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Sample records for femoral trochlea arthroscopic

  1. Osteochondral Fractures of the Lateral Femoral Trochlea in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Method: Between May 2012 and September 2014 cluster of five patients with large osteochondral fractures of the lateral femoral trochlea were treated at our institution. These all occurred in high level male athletes, one at a decathlete and the other four soccer players. The MRI scan showed a characteristic appearance of a large subchondral fracture involving most of the lateral femoral trochlea. All patients were symptomatic. The patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using headless compression screws. The operative technique and short term results will be outlined. Results: Fixation appears successful in most cases. Conclusion: This appears to be a repetitive trauma related injury that occurs in young high-level athletes.

  2. [The sulcus angle of the femoral trochlea: ultrasonographic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Martino, F; De Serio, A; Macarini, L; Colaianni, P; Solarino, M; Fracella, M R

    1995-03-01

    The sulcus angle of femoral trochlea is particularly important to evaluate the femoro-patellar joint. Our study was aimed at studying the normal trochlea, and especially the sulcus angle, with US. The right knees of 11 normal subjects were examined with US and Computed Tomography (CT) on the same section planes. The US measurements of the sulcus angle were correlated with CT results, which were considered the gold standard. The US and CT data were compared and a direct correlation was found (r = 0.832). The intraobserver difference in US measurements was r = 0.943. The mean sulcus angle value was 132 degrees, in agreement with literature data. We conclude that the US measurements of the sulcus angle are reproducible and as sensitive as CT. PMID:7754110

  3. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  4. Breech presentation is a risk factor for dysplasia of the femoral trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Øye, Christian R; Foss, Olav A; Holen, Ketil J

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Instability of the patellofemoral joint is a common disorder in children and young adults. Although it has multifactorial causes, a shallow femoral trochlea is the single most important factor for instability. There is no consensus as to the etiology of trochlear dysplasia. We assessed whether the presentation of the fetus at birth could be a predisposing factor for trochlear dysplasia. Subjects and methods We examined 348 knees in 174 newborns using ultrasonography, concentrating especially on the trochlea femoris. We measured the sulcus angle (SA) on a transverse scan. The way of fetal presentation at birth and standard parameters such as sex, gestational age, and length and weight at birth were registered. As breech presentation is a known risk factor for dysplasia of the hip, we also looked for an association between dysplasia of the femoral trochlea and dysplasia of the hips. Results The mean SA was 148°. 17 knees in 14 children had an SA of >159°, which was defined as the threshold value for dysplasia. The incidence of breech position in these children was 15-fold higher. Of the different groups of breech positions, a child in frank breech with the knees locked in extension had a 45-fold increased risk of having trochlear dysplasia. Interpretation For some newborns, a high sulcus angle can be found at birth, indicating that trochlear dysplasia can be found from birth. Breech presentation with knees extended appears to be a major risk factor for development of trochlear dysplasia. PMID:26381593

  5. Arthroscopic Suture Fixation in Femoral-Sided Avulsion Fracture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Umprai, Vantawat; Laohathaimongkol, Thongchai; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2015-01-01

    A femoral-sided avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a rare and challenging condition. Most reported cases have occurred in childhood or adolescence. Many techniques of ACL repair have been reported, and in recent years, techniques in arthroscopic surgery have been developed and have become ever more popular with orthopaedic surgeons. We created a technique of arthroscopic ACL repair with suture anchor fixation for a femoral-sided ACL avulsion fracture. This technique saves the natural ACL stump. It is available for cases in which creation of a tibial tunnel is not allowed. Moreover, it does not require a skin incision for fixation on the far femoral cortex and, therefore, does not require a second operation to remove the fixation device. The arthroscopic technique also has a good cosmetic outcome. PMID:26258035

  6. Hip Arthroscopic Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation for Treating Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takanori; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Watanuki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Akinori; Uchida, Soshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the femoral head is not a common source of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy is becoming a more frequent indication for intra-articular pathologies of the hip. Osteochondral autologous transplantation is a promising technique that theoretically can reconstruct osteochondral lesions of the femoral head. We describe our technique for arthroscopic antegrade osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of OCD of the femoral head. The advantages of this technique include that it is a less invasive method with the ability to assess and treat intra-articular pathologies associated with OCD of the femoral head at same time. Case series and outcomes after this technique are not currently reported in the literature; however, it could be a less invasive method and provide favorable clinical outcomes for patients with OCD lesions of the femoral head. PMID:26870645

  7. Technique of Arthroscopically Assisted Transtrochanteric Drilling for Femoral Head Chondral Defects.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lindner, Dror; Martin, Timothy J; Lodhia, Parth; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-08-01

    Microfracture is a marrow-stimulation technique in which damaged cartilage is drilled or punched, perforating the subchondral bone and generating a blood clot within the defect that matures into fibrocartilage. Microfracture for the treatment of small cartilage defects of the hip has shown good results. Arthroscopic procedures are less invasive than open procedures and have a reduced incidence of complications such as infection or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Furthermore, arthroscopic procedures allow for a shorter recovery time, resulting in not only lower overall treatment costs but also higher patient satisfaction. Medial and parafoveal cartilage defects of the femoral head can be challenging to effectively microfracture using standard arthroscopy portals because of the acute angles required for instrument manipulation. This report describes a technique for microfracturing these challenging areas of the femoral head using a 2.7-mm K-wire and drilling in a transtrochanteric direction using arthroscopic and imaging guidance to target the area of chondral damage. PMID:26759764

  8. Technique of Arthroscopically Assisted Transtrochanteric Drilling for Femoral Head Chondral Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lindner, Dror; Martin, Timothy J.; Lodhia, Parth; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Microfracture is a marrow-stimulation technique in which damaged cartilage is drilled or punched, perforating the subchondral bone and generating a blood clot within the defect that matures into fibrocartilage. Microfracture for the treatment of small cartilage defects of the hip has shown good results. Arthroscopic procedures are less invasive than open procedures and have a reduced incidence of complications such as infection or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Furthermore, arthroscopic procedures allow for a shorter recovery time, resulting in not only lower overall treatment costs but also higher patient satisfaction. Medial and parafoveal cartilage defects of the femoral head can be challenging to effectively microfracture using standard arthroscopy portals because of the acute angles required for instrument manipulation. This report describes a technique for microfracturing these challenging areas of the femoral head using a 2.7-mm K-wire and drilling in a transtrochanteric direction using arthroscopic and imaging guidance to target the area of chondral damage. PMID:26759764

  9. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  10. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head. PMID:24972445

  11. Arthroscopic correction for concomitant cam impingement in a patient with idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with pain in the right hip. Radiological examination showed idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) combined with a cam lesion. Findings on physical examination were consistent for femoroacetabular impingement. At surgery, we performed isolated arthroscopic correction for the cam lesion but did not use other treatment options such as hip arthroplasty or osteotomies for the ONFH. At the latest follow-up evaluation 3 years after surgery, findings indicted a satisfactory outcome, with a Harris hip score of 93.2 (compared with 76.4 before surgery), no joint-space narrowing, and no collapse of the femoral head. It is important to accurately diagnose the status of idiopathic ONFH and to consider another possible pathogenesis when a patient with idiopathic ONFH has hip pain even without femoral-head collapse. PMID:26773875

  12. Can 3D ultrasound identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns? Evaluation and applicability of a technique.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Heidt, Christoph; Bähler, Alexandrine; Kohl, Sandro; Gravius, Sascha; Friedrich, Max J; Ziebarth, Kai; Stranzinger, Enno

    2015-06-01

    Femoro-patellar dysplasia is considered as a significant risk factor of patellar instability. Different studies suggest that the shape of the trochlea is already developed in early childhood. Therefore early identification of a dysplastic configuration might be relevant information for the treating physician. An easy applicable routine screening of the trochlea is yet not available. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a screening method for femoro-patellar dysplasia using 3D ultrasound. From 2012 to 2013 we prospectively imaged 160 consecutive femoro-patellar joints in 80 newborns from the 36th to 61st gestational week that underwent a routine hip sonography (Graf). All ultrasounds were performed by a pediatric radiologist with only minimal additional time to the routine hip ultrasound. In 30° flexion of the knee, axial, coronal, and sagittal reformats were used to standardize a reconstructed axial plane through the femoral condyle and the mid-patella. The sulcus angle, the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea and the shape of the patella (Wiberg Classification) were evaluated. In all examinations reconstruction of the standardized axial plane was achieved, the mean trochlea angle was 149.1° (SD 4.9°), the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea ratio was 1.3 (SD 0.22), and a Wiberg type I patella was found in 95% of the newborn. No statistical difference was detected between boys and girls. Using standardized reconstructions of the axial plane allows measurements to be made with lower operator dependency and higher accuracy in a short time. Therefore 3D ultrasound is an easy applicable and powerful tool to identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns and might be used for screening for trochlea dysplasia. PMID:25843417

  13. Mosaic arthroplasty of the medial femoral condyle in horses - An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bodó, Gábor; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Hangody, László; Módis, László

    2014-06-01

    One Arabian and 5 Hungarian half-bred horses were used to study the macroscopic and microscopic survival of autologous osteochondral grafts in the weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Grafts were harvested from the cranial surface of the medial femoral trochlea (MFT) under arthroscopic control. Three of them were transplanted into the weight-bearing surface of the contralateral MFC using an arthrotomy approach. Three months later this transplantation procedure was repeated on the opposite stifle joints in the same animals, but at that time transplantation was performed arthroscopically. Follow-up arthroscopy was carried out 12 months after the first operations, and biopsies were taken from both the recipient and the donor sites for histological examination. During follow-up arthroscopy, the transplanted areas looked congruent and smooth. Microscopically, the characteristics of hyaline cartilage were present in 5 out of the 10 biopsies examined; however, in the other half of biopsies glycosaminoglycan (GAG) loss and change in the architecture of the transplanted cartilage was observed. In a 16-year-old horse, all grafts broke during harvesting, and thus transplantation was not performed. No radiological signs of osteoarthritic changes were detected 9 to 12 months after the operations in the donor and recipient joints. Clinically, no lameness or effusion was present three months after the transplantations. PMID:24334083

  14. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  15. Safe arthroscopic access to the central compartment of the hip.

    PubMed

    Dienst, Michael; Seil, Romain; Kohn, Dieter M

    2005-12-01

    This technical note describes a new method that allows access to the central compartment of the hip under arthroscopic control via the peripheral compartment with less risk of labral perforation and/or cartilage scuffing. After placement of the anterolateral portal in the peripheral compartment without traction, the anterior head area with the anterior acetabular labrum and the anterior surface of the femoral head are inspected. Under arthroscopic control, a guidewire is introduced through the anterior portal in between the anterior labrum and anterior femoral head cartilage and into the central compartment. The arthroscope is then removed from the anterolateral portal, the hip distracted, and the arthroscope introduced via cannulated instruments over the guidewire into the central compartment. Further portal placement can be controlled arthroscopically. PMID:16376244

  16. Arthroscopic microdiskectomy.

    PubMed

    Kambin, P

    1991-03-01

    Arthroscopic microdiskectomy through a posterolateral approach has opened a new window of opportunity in the treatment of lumbar disk disorders. Radiographic identification of the triangular working zone has permitted the safe introduction of instruments with an external diameter of 7-8 mm into the intervertebral disk. The technique allows not only evacuation and decompression of contained herniated disks, but also the introduction of instruments for decortication of the vertebral plates and bone grafting for percutaneous interbody fusion. Endoscopic laser nucleolysis, currently under investigation, may also enhance existing technological achievement in the field of minimal-intervention spinal surgery. Arthroscopic microdiskectomy has proven to be safe, effective, and cost efficient. In properly selected patients, satisfactory results of approximately 85% have been realized. PMID:1857361

  17. OCD Lesions Of The Patella And Trochlea In Children

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Simoni, Michael; Miller, Patricia; Micheli, Lyle J.; Kocher, Mininder S.; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this report is to evaluate the functional outcomes of surgical management of OCD lesions of the patella and trochlea in children. Secondary aims include elucidating predictors for higher functional outcomes, determining complication rates, surgical satisfaction and ability to return to sports. Methods: Patients age ≤ 18 years who were surgically treated for OCD of the patellar or trochlea were identified. Charts were queried to record patient/lesion data, surgical procedure, results and complications. Pre- and postoperative imaging was reviewed. Patients were asked to complete a follow-up athletic questionnaire and a Pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (Pedi-IKDC) score. Statistical analysis was conducted to look for predictors for reoperation, residual pain, ability to return to sports and lower Pedi-IKDC scores. Results: Twenty-six children (9 female, 17 male, 3 bilateral) were identified. Mean age was 14.7 (range: 9-18), 21/29 (72%) had open physes, and median follow-up was 3.8 years (range: 1-9 years). The most common location was the trochlea (17/29, 59%). Twenty-two lesions (76%) underwent transarticular drilling (n=14) or drilling with fixation (8), while 7 underwent excision and marrow stimulation. Four patients (14%) required unplanned re-operation. Internal fixation was predictive of reoperation (OR= 8.7, 95% CI= 2.8-26.9, P=0.04). At final follow up, 14 knees (48%) were pain-free, 14 (48%) had mild residual pain. Female gender was predictive of residual pain (OR= 9, 95% CI= 2-56, P=0.02). Twenty-two patients (85%) returned to sports. Longer duration of preoperative pain negatively impacted return to sports (OR= 0.32, 95% CI= 0.05-0.97, P=0.04). On postoperative imaging, the lesion appeared completely healed in 5 cases (42%) and partially healed in 12 cases (58%). All 15 survey respondents were satisfied with surgery. The mean Pedi-IKDC score was 82.4 ± 17.8 (range: 40.2 -100). Conclusion: Surgical treatment

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Technique and results].

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Kohn, D

    2009-05-01

    Hip arthroscopy has become an effective and reliable operative technique for treating femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). This report presents the latest arthroscopic technique, including positioning, portal placement, and treatment of the femoral and acetabular deformity and secondary lesions at the chondrolabral rim complex. After a review of the literature, the results of arthroscopic versus open treatment of FAI are compared, and an algorithm is suggested for deciding between these two types of FAI treatment. PMID:19415235

  19. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. PMID:27599442

  20. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  1. Why arthroscopic partial meniscectomy?

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey

    2015-09-01

    "Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy versus Sham Surgery for a Degenerative Meniscal Tear" published in the New England Journal of Medicine on December 26, 2013 draws the conclusion that arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy provides no significant benefit over sham surgery in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear and no knee osteoarthritis. This result argues against the current practice of performing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since the number of APM performed has been increasing, the information provided by this study should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. PMID:26488013

  2. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Matthew D; Baca, John; Arbuckle, Keith

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedures have been described for many years. New technological advances and a deeper understanding of the pathobiomechanics involved in chronic lateral ankle instability have allowed an expansion of arthroscopic approaches to this common pathology. As experience is gained and outcomes within the patient profile are understood, the authors feel that the arthroscopic approach to lateral ankle stabilization may prove superior to traditional methods secondary to the risk and traditional complications that are mitigated within minimally invasive arthroscopic approaches. Additionally, the arthroscopic approach may allow a quicker return to ballistic sport and decrease time for rehabilitation. PMID:27599440

  3. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Klepps, Steven; Hazrati, Yassamin; Flatow, Evan

    2002-01-01

    Surgical treatment of symptomatic pathology of the long head of the biceps tendon generally consists of either biceps tenotomy or tenodesis. Biceps tenodesis is generally recommended for younger patients and has been well described using open techniques. With advancements in arthroscopic ability and equipment, new arthroscopic techniques have recently been reported. These techniques can be especially useful when used in conjunction with other arthroscopic procedures such as distal clavicle resection, rotator cuff repair, and subacromial decompression. We present a modification of the techniques suggested by other researchers. In this technique, a bone anchor is used as a pulley at the bottom of the tunnel to pull the tendon into position. This is followed by interference screw fixation. To our knowledge, this technique has not been previously described. PMID:12426550

  4. Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Anna O; Winson, Ian G

    2015-03-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a good option for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. The surgical technique involving the use of a standard 4.5-mm arthroscope is described. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals are used. Joint surfaces except the lateral gutter are prepared to point bleeding with motorized burr, abraider, and curettes. Rigid fixation is achieved with cannulated screws. The postoperative regime includes 12 weeks protection, staged from non-weight bearing through partial to full weight bearing. Advantages compared with the open procedure include shorter hospital stay and shorter time to union with similar or better union rates. PMID:25726484

  5. Isolated shear fracture of the humeral trochlea in an adolescent: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Lance J; Jauregui, Julio J; Aarons, Chad E

    2015-09-01

    This report documents a rare case of isolated trochlear shear fracture in an adolescent patient and provides a literature review. Radiographic analysis of the distal humerus revealed an intra-articular fracture of the anterior trochlea, evidenced by a full moon-shaped osteochondral fragment. Open reduction and internal fixation with two headless Herbert screws secured the fragment. Because of the paucity of information on this injury, standard treatment and management have not been established. Prospective studies with longer follow-up are needed before a consensus with regard to these fractures is established. PMID:25887714

  6. Hip Arthroscopy for Excision of Osteoid Osteoma of Femoral Neck

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, AbdulRahman; AbdelSalam El-Assal, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

  7. Femoral Footprint Reconstruction With a Direct Viewing of the Posterior Insertion Using a Trans-Septal Portal in the Outside-In Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2015-01-01

    We established a technique for femoral tunnel preparation through direct vision of the femoral footprint with maximum preservation to the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remnant using a posterior trans-septal portal. Anterior arthroscopy is difficult for the proper tunnel placement without sacrificing the ACL remnant. Posterior arthroscopy could be helpful for viewing the posterior insertion of the ACL remnant that provides excellent femoral footprint exposure without sacrificing the native ACL remnant. Therefore, a posterolateral portal technique using a 70° arthroscope through a posterolateral portal is introduced. However, using the 70° arthroscope, an oblique view is displayed and distorted view could be seen. Therefore, to achieve the goal of posterior arthroscopy and avoid obstacles of the posterolateral view with the 70° arthroscope, we introduce this technique that uses the posterior trans-septal portal with a 30° arthroscope that provides an excellent viewing to the femoral footprint through a hole of the posterior septum. PMID:27073766

  8. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  9. The Etiology and Arthroscopic Surgical Management of Cam Lesions.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Gaudiani, Michael A; Ranawat, Anil S

    2016-07-01

    Cam-type deformity of the proximal femur is a relative increase in the discrepancy of the femoral head-neck offset. The etiology is unknown; several conditions have been implicated in the development of abnormal proximal femoral anatomy. Recent evidence suggests that high-impact sports place stress on the immature physis during growth and may play an important role. Imaging is essential in the initial diagnostic workup, characterization of pathology, preoperative planning, and intraoperative decision making. Short-term and mid-term outcomes for arthroscopic osteoplasty of cam lesions for both isolated cam-type deformity and mixed cam-pincer femoroacetabular impingement have been well-described and are favorable. PMID:27343392

  10. Arthroscopic hip labral repair.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Faucet, Scott C; Briggs, Karen K

    2013-05-01

    Labral tears in the hip may cause painful clicking or locking of the hip, reduced range of motion, and disruption to sports and daily activities. The acetabular labrum aids stabilization of the hip joint, particularly during hip motion. The fibrocartilaginous structure extends the acetabular rim and provides a suction seal around the femoroacetabular interface. Treatment options for labral tears include debridement, repair, and reconstruction. Repair of the labrum has been shown to have better results than debridement. Labral refixation is achieved with sutures anchored into the acetabular rim. The acetabular rim is trimmed either to correct pincer impingement or to provide a bleeding bed to improve healing. Labral repair has shown excellent short-term to midterm outcomes and allows patients to return to activities and sports. Arthroscopic rim trimming and labral refixation comprise an effective treatment for labral tears with an underlying diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement and are supported by the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:23875153

  11. Arthroscopic Resection of Osteochondroma of Hip Joint Associated with Internal Snapping: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heung-Tae; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Jeon, Yoo-Sun

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year old male patient visited the hospital complaining of inguinal pain and internal snapping of right hip joint. In physical examination, the patient was presumed to be diagnosed femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tear. In radiologic evaluation, FAI and acetabular labral tear were identified and bony tumor associated with internal snapping was found on the posteromedial portion of the femoral neck. Despite of conservative treatment, there was no symptomatic improvement. So arthroscopic labral repair, osteoplasty and resection of bony tumor were performed. The tumor was pathologically diagnosed as osteochondroma through biopsy and all symptoms improved after surgery. There was no recurrence, complication or abnormal finding during 1 year follow up. Osteochondroma located at posteromedial portion of femoral neck can be a cause of internal snapping hip and although technical demands are challenging, arthroscopic resection can be a good treatment option.

  12. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  13. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  14. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  15. Arthroscopic management of popliteal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Amite; Chahar, Deepak; Pathrot, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of popliteal cyst is controversial. Owing to high failure rates in open procedures, recent trend is towards arthroscopic decompression and simultaneous management of intraarticular pathology. We retrospectively analysed clinical results of symptomatic popliteal cysts after arthroscopic management at 24 month followup. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of hospital database for patients presenting with pathology suggestive of a popliteal cyst from June 2007 to December 2012 was done. Twelve cases of popliteal cyst not responding to NSAIDS and with Rauschning and Lindgren Grade 2 or 3 who consented for surgical intervention were included in the study. All patients underwent arthroscopic decompression using a posteromedial portal along with management of intraarticular pathologies as encountered. Furthermore, the unidirectional valvular effect was corrected to a bidirectional one by widening the cyst joint interface. The results were assessed as per the Rauschning and Lindgren criteria. Results: All patients were followed for a minimum of 24 months (range 24-36 months). It revealed that among the study group, six patients achieved Grade 0 status while five had a minimal limitation of range of motion accompanied by occasional pain (Grade 1). One patient had a failure of treatment with no change in the clinical grading. Conclusion: Arthroscopic approach gives easy access to decompression with the simultaneous management of articular pathologies. PMID:27053804

  16. Arthroscopic proficiency: methods in evaluating competency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current paradigm of arthroscopic training lacks objective evaluation of technical ability and its adequacy is concerning given the accelerating complexity of the field. To combat insufficiencies, emphasis is shifting towards skill acquisition outside the operating room and sophisticated assessment tools. We reviewed (1) the validity of cadaver and surgical simulation in arthroscopic training, (2) the role of psychomotor analysis and arthroscopic technical ability, (3) what validated assessment tools are available to evaluate technical competency, and (4) the quantification of arthroscopic proficiency. Methods The Medline and Embase databases were searched for published articles in the English literature pertaining to arthroscopic competence, arthroscopic assessment and evaluation and objective measures of arthroscopic technical skill. Abstracts were independently evaluated and exclusion criteria included articles outside the scope of knee and shoulder arthroscopy as well as original articles about specific therapies, outcomes and diagnoses leaving 52 articles citied in this review. Results Simulated arthroscopic environments exhibit high levels of internal validity and consistency for simple arthroscopic tasks, however the ability to transfer complex skills to the operating room has not yet been established. Instrument and force trajectory data can discriminate between technical ability for basic arthroscopic parameters and may serve as useful adjuncts to more comprehensive techniques. There is a need for arthroscopic assessment tools for standardized evaluation and objective feedback of technical skills, yet few comprehensive instruments exist, especially for the shoulder. Opinion on the required arthroscopic experience to obtain proficiency remains guarded and few governing bodies specify absolute quantities. Conclusions Further validation is required to demonstrate the transfer of complex arthroscopic skills from simulated environments to the

  17. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  18. Arthroscope assisted intralesional curettage of GCT

    PubMed Central

    Kekatpure, Aashay; Pimprikar, Milind; Kekatpure, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Incomplete intralesional curettage remains the most important factor contributing to the recurrence of the GCT tumor. A 360 degree view of the tumor cavity can be achieved with the help of an arthroscope, which can aid complete intralesional curettage. Case Report: This technical note describes the use of arthroscope assisted curettage of the distal femur GCT. Conclusion: Use of an arthroscope can improve the visibility for intralesional curettage 5 of Giant Cell tumor. PMID:27299030

  19. Functional Outcome Following Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction with Rigid Fix: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Shervegar, Satish; Nagaraj, Prashanth; Grover, Amit; DJ, Niranthara Ganesh; Ravoof, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background: No uniform consensus exists to decide type of fixation for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Hypothsis: There is similar functional outcome after rigid fix compared to other methods of fixation which has been published. Study design: Retrospective observational study. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendons using femoral Rigid fix cross-pin and interference screw tibial fixation. The evaluation methods were clinical examination, IKDC scores, Lysholm and pre injury and post reconstruction Tegner score. Patients were followed up from minimum of 6 months to 4 year seven months. Results: C In our study of sample size 50 we found that mean age of patients was 30.8 Years with male preponderance. Mean post operative IKDC and Lysholm score has been 75.6 and 84.4 respectively. Mean Tegner pre-injury score and post reconstruction score has been 5.4 and 4.26. Box plot comparison of pre injury and post operativeTegner score reveals a statistically significant difference with respect to paired t test P<0.001. Conclusions: Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with femoral rigid fix cross pins and tibial interference screws results in comparable short term to midterm functional results compared to other types of fixation PMID:26550591

  20. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  1. "Grand piano sign," a marker for proper femoral component rotation during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Thomas F; Hughes, Richard E; Urquhart, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    A malpositioned femoral component is an established risk factor for patellar instability and pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In the assessment of femoral rotation, several axes, including the transepicondylar axis, the posterior condylar axis, and the anteroposterior axis, are useful. However, these axes are not always easily applicable, particularly when significant deformity exists. An anecdotal method used by some surgeons involves assessing the shape of the anterior femoral surface osteotomy. Our observations from saw bone models and TKA led to our hypothesis that proper femoral component placement is indicated by a bimodal peak on the anterior femur, approximately twice as high on the lateral side than on the medial side. We use the term "grand piano sign" to describe the shape of the trochlea after the osteotomy is correctly completed. To our knowledge, this common observation has not been studied either in the laboratory or in vivo. Our cadaveric models demonstrated that the grand piano sign correlated with proper femoral rotation during TKA. Surgeons who are knowledgeable about this marker should find it helpful when orienting components during knee replacement surgery. PMID:22013571

  2. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  3. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo C.; Queiroz, Marcelo C.; Ono, Nelson K.; Honda, Emerson K.; Guimarāes, Rodrigo P; Junior, Walter Ricioli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term follow-up results of arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Our hypothesis is that arthroscopic treatment results are favorable. Methods: Between August 2003 and August 2007, 28 hips had femoroacetabular impingement treated by hip arthroscopy. The mean age was 34 years, with mean follow-up period of 27 months. Clinical results were graded with the modified Harris hip score, which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Patients had also their internal rotation analyzed. These parameters were calculated by using Wilcoxon's t test for analysis of nonparametric paired samples performed. Results: The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score was 54.2, improving to 94.8 postoperatively (p<0,001). The mean increase was 37.5 points. We had 4 good results (15%) and 24 excellent results (85%). Preoperatively, the patients had a mean internal rotation of 17°, and, postoperatively, 36°. The average internal rotation increase was 19° (p<0,001). Conclusions: The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement presents satisfactory results. PMID:27004177

  4. Radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition elbow reconstruction after proximal ulnar metastatic tumor resection: case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wide en bloc excision of proximal ulna sections is used to treat traumatic and pathological fractures of the ulna, though poor standardization of clinical treatment often results in long-term failure of such reconstructed biomechanical structures. In order to provide insight into effective ulnar reconstructive treatments, the case of an 80-year-old Chinese Han male presenting with pathological fracture caused by a proximal ulnar metastatic tumor concurrent with metastatic renal cancer complicated by occurrence in the brain and lungs is reported and contrasted with alternative treatment techniques. Wide resectioning of the proximal ulna and reconstruction with local radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition resulted in preservation of functionality, sensitivity, and biomechanical integrity after postsurgical immobilization, 6 weeks of passive- and active-assisted flexion, and extension with a hinged brace. The resultant Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating score was 25 of 30 (83 %). Full sensitivity and mobility of the left hand and elbow (10° to 90° with minimally impaired supination and pronation) was restored with minimal discomfort. No evidence of local recurrence or other pathological complications were observed within a 1-year follow-up period. Efficient reconstruction of osseous and capsuloligamentous structures in the elbow is often accomplished by allografts, prosthesis, and soft tissue reconstruction, though wide variations in risk and prognosis associated with these techniques has resulted in disagreements regarding the most effective standards for clinical treatment. Current findings suggest that radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition offers a superior range of elbow movement and fewer complications than similar allograft and prosthetic techniques for patients with multiple metastatic cancers. PMID:22800611

  5. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  6. Arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Dandy, D J; O'Carroll, P F

    1982-01-01

    In the first 1000 arthroscopic operations performed by one surgeon 136 patients had two or more procedures, making a total of 1168 during the 1000 operations. The indications for operation were internal mechanical derangements in 565 patients, anterior knee pain in 246, disorders of the synovium in 77, ligament injuries in 63, and degenerative joint disease in 49. Complications included fracture of instruments in the knee in five patients, haemarthrosis in 10, deep vein thrombosis in three, and synovial fistula in one. In no patient was the wound infected. A total of 26 different operations was performed. PMID:6812832

  7. Direct Arthroscopic Distal Clavicle Resection

    PubMed Central

    Lervick, Gregory N

    2005-01-01

    Degenerative change involving the acromioclavicular (AC) is frequently seen as part of a normal aging process. Occasionally, this results in a painful clinical condition. Although AC joint symptoms commonly occur in conjunction with other shoulder pathology, they may occur in isolation. Treatment of isolated AC joint osteoarthritis is initially non-surgical. When such treatment fails to provide lasting relief, surgical treatment is warranted. Direct (superior) arthroscopic resection of the distal (lateral) end of the clavicle is a successful method of treating the condition, as well as other isolated conditions of the AC joint. The following article reviews appropriate patient evaluation, surgical indications and technique. PMID:16089089

