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Sample records for femo cofactor maturation

  1. Purification and characterization of a FeMo cofactor-deficient MoFe protein.

    PubMed

    Gavini, N; Ma, L; Watt, G; Burgess, B K

    1994-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the nifH gene product is required for FeMo cofactor biosynthesis and insertion and that a delta nifH strain of Azotobacter vinelandii designated DJ54 accumulates a FeMo cofactor-deficient MoFe protein that is distinct from the FeMo cofactor-deficient protein synthesis by Nif B-, N-, or E- strains [Tal, S., Chun, T., Gavini, N., & Burgess, B. K. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 10654-10657]. Here we report the purification and activation of the MoFe protein from DJ54. The purified protein is an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer that is indistinguishable from the wild-type MoFe protein by the criteria of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, native gel electrophoresis, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It binds normally to its redox partner, the Fe protein, by the criterion of chemical cross-linking. It does not contain FeMo cofactor and does not catalyze significant C2H2 reduction or reduction-independent MgATP hydrolysis. It can, however, be activated with FeMo cofactor following the addition of the Fe protein and MgATP when an additional required component(s) is supplied by cell-free extracts from a delta nifD strain of A. vinelandii. The purified DJ54 MoFe protein does contain P-clusters by the criteria of metal analysis, CD spectroscopy, cluster extrusion, and electrochemical reduction of the POX state. In the presence of dithionite it exhibits an axial S = 1/2 EPR signal that integrates to 0.1-0.3 spin per alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7918402

  2. FeMo cofactor synthesis by a nifH mutant with altered MgATP reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gavini, N; Burgess, B K

    1992-10-15

    We have characterized a Nif- mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii, designated UW91 (Shah, V. K., Davis, L. C., Gordon, J. K., Orme-Johnson, W. H., and Brill, W. J. (1973) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 292, 246-255). The specific Fe protein mutation giving rise to the Nif- phenotype was shown by DNA sequencing and site-directed mutagenesis to be the substitution of a conserved alanine at position 157 by a serine. The UW91 Fe protein was purified and shown to have a normal [4Fe-4S] cluster and normal MgATP binding activity. The substitution of alanine 157 by serine, however, prevents the MgATP-induced conformational change that occurs for the wild-type Fe protein, prevents MgATP hydrolysis, and prevents productive electron transfer to the MoFe protein. The UW91 Fe protein does bind to the MoFe protein to give a normal cross-linking pattern; however, it does not compete very successfully with wild-type Fe protein in an activity assay. The UW91 MoFe protein was also purified and characterized and shown to be indistinguishable from the wild-type protein. Thus, the substitution of Fe protein residue alanine 157 by serine does not change the Fe protein's ability to function in FeMo cofactor biosynthesis or insertion. This demonstrates that these events do not require the MgATP-induced conformational change, MgATP hydrolysis, or productive electron transfer to the MoFe protein. PMID:1400428

  3. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I.; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R.; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP—used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor’s nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  4. Distinct Domains of the GATA-1 Cofactor FOG-1 Differentially Influence Erythroid versus Megakaryocytic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Alan B.; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2002-01-01

    FOG family zinc finger proteins play essential roles in development through physical interaction with GATA factors. FOG-1, like its interacting partner GATA-1, is required for normal differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic cells. Here, we have developed a functional assay for FOG-1 based on its ability to rescue erythroid and megakaryocytic maturation of a genetically engineered FOG-1−/− cell line. We demonstrate that interaction through only one of FOG-1's four GATA-binding zinc fingers is sufficient for rescue, providing evidence against a model in which FOG-1 acts to bridge multiple GATA-binding DNA elements. Importantly, we find that distinct regions of FOG-1 differentially influence erythroid versus megakaryocyte maturation. As such, we propose that FOG-1 may modulate the fate of a bipotential erythroid/megakaryocytic precursor cell. PMID:12024038

  5. In vitro synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor and maturation of the nif-encoded apodinitrogenase. Effect of substitution of VNFH for NIFH.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, R; Allen, R M; Ludden, P W; Shah, V K

    1997-08-22

    NIFH (the nifH gene product) has several functions in the nitrogenase enzyme system. In addition to reducing dinitrogenase during nitrogenase turnover, NIFH functions in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co), and in the processing of alpha2beta2 apodinitrogenase 1 (a catalytically inactive form of dinitrogenase 1 that lacks the FeMo-co) to the FeMo-co-activatable alpha2beta2gamma2 form. The molybdenum-independent nitrogenase 2 (vnf-encoded) has a distinct dinitrogenase reductase protein, VNFH. We investigated the ability of VNFH to function in the in vitro biosynthesis of FeMo-co and in the maturation of apodinitrogenase 1. VNFH can replace NIFH in both the biosynthesis of FeMo-co and in the maturation of apodinitrogenase 1. These results suggest that the dinitrogenase reductase proteins do not specify the heterometal incorporated into the cofactors of the respective nitrogenase enzymes. The specificity for the incorporation of molybdenum into FeMo-co was also examined using the in vitro FeMo-co synthesis assay system. PMID:9261182

  6. GATA4 mediates gene repression in the mature mouse small intestine through interactions with Friend of GATA (FOG) cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Beuling, Eva; Bosse, Tjalling; aan de Kerk, Daniel J.; Piaseckyj, Christina M.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Grand, Richard J.; Krasinski, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    GATA4, a transcription factor expressed in the proximal small intestine but not in the distal ileum, maintains proximal-distal distinctions by multiple processes involving gene repression, gene activation, and cell fate determination. Friend of GATA (FOG) is an evolutionarily conserved family of cofactors whose members physically associate with GATA factors and mediate GATA-regulated repression in multiple tissues. Using a novel, inducible, intestine-specific Gata4 knock-in model in mice, in which wild-type GATA4 is specifically inactivated in the small intestine, but a GATA4 mutant that does not bind FOG cofactors (GATA4ki) continues to be expressed, we found that ileal-specific genes were significantly induced in the proximal small intestine (P<0.01); in contrast, genes restricted to proximal small intestine and cell lineage markers were unaffected, indicating that GATA4-FOG interactions contribute specifically to the repression function of GATA4 within this organ. Fog1 mRNA displayed a proximal-distal pattern that parallels that of Gata4, and FOG1 protein was co-expressed with GATA4 in intestinal epithelial cells, implicating FOG1 as the likely mediator of GATA4 function in the small intestine. Our data are the first to indicate FOG function and expression in the mammalian small intestine. PMID:18692040

  7. Rubredoxin-related Maturation Factor Guarantees Metal Cofactor Integrity during Aerobic Biosynthesis of Membrane-bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Johannes; Siebert, Elisabeth; Priebe, Jacqueline; Zebger, Ingo; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Teutloff, Christian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) supports growth of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with H2 as the sole energy source. The enzyme undergoes a complex biosynthesis process that proceeds during cell growth even at ambient O2 levels and involves 14 specific maturation proteins. One of these is a rubredoxin-like protein, which is essential for biosynthesis of active MBH at high oxygen concentrations but dispensable under microaerobic growth conditions. To obtain insights into the function of HoxR, we investigated the MBH protein purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of hoxR mutant cells. Compared with wild-type MBH, the mutant enzyme displayed severely decreased hydrogenase activity. Electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed features resembling those of O2-sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases and/or oxidatively damaged protein. The catalytic center resided partially in an inactive Niu-A-like state, and the electron transfer chain consisting of three different Fe-S clusters showed marked alterations compared with wild-type enzyme. Purification of HoxR protein from its original host, R. eutropha, revealed only low protein amounts. Therefore, recombinant HoxR protein was isolated from Escherichia coli. Unlike common rubredoxins, the HoxR protein was colorless, rather unstable, and essentially metal-free. Conversion of the atypical iron-binding motif into a canonical one through genetic engineering led to a stable reddish rubredoxin. Remarkably, the modified HoxR protein did not support MBH-dependent growth at high O2. Analysis of MBH-associated protein complexes points toward a specific interaction of HoxR with the Fe-S cluster-bearing small subunit. This supports the previously made notion that HoxR avoids oxidative damage of the metal centers of the MBH, in particular the unprecedented Cys6[4Fe-3S] cluster. PMID:24448806

  8. Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Chemistry in the Synthesis of Hydrogenase and Nitrogenase Metal Cofactors*

    PubMed Central

    Byer, Amanda S.; Shepard, Eric M.; Peters, John W.; Broderick, Joan B.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. The FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. This minireview presents and discusses the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors. PMID:25477518

  9. In vitro biosynthesis of iron-molybdenum cofactor and maturation of the nif-encoded apodinitrogenase. Effect of substitution for NifH with site-specifically altered forms of NifH.

    PubMed

    Rangaraj, P; Ryle, M J; Lanzilotta, W N; Ludden, P W; Shah, V K

    1999-07-01

    NifH has three different roles in the nitrogenase enzyme system. Apart from serving as the physiological electron donor to dinitrogenase, NifH is involved in iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) biosynthesis and in maturation of the FeMo-co-deficient form of apodinitrogenase to a FeMo-co-activable form (apodinitrogenase maturation). The exact roles of NifH in these processes are not well understood. In the present study, the features of NifH required for the aforementioned processes have been investigated by the use of site-specifically altered forms of the enzyme. The ability of six altered forms of NifH inactive in substrate reduction (K15R, D39N, D43N, L127Delta, D129E, and F135Y) to function in in vitro FeMo-co synthesis and apodinitrogenase maturation reactions was investigated. We report that the ability of NifH to bind and not hydrolyze MgATP is required for it to function in these processes. We also present evidence that the ability of NifH to function in these processes is not dictated by the properties known to be required for its function in electron transfer to dinitrogenase. Evidence toward the existence of separate, overlapping sites on NifH for each of its functions (substrate reduction, FeMo-co biosynthesis, and apodinitrogenase maturation) is presented. PMID:10391920

  10. The Fe-V Cofactor of Vanadium Nitrogenase Contains an Interstitial Carbon Atom.

    PubMed

    Rees, Julian A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Schlesier, Julia; Sippel, Daniel; Einsle, Oliver; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-11-01

    The first direct evidence is provided for the presence of an interstitial carbide in the Fe-V cofactor of Azotobacter vinelandii vanadium nitrogenase. As for our identification of the central carbide in the Fe-Mo cofactor, we employed Fe Kβ valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, and herein report the highly similar spectra of both variants of the cofactor-containing protein. The identification of an analogous carbide, and thus an atomically homologous active site in vanadium nitrogenase, highlights the importance and influence of both the interstitial carbide and the identity of the heteroatom on the electronic structure and catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:26376620

  11. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  12. Cofactor squelching: Artifact or fact?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Mandrup, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Cofactor squelching is the term used to describe competition between transcription factors (TFs) for a limited amount of cofactors in a cell with the functional consequence that TFs in a given cell interfere with the activity of each other. Since cofactor squelching was proposed based primarily on reporter assays some 30 years ago, it has remained controversial, and the idea that it could be a physiologically relevant mechanism for transcriptional repression has not received much support. However, recent genome-wide studies have demonstrated that signal-dependent TFs are very often absent from the enhancers that are acutely repressed by those signals, which is consistent with an indirect mechanism of repression such as squelching. Here we review these recent studies in the light of the classical studies of cofactor squelching, and we discuss how TF cooperativity in so-called hotspots and super-enhancers may sensitize these to cofactor squelching. PMID:27273739

  13. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS) Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Bhatt, Shiven; Poudel, Saroj; Boyd, Eric S; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s) of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins. PMID:27517714

  14. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS) Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shiven; Poudel, Saroj; Boyd, Eric S.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s) of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins. PMID:27517714

  15. Autonomous Filling of Grain-Boundary Cavities during Creep Loading in Fe-Mo Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Fang, H.; Gramsma, M. E.; Kwakernaak, C.; Sloof, W. G.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Kuzmina, M.; Herbig, M.; Raabe, D.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the autonomous repair of creep damage by site-selective precipitation in a binary Fe-Mo alloy (6.2 wt pct Mo) during constant-stress creep tests at temperatures of 813 K, 823 K, and 838 K (540 °C, 550 °C, and 565 °C). Scanning electron microscopy studies on the morphology of the creep-failed samples reveal irregularly formed deposits that show a close spatial correlation with the creep cavities, indicating the filling of creep cavities at grain boundaries by precipitation of the Fe2Mo Laves phase. Complementary transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography have been used to characterize the precipitation mechanism and the segregation at grain boundaries in detail.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: molybdenum cofactor deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... molybdenum, is essential to the function of several enzymes. These enzymes help break down (metabolize) different substances in the ... molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Without the cofactor, the metabolic enzymes that rely on it cannot function. The resulting ...

  17. FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, John E; Laughter, Mark D; March-Leuba, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

  18. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe/Mo composite amorphous coatings prepared by air plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-ping; Xing, Ya-zhe; Zhang, Feng-ying; Hao, Jian-min

    2012-07-01

    Fe/Mo composite coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS) using Fe-based and Mo-based amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed powders. Microstructural studies show that the composite coatings present a layered structure with low porosity due to adding the self-bonded Mo-based alloy. Corrosion behaviors of the composite coatings, the Fe-based coatings and the Mo-based coatings were investigated by electrochemical measurements and salt spray tests. Electrochemical results show that the composite coatings exhibit a lower polarization current density and higher corrosion potentials than the Fe-based coating when tested in 3.5wt% NaCl solutions, indicating superior corrosion resistance compared with the Fe-based coating. Also with the increase in addition of the Mo-based alloy, a raised corrosion resistance, inferred by an increase in corrosion potential and a decrease in polarization current density, can be found. The results of salt spray tests again show that the corrosion resistance is enhanced by adding the Mo-based alloy, which helps to reduce the porosity of the composite coatings and enhance the stability of the passive films.

  19. Cofactor engineering for advancing chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors provide redox carriers for biosynthetic reactions, catabolic reactions and act as important agents in transfer of energy for the cell. Recent advances in manipulating cofactors include culture conditions or additive alterations, genetic modification of host pathways for increased availability of desired cofactor, changes in enzyme cofactor specificity, and introduction of novel redox partners to form effective circuits for biochemical processes and biocatalysts. Genetic strategies to employ ferredoxin, NADH and NADPH most effectively in natural or novel pathways have improved yield and efficiency of large-scale processes for fuels and chemicals and have been demonstrated with a variety of microbial organisms. PMID:23611567

  20. Molybdenum cofactor and human disease.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    Four molybdenum-dependent enzymes are known in humans, each harboring a pterin-based molybdenum cofactor (Moco) in the active site. They catalyze redox reactions using water as oxygen acceptor or donator. Moco is synthesized by a conserved biosynthetic pathway. Moco deficiency results in a severe inborn error of metabolism causing often early childhood death. Disease-causing symptoms mainly go back to the lack of sulfite oxidase (SO) activity, an enzyme in cysteine catabolism. Besides their name-giving functions, Mo-enzymes have been recognized to catalyze novel reactions, including the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. In this review we cover the biosynthesis of Moco, key features of Moco-enzymes and focus on their deficiency. Underlying disease mechanisms as well as treatment options will be discussed. PMID:27055119

  1. The Inflammatory Response to Femoral Arterial Closure Devices: A Randomized Comparison Among FemoStop, AngioSeal, and Perclose

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jens Saleh, Nawzad; Jensen, Ulf; Svane, Bertil; Joensson, Anders; Tornvall, Per

    2008-07-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the systemic inflammatory response differs, in patients undergoing coronary angiography, among the arterial closure devices FemoStop, AngioSeal, and Perclose. The study is a prospective and randomized study. We measured pre- and postprocedural C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels and collected clinical and procedural data on 77 patients who underwent coronary angiography because of stable angina pectoris. Patients were randomized to the following device: FemoStop (mechanical compression), AngioSeal (anchor and collagen sponge), or Perclose (nonabsorbable suture). No patient group experienced an increased incidence of vascular complications. There were no differences among the three groups regarding CRP, fibrinogen, or IL-6 values before or after coronary angiography. IL-6 levels increased 6 h after the procedure in all groups (p < 0.01), however, the increase did not differ among the groups. After 30 days there were no increased values of CRP or fibrinogen. We conclude that the femoral arterial closure devices AngioSeal and Perclose do not enhance an inflammatory response after a diagnostic coronary angiography, measured by CRP, fibrinogen, and IL-6, compared to femoral arterial closure using a mechanical compression device.

  2. Ab initio study of energetics and magnetism of sigma phase in Co-Mo and Fe-Mo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlů, J.; Vřešťál, J.; Šob, M.

    2016-02-01

    We analyse, from first-principles, the energetics and magnetic ordering of sigma phases in Co-Mo and Fe-Mo systems. Total energy differences between the sigma phase and Standard Element Reference (SER) structures are calculated in the whole concentration range at equilibrium volumes by means of the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in the atomic-sphere approximation (LMTO-ASA), the full-potential linearised augmented-plane waves (FLAPW) method and the pseudopotential approach. They are compared with the enthalpy of formation of sigma phase obtained from the phase equilibria calculations at higher temperature based on the semiempirical CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) method. It turns out that the binary sigma phases are more stable than the weighted average of the sigma phase of elemental constituents and that this stability for Fe-Mo is higher than for Co-Mo. On the other hand it was found that the binary sigma phases do not exhibit any stability with respect to the weighted average of the SER structures. The magnetic configurations in all systems are investigated and the stabilizing effect of magnetic order in sigma phase at 0 K is presented. It turns out that the atomic magnetic moment strongly depends on the type of occupied sublattice and total composition of the alloy.

  3. Properties of a reaction-bonded β-SiAlON ceramic doped with an FeMo alloy for application to molten aluminum environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-jun; Yu, Hai-liang; Jin, Hai-yun; Shi, Zhong-qi; Qiao, Guan-jun; Jin, Zhi-hao

    2015-05-01

    An FeMo-alloy-doped β-SiAlON (FeMo/β-SiAlON) composite was fabricated via a reaction-bonding method using raw materials of Si, Al2O3, AlN, FeMo, and Sm2O3. The effects of FeMo on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite were investigated. Some properties of the composite, including its bending strength at 700°C and after oxidization at 700°C for 24 h in air, thermal shock resistance and corrosion resistance to molten aluminum, were also evaluated. The results show that the density, toughness, bending strength, and thermal shock resistance of the composite are obviously improved with the addition of an FeMo alloy. In addition, other properties of the composite such as its high-temperature strength and oxidized strength are also improved by the addition of FeMo alloy, and its corrosion resistance to molten aluminum is maintained. These findings indicate that the developed FeMo/β-SiAlON composite exhibits strong potential for application to molten aluminum environments.

  4. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  5. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  6. Cofactor modification analysis: a computational framework to identify cofactor specificity engineering targets for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Liu, Chengcheng; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors, such as NAD(H) and NADP(H), play important roles in energy transfer within the cells by providing the necessary redox carriers for a myriad of metabolic reactions, both anabolic and catabolic. Thus, it is crucial to establish the overall cellular redox balance for achieving the desired cellular physiology. Of several methods to manipulate the intracellular cofactor regeneration rates, altering the cofactor specificity of a particular enzyme is a promising one. However, the identification of relevant enzyme targets for such cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) is often very difficult and labor intensive. Therefore, it is necessary to develop more systematic approaches to find the cofactor engineering targets for strain improvement. Presented herein is a novel mathematical framework, cofactor modification analysis (CMA), developed based on the well-established constraints-based flux analysis, for the systematic identification of suitable CSE targets while exploring the global metabolic effects. The CMA algorithm was applied to E. coli using its genome-scale metabolic model, iJO1366, thereby identifying the growth-coupled cofactor engineering targets for overproducing four of its native products: acetate, formate, ethanol, and lactate, and three non-native products: 1-butanol, 1,4-butanediol, and 1,3-propanediol. Notably, among several target candidates for cofactor engineering, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) is the most promising enzyme; its cofactor modification enhanced both the desired product and biomass yields significantly. Finally, given the identified target, we further discussed potential mutational strategies for modifying cofactor specificity of GAPD in E. coli as suggested by in silico protein docking experiments. PMID:24372035

  7. Structural Framework for Metal Incorporation during Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Schindelin, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is essential for the catalytic activity of all molybdenum-containing enzymes with the exception of nitrogenase. Moco biosynthesis follows an evolutionarily highly conserved pathway and genetic deficiencies in the corresponding human enzymes result in Moco deficiency, which manifests itself in severe neurological symptoms and death in childhood. In humans the final steps of Moco biosynthesis are catalyzed by gephyrin, specifically the penultimate adenylation of molybdopterin (MPT) by its N-terminal G domain (GephG) and the final metal incorporation by its C-terminal E domain (GephE). To better understand the poorly defined molecular framework of this final step, we determined high-resolution crystal structures of GephE in the apo state and in complex with ADP, AMP, and molybdate. Our data provide novel insights into the catalytic steps leading to final Moco maturation, namely deadenylation as well as molybdate binding and insertion. PMID:27112598

  8. Determination of ligand binding constants for the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase: monomers, multimers, and cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Frank, P; Angove, H C; Burgess, B K; Hodgson, K O

    2001-09-01

    Equilibrium titrations in N-methylformamide (NMF) of G-25 gel filtered (ox)-state FeMo cofactor [FeMoco(ox)] from Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase were carried out using sodium ethanethiolate and followed using UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy. For Fe-Moco(ox), a non-linear least squares (NLLSQ) fit to the data indicated a strong equilibrium thiolate-binding step with Keq = 1.3+/-0.2x10(6) M(-1). With 245 molar excess imidazole, cooperative binding of three ethanethiolates was observed. The best NLLSQ fit gave Keq=2.0+/-0.1x10(5) M(-2) and a Hill coefficient n=2.0+/-0.3. A Scatchard plot of these data was concave upward, indicating positive cooperativity. The fit to previously published data involving benzenethiol titration of the one-electron reduced (semi-reduced) cofactor, FeMoco(sr), as followed by EPR required a model that included both a sub-stoichiometric ratio of thiol to FeMoco(sr) and about five cooperative ligand binding sites. These constraints were met by modeling FeMoco(sr) as an aggregate, with fewer thiol binding sites than FeMoco(sr) units. The best fit model was that of FeMoco(sr) as a dodecamer with five cooperative benzenethiol binding sites, yielding a thiol binding constant of 3.32+/-0.09x10(4) M(-4.8) and a Hill coefficient n=4.8+/-0.6. The results of all the other published ligand titrations of FeMoco(sr) were similarly analyzed successfully in terms of equilibrium models that include both cooperative ligand binding and dimer-level aggregation. A possible structural model for FeMoco aggregation in NMF solution is proposed. PMID:11681702

  9. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  10. Molybdenum Enzymes, Cofactors, and Model Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgmayer, S. J. N; Stiefel, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) molybdoenzymes (examining their distribution and metabolic role, composition and redox strategy, cofactors, substrate reactions, and mechanistic possibilities); (2) structural information on molybdenum (Mo) centers; (3) modeling studies (Mo-co models, nitrogenase models, and the MO-S duo); and (4) the copper-molybdenum antagonism.…

  11. Cofactor binding protects flavodoxin against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; van den Berg, Willy A M; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Heck, Albert J R; van Mierlo, Carlo P M; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2012-01-01

    In organisms, various protective mechanisms against oxidative damaging of proteins exist. Here, we show that cofactor binding is among these mechanisms, because flavin mononucleotide (FMN) protects Azotobacter vinelandii flavodoxin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation. We identify an oxidation sensitive cysteine residue in a functionally important loop close to the cofactor, i.e., Cys69. Oxidative stress causes dimerization of apoflavodoxin (i.e., flavodoxin without cofactor), and leads to consecutive formation of sulfinate and sulfonate states of Cys69. Use of 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl) reveals that Cys69 modification to a sulfenic acid is a transient intermediate during oxidation. Dithiothreitol converts sulfenic acid and disulfide into thiols, whereas the sulfinate and sulfonate forms of Cys69 are irreversible with respect to this reagent. A variable fraction of Cys69 in freshly isolated flavodoxin is in the sulfenic acid state, but neither oxidation to sulfinic and sulfonic acid nor formation of intermolecular disulfides is observed under oxidising conditions. Furthermore, flavodoxin does not react appreciably with NBD-Cl. Besides its primary role as redox-active moiety, binding of flavin leads to considerably improved stability against protein unfolding and to strong protection against irreversible oxidation and other covalent thiol modifications. Thus, cofactors can protect proteins against oxidation and modification. PMID:22829943

  12. A survey of synthetic nicotinamide cofactors in enzymatic processes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Caroline E; Hollmann, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic nicotinamide cofactors are analogues of the natural cofactors used by oxidoreductases as redox intermediates. Their ability to be fine-tuned makes these biomimetics an attractive alternative to the natural cofactors in terms of stability, reactivity, and cost. The following mini-review focuses on the current state of the art of those biomimetics in enzymatic processes. PMID:27094184

  13. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Cofactors are critical for energy-consuming processes in the cell. Harnessing such processes for practical applications requires control over the concentration of cofactors. We have recently shown that DNA triplex motifs with a designed binding site can be used to capture and release nucleotides with low micromolar dissociation constants. In order to increase the storage capacity of such triplex motifs, we have explored the limits of ligand binding through designed cavities in the oligopurine tract. Oligonucleotides with up to six non-nucleotide bridges between purines were synthesized and their ability to bind ATP, cAMP or FAD was measured. Triplex motifs with several single-nucleotide binding sites were found to bind purines more tightly than triplexes with one large binding site. The optimized triplex consists of 59 residues and four C3-bridges. It can bind up to four equivalents of ligand with apparent Kd values of 52 µM for ATP, 9 µM for FAD, and 2 µM for cAMP. An immobilized version fuels bioluminescence via release of ATP at body temperature. These results show that motifs for high-density capture, storage and release of energy-rich biomolecules can be constructed from synthetic DNA. PMID:26561335

  14. The Influence of Oxygen on [NiFe]–Hydrogenase Cofactor Biosynthesis and How Ligation of Carbon Monoxide Precedes Cyanation

    PubMed Central

    Stripp, Sven T.; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Granich, Claudia; Sawers, R. Gary; Soboh, Basem

    2014-01-01

    The class of [NiFe]–hydrogenases is characterized by a bimetallic cofactor comprising low–spin nickel and iron ions, the latter of which is modified with a single carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN−) molecules. Generation of these ligands in vivo requires a complex maturation apparatus in which the HypC–HypD complex acts as a ‘construction site’ for the Fe–(CN)2CO portion of the cofactor. The order of addition of the CO and CN– ligands determines the ultimate structure and catalytic efficiency of the cofactor; however much debate surrounds the succession of events. Here, we present an FT–IR spectroscopic analysis of HypC–HypD isolated from a hydrogenase–competent wild–type strain of Escherichia coli. In contrast to previously reported samples, HypC–HypD showed spectral contributions indicative of an electron–rich Fe–CO cofactor, at the same time lacking any Fe–CN– signatures. This immature iron site binds external CO and undergoes oxidative damage when in contact with O2. Binding of CO protects the site against loss of spectral features associated with O2 damage. Our findings strongly suggest that CO ligation precedes cyanation in vivo. Furthermore, the results provide a rationale for the deleterious effects of O2 on in vivo cofactor biosynthesis. PMID:25211029

  15. Catalysis in Enzymatic Decarboxylations: Comparison of Selected Cofactor-dependent and Cofactor-independent Examples

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Frank; Patel, Hetalben

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on three types of enzymes decarboxylating very different substrates: (1) Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes reacting with 2-oxo acids; (2) Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes reacting with α-amino acids; and (3) An enzyme with no known co-factors, orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC). While the first two classes have been much studied for many years, during the past decade studies of both classes have revealed novel mechanistic insight challenging accepted understanding. The enzyme OMPDC has posed a challenge to the enzymologist attempting to explain a 1017-fold rate acceleration in the absence of cofactors or even metal ions. A comparison of the available evidence on the three types of decarboxylases underlines some common features and more differences. The field of decarboxylases remains an interesting and challenging one for the mechanistic enzymologist notwithstanding the large amount of information already available. PMID:23914308

  16. Control of p97 function by cofactor binding.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, Alexander; Schindelin, Hermann; Hänzelmann, Petra

    2015-09-14

    p97 (also known as Cdc48, Ter94, and VCP) is an essential, abundant and highly conserved ATPase driving the turnover of ubiquitylated proteins in eukaryotes. Even though p97 is involved in highly diverse cellular pathways and processes, it exhibits hardly any substrate specificity on its own. Instead, it relies on a large number of regulatory cofactors controlling substrate specificity and turnover. The complexity as well as temporal and spatial regulation of the interactions between p97 and its cofactors is only beginning to be understood at the molecular level. Here, we give an overview on the structural framework of p97 interactions with its cofactors, the emerging principles underlying the assembly of complexes with different cofactors, and the pathogenic effects of disease-associated p97 mutations on cofactor binding. PMID:26320413

  17. The role of FeS clusters for molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and molybdoenzymes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum is the only second row transition metal essential for biological systems, which is biologically available as molybdate ion. In eukarya, bacteria and archaea, molybdenum is bound to either to a tricyclic pyranopterin, thereby forming the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), or in some bacteria to the FeS cluster based iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco), which forms the active site of nitrogenase. To date more than 50 Moco-containing enzymes have been purified and biochemically or structurally characterized. The physiological role of molybdenum in these enzymes is fundamental to organisms, since the reactions include the catalysis of key steps in carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. The catalyzed reactions are in most cases oxo-transfer reactions or the hydroxylation of carbon centers. The biosynthesis of Moco has been intensively studied, in addition to its insertion into molybdoenzymes. In particular, a link between the biosynthesis and maturation of molybdoenzymes and the biosynthesis and distribution of FeS clusters has been identified in the last years: 1) The synthesis of the first intermediate in Moco biosynthesis requires an FeS-cluster containing protein, 2) The sulfurtransferase for the dithiolene group in Moco is common also for the synthesis of FeS clusters, thiamin and thiolated tRNAs, 3) the modification of the active site with a sulfur atom additionally involves a sulfurtransferase, 4) most molybdoenzymes in bacteria require FeS clusters as additional redox active cofactors. In this review we will focus on the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in bacteria, its modification and insertion into molybdoenzymes, with an emphasis to its link to FeS cluster biosynthesis and sulfur transfer. PMID:25268953

  18. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  19. Neutrino mass matrices with two vanishing elements/cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Singh, Lal; Raj, Desh

    2015-08-01

    We study the phenomenological implications of the recent neutrino data for class B of two texture zeros and two vanishing cofactors for Majorana neutrinos in the flavor basis. We find that the classes () of two texture zeros and the classes () of two vanishing cofactors have similar predictions for neutrino oscillation parameters for the same mass hierarchy. Similar predictions for the classes () of two texture zeros and classes () of two vanishing cofactors are expected. However, a preference for a shift in the quadrant of the Dirac-type CP-violating phase () in contrast to the earlier analysis has been predicted for a relatively large value of the reactor neutrino mixing angle () for class B of two texture zeros and two vanishing cofactors for an inverted mass spectrum. No such shift in the quadrant of has been found for the normal mass spectrum.

