may increase the chance of negative health outcomes. The state of pregnancy increases the risk of several dangerous secondary headache disorders, especially those associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and providers need to know the red flags to diagnose and treat emergently. Non-pharmacological migraine treatments can be instituted in advance of pregnancy as many are considered the safest options during pregnancy, but understanding the safety of medications and dietary supplements ensures appropriate care for the refractory migraine patient. New controversy exists over the safety of several historically routine and safe migraine treatment options in pregnancy, such as magnesium, acetaminophen, ondansetron, and butalbital. While it is not clear if breastfeeding decreases the postpartum recurrence of migraine, understanding safe treatment options during lactation can allow women to continue breastfeeding while achieving migraine relief. PMID:27002079

  20. Migraine in the era of precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lv-Ming; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder in the neurologic clinics whose mechanisms have been explored for several years. The aura has been considered to be attributed to cortical spreading depression (CSD) and dysfunction of the trigeminovascular system is the key factor that has been considered in the pathogenesis of migraine pain. Moreover, three genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A) have come from studies performed in individuals with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic form of migraine with aura. Therapies targeting on the neuropeptids and genes may be helpful in the precision medicine of migraineurs. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonists and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated efficacy in the acute specific treatment of migraine attacks. Therefore, ongoing and future efforts to find new vulnerabilities of migraine, unravel the complexity of drug therapy, and perform biomarker-driven clinical trials are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with migraine. PMID:27127758

  1. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (P<0.05). It was concluded that performing Orem's self-care nursing model improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society. PMID:27107519

  2. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  3. Randomized controlled trial: targeted neck cooling in the treatment of the migraine patient.

    PubMed

    Sprouse-Blum, Adam S; Gabriel, Alexandra K; Brown, Jon P; Yee, Melvin Hc

    2013-07-01

    Cold therapy has long been the number one self-care treatment employed for migraine without aura and the second most common for migraine with aura, yet its mechanism remains elusive. In this study, a mechanism by which this time-tested therapy works is proposed (by cooling the blood passing through intracranial vessels) in an attempt to further elucidate its beneficial effects. The study is designed as a randomized, controlled, crossover clinical trial utilizing an adjustable wrap containing two freezable ice packs targeting the carotid arteries at the neck, where they come close to the skin surface. Fifty-five participants successfully completed the study. Pain at onset, as recorded on a visual analog scale, was similar between the two treatment arms. Maximum pain reduction was observed at the 30 minute time point with a 31.8% ± 15.2% decrease in pain in the treatment arm compared to a 31.5% ± 20.0% increase in pain at the same time interval in the control arm. These findings confirm the application of a frozen neck wrap at onset of migraine headache targeting the carotid arteries at the neck significantly reduced recorded pain in participants with migraine headaches (P<.001). PMID:23901394

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial: Targeted Neck Cooling in the Treatment of the Migraine Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Alexandra K; Brown, Jon P; Yee, Melvin HC

    2013-01-01

    Cold therapy has long been the number one self-care treatment employed for migraine without aura and the second most common for migraine with aura, yet its mechanism remains elusive. In this study, a mechanism by which this time-tested therapy works is proposed (by cooling the blood passing through intracranial vessels) in an attempt to further elucidate its beneficial effects. The study is designed as a randomized, controlled, crossover clinical trial utilizing an adjustable wrap containing two freezable ice packs targeting the carotid arteries at the neck, where they come close to the skin surface. Fifty-five participants successfully completed the study. Pain at onset, as recorded on a visual analog scale, was similar between the two treatment arms. Maximum pain reduction was observed at the 30 minute time point with a 31.8% ± 15.2% decrease in pain in the treatment arm compared to a 31.5% ± 20.0% increase in pain at the same time interval in the control arm. These findings confirm the application of a frozen neck wrap at onset of migraine headache targeting the carotid arteries at the neck significantly reduced recorded pain in participants with migraine headaches (P<.001). PMID:23901394

  5. Diagnosis and management of migraines and migraine variants.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tomia Palmer

    2015-06-01

    Migraine headache is a neurologic disorder that occurs in 18% of women and 6% of men. Adults and children with mild to moderate migraine headaches seeking acute therapy should be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of the efficacy, cost, and decreased side effects. Some children and adults require preventive therapy (those with headaches lasting >12 h, those patients with >4 headaches in 1 month, those with headaches that affect their ability to function). Studies have shown that early treatment with large doses of medication work well for the treatment of moderate to severe migraine headache. PMID:25979584

  6. Psychological Counseling of Female Fertility Preservation Patients.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Angela K; Klock, Susan C; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Smith, Kristin N; Kazer, Ralph R

    2015-01-01

    Young cancer patients are increasingly interested in preserving their fertility prior to undergoing gonadotoxic therapies. Although the medical safety and treatment protocols for fertility preservation have been well documented, limited research has addressed the emotional issues that arise in fertility preservation patients. We briefly review the literature on the psychosocial issues in adult female fertility preservation treatment and describe our experiences within this patient population. Our findings suggest that several important issues to be addressed during the psychological counseling of adult female fertility preservation patients include: (1) preexisting psychological distress in patients undergoing treatment, (2) choice of fertility preservation strategy in the face of an uncertain relationship future, (3) decision making regarding use of third-party reproduction (e.g., sperm/egg donation, gestational surrogacy), (4) treatment expectations regarding pregnancy and miscarriage, (5) ethical issues related to treatment including the creation, cryopreservation, and disposition of embryos/oocytes, and (6) decision regret from patients who declined fertility preservation. PMID:25996581

  7. [Preventive treatment for migraine].

    PubMed

    Mulleners, Wim M; Haan, Joost; Dekker, Frans; Ferrari, Michel D

    2010-01-01

    Migraine patients who experience an average of 2 or more attacks per month are eligible for preventive treatment as well as treatment for acute attacks. The decision to offer preventative treatment is also made on the basis of the average attack duration, severity of the attacks, and response to attack treatment. Prior to initiating preventive treatment, the average attack frequency per month should be assessed, preferably by means of a headache diary over a number of months, as attack frequency is extremely variable. None of the currently available preventive drugs, such as beta-blockers, sodium valproate, topiramate and candesartan, were developed specifically for treating migraine, but were all originally intended for other indications. 50% of the migraine patients receiving preventive treatment can expect a 50% reduction in attacks, and the remaining attacks often seem to be less severe. The effects of the drugs are often unpredictable per individual, and side-effects frequently lead to early discontinuation of treatment. Drugs usually prescribed for cardiovascular disorders are often used. In the case of a disorder such as migraine with a high burden of disability, patients with cardiovascular or pulmonary comorbidity should receive medication that is optimally adjusted for both indications. PMID:20699036

  8. Botulinum toxin: A lift for chronic migraines.

    PubMed

    Sanassi, Lorraine A

    2016-06-01

    Chronic migraines are a common condition among patients seen in primary care and management often is a challenge. Despite existing therapies to help manage this condition, many patients continue to experience undue stress and diminished quality of life secondary to pain. This article briefly reviews treatments for migraine and introduces the role of onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox A) in improving the management of chronic migraines. PMID:27228039

  9. [Mnemonic complaints and chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Morandeira-Rivas, C; Lopez Del Val, L J; Bellosta-Diago, E; Velazquez-Benito, A

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Patients with chronic migraine often report lower cognitive performance, which affects their quality of life. AIMS. To analyse whether the mnemonic capacity of patients with chronic migraine is altered or not. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with chronic migraine evaluated consecutively in our unit, and paired by age (18-60 years) and gender with a control group consisting of cognitively healthy volunteers. The following cognitive instruments were administered: Folstein Minimental State Examination (MMSE), Memory Alteration Test (M@T), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and working memory. RESULTS. A total of 30 patients with chronic migraine were included (mean age: 49.33 ± 10.05 years) paired with a control group of 30 healthy volunteers (mean age: 44.83 ± 10.91 years). The mean elapsed time since onset of the patients with chronic migraine was 4.47 ± 2.74 years. On performing a comparative analysis between the two groups, significant differences were found with overall lower scores in the group of patients with chronic migraine in the MoCA (24.16 versus 29), M@T (43.76 versus 48.8) and working memory tests (17.5 versus 24.26). Performance in the MMSE was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with chronic migraine can have lower cognitive performance regardless of distracting elements, such as pharmacological factors or psychiatric comorbidity, since chronic migraine can be understood as yet another element within the spectrum of chronic pain. PMID:23884868

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Cady, Roger; Dodick, David W

    2002-03-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, considerable uncertainty remains surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder. This uncertainty is reflected in studies that show both underdiagnosis and undertreatment of migraine. While the diagnosis can be assisted by criteria from the International Headache Society, other approaches may be useful in clinical practice. Treatment of migraine must be based on an individualized patient strategy that integrates education, patient participation, and effective use of pharmacological interventions. Many patients, despite self-treatment with simple analgesics, continue to suffer considerable disability associated with their migraines. Triptans, which are more effective at relieving migraine symptoms and maintaining patient function than are nonspecific therapies, are used in only a minority of patients with migraine. Treatment goals of rapid, complete relief with no recurrence and minimal adverse effects can be achieved when effective therapy is matched to individual patient goals. For prophylaxis, anticonvulsant drugs emerging as effective options are being added to the armamentarium with traditional compounds such as tricyclic antidepressants and beta-blockers. PMID:11888029

  11. Reduction of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cells in migraine: Is migraine an autoimmune disorder?