  8. Arthroscopic Excision of Intra-Articular Hip Osteoid Osteoma: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nehme, Alexandre H.; Bou Ghannam, Alaa G.; Imad, Joseph P.; Jabbour, Fouad C.; Moucharafieh, Ramzi; Wehbe, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Intra-articular osteoid osteoma is uncommon accounting for approximately 12% of all osteoid osteomas. It presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges since several traumatic or degenerative pathologies of the joint can be simulated with delay in the diagnosis. We report the clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings in 2 cases of intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck and of the acetabulum. Technical aspects of arthroscopic excision and results of surgery are discussed. Arthroscopy allowed complete excision of the osteoid osteomas, with a short postoperative rehabilitation and excellent functional results. PMID:23304593

  9. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    PubMed Central

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  10. All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rueben; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Patel, Ronak M; Knesek, Michael; Terry, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Biceps tenodesis is a common treatment for pathology of the long head of the biceps tendon. Several authors have described various arthroscopic and open techniques for biceps tenodesis. Open techniques have been associated with complications such as wound infection and nerve injury. Previously described arthroscopic techniques have placed the tenodesis site within the bicipital groove, which may lead to persistent pain. We describe an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis technique that places the tenodesis site distal to the bicipital groove. This technique potentially avoids the complications associated with open tenodesis surgery while still removing the biceps tendon from the bicipital groove. PMID:27284524

  11. Arthroscopic resection of wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Hoyos, A; Pelaez, J

    2004-12-01

    The arthroscopic resection of synovial cysts of the wrist is a simple technique which is comfortable for the patient. We report on a series of 96 patients with dorsal synovial cysts (75 women, 21 men). All patients had undergone preliminary treatment which had been unsuccessful. We operated on 32 patients with a volar cyst (27 women, five men). All the patients were operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthesia. For the dorsal cysts, after having precisely located the cyst, it is then resected after having inserted a shaver directly through the wall of the cyst starting with the capsule. For the volar cysts the arthroscope was inserted through a 3-4 portal and the shaver was inserted through a 1-2 radiocarpal portal. In all cases, there was no immobilisation and a range of motion was started the same day. For the dorsal cysts, our average follow-up was 34 months (range 12-46 months). There were no complications. We had four recurrences. For the palmar cysts, our average follow-up was 26 months (range 12-39 months). There have been no recurrences to date. PMID:15810100

  12. Arthroscopic Subtalar, Double, and Triple Fusion.

    PubMed

    Walter, Richard; Parsons, Stephen; Winson, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Arthroscopic approaches to subtalar, double, and triple arthrodesis allow relative preservation of the soft tissue envelope compared with traditional open approaches. The surgical technique involving the use of a 4.5-mm 30° arthroscope via sinus tarsi portals is described. All 3 joints of the triple joint can be prepared for fusion with motorized burrs. Rigid fixation is achieved with cannulated screws. High union rates and low complication rates have been reported. PMID:27524712

  13. [Arthroscopic surgery of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ivan; Franić, Miljenko; Ivković, Alan

    2007-05-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the ankle has become indispensable method in the armamentarium of the modern orthopaedic surgeon. Technological advancement and thorough understanding of the anatomy have resulted in improved ability to perform arthroscopy of the ankle. The method is minimally invasive and it allows the direct visualization of intra-articular structures without arthrotomy or malleolar osteotomy. Anterior or posterior approach may be used, and various indications have become generally accepted: anterior soft tissue or bony impingement, loose bodies, osteochondral defects, synovitis (rheumatoid arthritis, infective arthritis, and hemophilic arthropathy), posterior impingement syndrome, posttraumatic conditions, osteoarthritis (arthrosis), ankle arthrodesis, tumor-like lesions (synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis) and many combinations of these pathological entities. In this paper we will discuss technique, indications, complications and future perspective of the ankle arthroscopy. In addition we will review the most recent literature data regarding this appealing technique. PMID:17695197

  14. Arthroscopic Treatment of Stiff Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Scelsi, Michele; Castoldi, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Contracture of the elbow represents a disabling condition that can impair a person's quality of life. Regardless of the event that causes an elbow contracture, the conservative or surgical treatment is usually considered technically difficult and associated with complications. When the conservative treatment fails to restore an acceptable range of motion in the elbow, open techniques have been shown to be successful options. More recently the use of arthroscopy has become more popular for several reasons. These reasons include better visualization of intra-articular structures, less tissue trauma from open incisions, and potentially the ability to begin early postoperative motion. The purpose of this paper is to review the indications, complications, and results of arthroscopic management of a stiff elbow. PMID:22084755

  15. Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Altchek, David W; Cordasco, Frank A

    2006-02-01

    Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction avoids the large incisions necessary with open reconstructions. This acromioclavicular joint reconstruction technique via the subacromial space does not violate the rotator interval or require screw removal. The patient is placed in a modified beach-chair position. The arthroscope is placed into the subacromial space, and a bursectomy is performed through a lateral subacromial portal. The coracoacromial ligament is released from the acromion with an electrocautery and an arthroscopic elevator. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the coracoacromial ligament with a suture passer, and an arthroscopic suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the suture out through the lateral portal. The coracoid is identified and isolated using a radiofrequency ablator placed through the anterior portal while visualizing through the lateral portal. A percutaneous shuttle device is passed through the skin superomedial to the coracoid. The shuttle is visualized entering superior to the coracoid and is passed just medial to the coracoid. Once the tip of the shuttle can be visualized in the recess inferior to the coracoid, the shuttle loop is advanced. A suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the shuttle out through the anterior portal. A semitendinosus allograft is used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through both ends of the allograft. Three strands of nonabsorbable suture are braided together. The tendon and the braided suture are shuttled around the coracoid. At this point, both the braided suture and the allograft tendon enter the anterior portal, wrap around the coracoid base, and exit the anterior portal. A 3-cm incision is made over the distal clavicle. A hole is drilled through the clavicle with a 5-mm drill. A loop of 22-gauge wire is passed through the hole in the clavicle, and a looped suture is shuttled through the hole. A curved clamp is used to

  16. Effects of arthroscopic-assisted surgery on irreducible developmental dislocation of hip by mid-term follow-up: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Fa; Yan, Ya-Bo; Xu, Chao; Li, Tian-Qing; Zhao, Tian-Feng; Liu, Ning; Huang, Lu-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lei, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the indications, surgical technique, and the clinical effects of arthroscopic-assisted treatment of irreducible developmental dislocation of the hip by mid-term follow-up. Arthroscopic-assisted surgeries were performed on 40 children (52 hips) between January 2005 and December 2009. Anterior and antero-superior greater trochanter portals were used in these treatments. Spica cast and abduction splint were applied for 3 months postoperatively. The follow-up was conducted on every 3 months postoperatively. During 12-month follow-up, a secondary treatment such as acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy (shortening, varus, and derotation) was applied if the acetabular angle was greater than 25°. The pelvic acetabular angle, Mckay and Severin score were evaluated every 6 months in all children. With 36 to 96 months (average 71 months) follow-up, 35 children (44 hips) were successfully followed up with complete case data while 5 children unsuccessfully. According to Tönnis classification, there were 5 grade 1 hips, 14 grade 2 hips, 14 grade 3 hips, 11 grade 4 hips, in which 3 children (4 hips) were failed in arthroscopic reduction and femoral head avascular necrosis occurred in 2 children (4 hips). According to Mckay standard, the good rate is 100%. According to Severin standard, the good rate is 84.1%. Arthroscopic assisted treatment is an effective way of reduction of the irreducible hip. Compared with the open reduction, arthroscopic treatment combined with acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy has advantages of less trauma and better function preservation. PMID:27537595

  17. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball of the hip joint from the thigh bone (femur) at ... A slipped capital femoral epiphysis may affect both hips. An epiphysis is an area at the end of a long bone . ...

  18. Arthroscopic Allograft Cartilage Transfer for Osteochondral Defects of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyong S.; Ryan, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondral defects is well established but has had mixed results in larger lesions and revision operations. Particulated allograft cartilage transfer may provide an arthroscopic option for lesions that would otherwise have been treated through open approaches or osteotomies. The procedure is performed under noninvasive distraction with standard arthroscopic portals. PMID:26052496

  19. Excimer laser in arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.

    1991-05-01

    The development of efficient high-power lasersystems for use in surgery, especially in arthroscopic fields, leads to a new push for all endoscopic techniques. Both techniques, laser and endoscope, complete each other in an ideal way and allow applications which could not be reached with conventional techniques. One of the newer laser types is the excimer laser, which will be a good choice for surface treatment because of its very considerate interaction with tissue. One example is the ablation or smoothing of articular cartilage and meniscal shaving in orthopaedics. On the other hand, the power of this laser system is high enough to cut tissue, for instance in the lateral release, and offers therefore an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments. All lasers can only work fine with effective delivery systems. Sometimes there is only a single fiber, which becomes very stiff at diameters of more than 800 micrometers . This fiber often allows only the tangential treatment of tissue, most of the laser power is lost in the background. New fiber systems with many, sometimes hundreds of very thin single fibers, could offer a solution. Special handpieces and fibersystems offer distinct advantages in small joint arthroscopy, especially those for use with excimer lasers will be discussed.

  20. In vivo quantitative ultrasound image analysis of femoral subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Koski, Juhani M; Pulkkinen, Pasi; Saarakkala, Simo

    2013-01-01

    A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US) for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of -1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes' grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r = 0.600, P < 0.001; r = 0.486, P = 0.006, resp.) or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r = 0.332, P = 0.039; r = 0.335, P = 0.037, resp.). This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA. PMID:23781150

  1. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Brian B; Crall, Timothy S; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  2. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Brian B.; Crall, Timothy S.; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  3. Review of Arthroscopic and Histological Findings Following Knee Inlay Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Gregory G; Kambour, Michael T; Uribe, John W

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of cartilage rim loading in defects exceeding the threshold diameter of 10 mm is well documented. Contoured defect fill off-loads the perimeter and counteracts further delamination and progression of defects. When biological procedures have failed, inlay arthroplasty follows these concepts. The human biological response to contoured metallic surface implants has not been described. Four patients underwent non-implant-related, second-look arthroscopy following inlay arthroplasty for bi- (n=3) and tricompartmental (n=1) knee arthrosis without subchondral bone collapse. Arthroscopic probing of the implant-cartilage interface of nine prosthetic components did not show signs of implant-cartilage gap formation, loosening, or subsidence. The implant periphery was consistently covered by cartilage confluence leading to a reduction of the original defect size diameter. Femoral condyle cartilage flow appeared to have more hyaline characteristics. Trochlear cartilage flow showed greater histological variability and less organization with fibrocartilage and synovialized scar tissue. This review reconfirmed previous basic science results and demonstrated effective defect fill and rim off-loading with inlay arthroplasty. PMID:27082884

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment of Talar Body Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Nicholas B.; Lutz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Talar fractures can be severe injuries with complications leading to functional disability. Open reduction–internal fixation remains the treatment of choice for displaced talar fractures. Arthroscopic evaluation of the fracture and articular surfaces can play an important role in the treatment of these fractures. Arthroscopic reduction–internal fixation (ARIF) is increasingly used for certain intra-articular fracture types through the body. The minimally invasive nature of ARIF and high accuracy are enviable attributes of an evolving technique. This technical note describes arthroscopic evaluation of 2 intra-articular talar head fractures, using posterior portals, with ARIF performed in 1 case and excision of the fracture fragments in the other case. PMID:24904775

  5. [Arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Charrois, O; Cheyrou, E; Remi, J; Panarella, L; Jouve, F; Beaufils, P

    2008-02-01

    We present here the preliminary results obtained with arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament. Six patients underwent the technique. Four had had prior ligamentoplasty, two had sequelae of tibial spine fractures. Laxity persisted in all cases. The transplant or the ligament were continuous and insertion points were well-positioned. The procedure consisted in using a trephine to bore the tibial bone at the "foot" of the ligament or transplant in order to tighten the ligament. There was no evidence of instability after the arthroscopic tightening procedure. Mean pre- and postoperative differential anterior drawer values were successively 9.2 and 3.9 mm. For native or reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, which are continuous and well-positioned but not loose, arthroscopic tightening spares the need for ligament transplant and appears to be free of specific morbidity. PMID:18342033

  6. Arthroscopic laser meniscectomy in a gas medium.

    PubMed

    Whipple, T L; Caspari, R B; Meyers, J F

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory investigations demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of utilizing CO2 laser energy for arthroscopic resection of the knee meniscus. Infrared light of 10.6 micron wavelength is sufficiently absorbed by fibrocartilage with byproducts of heat, water vapor, and a small residue of carbon ash. The remaining meniscus rim demonstrates viable chondrocytes in close proximity to the margin of resection, and gross collagen fiber architecture is preserved. The depth of penetration of the laser beam can be controlled by limiting the duration of exposure. Arthroscopic application of CO2 laser energy requires a gas medium. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen have proven to be satisfactory insufflation agents, with no lasting untoward effects noted in a clinical series of diagnostic arthroscopic procedures. The cost of laser generators and the lack of an ideal delivery system are limiting factors in clinical applications of this cutting mode for meniscectomy. PMID:3937537

  7. Feasibility of Arthroscopic Placement of Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis Grafts in the Cadaver Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Thorey, Fritz; Budde, Stefan; Ezechieli, Marco; Albrecht, Urs Vito; Ettinger, Max

    2013-01-01

    An assortment of clinical trials have been done presenting the effectiveness of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the regeneration of chondral leasions. The purpose of the study was to underline the accessability of the acetabulum and the femoral head through the known portals and prove i) the feasibility of placing the AMIC in the different zones of the hip joint and ii) check for dislocation after joint movement. Six human cadavers underwent hip arthroscopy on both hips. Two chondral lesions were set on each femoral head and two in the acetabulum to evaluate a total of 48 defects. After microfracturing an autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis graft was placed on these lesions arthroscopically. After repeated joint movement the dislocation of the graft was checked. It was possible to place the AMIC graft in all 48 chondral lesions. The time needed for placing the graft was 8±2.9 minutes. A trend of time reduction could be detected throughout this study as the surgeon gained more experience. For the femoral head, after twenty cycles of joint movement 18/24 spots showed no displacement, 4/24 showed minor displacement (<3 mm) and 2/24 showed major displacement (>3 mm). None showed total displacement. For the acetabulum 22/24 spots showed no displacement and 2/24 showed minor displacement. A combined microfracturing and placing of an AMIC graft of focal chondral lesions of the hip joint can be done arthroscopically. Prospective randomized in vivo studies should compare the results of arthroscopilally placed AMIC grafts with microfracturing and microfracturing alone. PMID:24191186

  8. Augmented virtuality for arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, John M; Bardana, Davide D; Stewart, A James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a computer system to visualize the location and alignment of an arthroscope using augmented virtuality. A 3D computer model of the patient's joint (from CT) is shown, along with a model of the tracked arthroscopic probe and the projection of the camera image onto the virtual joint. A user study, using plastic bones instead of live patients, was made to determine the effectiveness of this navigated display; the study showed that the navigated display improves target localization in novice residents. PMID:22003616

  9. Arthroscopic fixation of type III acromioclavicular dislocations.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jan F A; Van der Linden, Dietert

    2007-10-01

    Type III Acromio-Clavicular Joint dislocations can be treated successfully by surgical stabilisation in situ, with or without reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. The authors describe a simple and reliable mode of fixation, performed arthroscopically. The technique can be used for in situ fixation, or as part of an arthroscopically assisted Weaver and Dunn procedure. Using a metallic anchor loaded with a braided polyfilament suture, a strong and reliable fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid process is obtained. No hardware removal is necessary. Concomitant glenohumeral pathology can be treated simultaneously. PMID:18019910

  10. Femoral intercondylar notch shape and dimensions in ACL-injured patients.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Martins, Cesar A Q; Vyas, Shail M; Celentano, Umberto; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-09-01

    The femoral intercondylar notch has been an anatomic site of interest as it houses the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The objective of this study was to arthroscopically evaluate the femoral notch in patients with known ACL injury. This evaluation included establishing a classification for notch shapes, identifying the shape frequency, measuring notch dimensions, and determining correlation between notch shape, notch dimensions, and demographic patient data. In this clinical cohort study, 102 consecutive patients underwent diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation of the notch. Several intra-operative photos, videos, and measurements were taken of the notch. Demographic data for each patient were recorded including age, gender, height, weight, and BMI. Three categories of notch shape were established: 1. A-shaped; 2. U-shaped; and 3. W-shaped. Two blinded independent orthopedic surgeons were asked to categorize the recorded notches. Notch shape, dimensions, and demographic factors were correlated. Of the 102 notches evaluated, 55 notches were found to be "A-shaped," 42 "U-shaped," and 5 "W-shaped." "A-shaped" notches were narrower in all width dimensions than "U-shaped" notches. Only patient height was found to influence notch shape with a positive association between taller patients and "U-shaped" and "W-shaped" notches (P = 0.011). Women had a smaller notch width at the base and middle of the notch. With this data, surgeons who enter the knee and appreciate an "A-shaped" notch should consider placing the arthroscope in the anteromedial portal and drill the femoral tunnel through an accessory medial portal to improve visualization and accuracy in anatomic femoral tunnel creation. PMID:20390246

  11. [Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Dumontier, C; Chaumeil, G; Chassat, R; Nourissat, G

    2006-11-01

    Incidentally discovered in 1987, arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia is based on our knowledge of their physiopathology which in turn benefits from the arthroscopic wrist evaluation. Dorsal wrist ganglia arise in the radiocarpal space from the dorsal part of the scapholunate ligament and migrate along the dorsal wrist capsule. According to their position above or under the dorsal intercarpal ligament, their cutaneous projection may vary. The basis of the arthroscopic treatment of wrist ganglia is, as with open surgery, the capsular resection in front of their origin. Arthroscopic resection is made either from dorsal radio-carpal or midcarpal approaches with little morbidity. Scars are unnoticeable, wrist mobility and strength close to normal by three months, which is the delay for dorsal wrist pain, always very limited, to disappear. The recurrence rate is however still debatable. Close to zero in some series, we had almost 20% recurrence rate in our series, with half of patients who reccur after two years follow-up. This variability in the recurrence rate also exists with open techniques. The only prospective and randomized study available to date found no differences between the two techniques, according to the recurrence rate. PMID:17361892

  12. Open Versus Arthroscopic Tennis Elbow Release

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Jeff; Clark, Tod; McRae, Sheila; Dubberley, James; MacDonald, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine if quality of life and function are different following arthroscopic versus open tennis elbow release surgery. Based on retrospective studies, both approaches have been found to be beneficial, but no prospective randomized comparison has been conducted to date. Methods: Following a minimum six-months of conservative treatment, seventy-one patients (>16 yrs old) were randomized intraoperatively to undergo either arthroscopic or open lateral release. Outcome measures were the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH), a 5-question VAS Pain Scale, and grip strength. Study assessments took place pre-, and 6-week, 3-, 6-, and 12-months post-surgery. Comparisons between groups and within groups over time were conducted using repeated measures ANOVA. A minimal clinically significant difference for the DASH had been previously identified as 15 points, and was used to compare groups as well at 12-months post-operative (Beaton et al. 2001). Results: Fifteen women and 19 men underwent the open procedure with a mean age of 47.1 years (6.7) and 13 women and 21 men were in the arthroscopic group with a mean age of 45.0 (6.9). No pre-surgery differences were found between groups based on age, sex, DASH or VAS scores. Both groups demonstrated a significant improvement in subjective measures and grip strength by 12-months post-surgery, and no significant differences were found between groups at any time point. The DASH, our primary outcome, decreased from a mean (SD) of 47.5 (14.5) pre-surgery to 21.9 (21.8) at 12-months post-surgery in the Open group and from 52.7 (16.0) to 22.6 (21.1) in the Arthroscopic group. VAS-pain scores (%) decreased in the Open group from 62.5 (17.2) pre-operatively to 30.0 (26.5) at 12-months. In the arthroscopic group, scores decreased from 63.7 (15.9) to 26.2 (24.6). Grip strength (kg) increased on the affected side from 23.6 (14.9) to 29.3 (16.3) and 21.4 (15.4) to

  13. RigidFix femoral fixation: a test for detecting inaccurate cross pin positioning.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Pappis, Georgios; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-11-01

    The RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of graft in ACL reconstruction. In some cases, though, cross pins miss the femoral tunnel resulting in inadequate proximal graft fixation. We present a simple test to detect the incorrect placement of cross pins. The pinholes are drilled through the guide frame, leaving 2 sleeves for cross pins insertion. The manufacturer's recommendations, at this stage, are to reinsert the femoral tunnel guidewire, remove the guide frame, and insert the graft without verifying accurate pinhole positioning. We reinsert the femoral tunnel guidewire without removing the guide frame, and a second guidewire is introduced through each of the sleeves in turn. In case of appropriate pinhole placement, the 2 guidewires will meet in the cannulated rod of the guide frame and the surgeon will have the metal-to-metal feeling. If the pinhole misses the femoral tunnel, the 2 guidewires will not meet and the surgeon will not have the metal-to-metal feeling. In our practice, 9 cases of inaccurate pinhole placement were detected with this test and verified by direct vision of the femoral tunnel with the arthroscope. We find this test simple, reliable, and not time consuming. PMID:17986419

  14. Arthroscopically Assisted Treatment of Acute Dislocations of the Acromioclavicular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sepp; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Imhoff, Andreas B.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted treatments for dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint combine the advantages of exact and visually controlled coracoid tunnel placement with the possibility of simultaneous treatment of concomitant injuries. The clinical results of previous arthroscopically assisted techniques have been favorable at midterm and long-term follow-up. The presented surgical technique combines the advantages of arthroscopically positioned coracoclavicular stabilization with an additional suture cord cerclage of the acromioclavicular joint capsule for improved horizontal stability. PMID:26870646

  15. [Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff : Arthroscopic concepts].

    PubMed

    Greiner, S; Scheibel, M

    2011-01-01

    Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff and isolated greater or lesser tuberosity fractures are rare injuries and a clear consensus regarding classification and therapy does not yet exist. Conservative therapy is limited, especially in injuries with displaced fragments and in these cases surgical treatment is frequently indicated. The ongoing development of arthroscopic techniques has led to quite a number of reports about arthroscopically assisted or total arthroscopic techniques in the treatment of these injuries. The advantages and disadvantages of arthroscopic concepts for the treatment of bony avulsions of the rotator cuff are presented with reference to the current literature. PMID:21153534

  16. Outcomes after Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Tyler James; Vega, Jose F.; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Gelber, Jonathan David; Cagle, Robert; Saluan, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The shoulder is the most common joint dislocation effecting roughly 2% of the general population. Males are effected to a higher degree that females at a ratio of 3:1.1-2 The young, athletic population make up the largest portion of shoulder instability, and treated nonoperatively have a recurrent dislocation rate approaching 50%.3-5 Owens et. al recently published a cohort looking at 45 college athletes with an in season shoulder instability event. 73% of athletes returned to play in season. Only 36% of athletes completed the season without re-injury and 64% of athletes had a recurrent instability event.6 It is unknown how the outcomes of those who go on to have a recurrent dislocation in season are effected versus those who have a stabilization procedure after a first time dislocation. The objective of the current study is to report the postoperative outcomes of first time dislocators versus patients with recurrent dislocations prior to surgery. Methods: CPT codes were used to identify patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair between 2003-2013. 439 patients aged 16-30 years were identified across 8 fellowship trained surgical practices. The first phase of the study was a retrospective chart review to obtain patient demographics, number of reported preoperative dislocations, review imaging, and number of anchors placed. Patients were identified as first time dislocators or as recurrent dislocators when they had more than one dislocation prior to surgical intervention. The second phase consisted of a survey to obtain a simple shoulder test score, whether they returned to sport, postoperative instability events and further surgery on the shoulder. Postoperative instability was defined as a subluxation or dislocation reported by the patient survey in the postoperative period. Of the 439 patients identified, 296 were excluded for revision surgery, open repair, posterior instability, multidirectional instability, HAGL lesion, labral tears involving the

  17. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  18. Arthroscopic anatomy of the subdeltoid space.

    PubMed

    J Salata, Michael; J Nho, Shane; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Van Thiel, Geoffrey; Ghodadra, Neil; Dwyer, Tim; A Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    From the first shoulder arthroscopy performed on a cadaver in 1931, shoulder arthroscopy has grown tremendously in its ability to diagnose and treat pathologic conditions about the shoulder. Despite improvements in arthroscopic techniques and instrumentation, it is only recently that arthroscopists have begun to explore precise anatomical structures within the subdeltoid space. By way of a thorough bursectomy of the subdeltoid region, meticulous hemostasis, and the reciprocal use of posterior and lateral viewing portals, one can identify a myriad of pertinent ligamentous, musculotendinous, osseous, and neurovascular structures. For the purposes of this review, the subdeltoid space has been compartmentalized into lateral, medial, anterior, and posterior regions. Being able to identify pertinent structures in the subdeltoid space will provide shoulder arthroscopists with the requisite foundation in core anatomy that will be required for challenging procedures such as arthroscopic subscapularis mobilization and repair, biceps tenodesis, subcoracoid decompression, suprascapular nerve decompression, quadrangular space decompression and repair of massive rotator cuff tears. PMID:24191185

  19. Arthroscopic management of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Chloros, George D; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Kuzma, Gary R

    2006-11-01

    Arthroscopy has the advantage of providing a direct and accurate assessment of the articular surfaces and detecting the presence of injuries associated with distal radius fractures. Current indications, although numerous and potentially expanding, also are controversial. This report presents a global view of the current status of arthroscopy in the management of distal radius fractures. The rationale of arthroscopic treatment, the available evidence, and finally the diagnosis and treatment are discussed. PMID:17095385

  20. The Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Amsdell, Simon; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Bisson, Leslie J; Braman, Jonathan P; Butler, Aaron; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Harner, Christopher D; Garrett, William E; Olson, Tyson; Warme, Winston J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgeries employing arthroscopic techniques are among the most commonly performed in orthopaedic clinical practice however, valid and reliable methods of assessing the arthroscopic skill of orthopaedic surgeons are lacking. Hypothesis The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) will demonstrate content validity, concurrent criterion-oriented validity, and reliability, when used to assess the technical ability of surgeons performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3 Methods Content validity was determined by a group of seven experts using a Delphi process. Intra-articular performance of a right and left diagnostic knee arthroscopy was recorded for twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine fellowship trained attending surgeons. Subject performance was assessed by two blinded raters using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity, inter-rater reliability, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Results Content validity: The content development group identified 8 arthroscopic skill domains to evaluate using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity: Significant differences in total ASSET score (p<0.05) between novice, intermediate, and advanced experience groups were identified. Inter-rater reliability: The ASSET scores assigned by each rater were strongly correlated (r=0.91, p <0.01) and the intra-class correlation coefficient between raters for the total ASSET score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability: there was a significant correlation between ASSET scores for both procedures attempted by each individual (r = 0.79, p<0.01). Conclusion The ASSET appears to be a useful, valid, and reliable method for assessing surgeon performance of diagnostic knee arthroscopy in cadaveric specimens. Studies are ongoing to determine its generalizability to other procedures as well as to the live OR and other simulated environments. PMID:23548808

  1. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision. PMID:26726987

  2. Arthroscopic Treatment for External Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae Youn; Kwak, Hong Suk; Yoon, Kang Sup; Chang, Jae Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic treatment for recalcitrant external snapping hip. Materials and Methods Between September 2011 and June 2013, we evaluated 7 patients (10 cases) with snapping hip who were refractory to conservative treatments for at least 3 months. Two patients (4 cases) were impossible to adduct both knees in 90°of hip flexion. Surgery was done in lateral decubitus position, under spinal anesthesia. We made 2 arthroscopic portals to operate the patients, and used cross-cutting with flap resection technique to treat the lesion. We performed additional gluteal sling release in those 2 patients (4 cases) with adduction difficulty. Average follow-up length was 19 months (range, 12-33 months). Clinical improvement was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS), modified Harris hip score (mHHS), and also investigated for presence of limping or other complications as well. Results The VAS decreased from 6.8 (range, 6-9) preoperatively to 0.2 (range, 0-2) postoperatively, and the mHHS improved from 68.2 to 94.8 after surgery. None of the patients complained of post-operative wound problem or surgical complications. Conclusion The clinical outcome of arthroscopic treatment for recalcitrant external snapping hip was encouraging and all patients were also satisfied with the cosmetic results. PMID:27536576

  3. The effect of patellar button placement and femoral component design on patellar tracking in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, I; Whiteside, L A; Anouchi, Y S

    1992-02-01

    The effects of patellar button position and femoral component design on patellar tracking were investigated roentgenographically and arthroscopically using fresh-frozen adult anatomic specimen knees. Patellar tracking was evaluated for medial/lateral position and tilting angle deviation by comparing preoperative normal values to total knee replacement performance with the following variables: (1) femoral component design; symmetrical total condylar type with a 3-mm central patellar groove and a component with a 3-mm raised lateral patellar flange and 1-mm deepened patellar groove; and (2) patellar button placement; central insertion; and 10-mm medialized insertion. In the roentgenographic study, medialized position of the patellar button allowed the bony portion of the patella to assume its normal lateral position and tilt throughout the knee range of motion. A combination of medialized position of the patellar button and deepening of the patellar groove provided the most anatomically correct position and the most normal tilting of the bony structure of the patella. In the arthroscopic study, the centralized patellar position caused significant lateral tracking and subluxation relative to the femoral component, whereas the medialized position eliminated this tracking disorder. Deepening the patellar groove minimized the intraarticular tracking abnormality and constrained the patellar button in the patellar groove. These results show that the position of the patellar button and femoral component design exert a major influence on patellar tracking. PMID:1735216