  20. Enzyme cofactors: Double-edged sword for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2013-01-01

    The metal cofactors responsible for the activity of CDK2 -- a representative member of the kinase superfamily of enzymes -- have now been shown to also have inhibitory effects during the catalytic cycle.

  1. Ascorbate as a Co-Factor for Fe- and 2-Oxoglutarate Dependent Dioxygenases: Physiological Activity in Tumor Growth and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbate is a specific co-factor for a large family of enzymes known as the Fe- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are found throughout biology and catalyze the addition of a hydroxyl group to various substrates. The proline hydroxylase that is involved in collagen maturation is well known, but in recent times many new enzymes and functions have been uncovered, including those involved in epigenetic control and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulation. These discoveries have provided crucial mechanistic insights into how ascorbate may affect tumor biology. In particular, there is growing evidence that HIF-1-dependent tumor progression may be inhibited by increasing tumor ascorbate levels. However, rigorous clinical intervention studies are lacking. This review will explore the physiological role of ascorbate as an enzyme co-factor and how this mechanism relates to cancer biology and treatment. The use of ascorbate in cancer should be informed by clinical studies based on such mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:25540771

  2. Functional expression of the FeMo-cofactor-specific biosynthetic genes nifEN as a NifE-N fusion protein synthesizing unit in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Suh, Man Hee; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara

    2002-11-29

    The nifEN encodes an E2N2 tetrameric metalloprotein complex that serves as scaffold for assembly of the FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase. In most diazotrophs, the NifE and NifN are translated as separate polypeptides and then assembled into tetrameric E2N2 complex. However, in Anabaena variabilis which has two nif clusters that encode two different NifEN complexes, the NifEN2 is encoded by a single nifE-N like gene, which has high homology to the NifE at amino-terminus and to the NifN at the carboxy-terminus. These observations implied that a metalloprotein like NifEN can accommodate large variations in their amino acid composition and also in the way they are synthesized (as two separate proteins or as a single protein) and yet remain functional. In Azotobacter vinelandii NifE and NifN are synthesized separately. To test whether NifEN could retain its functionality when encoded by a single gene, we generated a translational fusion of the nifE and nifN genes of A. vinelandii that could encode a large NifE-N fusion protein. When expressed in the nifEN-minus strain of A. vinelandii, the nifE-N gene fusion could complement the NifEN function. Western blot analysis by using polyclonal NifEN antibodies revealed that the complementing nifEN product is a large NifE-N fusion protein unit. The fact that the gene fusion of nifE-N specifies a functional NifE-N fusion protein reflects that these metalloproteins can accommodate a wide range of flexibility in their gene organization, structure, and assembly. PMID:12437975

  3. Cofactor Engineering for Enhancing the Flux of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of a diverse array of chemicals is now possible with biologically engineered strains, an approach that is greatly facilitated by the emergence of synthetic biology. This is principally achieved through pathway engineering in which enzyme activities are coordinated within a genetically amenable host to generate the product of interest. A great deal of attention is typically given to the quantitative levels of the enzymes with little regard to their overall qualitative states. This highly constrained approach fails to consider other factors that may be necessary for enzyme functionality. In particular, enzymes with physically bound cofactors, otherwise known as holoenzymes, require careful evaluation. Herein, we discuss the importance of cofactors for biocatalytic processes and show with empirical examples why the synthesis and integration of cofactors for the formation of holoenzymes warrant a great deal of attention within the context of pathway engineering. PMID:25221776

  4. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  5. Pterin chemistry and its relationship to the molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Partha; Burgmayer, Sharon J.N.

    2011-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor is composed of a molybdenum coordinated by one or two rather complicated ligands known as either molybdopterin or pyranopterin. Pterin is one of a large family of bicyclic N-heterocycles called pteridines. Such molecules are widely found in Nature, having various forms to perform a variety of biological functions. This article describes the basic nomenclature of pterin, their biological roles, structure, chemical synthesis and redox reactivity. In addition, the biosynthesis of pterins and current models of the molybdenum cofactor are discussed. PMID:21607119

  6. Structural Basis for Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenation in Vancomycin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Widboom,P.; Fielding, E.; Liu, Y.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed oxidations are some of the most common transformations in primary and secondary metabolism. The vancomycin biosynthetic enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenation enzymes that are not dependent on an accessory cofactor or metal ion1. The detailed mechanism of cofactor-independent oxygenases has not been established. Here we report the first structure of an enzyme of this oxygenase class in complex with a bound substrate mimic. The use of a designed, synthetic substrate analogue allows unique insights into the chemistry of oxygen activation. The structure confirms the absence of cofactors, and electron density consistent with molecular oxygen is present adjacent to the site of oxidation on the substrate. Molecular oxygen is bound in a small hydrophobic pocket and the substrate provides the reducing power to activate oxygen for downstream chemical steps. Our results resolve the unique and complex chemistry of DpgC, a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of an important class of antibiotics. Furthermore, mechanistic parallels exist between DpgC and cofactor-dependent flavoenzymes, providing information regarding the general mechanism of enzymatic oxygen activation.

  7. Cofactor Trapping, a New Method To Produce Flavin Mononucleotide ▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Ulrich; Svensson, Vera; Wirtz, Astrid; Knieps-Grünhagen, Esther; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2011-01-01

    We have purified flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from a flavoprotein-overexpressing Escherichia coli strain by cofactor trapping. This approach uses an overexpressed flavoprotein to trap FMN, which is thus removed from the cascade regulating FMN production in E. coli. This, in turn, allows the isolation of highly pure FMN. PMID:21131527

  8. Tunable low-field magnetoresistance in Sr2FeMoO6 ceramics using organic glycerin to modify grain boundaries and Fe/Mo ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.-F.; Zhang, J.; Hu, B.; Gu, Z.-B.; Zhang, S.-T.

    2014-11-01

    A simple and efficient post-treatment method has been developed to tune the low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) of Sr2FeMoO6 (SFMO) ceramics. SFMO ceramics, with initial 10% Fe/Mo anitsite defects (ASD), were prepared and soaked in a glycerin/water mixture (v/v, 1/19) for 0-24 h at room temperature; such post-treatment leads to SrMoO4 precipitating, which affects both the grain boundary (GB) strength and the ASD content. By controlling the soaking time the negative effect of ASD and the positive effect of GB on LFMR can be controlled, thus the LFMR can be tuned. When the soaking time is no longer than 6 h, the precipitated SrMoO4 influences the effects of ASD negligibly, but greatly improves the effects of GB, with LFMR enhancements of ~2 times obtained. However, longer soaking times result in an abrupt increase in ASD content; its negative effect is dominant and can offset the increasingly positive effect of GB, so LFMR is suppressed. Our work may provide a new method of using organic materials to manipulate the transport properties of double perovskite ceramics.

  9. UV/V IS/NIR spectrum of β-carotene incorporated in lipid bilayers. FE-MO calculations and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, V. D.

    1984-03-01

    When incorporated in the bilayers of lipid vesicles, β-carotene shows an additional absorption band at 520-540 nm which is not observed in non-polar solvents. A widely distributed opinion attributes the new band to aggregates of the pigment, but conclusive evidence for this suggestion has not been given. Since the spectral properties of carotenoids in biological and artificial membranes are essential for understanding their functions in photosynthesis, an attempt is undertaken in this paper to obtain theoretical expressions for the parameters of the π-electron transitions using the FE-MO model of the long conjugated chromophore axis of β-carotene. The calculated values of the characteristic wavelengths and oscillator strengths are in good agreement with experimental data. As a band at 535 nm presents in the theoretical spectrum, it is suggested another mechanism of the origin of the long-wavelength band, namely, well oriented β-carotene monomers interacting with the neighbouring lipid molecules in the bilayer.

  10. New artificial fluoro-cofactor of hydride transfer with novel fluorescence assay for redox biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Jun; Xu, Yufang; Zhang, Y-H Percival; Qian, Xuhong

    2016-05-11

    A new artificial fluoro-cofactor was developed for the replacement of natural cofactors NAD(P), exhibiting a high hydride transfer ability. More importantly, we established a new and fast screening method for the evaluation of the properties of artificial cofactors based on the fluorescence assay and visible color change. PMID:27100122

  11. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  12. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  13. MYC Cofactors: Molecular Switches Controlling Diverse Biological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hann, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC has fundamental roles in proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and stem cell pluripotency. Over the last 30 years extensive information has been gathered on the numerous cofactors that interact with MYC and the target genes that are regulated by MYC as a means of understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling its diverse roles. Despite significant advances and perhaps because the amount of information learned about MYC is overwhelming, there has been little consensus on the molecular functions of MYC that mediate its critical biological roles. In this perspective, the major MYC cofactors that regulate the various transcriptional activities of MYC, including canonical and noncanonical transactivation and transcriptional repression, will be reviewed and a model of how these transcriptional mechanisms control MYC-mediated proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis will be presented. The basis of the model is that a variety of cofactors form dynamic MYC transcriptional complexes that can switch the molecular and biological functions of MYC to yield a diverse range of outcomes in a cell-type- and context-dependent fashion. PMID:24939054

  14. Efficiently Communicating Rich Heterogeneous Geospatial Data from the FeMO2008 Dive Cruise with FlashMap on EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R. C.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, D.; Staudigel, H.

    2008-12-01

    the web without losing scalability and control of the base maps. Our Flash-based application is fully compatible with KML (Keyhole Markup Language) 2.2, the most recent iteration of KML, allowing users with existing Google Earth KML files to effortlessly display their geospatial content embedded in a web page. As a test case for FlashMap, the annual Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Observatory (FeMO) dive cruise to the Loihi Seamount, in conjunction with data available from ongoing and published FeMO laboratory studies, showcases the flexibility of this single web-based application. With a KML 2.2 compatible web-service providing the content, any database can display results in FlashMap. The user can then hide and show multiple layers of content, potentially from several data sources, and rapidly digest a vast quantity of information to narrow the search results. This flexibility gives experienced users the ability to drill down to exactly the record they are looking for (SERC at Carleton College's educational application of FlashMap at http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/erese/activities/22223.html) and allows users familiar with Google Earth the ability to load and view geospatial data content within a browser from any computer with an internet connection.

  15. Constraints on texture zero and cofactor zero models for neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Whisnant, K.; Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.

    2014-06-24

    Imposing a texture or cofactor zero on the neutrino mass matrix reduces the number of independent parameters from nine to seven. Since five parameters have been measured, only two independent parameters would remain in such models. We find the allowed regions for single texture zero and single cofactor zero models. We also find strong similarities between single texture zero models with one mass hierarchy and single cofactor zero models with the opposite mass hierarchy. We show that this correspondence can be generalized to texture-zero and cofactor-zero models with the same homogeneous costraints on the elements and cofactors.

  16. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa A.; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M.; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD “chaperone.” The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  17. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa A; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone." The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  18. Design of dinuclear manganese cofactors for bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Olson, Tien L; Espiritu, Eduardo; Edwardraja, Selvakumar; Simmons, Chad R; Williams, JoAnn C; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Allen, James P

    2016-05-01

    A compelling target for the design of electron transfer proteins with novel cofactors is to create a model for the oxygen-evolving complex, a Mn4Ca cluster, of photosystem II. A mononuclear Mn cofactor can be added to the bacterial reaction center, but the addition of multiple metal centers is constrained by the native protein architecture. Alternatively, metal centers can be incorporated into artificial proteins. Designs for the addition of dinuclear metal centers to four-helix bundles resulted in three artificial proteins with ligands for one, two, or three dinuclear metal centers able to bind Mn. The three-dimensional structure determined by X-ray crystallography of one of the Mn-proteins confirmed the design features and revealed details concerning coordination of the Mn center. Electron transfer between these artificial Mn-proteins and bacterial reaction centers was investigated using optical spectroscopy. After formation of a light-induced, charge-separated state, the experiments showed that the Mn-proteins can donate an electron to the oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer of modified reaction centers, with the Mn-proteins having additional metal centers being more effective at this electron transfer reaction. Modeling of the structure of the Mn-protein docked to the reaction center showed that the artificial protein likely binds on the periplasmic surface similarly to cytochrome c2, the natural secondary donor. Combining reaction centers with exogenous artificial proteins provides the opportunity to create ligands and investigate the influence of inhomogeneous protein environments on multinuclear redox-active metal centers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26392146

  19. NifX and NifEN exchange NifB cofactor and the VK-cluster, a newly isolated intermediate of the iron-molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jose A; Igarashi, Robert Y; Soboh, Basem; Curatti, Leonardo; Dean, Dennis R; Ludden, Paul W; Rubio, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    The iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase (FeMo-co) is synthesized in a multistep process catalysed by several Nif proteins and is finally inserted into a pre-synthesized apo-dinitrogenase to generate mature dinitrogenase protein. The NifEN complex serves as scaffold for some steps of this synthesis, while NifX belongs to a family of small proteins that bind either FeMo-co precursors or FeMo-co during cofactor synthesis. In this work, the binding of FeMo-co precursors and their transfer between purified Azotobacter vinelandii NifX and NifEN proteins was studied to shed light on the role of NifX on FeMo-co synthesis. Purified NifX binds NifB cofactor (NifB-co), a precursor to FeMo-co, with high affinity and is able to transfer it to the NifEN complex. In addition, NifEN and NifX exchange another [Fe-S] cluster that serves as a FeMo-co precursor, and we have designated it as the VK-cluster. In contrast to NifB-co, the VK-cluster is electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-active in the reduced and the oxidized states. The NifX/VK-cluster complex is unable to support in vitro FeMo-co synthesis in the absence of NifEN because further processing of the VK-cluster into FeMo-co requires the simultaneous activities of NifEN and NifH. Our in vitro studies suggest that the role of NifX in vivo is to serve as transient reservoir of FeMo-co precursors and thus help control their flux during FeMo-co synthesis. PMID:17163967

  20. Effect of Aptamer Binding on the Electron-Transfer Properties of Redox Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Emahi, Ismaila; Gruenke, Paige R; Baum, Dana A

    2015-12-01

    In vitro selection or SELEX has allowed for the identification of functional nucleic acids (FNAs) that can potentially mimic and replace protein enzymes. These FNAs likely interact with cofactors, just like enzymes bind cofactors in their active sites. Investigating how FNA binding affects cofactor properties is important for understanding how an active site is formed and for developing useful enzyme mimics. Oxidoreductase enzymes contain cofactors in their active sites that allow the enzymes to do redox chemistry. In certain applications, these redox cofactors act as electron-transfer shuttles that transport electrons between the enzymes' active sites and electrode surfaces. Three redox cofactors commonly found in oxidoreductases are flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). We are interested in investigating how DNA aptamers that bind these cofactors influence the cofactors' redox abilities and if these aptamer-cofactor complexes could serve as redox catalysts. We employed cyclic voltammetry and amperometry to study the electrochemical properties of NAD(+) and PQQ when bound to DNA aptamers. Our results suggest that the aptamers provide a stable environment for the cofactor to participate in redox reactions, although enhanced redox activity was not observed. This work provides a foundation for the development of new FNAs capable of redox activity. PMID:26498628

  1. Cervical cancer: is herpes simplex virus type II a cofactor?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C

    1995-01-01

    In many ways, cervical cancer behaves as a sexually transmitted disease. The major risk factors are multiple sexual partners and early onset of sexual activity. Although high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) play an important role in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer, other sexually transmitted infectious agents may be cofactors. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is transmitted primarily by sexual contact and therefore has been implicated as a risk factor. Several independent studies suggest that HSV-2 infections correlate with a higher than normal incidence of cervical cancer. In contrast, other epidemiological studies have concluded that infection with HSV-2 is not a major risk factor. Two separate transforming domains have been identified within the HSV-2 genome, but continued viral gene expression apparently is not necessary for neoplastic transformation. HSV infections lead to unscheduled cellular DNA synthesis, chromosomal amplifications, and mutations. These observations suggest that HSV-2 is not a typical DNA tumor virus. It is hypothesized that persistent or abortive infections induce permanent genetic alterations that interfere with differentiation of cervical epithelium and subsequently induce abnormal proliferation. Thus, HSV-2 may be a cofactor in some but not all cases of cervical cancer. PMID:8665469

  2. Exercise–induced Anaphylaxis: the Role of Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Zogaj, Dukagjin; Ibranji, Alkerta; Hoxha, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anaphylaxis is a dramatic clinical emergency. It is a very severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction. Based on immunologic mechanism the anaphylaxis is divided in IgE, IgG, complement, or immune complexes-mediated vs non allergic anaphylaxis. There are a lot of etiologic factors of anaphylaxis, but the three principal immunologic triggers are drugs, insect stings, and foods. Regarding the clinical severity there are several proposed grading systems. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is mainly clinical. Discussion: The anaphylaxis markers measured in clinical laboratories are total tryptase and histamine. There are some conditions that modulate the onset of anaphylaxis, acting as co- or augmentation factors, which significantly lower the allergen dose necessary for triggering anaphylaxis. The well-documented cofactors of anaphylaxis are physical exercise, alcohol consumption, some foods, co-administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and concomitant infectious diseases. Development of anaphylaxis depends on the sensitization pattern, the proportion of the involved immunoglobulin classes, characteristics of the allergen, the proportion of the involved immunoglobulin classes, the avidity and affinity of immunoglobulins to bind an allergen, the route of allergen application, and, last but not least, the presence of cofactors of anaphylaxis. Conclusion: Anaphylaxis remains a continuous challenge for the diagnosis and treatment. The adequate management of anaphylaxis requires rapid diagnosis, implementation of primary and secondary prevention measures, and immediate administration of subcutaneous epinephrine. PMID:25685088

  3. HMGB1 is a cofactor in mammalian base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Liu, Yuan; Deterding, Leesa J; Poltoratsky, Vladimir P; Kedar, Padmini S; Horton, Julie K; Kanno, Shin-Ichiro; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Hou, Esther W; Khodyreva, Svetlana N; Lavrik, Olga I; Tomer, Kenneth B; Yasui, Akira; Wilson, Samuel H

    2007-09-01

    Deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) removal by DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta) is a pivotal step in base excision repair (BER). To identify BER cofactors, especially those with dRP lyase activity, we used a Pol beta null cell extract and BER intermediate as bait for sodium borohydride crosslinking. Mass spectrometry identified the high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) as specifically interacting with the BER intermediate. Purified HMGB1 was found to have weak dRP lyase activity and to stimulate AP endonuclease and FEN1 activities on BER substrates. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed interactions of HMGB1 with known BER enzymes, and GFP-tagged HMGB1 was found to accumulate at sites of oxidative DNA damage in living cells. HMGB1(-/-) mouse cells were slightly more resistant to MMS than wild-type cells, probably due to the production of fewer strand-break BER intermediates. The results suggest HMGB1 is a BER cofactor capable of modulating BER capacity in cells. PMID:17803946

  4. Insights into Hydrocarbon Formation by Nitrogenase Cofactor Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The L-cluster is an all-iron homolog of nitrogenase cofactors. Driven by europium(II) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [Eu(II)-DTPA], the isolated L-cluster is capable of ATP-independent reduction of CO and CN− to C1 to C4 and C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, respectively. Compared to its cofactor homologs, the L-cluster generates considerably more CH4 from the reduction of CO and CN−, which could be explained by the presence of a “free” Fe atom that is “unmasked” by homocitrate as an additional site for methanation. Moreover, the elevated CH4 formation is accompanied by a decrease in the amount of longer hydrocarbons and/or the lengths of the hydrocarbon products, illustrating a competition between CH4 formation/release and C−C coupling/chain extension. These observations suggest the possibility of designing simpler synthetic clusters for hydrocarbon formation while establishing the L-cluster as a platform for mechanistic investigations of CO and CN− reduction without complications originating from the heterometal and homocitrate components. PMID:25873377

  5. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-07-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM-MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM-MS data.

  6. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme–cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes. PMID:26537172

  7. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  8. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-01-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM–MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM–MS data. PMID:27418477

  9. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  10. Characterization of transcriptional regulatory domains of ankyrin repeat cofactor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Aihua; Li, Chia-Wei; Chen, J. Don . E-mail: chenjd@umdnj.edu

    2007-07-13

    The ankyrin repeats cofactor-1 (ANCO-1) was recently identified as a p160 coactivator-interacting protein that may inhibit transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. Here, we have characterized the transcriptional regulatory domains of ANCO-1. Two intrinsic repression domains (RD) were identified: an N-terminal RD1 at residues 318-611 and a C-terminal RD2 at 2369-2663. ANCO-1 also contains an activation domain (AD) capable of stimulating transcription in both mammalian and yeast cells. The minimal AD was delimited to a 70-amino acid region at residues 2076-2145. Overall, full-length ANCO-1 exhibited transcriptional repressor activity, suggesting that RD domains may suppress the AD activity. We further demonstrated that ANCO-1 silencing by siRNA enhanced progesterone receptor-mediated transcription. Together, these results indicate that the transcriptional potential of ANCO-1 may be modulated by a combination of repression and activation signals.