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Murugesan; Parthasarathy, Varadarajan

    2016-01-15

    Migraine is believed to be a chronic neurological disorder with the exact aetiology being unknown. But, there is a debate on the role of immune dysfunction in migraine pathophysiology. Hence, authors made a debut attempt to explore the link between lymphocyte subset populations and migraine. A significant increase in CD4(+) and decrease in CD8(+) population were observed in migraine patients compared to healthy volunteers. Interestingly, the immunoregulator CD4(+)CD25(+) levels were less in migraine patients compared to the healthy volunteers. The results of the present study indicate that failure of immunoregulation could be implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. PMID:26711570

  12. Antiepileptic drugs in migraine prevention.

    PubMed

    Mathew, N T

    2001-01-01

    Migraineurs may continue to experience attacks, despite daily use of one or more agents from a wide range of drugs, including beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, serotonin antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and antiepileptic agents. Divalproex sodium is the only antiepileptic drug approved for migraine prevention. Gabapentin, topiramate, and other antiepileptic agents are being evaluated for migraine prevention and treatment. Prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of divalproex, gabapentin, and topiramate for migraine prevention generally were composed of a prospective baseline period, a dose titration period, and a fixed-dose treatment period. The primary efficacy variable was a reduction in the 28-day frequency of migraine headache. Patients receiving divalproex for 12 weeks at doses up to 1500 mg/day achieved significant decreases in the migraine frequency (P<.05), corresponding to reductions of 30% to 40% compared with baseline. Nearly half of the divalproex-treated patients had a 50% or more reduction from baseline in headache frequencies (P< or =.05). Asthenia, vomiting, somnolence, tremor, and alopecia were common adverse events associated with divalproex. Significant reductions in migraine frequency were also observed with gabapentin (1800 to 2400 mg/day) when compared with placebo (P<.01), and nearly half of all patients treated at the highest dose experienced a reduction in headache rate of 50% or more. Somnolence was the most commonly reported adverse event among the gabapentin-treated patients. Two single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials evaluated topiramate for migraine prevention. A lower 28-day migraine frequency was seen during 18 weeks of administration at a maximum daily dose of 200 mg (P =.09). In a second study, a significantly lower mean 28-day migraine frequency was observed during 16 weeks of treatment with topiramate (P =.0015). Mean reduction in migraine

  13. Stroke and migraine is there a possible comorbidity?

    PubMed

    Spalice, Alberto; Del Balzo, Francesca; Papetti, Laura; Zicari, Anna Maria; Properzi, Enrico; Occasi, Francesca; Nicita, Francesco; Duse, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    The association between migraine and stroke is still a dilemma for neurologists. Migraine is associated with an increased stroke risk and it is considered an independent risk factor for ischaemic stroke in a particular subgroup of patients. The pathogenesis is still unknown even if several studies report some common biochemical mechanisms between these two diseases. A classification of migraine-related stroke that encompasses the full spectrum of the possible relationship between migraine and stroke includes three main entities: coexisting stroke and migraine, stroke with clinical features of migraine, and migraine-induced stroke. The concept of migraine-induced stroke is well represented by migrainous infarction and it is described in the revised classification of the International Headache Society (IHS), representing the strongest demonstration of the relationship between ischaemic stroke and migraine. A very interesting common condition in stroke and migraine is patent foramen ovale (PFO) which could play a pathogenetic role in both disorders. The neuroradiological evidence of subclinical lesions most typical in the white matter and in the posterior artery territories in patients with migraine, opens a new field of research. In conclusion the association between migraine and stroke remains an open question. Solving the above mentioned issues is fundamental to understand the epidemiologic, pathogenetic and clinical aspects of migraine-related stroke. PMID:27113086

  14. Current trends in migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Nabih M

    2007-04-01

    A variety of drugs from diverse pharmacological classes are in use for migraine prevention. Traditionally, they have been discovered by serendipity. Examples include beta-adrenergic blockers, anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin receptor antagonists. The mechanisms of action of migraine preventive drugs are multiple but it is postulated that they converge on two targets: (1) inhibition of cortical excitation; (2) restoring nociceptive dysmodulation. The antiepileptic drugs (e.g., topiramate, valproate, gabapentin), calcium channel blockers such as verapamil, and inhibitors of cortical spreading depression are some examples of drugs that reduce neuronal hyperexcitability. On the other hand, modulators of the serotonergic and adrenergic systems and cholinergic enhancing drugs may restore descending nociceptive inhibition and play a role in migraine prevention. To date, Level 1 evidence and clinical experience favor the use of the antidepressant amitriptyline, the anticonvulsants divalproex and topiramate, and the beta-adrenergic blockers propranolol, timolol and metoprolol as first line migraine preventive drugs. The evidence for others (e.g., verapamil) is not as strong. Migraine preventive drugs have varying degrees of adverse effects, some of which could be limiting, and their efficacy should balanced with their risks of adverse effects, patients' expectations and desires, and compliance. It is hoped that future migraine preventive drugs target migraine mechanisms more specifically, which could well enhance the therapeutic index. PMID:17425710

  15. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  16. Serotonin and CGRP in migraine.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Milan; Puri, Veena; Puri, Sanjeev

    2012-04-01

    Migraine is defined as recurrent attack of headache that are commonly unilateral and accompanied by gastrointestinal and visual disorders. Migraine is more prevalent in females than males with a ratio of 3:1. It is primarily a complex neurovascular disorder involving local vasodilation of intracranial, extracerebral blood vessels and simultaneous stimulation of surrounding trigeminal sensory nervous pain pathway that results in headache. The activation of 'trigeminovascular system' causes release of various vasodilators, especially calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that induces pain response. At the same time, decreased levels of neurotransmitter, serotonin have been observed in migraineurs. Serotonin receptors have been found on the trigeminal nerve and cranial vessels and their agonists especially triptans prove effective in migraine treatment. It has been found that triptans act on trigeminovascular system and bring the elevated serum levels of key molecules like calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) to normal. Currently CGRP receptor antagonists, olcegepant and telcagepant are under consideration for antimigraine therapeutics. It has been observed that varying levels of ovarian hormones especially estrogen influence serotonin neurotransmission system and CGRP levels making women more predisposed to migraine attacks. This review provides comprehensive information about the role of serotonin and CGRP in migraine, specifically the menstrual migraine. PMID:25205974

  17. Malignant syphilis in an immunocompetent female patient.

    PubMed

    Requena, Camila Bueno; Orasmo, Cínthia Rosane; Ocanha, Juliana Polizel; Barraviera, Silvia Regina Catharino Sartore; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Malignant syphilis is an uncommon manifestation of secondary syphilis, in which necrotic lesions may be associated with systemic signs and symptoms. Generally it occurs in an immunosuppressed patient, mainly HIV-infected, but might be observed on those who have normal immune response. Since there is an exponential increase in the number of syphilis cases, more diagnoses of malignant syphilis must be expected. We report a case in an immunocompetent female patient. PMID:25387504

  18. The science of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Rami; Jakubowski, Moshe; Rauch, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    The cardinal symptom of migraine is headache pain. In this paper we review the neurobiology of this pain as it is currently understood. In recent years, we discovered that the network of neurons that sense pain signals from the dura changes rapidly during the course of a single migraine attack and that the treatment of an attack is a moving target. We found that if the pain is not stopped within 10–20 minutes after it starts, the first set of neurons in the network, those located in the trigeminal ganglion, undergo molecular changes that make them hypersensitive to the changing pressure inside the head, which explains why migraine headache throbs and is worsened by bending over and sneezing. We found that if the pain is not stopped within 60–120 minutes, the second group of neurons in the network, those located in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, undergoes molecular changes that convert them from being dependent on sensory signals they receive from the dura by the first set of neurons, into an independent state in which they themselves become the pain generator of the headache. When this happens, patients notice that brushing their hair, taking a shower, touching their periorbital skin, shaving, wearing earrings, etc become painful, a condition called cutaneous allodynia. Based on this scenario, we showed recently that the success rate of rendering migraine patients pain-free increased dramatically if medication was given before the establishment of cutaneous allodynia and central sensitization. The molecular shift from activity-dependent to activity-independent central sensitization together with our recent conclusion that triptans have the ability to disrupt communications between peripheral and central trigeminovascular neurons (rather than inhibiting directly peripheral or central neurons) explain their clinical effects. Both our clinical and pre-clinical findings of the last five years point to possible short- and long-term advantages in using an early

  19. Migraines: What a Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Migraines: What a Pain! KidsHealth > For Kids > Migraines: What ... coming and how to avoid them. What's a Migraine? Almost everyone gets headaches . You might have one ...