  4. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  5. Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia and treatment of recurrences.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Badia, A; Alfarano, M; Orbay, J; Indriago, I; Mustapha, B

    2000-02-01

    From 1995 to 1998, 30 patients with dorsal wrist ganglia and four with recurrent dorsal ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection. At a mean follow-up of 16 months, no complications were seen, but minimal pain persisted in three patients. Two recurrences were seen after arthroscopic resection of primary ganglia. PMID:10763721

  6. Arthroscopic diagnosis and treatment of dorsal wrist ganglion.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S; Toh, S; Miura, H; Arai, K; Irie, T

    2001-12-01

    Thirty-seven patients with dorsal wrist ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection. The mean follow-up was 20 months, and no complications were encountered. The ganglia were classified into three types according to their arthroscopic appearance. This classification helps to determine the amount of dorsal capsular resection required. PMID:11884110

  7. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    At the present time proximal femoral fractures account for 30% of all fractures referred to hospitals for treatment. Our population is ageing, the proportion of patients with post-menopausal or senile osteoporosis is increasing and therefore the number of proximal femoral fractures requiring urgent treatment is growing too. In the age category of 50 years and older, the incidence of these fractures has increased exponentially. Our department serves as a trauma centre for half of Prague and part of the Central Bohemia Region with a population of 1 150 000. Prague in particular has a high number of elderly citizens. Our experience is based on extensive clinical data obtained from the Register of Proximal Femoral Fractures established in 1997. During 14 years, 4280 patients, 3112 women and 1168 men, were admitted to our department for treatment of proximal femoral fractures. All patients were followed up until healing or development of complications. In the group under study, 82% were patients older than 70 years; 72% of those requiring surgery were in their seventies and eighties. Men were significantly younger than women (p<0.001) and represented 30% of the group. The fractures were 2.3-times more frequent in women than in men. In the category under 60 years, men significantly outnumbered women (p<0.001). The patients with pertrochanteric fractures were, on the average, eight years older than the patients with intertrochanteric fractures, which is a significant difference (p<0.001). The mortality rate within a year of injury was about 30%. Trochanteric fractures accounted for 54.7% and femoral neck fractures for 45.3% of all fractures. The inter-annual increase was 5.9%, with more trochanteric than femoral neck fractures. There was a non-significant decrease in intertrochanteric (AO 31-A3) fractures. On the other hand, the number of pertrochanteric (AO 31-A1+2) fractures increased significantly (p<0.001). A total of 1 394 fractures were treated with a proximal

  8. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  9. Arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Birns, Michael E; Mbabuike, Jean-Jacques; Porter, David A; Galano, Gregory J

    2014-11-01

    The long head of the biceps (LHB) is commonly implicated in shoulder pathology due to its anatomic course and intimacy with the rotator cuff and superior labrum of the glenoid. Treatment of tendinosis of the LHB may be required secondary to partial thickness tears, instability/subluxation, associated rotator cuff tears, or SLAP (superior labrum, anterior to posterior) lesions. Treatment options include open or arthroscopic techniques for tenodesis vs tenotomy. Controversy exists in the orthopedic literature regarding the preferred procedure. The all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique is a viable and reproducible option for treatment. This article provides a review of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique using proximal interference screw fixation and its subsequent postoperative regimen. All-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis maintains elbow flexion and supination power, minimizes cosmetic deformities, and leads to less fatigue soreness after active flexion. Thus, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis should be offered and encouraged as a treatment option for younger, active patients. PMID:25361357

  10. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  11. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Nakamura, Junichi; Iida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiho; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  12. Arthroscopic Posterior Subtalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vilá y Rico, Jesús; Ojeda Thies, Cristina; Parra Sanchez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Surgical fusion of the subtalar joint is a procedure indicated to alleviate pain of subtalar origin, such as in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, and other disorders. Open subtalar arthrodesis has been performed with predictable results, but concerns exist regarding injury to proprioception and local vascularity due to wide surgical dissection. Minimally invasive techniques try to improve results by avoiding these issues but have a reputation for being technically demanding. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which has proved to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society scores. PMID:27073783

  13. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  14. Arthroscopic Hip Labral Reconstruction and Augmentation Using Knotless Anchors

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Mark O.; Moreira, Brett; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical stability is the primary function of the acetabular labrum. It provides a hip suction seal and optimal joint function. Labral tears are a common reason for hip arthroscopy, to improve patient function and to prevent long-term degenerative arthropathy. Arthroscopic labral repair has shown significantly better outcomes in return to premorbid activity levels when compared with labral debridement. Injury to the acetabular labrum is a challenge and can lead to long-term complications. In this scenario, arthroscopic labral reconstruction has shown good results regarding patient subjective and objective outcomes. We describe a technique for complete arthroscopic labral reconstruction using tensor fascia lata allograft. PMID:26870649

  15. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release.

    PubMed

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  16. Arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Roussignol, X

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopy has become indispensable for performing tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis. Now in 2015, it is the gold-standard surgical technique, and open surgery is reserved only for cases in which arthroscopy is contraindicated: material ablation after consolidation failure, osteophytes precluding a work chamber, excentric talus, severe malunion, bone defect requiring grafting, associated midfoot deformity, etc. The first reports of arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis date from the early 1990s. Consolidation rates were comparable to open surgery, but with significantly fewer postoperative complications: infection, skin necrosis, etc. Arthroscopy was for many years reserved to moderate deformity, with frontal or sagittal deviation less than 10°. The recent literature, however, seems to extend indications, the only restriction being the surgeon's experience. Tibiotalar arthrodesis on a posterior arthroscopic approach remains little used. And yet the posterior work chamber is much larger, and initial series showed consolidation rates similar to those of an anterior approach. The surgical technique for posterior tibiotalar arthrodesis was described by Van Dijk et al., initially using a posterior para-Achilles approach. This may be hampered by posterior osteophytes or ankylosis of the subtalar joint line (revision of non-consolidated arthrodesis, sequelae of calcaneal thalamus fracture) and is now used only by foot and ankle specialists. Posterior double tibiotalar-subtalar arthrodesis, described by Devos Bevernage et al., is facilitated by transplantar calcaneo-talo-tibial intramedullary nailing. PMID:26797006

  17. Arthroscopic reduction-association of the scapholunate.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Alberto J; Lee, Steve K; Hausman, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    The reduction-association scapholunate (RASL) procedure for stabilization of the scapholunate joint is an alternative to soft-tissue procedures that do not maintain normal carpal alignment, despite reports of good symptomatic relief. The RASL procedure--indicated for patients with scapholunate instability or scapholunate dissociation without arthritis and, in selected cases, with stage 1 scapholunate advanced collapse of the wrist--can be performed arthroscopically. Radial midcarpal and 3-4 radiocarpal portals are used to excoriate and prepare the scapholunate joint surfaces. By use of 0.62'' K-wire joysticks in the lunate and distal pole of the scaphoid, the scaphoid undergoes dorsiflexion and supination while the lunate undergoes palmarflexion to achieve reduction. A .35'' guidewire is advanced through the scaphoid waist, across the scapholunate joint to the proximomedial corner of the lunate. Supplemental K-wire fixation, from the scaphoid to the capitatum and lunate to the radius, stabilizes the reduction for placement of a cannulated HBS screw (Orthosurgical Implants, Miami, FL) through a 1-2 portal, while reduction and positioning are confirmed arthroscopically. Arthroscopy facilitates anatomic reduction of the joint, as well as the critically important, precise placement of the cannulated HBS screw, by use of 3 portals rather than the traditional 2-incision approach. PMID:17210436

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fracture].

    PubMed

    Lindau, T

    2006-11-01

    The orthopaedic surgeons cannot predict the functional results after a distal intra articular radius fracture. The intra-articular incongruity of more than 1 mm is associated with the development of secondary osteoarthrosis. The wrist arthroscopy became an essential help for the reduction of these fractures. The hand is normally in an upright position with a traction of approximately 4-5 kg which facilitates the reduction of the extra-articular fracture component. It is possible to use a technique of horizontal traction. The arthroscopy allows the reduction and control of the fixing of the various fragments, but also the treatment associated lesions associated. One randomized study, which compared 34 arthroscopically treated fractures with 48 openly treated, concluded that the arthroscopy-treated group had better outcome, better reduction, better grip strength and better range of motion than the openly treated group. The treatment of intra articular distal radius fractures with arthroscopic assistance is thus the guaranteeing of the most anatomical reduction of articular surface. It allows the diagnosis and the treatment of the associated lesions, decreases the peripheral fibrous scars of soft tissues by avoiding initially extensive approaches and finally gives better functional results. PMID:17361885

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Lindau, T

    2006-11-01

    The orthopaedic surgeons cannot predict the functional results after a distal intra articular radius fracture. The intra-articular incongruity of more than 1 mm is associated with the development of secondary osteoarthrosis. The wrist arthroscopy became an essential help for the reduction of these fractures. The hand is normally in an upright position with a traction of approximately 4-5 kg which facilitates the reduction of the extra-articular fracture component. It is possible to use a technique of horizontal traction. The arthroscopy allows the reduction and control of the fixing of the various fragments, but also the treatment associated lesions associated. One randomized study, which compared 34 arthroscopically treated fractures with 48 openly treated, concluded that the arthroscopy-treated group had better outcome, better reduction, better grip strength and better range of motion than the openly treated group. The treatment of intra articular distal radius fractures with arthroscopic assistance is thus the guaranteeing of the most anatomical reduction of articular surface. It allows the diagnosis and the treatment of the associated lesions, decreases the peripheral fibrous scars of soft tissues by avoiding initially extensive approaches and finally gives better functional results. PMID:17349390

  20. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  1. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  2. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  3. Traumatic Osteochondral Injury of the Femoral Head Treated by Mosaicplasty: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shindle, Michael K.; Buly, Robert L.; Kelly, Bryan T.; Lorich, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    The increased risk of symptomatic progression towards osteoarthritis after chondral damage has led to the development of multiple treatment options for cartilage repair. These procedures have evolved from arthroscopic lavage and debridement, to marrow stimulation techniques, and more recently, to osteochondral autograft and allograft transplants, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The success of mosaicplasty procedures in the knee has led to its application to other surfaces, including the talus, tibial plateau, patella, and humeral capitellum. In this report, we present two cases of a chondral defect to the femoral head after a traumatic hip dislocation, treated with an osteochondral autograft (OATS) from the ipsilateral knee, and the inferior femoral head, respectively, combined with a surgical dislocation of the hip. At greater than 1 year and greater than 5 years of follow-up, MRI studies have demonstrated good autograft incorporation with maintenance of articular surface conformity, and both patients clinically continue to have no pain and full active range of motion of their respective hips. In our opinion, treatment of osteochondral defects in the femoral head surface using a surgical dislocation combined with an OATS procedure is a promising approach, as full exposure of the femoral head can be obtained while preserving its vasculature, thus enabling adequate restoration of the articular cartilage surface. PMID:21886541

  4. Pre-operative Thresholds for Achieving Meaningful Clinical Improvement after Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U.; Fields, Kara G.; Nawabi, Danyal H.; Kelly, Bryan T.; Ranawat, Anil S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the thresholds and determinants for successful femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treatment is evolving. The primary purpose of this study was to define pre-operative outcome score thresholds that can be used to predict patients most likely to achieve meaningful clinically important difference (MCID) after arthroscopic FAI treatment. Secondarily determinants of achieving MCID were evaluated. Methods: A prospective institutional hip arthroscopy registry was reviewed to identify patients with FAI treated with arthroscopic labral surgery, acetabular rim trimming, and femoral osteochondroplasty. The modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) and the international Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33) tools were administered at baseline and at one year post-operatively. MCID was calculated using a distribution-based method. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate cohort-based threshold values predictive of achieving MCID. Area under the curve (AUC) was used to define predictive ability (strength of association) with AUC >0.7 considered acceptably predictive. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to analyze demographic, radiographic and intra-operative factors associated with achieving MCID. Results: There were 374 patients (mean + SD age, 32.9 + 10.5) and 56.4% were female. The MCID for mHHS, HOS activities of daily living (HOS-ADL), HOS Sports, and iHOT-33 was 8.2, 8.4,14.5, and 12.0 respectively. ROC analysis (threshold, % achieving MCID, strength of association) for these tools in our population was: mHHS (61.6, 78%, 0.68), HOS-ADL (83.8, 68%, 0.84), HOS-Sports (63.9, 64%, 0.74), and iHOT-33 (54.3, 82%, 0.65). Likelihood for achieving MCID declined above and increased below these thresholds. In univariate analysis female sex, femoral version, lower acetabular outerbridge score and increasing CT sagittal center edge angle (CEA) were predictive of achieving MCID. In multivariable analysis

  5. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Tenodesis: Loop-Suture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis. PMID:23875133

  6. Partial excision of discoid meniscus. Arthroscopic operation of 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Dimakopoulos, P; Patel, D

    1990-02-01

    10 patients underwent arthroscopic removal of the central and torn portions of the lateral discoid meniscus, leaving a semilunar-shaped peripheral portion. All but one of the knees were asymptomatic at follow-up. PMID:2336950

  7. Technique of Arthroscopic Treatment of Impingement After Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christopher E; Neumann, Julie A; Godin, Jonathan A; DeOrio, James K

    2016-04-01

    Rates of medial and/or lateral gutter impingement after total ankle replacement are not insignificant. If impingement should occur, it typically arises an average of 17 months after total ankle replacement. Our patient underwent treatment for right ankle medial gutter bony impingement with arthroscopic debridement 5 years after her initial total ankle replacement. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals and a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope were used. An aggressive soft-tissue and bony resection was performed using a combination of curettes, a 3.5-mm shaver, a 5.5-mm unsheathed burr, a drill, and a radiofrequency ablator. This case shows that arthroscopic treatment is an effective and potentially advantageous alternative to open treatment of impingement after total ankle replacement. In addition, symptoms of impingement often improve in a short amount of time after arthroscopic debridement of the medial and/or lateral gutter. PMID:27354942

  8. Arthroscopic suture anchor tenodesis: loop-suture technique.

    PubMed

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2013-05-01

    With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis. PMID:23875133

  9. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  10. A new automatic landmark extraction framework on ultrasound images of femoral condyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Sibut, Agnès; Nakib, Amir; Petit, Eric; Leitner, François

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS), surgeons have to acquire some anatomical landmarks as inputs to the system. To do so, they use manual pointers that are localized in the Operating Room (OR) space using an infrared camera. When the needed landmark is not reachable through an opening, it is palpated directly on skin and there is a loss of precision that can vary from several millimeters to centimeters depending on the thickness of soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a new framework based on three main steps to register the bone surface and extract automatically anatomical landmarks with an ultrasound probe. This framework is based on an oriented gradient calculation, a simulated-compound and a contour closure using a graph representation. The oriented gradient allows extracting a set of pixels that probably belong to the bone surface. The simulatedcompound step allows using ultrasound images properties to define a set of small segments which may belong to the bone surface, and the graph representation allows eliminating false positive detection among remaining segments. The proposed method has been validated on a database of 230 ultrasound images of anterior femoral condyles (on the knee). The average computation time is 0.11 sec per image, and average errors are: 0.54 mm for the bone surface extraction, 0.31 mm for the condylar line, and 1.4 mm for the trochlea middle.

  11. Arthroscopic-Assisted Fixation of Ideberg Type III Glenoid Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Matthew A.; Garrigues, Grant E.

    2015-01-01

    Operative treatment of scapular fractures with extension into the glenoid can be a challenging clinical scenario. Though traditionally addressed in an open fashion, the morbidity of this approach, complemented by advancements in arthroscopic technique and instrumentation, has led to increasing use of arthroscopic-assisted fixation. We describe our technique, including pearls and pitfalls, for minimally invasive fixation of Ideberg type III glenoid fractures. This approach minimizes morbidity, allows optimal visualization and reduction, and provides good functional results. PMID:26052487

  12. Experience-based virtual training system for knee arthroscopic inspection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic surgical training is inherently difficult due to limited visibility, reduced motion freedom and non-intuitive hand-eye coordination. Traditional training methods as well as virtual reality approach lack the direct guidance of an experienced physician. Methods This paper presents an experience-based arthroscopic training simulator that integrates motion tracking with a haptic device to record and reproduce the complex trajectory of an arthroscopic inspection procedure. Optimal arthroscopic operations depend on much practice because the knee joint space is narrow and the anatomic structures are complex. The trajectory of the arthroscope from the experienced surgeon can be captured during the clinical treatment. Then a haptic device is used to guide the trainees in the virtual environment to follow the trajectory. Results In this paper, an experiment for the eight subjects’ performance of arthroscopic inspection on the same simulator was done with and without the force guidance. The experiment reveals that most subjects’ performances are better after they repeated the same inspection five times. Furthermore, most subjects’ performances with the force guidance are better than those without the force guidance. In the experiment, the average error with the force guidance is 33.01% lower than that without the force guidance. The operation time with the force guidance is 14.95% less than that without the force guidance. Conclusions We develop a novel virtual knee arthroscopic training system with virtual and haptic guidance. Compared to traditional VR training system that only has a single play-script based on a virtual model, the proposed system can track and reproduce real-life arthroscopic procedures and create a useful training database. From our experiment, the force guidance can efficiently shorten the learning curve of novice trainees. Through such system, novice trainees can efficiently develop required surgical skills by the virtual

  13. Open Versus Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis: A Comparison of Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeMik, David E.; Uribe, Bastian; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background The proximal aspect of the long head of the biceps brachii (LHB) is a frequent source of anterior shoulder pain. Multiple techniques for LHB tenodesis have been described. However, comparative outcomes are lacking. The present study aims to compare functional results, patient reported outcomes, complications, and clinical failures for patients undergoing open versus arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. Methods All patients who underwent open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis from 2009-2012 at a single institution were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative variables of interest, including concomitant procedures, were recorded. Minimum 1-year follow-up was required for inclusion. Outcomes, including patient reported outcomes, physical exam findings, and complications were compared between open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis patients. Results Overall, 45 patients (25 open, 20 arthroscopic) were available for analysis. In total, there was a single clinical failure in a patient who underwent arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. No other complications or failures were noted. Active shoulder forward elevation was increased in the open tenodesis group as compared to the arthroscopic tenodesis group (177.8 ± 9.3° vs. 171.3 ± 11.7°; p = 0.049). Otherwise, there was no difference in range of motion or strength. For both groups, both the SF-36 and ASES scores improved significantly from preoperative values. Conclusion Both open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis provide good to excellent outcomes with few complications. Given the recent increased utilization of LHB tenodesis, future studies should use randomization and prospective data collection in order to determine if discrete patient populations are better served by either open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis techniques PMID:27528841

  14. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Pearson, Sara E; Caldwell, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a "reverse Hill-Sachs lesion." The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor-based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  15. A navigation system for shoulder arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tyryshkin, K; Mousavi, P; Beek, M; Ellis, R E; Pichora, D R; Abolmaesumi, P

    2007-10-01

    The general framework and experimental validation of a novel navigation system designed for shoulder arthroscopy are presented. The system was designed to improve the surgeon's perception of the three-dimensional space within the human shoulder. Prior to surgery, a surface model of the shoulder was created from computed tomography images. Intraoperatively, optically tracked arthroscopic instruments were calibrated. The surface model was then registered to the patient using tracked freehand ultrasound images taken from predefined landmark regions on the scapula. Three-dimensional models of the surgical instruments were displayed, in real time, relative to the surface model in a user interface. Laboratory experiments revealed only small registration and calibration errors, with minimal time needed to complete the intraoperative tasks. PMID:18019466

  16. [Arthroscopic studies of the stifle of dogs].

    PubMed

    Fehr, M; Behrends, I; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    1996-04-01

    Diagnosis by arthroscopy and arthrotomy of 36 dogs with stifle lesions (18 left, 18 right) assessed by physical and radiological examination were compared. 48 of 68 observations during arthrotomy had been diagnosed before by arthroscopy (accuracy 70.6%). Arthroscopical diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament rupture (ACL) (n = 11), partial ACL (n = 11), avulsion of m. extensor digitorum longum (n = 2) and immune-mediated arthritis (n = 2) confirmed the diagnosis by arthrotomy in all patients. Arthroscopy failed to detect meniscal lesions in 50% (18 of 36). Nine of 20 normal medial and lateral meniscus, eight of 14 medial and one of two lateral meniscal lesions were detected by arthroscopy. Six meniscal tears (two transverse, two longitudinal, one bucket-handle type, one caudal horn) were not diagnosed. These results indicate that other known human portals have to be proven or new portals have to be evaluated. PMID:8650682

  17. [Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Borisch, N

    2014-10-01

    In arthroscopic wrist surgery, the resection of dorsal wrist ganglia has become a well accepted practice. As advantages for the minimally invasive procedure the low complication rate and low postoperative morbidity, less postoperative pain and faster recovery over open techniques are discussed. The possibility to assess accompanying joint pathology is considered as another advantage. The importance of identifying a so-called ganglion cyst stalk seems to have been overstated. Regarding the technique, the main discussion points are the size and localisation of the capsular window and the necessity of additional midcarpal arthroscopy. The possibility and results of treatment of recurrent ganglion cysts are still controversial. Our own experience and that of some authors are positive. Hardly mentioned in the literature is the treatment of occult dorsal wrist ganglia and its results, which is considered as very successful by the authors. PMID:25290273

  18. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Chad D.; Hanzlik, Shane R.; Pearson, Sara E.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a “reverse Hill-Sachs lesion.” The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor–based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  20. ["Plica disease" (synovial folds) of the knee-joint: arthroscopic and histological findings, with suggestions for treatment (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klein, W; Schulitz, K P; Huth, F

    1979-09-01

    A mediopatellar plica (synovial fold) of the knee-joint may develop without recognisable cause in adolescents or young adults, predominantly females. It leads to pain on pressure over the medial knee compartment, sudden or "springing" intraarticular movements and pseudolocking of the joint. Similar plicae occur after traumatic joint contusion, with meniscus disease, or more rarely with arthrosis deformans. Histologically they are characterized by band-like fibrosed evaginations of the synovial membrane and of the synovial fat and connective tissue into the joint spaces. The following therapeutic suggestions, based on the personal experience of 15 cases, are made in the knowledge that significant inflammatory or proliferative arthritic changes can be excluded: the plica can be cut through under arthroscopy; chondromalacial defects, directly or indirectly caused by plical rubbing, of the medial femoral condyle and the medial patella can be removed, also under arthroscopic control, with an electric razor. Arthrotomy is no longer needed in most cases. PMID:477536

  1. Femoral approach to lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mulpuru, Siva K; Hayes, David L; Osborn, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Laser and radiofrequency energy-assisted lead extraction has greatly facilitated this complex procedure. Although success rates are high, in some instances alternate methods of extraction are required. In this review, we discuss techniques for femoral extraction of implanted leads and retained fragments. The major tools available, including commonly used snares and delivery tools, are discussed. We briefly describe combined internal jugular and femoral venous extraction approaches, as well as complimentary utilization of more than one technique via the femoral vein. Animated and procedural sequences are included to help the reader visualize the key components of these techniques. PMID:25311643

  2. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  3. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Meniscal Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Lauren; Moulton, Samuel G.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare subjective clinical outcomes in patients requiring arthroscopic transtibial pullout repair for posterior meniscus root tears of the medial and lateral menisci. We hypothesized that improvement in function and activity level would be similar among patients undergoing lateral and medial meniscal root repairs. Methods: This study was IRB approved. All patients who underwent posterior meniscal root repair by a single orthopaedic surgeon were included in this study. Detailed operative data were documented at surgery. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire, including Lysholm score, Tegner activity scale, WOMAC, SF-12 and patient satisfaction with outcome, which were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of two years postoperatively. Failure was defined as any patient who underwent revision meniscal root repair or partial meniscectomy following the index surgery. Results: There were 50 patients (16 females, 34 males) with a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16.6-65.7) and a mean BMI of 27.3 (range, 20.5-49.2) included in this study. Fifteen patients underwent lateral meniscus root repair and 35 patients underwent medial meniscus root repair. Three patients who underwent lateral meniscus root repair required revision meniscus root repair surgery, while no patients who underwent medial meniscus root repair required revision surgery (p=0.26). There was a significant difference in preoperative and postoperative Lysholm score (53 vs. 78) (p<0.001), Tegner activity scale (2.0 vs. 4.0) (p=0.03), SF-12 physical component subscale (38 vs. 50) (p=0.001) and WOMAC (36 vs. 8) (p<0.001) for the total population. Median patient satisfaction with outcome was 9 (range, 1-10). There was no significant difference in mean age between lateral and medial root repair groups (32 vs. 40) (p=0.12) or gender (p=0.19). There was no significant difference in gender between lateral and medial root repair groups (p=0.95). There was a

  4. Methylene blue-enhanced arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Joo; Sawyer, Gregory A; Dasilva, Manuel F

    2011-12-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue mass of the hand and wrist. Over the past 10 to 15 years, there has been a growing interest in arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions. Proposed advantages of arthroscopy include greater motion (particularly wrist flexion), improved cosmesis, and potential to identify/treat other intra-articular pathology. Despite the documented clinical success of arthroscopic ganglion excision, limitations include inconsistent identification of the ganglion stalk. Our described technique offers a means by which to improve visualization of the ganglion stalk intra-articularly to produce a more effective and efficient arthroscopic ganglion excision. During the procedure, a small volume of methylene blue solution is injected into the cyst. Its communication with the joint is apparent arthroscopically, thus identifying the location of the stalk. With the ability to precisely identify the ganglion stalk using an injection of methylene blue, the surgeon can direct the arthroscopic debridement toward the appropriate pathologic tissue. Unnecessary debridement of uninvolved tissue can be avoided with the technique. This also allows for optimal portal placement and, in particular, indicates whether a midcarpal portal should be employed. This should result in fewer recurrences, decreased operative time, and less iatrogenic injury. PMID:22105637

  5. Bone scintigraphy in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, M.J.; Strife, J.L.; Graham, E.J.; Crawford, A.H.

    1983-12-01

    Tc-/sub 99m/ diphosphonate bone scans were performed on 11 children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis. On pinhole hip images, seven hips in seven patients had increased radionuclide uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis where the slip had occurred. Three hips in three patients had decreased radionuclide uptake in the femoral head on the side of the slipped epiphysis, indicating compromise of the femoral head blood supply. Three or more months following internal fixation, three children had scintigraphy that showed loss of the usual focal uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis. Bone scintigraphy in pediatric patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is valuable in defining the metabolic status of the femoral head. Absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the affected femoral head indicates that the femoral head is at risk for development of radiographic changes associated with aseptic necrosis.