  11. Spontaneous Formation of RNA Strands, Peptidyl RNA, and Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    How the biochemical machinery evolved from simple precursors is an open question. Here we show that ribonucleotides and amino acids condense to peptidyl RNAs in the absence of enzymes under conditions established for genetic copying. Untemplated formation of RNA strands that can encode genetic information, formation of peptidyl chains linked to RNA, and formation of the cofactors NAD+, FAD, and ATP all occur under the same conditions. In the peptidyl RNAs, the peptide chains are phosphoramidate-linked to a ribonucleotide. Peptidyl RNAs with long peptide chains were selected from an initial pool when a lipophilic phase simulating the interior of membranes was offered, and free peptides were released upon acidification. Our results show that key molecules of genetics, catalysis, and metabolism can emerge under the same conditions, without a mineral surface, without an enzyme, and without the need for chemical pre-activation. PMID:26435376

  12. Mechanistic Contributions of Biological Cofactors in Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Andraka, Nagore; De Carufel, Carole Anne; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is associated with the deposition of fibrillar aggregates in pancreatic islets. The major protein component of islet amyloids is the glucomodulatory hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). Islet amyloid fibrils are virtually always associated with several biomolecules, including apolipoprotein E, metals, glycosaminoglycans, and various lipids. IAPP amyloidogenesis has been originally perceived as a self-assembly homogeneous process in which the inherent aggregation propensity of the peptide and its local concentration constitute the major driving forces to fibrillization. However, over the last two decades, numerous studies have shown a prominent role of amyloid cofactors in IAPP fibrillogenesis associated with the etiology of type II diabetes. It is increasingly evident that the biochemical microenvironment in which IAPP amyloid formation occurs and the interactions of the polypeptide with various biomolecules not only modulate the rate and extent of aggregation, but could also remodel the amyloidogenesis process as well as the structure, toxicity, and stability of the resulting fibrils. PMID:26576436

  13. Spatially Organized Enzymes Drive Cofactor-Coupled Cascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tien Anh; Nakata, Eiji; Saimura, Masayuki; Morii, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    We report the construction of an artificial enzyme cascade based on the xylose metabolic pathway. Two enzymes, xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, were assembled at specific locations on DNA origami by using DNA-binding protein adaptors with systematic variations in the interenzyme distances and defined numbers of enzyme molecules. The reaction system, which localized the two enzymes in close proximity to facilitate transport of reaction intermediates, resulted in significantly higher yields of the conversion of xylose into xylulose through the intermediate xylitol with recycling of the cofactor NADH. Analysis of the initial reaction rate, regenerated amount of NADH, and simulation of the intermediates' diffusion indicated that the intermediates diffused to the second enzyme by Brownian motion. The efficiency of the cascade reaction with the bimolecular transport of xylitol and NAD(+) likely depends more on the interenzyme distance than that of the cascade reaction with unimolecular transport between two enzymes. PMID:26881296

  14. EPR monitored redox titration of the cofactors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nar1.

    PubMed

    Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; van der Weel, Laura; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2014-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) monitored redox titrations are a powerful method to determine the midpoint potential of cofactors in proteins and to identify and quantify the cofactors in their detectable redox state. The technique is complementary to direct electrochemistry (voltammetry) approaches, as it does not offer information on electron transfer rates, but does establish the identity and redox state of the cofactors in the protein under study. The technique is widely applicable to any protein containing an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) detectable cofactor. A typical titration requires 2 ml protein with a cofactor concentration in the range of 1-100 µM. The protein is titrated with a chemical reductant (sodium dithionite) or oxidant (potassium ferricyanide) in order to poise the sample at a certain potential. A platinum wire and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode are connected to a voltmeter to measure the potential of the protein solution A set of 13 different redox mediators is used to equilibrate between the redox cofactors of the protein and the electrodes. Samples are drawn at different potentials and the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra, characteristic for the different redox cofactors in the protein, are measured. The plot of the signal intensity versus the sample potential is analyzed using the Nernst equation in order to determine the midpoint potential of the cofactor. PMID:25490157

  15. Dynamics of Protein Folding and Cofactor Binding Monitored by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins in living cells require cofactors to carry out their biological functions. To reach their functional states, these proteins need to fold into their unique three-dimensional structures in the presence of their cofactors. Two processes, folding of the protein and binding of cofactors, intermingle with each other, making the direct elucidation of the folding mechanism of proteins in the presence of cofactors challenging. Here we use single-molecule atomic force microscopy to directly monitor the folding and cofactor binding dynamics of an engineered metal-binding protein G6-53 at the single-molecule level. Using the mechanical stability of different conformers of G6-53 as sensitive probes, we directly identified different G6-53 conformers (unfolded, apo- and Ni2+-bound) populated along the folding pathway of G6-53 in the presence of its cofactor Ni2+. By carrying out single-molecule atomic force microscopy refolding experiments, we monitored kinetic evolution processes of these different conformers. Our results suggested that the majority of G6-53 folds through a binding-after-folding mechanism, whereas a small fraction follows a binding-before-folding pathway. Our study opens an avenue to utilizing force spectroscopy techniques to probe the folding dynamics of proteins in the presence of cofactors at the single-molecule level, and we anticipated that this method can be used to study a wide variety of proteins requiring cofactors for their function. PMID:22004755

  16. Nuclear Receptor Cofactors in PPARγ-Mediated Adipogenesis and Adipocyte Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Emily; Kuhn, Peter; Xu, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional cofactors are integral to the proper function and regulation of nuclear receptors. Members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear receptors are involved in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. They modulate gene transcription in response to a wide variety of ligands, a process that is mediated by transcriptional coactivators and corepressors. The mechanisms by which these cofactors mediate transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor function are still being elucidated. The rapidly increasing array of cofactors has brought into focus the need for a clear understanding of how these cofactors interact in ligand- and cell-specific manners. This review highlights the differential effects of the assorted cofactors regulating the transcriptional action of PPARγ and summarizes the recent advances in understanding the physiological functions of corepressors and coactivators. PMID:17389765

  17. Cone Early Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop cone early maturity is thought to be caused by diffuse infections of cone, just prior to harvest, by Podosphaera macularis. The disease is best managed by limiting the amount of leaf infection by P. macularis prior to bloom. The yield and quality reductions associated with Hop cone early matur...

  18. Identification and characterization of functional homologs of nitrogenase cofactor biosynthesis protein NifB from methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Aaron W.; Wiig, Jared A.; Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase biosynthesis protein NifB catalyzes the radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent insertion of carbide into the M cluster, the cofactor of the molybdenum nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two naturally “truncated” homologs of NifB from Methanosarcina acetivorans (NifBMa) and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (NifBMt), which contain a SAM-binding domain at the N terminus but lack a domain toward the C terminus that shares homology with NifX, an accessory protein in M cluster biosynthesis. NifBMa and NifBMt are monomeric proteins containing a SAM-binding [Fe4S4] cluster (designated the SAM cluster) and a [Fe4S4]-like cluster pair (designated the K cluster) that can be processed into an [Fe8S9] precursor to the M cluster (designated the L cluster). Further, the K clusters in NifBMa and NifBMt can be converted to L clusters upon addition of SAM, which corresponds to their ability to heterologously donate L clusters to the biosynthetic machinery of A. vinelandii for further maturation into the M clusters. Perhaps even more excitingly, NifBMa and NifBMt can catalyze the removal of methyl group from SAM and the abstraction of hydrogen from this methyl group by 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates the radical-based incorporation of methyl-derived carbide into the M cluster. The successful identification of NifBMa and NifBMt as functional homologs of NifB not only enabled classification of a new subset of radical SAM methyltransferases that specialize in complex metallocluster assembly, but also provided a new tool for further characterization of the distinctive, NifB-catalyzed methyl transfer and conversion to an iron-bound carbide. PMID:26627238

  19. MTR4, a putative RNA helicase and exosome co-factor, is required for proper rRNA biogenesis and development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lange, Heike; Sement, François M; Gagliardi, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    The exosome is a conserved protein complex that is responsible for essential 3'→5' RNA degradation in both the nucleus and the cytosol. It is composed of a nine-subunit core complex to which co-factors confer both RNA substrate recognition and ribonucleolytic activities. Very few exosome co-factors have been identified in plants. Here, we have characterized a putative RNA helicase, AtMTR4, that is involved in the degradation of several nucleolar exosome substrates in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that AtMTR4, rather than its closely related protein HEN2, is required for proper rRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis. AtMTR4 is mostly localized in the nucleolus, a subcellular compartmentalization that is shared with another exosome co-factor, RRP6L2. AtMTR4 and RRP6L2 cooperate in several steps of rRNA maturation and surveillance, such as processing the 5.8S rRNA and removal of rRNA maturation by-products. Interestingly, degradation of the Arabidopsis 5' external transcribed spacer (5' ETS) requires cooperation of both the 5'→3' and 3'→5' exoribonucleolytic pathways. Accumulating AtMTR4 targets give rise to illegitimate small RNAs; however, these do not affect rRNA metabolism or contribute to the phenotype of mtr4 mutants. Plants lacking AtMTR4 are viable but show several developmental defects, including aberrant vein patterning and pointed first leaves. The mtr4 phenotype resembles that of several ribosomal protein and nucleolin mutants, and may be explained by delayed ribosome biogenesis, as we observed a reduced rate of rRNA accumulation in mtr4 mutants. Taken together, these data link AtMTR4 with rRNA biogenesis and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:21682783

  20. Characterization of a Radical Intermediate in Lipoyl Cofactor Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Rectenwald, Justin M; Wang, Bo; Kakar, Elizabeth S; Laremore, Tatiana N; Booker, Squire J; Silakov, Alexey

    2015-10-21

    Lipoyl synthase (LipA) catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor, the insertion of two sulfur atoms at C6 and C8 of an n-octanoyl chain. LipA is a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes and uses two [4Fe-4S] clusters to catalyze its transformation. One cluster binds in contact with SAM and donates the requisite electron for the reductive cleavage of SAM to generate two 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radicals, which abstract hydrogen atoms from C6 and C8 of the substrate. By contrast, the second, auxiliary [4Fe-4S] cluster, has been hypothesized to serve as the sulfur donor in the reaction. Such a sacrificial role for an iron-sulfur cluster during catalysis has not been universally accepted. Use of a conjugated 2,4-hexadienoyl-containing substrate analogue has allowed the substrate radical to be trapped and characterized by continuous-wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance methods. Here we report the observation of a (57)Fe hyperfine coupling interaction with the paramagnetic signal, which indicates that the iron-sulfur cluster of LipA and its substrate are within bonding distance. PMID:26390103

  1. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R. . E-mail: tsaneva@biochem.ucl.ac.uk

    2005-11-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA{sup +} protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis.

  2. Elicitors and co-factors in food-induced anaphylaxis in adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis (FIA) in adults is often insufficiently diagnosed. One reason is related to the presence of co-factors like exercise, alcohol, additives and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The objective of this analysis was to retrospectively investigate the role of co-factors in patients with FIA. 93 adult patients with suspected FIA underwent double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges with suspected allergens and co-factors. The elicitors of anaphylaxis were identified in 44/93 patients. 27 patients reacted to food allergens upon challenge, 15 patients reacted only when a co-factor was co-exposed with the allergen. The most common identified allergens were celery (n = 7), soy, wheat (n = 4 each) and lupine (n = 3). Among the co-factors food additives (n = 8) and physical exercise (n = 6) were most frequent. In 10 patients more than one co-factor and/or more than one food allergen was necessary to elicit a positive reaction. The implementation of co-factors into the challenge protocol increases the identification rate of elicitors in adult food anaphylactic patients. PMID:24262093

  3. Protein-mediated assembly of succinate dehydrogenase and its cofactors.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Na, Un; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (or complex II; SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein complex that links the tribarboxylic acid cycle with the electron transport chain. SDH is composed of four nuclear-encoded subunits that must translocate independently to the mitochondria and assemble into a mature protein complex embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, it has become clear that failure to assemble functional SDH complexes can result in cancer and neurodegenerative syndromes. The effort to thoroughly elucidate the SDH assembly pathway has resulted in the discovery of four subunit-specific assembly factors that aid in the maturation of individual subunits and support the assembly of the intact complex. This review will focus on these assembly factors and assess the contribution of each factor to the assembly of SDH. Finally, we propose a model of the SDH assembly pathway that incorporates all extant data. PMID:25488574

  4. Protein-mediated assembly of succinate dehydrogenase and its cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G.; Na, Un; Winge, Dennis R.; Rutter, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (or Complex II; SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein complex that links the tribarboxylic acid cycle with the electron transport chain. SDH is composed of four nuclear-encoded subunits that must translocate independently to the mitochondria and assemble into a mature protein complex embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, it has become clear that failure to assemble functional SDH complexes can result in cancer and neurodegenerative syndromes. The effort to thoroughly elucidate the SDH assembly pathway has resulted in the discovery of four subunit-specific assembly factors that aid in the maturation of individual subunits and support the assembly of the intact complex. This review will focus on these assembly factors and assess the contribution of each factor to the assembly of SDH. Finally, we propose a model of the SDH assembly pathway that incorporates all extant data. PMID:25488574

  5. Biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor and the molybdenum cofactor in Klebsiella pneumoniae: effect of sulfur source

    SciTech Connect

    Ugalde, R.A.; Imperial, J.; Shah, V.K.; Brill, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    NifQ/sup -/ and Mol/sup -/ mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae show an elevated molybdenum requirement for nitrogen fixation. Substitution of cystine for sulfate as the sulfur source in the medium reduced the molybdenum requirement of these mutants to levels required by the wild type. Cystine also increased the intracellular molybdenum accumulation of NifQ/sup -/ and Mol/sup -/ mutants. Cystine did not affect the molybdenum requirement or accumulation in wild-type K. pneumoniae. Sulfate transport and metabolism in K. pneumoniae were repressed by cystine. However, the effect of cystine on the molybdenum requirement could not be explained by an interaction between sulfate and molybdate at the transport level. The data show that cystine does not have a generalized effect on molybdenum metabolism. Millimolar concentrations of molybdate inhibited nitrogenase and nitrate reductase derepression with sulfate as the sulfur source, but not with cystine. The inhibition was the result of a specific antagonism of sulfate metabolism by molybdate. This study suggests that a sulfur donor and molybdenum interact at an early step in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor. This interaction might occur nonenzymatically when the levels of the reactants are high.

  6. Biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor and the molybdenum cofactor in Klebsiella pneumoniae: effect of sulfur source.

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, R A; Imperial, J; Shah, V K; Brill, W J

    1985-01-01

    NifQ- and Mol- mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae show an elevated molybdenum requirement for nitrogen fixation. Substitution of cystine for sulfate as the sulfur source in the medium reduced the molybdenum requirement of these mutants to levels required by the wild type. Cystine also increased the intracellular molybdenum accumulation of NifQ- and Mol- mutants. Cystine did not affect the molybdenum requirement or accumulation in wild-type K. pneumoniae. Sulfate transport and metabolism in K. pneumoniae were repressed by cystine. However, the effect of cystine on the molybdenum requirement could not be explained by an interaction between sulfate and molybdate at the transport level. Cystine increased the molybdenum requirement of Mol- mutants for nitrate reductase activity by at least 100-fold. Cystine had the same effect on the molybdenum requirement for nitrate reductase activity in Escherichia coli ChlD- mutants. This shows that cystine does not have a generalized effect on molybdenum metabolism. Millimolar concentrations of molybdate inhibited nitrogenase and nitrate reductase derepression with sulfate as the sulfur source, but not with cystine. The inhibition was the result of a specific antagonism of sulfate metabolism by molybdate. The effects of nifQ and mol mutations on nitrogenase could be suppressed either by the addition of cystine or by high concentrations of molybdate. This suggests that a sulfur donor and molybdenum interact at an early step in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor. This interaction might occur nonenzymatically when the levels of the reactants are high. PMID:3905765

  7. In vitro synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase from iron, sulfur, molybdenum, and homocitrate using purified proteins.

    PubMed

    Curatti, Leonardo; Hernandez, Jose A; Igarashi, Robert Y; Soboh, Basem; Zhao, Dehua; Rubio, Luis M

    2007-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation, the conversion of atmospheric N2 to NH3, is an essential process in the global biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen that supports life on Earth. Most of the biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by the molybdenum nitrogenase, which contains at its active site one of the most complex metal cofactors known to date, the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co). FeMo-co is composed of 7Fe, 9S, Mo, R-homocitrate, and one unidentified light atom. Here we demonstrate the complete in vitro synthesis of FeMo-co from Fe(2+), S(2-), MoO4(2-), and R-homocitrate using only purified Nif proteins. This synthesis provides direct biochemical support to the current model of FeMo-co biosynthesis. A minimal in vitro system, containing NifB, NifEN, and NifH proteins, together with Fe(2+), S(2-), MoO4(2-), R-homocitrate, S-adenosyl methionine, and Mg-ATP, is sufficient for the synthesis of FeMo-co and the activation of apo-dinitrogenase under anaerobic-reducing conditions. This in vitro system also provides a biochemical approach to further study the function of accessory proteins involved in nitrogenase maturation (as shown here for NifX and NafY). The significance of these findings in the understanding of the complete FeMo-co biosynthetic pathway and in the study of other complex Fe-S cluster biosyntheses is discussed. PMID:17978192

  8. Sucrose Octasulfate Selectively Accelerates Thrombin Inactivation by Heparin Cofactor II*

    PubMed Central

    Sarilla, Suryakala; Habib, Sally Y.; Kravtsov, Dmitri V.; Matafonov, Anton; Gailani, David; Verhamme, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Inactivation of thrombin (T) by the serpins heparin cofactor II (HCII) and antithrombin (AT) is accelerated by a heparin template between the serpin and thrombin exosite II. Unlike AT, HCII also uses an allosteric interaction of its NH2-terminal segment with exosite I. Sucrose octasulfate (SOS) accelerated thrombin inactivation by HCII but not AT by 2000-fold. SOS bound to two sites on thrombin, with dissociation constants (KD) of 10 ± 4 μm and 400 ± 300 μm that were not kinetically resolvable, as evidenced by single hyperbolic SOS concentration dependences of the inactivation rate (kobs). SOS bound HCII with KD 1.45 ± 0.30 mm, and this binding was tightened in the T·SOS·HCII complex, characterized by Kcomplex of ∼0.20 μm. Inactivation data were incompatible with a model solely depending on HCII·SOS but fit an equilibrium linkage model employing T·SOS binding in the pathway to higher order complex formation. Hirudin-(54–65)(SO3−) caused a hyperbolic decrease of the inactivation rates, suggesting partial competitive binding of hirudin-(54–65)(SO3−) and HCII to exosite I. Meizothrombin(des-fragment 1), binding SOS with KD = 1600 ± 300 μm, and thrombin were inactivated at comparable rates, and an exosite II aptamer had no effect on the inactivation, suggesting limited exosite II involvement. SOS accelerated inactivation of meizothrombin 1000-fold, reflecting the contribution of direct exosite I interaction with HCII. Thrombin generation in plasma was suppressed by SOS, both in HCII-dependent and -independent processes. The ex vivo HCII-dependent process may utilize the proposed model and suggests a potential for oversulfated disaccharides in controlling HCII-regulated thrombin generation. PMID:20053992

  9. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment.

    PubMed

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J; Price, Amanda J; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A; Selwood, David L; James, Leo C; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J

    2013-11-21

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages. PMID:24196705

  10. A cofactor approach to copper-dependent catalytic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Kenneth M.; Wentworth, Paul; Harwig, Curtis W.; Wentworth, Anita D.; Shafton, Asher; Janda, Kim D.

    2002-01-01

    A strategy for the preparation of semisynthetic copper(II)-based catalytic metalloproteins is described in which a metal-binding bis-imidazole cofactor is incorporated into the combining site of the aldolase antibody 38C2. Antibody 38C2 features a large hydrophobic-combining site pocket with a highly nucleophilic lysine residue, LysH93, that can be covalently modified. A comparison of several lactone and anhydride reagents shows that the latter are the most effective and general derivatizing agents for the 38C2 Lys residue. A bis-imidazole anhydride (5) was efficiently prepared from N-methyl imidazole. The 38C2–5-Cu conjugate was prepared by either (i) initial derivatization of 38C2 with 5 followed by metallation with CuCl2, or (ii) precoordination of 5 with CuCl2 followed by conjugation with 38C2. The resulting 38C2–5-Cu conjugate was an active catalyst for the hydrolysis of the coordinating picolinate ester 11, following Michaelis–Menten kinetics [kcat(11) = 2.3 min−1 and Km(11) 2.2 mM] with a rate enhancement [kcat(11)kuncat(11)] of 2.1 × 105. Comparison of the second-order rate constants of the modified 38C2 and the Cu(II)-bis-imidazolyl complex k(6-CuCl2) gives a rate enhancement of 3.5 × 104 in favor of the antibody complex with an effective molarity of 76.7 M, revealing a significant catalytic benefit to the binding of the bis-imidazolyl ligand into 38C2. PMID:11880619

  11. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  12. Data Product Maturity

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-25

    ... document, maturity levels are provided separately for each scientific data set (SDS) included with the data files. The data product ... indiscriminate use of these data products as the basis for research findings, journal publications, and/or presentations.   ...

  13. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTRATE-COFACTOR RATIOS ON PARTIALLY PURIFIED INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES.

    PubMed

    MATHEMEIER, P F; MORITA, R Y

    1964-12-01

    Mathemeier, Paul F. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Influence of substrate-cofactor ratios on partially purified inorganic pyrophosphatase activity at elevated temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 88:1661-1666. 1964.-Inorganic pyrophosphatase of Bacillus stearothermophilus was studied for optimal substrate-cofactor ratios at 60 to 100 C. Mg(++) was the primary cofactor, and Co(++) resulted in 50% enzyme activity at 60 C. The pH optima differed for the Mg(++) activated and Co(++) activated pyrophosphatase. At 80 C and above, Co(++) replaced Mg(++) as the optimal cofactor in the enzyme reaction. The optimal ratio of pyrophosphate to Mg(++) varied from 2 to 0.25, dependent on enzyme concentration. The optimal pyrophosphate-cobalt ratio was constant at 1.0. The enzyme catalyzed appreciable pyrophosphate hydrolysis at 95 C. PMID:14240954

  14. Mouse model for molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B recapitulates the phenotype observed in molybdenum cofactor deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubiczka-Smorag, Joanna; Santamaria-Araujo, Jose Angel; Metz, Imke; Kumar, Avadh; Hakroush, Samy; Brueck, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Guenter; Burfeind, Peter; Reiss, Jochen; Smorag, Lukasz

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive disorder, mainly caused by mutations in MOCS1 (MoCo deficiency type A) or MOCS2 (MoCo deficiency type B) genes; the absence of active MoCo results in a deficiency in all MoCo-dependent enzymes. Patients with MoCo deficiency present with neonatal seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, brain atrophy and early childhood death. Although substitution therapy with cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP) has been successfully used in both Mocs1 knockout mice and in patients with MoCo deficiency type A, there is currently no Mocs2 knockout mouse and no curative therapy for patients with MoCo deficiency type B. Therefore, we generated and characterized a Mocs2-null mouse model of MoCo deficiency type B. Expression analyses of Mocs2 revealed a ubiquitous expression pattern; however, at the cellular level, specific cells show prominent Mocs2 expression, e.g., neuronal cells in cortex, hippocampus and brainstem. Phenotypic analyses demonstrated that Mocs2 knockout mice failed to thrive and died within 11 days after birth. None of the tested MoCo-dependent enzymes were active in Mocs2-deficient mice, leading to elevated concentrations of purines, such as hypoxanthine and xanthine, and non-detectable levels of uric acid in the serum and urine. Moreover, elevated concentrations of S-sulfocysteine were measured in the serum and urine. Increased levels of xanthine resulted in bladder and kidney stone formation, whereas increased concentrations of toxic sulfite triggered neuronal apoptosis. In conclusion, Mocs2-deficient mice recapitulate the severe phenotype observed in humans and can now serve as a model for preclinical therapeutic approaches for MoCo deficiency type B. PMID:27138983

  15. Effects of the cofactor binding sites on the activities of secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiangjun; Han, Jun; Ma, Sichun; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    SADHs from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are enzymes that, together with various cofactors, catalyze the reversible reduction of carbonyl compounds to their corresponding alcohols. To explore how cofactors bind to SADH, TeSADH was cloned in this study, and Ser(199) and Arg(200) were replaced by Tyr and Asp, respectively. Both sites were expected to be inside or adjacent to the cofactor-binding domain according to computational a prediction. Analysis of TeSADH activities revealed that the enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the S199Y mutant was noticeably enhanced using by NADH, NADPH as cofactors, and similar with that of wild-type using by NADP(+), NAD(+). Conversely, the activity of the R200D mutant significantly decreased with all cofactors. Furthermore, in yeast, the S199Y mutant substantially elevated the ethanol concentration compared with the wild type. Molecular dynamics simulation results indicated the H-bonding network between TeSADH and the cofactors was stronger for the S199Y mutant and the binding energy was simultaneously increased. Moreover, the fluorescence results indicated the S199Y mutant exhibited an increased preference for NAD(P)H, binding with NAD(P)H more compactly compared with wild type. PMID:27016086

  16. The glmS ribozyme cofactor is a general acid-base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Viladoms, Júlia; Fedor, Martha J

    2012-11-21

    The glmS ribozyme is the first natural self-cleaving ribozyme known to require a cofactor. The d-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) cofactor has been proposed to serve as a general acid, but its role in the catalytic mechanism has not been established conclusively. We surveyed GlcN6P-like molecules for their ability to support self-cleavage of the glmS ribozyme and found a strong correlation between the pH dependence of the cleavage reaction and the intrinsic acidity of the cofactors. For cofactors with low binding affinities, the contribution to rate enhancement was proportional to their intrinsic acidity. This linear free-energy relationship between cofactor efficiency and acid dissociation constants is consistent with a mechanism in which the cofactors participate directly in the reaction as general acid-base catalysts. A high value for the Brønsted coefficient (β ~ 0.7) indicates that a significant amount of proton transfer has already occurred in the transition state. The glmS ribozyme is the first self-cleaving RNA to use an exogenous acid-base catalyst. PMID:23113700

  17. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg2+ ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg2+ ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process. PMID:27440438

  18. The glmS Ribozyme Cofactor is a General Acid-Base Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Viladoms, Julia; Fedor, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    The glmS ribozyme is the first natural self-cleaving ribozyme known to require a cofactor. The D-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) cofactor has been proposed to serve as a general acid, but its role in the catalytic mechanism has not been established conclusively. We surveyed GlcN6P-like molecules for their ability to support self-cleavage of the glmS ribozyme and found a strong correlation between the pH dependence of the cleavage reaction and the intrinsic acidity of the cofactors. For cofactors with low binding affinities the contribution to rate enhancement was proportional to their intrinsic acidity. This linear free-energy relationship between cofactor efficiency and acid dissociation constants is consistent with a mechanism in which the cofactors participate directly in the reaction as general acid-base catalysts. A high value for the Brønsted coefficient (β ~ 0.7) indicates that a significant amount of proton transfer has already occurred in the transition state. The glmS ribozyme is the first self-cleaving RNA to use an exogenous acid-base catalyst. PMID:23113700

  19. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg(2+) ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg(2+) ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process. PMID:27440438

  20. A conserved haem redox and trafficking pathway for cofactor attachment

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L; Frawley, Elaine R; Bonner, Eric R; Zhu, Huifen; San Francisco, Brian; Kranz, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    A pathway for cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes (mitochondria) requires the genes encoding eight membrane proteins (CcmABCDEFGH). The CcmABCDE proteins are proposed to traffic haem to the cytochrome c synthetase (CcmF/H) for covalent attachment to cytochrome c by unknown mechanisms. For the first time, we purify pathway complexes with trapped haem to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of haem binding, trafficking and redox control. We discovered an early step in trafficking that involves oxidation of haem (to Fe3+), yet the final attachment requires reduced haem (Fe2+). Surprisingly, CcmF is a cytochrome b with a haem never before realized, and in vitro, CcmF functions as a quinol:haem oxidoreductase. Thus, this ancient pathway has conserved and orchestrated mechanisms for trafficking, storing and reducing haem, which assure its use for cytochrome c synthesis even in limiting haem (iron) environments and reducing haem in oxidizing environments. PMID:19629033

  1. Investigation into the nature of substrate binding to the dipyrromethane cofactor of Escherichia coli porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.J.; Jordan, P.M.

    1988-12-13

    The formation of the dipyrromethane cofactor of Escherichia coli porphobilinogen deaminase was shown to depend on the presence of 5-aminolevulinic acid. A hemA/sup -/ mutant formed inactive deaminase when grown in the absence of 5-aminolevulinic acid since this strain was unable to biosynthesize the dipyrromethane cofactor. The mutant formed normal levels of deaminase, however, when grown in the presence of 5-aminolevulinic acid. Porphobilinogen, the substrate, interacts with the free ..cap alpha..-position of the dipyrromethane cofactor to give stable enzyme-intermediate complexes. Experiments with regiospecifically labeled intermediate complexes have shown that, in the absence of further substrate molecules, the complexes are interconvertible by the exchange of the terminal pyrrole ring of each complex. The formation of enzyme-intermediate complexes is accompanied by the exposure of a cysteine residue, suggesting that substantial conformational changes occur on binding substrate. Specific labeling of the dipyrromethane cofactor by growth of the E. coli in the presence of 5-amino(5-/sup 14/C)levulinic acid has confirmed that the cofactor is not subject to catalytic turnover. Experiments with the ..cap alpha..-substituted substrate analogue ..cap alpha..-bromoporphobilinogen have provided further evidence that the cofactor is responsible for the covalent binding of the substrate at the catalytic site. On the basis of these cummulative findings, it has been possible to construct a mechanistic scheme for the deaminase reaction involving a single catalytic site which is able to catalyze the addition or removal of either NH/sub 3/ or H/sub 2/O. The role of the cofactor both as a primer and as a means for regulating the number of substrates bound in each catalytic cycle is discussed.