  20. [Drugs for migraine prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is a prevalent and disabling neurologic disorder. The aims of migraine management are lifting the burden of migraine and improvement of quality of life (QOL) of the sufferers. Chronification of episodic migraine would introduce refractory chronic migraine or medication overuse headache. The prevention of chronification of migraine is one of the major roles of prophylactic medication. There are some classes of prophylactic drugs against migraine headache. The calcium blocker (lomeridine, verapamil), anti-epileptic drugs (valproate), beta-blockers (propranorol), and anti-depressant (amytriptyline) have high quality evidence in migraine prophylaxis. Migraine has varied cormorbid disorders, such as hypertension, cardiac diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, psychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and allergic disorders. Upon choosing preventive drug, neurologists should consider the comorbid disorders. Recent studies revealed possible association of migraine and cerebrovascular diseases, especially in migraine with aura and in young women. Not only headache expert but every neurologist should have broad knowledge concerning migraine management. PMID:23196487

  1. Caffeine and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabling headaches . Home > Caffeine and Migraine Print Email Caffeine and Migraine ACHE Newsletter Sign up for our newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Caffeine and Migraine Robert E. Shapiro, MD, PhD and ...

  2. Preventive migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2009-05-01

    The pharmacologic treatment of migraine may be acute (abortive) or preventive (prophylactic), and patients with frequent severe headaches often require both approaches. Preventive therapy is used to try to reduce the frequency, duration, or severity of attacks. The preventive medications with the best-documented efficacy are amitriptyline, divalproex, topiramate, and the beta-blockers. Choice is made based on a drug's proven efficacy, the physician's informed belief about medications not yet evaluated in controlled trials, the drug's adverse events, the patient's preferences and headache profile, and the presence or absence of coexisting disorders. Because comorbid medical and psychologic illnesses are prevalent in patients who have migraine, one must consider comorbidity when choosing preventive drugs. Drug therapy may be beneficial for both disorders; however, it is also a potential confounder of optimal treatment of either. PMID:19289224

  3. Psychological Counseling of Female Fertility Preservation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Angela K.; Klock, Susan C.; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Smith, Kristin N.; Kazer, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Young cancer patients are increasingly interested in preserving their fertility prior to undergoing gonadotoxic therapies. Although the medical safety and treatment protocols for fertility preservation have been well documented, limited research has addressed the emotional issues which arise in fertility preservation patients. We briefly review the literature on the psychosocial issues in adult female fertility preservation treatment and describe our experiences within this patient population patient. Our findings suggest that several important issues to be addressed during the psychological counseling of adult female fertility preservation patients include: 1) pre-existing psychological distress in patients undergoing treatment, 2) choice of fertility preservation strategy in the face of an uncertain relationship future, 3) decision making regarding use of third party reproduction (e.g., sperm/egg donation, gestational surrogacy), 4) treatment expectations regarding pregnancy and miscarriage, 5) ethical issues related to treatment including the creation, cryopreservation, and disposition of embryos/oocytes, and 6) decision regret from patients who declined fertility preservation. PMID:25996581

  4. The treatment of pediatric migraine.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Donald W; Yonker, Marcy; Winner, Paul; Sowell, Michael

    2005-06-01

    The management of pediatric migraine requires a balance of biobehavioral measures coupled with agents for acute treatment and, if needed, daily preventive medicines. A recent American Academy of Neurology practice parameter has critically reviewed the limited data regarding the efficacy and safety of medicines for the acute and preventive therapy of pediatric migraine. The first step is to establish the headache frequency and degree to which the migraines impact upon lifestyle and performance. The next step is to institute nonpharmacologic measures such as regulation of sleep (improved sleep hygiene), moderation of caffeine, regular exercise, and identification of provocative influences (eg, stress, foods, social pressures). A wide variety of therapeutic options exist for patients whose migraine headaches occur with sufficient frequency and severity to produce functional impairment. The most rigorously studied agents for the acute treatment of migraine are ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and sumatriptan nasal spray, all of which have shown safety and efficacy in controlled trials. Daily preventive drug therapies are warranted in about 20% to 30% of young migraine sufferers. The particular drug selected for the individual patient requires an appreciation of comorbidities such as affective or anxiety disorders, co-existent medical conditions such as asthma or diabetes, and acceptability of potential toxicities such as weight gain, sedation, or tremor. PMID:16018227

  5. A Practical Approach to Migraine Management

    PubMed Central

    Edmeads, John

    1983-01-01

    Migraine is a benign constitutional disorder of neurovascular function characterized by recurrent headaches and autonomic and/or CNS symptoms. The diagnosis is made entirely on clinical grounds, and should not be difficult. The sequence of treatment is removal of migraine trigger factors, analgesic compounds, ergotamine, and migraine prophylactic agents. Providing that their specific contraindications are observed, and their side-effects mitigated by commonsense measures, these agents are safe and effective. A correct combination should result in improvement for most patients with migraine. Imagesp125-a PMID:21286588

  6. Vestibular migraine: diagnosis challenges and need for targeted treatment.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Felipe; Villa, Thaís Rodrigues

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population suffers from vestibular migraine. Despite the recently published diagnostic criteria, it is still underdiagnosed condition. The exact neural mechanisms of vestibular migraine are still unclear, but the variability of symptoms and clinical findings both during and between attacks suggests an important interaction between trigeminal and vestibular systems. Vestibular migraine often begins several years after typical migraine and has a variable clinical presentation. In vestibular migraine patients, the neurological and neurotological examination is mostly normal and the diagnosis will be based in the patient clinical history. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and therapeutic recommendations are based on migraine guidelines. Controlled studies on the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions in the treatment of vestibular migraine should be performed. PMID:27191239

  7. [An overview of prophylactic therapy for migraine].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko

    2009-10-01

    The launch of triptans has significantly changed the treatment of migraine, leading to great improvement in the quality of life (QOL) of migraine patients. In routine clinical settings, few patients present with migraine attacks that clearly deviate from the typical frequency and severity of migraine, and migraine that is difficult to control with acute-phase treatment alone is frequently encountered. Under these circumstances, the importance of prophylactic therapy, including lifestyle guidance and drug treatment, has attracted attention. However, in Japan, only a small number of prophylactics are currently indicated for migraine, and the available options are insufficient. In this study, I have outlined the prophylactic strategies for migraine, including lifestyle guidance, on the basis of literature published in Europe and North America. In addition, I have presented my clinical experiences and research reports to introduce cases of migraine for which prophylactic therapy was indicated, to hypothesize the mechanisms of the prophylatic activity of specific drugs (e.g., anti-convulsants, anti-depressants, beta-blockers, AII antagonists, Ca channel blockers, leukotriene receptor antagonists, statins, anti-herpes zoster virus drugs) for their prophylactic effect on migraine, and to determine drug regimens. PMID:19882936

  8. Migraine: preventive treatment.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, S D; Goadsby, P J

    2002-09-01

    Migraine is a common episodic headache disorder. A comprehensive headache treatment plan includes acute attack treatment to relieve pain and impairment and long-term preventive therapy to reduce attack frequency, severity, and duration. Circumstances that might warrant preventive treatment include: (i) migraine that significantly interferes with the patient's daily routine despite acute treatment; (ii) failure, contraindication to, or troublesome side-effects from acute medications; (iii) overuse of acute medications; (iv) special circumstances, such as hemiplegic migraine; (v) very frequent headaches (more than two a week); or (vi) patient preference. Start the drug at a low dose. Give each treatment an adequate trial. Avoid interfering, overused, and contraindicated drugs. Re-evaluate therapy. Be sure that a woman of childbearing potential is aware of any potential risks. Involve patients in their care to maximize compliance. Consider co-morbidity. Choose a drug based on its proven efficacy, the patient's preferences and headache profile, the drug's side-effects, and the presence or absence of coexisting or co-morbid disease. Drugs that have documented high efficacy and mild to moderate adverse events (AEs) include beta-blockers, amitriptyline, and divalproex. Drugs that have lower documented efficacy and mild to moderate AEs include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), calcium channel antagonists, gabapentin, topiramate, riboflavin, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:12230591