  6. The Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty: From Mini-Open to Arthroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Degreef, Ilse; De Smet, Luc

    2011-01-01

    In cubarthritis—osteoarthritis of the elbow—surgical procedures may be considered to debride the elbow joint to reduce pain, to increase mobility, and to postpone joint replacement surgery. The ulnohumeral arthroplasty as described by Outerbridge and Kashiwagi was originally introduced to debride both anterior and posterior elbow compartments through a direct posterior mini-open approach. To achieve this, a distal humeral fenestration throughout the humeral fossa is performed. Although with an elbow arthroscopy, a technique that was obviously developed later on, all compartments can be easily visualized. The arthroscopic fenestration of the humerus preserves its advantages, with good clinical results focused on pain relief and gaining mobility. On top, future elbow joint locking based on degenerative loose bodies can be prevented. Therefore, this surgery is often done in young, more active patients and even in sportsmen. These patients, however, need to be prompted to restrict loading on the elbow in the immediate postoperative period, because the elbow is biomechanically weakened and may be prone to a fracture. However, both outcome and postoperative rehabilitation are promising and the arthroscopic Outerbridge procedure is a reliable procedure with an easy rehabilitation. Therefore, the threshold is relatively low in early cubarthritis and recurrent locking of the elbow. In this paper, we present a literature review and the author's experience and own research on the Outerbridge procedure. PMID:22096621

  7. Arthroscopic Centralization of an Extruded Lateral Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hideyuki; Muneta, Takeshi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Horie, Masafumi; Nakamura, Tomomasa; Okawa, Atsushi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Extrusion of the lateral meniscus has been reported after posterior root tear or radial tear, partial meniscectomy, and meniscoplasty of discoid meniscus. It has also been shown to be associated with the development of osteoarthritis. This technical note describes a new arthroscopic technique to centralize and stabilize the mid body of the lateral meniscus to restore and maintain the lateral meniscus function by repairing/preventing extrusion of the meniscus. A JuggerKnot Soft Anchor (Biomet, Warsaw, IN), loaded with a MaxBraid suture (Biomet), was placed on the lateral edge of the lateral tibial plateau, just anterior to the popliteal hiatus, through a midlateral portal. A Micro Suture Lasso Small Curve with Nitinol Wire Loop (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to pass 2 limbs of the MaxBraid suture through the meniscus at the margin between the meniscus and the capsule. Another anchor was inserted on the lateral edge of the lateral tibial plateau, 1 cm anterior to the first anchor, and the same procedure was repeated. The sutures were then tied by use of a self-locking sliding knot, achieving centralization and secure stabilization of the lateral meniscus. PMID:23766997

  8. Arthroscopic centralization of an extruded lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hideyuki; Muneta, Takeshi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Horie, Masafumi; Nakamura, Tomomasa; Okawa, Atsushi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    Extrusion of the lateral meniscus has been reported after posterior root tear or radial tear, partial meniscectomy, and meniscoplasty of discoid meniscus. It has also been shown to be associated with the development of osteoarthritis. This technical note describes a new arthroscopic technique to centralize and stabilize the mid body of the lateral meniscus to restore and maintain the lateral meniscus function by repairing/preventing extrusion of the meniscus. A JuggerKnot Soft Anchor (Biomet, Warsaw, IN), loaded with a MaxBraid suture (Biomet), was placed on the lateral edge of the lateral tibial plateau, just anterior to the popliteal hiatus, through a midlateral portal. A Micro Suture Lasso Small Curve with Nitinol Wire Loop (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to pass 2 limbs of the MaxBraid suture through the meniscus at the margin between the meniscus and the capsule. Another anchor was inserted on the lateral edge of the lateral tibial plateau, 1 cm anterior to the first anchor, and the same procedure was repeated. The sutures were then tied by use of a self-locking sliding knot, achieving centralization and secure stabilization of the lateral meniscus. PMID:23766997

  9. The arthroscopic anatomy of symptomatic meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Dandy, D J

    1990-07-01

    The anatomy of 1000 symptomatic meniscus lesions is described and related to the age of the patients. All symptomatic lesions found during the study period were treated by arthroscopic surgery. Meniscal lesions were commoner in the right knee (56.5%) and 81% of the patients were men. Of the medial meniscus tears, 75% were vertical and 23% horizontal. Vertical tears of the medial meniscus occurred most often in the fourth decade and horizontal tears in the fifth. There were 22% type I, 37% type II and 31% type III vertical tears; 62% of type I tears and 23% of type II tears had locked fragments. Superior flaps were six times more common than inferior flaps. Of all medial meniscus fragments, 6% were inverted; 51% of these were flaps and the rest ruptured bucket-handle fragments. Of the lateral meniscus lesions 54% were vertical tears, 15% oblique, 15% myxoid, 4% were inverted and 5% were lesions of discoid menisci. The commonest pattern of tear in the lateral compartment (27%) was a vertical tear involving half the length and half the width of the meniscus. PMID:2380218

  10. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  11. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. PMID:27599433

  12. Arthroscopic Saucerization and Repair of Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tear.

    PubMed

    Fields, Logan K; Caldwell, Paul E

    2015-04-01

    Meniscal tears are among the most commonly diagnosed knee injuries and often require surgical intervention. Understanding the types of meniscal tears and treatment options is paramount to caring for the young athlete. Sports medicine and arthroscopic physicians now recognize that meniscal preservation in the young athlete is essential to the long-term health and function of the knee. Although uncommon, the discoid lateral meniscus is more prone to injury because of its increased thickness and lack of blood supply. Because of the abnormal development, the peripheral attachments are frequently absent and instability often persists after a partial meniscectomy. If the instability is unrecognized during the initial treatment, a recurrence of pain and mechanical symptoms is likely and a subsequent subtotal meniscectomy may be the only treatment option. With increased awareness, arthroscopic saucerization accompanied by arthroscopically assisted inside-out meniscal repair is a preferable treatment option with an excellent outcome. PMID:26052498

  13. Arthroscopic Saucerization and Repair of Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tear

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Logan K.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are among the most commonly diagnosed knee injuries and often require surgical intervention. Understanding the types of meniscal tears and treatment options is paramount to caring for the young athlete. Sports medicine and arthroscopic physicians now recognize that meniscal preservation in the young athlete is essential to the long-term health and function of the knee. Although uncommon, the discoid lateral meniscus is more prone to injury because of its increased thickness and lack of blood supply. Because of the abnormal development, the peripheral attachments are frequently absent and instability often persists after a partial meniscectomy. If the instability is unrecognized during the initial treatment, a recurrence of pain and mechanical symptoms is likely and a subsequent subtotal meniscectomy may be the only treatment option. With increased awareness, arthroscopic saucerization accompanied by arthroscopically assisted inside-out meniscal repair is a preferable treatment option with an excellent outcome. PMID:26052498

  14. Arthroscopic Debridement of Pediatric Accessory Anterolateral Talar Facet Causing Impingement.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Julie A; Mannava, Sandeep; Gross, Christopher E; Wooster, Benjamin M; Busch, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Symptomatic subfibular and/or lateral talocalcaneal impingement in pediatric patients may result from an accessory anterolateral talar facet (AALTF). This impingement may cause pain and disability and may limit athletic performance in high-level athletes. We report the case of a 12-year-old female competitive gymnast who had refractory, lateral-sided right ankle pain for 4 months and underwent right ankle arthroscopic resection of the AALTF causing impingement. Standard medial and anterolateral portals with the addition of an accessory anterolateral-distal portal were used in conjunction with a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope. The AALTF was resected with a combination of a shaver and a motorized rasp. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to verify successful debridement of the bony facet. This case illustrates that arthroscopic debridement is a technique to treat subfibular and/or talocalcaneal impingement associated with an AALTF. PMID:27462543

  15. Arthroscopic management of tibial plateau fractures: special techniques.

    PubMed

    Perez Carro, L

    1997-04-01

    Arthroscopic assessment and treatment of tibial plateau fractures has gained popularity in recent years. This article describes some maneuvers to facilitate the management of these fractures with the arthroscope. We use a 14-mm rounded curved periosteal elevator to manipulate fragments within the joint instead of using a probe. To facilitate visualization of fractures, we describe the use of loop sutures around the meniscus to retract the meniscus when there is a tear in the meniscus. We suggest the use of the arthroscope for directly viewing the interosseous space to be sure that any internal fixation devices remain outside the articular space. The use of these tactics will allow a faster, more accurate reduction with less radiation exposure in patients with displaced tibial plateau fractures. PMID:9127091

  16. Arthroscopic Resection of Wrist Ganglion Arising from the Lunotriquetral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Michael C. K.; Ho, Pak-cheong; Tse, W. L.; Wong, Clara W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal wrist ganglion is the most common wrist mass, and previous studies have shown that it arises from the scapholunate interval in the vast majority of cases. Treatment has traditionally been open excision, and more recently arthroscopic resection has been established as an effective and less invasive treatment method. However, application of this technique to ganglia in atypical locations has not been reported, where open excision is the usual practice. This report describes two cases of atypical dorsal wrist ganglia that arose from the lunotriquetral (LT) joint, demonstrated by arthroscopic visualization and wrist arthrogram in one of them. Arthroscopic resection was performed, and the application of this technique to a dorsal wrist ganglion with an atypical origin and location is described. PMID:24436842

  17. Increased Post-Operative Stiffness after Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Brian C.; Pehlivan, Hakan C.; Hart, Joseph M.; Carson, Eric W.; Diduch, David R.; Miller, Mark D.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Biceps tenodesis can be performed open or arthroscopically and can be positioned in a suprapectoral or subpectoral position. Suprapectoral tenodesis can be carried out arthroscopically, whereas the subpectoral tenodesis is performed as an open procedure. The goal of this study is to compare the incidence of postoperative stiffness between arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis and evaluate risk factors for its occurrence. Methods: Study Design: The charts of all patients who underwent arthroscopic or open biceps tenodesis who were a minimum of two years post-procedure were reviewed. Patients with preoperative frozen shoulder, prior shoulder surgery, or massive rotator cuff tears which required longer post-operative immobilization were excluded. Post-operative stiffness was defined as persistent range of motion deficit (<100oof forward flexion and abduction; <40o of internal or external rotation) and pain resulting in a diagnosis of post-operative frozen shoulder and requiring either an injection, lysis of adhesions/manipulation, or both. Analysis: Means were calculated for continuous variables and compared using Students t test. Frequencies for categorical variables were compared using chi square tests. Results: We identified 249 consecutive biceps tenodeses from 2008-11 (106 arthroscopic, 143 open) that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. A significantly increased incidence of post-operative stiffness was found in the arthroscopic tenodesis cohort as compared to the open cohort (17.9% vs. 5.6%, p=0.002). The groups were otherwise well matched. (Table I). Further analysis was performed comparing patients with and without post-operative stiffness within the arthroscopic cohort. (Table II) Female gender (63.2% vs 33.3%, p = 0.016) and smoking (36.8% vs 16.1%, p = 0.040) were independent risk factors for post-operative stiffness after arthroscopic tenodesis. Location of the tenodesis from the top of the humeral head as measured

  18. Arthroscopic Correction of a Supracondylar Malunion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Steven M.; Sakamoto, Sara; Abernathie, Brenon L.; Hausman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Malunions are a well-recognized complication of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. Results of corrective osteotomies vary, and complication rates have been reported to be as high as 40%. Considering the high rate of complications for malunion correction, we investigated the feasibility of arthroscopy. We present a technique for arthroscopic supracondylar osteotomy and percutaneous pinning. There are many advantages of an arthroscopic approach to malunion correction, including extension-type deformity correction, safe access to the anterior humerus, and minimal dissection and scarring; any intracapsular contracture can be addressed as well. Elbow arthroscopy appears to be a viable option in the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:26258033

  19. Arthroscopic capsular release of flexion contractures (arthrofibrosis) of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Savoie, F H

    1993-01-01

    Twelve patients with flexion contractures of the elbow were managed by arthroscopic release of the proximal capsule and debridement of the olecranon fossa. Postoperatively the mean flexion contracture improved from 38 to 3 degrees with supination improving from 45 to 84 degrees and pronation improving from 80 to 88 degrees. All patients reported a decrease in pain level as well as improvement in motion. There was one severe complication in this series, in which a patient sustained a permanent posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Arthroscopic limited capsular release appears to be satisfactory management modality for flexion contracture of the elbow. PMID:8323612

  20. CO2 laser arthroscopy-through the arthroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick, James G.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedists have been among the last of the specialists to utilize lasers in surgery. Even today, laser usage in orthopedics is almost exclusively limited to arthroscopy procedures. Although other types of lasers have been approved for use in orthopedics, nearly all laser-assisted arthroscopic procedures have involved the carbon dioxide laser in the knee. These techniques involve skills and problems not previously encountered. In an attempt to simplify the usage and circumvent some of the problems, we describe a means of laser energy delivery through the arthroscope.

  1. Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques for the Management of Proximal Biceps Injuries.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Holzgrefe, Russell E; Brockmeier, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Current arthroscopic surgical techniques for the management of proximal biceps tendon disorders encompass 3 commonly advocated procedures: proximal biceps anchor reattachment (superior labrum anterior to posterior or SLAP repair), biceps tenotomy, and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis. The indications for each procedure vary based on injury pattern, symptomatic presentation, concomitant pathologic abnormality, and most notably, patient factors, such as age, functional demand, and specific sport or activity participation. Outcomes after SLAP repair are generally favorable, although recent studies have found biceps tenodesis to be the preferred treatment for certain patient populations. PMID:26614472

  2. Arthroscopic management of the arthritic elbow: indications, technique, and results.

    PubMed

    Savoie, F H; Nunley, P D; Field, L D

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with painful restricted motion of the elbow joint because of an arthritic process were treated with an arthroscopic modification of the open Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure. Average preoperative flexion was to 90 degrees (range 60 degrees to 140 degrees), and average extension loss was -40 degrees (range -5 degrees to -60 degrees). The average total arc of motion was 50 degrees. The procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement, partial resection of the coronoid and olecranon processes, and fenestration of the olecranon fossa. The radial head was excised arthroscopically in 18 of the 24 patients. All patients were reexamined 24 to 60 months after operation (mean 32 months). All patients had a significant decrease in pain as described by a visual analog scale (preoperative 8.2; postoperative 2.2). Average flexion was to 139 degrees (range 95 degrees to 145 degrees), and average extension loss was -8 degrees (range 0 degree to 15 degrees). The average arc of motion was 131 degrees, an improvement of 81 degrees. Arthroscopic ulnohumeral arthroplasty provides satisfactory results in terms of pain control and improved motion. The complication rate is comparable to those reported in series of open ulnohumeral arthroplasties. This procedure seems to be a valuable adjunct in the management of the arthritic elbow, serving as an intermediate step between nonoperative management and elbow replacement surgery. PMID:10389075

  3. Plate presetting arthroscopic reduction technique for the distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukio; Tsubone, Tetsu; Tominaga, Yasuhiro

    2008-09-01

    Wrist arthroscopy for the distal radius fractures is an effective adjunct to evaluate the reduction of intraarticular fragments and soft tissue injuries. In recent years, volar locking plate fixation has become popular, and arthroscopic procedures for distal radius fracture reduction have become problematic because vertical traction has to be both on and off during surgery. We developed a plate presetting arthroscopic reduction technique to simplify the combination of plating and arthroscopy. The fracture was reduced, and anatomic alignment was regained under an image intensifier, and then the volar locking plate was preset. Wrist arthroscopy was introduced under vertical traction, and the intraarticular condition was assessed. If dislocations of the intraarticular fragments were residual, they were reduced arthroscopically, and soft tissue injuries were treated subsequently. Finally, the traction was removed, and the plate was securely fixed. Since May 2005, the authors have used this technique in more than 50 patients. This article will review the history, indications, contraindications, technique, rehabilitation, and complications for the plate presetting arthroscopic reduction technique for distal radius fractures. PMID:18776773

  4. Arthroscopic resection of the dorsal ganglia of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Bienz, T; Raphael, J S

    1999-08-01

    Arthroscopic ganglion resection provides a means by which dorsal wrist ganglia may be safely resected while avoiding the requisite scar accompanying open resection. Use of the arthroscope provides a much more complete examination of the wrist, allowing assessment of the cause of the ganglion as well as associated intra-articular problems. In a previous pilot study, 50% of patients demonstrated visible intra-articular abnormalities, including SL ligament laxity and perforations, TFCC tears, or chondral degeneration at the radial and triquetral-hamate joints. Use of the shaver within the joint allows the surgeon to directly address the ganglion's site of capsular origin, ensuring that the "one-way valve" mechanism is resected. The authors' initial experience was that the recurrence rate after arthroscopic resection was equal to or lower than after open resection. There is now some suggestion that resection of only the ganglion stalk, without removal of the sac, is feasible, but may yield slightly higher recurrence rates than formal open resection of the sac and stalk. This may be attributed to cases in which the capsular attachment to the SL ligament is debrided without identification and removal of a true stalk. The recurrence rate of a ganglion that has previously recurred also appears to be higher than that of primary resection. The authors look forward to publishing their completed results of an on-going follow-up study comparing open, arthroscopic, and recurrent ganglion resections. PMID:10451818

  5. Editorial Commentary: Open Versus Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis--You Choose.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    In a Level IV evidence systematic review of 16 studies comparing arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis, both techniques showed good or excellent short-term subjective and objective clinical outcomes in 98% of subjects. Ultimately, technique selection may be based on surgeon preference. In open tenodesis, one should avoid vigorous medial retraction to mitigate the risk of nerve injury. PMID:26814399

  6. [Diagnostic arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery: experiences with 500 knee arthroscopies].

    PubMed

    Glinz, W

    1979-05-01

    A diagnosis by clinical examination and arthrography was not possible in 160 out of 500 arthroscopically examined patients, most of them with post-traumatic knee disorders. In 157 cases the clinical diagnosis was wrong, and in another 58 cases incomplete. Only in 89 patients (18%) arthroscopy proved the clinical diagnosis to be correct. At arthroscopy, a meniscal injury was found in 156 patients (medial meniscus 57, lateral meniscus 64, both menisci 8). With regard to the menisci a previous arthrography was found correct only in 103 out of 213 cases, i.e. in 48%. Lesions of the articular cartilage were present in 210 patients, although they were expected clinically in only one third of these cases. Normal intraarticular structures were found in 95 examinations. The arthroscopic examination was insufficient three times because of a protruding fat pad, and wrong in 2 patients in whom an arthroscopically diagnosed meniscal tear could not be found at arthrotomy. The morbidity of arthroscopy is small. Only complications: A local allergic reaction because of a wound spray in four cases, bronchial asthma following general anesthesia in two patients. No infection occurred. Several therapeutic procedures may be carried out through the arthroscope. So loose bodies were removed from the joint in 39 and partial meniscectomy performed in 13 patients, all of them being treated as out-patients. PMID:468577

  7. Avoiding Complications and Technical Variability During Arthroscopically Assisted Transtibial ACL Reconstructions by Using a C-Arm With Image Intensifier

    PubMed Central

    Trentacosta, Natasha; Fillar, Allison Liefeld; Liefeld, Cynthia Pierce; Hossack, Michael D.; Levy, I. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be complicated by incorrect and variable tunnel placement, graft tunnel mismatch, cortical breaches, and inadequate fixation due to screw divergence. This is the first report describing the use of a C-arm with image intensifier employed for the sole purpose of eliminating those complications during transtibial ACL reconstruction. Purpose: To determine if the use of a C-arm with image intensifier during arthroscopically assisted transtibial ACL reconstruction (IIAA-TACLR) eliminated common complications associated with bone–patellar tendon–bone ACL reconstruction, including screw divergence, cortical breaches, graft-tunnel mismatch, and improper positioning of the femoral and tibial tunnels. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 110 consecutive patients (112 reconstructed knees) underwent identical IIAA-TACLR using a bone–patellar tendon–bone autograft performed by a single surgeon. Intra- and postoperative radiographic images and operative reports were evaluated for each patient looking for evidence of cortical breeching and screw divergence. Precision of femoral tunnel placement was evaluated using a sector map modified from Bernard et al. Graft recession distance and tibial α angles were recorded. Results: There were no femoral or tibial cortical breaches noted intraoperatively or on postoperative images. There were no instances of loss of fixation screw major thread engagement. There were no instances of graft-tunnel mismatch. The positions of the femoral tunnels were accurate and precise, falling into the desired sector of our location map (sector 1). Tibial α angles and graft recession distances varied widely. Conclusion: The use of the C-arm with image intensifier enabled accurate and precise tunnel placement and completely eliminated cortical breach, graft-tunnel mismatch, and screw divergence during IIAA-TACLR by allowing incremental

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries and results.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Gordon W; Bowen, Mark K

    2003-04-01

    Injuries and conditions that affect the AC joint are common. Low-grade separations, degenerative conditions, and osteolysis of the distal clavicle are frequently dealt with by the treating physician. Proper assessment requires a thorough history, examination, and radiologic work-up. An injection of bupivicaine into the AC joint can be a very useful test to evaluate the source of pain about the symptomatic shoulder. Most conditions affecting the AC joint can be treated conservatively, but patients who do not respond to these treatments or athletes who do not wish to modify their activities may require resection of the distal clavicle and the AC joint. Operative intervention can be performed as an open procedure with good results. Recent advances in operative arthroscopic procedures allow us to replicate and exceed the results of the open resection. Arthroscopic resection can be undertaken via a direct approach that does not violate the subacromial space or via an indirect or bursal approach. The indirect approach allows you to assess both the subacromial space and the AC joint because impingement pathology and subacromial compromise are frequently associated with AC change. The advantage of an arthroscopic resection is its ability to be performed as an outpatient procedure with less compromise of musculotendinous structures, shorter rehabilitation, and quicker return to activity. The amount of bone resection necessary is less than with the open procedure because of the ability to preserve the stabilizing properties of the superior AC ligaments. Resection of 4 mm to 8 mm of bone is all that may be required to give uniformly good results. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle is technically demanding and requires skill and familiarity with other arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Complications related to this procedure are relatively infrequent and include infection, residual pain, lack of adequate bone resection, and instability, particularly in patients with

  9. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  10. Tibial hemimelia and femoral bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Ali Akin; Sungur, Ibrahim; Akyildiz, Mustafa Fehmi; Ercin, Ersin

    2010-02-01

    Femoral bifurcation and tibial agenesis are rare anomalies and have been described in both the Gollop-Wolfgang complex and tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome. This article presents a case of Gollop-Wolfgang complex without hand ectrodactyly. Tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome and Gollop-Wolfgang complex are variants of tibial field defect, which includes distal femoral duplication, tibial aplasia, oligo-ectrodactylous toe defects, and preaxial polydactyly, occasionally associated with hand ectrodactyly.This article describes the case of a patient with bilateral tibial hemimelia and left femoral bifurcation. The proximal tibial anlage had not been identified in the patient's left leg. After failed fibular transfer procedure, the knee was disarticulated. The other leg was treated with tibiofibular synostosis and centralization of fibula to os calcis. At 7-year follow-up, the patient ambulates with an above-knee prosthesis and uses an orthopedic boot for ankle stability.In patients with a congenital absence of the tibia, accurate diagnosis is of the utmost importance in planning future treatment. In the absence of proximal tibial anlage, especially in patients with femoral bifurcation, the knee should be disarticulated. Tibiofibular synostosis is a good choice in the presence of a proximal tibial anlage and good quadriceps function. PMID:20192156

  11. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  12. Functional outcome after open and arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Materials and methods In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Results Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occured earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20° or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. Conclusion In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations. PMID:19258206

  13. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  14. Technical tips for (dry) arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Del Piñal, Francisco

    2011-10-01

    Contrary to general belief, arthroscopic assisted reduction in distal radius fractures can be done in an expeditious manner and with minimal consumption of operating room resources. This article presents the steps for a pleasant arthroscopic experience in detail. The technique proposed combines the benefits of rigid fixation with volar locking plates (for the extra-articular component) and arthroscopic control of the reduction (for the articular component). It is important that the operation be carried out using the dry arthroscopic technique. However, arthroscopy is just an addition to conventional methods. Thorough knowledge of and facility with classic techniques of distal radius fracture treatment is essential for a good result. PMID:21971058

  15. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  16. A case of delayed recurrent hemarthrosis after posterolateral reconstruction of the knee with a staple fixation at the lateral femoral epicondyle.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Yi, Seung Rim; Huh, Jung Kyu

    2008-11-01

    We present a case of delayed recurrent hemarthrosis after posterolateral reconstruction of the knee with staple fixation of the tendon graft at the lateral femoral condyle. A 20-year-old man had undergone a reconstructive surgery of the knee with allogeneic Achilles tendon aimed to reinforce lateral collateral ligament and popliteofibular ligament. At 4 months after surgery, recurrent swelling of the operated knee after minor exertion developed. The radiographs showed prominent staples at the lateral side of lateral femoral condyle. The arthroscopy revealed that the staples were salient intra-articularly at lateral gutter of the knee, and the adjacent lateral capsule seemed abraded, through which the longitudinal fibers of iliotibial band were seen. Iatrogenic iliotibial band syndrome owing to the prominent staple was speculated. The staples were removed under arthroscopic guidance, and there has been no recurrence thereafter. A staple fixation over bony prominence is not advisable and the interference screw might be a better alternative method of fixation. PMID:18365223

  17. Evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Carlos; Maia, Lucas Russo; Fonseca, Juliano Rocha; Zabeu, José Luís Amim; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide data for the analysis of arthroscopy as a method of surgical treatment for shoulder and discuss its actual indications and preliminary results. METHODS: We evaluated 15 patients submitted to reverse Bankart arthroscopic surgery. We used the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score to measure the results before surgery and 12 months thereafter. RESULTS: The average UCLA score changed from 26.67±0.25 (SD 0.97) before surgery to 34.20±0.53 (SD 2.04) after surgery. The effectiveness of surgery was 93%. In five cases loose bodies were found. A patient undergoing remplissage was evaluated separately. The data did not change after 24 months post-surgery. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability and posterior dislocation of the shoulder has been proved feasible and results in our series followed the same trends as in the literature. Level of Evidence III, Transversal Retrospective Study. PMID:26207089

  18. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  19. Arthroscopic management of the contact athlete with instability.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Romeo, Anthony A

    2013-10-01

    The shoulder is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body, with a greater incidence of instability in contact and collision athletes. In contact and collision athletes that have failed nonoperative treatment, the most important factors to consider when planning surgery are amount of bone loss (glenoid, humeral head); patient age; and shoulder hyperlaxity. Clinical outcomes, instability recurrence rate, and return to sport rate are not significantly different between arthroscopic suture anchor and open techniques. Lateral decubitus positioning with distraction and four portal (including seven-degree and 5-o’clock positions) techniques allow for 360-degree access to the glenoid rim, with placement of at least three sutures anchors below 3 o’clock for optimal results. In patients with significant glenoid bone loss (>20%-25%, inverted pear glenoid), open bone augmentation techniques are indicated and arthroscopic techniques are contraindicated. PMID:24079430

  20. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Debridement for Hip Dysplasia--The More Things Change, the More Things Stay the Same.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Klaud

    2016-02-01

    A systematic review of arthroscopic debridement versus open osteotomy for acetabular dysplasia documented essentially equivalent results; however, with much shorter follow-up and many fewer cases in the arthroscopic series. PMID:26814400

  1. Conservative femoral stem revision: avoiding therapeutic escalation.

    PubMed

    Pinaroli, Alban; Lavoie, Frédéric; Cartillier, Jean-Claude; Neyret, Philippe; Selmi, Tarik Ait Si

    2009-04-01

    A conservative approach to femoral revision is assessed. We report on 41 femoral revisions using an extensively coated hydroxyapatite primary femoral stem. Clinical, operative, and radiological data were gathered. Harris hip scores increased from 65/100 to 90/100 at the minimal follow-up of 1 year (P < .05). All stems showed signs of osseous integration. No significant migration was measured. No patient had to be reoperated because of problems related to the stem. Good results are reported for femoral revision with Paprosky type I and II bone defects with no significant difference between the 2 subgroups, hereby proving that conservative femoral revision is a reasonable treatment alternative. Reproducible results with such a technique may bring surgeons to be more aggressive when noticing early signs of femoral loosening. PMID:18534426

  2. Arthroscopic Treatment of Perilunate Dislocations and Fracture Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Pil; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Min Jong

    2015-01-01

    Background The key to a successful result in the treatment of perilunate dislocations (PLDs) and fracture-dislocations (PLFDs) is the restoration of normal alignment of the carpal bones, followed by stable maintenance until healing. This article aimed to assess whether arthroscopic techniques are a reliable surgical option for the treatment of this challenging injury. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with an acute PLD or PLFD were treated by an arthroscopic technique. They were retrospectively reviewed at an average follow-up of 31.2 months (range 18–61 months). Functional outcomes were assessed with the Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score as well as radiographic evaluations. Description of Technique Arthroscopic reduction and percutaneous fixation was performed to the scapholunate and lunotriquetral intervals using Kirschner wires (K-wires) as joysticks as well as to the scaphoid using a cannulated headless screw for transscaphoid-type injuries. The K-wires were removed at 10 weeks postoperation. Results Overall functional outcomes according to the MMWS were rated as excellent in three patients, good in eight, fair in seven, and poor in two. The mean DASH score was 18, and the mean PRWE score was 30. On the basis of radiographic parameters, reduction obtained at the operation was maintained within normal ranges in 15 patients. No patient had developed arthritis by the last follow-up. Conclusions The medium-term results show that arthroscopic treatment can provide proper restoration and stable fixation of carpal alignment and results in satisfactory functional and radiologic outcomes for acute perilunate injuries. Level of Evidence Level IV. PMID:25945291

  3. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus. PMID:26697294

  4. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus. PMID:26697294

  5. Arthroscopic Lysis of Arthrofibrosis of the Fifth Tarsometatarsal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Loss of motion of the fifth tarsometatarsal joint can be a cause of lateral foot pain after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation or fracture of the fifth metatarsal tubercle. Arthroscopic lysis of the joint can be an effective surgical treatment with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue trauma and early vigorous mobilization of the joint. The lysis can be extended to the fourth tarsometatarsal joint and the adjacent tendons if indicated. PMID:26870650

  6. SLAP repair with arthroscopic decompression of spinoglenoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A spinoglenoid cyst with suprascapular nerve disorders is highly associated with superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion. Conservative or surgical treatment is applied to relieve pain and neurological symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst. Methods: The subjects of this study were six patients with SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst who underwent arthroscopic surgery. There was one female and five males with a mean age of 48.5 years. SLAP lesion was found in all the patients at arthroscopy. A small tear of the rotator cuff was found in the two patients. The SLAP lesion was repaired using suture anchors, and the rotator cuff tears were repaired by suture-bridge fixation. The spinoglenoid cyst was decompressed through the torn labrum in three patients, and through the released superior to posterior portion of the capsule in the other three patients. Results: All patients showed excellent improvement in pain and muscle strength at the final follow-up examination. The mean Constant score was improved from 60.5 points preoperatively to 97.2 points postoperatively. The mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 4.5 on the day of the surgery to 2.5 within one week postoperatively. Postoperative MRI showed disappearance or reduction of the spinoglenoid cyst in four and two patients, respectively. There were no complications from the surgical intervention and in the postoperative period. Discussion: The patients treated by decompression through the released capsule obtained pain relief at an early period after the surgery. Arthroscopic treatment for a spinoglenoid cyst can provide a satisfactory clinical outcome. Arthroscopic decompression of a spinoglenoid cyst through the released capsule is recommended for a safe and reliable procedure for patients with suprascapular nerve disorders. PMID:27163090

  7. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  8. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Lafosse, Laurent; Baier, Gloria P; Leuzinger, Jan

    2005-08-01

    This article presents an all-arthroscopic technique for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction by ligamentoplasty after acute or chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. A coracoacromial ligament transfer is done to reconstruct the torn coracoclavicular ligaments, similar to open surgery. The coracoacromial ligament is dissected from the undersurface of the acromion and is reinserted on the inferior clavicle by transosseous suture fixation. Additional wire or screw stabilization may be used. With this method, we achieve a very satisfactory reduction of the dislocated acromioclavicular joint. PMID:16086572

  10. Arthroscopic all-inside lateral meniscus suture using posterolateral portal.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Oh, Irvin