  2. Jealousy and Moral Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; Deuger, Donna J.

    Jealousy may be perceived as either good or bad depending upon the moral maturity of the individual. To investigate this conclusion, a study was conducted testing two hypothesis: a positive relationship exists between conventional moral reasoning (reference to norms and laws) and the endorsement and level of jealousy; and a negative relationship…

  3. A new cofactor in prokaryotic enzyme: Tryptophan tryptophylquinone as the redox prosthetic group in methylamine dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, W.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Wemmer, D.E. ); Chistoserdov, A.; Lidstrom, M.E. )

    1991-05-10

    Methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH), an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} enzyme from numerous methylotrophic soil bacteria, contains a novel quinonoid redox prosthetic group that is covalently bound to its small {beta} subunit through two amino acyl residues. A comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the gene sequence of the small subunit for the enzyme from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 with the published amino acid sequence obtained by Edman degradation method, allowed the identification of the amino acyl constituents of the cofactor as two tryptophyl residues. This information was crucial for interpreting {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectral data collected for the semicarbazide- and carboxymethyl-derivatized bis(tripeptidyl)-cofactor of MADH from bacterium W3A1. The cofactor is composed of two cross-linked tryptophyl residues. Although there are many possible isomers, only one is consistent with all the data: The first tryptophyl residue in the peptide sequence exists as an indole-6,7-dione, and is attached at its 4 position to the 2 position of the second, otherwise unmodified, indole side group. Contrary to earlier reports, the cofactor of MADH is not 2,7,9-tricarboxypyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a derivative thereof, of pro-PQQ. This appears to be the only example of two cross-linked, modified amino acyl residues having a functional role in the active site of an enzyme, in the absence of other cofactors or metal ions.

  4. Cofactor dependence and isotype distribution of anticardiolipin antibodies in viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmone, H; Vitozzi, S; Elbarcha, O; Fernandez, E

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Antibodies to cardiolipin (aCLs) are often detected in patients with autoimmune disorders or infectious diseases.
OBJECTIVE—To investigate the distribution of aCL isotypes and requirement of protein cofactor in viral infections in order to establish the importance, if any, of these antibodies in these infectious diseases.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—The isotype distribution of aCLs in the sera from 160 patients with infection caused by HIV-1 (n=40), hepatitis A virus (n=40), hepatitis B virus (n=40), or hepatitis C virus (n=40) was studied by standardised enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the presence and absence of protein cofactor (mainly β2-glycoprotein I). Serum samples from healthy volunteers and patients with syphilis and antiphospholipid syndrome were also included and served as negative and positive control groups respectively.
RESULTS—The prevalence of one or more aCL isotypes in serum of patients with HIV-1, hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, or hepatitis C virus infection was 47%, 92%, 42%, and 17% respectively (principally IgM and/or IgA). Most of these antibodies were mainly cofactor independent.
CONCLUSIONS—The presence of aCLs in viral infections is principally cofactor independent, suggesting that cofactor dependence of the aCLs should be assessed to distinguish subjects most likely to suffer from clinical symptoms observed in the presence of these antibodies.

 PMID:11302873

  5. Catalytic reduction of CN−, CO and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions**

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent and added in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-free, organic solvent-based reaction medium to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN−), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) when samarium (II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are supplied as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors not only catalytically reduce CN− or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, but also catalytically reduce CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The observation of C-C coupling from CO2 reveals a unique, Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate; whereas the achievement of catalytic turnover of CN−, CO and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for hydrocarbon production from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  6. Catalytic reduction of CN-, CO, and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-01-19

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN(-)), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) without using adenosine triphosphate (ATP), when samarium(II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are employed as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors catalytically reduce CN(-) or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, and CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The C-C coupling from CO2 indicates a unique Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate, whereas the catalytic turnover of CN(-), CO, and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  7. Chemomimetic biocatalysis: exploiting the synthetic potential of cofactor-dependent enzymes to create new catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prier, Christopher K; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-11

    Despite the astonishing breadth of enzymes in nature, no enzymes are known for many of the valuable catalytic transformations discovered by chemists. Recent work in enzyme design and evolution, however, gives us good reason to think that this will change. We describe a chemomimetic biocatalysis approach that draws from small-molecule catalysis and synthetic chemistry, enzymology, and molecular evolution to discover or create enzymes with non-natural reactivities. We illustrate how cofactor-dependent enzymes can be exploited to promote reactions first established with related chemical catalysts. The cofactors can be biological, or they can be non-biological to further expand catalytic possibilities. The ability of enzymes to amplify and precisely control the reactivity of their cofactors together with the ability to optimize non-natural reactivity by directed evolution promises to yield exceptional catalysts for challenging transformations that have no biological counterparts. PMID:26502343

  8. The Fe–V Cofactor of Vanadium Nitrogenase Contains an Interstitial Carbon Atom

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Julian A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Schlesier, Julia; Sippel, Daniel; Einsle, Oliver; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    The first direct evidence is provided for the presence of an interstitial carbide in the Fe–V cofactor of Azotobacter vinelandii vanadium nitrogenase. As for our identification of the central carbide in the Fe–Mo cofactor, we employed Fe Kβ valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, and herein report the highly similar spectra of both variants of the cofactor-containing protein. The identification of an analogous carbide, and thus an atomically homologous active site in vanadium nitrogenase, highlights the importance and influence of both the interstitial carbide and the identity of the heteroatom on the electronic structure and catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:26376620

  9. Anthocyanin copigmentation and color of wine: The effect of naturally obtained hydroxycinnamic acids as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bimpilas, Andreas; Panagopoulou, Marilena; Tsimogiannis, Dimitrios; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2016-04-15

    Copigmentation of anthocyanins accounts for over 30% of fresh red wine color, while during storage, the color of polymeric pigments formed between anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins predominates. Rosmarinic acid and natural extracts rich in hydroxycinnamic acids, obtained from aromatic plants (Origanum vulgare and Satureja thymbra), were examined as cofactors to fresh Merlot wine and the effect on anthocyanin copigmentation and wine color was studied during storage for 6months. An increase of the copigmented anthocyanins that enhanced color intensity by 15-50% was observed, confirming the ability of complex hydroxycinnamates to form copigments. The samples with added cofactors retained higher percentages of copigmented anthocyanins and higher color intensity, compared to the control wine, up to 3 months. However, the change in the equilibrium between monomeric and copigmented anthocyanins that was induced by added cofactors, did not affect the rate of polymerization reactions during storage. PMID:26616922

  10. Modulation of heparin cofactor II activity by histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefsen, D M; Pestka, C A

    1985-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II is a plasma protein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate. We have determined the effects of two glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins, i.e., histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4, on these reactions. Inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and heparin was completely prevented by purified histidine-rich glycoprotein at the ratio of 13 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram heparin. In contrast, histidine-rich glycoprotein had no effect on inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and dermatan sulfate at ratios of less than or equal to 128 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram dermatan sulfate. Removal of 85-90% of the histidine-rich glycoprotein from plasma resulted in a fourfold reduction in the amount of heparin required to prolong the thrombin clotting time from 14 s to greater than 180 s but had no effect on the amount of dermatan sulfate required for similar anti-coagulant activity. In contrast to histidine-rich glycoprotein, purified platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate at the ratio of 2 micrograms platelet factor 4/micrograms glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, the supernatant medium from platelets treated with arachidonic acid to cause secretion of platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of heparin or dermatan sulfate. We conclude that histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4 can regulate the antithrombin activity of heparin cofactor II. Images PMID:3838317

  11. The phylogenomic roots of modern biochemistry: origins of proteins, cofactors and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2012-02-01

    The complexity of modern biochemistry developed gradually on early Earth as new molecules and structures populated the emerging cellular systems. Here, we generate a historical account of the gradual discovery of primordial proteins, cofactors, and molecular functions using phylogenomic information in the sequence of 420 genomes. We focus on structural and functional annotations of the 54 most ancient protein domains. We show how primordial functions are linked to folded structures and how their interaction with cofactors expanded the functional repertoire. We also reveal protocell membranes played a crucial role in early protein evolution and show translation started with RNA and thioester cofactor-mediated aminoacylation. Our findings allow elaboration of an evolutionary model of early biochemistry that is firmly grounded in phylogenomic information and biochemical, biophysical, and structural knowledge. The model describes how primordial α-helical bundles stabilized membranes, how these were decorated by layered arrangements of β-sheets and α-helices, and how these arrangements became globular. Ancient forms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) catalytic domains and ancient non-ribosomal protein synthetase (NRPS) modules gave rise to primordial protein synthesis and the ability to generate a code for specificity in their active sites. These structures diversified producing cofactor-binding molecular switches and barrel structures. Accretion of domains and molecules gave rise to modern aaRSs, NRPS, and ribosomal ensembles, first organized around novel emerging cofactors (tRNA and carrier proteins) and then more complex cofactor structures (rRNA). The model explains how the generation of protein structures acted as scaffold for nucleic acids and resulted in crystallization of modern translation. PMID:22210458

  12. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis. Structure and re-activation of apoenzyme by the cofactors thiamin diphosphate and magnesium ion.

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, R J; Duggleby, R G

    1991-01-01

    To study the mechanism of re-activation of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase apoenzyme by its cofactors thiamin diphosphate and Mg2+, cofactor-free enzyme was prepared by dialysis against 1 mM-dipicolinic acid at pH 8.2. This apoenzyme was then used in a series of experiments that included determination of: (a) the affinity towards one cofactor when the other was present at saturating concentrations; (b) cofactor-binding rates by measuring the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence on the apoenzyme; (c) the effect of replacement of cofactors with various analogues; (d) the stoichiometry of bound cofactors in holoenzyme; and (e) the molecular mass of apoenzyme by gel filtration. The results of these experiments form the basis for a proposed model for the re-activation of Z. mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase apoenzyme by its cofactors. In this model there exists two alterative but equivalent pathways for cofactor binding. In each pathway the first step is an independent reversible binding of either thiamin diphosphate (Kd 187 microM) or Mg2+ (Kd 1.31 mM) to free apoenzyme. When both cofactors are present, the second cofactor-binding step to form active holoenzyme is a slow quasi-irreversible step. This second binding step is a co-operative process for both thiamin diphosphate (Kd 0.353 microM) and Mg2+ (Kd 2.47 microM). Both the apo- and the holo-enzyme have a tetrameric subunit structure, with cofactors binding in a 1:1 ratio with each subunit. PMID:2049073

  13. Vocational Maturity and Self Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Hans

    The relationship between separate dimensions of vocational maturity and different self-concept and identity variables were examined. Subjects were Dutch students, age 14-18 years. The vocational maturity dimensions were measured by Dutch adaptations of American vocational maturity scales. Instruments for self-concept and identity measurement were…

  14. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  15. Cellular Cofactors of Lentiviral Integrase: From Target Validation to Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Taltynov, Oliver; Desimmie, Belete A.; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN), an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2) has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs). PMID:22928108

  16. New cofactor supports α,β-unsaturated acid decarboxylation via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Karl A.P.; White, Mark D.; Fisher, Karl; Khara, Basile; Bailey, Samuel S.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Beveridge, Rebecca; Barran, Perdita; Rigby, Stephen E.J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    The ubiD/ubiX or the homologous fdc/pad genes have been implicated in the non-oxidative reversible decarboxylation of aromatic substrates, and play a pivotal role in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis1–3 or microbial biodegradation of aromatic compounds4–6 respectively. Despite biochemical studies on individual gene products, the composition and co-factor requirement of the enzyme responsible for in vivo decarboxylase activity remained unclear7–9. We show Fdc is solely responsible for (de)carboxylase activity, and that it requires a new type of cofactor: a prenylated flavin synthesised by the associated UbiX/Pad10. Atomic resolution crystal structures reveal two distinct isomers of the oxidized cofactor can be observed: an isoalloxazine N5-iminium adduct and a N5 secondary ketimine species with drastically altered ring structure, both having azomethine ylide character. Substrate binding positions the dipolarophile enoic acid group directly above the azomethine ylide group. The structure of a covalent inhibitor-cofactor adduct suggests 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition chemistry supports reversible decarboxylation in these enzymes. While 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is commonly used in organic chemistry11–12, we propose this presents the first example of an enzymatic 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Our model for Fdc/UbiD catalysis offers new routes in alkene hydrocarbon production or aryl (de)carboxylation. PMID:26083754

  17. Nicotinamide cofactor ratios in engineered strains of Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum.

    PubMed

    Beri, Dhananjay; Olson, Daniel G; Holwerda, Evert K; Lynd, Lee R

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are bacteria under investigation for production of biofuels from plant biomass. Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum has been engineered to produce ethanol at high yield (>90% of theoretical) and titer (>70 g/l). Efforts to engineer C. thermocellum have not, to date, been as successful, and efforts are underway to transfer the ethanol production pathway from T. saccharolyticum to C. thermocellum One potential challenge in transferring metabolic pathways is the possibility of incompatible levels of nicotinamide cofactors. These cofactors (NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+) and NADPH) and their oxidation state are important in the context of microbial redox metabolism. In this study we directly measured the concentrations and reduced oxidized ratios of these cofactors in a number of strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum by using acid/base extraction and enzymatic assays. We found that cofactor ratios are maintained in a fairly narrow range, regardless of the metabolic network modifications considered. We have found that the ratios are similar in both organisms, which is a relevant observation in the context of transferring the T. saccharolyticum ethanol production pathway to C. thermocellum. PMID:27190292

  18. Protein cofactor competition regulates the action of a multifunctional RNA helicase in different pathways

    PubMed Central

    Heininger, Annika U.; Hackert, Philipp; Andreou, Alexandra Z.; Boon, Kum-Loong; Memet, Indira; Prior, Mira; Clancy, Anne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Urlaub, Henning; Schleiff, Enrico; Sloan, Katherine E.; Deckers, Markus; Lührmann, Reinhard; Enderlein, Jörg; Klostermeier, Dagmar; Rehling, Peter; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rapidly increasing number of RNA helicases are implicated in several distinct cellular processes, however, the modes of regulation of multifunctional RNA helicases and their recruitment to different target complexes have remained unknown. Here, we show that the distribution of the multifunctional DEAH-box RNA helicase Prp43 between its diverse cellular functions can be regulated by the interplay of its G-patch protein cofactors. We identify the orphan G-patch protein Cmg1 (YLR271W) as a novel cofactor of Prp43 and show that it stimulates the RNA binding and ATPase activity of the helicase. Interestingly, Cmg1 localizes to the cytoplasm and to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and its overexpression promotes apoptosis. Furthermore, our data reveal that different G-patch protein cofactors compete for interaction with Prp43. Changes in the expression levels of Prp43-interacting G-patch proteins modulate the cellular localization of Prp43 and G-patch protein overexpression causes accumulation of the helicase in the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. Overexpression of several G-patch proteins also leads to defects in ribosome biogenesis that are consistent with withdrawal of the helicase from this pathway. Together, these findings suggest that the availability of cofactors and the sequestering of the helicase are means to regulate the activity of multifunctional RNA helicases and their distribution between different cellular processes. PMID:26821976

  19. A NADH-accepting imine reductase variant: Immobilization and cofactor regeneration by oxidative deamination.

    PubMed

    Gand, Martin; Thöle, Christian; Müller, Hubertus; Brundiek, Henrike; Bashiri, Ghader; Höhne, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Engineering cofactor specificity of enzymes is a promising approach that can expand the application of enzymes for biocatalytic production of industrially relevant chemicals. Until now, only NADPH-dependent imine reductases (IREDs) are known. This limits their applications to reactions employing whole cells as a cost-efficient cofactor regeneration system. For applications of IREDs as cell-free catalysts, (i) we created an IRED variant showing an improved activity for NADH. With rational design we were able to identify four residues in the (R)-selective IRED from Streptomyces GF3587 (IR-Sgf3587), which coordinate the 2'-phosphate moiety of the NADPH cofactor. From a set of 15 variants, the highest NADH activity was caused by the single amino acid exchange K40A resulting in a 3-fold increased acceptance of NADH. (ii) We showed its applicability using an immobilisate obtained either from purified enzyme or from lysate using the EziG(™) carriers. Applying the variant and NADH, we reached 88% conversion in a preparative scale biotransformation when employing 4% (w/v) 2-methylpyrroline. (iii) We demonstrated a one-enzyme cofactor regeneration approach using the achiral amine N-methyl-3-aminopentanone as a hydrogen donor co-substrate. PMID:27164259

  20. Tetrahydropterin as a possible natural cofactor in the drosophila phenylalanine hydroxylation system

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Y.; Jacobson, K.B.; Ferre, J. . Dept. of Genetics; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Valencia Univ. . Dept. of Genetics)

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the study of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PH) activity of Drosophila melanogaster wild type with different cofactors: the two natural occurring tetrahydropteridines (BH{sub 4} and PH{sub 4}) and the synthetic 6,7-dimethyltetrahydropterin (DMPH{sub 4}), as well as the determination of this activity at different developmental stages. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Protein cofactor competition regulates the action of a multifunctional RNA helicase in different pathways.

    PubMed

    Heininger, Annika U; Hackert, Philipp; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Boon, Kum-Loong; Memet, Indira; Prior, Mira; Clancy, Anne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Urlaub, Henning; Schleiff, Enrico; Sloan, Katherine E; Deckers, Markus; Lührmann, Reinhard; Enderlein, Jörg; Klostermeier, Dagmar; Rehling, Peter; Bohnsack, Markus T

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly increasing number of RNA helicases are implicated in several distinct cellular processes, however, the modes of regulation of multifunctional RNA helicases and their recruitment to different target complexes have remained unknown. Here, we show that the distribution of the multifunctional DEAH-box RNA helicase Prp43 between its diverse cellular functions can be regulated by the interplay of its G-patch protein cofactors. We identify the orphan G-patch protein Cmg1 (YLR271W) as a novel cofactor of Prp43 and show that it stimulates the RNA binding and ATPase activity of the helicase. Interestingly, Cmg1 localizes to the cytoplasm and to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and its overexpression promotes apoptosis. Furthermore, our data reveal that different G-patch protein cofactors compete for interaction with Prp43. Changes in the expression levels of Prp43-interacting G-patch proteins modulate the cellular localization of Prp43 and G-patch protein overexpression causes accumulation of the helicase in the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. Overexpression of several G-patch proteins also leads to defects in ribosome biogenesis that are consistent with withdrawal of the helicase from this pathway. Together, these findings suggest that the availability of cofactors and the sequestering of the helicase are means to regulate the activity of multifunctional RNA helicases and their distribution between different cellular processes. PMID:26821976

  2. Photosensitivity syndrome brings to light a new transcription-coupled DNA repair cofactor.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, James E

    2012-05-01

    Three teams have applied whole-exome and proteome methods to identify a new cofactor of human RNA polymerase II that is required for the recovery of transcription on damaged templates. The identification of this new factor raises questions about the causal relationships between molecular mechanisms of transcription regulation and excision repair and developmental and neurological disease and nonmalignant skin photosensitivity. PMID:22538718

  3. Engineering the Assembly of Heme Cofactors in Man-Made Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Timely ligation of one or more chemical cofactors at preselected locations in proteins is a critical preamble for catalysis in many natural enzymes, including the oxidoreductases and allied transport and signaling proteins. Likewise, ligation strategies must be directly addressed when designing oxidoreductase and molecular transport functions in man-made, first-principle protein constructs intended to operate in vitro or in vivo. As one of the most common catalytic cofactors in biology, we have chosen heme B, along with its chemical analogues, to determine the kinetics and barriers to cofactor incorporation and bishistidine ligation in a range of 4-α-helix proteins. We compare five elementary synthetic designs (maquettes) and the natural cytochrome b562 that differ in oligomeric forms, apo- and holo-tertiary structural stability; qualities that we show can either assist or hinder assembly. The cofactor itself also imposes an assembly barrier if amphiphilicity ranges toward too hydrophobic or hydrophilic. With progressive removal of identified barriers, we achieve maquette assembly rates as fast as native cytochrome b562, paving the way to in vivo assembly of man-made hemoprotein maquettes and integration of artificial proteins into enzymatic pathways. PMID:24495285

  4. Mono and Dual Cofactor Dependence of Human Cystathionine β-Synthase Enzyme Variants In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dimster-Denk, Dago; Tripp, Katherine W.; Marini, Nicholas J.; Marqusee, Susan; Rine, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Any two individuals differ from each other by an average of 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Some polymorphisms have a functional impact on cofactor-using enzymes and therefore represent points of possible therapeutic intervention through elevated-cofactor remediation. Because most known disease-causing mutations affect protein stability, we evaluated how the in vivo impact caused by single amino acid substitutions in a prototypical enzyme of this type compared with physical characteristics of the variant enzymes in vitro. We focused on cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) because of its clinical relevance in homocysteine metabolism and because some variants of the enzyme are clinically responsive to increased levels of its B6 cofactor. Single amino-acid substitutions throughout the CBS protein caused reduced function in vivo, and a subset of these altered sensitivity to limiting B6-cofactor. Some of these B6-sensitive substitutions also had altered sensitivity to limiting heme, another CBS cofactor. Limiting heme resulted in reduced incorporation of heme into these variants, and subsequently increased protease sensitivity of the enzyme in vitro. We hypothesize that these alleles caused a modest, yet significant, destabilization of the native state of the protein, and that the functional impact of the amino acid substitutions caused by these alleles can be influenced by cofactor(s) even when the affected amino acid is distant from the cofactor binding site. PMID:23934999

  5. Structural basis of the cofactor function of denatured albumin in plasminogen activation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Galántai, Rita; Módos, Károly; Fidy, Judit; Kolev, Krasimir; Machovich, Raymund

    2006-03-17

    Certain denatured proteins function as cofactors in the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator. The present study approached the structural requirements for the cofactor activity of a model protein (human serum albumin). Heat denaturation of 100-230 microM albumin (80 degrees C and 60-90 min) reproducibly yielded aggregates with radius in the range of 10-150 nm. The major determinant of the cofactor potency was the size of the aggregates. The increase of particle size correlated with the cofactor activity, and there was a minimal requirement for the size of the cofactor (about 10 nm radius). Similar to other proteins, the molecular aggregates with cofactor function contained a significant amount of antiparallel intermolecular beta-sheets. Plasmin pre-digestion increased the cofactor efficiency (related to C-terminal lysine exposure) and did not affect profoundly the structure of the aggregates, suggesting a long-lasting and even a self-augmenting cofactor function of the denatured protein. PMID:16438933

  6. A modular system for regeneration of NAD cofactors using graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and diaphorase moieties.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Holly A; Lauterbach, Lars; Ash, Philip A; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2012-02-01

    Pyrolytic graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and an NAD(+)/NADH cycling enzyme provide a modular heterogeneous catalyst system for regeneration of oxidised or reduced nicotinamide cofactors using H(2) and H(+) as electron source or sink. Particles can be tuned for cofactor supply under different conditions by appropriate choice of hydrogenase. PMID:21986817

  7. A Conserved Acidic Residue in Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Contributes to Cofactor Affinity and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic domains of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAAHs) contain a non-heme iron coordinated to a 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and two water molecules. Asp139 from Chromobacterium violaceum PAH (cPAH) resides within the second coordination sphere and contributes key hydrogen bonds with three active site waters that mediate its interaction with an oxidized form of the cofactor, 7,8-dihydro-l-biopterin, in crystal structures. To determine the catalytic role of this residue, various point mutants were prepared and characterized. Our isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analysis of iron binding implies that polarity at position 139 is not the sole criterion for metal affinity, as binding studies with D139E suggest that the size of the amino acid side chain also appears to be important. High-resolution crystal structures of the mutants reveal that Asp139 may not be essential for holding the bridging water molecules together, because many of these waters are retained even in the Ala mutant. However, interactions via the bridging waters contribute to cofactor binding at the active site, interactions for which charge of the residue is important, as the D139N mutant shows a 5-fold decrease in its affinity for pterin as revealed by ITC (compared to a 16-fold loss of affinity in the case of the Ala mutant). The Asn and Ala mutants show a much more pronounced defect in their kcat values, with nearly 16- and 100-fold changes relative to that of the wild type, respectively, indicating a substantial role of this residue in stabilization of the transition state by aligning the cofactor in a productive orientation, most likely through direct binding with the cofactor, supported by data from molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes. Our results indicate that the intervening water structure between the cofactor and the acidic residue masks direct interaction between the two, possibly to prevent uncoupled hydroxylation of the cofactor before the arrival of

  8. Metabolic Impact of Redox Cofactor Perturbations on the Formation of Aroma Compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Isabelle; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is a fundamental requirement for the maintenance of metabolism, energy generation, and growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The redox cofactors NADH and NADPH are among the most highly connected metabolites in metabolic networks. Changes in their concentrations may induce widespread changes in metabolism. Redox imbalances were achieved with a dedicated biological tool overexpressing native NADH-dependent or engineered NADPH-dependent 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, in the presence of acetoin. We report that targeted perturbation of the balance of cofactors (NAD+/NADH or, to a lesser extent, NADP+/NADPH) significantly affected the production of volatile compounds. In most cases, variations in the redox state of yeasts modified the formation of all compounds from the same biochemical pathway (isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, and their derivatives) or chemical class (ethyl esters), irrespective of the cofactors. These coordinated responses were found to be closely linked to the impact of redox status on the availability of intermediates of central carbon metabolism. This was the case for α-keto acids and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which are precursors for the synthesis of many volatile compounds. We also demonstrated that changes in the availability of NADH selectively affected the synthesis of some volatile molecules (e.g., methionol, phenylethanol, and propanoic acid), reflecting the specific cofactor requirements of the dehydrogenases involved in their formation. Our findings indicate that both the availability of precursors from central carbon metabolism and the accessibility of reduced cofactors contribute to cell redox status modulation of volatile compound formation. PMID:26475113

  9. Metabolic Impact of Redox Cofactor Perturbations on the Formation of Aroma Compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Audrey; Sanchez, Isabelle; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is a fundamental requirement for the maintenance of metabolism, energy generation, and growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The redox cofactors NADH and NADPH are among the most highly connected metabolites in metabolic networks. Changes in their concentrations may induce widespread changes in metabolism. Redox imbalances were achieved with a dedicated biological tool overexpressing native NADH-dependent or engineered NADPH-dependent 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, in the presence of acetoin. We report that targeted perturbation of the balance of cofactors (NAD(+)/NADH or, to a lesser extent, NADP(+)/NADPH) significantly affected the production of volatile compounds. In most cases, variations in the redox state of yeasts modified the formation of all compounds from the same biochemical pathway (isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, and their derivatives) or chemical class (ethyl esters), irrespective of the cofactors. These coordinated responses were found to be closely linked to the impact of redox status on the availability of intermediates of central carbon metabolism. This was the case for α-keto acids and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which are precursors for the synthesis of many volatile compounds. We also demonstrated that changes in the availability of NADH selectively affected the synthesis of some volatile molecules (e.g., methionol, phenylethanol, and propanoic acid), reflecting the specific cofactor requirements of the dehydrogenases involved in their formation. Our findings indicate that both the availability of precursors from central carbon metabolism and the accessibility of reduced cofactors contribute to cell redox status modulation of volatile compound formation. PMID:26475113