  9. Effects of left primary motor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation on laser-evoked potentials in migraine patients and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Eleonora; Ricci, Katia; Montemurno, Anna; Delussi, Marianna; Invitto, Sara; de Tommaso, Marina

    2016-07-28

    Migraine is characterized by an altered cortical excitability. Because transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can change brain activity noninvasively, it is possible to hypothesize its efficacy in modulating pain in migraine. In this study, we compared the effects of tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) both on subjective pain and on evoked responses induced by laser stimulation (LEPs). Thirty-two patients and sixteen controls were randomized to receive sham stimulation and real tDCS with the anode centered over M1 or DLPFC. Laser Evoked potentials were recorded in basal, sham and tDCS conditions. We did not find significant acute changes in LEPs parameters and pain perception among subjects who received tDCS of both M1 and DLPFC. After DLPFC tDCS, we observed a significant increase of N2-P2 component habituation in migraine patients while M1 stimulation reduced it. These findings may suggest a modulation of abnormal pain processing induced by DLPFC and M1 anodal tDCS and outline the need for future investigations exploring the possible neuronal plasticity changes supporting the clinical effect on migraine. PMID:27208831

  10. Vestibular Migraine in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Findings and Laboratory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Langhagen, Thyra; Lehrer, Nicole; Borggraefe, Ingo; Heinen, Florian; Jahn, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. We summarize the clinical findings and laboratory test results in a cohort of children and adolescents with VM. We discuss the limitations of current classification criteria for dizzy children. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 118 children with migraine related vertigo at a tertiary care center. Patients were grouped in the following categories: (1) definite vestibular migraine (dVM); (2) probable vestibular migraine (pVM); (3) suspected vestibular migraine (sVM); (4) benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV); and (5) migraine with/without aura (oM) plus vertigo/dizziness according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). Results: The mean age of all patients was 12 ± 3 years (range 3–18 years, 70 females). 36 patients (30%) fulfilled criteria for dVM, 33 (28%) for pVM, 34 (29%) for sVM, 7 (6%) for BPV, and 8 (7%) for oM. Somatoform vertigo (SV) co-occurred in 27% of patients. Episodic syndromes were reported in 8%; the family history of migraine was positive in 65%. Mild central ocular motor signs were found in 24% (most frequently horizontal saccadic pursuit). Laboratory tests showed that about 20% had pathological function of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, and almost 50% had abnormal postural sway patterns. Conclusion: Patients with definite, probable, and suspected VM do not differ in the frequency of ocular motor, vestibular, or postural abnormalities. VM is the best explanation for their symptoms. It is essential to establish diagnostic criteria in clinical studies. In clinical practice, however, the most reasonable diagnosis should be made in order to begin treatment. Such a procedure also minimizes the fear of the parents and children, reduces the need to interrupt leisure time and school activities, and prevents the development of SV. PMID:25674076

  11. Prophylactic pharmacotherapy for migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Thomas M; Ramadan, Nabih M

    2006-04-01

    Migraine therapeutics are pharmacological, including acute and preventive, nonpharmacological and/or both. Preventive pharmacological strategies serendipitously were discovered to be effective and include drugs from various pharmacological classes (e.g., beta-adrenergic blocker, anticonvulsant, tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin receptor antagonist). Converging level I evidence and clinical experience support the use of the antidepressant amitriptyline, the anticonvulsants divalproex and topiramate, and the beta-adrenergic blockers propranolol, timolol, and metoprolol in migraine prevention. Other options for migraine prophylaxis exist, but the level of evidence in support of their use is not as robust. All of these drugs have varying degrees of adverse effects, some of which can limit their use. Balancing potential efficacy with risk of adverse effects, addressing patients' expectations and desires, complying with management recommendations, adequate follow up, and accurate assessment of treatment goals are key to migraine prevention. Finally, future migraine-preventive drugs likely will target migraine mechanisms more specifically, which undoubtedly will enhance the therapeutic index. PMID:16628529

  12. Cystosarcoma phylloides in adolescent female patients.

    PubMed

    Briggs, R M; Walters, M; Rosenthal, D

    1983-12-01

    Nine cases of cystosarcoma phylloides in adolescent female patients are reported along with an additional 35 cases collected from the literature. Analysis of these 44 cases revealed 37 (84.1 percent) benign lesions, 6 (13.6 percent) malignant tumors, and 1 borderline lesion. Excision was the most common operative procedure and was performed in 35 patients. Nine patients underwent mastectomy. There were three recurrent lesions (one benign and two malignant) for a recurrence rate of 6.8 percent. Wide excision was successful in the treatment of recurrent lesions. On the basis of these data, excision is the preferred initial therapy of cystosarcoma phylloides in the adolescent patient regardless of the histologic classification of the lesion. Malignant cystosarcoma is more likely to recur than a benign lesion but a recurrence can be managed with reexcision. Sacrifice of the adolescent breast at the initial procedure is strongly discouraged. PMID:6316797

  13. [Metabolic syndrome and prevention of migraine headache].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Takao

    2009-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) are consist of central obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Previous studies have reported possible association of migraine and MetS were reviewed. Migraine is a prevalent disabling disorder and have been regarded as an episodic and functional disorder. However, recent evidence suggests that in some cases, the disease may follow a chronic and progressive course. On the basis of available evidence, obesity is considered to be associated with migraine frequency and progression. The association between diabetes and migraine is unclear. Similarly, association of migraine with hypertension is also unclear. Female migraineurs commonly have an unfavorable cholesterol profile, i.e. one with high total cholesterol and low HDL levels. Obesity can be considered as a proinflammatory state in which increased inflammatory mediators, vascular hyperreactivity, plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations and decreased adiponectin concentrations are observed. These alterations can cause an increase in the frequency of migraine attacks developed of central sensitization, and thereafter, chronic migraine. Migraine and obesity may share some neurobiological abnormalities. Orexins modulate both pain and metabolism. Dysfunction in the orexin pathways seems to be a risk factor for both conditions. The methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene exhibit polymorphism. C677Tmutation in the MTHFR gene and the D-allele of the ACE gene are the shared risk factors for the development of migraine and cardiovascular disease. Certain beta-blockers, Ca blockers, ACE inhibitors, and angionten II receptor blocker (ARB) have excellent efficacy in migraine prophylaxis. The pharmacological mechanism of these agents do not seem to stand on their antihypertensive effect, but the other mechanism of action. Appropriate meal, sleep, and exercise are important for the management of MetS and migraine

  14. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... begins with a visual disturbance called an aura (spots, dots or even zig zag lines). * True/False: All migraines involve only one side of the head. True/False: There is a cure for migraine headaches. Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A, B, ...

  15. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine.

    PubMed

    Dussor, Greg

    2015-07-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25582295

  16. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  17. Individual triptan selection in migraine attack therapy.

    PubMed

    Belvís, Robert; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Kulisevsky, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    About 6% of men and 18% of women suffer migraine attacks. Migraine can induce a great impact in the quality of life of the patient and the costs of medical care and lost productivity can be also high. There are two therapeutic approaches in the treatment of migraine: preventive therapy and acute treatment of migraine attack. Immediate treatment with selective serotonin [5-HT1B/1T] receptor agonists (so-called triptans) is the first-line option in the acute treatment of moderate-severe migraine attacks. The introduction in early nineties of triptans was a revolution in migraine therapy and evidences about their efficacy are at present irrefutable. At the moment, there are seven marketed molecules: sumatriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, eletriptan, naratriptan, almotriptan and frovatriptan. Obviously, every molecule has different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodinamic properties and, moreover, some triptans have several formulations: tablets, dissolvable tablets, nasal and injections. The prescription of one of these seven triptans for a specified patient is based in the drug profile: efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Despite there are a lot of published studies using triptans, no clinical trial has analyzed all the molecules at the same time. Other data to take account in the final prescription are clinical characteristics of the migraine attack and patient characteristics: labour aspects, style of life and the patient medical history. We present a state-of-the-art of the triptan selection in treatment of moderate-severe migraine attacks. PMID:19149716

  18. Migraine prophylaxis: who, why, and how.

    PubMed

    Loj, Jadwiga; Solomon, Glen D

    2006-09-01

    If a patient has frequent, severely debilitating migraine headaches, prophylactic treatment may help. Beta-blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, and anticonvulsants have the best evidence of efficacy; calcium channel blockers and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also popular because they are well tolerated and inexpensive. We review migraine treatment with emphasis on prophylaxis. PMID:16970133