    2006-05-01

    A new arthroscopic all-inside suture for lateral meniscus posterior horn tear using a single posterolateral portal is described. A lateral meniscus posterior horn peripheral longitudinal tear is often seen with anterior cruciate ligament injury or discoid lateral meniscus tear. Conventional repair methods, such as arthroscopic inside-out, outside-in, or all-inside sutures, can be cumbersome and technically demanding. Our all-inside suture using the posterolateral portal allows thorough visualization of the posterolateral structures, excellent coaptation of torn meniscus, strong knot tightening, and avoidance of inadvertent cartilage injury. The arthroscope is inserted through the anteromedial portal and reaches the posterolateral compartment by a transcondylar approach. A suture hook is introduced into the posterolateral portal without a cannula, penetrates posterior peripheral rim, crosses the tear, and passes through mobile torn fragment. A large amount of No. 0 PDS is passed, so that it curls up inside the joint. After the suture hook is removed, a suture retriever is inserted through the posterolateral portal to pull out 2 ends of the PDS at the same time. The retrieved suture ends are passed through a knot pusher and a 5.5-mm cannula is introduced over the retrieved suture materials for the SMC knot to be tied. A longitudinal tear of lateral meniscus posterior horn is repaired with 2 to 3 sutures. PMID:16651176

  11. Arthroscopic Reduction and Stabilization of Chronic Perilunate Wrist Dislocations.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2016-04-01

    An acute perilunate wrist injury that is unreduced for more than 6 weeks results in severe disability, and even open reduction with stabilization through wide dorsal and volar approaches is technically challenging. This report describes an arthroscopic technique for reduction and percutaneous wire stabilization of a chronic perilunate wrist dislocations. The technique involves initial radiocarpal and midcarpal access through the 6R and 3-4 portals, and these portals are used for synovectomy and debridement of capsular flap tears. The midcarpal joint is accessed initially through the radiocarpal joint, and additional midcarpal portals are used for sequential perilunate adhesiolysis before carpal mobilization and reduction. A percutaneous wire drilled into the lunate is used as a joystick to manipulate the lunate into its anatomic alignment along the carpal bones, and percutaneous transcarpal wire fixation is performed to stabilize the carpus. Arthroscopic and fluoroscopic guidance is used to optimize anatomic reduction and to confirm stability. The wrist is immobilized for 6 weeks; the percutaneous wires are removed thereafter, and the wrist is mobilized. Overall, the arthroscopic technique provides a safe and reproducible method for treatment of this complex chronic injury. PMID:27354948

  12. Simplified arthroscopic rotator interval capsule closure: an alternative technique.

    PubMed

    Lewicky, Yuri M; Lewicky, Roman T

    2005-10-01

    The anatomy of the "coracoid eclipse" of the rotator cuff, the rotator interval, has been studied extensively. Its importance in shoulder stability with respect to inferior and posterior translation has been described. Historically, open repairs for instability indirectly addressed interval lesions and closure based simply on the definition of the deltopectoral approach with its subscapularis advancement and capsular shift in a "pants-over-vest" manner. With results of arthroscopic repairs of glenohumeral instability approaching those of open procedures, the importance of simplification without sacrificing outcome has become a forefront in arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We present an alternative technique for interval closure by means of a 3/32-inch smooth Steinmann pin modified at its proximal and distal ends. A standard 3-portal technique consisting of the anterior superior portal, anterior mid-glenoid portal, and the posterior superior portal is used. The technique does not require the use of a suture shuttle nor does it require the placement of the arthroscope in the subacromial space for suture tying. A Tennessee slider knot is tied intra-articularly, thus allowing for tension modification before definitive alternate locking half-hitch placement. Intra-articular knot tying also allows for added security because suture slack is eliminated, thus avoiding air knots. PMID:16226667

  13. Arthroscopic Removal of Shotgun Pellet From Within the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Tonnos, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic techniques are effective for the removal of intra-articular bullet and metal fragments after gunshot wounds to the shoulder, hip, knee, and sacroiliac joints. Surgical removal of bullets retained within the synovial joints is indicated; lead is dissolved by synovial fluid over time, leading to proliferative synovitis, lead arthropathy, elevated serum lead levels, and lead toxicity. We present an arthroscopic technique for removal of a shotgun pellet retained within the medial meniscus. In this technique, diagnostic knee arthroscopy is initially performed, which allows for localization of the pellet within the medial meniscus. An up-biter is used to resect the inner rim of meniscus surrounding the pellet, and the pellet is removed with a grasper. This arthroscopic approach is advantageous because it allows for efficient visualization of the pellet within the meniscus, thorough visualization of all compartments of the knee, a reduction in blood loss, and a decrease in surgical morbidity to the surrounding cartilaginous, neurovascular, and soft-tissue structures. This technique may therefore be one option to address bullet fragments or shotgun pellets that are retained within the medial meniscus. PMID:27073774

  14. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of a displaced tibial eminence fracture.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Ronald A; Murphy, Kevin P; Machen, M Shaun; Kuklo, Timothy R

    2003-02-01

    This study describes a new arthroscopic method using a whip-stitch technique for treating a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture. A 12-year-old girl who sustained a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture was treated with arthroscopic fixation using the Arthrosew disposable suture device (Surgical Dynamics, Norwalk, CT) to place a whip stitch into the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The Arthrex ACL guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to reduce the avulsed tibial spine fragment. Sutures were then passed through the tibial tunnel and secured over a bony bridge with the knee in 20 degrees of flexion. At 9 months, the patient has a full range of motion with normal Lachman and anterior drawer testing, and she has returned to competitive basketball. Radiographs show complete fracture healing. KT-1000 and isokinetic testing at 9-month follow-up show only minimal side-to-side differences. The Arthrosew device provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the ACL, thus obviating arthrotomy and hardware placement. This technique also restores the proper length and tension to the ACL, and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treatment for this injury. PMID:12579135

  15. Use of an Irrigation Pump System in Arthroscopic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mark S; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Sieg, Ryan N; Owens, Brett D; Herzog, Joshua P

    2016-05-01

    Since its inception, arthroscopic surgery has become widely adopted among orthopedic surgeons. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the basic principles of arthroscopy. Compared with open techniques, arthroscopic procedures are associated with smaller incisions, less structural damage, improved intra-articular visualization, less pain in the immediate postoperative period, and faster recovery for patients. Pump systems used for arthroscopic surgery have evolved over the years to provide improved intraoperative visualization. Gravity flow systems were described first and are still commonly used today. More recently, automated pump systems with pressure or dual pressure and volume control have been developed. The advantages of automated irrigation systems over gravity irrigation include a more consistent flow, a greater degree of joint distention, improved visualization especially with motorized instrumentation, decreased need for tourniquet use, a tamponade effect on bleeding, and decreased operative time. Disadvantages include the need for additional equipment with increased cost and maintenance, the initial learning curve for the surgical team, and increased risk of extra-articular fluid dissection and associated complications such as compartment syndrome. As image quality and pump systems improve, so does the list of indications including diagnostic and treatment modalities to address intra-articular pathology of the knee, shoulder, hip, wrist, elbow, and ankle joints. This article reviews the current literature and presents the history of arthroscopy, basic science of pressure and flow, types of irrigation pumps and their functions, settings, applications, and complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e474-e478.]. PMID:27135450

  16. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears. PMID:26761928

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. Results: In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function. PMID:27022591

  18. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone

    PubMed Central

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications. PMID:26697314

  19. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone.

    PubMed

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications. PMID:26697314

  20. Arthroscopically assisted treatment of intraosseous ganglions of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Turner, Perry C; Ashwood, Neil

    2008-12-01

    Intraosseous ganglia (IOGs) of the lunate are a relatively rare, but by no means insignificant, condition because treatment by traditional open curettage and bone grafting can lead to ongoing pain and stiffness of the wrist.An arthroscopically assisted minimally invasive technique of debridement and grafting of the lunate IOG is discussed, as well as the history of the condition, indications and contraindications, surgical technique with postoperative rehabilitation, and potential complications.The outcomes of 8 patients with persistent symptoms and typical radiographic and bone scan findings were assessed independently preoperatively and postoperatively by using a modified Green and O'Brien wrist score. The intraosseous cyst was drilled under arthroscopic and fluoroscopic guidance via either a volar or dorsal portal, depending on the position identified on the computed tomography scan. Average follow-up time was 3.8 years (range, 1-5.6 yrs). All patients returned to employment within 4 months. Wrist scores improved 34 points, from 51 to 85 points, by 1 year after surgery, with trabeculation being noted within the grafting lunate. The greatest improvements were seen in visual and analog pain scores, reducing from 68.3 to 11.2, and flexion-extension arcs, which increased from 98 to 114 degrees.The technique of arthroscopically assisted debridement of IOGs of the lunate is safe, with minimal morbidity and recurrence of symptoms during the follow-up period. PMID:19060679

  1. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video. PMID:26697301

  2. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video. PMID:26697301

  3. Osteoarthritis Classification Scales: Interobserver Reliability and Arthroscopic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rick W.; Ross, James R.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Garofoli, Elizabeth A.; Harris, David; Patel, Kushal; Pearson, David; Schutzman, Jake; Tarabichi, Majd; Ying, David; Albright, John P.; Allen, Christina R.; Amendola, Annunziato; Anderson, Allen F.; Andrish, Jack T.; Annunziata, Christopher C.; Arciero, Robert A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Baker, Champ L.; Bartolozzi, Arthur R.; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bechler, Jeffery R.; Berg, Jeffrey H.; Bernas, Geoffrey A.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.; Brophy, Robert H.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Butler V, J. Brad; Campbell, John D.; Carpenter, James E.; Cole, Brian J.; Cooper, Daniel E.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Cox, Charles L.; Creighton, R. Alexander; Dahm, Diane L.; David, Tal S.; DeBerardino, Thomas M.; Dunn, Warren R.; Flanigan, David C.; Frederick, Robert W.; Ganley, Theodore J.; Gatt, Charles J.; Gecha, Steven R.; Giffin, James Robert; Hame, Sharon L.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Harner, Christopher D.; Harris, Norman Lindsay; Hechtman, Keith S.; Hershman, Elliott B.; Hoellrich, Rudolf G.; Hosea, Timothy M.; Johnson, David C.; Johnson, Timothy S.; Jones, Morgan H.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Kamath, Ganesh V.; Klootwyk, Thomas E.; Lantz, Brett A.; Levy, Bruce A.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Maiers, G. Peter; Mann, Barton; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; Mathien, Gregory M.; McAllister, David R.; McCarty, Eric C.; McCormack, Robert G.; Miller, Bruce S.; Nissen, Carl W.; O’Neill, Daniel F.; Owens, LTC Brett D.; Parker, Richard D.; Purnell, Mark L.; Ramappa, Arun J.; Rauh, Michael A.; Rettig, Arthur; Sekiya, Jon K.; Shea, Kevin G.; Sherman, Orrin H.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spang, Jeffrey T.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Stuart, Michael J.; Svoboda, LTC Steven J.; Taft, Timothy N.; Tenuta, COL Joachim J.; Tingstad, Edwin M.; Vidal, Armando F.; Viskontas, Darius G.; White, Richard A.; Williams, James S.; Wolcott, Michelle L.; Wolf, Brian R.; York, James J.; Carey, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is commonly diagnosed and monitored with radiography. However, the reliability of radiographic classification systems for osteoarthritis and the correlation of these classifications with the actual degree of confirmed degeneration of the articular cartilage of the tibiofemoral joint have not been adequately studied. Methods: As the Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) Group, we conducted a multicenter, prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients undergoing revision surgery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We followed 632 patients who underwent radiographic evaluation of the knee (an anteroposterior weight-bearing radiograph, a posteroanterior weight-bearing radiograph made with the knee in 45° of flexion [Rosenberg radiograph], or both) and arthroscopic evaluation of the articular surfaces. Three blinded examiners independently graded radiographic findings according to six commonly used systems—the Kellgren-Lawrence, International Knee Documentation Committee, Fairbank, Brandt et al., Ahlbäck, and Jäger-Wirth classifications. Interobserver reliability was assessed with use of the intraclass correlation coefficient. The association between radiographic classification and arthroscopic findings of tibiofemoral chondral disease was assessed with use of the Spearman correlation coefficient. Results: Overall, 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had higher interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.61 to 0.65) compared with anteroposterior radiographs (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 0.56). Similarly, the 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had higher correlation with arthroscopic findings of chondral disease (Spearman rho = 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.39) compared with anteroposterior radiographs (Spearman rho = 0.29; 95

  4. Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Micro Fracture of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Begly, John P.; Ryan, Michael K.; Capogna, Brian; Youm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Objective and clinical results of microfracture for treatment of chondral defects of the knee is well documented, yet outcomes for microfracture of the hip have not been extensively studied. Recently, several studies demonstrated clinical improvements in patients treated with microfracture of the hip. The purpose of this study is to examine clinical outcomes and survivorship in patients who underwent microfracture during arthroscopic hip surgery. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database was performed. Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 41 (range, 17-64) who underwent microfracture during arthroscopic hip surgery by a single surgeon (senior author) were identified. Demographic data, diagnosis, and details regarding operative procedures were collected. All patients were indicated for hip arthroscopy based on standard pre-operative examination as well as routine and advanced imaging. Baseline pre-operative modified Harris Hip Scores (mHHS) and Non-Arthritic Hip Scores (NAHS) were compared to mHHS and NAHS at two-year follow-up. Additionally, survivorship data was assessed to determine failure, defined as any subsequent revision arthroscopic surgery and/or hip arthroplasty of the same hip. Results: Thirty-four of the 38 (89.5%) patients were available for two-year clinical follow-up. Baseline mean mHHHS and NAHS for all patients improved from 50.6 (+/- 12.7) and 46.9 (+/-12.8) to 84.7 (+/- 12.5) and 85.6 (+/- 11.2) respectively. Both improvements were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Eight patients (23.5%) met failure criteria and underwent additional surgery at an average of 23.9 months. Two patients (5.8%) underwent revision arthroscopic surgery, and six patients (17.7%) underwent hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Significant improvements in clinical outcomes are seen at two-year follow-up after microfracture treatment of chondral lesions of the hip. Despite overall success, failure rates are relatively high. As with

  5. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using the Undersurface Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rubenis, Imants; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has traditionally been performed in the subacromial space from the bursal side of the tendon. The undersurface rotator cuff repair technique involves the arthroscope remaining in the glenohumeral joint, thus viewing the tendon from its undersurface during repair without a bursectomy or acromioplasty. Purpose: To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of undersurface rotator cuff repair with bursal-side repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted on 2 cohorts of patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with knotless suture anchors configured in a single-row formation using inverted mattress–style sutures from either the bursal side (n = 100) or undersurface (n = 165) of the supraspinatus tendon. Data were collected preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. At each time point, patients completed a modified L’Insalata questionnaire to assess patient-ranked pain scores and were clinically examined using standardized tests. Ultrasound examination was performed at 6 months and 2 years to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: At 2 years postoperatively, patients in both cohorts had significantly less pain and less difficulty with overhead activities compared with preoperative levels (P < .001). The type of repair performed (bursal or undersurface) did not affect the ability to perform overhead activities at 2 years. At 2 years, both groups also had similar retear rates (21% for bursal side, 23% for undersurface). The mean operative time for the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was 32 minutes when performed from the bursal side and 20 minutes when performed from the undersurface (P < .001). Conclusion: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, whether performed from the subacromial space or glenohumeral joint, resulted in decreased levels of

  6. Inside-Out Trans-Arthroscopic Drain Application During Knee Joint Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Gian M.; Preiss, Stefan; Harder, Laurent P.; Naal, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Although knee joint arthroscopy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide, there is no consensus on how to apply a drain in the joint if it is decided to use one. Therefore we describe a simple technique to safely apply a drain intra-articularly under full arthroscopic control, avoiding placement of the drain through the arthroscopic portal. PMID:26870639

  7. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

    2014-01-01

    After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management. PMID:25035838

  8. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

    2014-07-18

    After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management. PMID:25035838

  9. [Aneurysm of the femoral and popliteal vein].

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Boris, P

    1986-04-01

    Aneurysms of the popliteal and femoral veins are rare and may be seen as casual findings with no clinical manifestations whatsoever. On the other hand they may be potential source of recurrent pulmonary embolism. A case is reported, where an aneurysm of the femoral vein was found in a clinically symptomless woman aged 48. PMID:3715020

  10. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  11. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  12. Arthroscopically Assisted Mini-Invasive Management of Perilunate Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Chen, Shan-Lin; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Shen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of perilunate dislocations and fracture-dislocations treated with arthroscopically assisted mini-invasive reduction and fixation. Methods Between June 2012 and May 2014, 24 patients who had a dorsal perilunate dislocation or fracture-dislocation were treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous fixation. The mean follow-up was 14.8 months (range 6–32 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated on the basis of range of motion; grip strength; Mayo Wrist Score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire; and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score. Radiographic evaluations included time to scaphoid union, carpal alignments, and any development of arthritis. Results The range of flexion-extension motion of the injured wrist averaged 86% of the values for the contralateral wrist. The grip strength of the injured wrist averaged 83% of the values for the contralateral wrists. The mean QuickDASH score was 6, and the mean PRWE score was 10. According to the Mayo Wrist Scores, overall functional outcomes were rated as excellent in 13 patients (54%), good in 6 (25%), fair in 4 (17%), and poor in 1 (4%). Scaphoid nonunion developed in one patient. Reduction obtained during the operation was maintained within normal ranges in all patients. Arthritis had not developed in any patient at final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopically assisted mini-invasive reduction with percutaneous fixation is a reliable and favorable alternative in the treatment of perilunate injuries according to our early follow-up results. Level of Evidence: Level IV, Therapeutic. PMID:25945293

  13. Arthroscopic technique of interposition arthroplasty of the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; du Toit, Donald F; de Beer, Joe F

    2006-05-01

    Arthroscopic glenohumeral interposition arthroplasty is performed with the patient placed in the lateral decubitus position. Standard posterior, anterior, and anterosuperior portals are created, a routine diagnostic arthroscopy is performed, and the joint is débrided with the use of an arthroscopic shaver. An arthroscopic burr is used to resect prominent osteophytes, to alter the version of the glenoid if necessary, and to create microfractures on the glenoid surface. Next, 3 absorbable sutures are passed percutaneously with a 30 degrees angled suture grasper from 3 different sites posteriorly through the posterior capsular-labral tissue and into the anterior portal cannula, where they are isolated by means of the suture saver kit. The prepared interposition membrane/tissue (GRAFTJACKET Regenerative Tissue Matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN) is tagged with the 3 sutures in the anterior cannula before it is introduced into the joint. Three additional sutures are attached to the membrane anteriorly at 1, 3, and 5 o'clock positions and are isolated with suture savers. The membrane is next introduced into the joint through the anterior cannula and is aligned with the glenoid rim. The anterior sutures are rerouted through the anterior capsular-labral tissue with a 70 degrees angled suture grasper, and they are retrieved through the anterior cannula. Intra-articular nonsliding knots are used anteriorly to anchor the interposition tissue to the anterior glenoid labrum and capsule. The posterior sutures are knotted intra-articularly, or they may be tied extra-articularly; the proximal and distal posterior sutures are retrieved subcutaneously out through the skin tract of the posterior portal and are knotted with the suture present in this portal, with the use of nonsliding knots. Stability of the interposition tissue is assessed by movement of the glenohumeral joint through its entire range of motion. The postoperative protocol consists of early

  14. The thrower's elbow: arthroscopic treatment of valgus extension overload syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Holleran, James D; Altchek, David W

    2006-02-01

    Injury to the medial collateral ligament of the elbow (MCL) can be a career-threatening injury for an overhead athlete without appropriate diagnosis and treatment. It has been considered separately from other athletic injuries due to the unique constellation of pathology that results from repetitive overhead throwing. The past decade has witnessed tremendous gains in understanding of the complex interplay between the dynamic and static stabilizers of the athlete's elbow. Likewise, the necessity to treat these problems in a minimally invasive manner has driven the development of sophisticated techniques and instrumentation for elbow arthroscopy. MCL injuries, ulnar neuritis, valgus extension overload with osteophyte formation and posteromedial impingement, flexor pronator strain, medial epicondyle pathology, and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum have all been described as sequelae of the overhead throwing motion. In addition, loose body formation, bony spur formation, and capsular contracture can all be present in conjunction with these problems or as isolated entities. Not all pathology in the thrower's elbow is amenable to arthroscopic treatment; however, the clinician must be familiar with all of these problems in order to form a comprehensive differential diagnosis for an athlete presenting with elbow pain, and he or she must be comfortable with the variety of open and arthroscopic treatments available to best serve the patient. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the thrower's elbow is critical to the care of this population. The preoperative evaluation should focus on a thorough history and physical examination, as well as on specific diagnostic imaging modalities. Arthroscopic setup, including anesthesia, patient positioning, and portal choices will be discussed. Operative techniques in the anterior and posterior compartments will be reviewed, as well as postoperative rehabilitation and surgical results. Lastly, complications

  15. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  16. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  17. A Comparison of Rehabilitation Methods After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Anthony; Villacis, Diego; Yalamanchili, Raj; Hatch, George F. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Context: Despite the significant attention directed toward optimizing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there has been less focus on rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery. Objective: To determine the effect of different rehabilitation protocols on clinical outcomes by comparing early versus late mobilization approaches and continuous passive mobilization (CPM) versus manual therapy after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Data Sources: PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords rotator cuff, rotator, cuff, tears, lacerations, and rehabilitation to identify articles published from January 1980 to March 2014. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 1 or 2 evidence, written in the English language, and with reported outcomes for early versus late mobilization or rehabilitation with CPM versus manual therapy after primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Exclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 3, 4, or 5 evidence, non-English language, and those with significantly different demographic variables between study groups. Included studies were evaluated with the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials criteria. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Data Extraction: Level of evidence, study type, number of patients enrolled, number of patients at final follow-up, length of follow-up, age, sex, rotator cuff tear size, surgical technique, and concomitant operative procedures were extracted from included articles. Postoperative data included clinical outcome scores, visual analog score for pain, shoulder range of motion, strength, and rotator cuff retear rates. Results: A total of 7 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. Five studies compared early and late mobilization. Two studies compared CPM and manual therapy. Conclusion: In general, current data do not definitively demonstrate a significant difference between postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation

  18. Day case arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Allum, R. L.; Ribbans, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A Day Case Unit was opened at Wexham Park Hospital in October 1985 and this paper describes the first year's experience in arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery. Ninety nine knees in 96 patients were examined. The predominant diagnoses were lesions of the medial meniscus (33%), ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (30%) and lesions of the lateral meniscus (20%). Fourteen knees (14%) were normal. There was one postoperative infection, 3 patients had troublesome effusions and one patient developed a synovial fistula. Two patients required overnight admission. The waiting list was reduced from 14.7 weeks to 3.0 weeks. The advantages and limitations of this technique is discussed. PMID:3674684

  19. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  20. Arthroscopic management of talar dome lesions using a transmalleolar approach.

    PubMed

    Grady, John; Hughes, David

    2006-01-01

    Surgical treatment of posteromedial talar dome lesions is frequently necessary for Berndt and Harty grade IV osteochondral defects and nondisplaced osteochondral fragments resistant to conservative modalities. When operative intervention is indicated, the approach and management can be complicated by the location and extent of the injury. The operative technique we advocate allows direct exposure of the lesion and minimizes damage to healthy articular cartilage and surrounding soft tissue. Use of a drill guide assists the surgeon in precisely placing a transmalleolar portal through the tibia for subchondral drilling of osteochondral defects when the lesions are inaccessible through traditional arthroscopic portals. PMID:16707640

  1. Arthroscopic Management of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral fractures of the ankle are typically caused by traumatic injuries of the ankle. Repetitive trauma can lead to further cartilage damage with subsequent increasing size of the lesion, ultimately leading to severe cartilage disorder and degenerative arthritis of the ankle. Arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation has been shown to be a highly successful option for patients with small osteochondral lesions. Studies show a higher failure rate for larger lesions and cystic changes that disrupt the subchondral plate. The threshold size seems to be 150 mm(2). PMID:27599437

  2. Arthroscopic findings in patients with painful wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Povlsen, B; Peckett, W R

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of painful dorsal wrist ganglia remains obscure. In a prospective study we investigated the link between a painful dorsal wrist ganglion and wrist joint abnormality with wrist arthroscopy before excision of the ganglion. Of 16 wrists arthroscoped 12 were abnormal, 10 had an abnormal scapholunate joint, and two had abnormal lunatetriquetral joints. We think that painful dorsal wrist ganglia, like popliteal cysts in the knee, are markers of underlying joint abnormalities. Surgeons who treat painful ganglia should be aware of a possible underlying cause so that they can target treatment more accurately, particularly in recurrent cases and those patients with persistent wrist pain after excision of the ganglion. PMID:11680404

  3. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to

  4. Arthroscopic Management of Anterior, Posterior, and Multidirectional Shoulder Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Field, Larry D; Ryu, Richard K N; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Provencher, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization offers several potential advantages compared with open surgery, including the opportunity to more accurately evaluate the glenohumeral joint at the time of diagnostic assessment; comprehensively address multiple pathologic lesions that may be identified; and avoid potential complications unique to open stabilization, such as postoperative subscapularis failure. A thorough understanding of normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics, along with the pathoanatomy responsible for anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability patterns, is very important in the management of patients who have shoulder instability. The treating physician also must be familiar with diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers that are required to accurately diagnose shoulder instability. PMID:27049209

  5. Late arthroscopic retrieval of a bullet from hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi K; Aggarwal, Varun

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of arthroscopic retrieval of a bullet from the hip joint of an 18-year-old boy, who sustained the injury four months back, accidentally, while bird hunting with a country made shotgun. The surgery was performed with the standard ordinary instrumentation of knee arthroscopy. The patient became pain-free the same evening and started partial weight bearing on the next day of surgery. At 13 months follow-up, the patient had returned to normal activity without any functional limitations. PMID:19838396

  6. Lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia: an anatomical insight.

    PubMed

    Dias Filho, L C; Valença, M M; Guimarães Filho, F A V; Medeiros, R C; Silva, R A M; Morais, M G V; Valente, F P; França, S M L

    2003-07-01

    A detailed anatomic study was carried out on the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve to better understand the etiology and treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. As it passed from the pelvis into the thigh, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve ran through an "aponeuroticofascial tunnel," beginning at the iliopubic tract and ending at the inguinal ligament; as it passed through the tunnel, an enlargement in its side-to-side diameter was observed, suggesting that the fascial structures proximal to the inguinal ligament may be implicated in the genesis of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. The finding of pseudoneuromas at this location, distant from the inguinal ligament, supports this hypothesis. The anterior superior iliac spine is located approximately 0.7 cm from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and serves as the bony landmark for nerve localization. Within the first 3 cm of leaving the pelvis, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed deep to the fascia lata; therefore, surgical dissection within the subcutaneous fascia may be conducted with relative impunity near the anterior superior iliac spine just inferior to the inguinal ligament. In 36% of cases there was no posterior branch of the nerve, which is correlated to lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia symptoms often being limited to the anterior branch region. An accessory nerve was found in 30% of cases. PMID:12794914

  7. Distal femoral fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, F Winston; Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Kahler, David; Hurwitz, Shepard; Cui, Quanjun

    2010-10-01

    The diversity of surgical options for the management of distal femoral fractures reflects the challenges inherent in these injuries. These fractures are frequently comminuted and intra-articular, and they often involve osteoporotic bone, which makes it difficult to reduce and hold them while maintaining joint function and overall limb alignment. Surgery has become the standard of care for displaced fractures and for patients who must obtain rapid return of knee function. The goal of surgical management is to promote early knee motion while restoring the articular surface, maintaining limb length and alignment, and preserving the soft-tissue envelope with a durable fixation that allows functional recovery during bone healing. A variety of surgical exposures, techniques, and implants has been developed to meet these objectives, including intramedullary nailing, screw fixation, and periarticular locked plating, possibly augmented with bone fillers. Recognition of the indications and applications of the principles of modern implants and techniques is fundamental in achieving optimal outcomes. PMID:20889949

  8. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  9. Discoid lateral meniscus: case report of arthroscopic attachment of a symptomatic Wrisberg-ligament type.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T D; Paulos, L E; Parker, R D; Harner, C D; Gurley, W D

    1987-01-01

    The symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus is a well-known congenital anomaly that is of three different types: complete, incomplete, and Wrisberg-ligament type. The Wrisberg-ligament type has no meniscotibial attachment posteriorly, and in the past has been treated by total (open or arthroscopic) meniscectomy. In this article, we review the literature and report a previously unreported case of arthroscopic peripheral attachment after central partial meniscectomy of a Wrisberg-ligament type discoid lateral meniscus, with documentation of healing at arthroscopic second look 1 year following surgery. PMID:3689527

  10. Arthroscopic Trans-osseous Suture of Peripheral Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear.

    PubMed

    Jegal, Midum; Heo, Kang; Kim, Jong Pil

    2016-10-01

    The importance of foveal repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) on stability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) has been emphasized with increasing knowledge of the anatomy and biomechanics of the TFCC and DRUJ. Although both open and arthroscopic techniques have been described for improving DRUJ stability, there has been a marked evolution of arthroscopic TFCC repair technique with successful clinical outcome. Recently, an arthroscopic trans-osseous technique has been described to repair foveal tears of the TFCC. The advantage of the technique is that it allows for anatomical repair of both the superficial and deep layers. This article describes the details of this novel technique. PMID:27595945

  11. Arthroscopic interposition arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E; Merten, S M; Steinmann, S P

    2007-06-01

    First carpometacarpal joint arthritis is a common condition encountered by hand surgeons. Traditionally, surgical approaches have included arthrodesis, trapeziectomy or reconstructive arthroplasty techniques. Previously, we described a technique for arthroscopic debridement and interposition arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint. Patients with Eaton stages II and III symptomatic first carpometacarpal joint arthritis recalcitrant to >6 months of non-operative therapy underwent arthroscopic debridement of the first carpometacarpal joint with interposition of an acellular dermal matrix allograft (GRAFTJACKET). In this paper, we describe outcomes following this procedure. Postoperatively, all patients reported symptomatic relief and 94% stated that they were partially, or completely, satisfied. More than 70% of patients reported no to mild difficulty in performing activities of daily living (average grip strength = 18.5 kg, pinch strength = 3.9kg). Complications were minimal. Outcomes from this study compare favourably to those of other series, demonstrating that this technique is a viable option for treatment of Eaton stages II and III first carpometacarpal arthritis. PMID:17276564

  12. Arthroscopic partial resection of the discoid meniscus in children.

    PubMed

    Atay, O A; Doral, M N; Aksoy, M C; Tetik, O; Leblebicioğlu, G

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen children with 14 lateral discoid menisci were reviewed at an average follow-up of 2.7 years. Their average age at the time of the operation was 12.8 years. Most of the children had vague and intermittent painful symptoms, and the classical "clunk" was demonstrable in nine of the 13 patients in clinical examinations. Thirteen children underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus, by performing partial resection. This procedure, modifying the discoid lateral meniscus to the normal semilunar shape, was indicated only when the capsular attachment was intact. The results were excellent both clinically and radiologically. Furthermore, rehabilitation time was considerably shorter than the time required after open procedures. Arthroscopic discoid meniscus surgery performed by experienced and skilled hands gives better results. According to the literature and our experiences, it is better to perform open techniques in patients with stiff knees. Additionally, it is technically feasible to use small joint instruments in the pediatric age group. PMID:9433153

  13. Arthroscopic Management of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Dwidmuthe, Samir; Barick, Devashis; Rathi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) of knee joint is a rare disorder of Synovium. Hip and knee joint are commonly affected joints. The knee PVNS presents as a localized or diffuse form. Diagnosis if often delayed and permanent joint damage occurs with advanced disease. Ultrasound examination shows fluid collection and synovial hypertrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging helps in clinching the diagnosis. Final confirmation of PVNS is done with histopathological examination of synovial tissue removed. Post operative radiation has shown to reduce the rate of recurrent disease. Case Report: 25 years male presented to us with painless swelling of left knee joint of 3 months duration. Radiographs were normal. MRI showed synovial hypertrophy with changes suggestive of PVNS. We did arthroscopic six portal synovectomy. The patient regained his function and was asymptomatic at 2 year follow up. Conclusion: We want to emphasize that early diagnosis and well done arthroscopic Synovectomy gives good clinical outcome with low recurrence rate. Radiotherapy should be reserved for recurrent disease. PMID:27299033

  14. Arthroscopic Thermal Capsular Shrinkage for Palmar Midcarpal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic capsular shrinkage has been previously used to stabilize major joints. This is the first series of its use in the wrist for palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI). Materials and Methods This is a medium-term retrospective review of 13 patients (15 wrists) at an average follow-up of 48 months postoperative. All patients were assessed with a functional questionnaire for instability and a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score, as well as clinical examination. Description of Technique Arthroscopic capsular shrinkage was performed to the palmar and dorsal capsules of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using a bipolar thermal probe. All wrists were immobilized for 6 weeks post operation. Results 100% follow-up was achieved . All cases had an improvement in the frequency and severity of instability symptoms. The average DASH score was significantly reduced. There were no complications. The average loss of movement following the procedure was 15%. Conclusions The medium-term results show that wrist instability due to PMCI can be improved significantly by thermal capsular shrinkage with only a minimal amount of secondary stiffness. PMID:25097808

  15. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic subacromial decompression and distal clavicle excision.