  10. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity. PMID:26335395

  11. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  12. Host co-factors of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons have complex modes of mobility involving reverse transcription of their RNA genomes in cytoplasmic virus-like particles (VLPs) and integration of the cDNA copies into the host genome. The limited coding capacity of retrotransposons necessitates an extensive reliance on host co-factors; however, it has been challenging to identify co-factors that are required for endogenous retrotransposon mobility because retrotransposition is such a rare event. Results To circumvent the low frequency of Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon mobility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we used iterative synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis to isolate host mutations that reduce retrotransposition. Query strains that harbor a chromosomal Ty1his3AI reporter element and either the rtt101Δ or med1Δ mutation, both of which confer a hypertransposition phenotype, were mated to 4,847 haploid ORF deletion strains. Retrotransposition was measured in the double mutant progeny, and a set of 275 ORF deletions that suppress the hypertransposition phenotypes of both rtt101Δ and med1Δ were identified. The corresponding set of 275 retrotransposition host factors (RHFs) includes 45 previously identified Ty1 or Ty3 co-factors. More than half of the RHF genes have statistically robust human homologs (E < 1 x 10-10). The level of unintegrated Ty1 cDNA in 181 rhfΔ single mutants was altered <2-fold, suggesting that the corresponding co-factors stimulate retrotransposition at a step after cDNA synthesis. However, deletion of 43 RHF genes, including specific ribosomal protein and ribosome biogenesis genes and RNA degradation, modification and transport genes resulted in low Ty1 cDNA levels. The level of Ty1 Gag but not RNA was reduced in ribosome biogenesis mutants bud21Δ, hcr1Δ, loc1Δ, and puf6Δ. Conclusion Ty1 retrotransposition is dependent on multiple co-factors acting at different steps in the replication cycle. Human orthologs of these RHFs are

  13. Impact of cofactor-binding loop mutations on thermotolerance and activity of E. coli transketolase.

    PubMed

    Morris, P; Rios-Solis, L; García-Arrazola, R; Lye, G J; Dalby, P A

    2016-07-01

    Improvement of thermostability in engineered enzymes can allow biocatalysis on substrates with poor aqueous solubility. Denaturation of the cofactor-binding loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK) was previously linked to the loss of enzyme activity under conditions of high pH or urea. Incubation at temperatures just below the thermal melting transition, above which the protein aggregates, was also found to anneal the enzyme to give an increased specific activity. The potential role of cofactor-binding loop instability in this process remained unclear. In this work, the two cofactor-binding loops (residues 185-192 and 382-392) were progressively mutated towards the equivalent sequence from the thermostable Thermus thermophilus TK and variants assessed for their impact on both thermostability and activity. Cofactor-binding loop 2 variants had detrimental effects on specific activity at elevated temperatures, whereas the H192P mutation in cofactor-binding loop 1 resulted in a two-fold improved stability to inactivation at elevated temperatures, and increased the critical onset temperature for aggregation. The specific activity of H192P was 3-fold and 19-fold higher than that for wild-type at 60°C and 65°C respectively, and also remained 2.7-4 fold higher after re-cooling from pre-incubations at either 55°C or 60°C for 1h. Interestingly, H192P was also 2-times more active than wild-type TK at 25°C. Optimal activity was achieved at 60°C for H192P compared to 55°C for wild type. These results show that cofactor-binding loop 1, plays a pivotal role in partial denaturation and aggregation at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, a single rigidifying mutation within this loop can significantly improve the enzyme specific activity, as well as the stability to thermal denaturation and aggregation, to give an increased temperature optimum for activity. PMID:27233131

  14. What can molecular modelling bring to the design of artificial inorganic cofactors?

    PubMed

    Muñoz Robles, Victor; Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; González Fuentes, Eric; Lledós, Agustí; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the development of synthetic metalloenzymes based on the insertion of inorganic catalysts into biological macromolecules has become a vivid field of investigation. The success of the design of these composites is highly dependent on an atomic understanding of the recognition process between inorganic and biological entities. Despite facing several challenging complexities, molecular modelling techniques could be particularly useful in providing such knowledge. This study aims to discuss how the prediction of the structural and energetic properties of the host-cofactor interactions can be performed by computational means. To do so, we designed a protocol that combines several methodologies like protein-ligand dockings and QM/MM techniques. The overall approach considers fundamental bioinorganic questions like the participation of the amino acids of the receptor to the first coordination sphere of the metal, the impact of the receptor/cofactor flexibility on the structure of the complex, the cost of inserting the inorganic catalyst in place of the natural ligand/substrate into the host and how experimental knowledge can improve or invalidate a theoretical model. As a real case system, we studied an artificial metalloenzyme obtained by the insertion of a Fe(Schiff base) moiety into the heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The experimental structure of this species shows a distorted cofactor leading to an unusual octahedral configuration of the iron with two proximal residues chelating the metal and no external ligand. This geometry is far from the conformation adopted by similar cofactors in other hosts and shows that a fine tuning exists between the coordination environment of the metal, the deformability of its organic ligand and the conformational adaptability of the receptor. In a field where very little structural information is yet available, this work should help in building an initial molecular modelling framework for the discovery

  15. The MoxR ATPase RavA and Its Cofactor ViaA Interact with the NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase I in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith S.; Snider, Jamie D.; Graham, Chris; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew; Babu, Mohan; Houry, Walid A.

    2014-01-01

    MoxR ATPases are widespread throughout bacteria and archaea. The experimental evidence to date suggests that these proteins have chaperone-like roles in facilitating the maturation of dedicated protein complexes that are functionally diverse. In Escherichia coli, the MoxR ATPase RavA and its putative cofactor ViaA are found to exist in early stationary-phase cells at 37°C at low levels of about 350 and 90 molecules per cell, respectively. Both proteins are predominantly localized to the cytoplasm, but ViaA was also unexpectedly found to localize to the cell membrane. Whole genome microarrays and synthetic lethality studies both indicated that RavA-ViaA are genetically linked to Fe-S cluster assembly and specific respiratory pathways. Systematic analysis of mutant strains of ravA and viaA indicated that RavA-ViaA sensitizes cells to sublethal concentrations of aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this effect was dependent on RavA's ATPase activity, and on the presence of specific subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase I (Nuo Complex, or Complex I). Importantly, both RavA and ViaA were found to physically interact with specific Nuo subunits. We propose that RavA-ViaA facilitate the maturation of the Nuo complex. PMID:24454883

  16. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Uosaki, Hideki; Cahan, Patrick; Lee, Dong I.; Wang, Songnan; Miyamoto, Matthew; Fernandez, Laviel; Kass, David A.; Kwon, Chulan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation. However, control of CM maturation which is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes, remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs mature early in culture, but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation. PMID:26586429

  17. Maturational and Non-Maturational Factors in Heritage Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the maturational and non-maturational aspects of early bilingualism and language attrition in heritage speakers who have acquired their L1 incompletely in childhood. The study highlights the influential role of age and input dynamics in early L1 development, where the timing of reduction in L1 input and the…

  18. Dynamic Determination of Active-Site Reactivity in Semiquinone Photolyase by the Cofactor Photoreduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photolyase contains a flavin cofactor in a fully reduced form as its functional state to repair ultraviolet-damaged DNA upon blue light absorption. However, after purification, the cofactor exists in its oxidized or neutral semiquinone state. Such oxidization eliminates the repair function, but it can be reverted by photoreduction, a photoinduced process with a series of electron-transfer (ET) reactions. With femtosecond absorption spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, we completely recharacterized such photoreduction dynamics in the semiquinone state. Comparing with all previous studies, we identified a new intramolecular ET pathway, determined stretched ET behaviors, refined all ET time scales, and finally evaluated the driving forces and reorganization energies for eight elementary ET reactions. Combined with the oxidized-state photoreduction dynamics, we elucidated the different active-site properties of the reduction ability and structural flexibility in the oxidized and semiquinone states, leading to the dramatically different ET dynamics and photoreduction efficiency in the two states. PMID:24803991

  19. Ca cofactor of the water-oxidation complex: Evidence for a Mn/Ca heteronuclear cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Cinco, Roehl M.; Robblee, John H.; Messinger, Johannes; Fernandez, Carmen; McFarlane, Karen L.; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Sauer, Ken; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2001-07-25

    Calcium and chloride are necessary cofactors for the proper function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II). Located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants, cyanobacteria and algae, PS II and the OEC catalyze the light-driven oxidation of water into dioxygen (released into the biosphere), protons and electrons for carbon fixation. The actual chemistry of water oxidation is performed by a cluster of four manganese atoms, along with the requisite cofactors Ca{sup 2+} and Cl{sup -}. While the Mn complex has been extensively studied by X-ray absorption techniques, comparatively less is known about the Ca{sup 2+} cofactor. The fewer number of studies on the Ca{sup 2+} cofactor have sometimes relied on substituting the native cofactor with strontium or other metals, and have stirred some debate about the structure of the binding site. past efforts using Mn EXAFS on Sr-substituted PSII are suggestive of a close link between the Mn cluster and Sr, within 3.5 {angstrom}. The most recent published study using Sr EXAFS on similar samples confirms this finding of a 3.5 {angstrom} distance between Mn and Sr. This finding was base3d on a second Fourier peak (R {approx} 3 {angstrom}) in the Sr EXAFS from functional samples, but is absent from inactive, hydroxylamine-treated PS II. This Fourier peak II was found to fit best to two Mn at 3.5 {angstrom} rather than lighter atoms (carbon). Nevertheless, other experiments have given contrary results. They wanted to extend the technique by using polarized Sr EXAFS on layered Sr-substituted samples, to provide important angle information. Polarized EXAFS involves collecting spectra for different incident angles ({theta}) between the membrane normal of the layered sample and the X-ray electric field vector. Dichroism in the EXAFS can occur, depending on how the particular absorber-backscatterer (A-B) vector is aligned with the electric field. Through analysis of the dichroism, they extract the average number

  20. SRF regulates craniofacial development through selective recruitment of MRTF cofactors by PDGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Harish N.; Soriano, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling is critical for mammalian craniofacial development, but the key downstream transcriptional effectors remain unknown. We demonstrate that SRF is induced by both PDGF and FGF signaling in mouse embryonic palatal mesenchyme cells, and Srf neural crest conditional mutants exhibit facial clefting accompanied by proliferation and migration defects. Srf and Pdgfra mutants interact genetically in craniofacial development, but Srf and Fgfr1 mutants do not. This signal specificity is recapitulated at the level of cofactor activation: while both PDGF and FGF target gene promoters show enriched genome-wide overlap with SRF ChIP-seq peaks, PDGF selectively activates a network of MRTF-dependent cytoskeletal genes. Collectively, our results identify a novel role for SRF in proliferation and migration during craniofacial development and delineate a mechanism of receptor tyrosine kinase specificity mediated through differential cofactor usage, leading to a unique PDGF-responsive SRF-driven transcriptional program in the midface. PMID:25453829

  1. Ligand binding to the FeMo-cofactor: structures of CO-bound and reactivated nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A.; Einsle, Oliver; Howard, James B.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of nitrogenase remains enigmatic, with a major unresolved issue concerning how inhibitors and substrates bind to the active site. We report a crystal structure of carbon monoxide (CO) inhibited nitrogenase MoFe-protein at 1.50 Å resolution, revealing a CO molecule bridging Fe2 and Fe6 of the FeMo-cofactor. The μ2 binding geometry is achieved by replacing a belt-sulfur atom (S2B) and highlights the generation of a reactive iron species uncovered by the displacement of sulfur. The CO inhibition is fully reversible as established by regain of enzyme activity and reappearance of S2B in the 1.43 Å resolution structure of the reactivated enzyme. The substantial and reversible reorganization of the FeMo-cofactor accompanying CO binding was unanticipated and provides insights into a catalytically competent state of nitrogenase. PMID:25258081

  2. The History of the Discovery of the Molybdenum Cofactor and Novel Aspects of its Biosynthesis in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Leimkühler, Silke; Wuebbens, Margot M; Rajagopalan, K V

    2011-05-01

    Biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in bacteria is described with a detailed analysis of each individual reaction leading to the formation of stable intermediates during the synthesis of molybdopterin from GTP. As a starting point, the discovery of molybdopterin and the elucidation of its structure through the study of stable degradation products are described. Subsequent to molybdopterin synthesis, the molybdenum atom is added to the molybdopterin dithiolene group to form the molybdenum cofactor. This cofactor is either inserted directly into specific molybdoenzymes or is further modified by the addition of nucleotides to the molybdopterin phosphate group or the replacement of ligands at the molybdenum center. PMID:21528011

  3. DEAH-RHA helicase•Znf cofactor systems in kinetoplastid RNA editing and evolutionarily distant RNA processes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Reyes, Jorge; Mooers, Blaine H.M.; Abu-Adas, Zakaria; Kumar, Vikas; Gulati, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Multi-zinc finger proteins are an emerging class of cofactors in DEAH-RHA RNA helicases across highly divergent eukaryotic lineages. DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor partnerships predate the split of kinetoplastid protozoa, which include several human pathogens, from other eukaryotic lineages 100–400 Ma. Despite a long evolutionary history, the prototypical DEAH-RHA domains remain highly conserved. This short review focuses on a recently identified DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor system in kinetoplastid RNA editing, and its potential functional parallels with analogous systems in embryogenesis control in nematodes and antivirus protection in humans. PMID:27540585

  4. Biosynthesis of flavin cofactors in man: implications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Maria; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Brizio, Carmen; Panebianco, Concetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Galluccio, Michele; Vergani, Lodovica; Eberini, Ivano; Gianazza, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2, i.e. riboflavin, in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, reductases and oxidases involved in energetic metabolism, redox homeostasis and protein folding as well as in diverse regulatory events. Deficiency of riboflavin in men and experimental animal models has been linked to several diseases, including neuromuscular and neurological disorders and cancer. Riboflavin at pharmacological doses has been shown to play unexpected and incompletely understood regulatory roles. Besides a summary on riboflavin uptake and a survey on riboflavin-related diseases, the main focus of this review is on discovery and characterization of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) and other components of the cellular networks that ensure flavin cofactor homeostasis.Special attention is devoted to the problem of sub-cellular compartmentalization of cofactor synthesis in eukaryotes, made possible by the existence of different FAD synthase isoforms and specific molecular components involved in flavin trafficking across sub-cellular membranes.Another point addressed in this review is the mechanism of cofactor delivery to nascent apo-proteins, especially those localized into mitochondria, where they integrate FAD in a process that involves additional mitochondrial protein(s) still to be identified. Further efforts are necessary to elucidate the role of riboflavin/FAD network in human pathologies and to exploit the structural differences between human and microbial/fungal FAD synthase as the rational basis for developing novel antibiotic/antimycotic drugs. PMID:23116402

  5. Co-Factor Binding Confers Substrate Specificity to Xylose Reductase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Appu Kumar; Mondal, Alok K.; Kumaran, S.

    2012-01-01

    Binding of substrates into the active site, often through complementarity of shapes and charges, is central to the specificity of an enzyme. In many cases, substrate binding induces conformational changes in the active site, promoting specific interactions between them. In contrast, non-substrates either fail to bind or do not induce the requisite conformational changes upon binding and thus no catalysis occurs. In principle, both lock and key and induced-fit binding can provide specific interactions between the substrate and the enzyme. In this study, we present an interesting case where cofactor binding pre-tunes the active site geometry to recognize only the cognate substrates. We illustrate this principle by studying the substrate binding and kinetic properties of Xylose Reductase from Debaryomyces hansenii (DhXR), an AKR family enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of carbonyl substrates using NADPH as co-factor. DhXR reduces D-xylose with increased specificity and shows no activity towards “non-substrate” sugars like L-rhamnose. Interestingly, apo-DhXR binds to D-xylose and L-rhamnose with similar affinity (Kd∼5.0–10.0 mM). Crystal structure of apo-DhXR-rhamnose complex shows that L-rhamnose is bound to the active site cavity. L-rhamnose does not bind to holo-DhXR complex and thus, it cannot competitively inhibit D-xylose binding and catalysis even at 4–5 fold molar excess. Comparison of Kd values with Km values reveals that increased specificity for D-xylose is achieved at the cost of moderately reduced affinity. The present work reveals a latent regulatory role for cofactor binding which was previously unknown and suggests that cofactor induced conformational changes may increase the complimentarity between D-xylose and active site similar to specificity achieved through induced-fit mechanism. PMID:23049810

  6. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H+ and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN− ligands of the H-cluster, tracing 57Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe–S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN− ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications. PMID:26508821

  7. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases.

    PubMed

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900's at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases. PMID:26777674

  8. Metal Cofactors in the Structure and Activity of the Fowlpox Resolvase

    PubMed Central

    Culyba, Matthew J.; Hwang, Young; Hu, Jimmy Yan; Minkah, Nana; Ocwieja, Karen E.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2010-01-01

    Poxvirus DNA replication generates linear concatemers containing many copies of the viral genome with inverted repeat sequences at the junctions between monomers. The inverted repeats refold to generate Holliday junctions, which are cleaved by the virus-encoded resolvase enzyme to form unit-length genomes. Here we report studies of the influence of metal cofactors on the activity and structure of the resolvase of fowlpox virus (FPV), which provides a tractable model for in vitro studies. Small molecule inhibitors of related enzymes bind simultaneously to metal cofactors and nearby surface amino-acid residues, so understanding enzyme-cofactor interactions is important for the design of antiviral agents. Analysis of inferred active site residues (D7, E60, K102, D132, D135) by mutagenesis and metal rescue experiments specified residues that contribute to binding metal ions, and that multiple binding sites are probably involved. Differential electrophoretic analysis was used to map the conformation of the DNA junction when bound by resolvase. For the wild-type complex in the presence of EDTA or Ca2+, migration was consistent with the DNA arms arranged in near tetrahedral geometry. However, the D7N active site mutant resolvase held the arms in a more planar arrangement in EDTA, Ca2+ or Mg2+ conditions, implicating metal-dependent contacts at the active site in the larger architecture of the complex. These data show how divalent metals dictate the conformation of FPV resolvase/ DNA complexes and subsequent DNA cleavage. PMID:20380839

  9. Biochemical Characterization of Molybdenum Cofactor-free Nitrate Reductase from Neurospora crassa*

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Phillip; Krausze, Joern; van den Heuvel, Joop; Curth, Ute; Pierik, Antonio J.; Herzog, Stephanie; Mendel, Ralf R.; Kruse, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is a complex molybdenum cofactor (Moco)-dependent homodimeric metalloenzyme that is vitally important for autotrophic organism as it catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of nitrate assimilation. Beside Moco, eukaryotic NR also binds FAD and heme as additional redox active cofactors, and these are involved in electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the enzyme molybdenum center where reduction of nitrate to nitrite takes place. We report the first biochemical characterization of a Moco-free eukaryotic NR from the fungus Neurospora crassa, documenting that Moco is necessary and sufficient to induce dimer formation. The molybdenum center of NR reconstituted in vitro from apo-NR and Moco showed an EPR spectrum identical to holo-NR. Analysis of mutants unable to bind heme or FAD revealed that insertion of Moco into NR occurs independent from the insertion of any other NR redox cofactor. Furthermore, we showed that at least in vitro the active site formation of NR is an autonomous process. PMID:23539622

  10. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J.; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900’s at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases. PMID:26777674

  11. Rapid X-ray Photoreduction of Dimetal-Oxygen Cofactors in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sigfridsson, Kajsa G. V.; Chernev, Petko; Leidel, Nils; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Gräslund, Astrid; Haumann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Prototypic dinuclear metal cofactors with varying metallation constitute a class of O2-activating catalysts in numerous enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase. Reliable structures are required to unravel the reaction mechanisms. However, protein crystallography data may be compromised by x-ray photoreduction (XRP). We studied XPR of Fe(III)Fe(III) and Mn(III)Fe(III) sites in the R2 subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Rapid and biphasic x-ray photoreduction kinetics at 20 and 80 K for both cofactor types suggested sequential formation of (III,II) and (II,II) species and similar redox potentials of iron and manganese sites. Comparing with typical x-ray doses in crystallography implies that (II,II) states are reached in <1 s in such studies. First-sphere metal coordination and metal-metal distances differed after chemical reduction at room temperature and after XPR at cryogenic temperatures, as corroborated by model structures from density functional theory calculations. The inter-metal distances in the XPR-induced (II,II) states, however, are similar to R2 crystal structures. Therefore, crystal data of initially oxidized R2-type proteins mostly contain photoreduced (II,II) cofactors, which deviate from the native structures functional in O2 activation, explaining observed variable metal ligation motifs. This situation may be remedied by novel femtosecond free electron-laser protein crystallography techniques. PMID:23400774

  12. Stepwise isotope editing of [FeFe]-hydrogenases exposes cofactor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Heberle, Joachim; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven Timo

    2016-07-26

    The six-iron cofactor of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (H-cluster) is the most efficient H2-forming catalyst in nature. It comprises a diiron active site with three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN(-)) ligands in the active oxidized state (Hox) and one additional CO ligand in the inhibited state (Hox-CO). The diatomic ligands are sensitive reporter groups for structural changes of the cofactor. Their vibrational dynamics were monitored by real-time attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Combination of (13)CO gas exposure, blue or red light irradiation, and controlled hydration of three different [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins produced 8 Hox and 16 Hox-CO species with all possible isotopic exchange patterns. Extensive density functional theory calculations revealed the vibrational mode couplings of the carbonyl ligands and uniquely assigned each infrared spectrum to a specific labeling pattern. For Hox-CO, agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies improved by up to one order of magnitude for an apical CN(-) at the distal iron ion of the cofactor as opposed to an apical CO. For Hox, two equally probable isomers with partially rotated ligands were suggested. Interconversion between these structures implies dynamic ligand reorientation at the H-cluster. Our experimental protocol for site-selective (13)CO isotope editing combined with computational species assignment opens new perspectives for characterization of functional intermediates in the catalytic cycle. PMID:27432985

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Cell Receptors, Coreceptors, and Cofactors: Implications for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Skeate, Joseph G; Sanna, Adriana M; Taylor, Julia R; Da Silva, Diane M; Cannon, Paula M; Kast, W Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the last three decades, extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has highlighted its capability to exploit a variety of strategies to enter and infect immune cells. Although CD4(+) T cells are well known as the major HIV target, with infection occurring through the canonical combination of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) receptor and either the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) or C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) coreceptors, HIV has also been found to enter other important immune cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, Langerhans cells, B cells, and granulocytes. Interestingly, the expression of distinct cellular cofactors partially regulates the rate in which HIV infects each distinct cell type. Furthermore, HIV can benefit from the acquisition of new proteins incorporated into its envelope during budding events. While several publications have investigated details of how HIV manipulates particular cell types or subtypes, an up-to-date comprehensive review on HIV tropism for different immune cells is lacking. Therefore, this review is meant to focus on the different receptors, coreceptors, and cofactors that HIV exploits to enter particular immune cells. Additionally, prophylactic approaches that have targeted particular molecules associated with HIV entry and infection of different immune cells will be discussed. Unveiling the underlying cellular receptors and cofactors that lead to HIV preference for specific immune cell populations is crucial in identifying novel preventative/therapeutic targets for comprehensive strategies to eliminate viral infection. PMID:27410493

  14. The Mtm1p carrier and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate cofactor trafficking in yeast mitochondria *

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Mei M.; Penmatsa, Aravind; Whittaker, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical communication between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial subsystems of the cell depends on solute carriers in the mitochondrial inner membrane that transport metabolites between the two compartments. We have expressed and purified a yeast mitochondrial carrier protein (Mtm1p, YGR257cp), originally identified as a manganese ion carrier, for biochemical characterization aimed at resolving its function. High affinity, stoichiometric pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) cofactor binding was characterized by fluorescence titration and calorimetry, and the biochemical effects of mtm1 gene deletion on yeast mitochondria were investigated. The PLP status of the mitochondrial proteome (the mitochondrial ‘PLP-ome’) was probed by immunoblot analysis of mitochondria isolated from wild type (MTM1+) and knockout (MTM1−) yeast, revealing depletion of mitochondrial PLP in the latter. A direct activity assay of the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step of heme biosynthesis, the PLP-dependent mitochondrial enzyme 5-aminolevulinate synthase, extends these results, providing a specific example of PLP cofactor limitation. Together, these experiments support a role for Mtm1p in mitochondrial PLP trafficking and highlight the link between PLP cofactor transport and iron metabolism, a remarkable illustration of metabolic integration. PMID:25637770

  15. Developmental expression patterns of candidate cofactors for vertebrate six family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Karen M; Pignoni, Francesca; Yan, Bo; Moody, Sally A

    2010-12-01

    Six family transcription factors play important roles in craniofacial development. Their transcriptional activity can be modified by cofactor proteins. Two Six genes and one cofactor gene (Eya1) are involved in the human Branchio-otic (BO) and Branchio-otic-renal (BOR) syndromes. However, mutations in Six and Eya genes only account for approximately half of these patients. To discover potential new causative genes, we searched the Xenopus genome for orthologues of Drosophila cofactor proteins that interact with the fly Six-related factor, SO. We identified 33 Xenopus genes with high sequence identity to 20 of the 25 fly SO-interacting proteins. We provide the developmental expression patterns of the Xenopus orthologues for 11 of the fly genes, and demonstrate that all are expressed in developing craniofacial tissues with at least partial overlap with Six1/Six2. We speculate that these genes may function as Six-interacting partners with important roles in vertebrate craniofacial development and perhaps congenital syndromes. PMID:21089078

  16. Live Cell Discovery of Microbial Vitamin Transport and Enzyme-Cofactor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lindsey N; Koech, Phillip K; Plymale, Andrew E; Landorf, Elizabeth V; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank R; Lipton, Mary S; Romine, Margaret F; Wright, Aaron T

    2016-02-19

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, which shuttle nutrients such as B vitamins and metabolites across cell membranes and are required for the survival of microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, along with characterization of intracellular enzyme-cofactor associations, are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemistry and physiology, microbial interactions, and microbial responses to perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular enzyme-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic photoheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known to employ mechanisms for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by identifying B vitamin transport and cofactor-dependent interactions required for survival. PMID:26669591

  17. Developmental expression patterns of candidate co-factors for vertebrate Six family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Karen M.; Pignoni, Francesca; Yan, Bo; Moody, Sally A.