  19. Neuromodulation in migraine: state of the art and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Magis, Delphine

    2015-05-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling disease. The drugs prescribed for migraine prophylaxis can have intolerable side effects or can be ineffective. Neuromodulation techniques are increasingly used in neurology. Transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation is effective in episodic migraine prevention, whereas vagus nerve stimulation provides interesting results in acute migraine therapy. Transcranial stimulation techniques gave variable, and sometimes contradictory, results. The visual cortex is the target of choice in migraine: studies in migraine prevention and aura acute treatment are encouraging. These noninvasive therapies appear safe with a low rate of side effects. Available studies of invasive occipital nerve stimulation in chronic migraine gave modest results; but invasive occipital nerve stimulation offers a new hope to highly disabled patients who failed to respond to any other treatment. In the future, neuromodulation will probably take an increasing place in migraine treatment, as add-on therapy or alternative to medications, especially because of its attractive safety profile. PMID:25633885

  20. Relationship between motion sickness, migraine and menstruation in crew members of a "round the world" yacht race.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, E; Gresty, M A

    1998-11-15

    The similarities between the symptoms reported by patients with migraine and those experienced by severely motion sick individuals raises the question of whether the two conditions involve common mechanisms. In women, attacks of migraine may follow the menstrual cycle, and anecdote suggests this may also be true of motion sickness. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was a cyclical pattern in the occurrence of migraine/headache and motion sickness among crew members of a "round the world" yacht race. The participants were asked to complete pre- and postrace questionnaires that related to their susceptibility to motion sickness and headache/migraine; additionally, the female subjects were asked for details about their menstrual cycle. During the race the subjects completed a logbook to record the occurrence of motion sickness (using a four-point scale), migraine/headache (including the type of headache), menstruation, medication consumption and duties aboard the yacht. Female sailors were found to be more prone to motion sickness than the males. Motion sickness was also found to be linked to time at sea, and subjects who suffered migraine during the race were also more susceptible to motion sickness. A distinct pattern was found in the occurrence of motion sickness and headache that related to the menstrual cycle, although motion sickness and headache did not generally occur together in most of the subjects. A cyclical pattern was not obvious for the male subjects. PMID:10052571

  1. Fertility preservation in female cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Jeon, Gyun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    With improved survival rates among cancer patients, fertility preservation is now being recognized as an issue of great importance. There are currently several methods of fertility preservation available in female cancer patients and the options and techniques via assisted reproduction and cryopreservation are increasing, but some are still experimental and continues to be evaluated. The established means of preserving fertility include embryo cryopreservation, gonadal shielding during radiation therapy, ovarian transposition, conservative gynecologic surgery such as radical trachelectomy, donor embryos/oocytes, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The experimental methods include oocyte cryopreservation, ovarian cryopreservation and transplantation, in vitro maturation, and ovarian suppression. With advances in methods for the preservation of fertility, providing information about risk of infertility and possible options of fertility preservation to all young patients with cancer, and discussing future fertility with them should be also considered as one of the important parts of consultation at the time of cancer diagnosis. PMID:22462006

  2. Migraine with isolated facial pain: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Obermann, M; Mueller, D; Yoon, M-S; Pageler, L; Diener, Hc; Katsarava, Z

    2007-11-01

    We present a series of seven migraine patients with typical features of a migraine attack without aura, but atypical pain localization in the face in one or both of the lower two distributions of the trigeminal nerve (V2 and V3). All of them responded well to triptans. Three patients responded to preventive treatment for migraine with beta-blockers (n = 2) or valproic acid (n = 1). These cases underline the heterogenic clinical presentation of migraine, which is sometimes difficult to diagnose even for headache specialists, and broaden the pathophysiological understanding of trigeminal nociceptive processing in migraine in the light of neuronal plasticity. PMID:17850354

  3. Antiepileptic Drug Therapy in Migraine Headache.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steve D.

    2002-09-01

    Severe migraine affects more than 28 million Americans. It is associated with episodic as well as long-term disability and suffering, yet it is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Acute treatments have advanced considerably, ignited by sumatriptan and the subsequent triptans; unfortunately migraine prevention has lagged far behind. There are no great migraine preventives! No migraine preventive agent studied in good randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trials proved to be 50% better than placebo. Migraine trials typically focus on episodic migraine, a milder, gentler type of migraine that is selected for low frequency, lack of daily headaches, no preventive need, and previous failure to no more than a few preventive agents. These features are not typical of the usual migraine patient seen in most neurologic practices, thus the results of clinical trials may not carryover to real world situations. Treatment of frequent, chronic, or pervasive migraine is inadequate, and never has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Traditional migraine preventives, eg, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and tricyclic antidepressants, are often ineffective in difficult or complicated populations. The antiepileptic drugs represent a category of pharmaceutics that target the neuronal instability and central hyperexcitability of migraine, and, through these actions, may be more effective than traditional preventives. Episodic migraine attacks are associated with peripheral and central sensitization; however, if attacks are frequent, severe, or long lasting, this sensitization may increase the risk of developing daily headaches. If antiepileptic drugs have an effect on central sensitization, perhaps mediated via glutamate inhibition or gamma-aminobutyric acid potentiation, it is appropriate to use these agents early in migraine treatment, particularly in the highly comorbid patient, possibly in conjunction with agents that antagonize the 5HT2 receptor. This report

  4. Patent foramen ovale closure and migraine: science and sensibility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Migraine has been associated with patent foramen ovale (PFO), and PFO closure has become the most high-profile nonpharmacologic invasive therapy recommended for the prevention of recurrent migraine attacks, as well as for preventing further attacks in cryptogenic stroke. The results of Migraine Intervention with STARFlex Technology (MIST), a controversial but important recent randomized clinical trial (RCT) of PFO closure for migraine, do not support PFO closure for preventing migraine attacks. All patients with migraine, however, do not have a PFO, and the characteristic periodicity and predictability of migraine cannot be explained on the basis of paradoxical embolism through the PFO. Closure of the PFO or atrial septal defect can aggravate migraine suddenly. PFO increases in size with age, but migraine generally subsides with the passage of years. Serendipity does play a role in some medical discoveries, but in the absence of a logically defensible theoretical basis, chance and statistics can both become misleading. With soft end points, RCTs in migraine patients can generate conflicting and irreconcilable data. RCTs cannot supplant or substitute clinical common sense or justify serendipity. Scientific progress mandates that any serendipitous research must ultimately conform to the principles of the basic sciences surrounding the chance discovery. PFO closure for preventing migraine attacks is an unfortunate, but sobering, chapter in the migraine research saga. PMID:20819012

  5. Migraine and recurrent epistaxis in children.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Imad T; Jarjour, Laila K

    2005-08-01

    Recurrent epistaxis is a common pediatric problem with uncertain etiology in most cases. We observed frequent complaints, or history of epistaxis in children with migraine. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between epistaxis and migraine in children. A detailed questionnaire was used to conduct a study of 45 consecutive patients, ages 6-11 years, with migraine, diagnosed according to the 1997 proposed pediatric revisions to the International Headache Society criteria; the patients were evaluated in our Pediatric Neurology Clinic. Control subjects consisted of 64 children without recurrent headaches, matched as a group for age and sex, and drawn as a convenient sample from two general pediatric practices and an elementary school. Sixteen (36%) of 45 patients with migraine had epistaxis as compared with 7 (11%) of 64 control subjects (odds ratio = 4.5; 95% confidence interval 1.6-12.1; P = 0.002). Epistaxis began an average of 3 years before migraine with similar characteristics to idiopathic epistaxis in habitual nose-bleeders, such as onset in early childhood, high incidence in sleep, and family history of epistaxis. This study demonstrates a significant association between migraine and recurrent epistaxis in children. Recurrent epistaxis increased the odds of migraine more than fourfold. Moreover, these data raise the question of whether epistaxis may represent a precursor to childhood migraine. The two disorders may share a common pathogenesis, and a prospective, longitudinal study is required to define further the relationship between them. PMID:16087052

  6. Migraine prevalence, socioeconomic status, and social causation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jason; Lipton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the known higher prevalence of migraine in lower household (HH) income groups is explained by a higher incidence rate or a lower remission rate. Methods: We used data from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study, a US national sample of 132,674 females (with a 64.3% response rate) and 124,665 males (with a 62.0% response rate) 12 years of age and older. Data were previously collected on migraine symptoms, onset age, and demographics. Previously validated methods applied to the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study data were used to simulate a cohort study. Incidence and remission rates were estimated within 3 sex-specific HH income groups (<$22,500, $22,500–$59,999, and ≥$60,000). The χ2 test was used to determine whether the incidence or remission rates differed by HH income group as an explanation for differences in migraine prevalence by HH income. Results: Migraine prevalence increased as HH income decreased for females (χ2, p < 0.01) and males (χ2, p < 0.01). Differences were not explained by race and other known confounders. Variation in prevalence was explained, in large part, by a higher incidence rate in the lower HH income groups for both females (χ2, p < 0.01) and males (χ2, p < 0.01). Migraine remission rates did not differ by HH income. Conclusions: The higher incidence of migraine in lower HH income groups is compatible with the social causation hypothesis. Once initiated, migraine remission is independent of HH income. Onset and remission may have etiologically distinct causes. PMID:23990405