    PubMed

    Webb, Brian G; Elliott, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder surgery is considered a safe and effective method of treating a variety of shoulder pathologies and is associated with a low complication rate. The type and rate of complications can vary, depending on the procedure, positioning, surgical time, and anesthesia. Fortunately, neurovascular injuries occur infrequently. Numerous studies have described the proximity of neurovascular structures to portals placed in shoulder arthroscopy, in both the beach chair and the lateral decubitus positions. Accurate portal placement is important to avoid damage to adjacent neurovascular structures. Inaccurate placement of portals can lead to inadvertent damage to these structures and create more difficulty with visualization and angle of instrumentation, possibly compromising the success of the procedure. This article describes a 50-year-old man who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression and distal clavicle excision for persistent subacromial impingement and acromioclavicular arthritis. During postoperative follow-up, the patient had a small, bulging area located near the anterior portal site. Examination showed a well-healed anterior portal site with a small (approximately 2×2 cm), nontender, immobile mass located within the deep soft tissues just below the anterior portal incision. Ultrasound evaluation showed a pseudoaneurysm of a branch off the axillary artery. The patient underwent successful embolization of the pseudoaneurysm, with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:24972444

  16. Change in Driving Performance following Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; McGee, A; Weinberg, M; Bansal, A; Hamula, M; Wolfson, T; Zuckerman, J; Jazrawi, L

    2016-08-01

    The current study aimed to measure perioperative changes in driving performance following arthroscopic shoulder surgery using a validated driving simulator.21 patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff or labral pathology were tested on a driving simulator preoperatively, and 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. An additional 21 subjects were tested to establish driving data in a control cohort. The number of collisions, centerline crossings, and off-road excursions were recorded for each trial. VAS and SPADI scores were obtained at each visit.The mean number of collisions in the study group significantly increased from 2.05 preoperatively to 3.75 at 6 weeks (p<0.001), and significantly decreased to 1.95 at 12 weeks (p<0.001). Centerline crossings and off-road excursions did not significantly change from preoperative through 12 weeks, although centerline crossings were statistically different from the controls at each time point (p<0.001). Surgery on the dominant driving arm resulted in greater collisions at 6 weeks than surgery on the non-dominant driving arm (p<0.001).Preliminary data shows that driving performance is impaired for at least 6 weeks postoperatively, with a return to normal driving by 12 weeks. Driving is more profoundly affected in conditions that require avoiding a collision and when the dominant driving arm is involved. PMID:27487432

  17. Evaluation of pain after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brown, D W; Curry, C M; Ruterbories, L M; Avery, F L; Anson, P S

    1997-01-01

    Pain after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate reconstruction was examined during the first 5 postoperative days to evaluate its intensity and duration. One hundred consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft were examined. During surgery, ketorolac (60 mg) was given intravenously and 0.25% bupivicaine (1 ml/kg total) was injected into the joint space and the graft donor site. After surgery, all patients received scheduled doses of oral acetaminophen (650 mg) and ketorolac (10 mg) four times a day, and they were allowed to take oral oxycodone (5 to 10 mg) every 2 hours as needed. Pain scores at rest and with activity reached a maximum on the 2nd postoperative morning. Oxycodone consumption also peaked on the 2nd postoperative day. Eighty-nine (89%) patients reported overall pain as mild or moderate, and 95 patients (95%) reported either excellent or good overall relief of pain. The 5-day cumulative mean of visual analog scale pain scores for attempting straight leg raises was significantly higher for patients unable to successfully perform that activity than for patients who were able to perform it. The association between elevated pain scores and diminished ability to perform straight leg raises suggests that pain may inhibit function and therefore early rehabilitation. PMID:9079170

  18. The successful arthroscopic treatment of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Spinner, Robert J; Smith, Jay; Howe, Benjamin M; Amrami, Kimberly K; Iannotti, Joseph P; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can distinguish between intraneural ganglion cysts and paralabral (extraneural) cysts at the glenohumeral joint. Suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts share the same pathomechanism as their paralabral counterparts, emanating from a tear in the glenoid labrum. The authors present 2 cases to demonstrate that the identification and arthroscopic repair of labral tears form the cornerstone of treatment for intraneural ganglion cysts of the suprascapular nerve. METHODS Two patients with suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts were identified: 1 was recognized and treated prospectively, and the other, previously reported as a paralabral cyst, was identified retrospectively through the reinter-pretation of high-resolution MR images. RESULTS Both patients achieved full functional recovery and had complete radiological involution of the intraneural ganglion cysts at the 3-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Previous reports of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts described treatment by an open approach to decompress the cysts and resect the articular nerve branch to the glenohumeral joint. The 2 cases in this report demonstrate that intraneural ganglion cysts, similar to paralabral cysts, can be treated with arthroscopic repair of the glenoid labrum without resection of the articular branch. This approach minimizes surgical morbidity and directly addresses the primary etiology of intraneural and extraneural ganglion cysts. PMID:26323813

  19. Prospective outcomes of arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Najafi, Arvin; Zaaferani, Zohre

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the results of arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia. Between November 2002 and September 2007, all patients with dorsal wrist ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection in our institution. Average follow-up was 39.2 months (range, 24-71 months). Fifty-two patients (40 women and 12 men; mean age, 29.8 years) were treated with our operative technique. Symptoms at presentation were unpleasant appearance in 15 patients (28.8 %), pain in 30 (57.6%), and unpleasant appearance and pain in 7 (13.5%). The ganglion cyst site was in front of the midcarpal joint in 41 patients (78.8%), in front of the radiocarpal joint in 6 patients (11.5%), and in front of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints in 5 patients (9.6%). Our surgical technique resulted in a significant improvement in flexion, extension, and grip strength (P≤.005). In patients with painful ganglia, treatment also had a significant effect. Nine (17.3%) recurrences were observed. Mean time off work was 14 days, but 19 patients returned to work immediately. According to the results of this study, we recommend the use of arthroscopy as the primary treatment method for dorsal wrist ganglion excision. PMID:22385448

  20. Arthroscopic management of the painful total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure of total elbow arthroplasty is more common than after other major joint arthroplasties and is often a result of aseptic loosening, peri-prosthetic infection, fracture and instability. Infection can be a devastating complication, yet there are no established guidelines for the pre-operative diagnosis of total elbow peri-prosthetic infection. This is because pre-operative clinical, radiographic and biochemical tests are often unreliable. Methods Using three case examples, a standardized protocol for the clinical and arthroscopic assessment of the painful total elbow arthroplasty is described. This is used to provide a mechanical and microbiological diagnosis of the patient’s pain. Results There have been no complications resulting from the use of this technique in the three patients described, nor in any other patient to date. Conclusions The staged protocol described in the present study, utilizing arthroscopic assessment, has refined the approach to the painful total elbow arthroplasty because it directly influences the definitive surgical management of the patient. It is recommended that other surgeons follow the principles outlined in the present study when faced with this challenging problem. PMID:27583000

  1. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  2. Arthroscopic Superior Capsule Reconstruction for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mihata, Teruhisa; Lee, Thay Q.; Itami, Yasuo; HASEGAWA, Akihiko; Ohue, Mutsumi; Neo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: An arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction, in which the fascia lata autograft attached medially to the superior glenoid and laterally to the greater tuberosity, restores shoulder stability and muscle balance in patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears; consequently, it improves shoulder function specifically deltoid muscle function and relieves pain. We assessed the clinical outcome of arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (Figure 1) in 100 consecutive patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears. Specifically, we focused on the rates of return to sport and work. Methods: From 2007 to 2014, we performed arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction on 107 consecutive patients (mean 66.7 years; range, 43 to 82) with irreparable rotator cuff tears that had failed conservative treatment. Seven patients were lost to follow-up because of other medical problems or reasons. In the remaining 100 patients there were 56 supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears; 39 supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tears; 3 supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis tears; and 2 supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor tears. Physical examination, radiography, and MRI were performed before surgery; at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery; and yearly thereafter. Rates of return to sport and work were also investigated in those patients who had been employed (34 patients: 21 manual workers, 10 farmers, 1 butcher, 1 cook, and 1 athletic trainer) or played sport (26 patients: 6 golf, 4 table tennis, 4 swimming, 3 martial arts, 2 baseball, 2 yoga, 1 tennis, 1 badminton, 1 skiing, 1 mountain-climbing, and 1 ground golf) before injury. Results: The average preoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score was 31.6 points (range, 3.3 to 63.3 points) and the average Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 51.6 points (26.5 to 68.5 points). Average postoperative clinical outcome scores all improved significantly at final

  3. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  4. Atypical periprosthetic femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woo, S B; Choi, S T; Chan, W L

    2016-08-01

    We report an 82-year-old woman who underwent fixation with a long-spanning cable-plate for a bisphosphonate-induced Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture. Non-union and breakage of the plate occurred at 16 months and necessitated revision surgery using a long-stem femoral prosthesis augmented with a cable-plate construct. Bone union was achieved eventually after 10 months. PMID:27574277

  5. Arthroscopic Augmentation With Subscapularis Tendon in Anterior Shoulder Instability With Capsulolabral Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic shoulder instability with poor quality of the anterior capsulolabral tissue is still controversial. In these cases the Latarjet procedure is certainly more effective in preventing recurrence than an arthroscopic capsular repair. However, several studies have reported a variety of severe complications related to the Latarjet procedure because of the use of bone augmentation and hardware implantation; moreover, the arthroscopic version of the Latarjet procedure is technically difficult and potentially dangerous because of the proximity of neurovascular structures. The aim of this report is to describe an innovative arthroscopic technique consisting of an augmentation of the anterior capsulolabral tissue using the articular portion of the subscapularis tendon and knotless suture anchors paired with high-strength tape for its fixation to the anterior glenoid edge. In the absence of severe bone deficiency of the anterior glenoid edge, this procedure can minimize arthroscopic technique failures, restoring the anterior capsulolabral wall without any significant reduction of shoulder functionality. PMID:24266004

  6. Normal and pathological anatomy of the TMJ viewed by computerized panoramic arthroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xudong; Yang, Chi; Goddard, Greg; Qiu, Weiliu

    2003-07-01

    The individual single images obtained to document TMJ arthroscopy are often difficult to interpret. The aim of this paper is to make available a new computer-aided image process system to reformat the panoramic arthroscopic images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Arthroscopic images were input directly into a computer and memorized into a magneto optical disk. Using Photoshop 5.0 (Adobe Systems, Inc., Mountain View, CA) software for Windows 98 (Microsoft Corp., King County, WA) the images were edited and adjusted to compound sagittal and/or coronal panoramic images of normal articular surfaces as well as pathology of TMJ disorders. Normal TMJ sagittal and coronal two-dimensional composite panoramic arthroscopic images were achieved. The panoramic images of some intracapsular disorders (including disk displacement, osteoarthrosis, adhesion, and disk perforation) were also obtained. The computerized arthroscopic panoramic images are a new technique that may aid in the understanding of TMJ anatomy and TMJ disorders. PMID:12889676

  7. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability With All-Soft Knotless Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hélder; Vuurberg, Gwen; Gomes, Nuno; Oliveira, Joaquim Miguel; Ripoll, Pedro L.; Reis, Rui Luís; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Niek van Dijk, C.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, arthroscopic and arthroscopically assisted techniques have been increasingly used to reconstruct the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Besides permitting the treatment of several comorbidities, arthroscopic techniques are envisioned to lower the amount of surgical aggression and to improve the assessment of anatomic structures. We describe our surgical technique for arthroscopic, two-portal ankle ligament repair using an all-soft knotless anchor, which is made exclusively of suture material. This technique avoids the need for classic knot-tying methods. Thus it diminishes the chance of knot migration caused by pendulum movements. Moreover, it avoids some complications that have been related to the use of metallic anchors and some currently available biomaterials. It also prevents prominent knots, which have been described as a possible cause of secondary complaints. PMID:27073785

  8. A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

    2010-10-01

    Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically. PMID:19716324

  9. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability With All-Soft Knotless Anchors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Hélder; Vuurberg, Gwen; Gomes, Nuno; Oliveira, Joaquim Miguel; Ripoll, Pedro L; Reis, Rui Luís; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Niek van Dijk, C

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, arthroscopic and arthroscopically assisted techniques have been increasingly used to reconstruct the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Besides permitting the treatment of several comorbidities, arthroscopic techniques are envisioned to lower the amount of surgical aggression and to improve the assessment of anatomic structures. We describe our surgical technique for arthroscopic, two-portal ankle ligament repair using an all-soft knotless anchor, which is made exclusively of suture material. This technique avoids the need for classic knot-tying methods. Thus it diminishes the chance of knot migration caused by pendulum movements. Moreover, it avoids some complications that have been related to the use of metallic anchors and some currently available biomaterials. It also prevents prominent knots, which have been described as a possible cause of secondary complaints. PMID:27073785

  10. Arthroscopic release and labral repair for bifocal compression of the suprascapular nerve

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of combined proximal and distal compression of the suprascapular nerve causing supra- and infraspinatus weakness and wasting in a 17-year-old rower. Clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyeographic studies confirm this. The case was managed with an arthroscopic approach, consisting of arthroscopic labral repair and decompression of a paralabral cyst, combined with arthroscopic release of the transverse scapular ligament. An excellent result was achieved, with the patient returning to full competitive rowing prior to the 6-month clinical review. This case highlights the interesting nature of bifocal compression of the suprascapular nerve, as well as the successful use of arthroscopic techniques to manage the problem. PMID:27582998

  11. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Repair of Type-II SLAP Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeier, Stephen F.; Voos, James E.; Williams, Riley J.; Altchek, David W.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To our knowledge, there has been no prospective study on the results of arthroscopic repair of superior labrum-biceps anchor complex (SLAP) tears with use of modern techniques. The purpose of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the minimum two-year results for patients with type-II SLAP tears that were treated with arthroscopic suture anchor fixation. Methods: Forty-seven patients with symptomatic type-II SLAP tears were evaluated preoperatively and at least two years postoperatively with use of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and L'Insalata outcomes instruments and physical examination. The study group included thirty-nine male and eight female patients with a mean age of thirty-six years; thirty-four of the forty-seven patients were athletes. Patients with rotator cuff tears requiring repair or concomitant shoulder instability were excluded. Results: At an average of 2.7 years, the median ASES and L'Insalata scores were 97 and 93, respectively, compared with baseline scores of 62 and 65 (p < 0.05). The median patient-reported satisfaction rating was 9 (of 10); forty-one patients (87%) rated the outcome as good or excellent. The median patient-reported satisfaction rating was significantly higher for patients with a discrete traumatic etiology than for those with an atraumatic etiology (9 compared with 7); however, there was no significant difference between these groups in terms of the ASES or L'Insalata outcome scores. Overall, twenty-five (74%) of the thirty-four athletes were able to return to their preinjury level of competition, whereas eleven (92%) of the twelve athletes who reported a discrete traumatic event were able to return to their previous level of competition. There were five complications, including four cases of refractory postoperative stiffness. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that favorable outcomes can be anticipated in the majority of patients after arthroscopic SLAP lesion repair. While only three

  12. Patient Perception of Reimbursement for Arthroscopic Meniscectomy and ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Okoroha, Kelechi; Keller, Robert A.; Marshall, Nathan E.; Guest, John-Michael; Lynch, Jonathan; Lock, Terrence R.; Rill, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Healthcare policy changes and decreases in Medicare physician reimbursement continue to change the landscape of healthcare. Historically, patient perceptions of surgeon reimbursement have been exaggerated compared to actual reimbursement. Currently there is limited evidence for patient perception for arthroscopic meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient perception of physician reimbursement for arthroscopic meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction and to compare health care perceptions between urban and suburban clinics. Methods: Surveys were given to 231 consecutive patients, 127 in an urban clinic and 104 in a suburban clinic. Patients were asked their estimation of reasonable reimbursement for arthroscopic meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction as well as their perception on actual Medicare reimbursement to physicians. They were also asked how much would they be willing to pay out of pocket for the procedures. After revealing actual reimbursement rates, patients were asked if reimbursement levels were appropriate, whether surgeon subspecialty training was important, and if additional compensation should be associated with subspecialty training. Survey responses were compared with respondents in an urban versus a suburban setting as well as amongst income and education level. Results: Patients on average reported surgeons should receive $8,096 for a meniscectomy and $11,794 for an ACL reconstruction, 14 times and 11 times as much as actually reimbursed, respectively. Patients estimated that Medicare paid physicians $5,442 for a meniscectomy and $6,667 for an ACL reconstruction. Patients were willing to pay $2,286 out of pocket for a meniscectomy and $11,793 for an ACL reconstruction. Sixty five percent of patients believed reimbursement for meniscectomy was too low and 57% of patients believe reimbursement for ACL reconstruction was too low. Less than 2% of patients believed physician salaries should be cut

  13. Clinical, radiologic and arthroscopic assessment and treatment of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sharath K; Sripathi Rao, P

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate clinical, radiologic and arthroscopic features of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus and to assess the outcome of arthroscopic meniscectomy. Among the 177 arthroscopies performed for discoid lateral meniscus between January 1993 and January 2004, 12 were bilateral. The clinical and radiologic evaluation was done from the records. The type of discoid meniscus, the type of tear was assessed arthroscopically. All patients underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Patients were followed up for a minimum period of 2 years. All patients had pain as presenting symptom. Eight patients presented with bilateral knee pain and four patients developed pain in the opposite knee after the affected knee was treated. The classically described thud was present in 11 knees. The widening of the joint space was found in 13 knee radiographs; 14 knees had complete type, nine had incomplete type and one had ring type of discoid lateral meniscus on arthroscopic evaluation; 20 knees involving 10 complete types, all incomplete types and ring type of discoid lateral meniscus showed obvious meniscal tears. The remaining four meniscus showed softening of a portion of the meniscus. Underlying intra-substance tear was visualized arthroscopically in the softened areas on saucerisation. All but one discoid menisci underwent arthroscopic partial central meniscectomy. When followed up for an average period of 32.6 months 19 knees showed excellent results and 5 knees good results. Possibility of bilaterality should be suspected in discoid lateral meniscus. Softening of meniscus denotes underlying intra-substance tear. This finding has not been described in the literature so far. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy gives good results in symptomatic bilateral discoid meniscus. This to our knowledge is the largest series of bilateral discoid lateral menisci. PMID:17225177

  14. Lipoma arborescens of the knee: report of a case managed by arthroscopic synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Franco, Michel; Puch, J M; Carayon, M J; Bortolotti, D; Albano, Laetitia; Lallemand, A

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of lipoma arborescens treated with an arthroscopic procedure. Lipoma arborescens is an uncommon pseudo-tumoral synovial lesion usually located in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee. This diagnosis should be considered, particularly in patients with chronic joint effusion. Magnetic resonance imaging confirms the lipomatous nature of the synovial proliferation. When limited to the anterior compartment of the knee, lipoma arborescens can be treated by arthroscopic synovectomy. PMID:14769527

  15. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  16. The temporal outcomes of open versus arthroscopic knotted and knotless rotator cuff repair over 5 years

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Thomas R; Lam, Patrick H; Millar, Neal L

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine how repair technique influenced structural and clinical outcomes at 5 years post-surgery. Methods Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (i) an open double-row mattress repair technique (n = 25); (ii) arthroscopic single-row simple suture knotted technique (n = 25); or (iii) arthroscopic single-row inverted mattress knotless technique (n = 36) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained pre-operatively and postoperatively with a validated protocol, ultrasound were also performed at the same time. Results Retear occurred more often after open repair (48%) at 5 years than after arthroscopic knotted (33%) and arthroscopic knotless (26%) repair. Retear was associated with increasing age, pre-operative tear size and weaker pre-operative and 5 years postoperative cuff strength. Between 2 years and 5 years, the open repair group experienced an increase in the frequency of pain during activity, as well as in the difficulty experienced and the severity of pain during overhead activities (p < 0.05) and, at 5 years, also experienced more difficulty with overhead activities, compared to the arthroscopic knotless repair group. Conclusions At 5-year follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques resulted in fewer retears and better outcomes compared to an open double-row technique.

  17. Removal of a well-fixed cementless femoral component with an extended proximal femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Younger, T I; Bradford, M S; Paprosky, W G

    1995-05-01

    Removal of a stable, well-fixed cementless femoral arthroplasty component occasionally is necessary because of infection, component malposition, persistent pain, or incompatibility with a femoral revision component. Restricted access to ingrowth surfaces may make implant removal exceedingly difficult and increases the risk of iatrogenic damage to the proximal femur. A new extended proximal femoral osteotomy technique is described for use in removing well-fixed cementless femoral components. Previous techniques have been modified to allow access to the bone-implant interface and to provide straight-shot access to the femoral canal for proper sizing and positioning of the revision implant. The osteotomy can be extended to accommodate the entire length of the porous coating on the revision component. If a shorter osteotomy is desired, access to the prosthesis for transection with a metal-cutting burr is possible. The osteotomy is easily repositioned with cerclage wires or cables and reliable healing has been demonstrated. PMID:10150358

  18. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  19. Femoral Tunnel Malposition in ACL Revision Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific “technical cause of failure.” Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  20. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  1. All-inside arthroscopic suturing technique for meniscal ruptures.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Nikica; Dovzak-Bajs, Ivana; Bilić, Vide; Darabos, Anela; Popović, Iva; Cengić, Tomislav

    2012-03-01

    The most frequent indication for surgical treatment of the knee is lesion of the meniscus. The "all inside" arthroscopic technique with bioresorptive material for meniscus lesion is becoming the most popular treatment. This prospective study included 10 patients with posterior meniscal horn lesion operatively treated at Sports Traumatology Department. The "all inside" technique was performed by intra-articular application of bioresorptive pins-Darts sticks or Meniscus Viper and bioresorptive string. Patients were followed up for 2-6 months postoperatively and graded according to the IKDC 2000 scale. All surgical treatments showed satisfactory results. Young patients with acute longitudinal peripheral lesion-posterior horn lesions, in the red-red or red-white meniscal zone, 1-2 centimeters long are most appropriate for this type of treatment. In these patients, this technique proved to be superior and free from the risk of neurovascular damage. For better authentication of this conclusion, additional prospective randomized studies should be performed. PMID:22920001

  2. Arthroscopic wafer resection for ulnar impaction syndrome: prediction of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Meftah, Morteza; Keefer, Eric P; Panagopoulos, Georgia; Yang, S Steven

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with mean age of 38.5 (range 18-59), from 1998 to 2005, with ulnar impaction syndrome who failed nonoperative treatments were included in our study. Patients' age, history of previous wrist fracture, presence of MRI signs and ulnar variance were recorded as variables. Also, patients' postoperative strength (compared to the contralateral wrist) and pain relief were collected as outcome measurements. Twenty-two patients (84.6%) had either good or excellent pain relief (median 4, range 1-4). Significant correlation was found between MRI findings and postop pain relief (r = 0.53, p < or = 0.01). History of previous distal radius fractures was negatively correlated with pain relief (r = -0.50, p < or = 0.01). No correlation was found between postop strength and any of the variables. Presence of MRI signs of UIS is a predictor of good outcome in arthroscopic wafer resection. PMID:20672395

  3. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Anatomy of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Hsu, Andrew R.; Gross, Christopher E.; Walton, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  4. Free biceps tendon autograft to augment arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Obma, Padraic R

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while one is performing rotator cuff surgery. A subpectoral biceps tenodesis provides a source of autograft to augment rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. Two techniques are presented to augment rotator cuff repairs with a free biceps tendon autograft. This is a novel idea in an attempt to improve healing rates and long-term results of rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. PMID:24400197

  5. Arthroscopic Labral Reconstruction of the Hip Using Semitendinosus Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, John M.; Cregar, William M.; Martin, Timothy J.; Vemula, S. Pavan; Gupta, Asheesh; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    The labrum of the hip is recognized as being important to the stability of the hip and a major cause of hip pain. Damage to the labrum may result in increased joint stress and articular damage. Labral damage is often treated through various methods, among them simple stitch repair, base refixation, and debridement. Labral reconstruction becomes necessary when the labrum is too damaged to salvage, which renders labral repair improbable and labral debridement ineffective. In contrast to other methods that have been described for this treatment, our technique uses a semitendinosus allograft as a graft source, allowing for arthroscopic hip labral reconstruction. This technique has many advantages and is easily reproducible. It has shown promising results in patients with labral damage. The purpose of this article is to detail the step-by-step surgical technique of labral reconstruction using a semitendinosus allograft, in addition to the indications, pearls, and pitfalls of the technique. PMID:26759770

  6. Return to sport after arthroscopic meniscectomy on stable knees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Athletes suffering from any injuries want to know when they will be able to return sports activity. The period of return-to-sport after the arthroscopic meniscectomy is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the period of the return-to-sport from surgery and the clinical symptoms after the meniscectomy on stable knees. Methods Fifty-six athletes who underwent the arthroscopic meniscectomy were evaluated. The patients with an average age of 26.7 years (range, 13–67) comprised 45 men and 11 women, 16 medial meniscus and 40 lateral meniscus injuries. The average of the follow-up period was 9.2 months. The parameter examined were age, the injured side of meniscus (medial or lateral), articular cartilage status, amount of resection, and sports activity level. Results The mean period was 54 days in young group, and was 89 days in old group (p = 0.0013). The period was 79 days in medial meniscus (MM) injured group, and was 61 days in lateral meniscus (LM) group (p = 0.017). There was a significant difference among the groups in activity levels and in amount of resection. Pain and/or effusion in the knee after the return-to-sport were found 22% of the MM group and 53% in the LM group. Conclusions The period of the return-to-sport was shorter in young age, high activity and large amount of resection group. Although athletes in LM group can return to sports earlier than those in MM group, more than half of athletes have pain or effusion at the time of return-to sport. PMID:24257295

  7. Revision Wrist Arthroscopy after Failed Primary Arthroscopic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eugene; Danoff, Jonathan R.; Rajfer, Rebecca A.; Rosenwasser, Melvin P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiologies and outcomes of cases of failed therapeutic wrist arthroscopy have not been well-described to date. Purpose The purposes of this study were to identify common preventable patterns of failure in wrist arthroscopy and to report outcomes of a series of revision arthroscopy cases. Patients and Methods Retrospective review of 237 wrist arthroscopies revealed 21 patients with a prior arthroscopy for the same symptoms, of which 16 were assessed by questionnaires and physical exam for this study. Results Six of sixteen patients (38%) had unrecognized dynamic ulnar impaction after débridement of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears, which resolved with arthroscopic wafer resection. Five (31%) had persistent distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability after initial treatment of TFCC tears, requiring arthroscopic repair at revision. Four (25%) experienced diffuse dorsal wrist pain initially diagnosed as TFCC tears, but dynamic scapholunate ligament injuries were found and addressed with radiofrequency (RF) shrinkage at reoperation. Two (13%) required further resection of the radial styloid, after initial débridement was insufficient to correct radioscaphoid impingement. At a mean of 4.8 years after repeat arthroscopy (range, 1.5–13.4 years), this cohort had significant improvements in pain and satisfaction with outcomes after revision arthroscopy. Conclusions The most common indications for repeat wrist arthroscopy were ligamentous instability (of the DRUJ or scapholunate ligament) and osteoarthritis (from dynamic ulnar impaction or radioscaphoid impingement). Although revision wrist arthroscopy may yield acceptable outcomes, careful assessment of stability and cartilage wear at index procedure is crucial. Level of Evidence: Level IV Therapeutic. PMID:24533243

  8. [Arthroscopic distal ulna resection after post traumatic ulno carpal abutment].