    2010-01-01

    Six family transcription factors play important roles in craniofacial development. Their transcriptional activity can be modified by co-factor proteins. Two Six genes and one co-factor gene (Eya1) are involved in the human Branchio-otic (BO) and Branchio-otic-renal (BOR) syndromes. However, mutations in Six and Eya genes only account for about half of these patients. To discover potential new causative genes, we searched the Xenopus genome for orthologues of Drosophila co-factor proteins that interact with the fly Six-related factor, SO. We identified 33 Xenopus genes with high sequence identity to 20 of the 25 fly SO-interacting proteins. We provide the developmental expression patterns of the Xenopus orthologues for 11 of the fly genes, and demonstrate that all are expressed in developing craniofacial tissues with at least partial overlap with Six1/Six2. We speculate that these genes may function as Six-interacting partners with important roles in vertebrate craniofacial development and perhaps congenital syndromes. PMID:21089078

  18. Functional and structural characterization of an unusual cofactor-independent oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Baas, Bert-Jan; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Geertsema, Edzard M; Rozeboom, Henriette J; de Vries, Marcel P; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-02-10

    The vast majority of characterized oxygenases use bound cofactors to activate molecular oxygen to carry out oxidation chemistry. Here, we show that an enzyme of unknown activity, RhCC from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, functions as an oxygenase, using 4-hydroxyphenylenolpyruvate as a substrate. This unique and complex reaction yields 3-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-pyruvate, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and oxalic acid as major products. Incubations with H2(18)O, (18)O2, and a substrate analogue suggest that this enzymatic oxygenation reaction likely involves a peroxide anion intermediate. Analysis of sequence similarity and the crystal structure of RhCC (solved at 1.78 Å resolution) reveal that this enzyme belongs to the tautomerase superfamily. Members of this superfamily typically catalyze tautomerization, dehalogenation, or decarboxylation reactions rather than oxygenation reactions. The structure shows the absence of cofactors, establishing RhCC as a rare example of a redox-metal- and coenzyme-free oxygenase. This sets the stage to study the mechanistic details of cofactor-independent oxygen activation in the unusual context of the tautomerase superfamily. PMID:25565350

  19. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  20. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  1. Intracellular trafficking of the pyridoxal cofactor. Implications for health and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, James W

    2016-02-15

    The importance of the vitamin B6-derived pyridoxal cofactor for human health has been established through more than 70 years of intensive biochemical research, revealing its fundamental roles in metabolism. B6 deficiency, resulting from nutritional limitation or impaired uptake from dietary sources, is associated with epilepsy, neuromuscular disease and neurodegeneration. Hereditary disorders of B6 processing are also known, and genetic defects in pathways involved in transport of B6 into the cell and its transformation to the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate enzyme cofactor can contribute to cardiovascular disease by interfering with homocysteine metabolism and the biosynthesis of vasomodulatory polyamines. Compared to the processes involved in cellular uptake and processing of the B6 vitamers, trafficking of the PLP cofactor across intracellular membranes is very poorly understood, even though the availability of PLP within subcellular compartments (particularly the mitochondrion) may have important health implications. The aim of this review is to concisely summarize the state of current knowledge of intracellular trafficking of PLP and to identify key directions for future research. PMID:26619753

  2. The Mature Athlete

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Moira M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Aging changes the biology, healing capacity, and biomechanical function of tendons and ligaments and results in common clinical pathologies that present to orthopedic surgeons, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and athletic trainers. A better understanding of the age-related changes in these connective tissues will allow better patient care. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in December 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to age-related changes in tendons and ligaments. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges associated with age-dependent changes in the rotator cuff, Achilles tendon, lateral humeral epicondylar tendons, quadriceps tendon, and patellar tendon. The anterior cruciate ligament and the medial collateral ligament are the most studied intra-articular and extra-articular ligaments, and both are associated with age-dependent changes. Conclusion: Tendons and ligaments are highly arranged connective tissue structures that maintain joint motion and joint stability. These structures are subject to vascular and compositional changes with increasing age that alter their mechanotransduction, biology, healing capacity, and biomechanical function. Emerging research into the etiology of age-dependent changes will provide further information to help combat the age-related clinical complications associated with the injuries that occur to tendons and ligaments. PMID:24427441

  3. Career Maturity of Welfare Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckman, Carol M.

    To investigate the career maturity of welfare recipients, this thesis examines six independent variables: (1) race; (2) sex; (3) age; (4) level of formal education; (5) general intelligence; and (6) locus of control. Scales taken from the Career Maturity Inventory served as the dependent variables. The sample consisted of 83 welfare recipients who…

  4. 2-Chloro-1,4-Dimethoxybenzene as a Novel Catalytic Cofactor for Oxidation of Anisyl Alcohol by Lignin Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Teunissen, Pauline J. M.; Field, Jim A.

    1998-01-01

    2-Chloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (2Cl-14DMB) is a natural compound produced de novo by several white rot fungi. This chloroaromatic metabolite was identified as a cofactor superior to veratryl alcohol (VA) in the oxidation of anisyl alcohol (AA) by lignin peroxidase (LiP). Our results reveal that good LiP substrates, such as VA and tryptophan, are comparatively poor cofactors in the oxidation of AA. Furthermore, we show that a good cofactor does not necessarily serve a role in protecting LiP against H2O2 inactivation. 2Cl-14DMB was not a direct mediator of AA oxidation, since increasing AA concentrations did not inhibit the oxidation of 2Cl-14DMB at all. However, the high molar ratio of anisaldehyde formed to 2Cl-14DMB consumed, up to 13:1, indicates that a mechanism which recycles the cofactor is present. PMID:16349526

  5. Photo-cycle dynamics of LOV1-His domain of phototropin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with roseoflavin monophosphate cofactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Mathes, T.; Hegemann, P.

    2010-09-01

    The wild-type phototropin protein phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii consists of two N-terminal LOV domains LOV1 and LOV2 with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a C-terminal serine-threonine kinase domain. It controls multiple steps in the sexual lifecycle of the alga. Here the LOV1-His domain of phot with modified cofactor is studied. FMN is replaced by roseoflavin monophosphate (8-dimethylamino-8-demethyl-FMN, RoFMN). The modified LOV1 domain is called RoLOV1. The photo-dynamics consequences of the cofactor change are studied. The absorption, emission, and photo-cyclic behaviour of LOV1-His and RoLOV1-His are compared. A spectroscopic characterisation of the cofactors FMN and RoFMN (roseoflavin) is given.

  6. Genes for the dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (DCOH) are on human and murine chromsomes 10

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Mendel, D.B.; Crabtree, G.R.; Francke, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (HNF-1[alpha]; gene symbol, TCF1) forms dimers with itself as well as with HNF-1[beta] and regulates the expression of several liver-specific genes. Recently, a dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha], called DCOH, has been identified. Here, the authors report the chromosomal localization of the genes for this cofactor to chromosomes 10 in both humans and mice by Southern blot analyses of somatic cell hybrids. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM).

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Urbina, Angel

    2010-10-01

    Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a communication tool that must include a dicussion of the supporting evidence. PCMM is a tool for managing risk in the use of modeling and simulation. PCMM is in the service of organizing evidence to help tell the modeling and simulation (M&S) story. PCMM table describes what activities within each element are undertaken at each of the levels of maturity. Target levels of maturity can be established based on the intended application. The assessment is to inform what level has been achieved compared to the desired level, to help prioritize the VU activities & to allocate resources.

  8. Cerebellar mature teratoma in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zavanone, M; Alimehmeti, R; Campanella, R; Ram-Pini, P; Locatelli, M; Egidi, M; Righini, A; Bauer, D

    2002-03-01

    Mature teratoma of the posterior cranial fossa in adults is extremely rare. We report a particularly rare case of medio-lateral cerebellar mature teratoma that became symptomatic in a middle-aged man. The CT revealed the lesion of heterogeneous density with calcifications in the solid medial portion. Only the MRI could reliably define the borders of the cystic component extending into the left cerebellar lobe. Histologically the presence of fully matured representative tissues of the 3 germ layers ensured the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We suggest that the cyst formation from progressive latent hemorrhage and/or secretion from the gland cells of the tumor, may be responsible for the clinical decompensation even in adulthood. PMID:12118223

  9. Defining efficient enzyme-cofactor pairs for bioorthogonal profiling of protein methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Kabirul; Chen, Yuling; Wu, Hong; Bothwell, Ian R.; Blum, Gil J.; Zeng, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Zheng, Weihong; Min, Jinrong; Deng, Haiteng; Luo, Minkui

    2013-11-18

    Protein methyltransferase (PMT)-mediated posttranslational modification of histone and nonhistone substrates modulates stability, localization, and interacting partners of target proteins in diverse cellular contexts. These events play critical roles in normal biological processes and are frequently deregulated in human diseases. In the course of identifying substrates of individual PMTs, bioorthogonal profiling of protein methylation (BPPM) has demonstrated its merits. In this approach, specific PMTs are engineered to process S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) analogs as cofactor surrogates and label their substrates with distinct chemical modifications for target elucidation. Despite the proof-of-concept advancement of BPPM, few efforts have been made to explore its generality. With two cancer-relevant PMTs, EuHMT1 (GLP1/KMT1D) and EuHMT2 (G9a/KMT1C), as models, we defined the key structural features of engineered PMTs and matched SAM analogs that can render the orthogonal enzyme–cofactor pairs for efficient catalysis. Here we have demonstrated that the presence of sulfonium-β-sp2 carbon and flexible, medium-sized sulfonium-δ-substituents are crucial for SAM analogs as BPPM reagents. The bulky cofactors can be accommodated by tailoring the conserved Y1211/Y1154 residues and nearby hydrophobic cavities of EuHMT1/2. Profiling proteome-wide substrates with BPPM allowed identification of >500 targets of EuHMT1/2 with representative targets validated using native EuHMT1/2 and SAM. This finding indicates that EuHMT1/2 may regulate many cellular events previously unrecognized to be modulated by methylation. The present work, therefore, paves the way to a broader application of the BPPM technology to profile methylomes of diverse PMTs and elucidate their downstream functions.

  10. Investigation of molybdenum cofactor deficiency due to MOCS2 deficiency in a newborn baby

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Matthew; Roeper, Juliane; Allgood, Catherine; Chin, Raymond; Santamaria, Jose; Wong, Flora; Schwarz, Guenter; Whitehall, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MOCD) is a severe autosomal recessive neonatal metabolic disease that causes seizures and death or severe brain damage. Symptoms, signs and cerebral images can resemble those attributed to intrapartum hypoxia. In humans, molybdenum cofactor (MOCO) has been found to participate in four metabolic reactions: aldehyde dehydrogenase (or oxidase), xanthine oxidoreductase (or oxidase) and sulfite oxidase, and some of the components of molybdenum cofactor synthesis participate in amidoxime reductase. A newborn girl developed refractory seizures, opisthotonus, exaggerated startle reflexes and vomiting on the second day of life. Treatment included intravenous fluid, glucose supplementation, empiric antibiotic therapy and anticonvulsant medication. Her encephalopathy progressed, and she was given palliative care and died aged 1 week. There were no dysmorphic features, including ectopia lentis but ultrasonography revealed a thin corpus callosum. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide etiology, prognosis and genetic counseling. Methods Biochemical analysis of urine, blood, Sanger sequencing of leukocyte DNA, and analysis of the effect of the mutation on protein expression. Results Uric acid level was low in blood, and S-sulfo-L-cysteine and xanthine were elevated in urine. Compound Z was detected in urine. Two MOCS2 gene mutations were identified: c.501 + 2delT, which disrupts a conserved splice site sequence, and c.419C > T (pS140F). Protein expression studies confirmed that the p.S140F substitution was pathogenic. The parents were shown to be heterozygous carriers. Conclusions Mutation analysis confirmed that the MOCD in this family could not be treated with cPMP infusion, and enabled prenatal diagnosis and termination of a subsequent affected pregnancy. PMID:25709896

  11. Dimeric human sulfotransferase 1B1 displays cofactor-dependent subunit communication

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, Zachary E; Falany, Charles N

    2015-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are dimeric enzymes that catalyze the transformation of hydrophobic drugs and hormones into hydrophilic sulfate esters thereby providing the body with an important pathway for regulating small molecule activity and excretion. While SULT dimerization is highly conserved, the necessity for the interaction has not been established. To perform its function, a SULT must efficiently bind the universal sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS), and release the byproduct, 3′, 5′-diphosphoadenosine (PAP), following catalysis. We hypothesize this efficient binding and release of PAPS/PAP may be connected to SULT dimerization. To allow for the visualization of dynamic protein interactions critical for addressing this hypothesis and to generate kinetically testable hypotheses, molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) of hSULT1B1 were performed with PAPS and PAP bound to each dimer subunit in various combinations. The results suggest the dimer subunits may possess the capability of communicating with one another in a manner dependent on the presence of the cofactor. PAP or PAPS binding to a single side of the dimer results in decreased backbone flexibility of both the bound and unbound subunits, implying the dimer subunits may not act independently. Further, binding of PAP to one subunit of the dimer and PAPS to the other caused increased flexibility in the subunit bound to the inactive cofactor (PAP). These results suggest SULT dimerization may be important in maintaining cofactor binding/release properties of SULTs and provide hypothetical explanations for SULT half-site reactivity and substrate inhibition, which can be analyzed in vitro. PMID:26236487

  12. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  13. Reactions of the oxidized organic cofactor in copper-depleted bovine serum amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Agostinelli, E; De Matteis, G; Sinibaldi, A; Mondovì, B; Morpurgo, L

    1997-01-01

    A novel copper-depleted bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO), in which about half the molecules contained the organic cofactor in the oxidized form, was prepared by adding a reductant in anaerobic conditions to the cyanide-reacted protein. The CuI-semiquinone formed in these conditions reoxidizes after the removal of copper. The inactive derivative was reduced by benzylamine at approx. 1/1000 the rate of BSAO. The pseudo-first-order reaction was preceded by the formation of a protein-benzylamine complex with dissociation constant, Kd, of 4.9+/-0.5 mM, similar to the Km of BSAO (2.2 mM). Also the reactions with phenylhydrazine and benzohydrazide were considerably slower than in holo-BSAO, whereas the reactions with p-pyridine-2-ylphenylacetohydrazide, containing a longer aromatic tail, and semicarbazide, lacking an aromatic moiety, were less severely affected. Removal of copper had no effect on the optical spectra of BSAO and of most adducts, containing the cofactor in quinol form, showing that copper is bound to neither the oxidized nor the reduced cofactor. Benzylhydrazine did not produce optical effects but was tightly bound, as inferred from its inhibitory effect on reaction with other molecules. Substrate and inhibitors might bind a hydrophobic pocket at some distance from the quinone, probably near the protein surface, with their affinity depending on the hydrophobic character and pKa. The binding, which is not greatly influenced by copper removal, probably induces a copper-dependent change of conformation, 'opening' a pathway to the active site buried in the protein interior. PMID:9182709

  14. JadR*-mediated feed-forward regulation of cofactor supply in jadomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Pan, Guohui; Zou, Zhengzhong; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian; Tan, Huarong

    2013-11-01

    Jadomycin production is under complex regulation in Streptomyces venezuelae. Here, another cluster-situated regulator, JadR*, was shown to negatively regulate jadomycin biosynthesis by binding to four upstream regions of jadY, jadR1, jadI and jadE in jad gene cluster respectively. The transcriptional levels of four target genes of JadR* increased significantly in ΔjadR*, confirming that these genes were directly repressed by JadR*. Jadomycin B (JdB) and its biosynthetic intermediates 2,3-dehydro-UWM6 (DHU), dehydrorabelomycin (DHR) and jadomycin A (JdA) modulated the DNA-binding activities of JadR* on the jadY promoter, with DHR giving the strongest dissociation effects. Direct interactions between JadR* and these ligands were further demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance, which showed that DHR has the highest affinity for JadR*. However, only DHU and DHR could induce the expression of jadY and jadR* in vivo. JadY is the FMN/FAD reductase supplying cofactors FMNH₂/FADH₂ for JadG, an oxygenase, that catalyses the conversion of DHR to JdA. Therefore, our results revealed that JadR* and early pathway intermediates, particularly DHR, regulate cofactor supply by a convincing case of a feed-forward mechanism. Such delicate regulation of expression of jadY could ensure a timely supply of cofactors FMNH₂/FADH₂ for jadomycin biosynthesis, and avoid unnecessary consumption of NAD(P)H. PMID:24112541

  15. Non-racemic Antifolates Stereo-selectively Recruit Alternate Cofactors and Overcome Resistance in S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Keshipeddy, Santosh; Reeve, Stephanie M.; Anderson, Amy C.; Wright, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    While antifolates such as Bactrim (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; TMP-SMX) continue to play an important role in treating community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), resistance-conferring mutations, specifically F98Y of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), have arisen and compromise continued use. In an attempt to extend the lifetime of this important class, we have developed a class of propargyl-linked antifolates (PLAs) that exhibit potent inhibition of the enzyme and bacterial strains. Probing the role of the configuration at the single propargylic stereocenter in these inhibitors required us to develop a new approach to non-racemic 3-aryl-1-butyne building blocks by the pairwise use of asymmetric conjugate addition and aldehyde dehydration protocols. Using this new route, a series of non-racemic PLA inhibitors was prepared and shown to possess potent enzyme inhibition (IC50 values < 50 nM), antibacterial effects (several with MIC values < 1 µg/mL) and to form stable ternary complexes with both wild-type and resistant mutants. Unexpectedly, crystal structures of a pair of individual enantiomers in the wild-type DHFR revealed that the single change in configuration of the stereocenter drove the selection of an alternative NADPH cofactor, with the minor α-anomer appearing with R-27. Remarkably, this cofactor switching becomes much more prevalent when the F98Y mutation is present. The observation of cofactor site plasticity leads to a postulate for the structural basis of TMP resistance in DHFR and also suggests design strategies that can be used to target these resistant enzymes. PMID:26098608

  16. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  17. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  18. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  19. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  20. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  1. Substituted quinoline quinones as surrogates for the PQQ cofactor: an electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    Dorfner, Walter L; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-04-17

    Pyrroloquinoline quinones (PQQ) are important cofactors that shuttle redox equivalents in diverse metalloproteins. Quinoline 7,8-quinones have been synthesized and characterized as surrogates for PQQ to elucidate redox energetics within metalloenzyme active sites. The quinoline 7,8-quinones were accessed using polymer-supported iodoxybenzoic acid and the compounds evaluated using solution electrochemistry. Together with a family of quinones, the products were evaluated computationally and used to generate a predictive correlation between a computed ΔG and the experimental reduction potentials. PMID:25826406

  2. Substrate, product, and cofactor: The extraordinarily flexible relationship between the CDE superfamily and heme.

    PubMed

    Celis, Arianna I; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2015-05-15

    PFam Clan 0032, also known as the CDE superfamily, is a diverse group of at least 20 protein families sharing a common α,β-barrel domain. Of these, six different groups bind heme inside the barrel's interior, using it alternately as a cofactor, substrate, or product. Focusing on these six, an integrated picture of structure, sequence, taxonomy, and mechanism is presented here, detailing how a single structural motif might be able to mediate such an array of functions with one of nature's most important small molecules. PMID:25778630

  3. Electronic structural flexibility of heterobimetallic Mn/Fe cofactors: R2lox and R2c proteins.

    PubMed

    Shafaat, Hannah S; Griese, Julia J; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Roos, Katarina; Andersson, Charlotta S; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Gräslund, Astrid; Siegbahn, Per E M; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Högbom, Martin; Cox, Nicholas

    2014-09-24

    The electronic structure of the Mn/Fe cofactor identified in a new class of oxidases (R2lox) described by Andersson and Högbom [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2009, 106, 5633] is reported. The R2lox protein is homologous to the small subunit of class Ic ribonucleotide reductase (R2c) but has a completely different in vivo function. Using multifrequency EPR and related pulse techniques, it is shown that the cofactor of R2lox represents an antiferromagnetically coupled Mn(III)/Fe(III) dimer linked by a μ-hydroxo/bis-μ-carboxylato bridging network. The Mn(III) ion is coordinated by a single water ligand. The R2lox cofactor is photoactive, converting into a second form (R2loxPhoto) upon visible illumination at cryogenic temperatures (77 K) that completely decays upon warming. This second, unstable form of the cofactor more closely resembles the Mn(III)/Fe(III) cofactor seen in R2c. It is shown that the two forms of the R2lox cofactor differ primarily in terms of the local site geometry and electronic state of the Mn(III) ion, as best evidenced by a reorientation of its unique (55)Mn hyperfine axis. Analysis of the metal hyperfine tensors in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggests that this change is triggered by deprotonation of the μ-hydroxo bridge. These results have important consequences for the mixed-metal R2c cofactor and the divergent chemistry R2lox and R2c perform. PMID:25153930

  4. Bienzymatic Sequential Reaction on Microgel Particles and Their Cofactor Dependent Applications.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi C; Tripathi, Bijay P; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-05-01

    We report, the preparation and characterization of bioconjugates, wherein enzymes pyruvate kinase (Pk) and l-lactic dehydrogenase (Ldh) were covalently bound to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgel support using glutaraldehyde (GA) as the cross-linker. The effects of different arrangements of enzymes on the microgels were investigated for the enzymatic behavior and to obtain maximum Pk-Ldh sequential reaction. The dual enzyme bioconjugates prepared by simultaneous addition of both the enzymes immobilized on the same microgel particles (PL), and PiLi, that is, dual enzyme bioconjugate obtained by combining single-enzyme bioconjugates (immobilized pyruvate kinase (Pi) and immobilized lactate dehydrogenase (Li)), were used to study the effect of the assembly of dual enzymes systems on the microgels. The kinetic parameters (Km, kcat), reaction parameters (temperature, pH), stability (thermal and storage), and cofactor dependent applications were studied for the dual enzymes conjugates. The kinetic results indicated an improved turn over number (kcat) for PL, while the kcat and catalytic efficiency was significantly decreased in case of PiLi. For cofactor dependent application, in which the ability of ADP monitoring and ATP synthesis by the conjugates were studied, the activity of PL was found to be nearly 2-fold better than that of PiLi. These results indicated that the influence of spacing between the enzymes is an important factor in optimization of multienzyme immobilization on the support. PMID:27010819

  5. Epitope mapping of 10 monoclonal antibodies against the pig analogue of human membrane cofactor protein (MCP)

    PubMed Central

    PéRez De La Lastra, J M; Van Den Berg, C W; Bullido, R; Almazán, F; Domínguez, J; Llanes, D; Morgan, B P

    1999-01-01

    Pig membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46) is a 50 000–60 000 MW glycoprotein that is expressed on a wide variety of cells, including erythrocytes. Pig MCP has cofactor activity for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b and is an efficient regulator of the classical and alternative pathway of human and pig complement. A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was collected from two different laboratories; all of these mAbs were raised against pig leucocytes and all recognized the same complex banding pattern on sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) of erythrocyte membranes. All were shown to be reactive with pig MCP and were divided into four groups of mutually competitive antibodies based on competition studies for membrane-bound MCP and for soluble MCP, the latter by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The antigenic properties of membrane-bound and soluble MCP were similar, although some interesting differences were revealed. None of the 10 mAbs were cross-reactive with human MCP and only one showed cross-reactivity with leucocytes from a panel of large mammals – a weak cross-reactivity with a subset of dog leucocytes. All antibodies in one of the epitope groups and some in a second epitope group were able to block the functional activity of pig MCP, as measured by inhibition of MCP-catalysed C3 degradation by factor I. PMID:10233756

  6. Conjugated Cofactor Enables Efficient Temperature-Independent Electronic Transport Across ∼6 nm Long Halorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Dutta, Sansa; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2015-09-01

    We observe temperature-independent electron transport, characteristic of tunneling across a ∼6 nm thick Halorhodopsin (phR) monolayer. phR contains both retinal and a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, as cofactors, in a trimeric protein-chromophore complex. This finding is unusual because for conjugated oligo-imine molecular wires a transition from temperature-independent to -dependent electron transport, ETp, was reported at ∼4 nm wire length. In the ∼6 nm long phR, the ∼4 nm 50-carbon conjugated bacterioruberin is bound parallel to the α-helices of the peptide backbone. This places bacterioruberin's ends proximal to the two electrodes that contact the protein; thus, coupling to these electrodes may facilitate the activation-less current across the contacts. Oxidation of bacterioruberin eliminates its conjugation, causing the ETp to become temperature dependent (>180 K). Remarkably, even elimination of the retinal-protein covalent bond, with the fully conjugated bacterioruberin still present, leads to temperature-dependent ETp (>180 K). These results suggest that ETp via phR is cooperatively affected by both retinal and bacterioruberin cofactors. PMID:26301971

  7. NAD(+)-independent aldehyde oxidase catalyzes cofactor balanced 3-hydroxypropionic acid production in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Luo; Tian, Pingfang

    2014-11-01

    The limiting step for biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) in Klebsiella pneumoniae is the conversion of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) to 3-HP. This reaction is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although NAD(+)-dependent ALDH overexpression facilitates 3-HP biosynthesis, ALDH activity decreases and 3-HP stops accumulation when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here, we show that an NAD(+)-independent aldehyde oxidase (AOX) from Pseudomonas sp. AIU 362 holds promise for cofactor-balanced 3-HP production in K. pneumoniae. The AOX coding gene, alod, was heterologously expressed in E. coli and K. pneumoniae, and their respective crude cell extracts showed 38.1 U/mg and 16.6 U/mg activities toward propionaldehyde. The recombinant K. pneumoniae expressing alod showed 13.7 U/mg activity toward 3-HPA; K m and V max were 6.7 mM and 42 μM/min/mg, respectively. In shake-flask cultures, the recombinant K. pneumoniae strain produced 0.89 g 3-HP/l, twice that of the control. Moreover, it produced 3 g 3-HP/l during 24 h fed-batch cultivation in a 5 l bioreactor. The results indicate that AOX can efficiently convert 3-HPA into 3-HP. PMID:24980850

  8. TFPI cofactor function of protein S: essential role of the protein S SHBG-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Reglińska-Matveyev, Natalia; Andersson, Helena M.; Rezende, Suely M.; Dahlbäck, Björn; Crawley, James T. B.; Lane, David A.; Ahnström, Josefin

    2014-01-01

    Protein S is a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), accelerating the inhibition of activated factor X (FXa). TFPI Kunitz domain 3 residue Glu226 is essential for enhancement of TFPI by protein S. To investigate the complementary functional interaction site on protein S, we screened 44 protein S point, composite or domain swap variants spanning the whole protein S molecule for their TFPI cofactor function using a thrombin generation assay. Of these variants, two protein S/growth arrest–specific 6 chimeras, with either the whole sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG)-like domain (Val243-Ser635; chimera III) or the SHBG laminin G-type 1 subunit (Ser283-Val459; chimera I), respectively, substituted by the corresponding domain in growth arrest–specific 6, were unable to enhance TFPI. The importance of the protein S SHBG-like domain (and its laminin G-type 1 subunit) for binding and enhancement of TFPI was confirmed in FXa inhibition assays and using surface plasmon resonance. In addition, protein S bound to C4b binding protein showed greatly reduced enhancement of TFPI-mediated inhibition of FXa compared with free protein S. We show that binding of TFPI to the protein S SHBG-like domain enables TFPI to interact optimally with FXa on a phospholipid membrane. PMID:24740810