  7. Alcohol and migraine: trigger factor, consumption, mechanisms. A review.

    PubMed

    Panconesi, Alessandro

    2008-02-01

    This study investigates the importance of alcohol as a migraine trigger factor, the prevalence of alcohol consumers and the mechanism of headache provocation. A MEDLINE search from 1988 to October 2007 was performed for "headache and alcohol", "headache and wine", "migraine and alcohol" and "migraine and wine". In retrospective studies, about one-third of the migraine patients reported alcohol as a migraine trigger, at least occasionally, but only 10% of the migraine patients reported alcohol as a migraine trigger frequently. Regional differences were reported, perhaps depending in part on alcohol habits. No differences were found between migraine and tension headache and different genders. However, prospective studies limit considerably the importance of alcohol as a trigger. Recent studies show that migraine patients consume less alcohol than controls. Red wine was reported to be the principal trigger of migraine, but other studies show that white wine or other drinks are more involved. Then, the discussion based on the different composition of the various alcoholic beverages, in order to discover the content of alcoholic drinks responsible for migraine attack, reflects this uncertainty. Biogenic amines, sulphites, flavonoid phenols, 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms and vasodilating effects are discussed. The fact that few headache patients cannot tolerate some alcoholic drinks does not justify the consideration that alcohol is a major trigger and the suggestion of abstinence. In fact, low doses of alcohol can have a beneficial effect on patients such as migraineurs, who were reported to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:18231712

  8. A Primary Care Migraine Education Program has Benefit on Headache Impact and Quality of Life: Results from the Mercy Migraine Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Timothy R.; Nicholson, Robert A.; Banks, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Mercy Migraine Management Program (MMMP), an educational program for physicians and patients. The primary outcome was change in headache days from baseline at 3, 6, and 12 months. Secondary outcomes were changes in migraine-related disability and quality of life, worry about headaches, self-efficacy for managing migraines, ER visits for headache, and satisfaction with headache care. Background Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine and development of effective therapeutic agents, many practitioners and patients continue to lack the knowledge and skills to effectively manage migraine. Educational efforts have been helpful in improving the quality of care and quality of life for migraine sufferers. However, little work has been done to evaluate these changes over a longer period of time. Also, there is a paucity of published research evaluating the influence of education about migraine management on cognitive and emotional factors (e.g., self-efficacy for managing headaches, worry about headaches). Methods In this open-label, prospective study, 284 individuals with migraine (92% female, mean age = 41.6) participated in the MMMP, an educational and skills based program. Of the 284 who participated in the program, 228 (80%) provided data about their headache frequency, headache-related disability (as measured by the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6), migraine-specific quality of life (MSQ), worry about headaches, self-efficacy for managing headaches, ER visits for headaches, and satisfaction with care at four time points over 12 months (baseline, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months). Results Overall, 46% (106) of subjects reported a 50% or greater reduction in headache frequency. Over 12 months, patients reported fewer headaches and improvement on the HIT-6 and MSQ (all p < .001). The improvement in headache impact and quality of life was greater among those who had

  9. Alexithymia and its impact on quality of life in a group of Brazilian women with migraine without aura

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Migraine is a type of primary headache widely known for its impact on quality of life of patients. Although the psychological aspects of the disease are receiving increasing attention in current research, some of them, as alexithymia, are still seldom explored. This study aimed to provide evidence on the relationships between markers of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, self-reflection, insight and quality of life in migraine. Methods Forty female outpatients from a Brazilian specialized headache hospital service and a paired control group were compared. Results The results revealed that women with migraine had higher levels of depression, anxiety and alexithymia, and lower levels of quality of life, self-reflection and insight, compared to controls. Quality of life in women with migraine was predicted by levels of depression and one alexithymia factor (ability to express emotions and fantasies). A binary regression analysis between clinical and control groups revealed the migraine group to comprise individuals with high anxiety, low quality of life in the physical domain and the presence of a concrete thinking style. Conclusions The results highlight the relevance of considering psychological variables in the routine healthcare practices for migraine patients in general, while keeping steady attention to individual case features. PMID:23565860

  10. Scheuermann's disease as a model displaying the mechanism of venous obstruction in thoracic outlet syndrome and migraine patients: MRI and MRA.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James D.; Saxton, Emestina H.; Miller, Theodore Q.; Ahn, Samuel S.; Gelabert, Hugh; Carnes, Alfred

    2003-01-01

    Kyphosis of the thoracic spine rotates the scapulae anterior laterally, clavicles and subclavius muscles anteriorly, displaces the manubrium posteriorly, which increases the slope of the first ribs. This increases tension on the anterior scalene muscles and the neurovascular bundles which causes brachial plexopathy (TOS). Scheuermann's disease (spinal osteochondrosis; juvenile kyphoscoliosis) is a disorder which consists of vertebral wedging endplate irregularity and narrowing of the intervertebral disk space causing kyphosis of the thoracic spine and may also involve the lumbar space. It occurs at puberty and involves both male and females. Abduction external rotation of the upper extremities (arms overhead) posterior inferiorly rotate the clavicles and the subclavius muscles which enhances tension on the venous drainage and neurovascular supply that diminishes venous return. This triggers complaints of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and migraine headache. Bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates compressing abnormalities of the brachial plexus. Five patients with Scheuermann's disease were imaged with the 1.5 Tesla magnet (Signa; General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) 3-D reconstruction MRI. T1W and T2W pulse sequences were performed in transverse, the coronal, transverse oblique, sagittal, and coronal abduction external rotation planes using 4 mm slice thickness and 512 x 256 matrix size. Water bags were used to enhance the signal to noise ratio. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) 2-D Time Of Flight (TOF) was obtained to compression for anatomic display evaluate perfusion of the brachial plexus. MRI and MRA captured sites of brachial plexus. One patient was selected for this presentation, which demonstrates the compression of the brachial plexus and venous obstruction which triggered complaints of thoracic outlet syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3(A,B) Figure 4 Figure 5(A,B) Figure 6(A,B) Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:12749621

  11. Managing migraine and other headache syndromes in those over 50.

    PubMed

    Dees, Brett; Coleman-Jackson, Rhonda; Hershey, Linda A

    2013-11-01

    Migraine in an older person may appear with sensory or motor phenomena ("late-life migraine accompaniments"), so that it may be confused with transient ischemic attack or stroke. An older patient may have cervicogenic headache in addition to migraine. Medication overuse headache is just as much of a problem in older patients as it is in younger ones. Abdominal migraine without headache can be seen in older adults as a migraine equivalent, just as it can occur in children. The most effective drugs for migraine prophylaxis in young people (divalproex, topiramate, metoprolol and propranolol) are similarly effective for those who are over the age of 50. Oral rescue drugs, including naproxen and hydroxyzine, are also useful in older adults. We need to remind older adults about the dangers of excessive use of caffeine in coffee, tea and energy drinks, since these substances can lead to daily HA and migraine equivalents. PMID:23759429

  12. Relationship between primary restless legs syndrome and migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Acar, Bilgehan Atılgan; Acar, Türkan; Alagöz, Aybala Neslihan; Karacan, Alper; Varım, Ceyhun; Uyanık, Mehmet Şevki; Kaya, Tezcan; Akdemir, Ramazan

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the prevalence and characteristics of definite migraine in primary restless legs syndrome (pRLS) patients and matched control patients (CPs) were investigated. We evaluated 63 consecutive adult pRLS patients and 141 age- and sex-matched controls in this case-control study. The diagnosis of migraine and its subtypes were defined based on The International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Only those with "definite" migraine were included in the study. The mean age of 63 adult pRLS patients (15 men and 48 women) who participated in the study was 49.4 years. A total of 27 patients (42.9%) had definite migraine. Of these migraineurs, seven (11.1%) were without aura and 20 (31.8%) were with aura. The mean age of the 141 matched CPs was 48.7 years. A total of 32 CPs (22.7%) experienced migraine. Among these 32 migraineurs, 28 (19.9%) were without aura and four (2.8%) were with aura. Migraine and migraine with aura were significantly more common in pRLS patients than in CPs. pRLS patients with migraine were more anxious and experienced a shorter duration of RLS symptoms than pRLS patients without migraine. Migraineurs in the pRLS group tended to have high scores for severity of migraine headache by Visual Analog Scale score and high levels of disability by Migraine Disability Assessment grading than those in the control group. pRLS patients showed a positive association with definite migraine headaches. In contrast to results highlighted in recent studies, we found a strong link between migraine with aura and pRLS. PMID:27523456