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Pagnotta, A

    2006-11-01

    Ulno carpal abutments secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the radius are often due to the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index by shortening relative to the radius. This positive ulnar variance eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulnar and the proximal articular face of the lunate with alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. The wrist arthroscopy makes diagnosis and treatment possible in a less invasive way. The patients are operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthetic using a pneumatic tourniquet. The arthroscope is positioned using the 3-4 radio carpal opening permitting exploration of the joint. The surgical treatment is performed by arthroscopy using a burr and going in through the 6R radio carpal opening. In this way we use the technique of partial resection of the distal ulna. We have a series of 62 patients who have benefited from the technique of partial resection of the ulnar head by arthroscopy. There were 30 men and 32 women. The average age was 66 years old (between 45 and 82). Our average follow-up is 32 months (between 12 and 60 months). Recovery of mobility was immediate in all cases with persistent pain in the radio ulnar joint in 8 cases. Arthroscopic treatment of ulno carpal abutment has proved itself effective and innocuous. It should nevertheless be reserved for operations on small sized inversions of the distal radio ulnar index (less than 5 mm). In the event of larger ulnar variances we prefer ulnar shortening osteotomy. The other techniques will be restricted to cases where the distal radio ulnar joint has been impaired. PMID:17361890

  9. [Arthroscopic distal ulna resection after post traumatic ulno carpal abutment.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Pagnotta, A

    2006-11-01

    Ulno carpal abutments secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the radius are often due to the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index by shortening relative to the radius. This positive ulnar variance eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulnar and the proximal articular face of the lunate with alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. The wrist arthroscopy makes diagnosis and treatment possible in a less invasive way. The patients are operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthetic using a pneumatic tourniquet. The arthroscope is positioned using the 3-4 radio carpal opening permitting exploration of the joint. The surgical treatment is performed by arthroscopy using a burr and going in through the 6R radio carpal opening. In this way we use the technique of partial resection of the distal ulna. We have a series of 62 patients who have benefited from the technique of partial resection of the ulnar head by arthroscopy. There were 30 men and 32 women. The average age was 66 years old (between 45 and 82). Our average follow-up is 32 months (between 12 and 60 months). Recovery of mobility was immediate in all cases with persistent pain in the radio ulnar joint in 8 cases. Arthroscopic treatment of ulno carpal abutment has proved itself effective and innocuous. It should nevertheless be reserved for operations on small sized inversions of the distal radio ulnar index (less than 5 mm). In the event of larger ulnar variances we prefer ulnar shortening osteotomy. The other techniques will be restricted to cases where the distal radio ulnar joint has been impaired. PMID:17349395

  10. Interactive stereotaxic teleassistance of remote experts during arthroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Undt, Gerhard; Schicho, Kurt; Wanschitz, Felix; Watzinger, Franz; Murakami, Kenichiro; Czerny, Christian; Ewers, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the technical setup for stereotaxic telesurgical assistance for arthroscopic procedures. It also outlines the current state, limitations, and feasibility of this technical development. Teleassistance or teleconsultation implemented in endoscopic or arthroscopic procedures have not yet been reported. In this study, 7 computer-assisted arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint were supported by extramural experts via interactive stereotaxic teleconsultation from distant locations. The external experts were supplied with close to real-time video, audio, and stereotaxic navigation data directly from the operation site. This setup allows the surgeons and external experts to interactively determine portals, target structures, and instrument positions relative to the patient's anatomy and to discuss any step of the procedures. Optoelectronic tracking interfaced to computer- based navigation technology allowed precise positioning of instruments for single or multiple temporomandibular joint punctures. The average error of digitizing probe measurements was 1.3 mm (range, 0.0 to 2.5 mm) and the average standard deviation was 0.7 mm (range, 0.4 to 0.9 mm). Evaluation of the reliability and accuracy of this technique suggests that it is sufficient for controlled navigation, even inside the small temporomandibular joint, a fact that encourages further applications for arthroscopy in general. The minimum requirement for high-quality video transmission for teleassisted procedures are integrated services digital network (ISDN) connections. Conventional ISDN-based videoconferencing can be combined with computer-aided intraoperative navigation. Transmission control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP)-based stereotaxic teleassistance data transmission via ATM or satellite seem to be promising techniques to considerably improve the field of arthroscopy. PMID:12426549

  11. Femoral lipectomy increases postprandial lipemia in women.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Bessesen, Daniel H; Cox-York, Kimberly A; Erickson, Christopher B; Law, Christopher K; Anderson, Molly K; Wang, Hong; Jackman, Matthew R; Van Pelt, Rachael E

    2015-07-01

    Femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) appears to be cardioprotective compared with abdominal SAT, possibly through better triglyceride (TG) sequestration. We hypothesized that removal of femoral SAT would increase postprandial TG through a reduction in dietary fatty acid (FA) storage. Normal-weight (means ± SD; BMI 23.9 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) women (n = 29; age 45 ± 6 yr) were randomized to femoral lipectomy (LIPO) or control (CON) and followed for 1 yr. Regional adiposity was measured by DEXA and CT. A liquid meal labeled with [(14)C]oleic acid was used to trace the appearance of dietary FA in plasma (6-h postprandial TG), breath (24-h oxidation), and SAT (24-h [(14)C]TG storage). Fasting LPL activity was measured in abdominal and femoral SAT. DEXA leg fat mass was reduced after LIPO vs. CON (Δ-1.4 ± 0.7 vs. 0.1 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.001) and remained reduced at 1 yr (-1.1 ± 1.4 vs. -0.2 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.05), as did CT thigh subcutaneous fat area (-39.6 ± 36.6 vs. 4.7 ± 14.6 cm(2), P < 0.05); DEXA trunk fat mass and CT visceral fat area were unchanged. Postprandial TG increased (5.9 ± 7.7 vs. -0.6 ± 5.3 × 10(3) mg/dl, P < 0.05) and femoral SAT LPL activity decreased (-21.9 ± 22.3 vs. 10.5 ± 26.5 nmol·min(-1)·g(-1), P < 0.05) 1 yr following LIPO vs. CON. There were no group differences in (14)C-labeled TG appearing in abdominal and femoral SAT or elsewhere. In conclusion, femoral fat remained reduced 1 yr following lipectomy and was accompanied by increased postprandial TG and reduced femoral SAT LPL activity. There were no changes in storage of meal-derived FA or visceral fat. Our data support a protective role for femoral adiposity on circulating TG independent of dietary FA storage and visceral adiposity. PMID:25968576

  12. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  13. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  14. Guide wire migration during femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Rozita; Sadigh, Gelareh

    2010-10-01

    Central vein catheterization is a routine and relatively safe procedure in critically ill patients. Complications with this procedure depend to the site of catheterization and the skill of the operator. In addition to the common complications with femoral vein catheterization there are some rare usually preventable side effects related to guide wire and catheter. In our patient who underwent femoral catheterization for acute hemodialysis, we report migration of guide wire through the systemic circulation from the femoral vein to the jugular vein. This is a very rare complication that is a human error and is totally preventable by doing the procedure by a skilled doctor and considering the standards described for central vein catheter insertion. PMID:20852377

  15. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  16. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  17. Adventitial cystic disease of common femoral vein

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Bo-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Adventitial cystic disease (ACD) of venous system is an extremely rare condition. Very few reports of ACD in venous system have been described. In this report we discuss two cases of common femoral vein ACD that presented with a swollen leg by the obstruction of the vein. Ultrasound imaging showed the typical hypoechoic fluid filled cyst with a posterior acoustic window. Computed tomography scan and ascending venogram showed a stenosis to flow in the common femoral vein caused by an extrinsic mass. Trans-adventitial evacuation of cyst with removal of vein wall was performed for both cases. During operation we found the gelatinous material in the cysts arising in the wall of the common femoral vein and compressing the lumen. The patients were released after short hospitalization and have remained symptom free with no recurrence. PMID:22066091

  18. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  19. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  20. Intramedullary nailing of pediatric femoral shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Harish S; Pandya, Nirav K; Cho, Robert H; Glaser, Diana A; Moor, Molly A; Herman, Martin J

    2011-08-01

    Intramedullary nail fixation of pediatric long bone fracture, particularly femoral shaft fracture, has revolutionized the care and outcome of these complex injuries. Nailing is associated with a high rate of union and a low rate of complications. Improved understanding of proximal femoral vascularity has led to changes in nail insertion methodology. Multiple fixation devices are available; selection is based on fracture type, patient age, skeletal maturity, and body mass index. A thorough knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics is required to achieve optimal results without negatively affecting skeletal development. PMID:21807915

  1. Arthroscopic technique for patch augmentation of rotator cuff repairs.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    The patient is placed in the lateral position, and an arthroscopic cuff repair is performed according to standard techniques. The line of repair is usually in the shape of a "T" or an "L." The repair is viewed through the lateral portal, with fluid inflow through the scope. Mattress sutures are placed in the anterior and posterior portions of the cuff, with respect to the line of repair, just medial to the most medial point of the tear. The sutures are placed in accordance with margin convergence suture passing methods. Next, 2 double-stranded suture anchors are placed into the lateral aspect of the greater tuberosity, which can be used to secure the anterior and posterior portions of the rotator cuff as well as the patch. The cuff sutures are tied first; then, the patch is addressed. The graft is sized by placement of a ruled probe or similar device into the subacromial space. The length of each side of the "rectangle" is measured to obtain the dimensions of the patch. The patch is then cut to fit the measurements. If the patch material is elastic, a slightly smaller than measured graft is cut to provide tension on the repair. The arthroscope is then moved to the posterior portal, and a large (8 mm) cannula, with a dam, is placed into the lateral portal. All sutures are brought out of the lateral cannula, and corresponding ends of each suture are held together in a clamp. The sutures are placed in their respective orientations once outside the cannula (e.g., anterior-medial, anterior-lateral), covering all 4 quadrants. Care is taken to ensure that the sutures have no twists and are not wrapped around one another. The sutures are passed through the graft, in mattress fashion, with a free needle, in their respective corners and clamped again. The graft is then grasped with a small locking grasper on its medial edge and is passed through the cannula into the subacromial space. The clamps holding the sutures are then gently pulled to remove the slack. A smaller (5 mm

  2. Arthroscopic Assessment of Stifle Synovitis in Dogs with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Little, Jeffrey P.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Sutherland, Brian J.; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Ramaker, Megan A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs

  3. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  4. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Methods: The records of all female tennis players on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Details of the surgery including date, procedures performed, and complications were recorded. The primary outcomes were ability and time to return to professional play, and if they were able to return to their previous level of function, as determined by singles ranking. Pre and post-operative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. Their highest ranking pre-injury, post operatively, and the time to return to pre-injury ranking were evaluated. Results: During the study period eight professional women tennis players from the WTA underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. All surgery was performed arthroscopically, 7 out of 8 players had more than one procedure performed during the surgery. In total, 3 players underwent debridement of a partial rotator cuff tear and 2 players underwent repair of a complete supraspinatus tear. Three players had an anterior labral repair or reconstruction for anterior instability, and one player underwent repair of a SLAP lesion. Two players underwent neurolysis of a suprascapular nerve, and three players in total underwent a subacromial decompression. All players (100%) returned to professional play. The mean

  5. History of femoral head fracture and coronal fracture of the femoral condyles.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, Jan; Rammelt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The first known description of the coronal fracture of the lateral femoral condyle was published by Busch in 1869. Hoffa used Busch's drawing in the first edition of his book in 1888 and accompanied it only with one sentence. A full case history of this fracture pattern was described by Braun in 1891. However, Braun's article fell into oblivion and so the fracture was popularized only in the fourth edition of Hoffa's textbook, particularly thanks to the drawing, rather than the brief description. Therefore, a fracture of the posterior femoral condyle, or more specifically, of the lateral condyle, could properly be called "Busch-Hoffa fracture". Femoral head fracture was initially described by Birkett in 1869. Of essential importance in this respect were the publications by Christopher in 1924 and, particularly, Pipkin's study of 1957, including his classification that is still in use today. A historically correct eponym for a femoral head fracture would therefore be "Birkitt-Pipkin fracture". PMID:25787681

  6. Report of a group developing a virtual reality simulator for arthroscopic surgery of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Cannon, W Dilworth; Eckhoff, Donald G; Garrett, William E; Hunter, Robert E; Sweeney, Howard J

    2006-01-01

    Apprenticeship training of surgical skills is time consuming and can lead to surgical errors. Our group is developing an arthroscopic virtual reality knee simulator for training orthopaedic residents in arthroscopic surgery before live-patient operating room experience. The simulator displays realistic human knee anatomy derived from the Visible Human Dataset developed by the National Library of Medicine and incorporates active force-feedback haptic technology. Our premise is that postgraduate year 2 residents completing a formal virtual education program who are trained to reach a proficiency standard in the techniques and protocol for an arthroscopic knee examination will complete a diagnostic arthroscopy on an actual patient in less time with greater accuracy, less iteration of movement of the arthroscope, and less damage to the patient's tissue compared with residents in the control group learning and practicing the arthroscopic knee examination procedures through the residency program's established education and training program. The validation study, done at eight orthopaedic residency programs, will commence in early 2006 and will take one year to complete. We anticipate that proficiency obtained on the simulator will transfer to surgical skills in the operating room. PMID:16394734

  7. Lateral Decubitus All-Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Treatment of Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Matthew R.; Urquhart, Nathan; Wong, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder instability can be a challenging condition to treat when it becomes refractory to soft-tissue procedures or when bone loss exceeds 25% to 27% of the glenoid. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure has been developed and popularized to deal with these concerns. Traditionally, the procedure has been performed as an open approach; however, this has been recently supplanted by novel arthroscopic techniques. We present a technique for the procedure performed with the patient in a semi-lateral decubitus position that assists with optimal graft placement on the native glenoid. We use the cannulated Bristow-Latarjet Instability Shoulder System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). After a diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation, we use multiple arthroscopic anterior portals to debride the rim of the glenoid. The coracoid is prepared and taken down arthroscopically, and the cannulated guide is attached and advanced through an arthroscopically created subscapularis split. With the shoulder held in a reduced position, we are then able to drill and anchor the graft to the native glenoid. The patient is able to begin gentle range-of-motion exercises immediately postoperatively. PMID:26258032

  8. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  9. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  10. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  11. Time to get rid of the clock: intraobserver and interobserver reliability in determination of the o'clock position of the femoral tunnel in ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Jocelyn Ross; Garrett, William E

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates intraobserver and interobserver agreement in reporting the o'clock position of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Four PGY2 residents, four PGY5 residents, and four sports medicine orthopedic surgeons reported the o'clock position of the femoral ACL tunnel in 10 arthroscopic pictures on two occasions 3 months apart. Intraobserver agreement was determined using the intraobserver correlation coefficient (r > 0.576 for 0.05 significance level). Interobserver agreement between members of each group and between reviewer groups was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.75 considered good agreement). Poor interobserver agreement was demonstrated between the attending and PGY2 groups (ICC = 0.1685), between the attending and PGY5 groups (ICC = 0.2982), and between the PGY5 and PGY2 groups (ICC = 0.267). Attending surgeons, PGY5s, and PGY2s demonstrated poor interobserver agreement amongst themselves (ICC = 0.2244, 0.471, and 0.0859, respectively). PGY2s and PGY5s demonstrated good intraobserver agreement, but attending surgeons demonstrated poor intraobserver agreement. Attending orthopedic surgeons and residents of different levels of training interpret the o'clock position of the femoral tunnel differently. Greater years of experience does not improve intraobserver or interobserver agreement on the o'clock position. The clock face terminology for femoral tunnel placement may not be a reliable descriptor for scientific investigations or clinical instruction. PMID:24227399

  12. Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Recovery after Arthroscopic Knee Surgery.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjeev; Singisetti, Kiran; Srikanth, Koppa N; Bamforth, Cathy; Asumu, Theophilus; Buch, Keyur

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single immediate postoperative instillation of 10 mL of sodium hyaluronate (Viscoseal) into the knee following arthroscopy. A single-center, prospective, randomized, controlled study was undertaken. Consenting knee arthroscopy patients were randomized into two groups following surgery: the study group received 10 mL of sodium hyaluronate intra-articularly, while the control group received an intra-articular instillation of 10 mL of Bupivacaine. Pre- and postoperative visual analogue scale scores for pain and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) scores for knee function were obtained. Overall, 48 patients under the care of a single surgeon were randomized into two groups of 24. There were no statistically significant demographic differences at baseline. Three patients were lost to follow-up. There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores favoring the study group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.05), and a statistically significant difference in WOMAC scores favoring the study group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively (p = 0.01). Synovial fluid replacement with sodium hyaluronate following arthroscopic knee surgery conferred statistically significant improvements in pain and function scores compared with Bupivacaine in the short term (3-6 weeks). PMID:26551066

  13. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for horizontal tear of discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Bin, Seong-Il; Jeong, Sang-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Shon, Hyun-Chul

    2002-01-01

    A new method of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for horizontal tear of discoid lateral meniscus was devised to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible. To evaluate the clinical result of this method for horizontal tear of discoid lateral meniscus, 31 knees (30 patients) were reviewed at an average follow-up of 35 months (range 14-48 months). Horizontally torn discoid lateral menisci were classified as incomplete (11 cases) or complete (20 cases) by the Watanabe classification; no Wrisberg type was noted. Partial meniscectomy was performed in all cases. For the technique of a new method of partial meniscectomy, the unstable leaf of the horizontally torn meniscus was removed to the peripheral rim, but the stable one was preserved and reshaped to produce the similar appearance to the normal lateral meniscus in terms of width and thickness. It was trimmed to have a balanced rim of meniscal tissue about 6-8 mm in width. Meniscal repair was added to partial meniscectomy in one case. All the cases were rated using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and were reviewed to recognize retear clinically. The scores increased after partial meniscectomy by average 20.7 (from 73.0 to 93.7). Recurrence of tear or aggravation of symptoms was not noted at the final follow-up. PMID:11819016

  14. Arthroscopic Management of Synovial Osteochondromatosis of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Blitzer, Charles M; Scarano, Kyle A

    2015-06-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign metaplasia of the synovium resulting in the formation of osteocartilaginous nodules within the synovial lining. At presentation, radiographs typically reveal these nodules to have broken free from the synovial lining, becoming loose bodies residing in the free space of the affected joint. These fragments readily receive the necessary nutrients for continued growth from the synovial fluid in which they reside. Controversy exists over the management of the disease. Some physicians call for arthrotomy with a complete synovectomy, whereas others vouch for a minimally invasive arthroscopic approach. In the case described here, the surgeon decided on hip arthroscopy to treat synovial osteochondromatosis in a 61-year-old woman. All but one loose body that was adherent in the anterior hip capsule was successfully removed and the patient recovered promptly. This case highlights the importance of hip arthroscopy and its usefulness not only in treating conditions such as synovial osteochondromatosis, but also in accurately diagnosing them. Recognition and management of hip conditions such as synovial osteochondromatosis through arthroscopy result in minimally invasive treatment and decreased morbidity and may markedly accelerate patient rehabilitation. It is the authors' belief that this unique case further suggests the practicality of using hip arthroscopy to successfully treat synovial osteochondromatosis. PMID:26091229

  15. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review.

    PubMed

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-05-18

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  16. Postoperative pain control after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Uquillas, Carlos A; Capogna, Brian M; Rossy, William H; Mahure, Siddharth A; Rokito, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) can provide excellent clinical results for patients who fail to respond to conservative management of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. ARCR, however, can be associated with severe postoperative pain and discomfort that requires adequate analgesia. As ARCR continues to shift toward being performed as an outpatient procedure, it is incumbent on physicians and ambulatory surgical centers to provide appropriate pain relief with minimal side effects to ensure rapid recovery and safe discharge. Although intravenous and oral opioids are the cornerstone of pain management after orthopedic procedures, they are associated with drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and increased length of hospital stay. As health care reimbursements continue to become more intimately focused on quality, patient satisfaction, and minimizing of complications, the need for adequate pain control with minimal complications will continue to be a principal focus for providers and institutions alike. We present a review of alternative modalities for pain relief after ARCR, including cryotherapy, intralesional anesthesia, nerve blockade, indwelling continuous nerve block catheters, and multimodal anesthesia. In choosing among these modalities, physicians should consider patient- and system-based factors to allow the efficient delivery of analgesia that optimizes recovery and improves patient satisfaction. PMID:27079219

  17. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-01-01

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  18. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  19. Femoral mononeuropathy caused by a malignant sarcoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Patrícia; Pumarola, Martí; Zamora, Angels; Espada, Ivonne; Lloret, Albert; Añor, Sònia

    2008-11-01

    A 9-year old miniature poodle and a 6-year old American Staffordshire terrier were evaluated for slowly progressive lameness and atrophy of the left pelvic limb. Neurological examinations of both animals were consistent with femoral nerve lesions. In both cases, neoplastic masses were identified within the left psoas muscle, invading the left femoral nerve or, in one case, its nerve roots. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate and histopathological examination of the masses revealed that these were malignant sarcomas. Femoral mononeuropathies are very rare in dogs, and most descriptions of femoral nerve lesions are caused by traumatic injuries. Descriptions of neoplastic processes affecting the femoral nerve are limited to peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNST). These cases provide the first descriptions of malignant neoplasms other than PNSTs that infiltrate the femoral nerve or its nerve roots and cause unilateral femoral mononeuropathy and lameness of obscure origin. PMID:17889576

  20. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  1. [Arthroscopic meniscus plasty of the discoid cartilage of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Sun, C J; Zhang, W

    2000-04-28

    From 1989 to 1998, arthroscopic discoid lateral meniscus plasty was performed in twenty-eight patients(thirty-one joints), and evaluated in a short follow-up term. The mean age was 21.5(6-42) years. The average follow-up period lasted 8.4 months. The results were assessed by the Ikeuchi's grading, 87.1% joints had excellent and good results, including all incomplete types and 77.8% complete type of discoid meniscus. It is suggested that arthroscopic meniscus plasty plays an important role in the treatment of discoid meniscus of knee, and should be performed possibly as soon as the disease was diagnosed by arthroscopic examination. PMID:12212212

  2. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1A ankle Fractures in Children: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of growth arrest following paediatric ankle fractures type 1 A is very high. Therefore all attempts should be done to anatomically reduce this kind of fracture. The advances in ankle arthroscopy have brought the possibility to reduce these fractures under direct vision, without the need of capsulotomy. The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance of the use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures. Case Report: We describe two cases with SH type IV fractures of the distal medial tibia, one treated with open reduction and percutaneous screw fixation and the other treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation. The first case ended with severe growth disturbance, while the second gave a very good result. Conclusion: The use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures should be considered to ensure anatomical reduction. PMID:27298899

  3. [Arthroscopic management of intra-articular fractures of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Cognet, J-M; Martinache, X; Mathoulin, C

    2008-09-01

    The use of arthroscopy in the management of intra-articular fractures of the distal radius has become established over the last ten years, but the operative technique is not yet standardised. We report our experience with this technique and give a stage by stage description of the operative procedure. The arthroscopic part of the procedure consists firstly of an evaluation of the bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous injuries and secondly direct visual control of the reduction. The choice of bone fixation depends on the individual preferences of the surgeon but may be influenced by the configuration of the fracture. A literature review reiterates the advantages of arthroscopic assistance in managing these fractures without revealing any disadvantages. However, mastery of the arthroscopic techniques is vital before the full advantages of this type of management can be realised. PMID:18774328

  4. Color-aided visualization of dorsal wrist ganglion stalks aids in complete arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jeffrey; Trindade, Michael C D

    2011-03-01

    Dorsal wrist ganglia are the most common mass of the upper extremity. Treatment modalities include benign neglect, aspiration, and surgical excision. Arthroscopic excision is a less invasive surgical alternative to open resection with the benefit of visualizing and treating other intra-articular pathology, fewer potential complications, earlier return to activities, and possibly, a more complete resection. This may lead to a lower rate of recurrence, although this has not been proven in the literature. Recurrence depends in part on adequate ganglion stalk visualization and resection. This is often difficult in open and arthroscopic ganglionectomy. This work describes a new technique with improved arthroscopic stalk visualization and ganglion resection using intralesional injection of an inert dye. PMID:21353171

  5. Arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair for lateral instability of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Matsui, Kentaro; Stone, James W; Glazebrook, Mark A; Kennedy, John G; Guillo, Stephane; Calder, James D; Karlsson, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Although several arthroscopic procedures for lateral ligament instability of the ankle have been reported recently, it is difficult to augment the reconstruction by arthroscopically tightening the inferior extensor retinaculum. There is also concern that when using the inferior extensor retinaculum, this is not strictly an anatomical repair since its calcaneal attachment is different to that of the calcaneofibular ligament. If a ligament repair is completed firmly, it is unnecessary to add argumentation with inferior extensor retinaculum. The authors describe a simplified technique, repair of the lateral ligament alone using a lasso-loop stitch, which avoids additionally tighten the inferior extensor retinaculum. In this paper, it is described an arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair using lasso-loop stitch alone for lateral instability of the ankle that is likely safe for patients and minimal invasive. Level of evidence Therapeutic study, Level V. PMID:25982624

  6. Traumatic arteriovenous fistula as consequence of TMJ arthroscopic surgery. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Fernandez, Ana-Belen; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    The ocurrence of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula after arthroscopic surgery of TMJ represents an extremely rare event. Specifically, this uncommon complication has been described only in a few case reports. In this light, the most frequent symptoms showed by this disease are thrills, bruits, pulsatile tinnitus, and an expansible vascular mass. Importantly, the severity of these symptoms is also dependent on the vessels involved. With regard to the management, is important to note that the vessel ligation with surgery as well as vessel emolization with endovascular procedures have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these cases. In view of that, the present study describes a case of superficial temporal arteriovenous fistula that arose as a postoperative complication of a bilateral arthroscopic eminoplasty of TMJ. The aim of the present report is to characterize this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Arteriovenous fistula, arthroscopic surgery, eminoplasty of TMJ, temporal vessels. PMID:27398189

  7. In vivo cartilage regeneration induced by a double-network hydrogel: Evaluation of a novel therapeutic strategy for femoral articular cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Nobuto; Yokota, Masashi; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect using a poly-(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid)/poly-(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel in a sheep model. Seventeen mature sheep were used in this study. We created a 6.0-mm osteochondral defect in the femoral trochlea of the patellofemoral (PF) joint and the medial condyle of the tibiofemoral (TF) joint. A cylindrical DN gel plug was implanted into the defect of the right knee so that a vacant space of the planned depths of 2.0 mm in group I, 3.0 mm in group II, and 4.0 mm in group III were left. In the left knee, we created a defect with the same depth as the right knee. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the O'Driscoll score and real-time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 12 weeks. The DN gel implanted defect of group II in the PF and TF joints was completely filled with a sufficient volume of the proteoglycan-rich tissue stained with Safranin-O. The score showed that group II was significantly greater than groups I and III when treated with DN gel in the PF joint (p = 0.0441, p = 0.0174, respectively) and in the TF joint (p = 0.0019, p = 0.0006, respectively). This study has clarified the short-term efficacy of the cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel in a sheep model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2159-2165, 2016. PMID:27087198

  8. Comparison of Three Virtual Reality Arthroscopic Simulators as Part of an Orthopedic Residency Educational Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kevin D; Amendola, Annunziato; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Orthopedic education continues to move towards evidence-based curriculum in order to comply with new residency accreditation mandates. There are currently three high fidelity arthroscopic virtual reality (VR) simulators available, each with multiple instructional modules and simulated arthroscopic procedures. The aim of the current study is to assess face validity, defined as the degree to which a procedure appears effective in terms of its stated aims, of three available VR simulators. Methods Thirty subjects were recruited from a single orthopedic residency training program. Each subject completed one training session on each of the three leading VR arthroscopic simulators (ARTHRO mentor-Symbionix, ArthroS-Virtamed, and ArthroSim-Toltech). Each arthroscopic session involved simulator-specific modules. After training sessions, subjects completed a previously validated simulator questionnaire for face validity. Results The median external appearances for the ARTHRO Mentor (9.3, range 6.7-10.0; p=0.0036) and ArthroS (9.3, range 7.3-10.0; p=0.0003) were statistically higher than for Arthro- Sim (6.7, range 3.3-9.7). There was no statistical difference in intraarticular appearance, instrument appearance, or user friendliness between the three groups. Most simulators reached an appropriate level of proportion of sufficient scores for each categor y (≥70%), except for ARTHRO Mentor (intraarticular appearance-50%; instrument appearance- 61.1%) and ArthroSim (external appearance- 50%; user friendliness-68.8%). Conclusion These results demonstrate that ArthroS has the highest overall face validity of the three current arthroscopic VR simulators. However, only external appearance for ArthroS reached statistical significance when compared to the other simulators. Additionally, each simulator had satisfactory intraarticular quality. This study helps further the understanding of VR simulation and necessary features for accurate arthroscopic representation

  9. All-Arthroscopic Patch Augmentation of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Gupta, Anil K.; Yanke, Adam B.; Trenhaile, Scott W.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of massive rotator cuff tears remains challenging, with failure rates ranging from 20% to 90%. Multiple different arthroscopic and open techniques have been described, but there is no current gold standard. Failure after rotator cuff repair is typically multifactorial; however, failure of tendon-footprint healing is often implicated. Patch augmentation has been described as a possible technique to augment the biology of rotator cuff repair in situations of compromised tendon quality and has shown promising short-term results. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with patch augmentation. PMID:24400198

  10. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  11. Technique of synovial biopsy of metacarpophalangeal joints using the needle arthroscope.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Levente; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Dezso, Balázs; Szegedi, Gyula; Csernátony, Zoltán; Szepesi, Kálmán

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate the technique, advantages, and disadvantages of metacarpophalangeal joint examination with needle arthroscope. We evaluated our experience from biopsies of 10 metacarpophalangeal joints of eight rheumatoid women aged 41-45 years. The procedures were performed using a 1-mm needle arthroscope. The synovium biopsy was taken with a microforceps. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia. The tight tension of the joint and traction of the finger is necessary for good visualization, but despite this visibility can be difficult. Needle biopsy is a useful method for the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:12548452

  12. Use of a Bone Graft Drill Harvester to Create the Fenestration During Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratna, Malin D.; Ek, Eugene T.; Hoy, Gregory A.; Chehata, Ash

    2015-01-01

    The Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, or ulnohumeral arthroplasty, was described in 1978 as a method of treating elbow arthritis by creating a fenestration in the olecranon fossa. This fenestration diminishes the likelihood of recurrent spurs in the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa, without loss of structural bony strength. Arthroscopic techniques have now been developed to perform this procedure. We describe an efficient method of creating the fenestration between the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa during an arthroscopic ulnohumeral arthroplasty, or Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, that also reduces the amount of residual bone debris produced during the resection. PMID:26697312

  13. Use of a Bone Graft Drill Harvester to Create the Fenestration During Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wijeratna, Malin D; Ek, Eugene T; Hoy, Gregory A; Chehata, Ash

    2015-10-01

    The Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, or ulnohumeral arthroplasty, was described in 1978 as a method of treating elbow arthritis by creating a fenestration in the olecranon fossa. This fenestration diminishes the likelihood of recurrent spurs in the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa, without loss of structural bony strength. Arthroscopic techniques have now been developed to perform this procedure. We describe an efficient method of creating the fenestration between the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa during an arthroscopic ulnohumeral arthroplasty, or Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, that also reduces the amount of residual bone debris produced during the resection. PMID:26697312

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of painful Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome in a professional handball player.