  9. FAD synthesis and degradation in the nucleus create a local flavin cofactor pool.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-10-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg(-1) protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min(-1)·mg(-1) protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  10. FAD Synthesis and Degradation in the Nucleus Create a Local Flavin Cofactor Pool*

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg−1 protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min−1·mg−1 protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  11. Heterogeneity in maple syrup urine disease: aspects of cofactor requirement and complementation in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Willers, I; Goedde, H W

    1977-04-01

    Fibroblast strains derived from six patients with maple syrup urine disease have been investigated for their requirements of the cofactors NAD, CoASH, Mg++ and TPP in comparison with 10 normal control strains. The reconstitution of the decarboxylase function of branched chain alpha-keto acid (BCKA) dehydrogenase complex in lysed cells was studied with respect to the substrates alpha-keto-isocaproic acid, alpha-keto-isovaleric acid, and alpha-keto-beta-methylvaleric acid (KIC, KIVA, MEVA). The enzyme activity of all normal control strains for the substrates KIC and KIVA was not reconstituted by TPP + Mg++ alone, but CoASH + NAD could reconstitute the enzyme activity with KIC and KIVA in different degrees. Only two control strains were tested with MEVA as substrate, and these showed in contrast that TPP + Mg++ could partly reconstitute the enzyme activity. In contrast to the relative homogeneity in the reconstitution profiles of normal strains, the five classical and one intermittent MSUD strains showed heterogeneity in cofactor requirements. Complementation analysis using heterokaryons prepared from fibroblasts of four patients with classical MSUD and one patient with intermittent MSUD showed, in contrast to experiments with normal controls, a partial amelioration of the defect in two combinations; it is suggested that the defect in these strains is located at different functional subunits of the multienzyme complex. PMID:192504

  12. Can cofactor-binding sites in proteins be flexible? Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin binds FMN dimer.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2003-11-11

    Flavodoxins catalyze redox reactions using the isoalloxazine moiety of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor stacked between two aromatic residues located in two peptide loops. At high FMN concentrations that favor stacked FMN dimers in solution, isothermal titration calorimetric studies show that these dimers bind strongly to apo-flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (30 degrees C, 20 mM Hepes, pH 7, K(D) = 5.8 microM). Upon increasing the temperature so the FMN dimers dissociate (as shown by (1)H NMR), only one-to-one (FMN-to-protein) binding is observed. Calorimetric titrations result in one-to-one binding also in the presence of phosphate or sulfate (30 degrees C, 13 mM anion, pH 7, K(D) = 0.4 microM). FMN remains dimeric in the presence of phosphate and sulfate, suggesting that specific binding of a divalent anion to the phosphate-binding site triggers ordering of the peptide loops so only one isoalloxazine can fit. Although the physiological relevance of FMN and other nucleotides as dimers has not been explored, our study shows that high-affinity binding to proteins of such dimers can occur in vitro. This emphasizes that the cofactor-binding site in flavodoxin is more flexible than previously expected. PMID:14596623

  13. Thermal unfolding of Apo and Holo Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin: cofactor stabilizes folded and intermediate states.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2004-10-12

    We here compare thermal unfolding of the apo and holo forms of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin, which noncovalently binds a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. In the case of the apo form, fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) detected transitions are reversible but do not overlap (T(m) of 50 and 60 degrees C, respectively, pH 7). The thermal transitions for the holo form follow the same pattern but occur at higher temperatures (T(m) of 60 and 67 degrees C for fluorescence and CD transitions, respectively, pH 7). The holoprotein transitions are also reversible and exhibit no protein concentration dependence (above 10 microM), indicating that the FMN remains bound to the polypeptide throughout. Global analysis shows that the thermal reactions for both apo and holo forms proceed via an equilibrium intermediate that has approximately 90% nativelike secondary structure and significant enthalpic stabilization relative to the unfolded states. Incubation of unfolded holoflavodoxin at high temperatures results in FMN dissociation. Rebinding of FMN at these conditions is nominal, and therefore, cooling of holoprotein heated to 95 degrees C follows the refolding pathway of the apo form. However, FMN readily rebinds to the apoprotein at lower temperatures. We conclude that (1) a three-state thermal unfolding behavior appears to be conserved among long- and short-chain, as well as apo and holo forms of, flavodoxins and (2) flavodoxin's thermal stability (in both native and intermediate states) is augmented by the presence of the FMN cofactor. PMID:15461458

  14. PRIC295, a Nuclear Receptor Coactivator, Identified from PPARα-Interacting Cofactor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pyper, Sean R.; Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Fondell, Joseph D.; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) plays a key role in lipid metabolism and energy combustion. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents leads to the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. The ability of PPARα to induce expression of its target genes depends on Mediator, an evolutionarily conserved complex of cofactors and, in particular, the subunit 1 (Med1) of this complex. Here, we report the identification and characterization of PPARα-interacting cofactor (PRIC)-295 (PRIC295), a novel coactivator protein, and show that it interacts with the Med1 and Med24 subunits of the Mediator complex. PRIC295 contains 10 LXXLL signature motifs that facilitate nuclear receptor binding and interacts with PPARα and five other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily in a ligand-dependent manner. PRIC295 enhances the transactivation function of PPARα, PPARγ, and ERα. These data demonstrate that PRIC295 interacts with nuclear receptors such as PPARα and functions as a transcription coactivator under in vitro conditions and may play an important role in mediating the effects in vivo as a member of the PRIC complex with Med1 and Med24. PMID:20885938

  15. Chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by xray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR ischemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  16. Correlation of active site metal content in human diamine oxidase with trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone cofactor biogenesis .

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Collyer, Charles A; Guss, J Mitchell

    2010-09-28

    Copper-containing amine oxidases (CAOs) require a protein-derived topaquinone cofactor (TPQ) for activity. TPQ biogenesis is a self-processing reaction requiring the presence of copper and molecular oxygen. Recombinant human diamine oxidase (hDAO) was heterologously expressed in Drosophila S2 cells, and analysis indicates that the purified hDAO contains substoichiometric amounts of copper and TPQ. The crystal structure of a complex of an inhibitor, aminoguanidine, and hDAO at 2.05 Å resolution shows that the aminoguanidine forms a covalent adduct with the TPQ and that the site is ∼75% occupied. Aminoguanidine is a potent inhibitor of hDAO with an IC(50) of 153 ± 9 nM. The structure indicates that the catalytic metal site, normally occupied by copper, is fully occupied. X-ray diffraction data recorded below the copper edge, between the copper and zinc edges, and above the zinc edge have been used to show that the metal site is occupied approximately 75% by copper and 25% by zinc and the formation of the TPQ cofactor is correlated with copper occupancy. PMID:20722416

  17. Role of HOXA9 in leukemia: dysregulation, cofactors and essential targets

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Cailin T.; Hess, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    HOXA9 is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell expansion and is commonly deregulated in acute leukemias. A variety of upstream genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) lead to overexpression of HOXA9, which is a strong predictor of poor prognosis. In many cases, HOXA9 has been shown to be necessary for maintaining leukemic transformation, however the molecular mechanisms through which it promotes leukemogenesis remain elusive. Recent work has established that HOXA9 regulates downstream gene expression through binding at promoter distal enhancers along with a subset of cell-specific cofactor and collaborator proteins. Increasing efforts are being made to identify both the critical cofactors and target genes required for maintaining transformation in HOXA9-overexpressing leukemias. With continued advances in understanding HOXA9-mediated transformation, there is a wealth of opportunity for developing novel therapeutics that would be applicable for the greater than 50% of AML with overexpression of HOXA9. PMID:26028034

  18. Structural insights into a protein-bound iron-molybdenum cofactor precursor

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Mary C.; Hu, Yilin; Fay, Aaron W.; Ribbe, Markus W.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2006-01-01

    The iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) of the nitrogenase MoFe protein is a highly complex metallocluster that provides the catalytically essential site for biological nitrogen fixation. FeMoco is assembled outside the MoFe protein in a stepwise process requiring several components, including NifB-co, an iron- and sulfur-containing FeMoco precursor, and NifEN, an intermediary assembly protein on which NifB-co is presumably converted to FeMoco. Through the comparison of Azotobacter vinelandii strains expressing the NifEN protein in the presence or absence of the nifB gene, the structure of a NifEN-bound FeMoco precursor has been analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results provide physical evidence to support a mechanism for FeMoco biosynthesis. The NifEN-bound precursor is found to be a molybdenum-free analog of FeMoco and not one of the more commonly suggested cluster types based on a standard [4Fe–4S] architecture. A facile scheme by which FeMoco and alternative, non-molybdenum-containing nitrogenase cofactors are constructed from this common precursor is presented that has important implications for the biosynthesis and biomimetic chemical synthesis of FeMoco. PMID:16423898

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Nishida, Masami; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-12-03

    The Gram-negative aerobic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is an extremely important thermophilic microorganism that was originally isolated from a thermal vent environment in Japan. The molybdenum cofactor in this organism is considered to be an essential component required by enzymes that catalyze diverse key reactions in the global metabolism of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C derived from T. thermophilus was crystallized in two different space groups. Crystals obtained using the first crystallization condition belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.81, b = 109.84, c = 115.19 {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.9{sup o}; the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 {angstrom}. The other crystal form belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.57, c = 59.25 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains 12 monomers and one monomer for the crystals belonging to space group P2{sub 1} and R32, respectively.

  20. Chemical Nature and Reaction Mechanisms of the Molybdenum Cofactor of Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by x-ray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR is chemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  1. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-06-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA-binding factor 1 (GATA1) and T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia protein 1 (TAL1), have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here, we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor transcription factor Dp-2 (Tfdp2) were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis. PMID:24607859

  2. Cheese maturity assessment using ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2000-02-01

    The relationship between Mahon cheese maturity and ultrasonic velocity was examined. Moisture and textural properties were used as maturity indicators. The ultrasonic velocity of the cheese varied between 1630 and 1740 m/s, increasing with the curing time mainly because of loss of water, which also produced an increase of the textural properties. Because of the nature of low-intensity ultrasonics, velocity was better related to those textural parameters that involved small displacements. Ultrasonic velocity decreased with increasing temperature because of the negative temperature coefficient of the ultrasonic velocity of fat and the melting of fat. These results highlight the potential use of ultrasonic velocity measurements to rapidly and nondestructively assess cheese maturity. PMID:10714857

  3. Crystal structure of the NADP+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase from Vibrio harveyi: structural implications for cofactor specificity and affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Ahvazi, B; Coulombe, R; Delarge, M; Vedadi, M; Zhang, L; Meighen, E; Vrielink, A

    2000-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase from the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, catalyses the oxidation of long-chain aliphatic aldehydes to acids. The enzyme is unique compared with other forms of aldehyde dehydrogenase in that it exhibits a very high specificity and affinity for the cofactor NADP(+). Structural studies of this enzyme and comparisons with other forms of aldehyde dehydrogenase provide the basis for understanding the molecular features that dictate these unique properties and will enhance our understanding of the mechanism of catalysis for this class of enzyme. The X-ray structure of aldehyde dehydrogenase from V. harveyi has been solved to 2.5-A resolution as a partial complex with the cofactor NADP(+) and to 2. 1-A resolution as a fully bound 'holo' complex. The cofactor preference exhibited by different forms of the enzyme is predominantly determined by the electrostatic environment surrounding the 2'-hydroxy or the 2'-phosphate groups of the adenosine ribose moiety of NAD(+) or NADP(+), respectively. In the NADP(+)-dependent structures the presence of a threonine and a lysine contribute to the cofactor specificity. In the V. harveyi enzyme an arginine residue (Arg-210) contributes to the high cofactor affinity through a pi stacking interaction with the adenine ring system of the cofactor. Further differences between the V. harveyi enzyme and other aldehyde dehydrogenases are seen in the active site, in particular a histidine residue which is structurally conserved with phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This may suggest an alternative mechanism for activation of the reactive cysteine residue for nucleophilic attack. PMID:10903148

  4. Structural basis for double cofactor specificity in a new formate dehydrogenase from the acidobacterium Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8.

    PubMed

    Fogal, Stefano; Beneventi, Elisa; Cendron, Laura; Bergantino, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are considered particularly useful enzymes in biocatalysis when the regeneration of the cofactor NAD(P)H is required, that is, in chiral synthesis with dehydrogenases. Their utilization is however limited to the recycling of NAD(+), since all (apart one) of the FDHs characterized so far are strictly specific for this cofactor, and this is a major drawback for their otherwise wide applicability. Despite the many attempts performed to modify cofactor specificity by protein engineering different NAD(+)-dependent FDHs, in the general practice, glucose or phosphite dehydrogenases are chosen for the recycling of NADP(+). We report on the functional and structural characterization of a new FDH, GraFDH, identified by mining the genome of the extremophile prokaryote Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8. The new enzyme displays a valuable stability in the presence of many organic cosolvents as well as double cofactor specificity, with NADP(+) preferred over NAD(+) at acidic pH values, at which it also shows the highest stability. The quite low affinities for both cofactors as well as for the substrate formate indicate, however, that the native enzyme requires optimization to be applied as biocatalytic tool. We also determined the crystal structure of GraFDH both as apoprotein and as holoprotein, either in complex with NAD(+) or NADP(+). Noticeably, the latter represents the first structure of an FDH enzyme in complex with NADP(+). This fine picture of the structural determinants involved in cofactor selectivity will possibly boost protein engineering of the new enzyme or other homolog FDHs in view of their biocatalytic exploitation for NADP(+) recycling. PMID:26104866

  5. Exogenous cofactors for the improvement of bioremoval and biotransformation of sulfamethoxazole by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Bi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Qiu-Man; Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Luo, Yu-Lu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-09-15

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), an extensively prescribed or administered antibiotic pharmaceutical product, is usually detected in aquatic environments, because of its incomplete metabolism and elimination. This study investigated the effects of exogenous cofactors on the bioremoval and biotransformation of SMX by Alcaligenes faecalis. High concentration (100mg·L(-1)) of exogenous vitamin C (VC), vitamin B6 (VB6) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) enhanced SMX bioremoval, while the additions of vitamin B2 (VB2) and vitamin B12 (VB12) did not significantly alter the SMX removal efficiency. Globally, cellular growth of A. faecalis and SMX removal both initially increased and then gradually decreased, indicating that SMX bioremoval is likely dependent on the primary biomass activity of A. faecalis. The decreases in the SMX removal efficiency indicated that some metabolites of SMX might be transformed into parent compound at the last stage of incubation. Two transformation products of SMX, N-hydroxy sulfamethoxazole (HO-SMX) and N4-acetyl sulfamethoxazole (Ac-SMX), were identified by a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer. High concentrations of VC, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH, 7.1mg·L(-1)), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+), 6.6mg·L(-1)), and low concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, 0.1 and 10mg·L(-1)) and VB2 (1mg·L(-1)) remarkably increased the formation of HO-SMX, while VB12 showed opposite effects on HO-SMX formation. In addition, low concentrations of GSH and NADH enhanced Ac-SMX formation by the addition of A. faecalis, whereas cofactors (VC, VB2, VB12, NAD(+), and GSSG) had no obvious impact on the formation of Ac-SMX compared with the controls. The levels of Ac-SMX were stable when biomass of A. faecalis gradually decreased, indicating the direct effect of biomass on the formation of Ac-SMX by A. faecalis. In sum, these results help us understand the roles played by exogenous cofactors in

  6. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  7. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  8. Adolescent Maturation in Transitioning Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin; Palacios, Anna; Reid, Robert E.

    This is a theoretical study of adolescent maturation within a cultural context. Personality development and disintegration due to the pressure of a dominant culture on a minority culture is considered. An attempt is made to understand how teachers might assist students to work out their psychological growth by story telling. The need for cultural…

  9. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  10. Chyloabdomen in a mature cat.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, K L

    2001-01-01

    A mature, castrated male cat presented with progressive lethargy and a severely distended abdomen. Abdominal radiographs, abdominocentesis, and evaluation of the fluid obtained led to a diagnosis of chyloabdomen. The underlying pathology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment associated with this disease are discussed. PMID:11360862

  11. Mature Cystic Teratoma of Liver

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Bansal, Kalpana; Manchanda, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    A four-year-old boy presented with constipation and mild abdominal distention for one year. Radiologic investigations showed a multiloculated cystic lesion in the caudate lobe of liver with focal calcification in the wall. The child underwent laparotomy with marsupialization of the cystic lesion. Histopathologic examination showed mature teratoma of liver. PMID:24040591

  12. Crystal Structures of Phosphite Dehydrogenase Provide Insights into Nicotinamide Cofactor Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Zhang, Houjin; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Johannes, Tyler W.; Woodyer, Ryan; Hung, John E.; Nair, Nikhil; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-08-21

    The enzyme phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH) catalyzes the NAD{sup +}-dependent conversion of phosphite to phosphate and represents the first biological catalyst that has been shown to conduct the enzymatic oxidation of phosphorus. Despite investigation for more than a decade into both the mechanism of its unusual reaction and its utility in cofactor regeneration, there has been a lack of any structural data for PTDH. Here we present the cocrystal structure of an engineered thermostable variant of PTDH bound to NAD{sup +} (1.7 {angstrom} resolution), as well as four other cocrystal structures of thermostable PTDH and its variants with different ligands (all between 1.85 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution). These structures provide a molecular framework for understanding prior mutational analysis and point to additional residues, located in the active site, that may contribute to the enzymatic activity of this highly unusual catalyst.

  13. Income poverty, poverty co-factors, and the adjustment of children in elementary school.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Brian P; Brown, Eleanor D

    2006-01-01

    Since 1990, there have been great advances in how developmental researchers construct poverty. These advances are important because they may help inform social policy at many levels and help frame how American culture constructs poverty for children, both symbolically and in the opportunities children and families get to escape from poverty. Historically, developmental perspectives have embodied social address and main effects models, snapshot views of poverty effects at single points in time, and a rather narrow focus on income as the symbolic marker of the ecology of disadvantage. More recent views, in contrast, emphasize the diverse circumstances of disadvantaged families and diverse outcomes of disadvantaged children, the multiple sources of risk and the multiple determinants of poor outcomes for these children, dynamic aspects of that ecology, and change as well as continuity in outcome trajectories. The advances also consist of more powerful frames for understanding the ecology of disadvantage and the risk it poses for child outcomes. Most developmental researchers still tend to frame causal variables ultimately in terms of the dichotomy between social causation and social selection views, with a primary emphasis on the former. In part, this framing has reflected limitations of sample size and design, because the theoretical and empirical power of reciprocal selection models is clear (Kim et al., 2003). The conceptual advances that prompt such models include widespread acknowledgement of third variable problems in interpreting effects, of the clear need for multivariate approaches, and the need to pursue mechanisms and moderators of the relations between causal candidates and child outcomes. In the context of these advances, one of the core goals of our research program has been to construct robust representations of environmental adversity for disadvantaged families. Most of our research focuses on contextual co-factors at a family level (e.g., maternal

  14. Cofactor Strap regulates oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial p53 activity through ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, S; Coutts, A S; Stratford, M R; McGouran, J; Kessler, B; La Thangue, N B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is a novel TPR motif OB-fold protein that contributes to p53 transcriptional activation. We show here that, in addition to its established transcriptional role, Strap is localised at mitochondria where one of its key interaction partners is ATP synthase. Significantly, the interaction between Strap and ATP synthase downregulates mitochondrial ATP production. Under glucose-limiting conditions, cancer cells are sensitised by mitochondrial Strap to apoptosis, which is rescued by supplementing cells with an extracellular source of ATP. Furthermore, Strap augments the apoptotic effects of mitochondrial p53. These findings define Strap as a dual regulator of cellular reprogramming: first as a nuclear transcription cofactor and second in the direct regulation of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25168243

  15. Enzymatic aminoacylation of single-stranded RNA with an RNA cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Musier-Forsyth, K; Scaringe, S; Usman, N; Schimmel, P

    1991-01-01

    A chemically synthesized single-stranded ribonucleotide tridecamer derived from the 3' end of Escherichia coli alanine tRNA can be charged with alanine in the presence of short complementary RNA oligonucleotides that form duplexes with the 3' fragment. Complementary 5' oligomers of 9, 8, 6, and 4 nucleotides all confer charging of the 3' fragment. Furthermore, in the presence of limiting 5' oligomer, greater than stoichiometric amounts of the single-stranded 3' acceptor fragment can be aminoacylated. This is due to a reiterative process of transient duplex formation followed by charging, dissociation of the 5' oligomer, and then rebinding to an uncharged single-stranded ribotridecamer so as to create another transient duplex substrate. Thus, a short RNA oligomer serves as a cofactor for a charging enzyme, and it thereby makes possible the aminoacylation of single-stranded RNA. These results expand possibilities for flexible routes to the development of early charging and coding systems. Images PMID:1986368

  16. HEB and E2A function as SMAD/FOXH1 cofactors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Jin; Wills, Andrea E; Chuong, Edward; Gupta, Rakhi; Baker, Julie C

    2011-08-01

    Nodal signaling, mediated through SMAD transcription factors, is necessary for pluripotency maintenance and endoderm commitment. We identified a new motif, termed SMAD complex-associated (SCA), that is bound by SMAD2/3/4 and FOXH1 in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and derived endoderm. We demonstrate that two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins-HEB and E2A-bind the SCA motif at regions overlapping SMAD2/3 and FOXH1. Furthermore, we show that HEB and E2A associate with SMAD2/3 and FOXH1, suggesting they form a complex at critical target regions. This association is biologically important, as E2A is critical for mesendoderm specification, gastrulation, and Nodal signal transduction in Xenopus tropicalis embryos. Taken together, E proteins are novel Nodal signaling cofactors that associate with SMAD2/3 and FOXH1 and are necessary for mesendoderm differentiation. PMID:21828274

  17. Viral infection and aging as cofactors for the development of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Payal K; Moore, Bethany B

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease of unknown origin and progression that primarily affects older adults. Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence suggests that viral infections may play a role, either as agents that predispose the lung to fibrosis or exacerbate existing fibrosis. In particular, herpesviruses have been linked with IPF. This article summarizes the evidence for and against viral cofactors in IPF pathogenesis. In addition, we review mechanistic studies in animal models that highlight the fibrotic potential of viral infection, and explore the different mechanisms that might be responsible. We also review early evidence to suggest that the aged lung may be particularly susceptible to viral-induced fibrosis and make recommendations for future research directions. PMID:21128751

  18. RNA with iron(II) as a cofactor catalyses electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Chou, I.-Chun; Okafor, C. Denise; Bowman, Jessica C.; O'Neill, Eric B.; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Petrov, Anton S.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Wartell, Roger M.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2013-06-01

    Mg2+ is essential for RNA folding and catalysis. However, for the first 1.5 billion years of life on Earth RNA inhabited an anoxic Earth with abundant and benign Fe2+. We hypothesize that Fe2+ was an RNA cofactor when iron was abundant, and was substantially replaced by Mg2+ during a period known as the ‘great oxidation’, brought on by photosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that reversing this putative metal substitution in an anoxic environment, by removing Mg2+ and replacing it with Fe2+, expands the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Fe2+ can confer on some RNAs a previously uncharacterized ability to catalyse single-electron transfer. We propose that RNA function, in analogy with protein function, can be understood fully only in the context of association with a range of possible metals. The catalysis of electron transfer, requisite for metabolic activity, may have been attenuated in RNA by photosynthesis and the rise of O2.

  19. A model for cofactor use during HIV-1 reverse transcription and nuclear entry.

    PubMed

    Hilditch, Laura; Towers, Greg J

    2014-02-01

    Lentiviruses have evolved to infect and replicate in a variety of cell types in vivo whilst avoiding the powerful inhibitory activities of restriction factors or cell autonomous innate immune responses. In this review we offer our opinions on how HIV-1 uses a series of host proteins as cofactors for infection. We present a model that may explain how the capsid protein has a fundamental role in the early part of the viral lifecycle by utilising cyclophilin A (CypA), cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor-6 (CPSF6), Nup358 and TNPO3 to orchestrate a coordinated process of DNA synthesis, capsid uncoating and integration targeting that evades innate responses and promotes integration into preferred areas of chromatin. PMID:24525292

  20. Direct stimulation of transcription by negative cofactor 2 (NC2) through TATA-binding protein (TBP)

    PubMed Central

    Cang, Yong; Prelich, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Negative cofactor 2 (NC2) is an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulator that was originally identified as an inhibitor of basal transcription. Its inhibitory mechanism has been extensively characterized; NC2 binds to the TATA-binding protein (TBP), blocking the recruitment of TFIIA and TFIIB, and thereby inhibiting preinitiation complex assembly. NC2 is also required for expression of many yeast genes in vivo and stimulates TATA-less transcription in a Drosophila in vitro transcription system, but the mechanism responsible for the NC2-mediated stimulation of transcription is not understood. Here we establish that yeast NC2 can directly stimulate activated transcription from TATA-driven promoters both in vivo and in vitro, and moreover that this positive role requires the same surface of TBP that mediates the NC2 repression activity. On the basis of these results, we propose a model to explain how NC2 can mediate both repression and activation through the same surface of TBP. PMID:12237409

  1. Small Cofactors May Assist Protein Emergence from RNA World: Clues from RNA-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that at an early stage in the evolution of life an RNA world arose, in which RNAs both served as the genetic material and catalyzed diverse biochemical reactions. Then, proteins have gradually replaced RNAs because of their superior catalytic properties in catalysis over time. Therefore, it is important to investigate how primitive functional proteins emerged from RNA world, which can shed light on the evolutionary pathway of life from RNA world to the modern world. In this work, we proposed that the emergence of most primitive functional proteins are assisted by the early primitive nucleotide cofactors, while only a minority are induced directly by RNAs based on the analysis of RNA-protein complexes. Furthermore, the present findings have significant implication for exploring the composition of primitive RNA, i.e., adenine base as principal building blocks. PMID:21789260

  2. Immunization with anticardiolipin cofactor (beta-2-glycoprotein I) induces experimental antiphospholipid syndrome in naive mice.