  13. Real-Time Sharing and Expression of Migraine Headache Suffering on Twitter: A Cross-Sectional Infodemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Thiago D; DosSantos, Marcos F; Danciu, Theodora; DeBoer, Misty; van Holsbeeck, Hendrik; Lucas, Sarah R; Aiello, Christine; Khatib, Leen; Bender, MaryCatherine A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-01-01

    Background Although population studies have greatly improved our understanding of migraine, they have relied on retrospective self-reports that are subject to memory error and experimenter-induced bias. Furthermore, these studies also lack specifics from the actual time that attacks were occurring, and how patients express and share their ongoing suffering. Objective As technology and language constantly evolve, so does the way we share our suffering. We sought to evaluate the infodemiology of self-reported migraine headache suffering on Twitter. Methods Trained observers in an academic setting categorized the meaning of every single “migraine” tweet posted during seven consecutive days. The main outcome measures were prevalence, life-style impact, linguistic, and timeline of actual self-reported migraine headache suffering on Twitter. Results From a total of 21,741 migraine tweets collected, only 64.52% (14,028/21,741 collected tweets) were from users reporting their migraine headache attacks in real-time. The remainder of the posts were commercial, re-tweets, general discussion or third person’s migraine, and metaphor. The gender distribution available for the actual migraine posts was 73.47% female (10,306/14,028), 17.40% males (2441/14,028), and 0.01% transgendered (2/14,028). The personal impact of migraine headache was immediate on mood (43.91%, 6159/14,028), productivity at work (3.46%, 486/14,028), social life (3.45%, 484/14,028), and school (2.78%, 390/14,028). The most common migraine descriptor was “Worst” (14.59%, 201/1378) and profanity, the “F-word” (5.3%, 73/1378). The majority of postings occurred in the United States (58.28%, 3413/5856), peaking on weekdays at 10:00h and then gradually again at 22:00h; the weekend had a later morning peak. Conclusions Twitter proved to be a powerful source of knowledge for migraine research. The data in this study overlap large-scale epidemiological studies, avoiding memory bias and experimenter

  14. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  15. Fifty years of migraine research.

    PubMed

    Lance, J W

    1988-05-01

    The prevalence of ice-pick pains and ice-cream headache in migrainous patients and their localisation to the habitual site of migraine headache, suggest that segments of the central pain pathways remain hyperexcitable between spontaneous attacks. Excessive afferent stimulation (flashing lights, noise, strong perfumes) or hypothalamic changes resulting from emotion, stress or the operation of some internal clock may set in motion brainstem mechanisms, including spontaneous unilateral or bilateral discharge of pain pathways. Studies in the experimental animal have shown that certain monoaminergic brainstem nuclei can influence the cerebral circulation unilaterally and that they and the trigeminal system can induce a reflex dilatation of the external carotid circulation. Descending pathways from the same brainstem nuclei cause the adrenal gland to secrete noradrenaline, which in turn can release serotonin from blood platelets. Free serotonin may become adsorbed to the arterial wall, thus increasing sensitivity to pain, augmenting afferent input and adding a pulsating quality to migrainous pain. Both neural and vascular components of migraine implicate monoamines, specifically noradrenaline and serotonin, as neurotransmitters and humoral agents. The recent pharmacological classification of serotonin (5HT) receptors indicates that agonists of a subset of the 5HT1 receptor and antagonists of 5HT2 receptors are most likely to be helpful in the treatment of migraine. PMID:3056372

  16. Associations Between Sleep Quality and Migraine Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Lin, Guan-Yu; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Hsu, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Tsai, Yi-Chien; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine has been associated with sleep disturbances. Relationship between sleep quality and migraine frequency is yet to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate sleep disturbances among low-frequency, moderate-frequency, high-frequency, and chronic migraineurs, with and without auras, with well-controlled confounding variables. This cross-sectional controlled study included 357 subjects from an outpatient headache clinic in Taiwan. Standardized questionnaires were utilized to collect demographic, migraine, sleep, depression, anxiety, and restless leg syndrome characteristics in all participants. According to frequency of migraine attacks, patients were divided into 4 groups: with 1 to 4 migraine days per month, 5 to 8 migraine days in a month, 9 to 14 migraine days in a month, and >14 migraine days per month. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and subgroup items were used to evaluate sleep quality. The association between migraine frequency and sleep quality was investigated using multivariable linear regression and logistic regression. The PSQI total score was highest in patients with high frequent migraine (10.0 ± 3.4) and lowest in controls (7.0 ± 3.4) with a significant trend analysis (P for trend = 0.006). Migraine frequency had an independent effect on the items “Cannot get to sleep within 30 minutes” (P < 0.001), “Wake up in the middle of the night or early morning” (P < 0.001), “Bad dreams” (P = 0.001), “Pain” (P = 0.004), and “Quality of sleep” (P < 0.001). The result showed the effect of migraine frequency in both the aura-present (P for trend = 0.008) and the aura-absent subgroups (P for trend = 0.011). High migraine frequency correlates with poor sleep quality and a higher prevalence of poor sleepers. These associations occur in migraine with aura and without aura. PMID:27124064

  17. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients.

    PubMed

    van Erven, Britt; Gubbels, Cynthia S; van Golde, Ron J; Dunselman, Gerard A; Derhaag, Josien G; de Wert, Guido; Geraedts, Joep P; Bosch, Annet M; Treacy, Eileen P; Welt, Corrine K; Berry, Gerard T; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2013-01-01

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age. PMID:23866841

  18. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age. PMID:23866841

  19. Genetic diagnosis and acetazolamide treatment of familial hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Omata, Taku; Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Wada, Takahito; Arai, Hidee; Tanabe, Yuzo

    2011-04-01

    A female patient presented with horizontal gaze nystagmus, mild cerebellar ataxia, recurrent headache and hemiplegia since childhood with cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging. Genetic analysis revealed a CACNA1A gene mutation, leading to a diagnosis of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM1). FHM is very rare, but should be considered as a differential diagnosis for childhood cerebellar symptoms and/or cerebellar atrophy. To avoid missing FHM1, a detailed clinical history including headache or hemiplegia is essential. Oral acetazolamide during the aura phase, comprising mild headache and abnormal leg sensation, relieved these symptoms in this patient, suggesting that acetazolamide could represent a first line of treatment. PMID:20542393

  20. Hypertension as a risk factor for migraine chronification.

    PubMed

    Barbanti, P; Aurilia, C; Egeo, G; Fofi, L

    2010-06-01

    Progression of episodic migraine to chronic migraine may be related to comorbid medical conditions. In this study, we focused on the role played by arterial hypertension in migraine transformation. Several studies reveal that hypertension is associated with chronic migraine and may induce migraine chronification. Hypertension probably amplifies the effects of migraine on the vascular wall further enhancing the endothelial dysfunction in cerebral vasculature. Consequently, monitoring of blood pressure is recommended in migraineurs showing an otherwise unexplained increase in attack frequency. Studies are needed to verify if prophylactic treatment with drugs improving endothelial function (e.g. calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, calcium inhibitors, ACE inhibitors and sartans) may selectively ameliorate the course of migraine in these patients. PMID:20464581

  1. Migraine Variants in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Migraine and Other Headaches Headache Journal - Public Site Art Gallery Art Gallery Support the AMF American Migraine Foundation The ... it difficult to distinguish anorexia from nausea. The history and physical examination will not show signs of ...

  2. Allergy, Rhinitis and Migraine Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... play no role in provoking attacks of migraine headache. Recent research suggests this may not be correct. Confirming allergy - ... might lead to sleep apnea that could cause headache. Third, allergy worsens symptoms ... Research shows that patients with depression compared to those ...

  3. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  4. Does Migraine Increase the Risk of Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether migraine influences the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in Taiwan. We retrieved the data analyzed in this study from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included 17,606 newly diagnosed migraine patients without preexisting glaucoma and randomly selected and matched 70,423 subjects without migraine as the comparison cohort. The same exclusion criteria were also applied to comparison subjects. Multivariate Cox proportion-hazards regression model was used to assess the effects of migraines on the risk of glaucoma after adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The cumulative incidence of POAG was higher in the migraine cohort than that in the comparison cohort (log-rank P = 0.04). The overall incidence of POAG (per 10,000 person-years) was 9.62 and 7.69, respectively, for migraine cohort and nonmigraine cohort (crude hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–1.54). After adjusting the covariates, the risk of POAG was not significantly higher in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (adjusted HR [aHR] = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.93–1.42). The cumulative incidence of PACG did not differ between the migraine cohort and the comparison cohort (log-rank test P = 0.53). The overall incidence of PACG was not significantly higher in the migraine cohort than that in the comparison cohort (7.42 vs 6.84 per 10,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.04 (95% CI = 0.82–1.32). This study shows that migraines are not associated with a higher risk either in POAG or in PACG. PMID:27175700

  5. Migraine in Children: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Tabassum, S; Rahman, S M; Akhter, S; Rahman, M M; Bayes, F; Roy, S

    2016-07-01

    Recurrent headache is common in children. Among them migraine is the most common disabling cause of primary headache. It causes serious disability in child's life and family. It causes negative impact on their quality of life. Clinical characteristic of migraine in children differ from adult. It may be shorter in duration and bifrontal or bitemporal in location in contrast to adult which is longer in duration and usually unilateral. It is less common before 3 years of age. Males are more affected before puberty. But after puberty females are predominantly affected. Intensity of pain is moderate to severe. There are some triggering factors. Positive family history usually present. Disability can be assessed by PedMIDAS scale in children and adolescents which is modified version of MIDAS scale for adult. Diagnosis of migraine usually clinical but evaluation should be done to exclude severe underlying secondary cause. Management consists of pharmacological and non pharmacological approach. Parental education, life style modification is the mainstay of management. Acute treatment consists of Acetaminophen, NSAIDs and Triptans. Among Triptans, Sumatriptan nasal spray is only found effective for children. Preventive therapy aims to decrease frequency and severity of headache. Flunarizine, Propranolol, Amitryptylline, Levetiracetam, Valproate, Topiramate are found effective in pediatric age group. Pediatrician should evaluate the child to exclude secondary cause of headache when indicated. They should have also proper knowledge and skills to manage a child having migraine to improve their quality of life and academic achievement. PMID:27612914

  6. The migraine generator revisited: continuous scanning of the migraine cycle over 30 days and three spontaneous attacks.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Laura H; May, Arne

    2016-07-01

    Functional imaging using positron emission tomography and later functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed a particular brainstem area that is believed to be specifically activated in migraine during, but not outside of the attack, and consequently has been coined the 'migraine generator'. However, the pathophysiological concept behind this term is not undisputed and typical migraine premonitory symptoms such as fatigue and yawning, but also a typical association of attacks to circadian and menstrual cycles, all make the hypothalamus a possible regulating region of migraine attacks. Neuroimaging studies investigating native human migraine attacks however are scarce and for methodological but also clinical reasons there are currently no studies investigating the last 24 h before headache onset. Here we report a migraine patient who had magnetic resonance imaging every day for 30 days, always in the morning, to cover, using functional imaging, a whole month and three complete, untreated migraine attacks. We found that hypothalamic activity as a response to trigeminal nociceptive stimulation is altered during the 24 h prior to pain onset, i.e. increases towards the next migraine attack. More importantly, the hypothalamus shows altered functional coupling with the spinal trigeminal nuclei and the region of the migraine generator, i.e. the dorsal rostral pons during the preictal day and the pain phase of native human migraine attacks. These data suggest that although the brainstem is highly linked to the migraine biology, the real driver of attacks might be the functional changes in hypothalamo-brainstem connectivity. PMID:27190019

  7. Using patient-centered endpoints to determine the cost-effectiveness of triptans for acute migraine therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Leslie; Von Seggern, Randal L

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use the patient-centered efficacy measurements of sustained pain free and sustained pain free with no adverse events to compare the relative cost-effectiveness of 6 oral triptans in the treatment of acute migraine. Adverse event and sustained pain-free rates were obtained from a comprehensive meta-analysis of 53 clinical trials of oral triptans. Efficacy and tolerability were assumed to be independent. Average wholesale prices were in US dollars as of May 10, 2004. The meta-analysis of oral triptans reported that almotriptan 12.5 mg (Axert) exhibited the highest sustained pain-free rate (25.9%), with the lowest rate associated with eletriptan 20 mg (Relpax) (10.6%). In addition, almotriptan 12.5 mg possessed the lowest overall absolute adverse event rate (14.2%), with the highest adverse event rate exhibited by eletriptan 80 mg (53.9%). To attain 100 sustained pain-free patients, almotriptan 12.5 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg (Maxalt) proved to be the most cost-effective triptans, costing $7120 and $7427, respectively; the least cost-effective were naratriptan 2.5 mg (Amerge) ($13,736) and eletriptan 20 mg ($16,104). To attain 100 sustained pain-free with no adverse events patients, almotriptan 12.5 mg was the most cost-effective triptan ($8298) and the least cost-effective were eletriptan 20 mg ($25,521) and eletriptan 80 mg ($29,614). At average wholesale prices as of May 10, 2004, almotriptan 12.5 mg achieved the highest level of cost-effectiveness using either sustained pain free or sustained pain free with no adverse events as endpoints. PMID:16988536

  8. How patient-centered do female physicians need to be? Analogue patients' satisfaction with male and female physicians' identical behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith A; Roter, Debra L; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Mast, Marianne Schmid; Pitegoff, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that female physicians may not receive appropriate credit in patients' eyes for their patient-centered skills compared to their male counterparts. An experiment was conducted to determine whether a performance of higher (versus lower) verbal patient-centeredness would result in a greater difference in analogue patient satisfaction for male than female physicians. Two male and two female actors portrayed physicians speaking to a patient using high or low patient-centered scripts while not varying their nonverbal cues. One hundred ninety-two students served as analogue patients by assuming the patient role while watching one of the videos and rating their satisfaction and other evaluative responses to the physician. Greater verbal patient-centeredness had a stronger positive effect on satisfaction and evaluations for male than for female physicians. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the different associations between patient-centeredness and patients' satisfaction for male versus female physicians occur because of the overlap between stereotypical female behavior and behaviors that comprise patient-centered medical care. If this is the case, high verbal patient-centered behavior by female physicians is not recognized as a marker of clinical competence, as it is for male physicians, but is rather seen as expected female behavior. PMID:25175277

  9. Treatment recommendations for migraine.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2008-09-01

    The pharmacological treatment of migraine can be acute or preventive. Acute treatment attempts to stop the progression of an attack or relieve pain and functional impairment once an attack has begun, whereas preventive therapy is given to reduce attack frequency and severity. Additional benefits of preventive therapy include improving responsiveness to acute attack treatment, and reducing disability. Treatment protocols should also include education and reassurance, avoidance of triggers, nonpharmacological treatments, and physical and/or complementary medicine when appropriate. The treatment plan should be reassessed at regular intervals. Acute attack medication can be specific or nonspecific, and needs to be tailored to the individual patient. Backup and rescue medication should be available in case the initial treatment fails. The route of drug administration depends on attack severity, how rapidly the attack escalates, the patient's preference, the presence or absence of severe nausea or vomiting, and the need for rapid relief. Preventive migraine treatments include beta-blockers, antidepressants, calcium channel antagonists, 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonists, anticonvulsants, and NSAIDs. Preventive treatments are selected on the basis of the drugs' side-effect profiles and the patient's coexistent and comorbid conditions. PMID:18665146

  10. Migraine headache is present in the aura phase

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jakob M.; Lipton, Richard B.; Dodick, David W.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Saper, Joel R.; Aurora, Sheena K.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: Migraine aura is commonly considered to be a distinct phase of a migraine attack that precedes headache. The objective of the study was to examine a large number of prospectively recorded attacks of migraine with aura and determine the timing of headache and other migraine symptoms relative to aura. Methods: As part of a clinical trial we collected prospective data on the time course of headache and other symptoms relative to the aura. Patients (n = 267) were enrolled from 16 centers, and asked to keep a headache diary for 1 month (phase I). They were asked to record headache symptoms as soon as possible after aura began and always within 1 hour of aura onset. A total of 456 attacks were reported during phase I by 201 patients. These patients were then randomized and included in phase II, during which a total of 405 attacks were reported in 164 patients. In total, we present data from 861 attacks of migraine with aura from 201 patients. Results: During the aura phase, the majority of attacks (73%) were associated with headache. Other migraine symptoms were also frequently reported during the aura: nausea (51%), photophobia (88%), and photophobia (73%). During the first 15 minutes within the onset of aura, 54% of patients reported headache fulfilling the criteria for migraine. Conclusion: Our results indicate that headaches as well as associated migraine symptoms are present early, during the aura phase of the migraine attack in the majority of patients. PMID:23115208