    PubMed

    Blank, M; Faden, D; Tincani, A; Kopolovic, J; Goldberg, I; Gilburd, B; Allegri, F; Balestrieri, G; Valesini, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    1994-08-01

    Beta-2-GPI is a 50 kDa glycoprotein which is known to be a serum co-factor, with a role in determining the binding of pathogenic anticardiolipin antibodies to phospholipids. Immunization of naive mice with beta-2-GPI resulted in elevated levels of antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids (cardiolipin, phosphotidylserine, phosphatidylinositol). The presence of increased titres of antiphospholipid antibodies in the sera of the mice was later followed by prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombocytopenia, and when the mice were mated, by a high percentage of fetal resorptions in the uterus. These data point to the ability of beta-2-GPI to induce pathogenic anti-cardiolipin antibodies following active immunization. PMID:7980847

  3. Epstein-Barr virus uses HLA class II as a cofactor for infection of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q; Spriggs, M K; Kovats, S; Turk, S M; Comeau, M R; Nepom, B; Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1997-01-01

    Infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) requires attachment of virus via binding of viral glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on the cell surface. Penetration of the cell membrane additionally involves a complex of three glycoproteins, gH, gL, and gp42. Glycoprotein gp42 binds to HLA-DR. Interference with this interaction with a soluble form of gp42, with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to gp42, or with a MAb to HLA-DR inhibited virus infection. It was not possible to superinfect cells that failed to express HLA-DR unless expression was restored by transfection or creation of hybrid cell lines with complementing deficiencies in expression of HLA class II. HLA class II molecules thus serve as cofactors for infection of human B cells. PMID:9151859

  4. Constrained spin-density dynamics of an iron-sulfur complex: Ferredoxin cofactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md. Ehesan; Nair, Nisanth N.; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2012-06-01

    The computation of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling constants J by means of efficient density-based approaches requires in practice to take care of both spin projection to approximate the low spin ground state and proper localization of the magnetic orbitals at the transition metal centers. This is demonstrated here by a combined approach where the extended broken-symmetry (EBS) technique is employed to include the former aspect, while spin density constraints are applied to ensure the latter. This constrained EBS (CEBS) approach allows us to carry out ab initio molecular dynamics on a spin-projected low spin potential energy surface that is generated on-the-fly by propagating two coupled determinants and thereby accessing the antiferromagnetic coupling along the trajectory. When applied to the prototypical model of the oxidized [2Fe-2S] cofactor in Ferredoxins, [Fe2S2(SH)4]2-, at room temperature, CEBS leads to remarkably good results for geometrical structures and coupling constants J.

  5. Substrate and Cofactor Range Differences of Two Cysteine Dioxygenases from Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Wenning, Leonie; Stöveken, Nadine; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenases (Cdos), which catalyze the sulfoxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA), have been extensively studied in eukaryotes because of their roles in several diseases. In contrast, only a few prokaryotic enzymes of this type have been investigated. In Ralstonia eutropha H16, two Cdo homologues (CdoA and CdoB) have been identified previously. In vivo studies showed that Escherichia coli cells expressing CdoA could convert 3-mercaptopropionate (3MP) to 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), whereas no 3SP could be detected in cells expressing CdoB. The objective of this study was to confirm these findings and to study both enzymes in detail by performing an in vitro characterization. The proteins were heterologously expressed and purified to apparent homogeneity by immobilized metal chelate affinity chromatography (IMAC). Subsequent analysis of the enzyme activities revealed striking differences with regard to their substrate ranges and their specificities for the transition metal cofactor, e.g., CdoA catalyzed the sulfoxidation of 3MP to a 3-fold-greater extent than the sulfoxidation of cysteine, whereas CdoB converted only cysteine. Moreover, the dependency of the activities of the Cdos from R. eutropha H16 on the metal cofactor in the active center could be demonstrated. The importance of CdoA for the metabolism of the sulfur compounds 3,3′-thiodipropionic acid (TDP) and 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) by further converting their degradation product, 3MP, was confirmed. Since 3MP can also function as a precursor for polythioester (PTE) synthesis in R. eutropha H16, deletion of cdoA might enable increased synthesis of PTEs. PMID:26590284

  6. Identification of a cyclic nucleotide as a cryptic intermediate in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hover, Bradley M; Loksztejn, Anna; Ribeiro, Anthony A; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2013-05-01

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is a redox cofactor found in all kingdoms of life, and its biosynthesis is essential for survival of many organisms, including humans. The first step of Moco biosynthesis is a unique transformation of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) into cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP). In bacteria, MoaA and MoaC catalyze this transformation, although the specific functions of these enzymes were not fully understood. Here, we report the first isolation and structural characterization of a product of MoaA. This molecule was isolated under anaerobic conditions from a solution of MoaA incubated with GTP, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and sodium dithionite in the absence of MoaC. Structural characterization by chemical derivatization, MS, and NMR spectroscopy suggested the structure of this molecule to be (8S)-3',8-cyclo-7,8-dihydroguanosine 5'-triphosphate (3',8-cH2GTP). The isolated 3',8-cH2GTP was converted to cPMP by MoaC or its human homologue, MOCS1B, with high specificities (Km < 0.060 μM and 0.79 ± 0.24 μM for MoaC and MOCS1B, respectively), suggesting the physiological relevance of 3',8-cH2GTP. These observations, in combination with some mechanistic studies of MoaA, unambiguously demonstrate that MoaA catalyzes a unique radical C-C bond formation reaction and that, in contrast to previous proposals, MoaC plays a major role in the complex rearrangement to generate the pyranopterin ring. PMID:23627491

  7. On reversible H2 loss upon N2 binding to FeMo-cofactor of nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Khadka, Nimesh; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Hoffman, Brian M.; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase is activated for N2 reduction by the accumulation of four electrons/protons on its active site FeMo-cofactor, yielding a state, designated as E4, which contains two iron-bridging hydrides [Fe–H–Fe]. A central puzzle of nitrogenase function is an apparently obligatory formation of one H2 per N2 reduced, which would “waste” two reducing equivalents and four ATP. We recently presented a draft mechanism for nitrogenase that provides an explanation for obligatory H2 production. In this model, H2 is produced by reductive elimination of the two bridging hydrides of E4 during N2 binding. This process releases H2, yielding N2 bound to FeMo-cofactor that is doubly reduced relative to the resting redox level, and thereby is activated to promptly generate bound diazene (HN=NH). This mechanism predicts that during turnover under D2/N2, the reverse reaction of D2 with the N2-bound product of reductive elimination would generate dideutero-E4 [E4(2D)], which can relax with loss of HD to the state designated E2, with a single deuteride bridge [E2(D)]. Neither of these deuterated intermediate states could otherwise form in H2O buffer. The predicted E2(D) and E4(2D) states are here established by intercepting them with the nonphysiological substrate acetylene (C2H2) to generate deuterated ethylenes (C2H3D and C2H2D2). The demonstration that gaseous H2/D2 can reduce a substrate other than H+ with N2 as a cocatalyst confirms the essential mechanistic role for H2 formation, and hence a limiting stoichiometry for biological nitrogen fixation of eight electrons/protons, and provides direct experimental support for the reductive elimination mechanism. PMID:24062454

  8. Interaction of the Human Adenovirus Proteinase with Its 11-Amino Acid Cofactor pVIc†

    PubMed Central

    Baniecki, Mary Lynn; McGrath, William J.; McWhirter, Sarah M.; Li, Caroline; Toledo, Diana L.; Pellicena, Patricia; Barnard, Dale L.; Thorn, Kurt S.; Mangel, Walter F.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the human adenovirus proteinase (AVP) and AVP–NA complexes with the 11-amino acid cofactor pVIc was characterized. The equilibrium dissociation constant for the binding of pVIc to AVP was 4.4 μM. The binding of AVP to 12-mer single-stranded DNA decreased the Kd for the binding of pVIc to AVP to 0.09 μM. The pVIc–AVP complex hydrolyzed the substrate with a Michaelis constant (Km) of 3.7 μM and a catalytic rate constant (kcat) of 1.1 s−1 In the presence of DNA, the Km increased less than 2-fold, and the kcat increased 3-fold. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was performed to determine the contribution of individual pVIc side chains in the binding and stimulation of AVP. Two amino acid residues, Gly1′ and Phe11′, were the major determinants in the binding of pVIc to AVP, while Val2′ and Phe11′ were the major determinants in stimulating enzyme activity. Binding of AVP to DNA greatly suppressed the effects of the alanine substitutions on the binding of mutant pVIcs to AVP. Binding of either or both of the cofactors, pVIc or the viral DNA, to AVP did not dramatically alter its secondary structure as determined by vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism. pVIc, when added to Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus serotype 5, inhibited the synthesis of infectious virus, presumably by prematurely activating the proteinase so that it cleaved virion precursor proteins before virion assembly, thereby aborting the infection. PMID:11591154

  9. Molybdenum cofactor and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiencies: Clinical and molecular spectrum among Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Maha S.; Selim, Laila; EL-Bassyouni, Hala T.; Issa, Mahmoud Y.; Mahmoud, Iman; Ismail, Samira; Girgis, Mariane; Sadek, Abdelrahim A.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Abdel Hamid, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) and Sulfite oxidase deficiency (SOD) are rare autosomal recessive conditions of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism with overlapping clinical features and emerging therapies. The clinical phenotype is indistinguishable and they can only be differentiated biochemically. MOCS1, MOCS2, MOCS3, and GPRN genes contribute to the synthesis of molybdenum cofactor, and SUOX gene encodes sulfite oxidase. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical, radiological, biochemical and molecular findings in patients with SOD and MoCD. Methods Detailed clinical and radiological assessment of 9 cases referred for neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia, microcephaly, and epilepsy led to a consideration of disorders of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The diagnosis of six with MoCD and three with SOD was confirmed by biochemical tests, targeted sequencing, and whole exome sequencing where suspicion of disease was lower. Results Novel SUOX mutations were detected in 3 SOD cases and a novel MOCS2 mutation in 1 MoCD case. Most patients presented in the first 3 months of life with intractable tonic–clonic seizures, axial hypotonia, limb hypertonia, exaggerated startle response, feeding difficulties, and progressive cystic encephalomalacia on brain imaging. A single patient with MoCD had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hitherto unreported with these diseases. Interpretation Our results emphasize that intractable neonatal seizures, spasticity, and feeding difficulties can be important early signs for these disorders. Progressive microcephaly, intellectual disability and specific brain imaging findings in the first year were additional diagnostic aids. These clinical cues can be used to minimize delays in diagnosis, especially since promising treatments are emerging for MoCD type A. PMID:27289259

  10. Transport Proteins Regulate the Flux of Metabolites and Cofactors Across the Membrane of Plant Peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Linka, Nicole; Esser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In land plants, peroxisomes play key roles in various metabolic pathways, including the most prominent examples, that is lipid mobilization and photorespiration. Given the large number of substrates that are exchanged across the peroxisomal membrane, a wide spectrum of metabolite and cofactor transporters is required and needs to be efficiently coordinated. These peroxisomal transport proteins are a prerequisite for metabolic reactions inside plant peroxisomes. The entire peroxisomal “permeome” is closely linked to the adaption of photosynthetic organisms during land plant evolution to fulfill and optimize their new metabolic demands in cells, tissues, and organs. This review assesses for the first time the distribution of these peroxisomal transporters within the algal and plant species underlining their evolutionary relevance. Despite the importance of peroxisomal transporters, the majority of these proteins, however, are still unknown at the molecular level in plants as well as in other eukaryotic organisms. Four transport proteins have been recently identified and functionally characterized in Arabidopsis so far: one transporter for the import of fatty acids and three carrier proteins for the uptake of the cofactors ATP and NAD into plant peroxisomes. The transport of the three substrates across the peroxisomal membrane is essential for the degradation of fatty acids and fatty acids-related compounds via β-oxidation. This metabolic pathway plays multiple functions for growth and development in plants that have been crucial in land plant evolution. In this review, we describe the current state of their physiological roles in Arabidopsis and discuss novel features in their putative transport mechanisms. PMID:22645564

  11. Structure of the biliverdin cofactor in the Pfr state of bathy and prototypical phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Kaminski, Steve; von Stetten, David; Keidel, Anke; Rippers, Yvonne; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Piwowarski, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Ringsdorf, Simone; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lamparter, Tilman; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Phytochromes act as photoswitches between the red- and far-red absorbing parent states of phytochromes (Pr and Pfr). Plant phytochromes display an additional thermal conversion route from the physiologically active Pfr to Pr. The same reaction pattern is found in prototypical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochromes in contrast to the reverse thermal transformation in bathy bacteriophytochromes. However, the molecular origin of the different thermal stabilities of the Pfr states in prototypical and bathy bacteriophytochromes is not known. We analyzed the structures of the chromophore binding pockets in the Pfr states of various bathy and prototypical biliverdin-binding phytochromes using a combined spectroscopic-theoretical approach. For the Pfr state of the bathy phytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the very good agreement between calculated and experimental Raman spectra of the biliverdin cofactor is in line with important conclusions of previous crystallographic analyses, particularly the ZZEssa configuration of the chromophore and its mode of covalent attachment to the protein. The highly homogeneous chromophore conformation seems to be a unique property of the Pfr states of bathy phytochromes. This is in sharp contrast to the Pfr states of prototypical phytochromes that display conformational equilibria between two sub-states exhibiting small structural differences at the terminal methine bridges A-B and C-D. These differences may mainly root in the interactions of the cofactor with the highly conserved Asp-194 that occur via its carboxylate function in bathy phytochromes. The weaker interactions via the carbonyl function in prototypical phytochromes may lead to a higher structural flexibility of the chromophore pocket opening a reaction channel for the thermal (ZZE → ZZZ) Pfr to Pr back-conversion. PMID:23603902

  12. Semiquinone-induced Maturation of Bacillus anthracis Ribonucleotide Reductase by a Superoxide Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Gustav; Duraffourg, Nicolas; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, and represent the only de novo pathway to provide DNA building blocks. Three different classes of RNR are known, denoted I-III. Class I RNRs are heteromeric proteins built up by α and β subunits and are further divided into different subclasses, partly based on the metal content of the β-subunit. In subclass Ib RNR the β-subunit is denoted NrdF, and harbors a manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor. The generation of this cofactor is dependent on a flavodoxin-like maturase denoted NrdI, responsible for the formation of an active oxygen species suggested to be either a superoxide or a hydroperoxide. Herein we report on the magnetic properties of the manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of Bacillus anthracis NrdF and the redox properties of B. anthracis NrdI. The tyrosyl radical in NrdF is stabilized through its interaction with a ferromagnetically coupled manganese dimer. Moreover, we show through a combination of redox titration and protein electrochemistry that in contrast to hitherto characterized NrdIs, the B. anthracis NrdI is stable in its semiquinone form (NrdIsq) with a difference in electrochemical potential of ∼110 mV between the hydroquinone and semiquinone state. The under anaerobic conditions stable NrdIsq is fully capable of generating the oxidized, tyrosyl radical-containing form of Mn-NrdF when exposed to oxygen. This latter observation strongly supports that a superoxide radical is involved in the maturation mechanism, and contradicts the participation of a peroxide species. Additionally, EPR spectra on whole cells revealed that a significant fraction of NrdI resides in its semiquinone form in vivo, underscoring that NrdIsq is catalytically relevant. PMID:25262022

  13. Effects of sexual maturation and feeding level on fatty acid metabolism gene expression in muscle, liver, and visceral adipose tissue of diploid and triploid rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Manor, Meghan L; Cleveland, Beth M; Weber, Gregory M; Kenney, P Brett

    2015-01-01

    In many cultured fish species, such as salmonids, gonadal development occurs at the expense of stored energy and nutrients, including lipids. However, mechanisms regulating nutrient repartitioning during sexual maturation are not well understood. This study compared sexually maturing diploid (2N) and sterile triploid (3N) female rainbow trout to investigate effects of sexual maturation on expression of 35 genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, including genes within fatty acid synthesis, β-oxidation, and cofactors of the mTOR and PPAR signaling pathways, in liver, white muscle, and visceral adipose tissue. Diploid fish were fed at different rations (0.25% and 0.50% tank biomass, and satiation) to determine effects of ration on gene expression. Gene expression was affected by ration level only in white muscle; erk and acat2 had higher expression in fish fed higher rations. On the other hand, sexual maturation affected gene expression across all three tissue types. Data indicate 2N fish have higher expression of β-oxidation genes within white muscle and within visceral adipose tissue. These findings support enhanced fatty acid mobilization within these tissues during sexual maturation. Higher expression of fatty acid synthesis genes in 3N female liver is associated with higher expression of mTOR cofactors and pparγ, which reflects continued deposition of lipids in these fish. Furthermore, greater expression of genes involved in β-oxidation pathways across ration levels in 2N females suggests that sexual maturation and the associated maturation-related signals are stronger regulators of lipid metabolism-related genes rather the rations applied in the current study. PMID:25242626

  14. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, Danielle J.; Patrick, Wayne M.; Gerth, Monica L.

    2015-01-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2′-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary–secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2′-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme–cofactor interactions. PMID:26034298

  15. An Ancient Fingerprint Indicates the Common Ancestry of Rossmann-Fold Enzymes Utilizing Different Ribose-Based Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Paola; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Lin, Wei; Truhlar, Donald G; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside-based cofactors are presumed to have preceded proteins. The Rossmann fold is one of the most ancient and functionally diverse protein folds, and most Rossmann enzymes utilize nucleoside-based cofactors. We analyzed an omnipresent Rossmann ribose-binding interaction: a carboxylate side chain at the tip of the second β-strand (β2-Asp/Glu). We identified a canonical motif, defined by the β2-topology and unique geometry. The latter relates to the interaction being bidentate (both ribose hydroxyls interacting with the carboxylate oxygens), to the angle between the carboxylate and the ribose, and to the ribose's ring configuration. We found that this canonical motif exhibits hallmarks of divergence rather than convergence. It is uniquely found in Rossmann enzymes that use different cofactors, primarily SAM (S-adenosyl methionine), NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide). Ribose-carboxylate bidentate interactions in other folds are not only rare but also have a different topology and geometry. We further show that the canonical geometry is not dictated by a physical constraint--geometries found in noncanonical interactions have similar calculated bond energies. Overall, these data indicate the divergence of several major Rossmann-fold enzyme classes, with different cofactors and catalytic chemistries, from a common pre-LUCA (last universal common ancestor) ancestor that possessed the β2-Asp/Glu motif. PMID:26938925

  16. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions. PMID:26034298

  17. Characterization of an Additional Binding Surface on the p97 N-Terminal Domain Involved in Bipartite Cofactor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hänzelmann, Petra; Schindelin, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The type II AAA ATPase p97 interacts with a large number of cofactors that regulate its function by recruiting it to different cellular pathways. Most of the cofactors interact with the N-terminal (N) domain of p97, either via ubiquitin-like domains or short linear binding motifs. While some linear binding motifs form α helices, another group features short stretches of unstructured hydrophobic sequences as found in the so-called SHP (BS1, binding segment 1) motif. Here we present the crystal structure of a SHP-binding motif in complex with p97, which reveals a so far uncharacterized binding site on the p97 N domain that is different from the conserved binding surface of all other known p97 cofactors. This finding explains how cofactors like UFD1/NPL4 and p47 can utilize a bipartite binding mechanism to interact simultaneously with the same p97 monomer via their ubiquitin-like domain and SHP motif. PMID:26712280

  18. Engineering a d-lactate dehydrogenase that can super-efficiently utilize NADPH and NADH as cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hengkai; Liu, Pi; Sun, Hongbing; Cai, Zhen; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Jianping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the cofactor specificity of a natural enzyme often results in a significant decrease in its activity on original cofactor. Here we report that a NADH-dependent dehydrogenase (d-LDH) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii 11842 can be rationally engineered to efficiently use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Point mutations on three amino acids (D176S, I177R, F178T) predicted by computational analysis resulted in a modified enzyme designated as d-LDH*. The Kcat/Km of the purified d-LDH* on NADPH increased approximately 184-fold while the Kcat/Km on NADH also significantly increased, showing for the first time that a rationally engineered d-LDH could exhibit comparable activity on both NADPH and NADH. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the enhanced affinity with NADH or NADPH and the significant increased Kcat of d-LDH* resulted in the significant increase of d-LDH* activity on both NADPH and NADH. This study thus demonstrated that the cofactor specificity of dehydrogenase can be broadened by using targeted engineering approach, and the engineered enzyme can efficiently function in NADH-rich, or NADPH-rich, or NADH and NADPH-rich environment. PMID:27109778

  19. An Ancient Fingerprint Indicates the Common Ancestry of Rossmann-Fold Enzymes Utilizing Different Ribose-Based Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Paola; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Lin, Wei; Truhlar, Donald G.; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside-based cofactors are presumed to have preceded proteins. The Rossmann fold is one of the most ancient and functionally diverse protein folds, and most Rossmann enzymes utilize nucleoside-based cofactors. We analyzed an omnipresent Rossmann ribose-binding interaction: a carboxylate side chain at the tip of the second β-strand (β2-Asp/Glu). We identified a canonical motif, defined by the β2-topology and unique geometry. The latter relates to the interaction being bidentate (both ribose hydroxyls interacting with the carboxylate oxygens), to the angle between the carboxylate and the ribose, and to the ribose’s ring configuration. We found that this canonical motif exhibits hallmarks of divergence rather than convergence. It is uniquely found in Rossmann enzymes that use different cofactors, primarily SAM (S-adenosyl methionine), NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide). Ribose-carboxylate bidentate interactions in other folds are not only rare but also have a different topology and geometry. We further show that the canonical geometry is not dictated by a physical constraint—geometries found in noncanonical interactions have similar calculated bond energies. Overall, these data indicate the divergence of several major Rossmann-fold enzyme classes, with different cofactors and catalytic chemistries, from a common pre-LUCA (last universal common ancestor) ancestor that possessed the β2-Asp/Glu motif. PMID:26938925

  20. Studies by electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectroscopy of the environment of the metal in the molybdenum cofactor of molybdenum-containing enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, T R; Bray, R C

    1984-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor prepared by denaturing xanthine oxidase by heat treatment or other methods was partially purified by anaerobic gel filtration in the presence of sodium dithionite, with little loss of activity. A range of products with different elution volumes was obtained. This behaviour is apparently related to association of the molybdenum cofactor with various residual peptides. E.p.r. signals from molybdenum (V) in the active cofactor, present either in crude preparations or in purified fractions, may be generated in dimethyl sulphoxide solution by controlled oxidation carried out on the molybdenum cofactor alone or in the presence of added thiols. The g-values of the spectra suggest that in the oxidized cofactor molybdenum has one terminal oxygen ligand and four ligands from thiolate groups. It is proposed that two of these are from the organic part of the cofactor and two from cysteine residues in the protein or in residual peptides. A signal generated in high yield with little loss of cofactor activity in the presence of thiophenol has g parallel = 2.0258 and g = 1.9793. It is suggested that in this species two cysteine residues have been replaced by two thiophenol molecules. The possible usefulness of the thiophenol complex in further purification of the molybdenum cofactor is discussed. PMID:6091619

  1. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  2. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  3. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain’s region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex

  4. Shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors: Mechanism and functions of cysteine desulfurases and sulfur acceptors.

    PubMed

    Black, Katherine A; Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Cysteine desulfurases utilize a PLP-dependent mechanism to catalyze the first step of sulfur mobilization in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cofactors. Sulfur activation and integration into thiocofactors involve complex mechanisms and intricate biosynthetic schemes. Cysteine desulfurases catalyze sulfur-transfer reactions from l-cysteine to sulfur acceptor molecules participating in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors, including Fe-S clusters, thionucleosides, thiamin, biotin, and molybdenum cofactor. The proposed mechanism of cysteine desulfurases involves the PLP-dependent cleavage of the C-S bond from l-cysteine via the formation of a persulfide enzyme intermediate, which is considered the hallmark step in sulfur mobilization. The subsequent sulfur transfer reaction varies with the class of cysteine desulfurase and sulfur acceptor. IscS serves as a mecca for sulfur incorporation into a network of intertwined pathways for the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors. The involvement of a single enzyme interacting with multiple acceptors, the recruitment of shared-intermediates partaking roles in multiple pathways, and the participation of Fe-S enzymes denote the interconnectivity of pathways involving sulfur trafficking. In Bacillus subtilis, the occurrence of multiple cysteine desulfurases partnering with dedicated sulfur acceptors partially deconvolutes the routes of sulfur trafficking and assigns specific roles for these enzymes. Understanding the roles of promiscuous vs. dedicated cysteine desulfurases and their partnership with shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors will help to map sulfur transfer events across interconnected pathways and to provide insight into the hierarchy of sulfur incorporation into biomolecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25447671

  5. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  6. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  7. Young Children's Social Maturity and Their Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Norejane J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between preschool children's level of social maturity and their drawing expressions was tested; findings stregthened the contention that the drawings of preschoolers are not appropriate indicators of their social maturity. (SDH)

  8. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating competing pathways and resolving cofactor imbalance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isobutanol is an important target for biorefinery research as a next-generation biofuel and a building block for commodity chemical production. Metabolically engineered microbial strains to produce isobutanol have been successfully developed by introducing the Ehrlich pathway into bacterial hosts. Isobutanol-producing baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains have been developed following the strategy with respect to its advantageous characteristics for cost-effective isobutanol production. However, the isobutanol yields and titers attained by the developed strains need to be further improved through engineering of S. cerevisiae metabolism. Results Two strategies including eliminating competing pathways and resolving the cofactor imbalance were applied to improve isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol production levels were increased in strains lacking genes encoding members of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex such as LPD1, indicating that the pyruvate supply for isobutanol biosynthesis is competing with acetyl-CoA biosynthesis in mitochondria. Isobutanol production was increased by overexpression of enzymes responsible for transhydrogenase-like shunts such as pyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, and malic enzyme. The integration of a single gene deletion lpd1Δ and the activation of the transhydrogenase-like shunt further increased isobutanol levels. In a batch fermentation test at the 50-mL scale from 100 g/L glucose using the two integrated strains, the isobutanol titer reached 1.62 ± 0.11 g/L and 1.61 ± 0.03 g/L at 24 h after the start of fermentation, which corresponds to the yield at 0.016 ± 0.001 g/g glucose consumed and 0.016 ± 0.0003 g/g glucose consumed, respectively. Conclusions These results demonstrate that downregulation of competing pathways and metabolic functions for resolving the cofactor imbalance are promising strategies to construct S. cerevisiae strains that effectively produce

  9. Induction of Bulb Maturity of Ornithogalum Thyrsoides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of bulb maturity at bulb harvest on growth and flowering response of Ornithogalum thyrsoides Jacq. ‘Chesapeake Starlight’ was investigated. Experiments were designed to determine if bulb maturity can be induced by bulb storage temperatures and whether bulb maturity can be evaluated by...

  10. β2-Glycoprotein I Is a Cofactor for t-PA–Mediated Plasminogen Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Chunya; Gao, Lei; Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Jainwei; He, Yuhong; Cai, Guoping; McCrae, Keith R

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is critical in the control of fibrin deposition. While several plasminogen activators have been described, soluble plasma cofactors that stimulate fibrinolysis have not been characterized. Here, we report that the abundant plasma glycoprotein, β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), stimulates t-PA–dependent plasminogen activation in the fluid phase and within a fibrin gel. The region within β2GPI responsible for stimulating t-PA activity is at least partially contained within β2GPI domain V. β2GPI bound t-PA with high affinity (Kd ~ 20 nM), stimulated t-PA amidolytic activity, and caused an overall 20-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of t-PA–mediated conversion of Glu-plasminogen to plasmin. Moreover, depletion of β2GPI from plasma led to diminished rates of clot lysis, with restoration of normal lysis rates following β2GPI repletion. Finally, stimulation of t-PA–mediated plasminogen activity by β2GPI was inhibited by monoclonal anti-β2GPI antibodies, as well as by anti-β2GPI antibodies from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These findings suggest that β2GPI may be an endogenous regulator of fibrinolysis. Impairment of β2GPI-stimulated fibrinolysis by anti-β2GPI antibodies may contribute to the development of thrombosis in patients with APS. PMID:19180513