    PubMed

    Kajetanek, C; Thaunat, M; Guimaraes, T; Carnesecchi, O; Daggett, M; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2016-09-01

    Sinding-Larsen-Johansson (SLJ) syndrome is a type of osteochondrosis of the distal pole of the patella most often caused by repeated microtrauma. Here, we describe the case of a professional athlete with painful SLJ syndrome treated arthroscopically. A 29-year-old male professional handball player presented with anterior knee pain that persisted after 4 months of an eccentric rehabilitation protocol and platelet-rich plasma injections. Despite this conservative treatment, the patient could not participate in his sport. The SLJ lesion was excised arthroscopically, which led to complete disappearance of symptoms and return to competitive sports after 5 months. PMID:27450859

  15. Basic Hip Arthroscopy: Anatomic Establishment of Arthroscopic Portals Without Fluoroscopic Guidance.

    PubMed

    Howse, Elizabeth A; Botros, Daniel B; Mannava, Sandeep; Stone, Austin V; Stubbs, Allston J

    2016-04-01

    Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity in recent years for diagnostic and therapeutic hip preservation management. This article details the establishment of arthroscopic portals of the hip, specifically the anterolateral and modified anterior portals without fluoroscopic guidance. The anterolateral portal is established anatomically, and the modified anterior portal is then established under arthroscopic guidance. A through understanding of the hip anatomy allows for these portals to be made both safely and reliably for hip arthroscopies in the modified supine positioned patient. The reduced use of fluoroscopy with this technique lowers the risk of ionizing radiation exposure to the patient and surgeon. PMID:27489756

  16. Advanced imaging and arthroscopic management of shoulder contracture after birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2012-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques applied to the pediatric glenohumeral joint have advanced understanding of the anatomic changes that occur secondary to muscular imbalance after brachial plexus birth palsy. A better understanding of the progression and timing of glenohumeral dysplasia has also increased awareness and vigilance of this problem. Early detection of glenohumeral joint subluxation is now possible, allowing for prompt treatment with closed, arthroscopic, or open joint reduction with and without tendon transfers. Dynamic ultrasound imaging, Botox, and arthroscopic techniques have expanded treatment options, providing minimally invasive methods to successfully manage glenohumeral joint dysplasia. PMID:23101604

  17. Postcatheterization Femoral Arteriovenous Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran Kosar, Sule; Gumus, Terman; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Akpek, Sergin

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To report our results of stent-graft implantation for the endovascular treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) occurring between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein.Methods: Endovascular treatment of iatrogenic femoral AVFs as a result of arterial puncture for coronary angiography and/or angioplasty was attempted in 10 cases. Balloon-expandable stent-grafts, one for each lesion, were used to repair the fistulas, which were between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein in all cases. Stent-graft implantation to the deep femoral artery was performed by a contralateral retrograde approach.Results: All stent-grafts were deployed successfully. Complete closure of the fistulas was accomplished immediately in nine of 10 cases. In one case, complete closure could not be obtained but the fact that the complaint subsided was taken to indicate clinical success. In three cases, side branch occlusion of the deep femoral artery occurred. No complications were observed after implantation. Follow-up for 8-31 months (mean 18.5 months) with color Doppler ultrasonography revealed patency of the stented arterial segments without recurrent arteriovenous shunting in those nine patients who had successful immediate closure of their AVFs.Conclusion: Our results with a mean follow-up 18.5 months suggest that stent-graft implantation for the closure of postcatheterization femoral AVFs originating from the deep femoral artery is an effective, minimally invasive alternative procedure.

  18. All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral versus Open Subpectoral Tenodesis of the Long Head of the Biceps Brachii

    PubMed Central

    Gombera, M. Mustafa; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Nair, Rueben; Saltzman, Matthew D.; Terry, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pathology of the long head of the biceps tendon is a recognized source of shoulder pain in adults that can be treated with tenotomy or tenodesis when non-operative measures are not effective. It is not clear whether arthroscopic or open biceps tenodesis has a clinical advantage. To date, we are not aware of any studies that directly compare clinical outcomes between an arthroscopic and an open technique for tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a difference in outcomes and complications exists between matched cohorts after biceps tenodesis utilizing an open subpectoral versus an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral technique. Methods: A prospective database was reviewed for patients undergoing an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral or open subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Adult patients with a minimum 18-month follow-up were included. Patients undergoing a concomitant rotator cuff or labral repair were excluded. The groups were matched to age within 3 years, sex, and time to follow-up within 3 months. Pain improvement, development of a popeye deformity, muscle cramping, post-operative ASES scores, satisfaction scores, and complications were evaluated. Results: Forty-six patients (23 all-arthroscopic, 23 open) patients with an average age of 57.2 years (range, 45-70) were evaluated at a mean 28.7 months (range, 18-42) follow-up. No patients in either group developed a popeye deformity or complained of arm cramping. There was no significant difference in mean ASES scores between the open and all-arthroscopic groups (92.7 vs. 88.9, P = 0.42, Table 1). Similarly, there was no significant difference between patient satisfaction scores (8.9 vs. 9.1, P = 0.73). Eighteen patients (78.3%) in the arthroscopic cohort and sixteen patients (69.6%) in the open cohort fully returned to athletic activity (P = 0.50). There were no complications in the all-arthroscopic group. There were two complications in the open group

  19. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  20. Atypical femoral fracture following zoledronic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Ataoğlu, Baybars; Kaptan, Ahmet Yiğit; Eren, Toygun Kağan; Yapar, Ali Ekber; Berkay, Ahmet Fırat

    2016-04-01

    A 68-year-old female patient admitted to our clinic with right anterior thigh pain ongoing for six months and which increased in last two months. The patient had no trauma history. The patient had been followed-up for 15 years because of osteoporosis and administrated alendronate and ibandronate treatment for 10 years. Patient had three shots of zoledronate once a year during the last three years. Her pain was increasing when she was walking. Physical examination revealed pain in her right thigh. Radiogram showed thickened lateral cortex of the subtrochanteric area. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed thickening and edema of the same area. These images were correlated with atypical fracture in right femoral subthrochanteric zone. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed that T score was -3.3 in lumbar region and -2.5 in femoral neck. Zoledronate treatment was ended. Prophylactic surgical fixation was performed with titanium elastic nails. PMID:26874637

  1. Repair Integrity and Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ariel A.; Mark, P.; DiVenere, Jessica Megan; Klinge, Stephen Austin; Arciero, Robert A.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the effect of early versus delayed motion on repair integrity on 6-month postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following rotator cuff repair, and to correlate repair integrity with clinical and functional outcomes. We hypothesized that repair integrity would differ between the early and delayed groups and that patients with repair failures would have worse clinical and functional outcomes. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, single blinded clinical trial comparing an early motion (post-op day 2-3) to a delayed motion (post-op day 28) rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic repair of isolated supraspinatus tears. All patients underwent MRI at 6 months post-operatively as part of the study protocol. A blinded board-certified and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon (not part of the surgical team) reviewed operative photos and video to confirm the presence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear and to ensure an adequate and consistent repair. The same surgeon along with a blinded sports medicine fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist independently reviewed all MRIs to determine whether the repair was intact at 6 months. Outcome measures were collected by independent evaluators who were also blinded to group assignment. These included the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) ratings, pain scores, sling use, and physical exam data. Enrolled patients were followed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Results: From October 2008 to April 2012, 73 patients met all inclusion criteria and were willing to participate. 36 patients were randomized to delayed motion and 37 were randomized to early motion. The final study group at 6 months consisted of 58 study participants. Postoperative MRIs were obtained on all of these patients at 6 months regardless of whether or not they were progressing as expected. These MRIs demonstrated an overall failure rate of

  2. Arthroscopic intralesional curettage for large benign talar dome cysts

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M.; Nasef Abdelatif, Nasef Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical management of large talar dome cysts is challenging due to increased morbidity by associated cartilage damage and malleolar osteotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of endoscopic curettage and bone graft for large talar dome cysts. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of data for eight patients (eight feet) who were treated by arthroscopic curettage and grafting for large talar dome cysts. Seven cases were treated by posterior ankle arthroscopy as the lesion was located posteriorly while one case was treated by anterior ankle arthroscopy as the lesion was breached anteriorly. Results: The final diagnosis, was; large osteochondral lesion of talus (two cases), aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (two case), intra-osseous ganglion (two cases), Chronic infection in talus (one case) and angiomatous lesion of the talus (one case). The mean follow up period was 18.3 (±3.06 SD) months (range 16–25 months). The median preoperative AOFAS score was 74.5 (±5.34 SD) points. The mean postoperative AOFAS score at one year follow up was 94.6 (±2.97 SD) points. None of the patient had recurrence of the lesion during follow up. Return to normal daily activity was achieved at 11.25 (±2.37 SD) weeks. Discussion: In this short case series study, large talar dome bony cysts of different pathologies including aneurysmal bone cysts could be treated effectively by endoscopic curettage and bone grafting with no recurrence no complications during the follow-up period. PMID:27163087

  3. Arthroscopical and histological study of cartilaginous lesions treated by mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cirstoiu, CF; Bădilă, AE

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of our study was to assess macro– and microscopically the knee cartilaginous lesions outcome treated by mosaicplasty. Material and method Our study included 32 patients which underwent mosaicplasty for nondegenerative cartilaginous lesions of the knee and a second look arthroscopy. In 21 patients, minibiopsies from the repaired lesion were performed under arthroscopic control (from the cartilaginous region of the transplanted osteocartilaginous grafts and from the spaces between grafts). All repaired lesions were carefully examined during arthroscopy and all harvested minifragments were studied by optical microscopy (staining method – hematoxylin eosin). Results Macroscopically, the articular surface of the repaired cartilaginous lesions was smooth and congruent to the adjacent surfaces. The aspect and resistance to compression of grafted area was similar to those of the normal surrounding cartilage. The transferred cartilage maintained its height, being at the level of the neighboring cartilage. One year postoperatively, the limits of the cartilaginous autografts were still visible. Two years postoperatively, these limits were no longer visible. Microscopically, the region of the former lesion was constituted mainly by viable hyaline cartilage. Fibrous cartilaginous tissue was visualized in the spaces between the grafts. Conclusions The second look arthroscopy showed that after mosaicplasty the repaired articular surface was smooth, leveled, homogenous and congruent to adjacent cartilage. The spaces between grafts are progressively covered by fibrous cartilaginous tissue with a more textured and uneven surface. Mosaicplasty is a biological surgical technique which restores the normal osteocartilaginous architecture of the most part of the grafted area. The transplanted osteocartilaginous cylindrical grafts maintain its viability and mechanical properties. PMID:21254739

  4. Femoral midshaft fractures: expandable versus locked nailing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen-Tao; Song, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Xiao-Zhong; Zhou, Hai-Bin; Luo, Zong-Ping; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2015-04-01

    Femoral midshaft fracture is one of the most common clinical injuries and is often caused by high-energy traffic accidents. Intramedullary nailings, plates, and external fixators are all used as treatment alternatives for a variety of patients depending on fracture location, displacement, comminution, soft tissue condition, and local tradition. Locked intramedullary nailing is currently the preferred treatment method for most diaphyseal fractures and has good clinical results. The goal of this study was to compare expandable and locked intramedullary nailing for the treatment of AO type 32A and 32B1 femoral midshaft fractures. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 46 patients (33 men and 13 women; mean age, 32.3 years; range, 22-52 years) with femoral midshaft fractures who were divided into 2 groups-one treated with an expandable intramedullary nailing method and the other with a conventional locked intramedullary nailing. The 2 groups were compared with respect to operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, hospitalization time, healing time, and complications. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. The results of this study showed that all of the patients achieved bone union within 12 to 24 months. Expandable nailing performed better than locked nailing in operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, and healing time (P<.001). There was no difference in hospitalization time and no visible shortening or severe complications were observed in either group. Based on the results of this study, the expandable intramedullary nailing is an easy and effective treatment for AO type 32A and 32B1 diaphyseal femoral fractures. PMID:25901625

  5. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing.

    PubMed

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-10-18

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  6. Incomplete transposition of the common femoral artery and vein.

    PubMed

    Leite, J O; Carvalho Ventura, I; Botelho, F E; Costa Galvao, W

    2010-02-01

    Anatomical variations of the great saphenous vein, femoral artery and femoral vein at the inguinal level are rare. Modifications in the anatomical relationships among theses vessel can cause technical difficulties. There are two reports in the literature of the complete transposition of the femoral artery and vein. Both patients had large varicose veins only in the limb that presented the variation, which suggested an extrinsic compression. In the present paper, we report a case study of a patient with an incomplete transposition of the femoral artery and vein. Specifically, the common femoral vein and the saphenofemoral junction were completely overlapped by the common femoral artery. Although this anatomical variation did not present any clinical signs, it required a more complex surgical procedure. PMID:20224538

  7. Incidence of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Jong-Keon; Byun, Young-Soo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Shon, Hyun Chul; Park, Ki Chul; Kim, Jung Jae; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and to identify risk factors for developing AVNFH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral shaft fractures treated with antegrade intramedullary nailing at 10 institutions. Among the 703 patients enrolled, 161 patients were excluded leaving 542 patients in the study. Average age was 42.1 years with average follow-up of 26.3 months. Patient characteristics and fracture patterns as well as entry point of femoral nails were identified and the incidence of AVNFH was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to open versus closed physis, open versus closed fractures, and age (<20 versus ≥20 years). Overall incidence of AVNFH was 0.2% (1 of 542): the patient was 15-year-old boy. Of 25 patients with open physis, the incidence of AVNFH was 4%, whereas none of 517 patients with closed physis developed AVNFH (P < 0.001). The incidence of AVNFH in patients aged < 20 versus ≥20 years was 1.1% (1 of 93) and 0.0% (0 of 449), respectively (P = 0.172), which meant that the incidence of AVNFH was 0% in adult with femur shaft fracture. Of 61 patients with open fractures, the incidence of AVNFH was 0%. The number of cases with entry point at the trochanteric fossa or tip of the greater trochanter (GT) was 324 and 218, respectively, and the incidence of AVNFH was 0.3% and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.412). In patients aged ≥20 years with isolated femoral shaft fracture, there was no case of AVNFH following antegrade intramedullary nailing regardless of the entry point. Therefore, our findings suggest that the risk of AVNFH following antegrade femoral nailing is extremely low in adult patients. PMID:26844518

  8. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of the discoid lateral meniscus: results of long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vandermeer, R D; Cunningham, F K

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two patients (25 knees) were evaluated at an average follow-up of 54 months for clinical results of arthroscopic treatment of the discoid lateral meniscus syndrome. Discoid lateral menisci were classified arthroscopically as incomplete (92%) or complete (8%); no Wrisberg-type lesions were noted. Three patients (14%) had bilateral lesions. Symptomatic torn discoid menisci (20 knees) and torn discoid menisci with other significant symptomatic lesions (3 knees) underwent arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy utilizing the saucerization technique. Asymptomatic intact discoid menisci (2 knees) were left unresected. Using the knee scale of Ikeuchi, 55% of the symptomatic torn lesions were rated as excellent or good, 30% were rated as fair, and 15% were rated as poor at follow-up. Two of the 3 asymptomatic torn lesions were rated as excellent or good, as were both of the intact discoid lesions. Factors associated with an unsatisfactory rating at follow-up included preexistent degenerative changes, age, and sex. Duration of symptoms, type of discoid tear, and length of follow-up were not necessarily related to outcome results. Seven knees (28%) required arthroscopic reevaluation at a postoperative average of 23 months, documenting apparent physiologic function of the saucerized rim in 4 patients and failure of saucerization in 3 patients (12%). Overall, 14 of the 22 patients in this study (64%) resumed a normal activity level postoperatively, including 61% of those with symptomatic torn discoid lateral menisci. PMID:2736005

  10. Arthroscopic repair of peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex tears with suture welding: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Badia, Alejandro; Jiménez, Alexis

    2006-10-01

    This report presents a method of arthroscopic repair of the peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex tears that replaces traditional suture knots with ultrasonic welding of sutures. This will help eliminate potential causes of ulnar-sided wrist discomfort during the postoperative period. PMID:17027791

  11. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Chung, Woo Chull; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  12. A Review of Arthroscopic Bone Marrow Stimulation Techniques of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Christopher D.; Foo, Li Foong; Kennedy, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries following acute and chronic ankle sprains. Numerous surgical treatment strategies have been employed for treating these lesions; arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation is recognized as the first-line technique to provide fibrocartilage infill of the defect site. While the short- and medium-term outcomes of this technique are good, the long-term outcomes are not yet known. An increasing number of studies, however, show a cause for concern in employing this technique, including declining outcome scores over time. The current authors have therefore developed a treatment strategy based on previously established guidelines in addition to morphological cartilage-sensitive fast spin echo techniques and quantitative T2 mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accordingly, the authors advocate arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation in lesion sizes up to 8 mm in diameter and osteochondral autograft transplant (OATS) in lesion sizes greater than 8 mm in diameter. In the absence of long-term studies, confining the use of arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation to smaller lesions may support prolonged joint life by decreasing the rate at which the fibrocartilage ultimately degenerates over time. Employing the OATS procedure in larger lesions has the advantage of replacing “like with like.” The current review examines the role of arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation techniques of the talus. PMID:26069545

  13. Application of optical coherence tomography enhances reproducibility of arthroscopic evaluation of equine joints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthroscopy is widely used in various equine joints for diagnostic and surgical purposes. However, accuracy of defining the extent of cartilage lesions and reproducibility in grading of lesions are not optimal. Therefore, there is a need for new, more quantitative arthroscopic methods. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising tool introduced for quantitative detection of cartilage degeneration and scoring of the severity of chondral lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-investigator agreement and inter-method agreement in grading cartilage lesions by means of conventional arthroscopy and with OCT technique. For this aim, 41 cartilage lesions based on findings in conventional and OCT arthroscopy in 14 equine joints were imaged, blind coded and independently ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) scored by three surgeons and one PhD-student. Results The intra- and inter-investigator percentages of agreement by means of OCT (68.9% and 43.9%, respectively) were higher than those based on conventional arthroscopic imaging (56.7% and 31.7%, respectively). The intra-investigator Kappa coefficients were 0.709 and 0.565 for OCT and arthroscopy, respectively. Inter-investigator Kappa coefficients were 0.538 and 0.408 for OCT and arthroscopy, respectively. Conclusions OCT can enhance reproducibility of arthroscopic evaluation of equine joints. PMID:24410869

  14. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  15. A novel technique of arthroscopic excision of a symptomatic os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Shuji; Kita, Keisuke; Natsu-ume, Takashi; Hamada, Masayuki; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new arthroscopic excision technique for a symptomatic os trigonum. With the patient lying in a prone position, a posterolateral portal just lateral to the Achilles tendon, at the 5-mm level proximal to the tip of the fibula, is used for the arthroscope and an accessory posterolateral portal just posterior to the peroneal tendon at the same level is used for instruments. The synovial tissues are then debrided with a power shaver through the accessory posterolateral portal for better visualization. An elevator is used to release the fibrous tissue between the os trigonum and the talus. The os trigonum is completely excised with a grasper to visualize the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Radiographic control is helpful to check the position of the arthroscope if it happens to be inserted into the ankle joint as a result of the reduced subtalar joint space. Postoperatively, no immobilization is necessary, and full weight-bearing is allowed as tolerated. Three of us have performed 11 procedures with excellent results and no cases of complications. This arthroscopic excision technique for the symptomatic os trigonum is a safe and effective procedure. PMID:18182212

  16. Treatment of intra-articular fractures of the distal radius: fluoroscopic or arthroscopic reduction?

    PubMed

    Varitimidis, S E; Basdekis, G K; Dailiana, Z H; Hantes, M E; Bargiotas, K; Malizos, K

    2008-06-01

    In a randomised prospective study, 20 patients with intra-articular fractures of the distal radius underwent arthroscopically- and fluoroscopically-assisted reduction and external fixation plus percutaneous pinning. Another group of 20 patients with the same fracture characteristics underwent fluoroscopically-assisted reduction alone and external fixation plus percutaneous pinning. The patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at follow-up of 24 months. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and modified Mayo wrist score were used at 3, 9, 12 and 24 months postoperatively. In the arthroscopically- and fluoroscopically-assisted group, triangular fibrocartilage complex tears were found in 12 patients (60%), complete or incomplete scapholunate ligament tears in nine (45%), and lunotriquetral ligament tears in four (20%). They were treated either arthroscopically or by open operation. Patients who underwent arthroscopically- and fluoroscopically-assisted treatment had significantly better supination, extension and flexion at all time points than those who had fluoroscopically-assisted surgery. The mean DASH scores were similar for both groups at 24 months, whereas the difference in the mean modified Mayo wrist scores remained statistically significant. Although the groups are small, it is clear that the addition of arthroscopy to the fluoroscopically-assisted treatment of intra-articular distal radius fractures improves the outcome. Better treatment of associated intra-articular injuries might also have been a reason for the improved outcome. PMID:18539672

  17. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  18. Radial nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior capsular release for degenerative elbow contracture.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Sung-Tae; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-12-01

    Because the use of arthroscopy has increased recently for the treatment of elbow lesions, reports of complications have become more common. Nerve injury after arthroscopic anterior capsular release is an extremely rare complication, with 4 reported cases worldwide. We usually use a sharp-tipped electrocautery device with a 0.5-mm diameter during arthroscopic capsular release. In this case, because the former was not prepared, we used a ball-tipped electrocautery device with a 3-mm diameter. Herein, we experienced a case of radial nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior capsular release using a ball-tipped electrocautery device on a degenerative elbow contracture. We supposed that the electrocautery device caused transiently thermal injury of the radial nerve despite proper portal entry site, intra-articular distension, and gentle arthroscopic manipulation. Elbow arthroscopy remains a technically difficult procedure with the potential for neurologic complications. To perform surgery safely, knowledge of the regional neuroanatomy and a thorough understanding of proper instrument usage are required. PMID:18063186

  19. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Hip Preservation Is Critical for Preserving Health and Function in Adolescents and Adults.

    PubMed

    Martin, Hal David

    2016-09-01

    Hip health is a critical factor in preserving daily life activities and wellbeing for both adults and adolescents. There are several potential economic influences in developing arthroscopic hip techniques for the evaluation and treatment of hip pathology in patients of all ages. PMID:27594331

  20. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb. PMID:23341246

  1. Operative Management of Crossover Femoral-femoral Graft Erosion into Bladder: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Motiani, Karan; Mahdy, Ayman

    2016-09-01

    Erosion of vascular grafts is not uncommon as seen in the recent literature. There have been many case reports documenting the work up and management of erosion of these grafts into bowel. We report a case of a crossover femoral-femoral graft that eroded into the anterior bladder wall and was incidentally found as an adherent bladder stone during cystoscopy. We demonstrate the importance of having a high level of clinical suspicion for eroding vascular grafts when preoperative imaging shows close proximity of graft to bladder. PMID:27462547

  2. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay. PMID:27289256

  3. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  4. Return to Elite Level of Play and Performance in Professional Golfers After Arthroscopic Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Justin T.; Saroki, Adriana J.; Briggs, Karen K.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip conditions, such as femoroacetabular impingement and labral injury, can cause pain and limit the ability to play sports at a professional level. Purpose: To evaluate performance metrics of professional golfers prior to arthroscopic hip surgery and after surgery. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study included professional golfers who underwent arthroscopic hip surgery. Primary outcome variables were greens in regulation and driving distance. Metrics were recorded for 2 years prior to arthroscopic hip surgery and 1, 2, and 5 years after arthroscopy. Results: A consecutive cohort of 20 male professional golfers (27 hips) from 2000 to 2011 underwent arthroscopic hip surgery by a single surgeon. All players were on the PGA Tour with a mean age of 38 years (range, 26-54 years). Eleven hips had labral repair and 16 had labral debridements. Four hips required microfracture of a chondral lesion. All players returned to play at a mean of 4.7 months (range, 1 month to 2 years). The mean number of years played after surgery was 5.72. There was no significant difference between preoperative and postoperative greens in regulation (P = .227). The mean distance per golf drive was significantly longer at 1 and 2 years postoperative compared with prior to surgery (P < .01), and driving distance at 5 years was also longer than preoperative (P = .008). Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of chondrolabral dysfunction due to femoroacetabular impingement in the professional golfer allowed the golfer to return to the same skill level prior to surgery. Mean driving distance was found to increase after arthroscopy, demonstrating not only a return but also an improvement in driving performance from prior level of play. PMID:27141515

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  6. Effectiveness of Fulkerson Osteotomy with Femoral Nerve Stimulation for Patients with Severe Femoral Trochlear Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Crebs, D.T.; Anthony, C.A.; McCunniff, P.T.; Nieto, M.J.; Beckert, M.W.; Albright, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with femoral trochlear dysplasia are at risk for chronic recurrent patellofemoral dislocations, with extreme cases often requiring a surgical procedure. Anteromedialization of the tibial tubercle with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent medial patella-femoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a previously reported method of maximizing patello-femoral congruency. We hypothesize the Fulkerson osteotomy with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent MPFL reconstruction in patients with severe trochlear dysplasia provides equivalent postoperative clinical outcomes to the same procedure in patients with low level trochlear dysplasia. Methods 48 knees underwent Fulkerson osteotomy with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent MPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellar dislocations. MRI, surgeon intraoperative assessment, and X-ray were used to assess degrees of trochlear dysplasia; inter-observer and intra-observer error were measured. The knees positive for severe dysplasia on MRI, intraoperative assessment, and X-ray were considered as a comparison cohort to the rest of the study population. We considered postoperative dislocation events and patellar tracking kinematics as outcome measures. Independent student t tests and Fisher exact tests were used to evaluate differences between groups. Significance was set at P<0.05. Results 11 knees were positive for severe dysplasia (SD) by combined MRI, surgeon intraoperative assessment, and X-ray with the remaining 37 knees categorized as low dysplasia (LD). No patients in either group exhibited apprehension or required re-operation. Mean sulcus angle in the SD group was 175.8 +−2.45 degrees (95% CI 171.0–180.6); the LD group mean sulcus angle was 154.3 +− 0.98 degrees (95% CI 152.4–156.2) (P<.001). Postoperatively there was no significant difference in dislocation events between the SD group (0/11) and the LD group (2/37) (P>0.999). Patellar

  7. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: what's new?

    PubMed

    Peck, Kathryn; Herrera-Soto, José

    2014-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip disorder among adolescents, whereby the epiphysis is displaced posteriorly and inferiorly to the metaphysis. Treatment modalities aim to stabilize the epiphysis, prevent further slippage, and avoid complications associated with long-term morbidity, such as osteonecrosis and chondrolysis. Controversy exists with SCFE regarding prophylactic fixation of the contralateral, painless, normal hip, the role of femoroacetabular impingement with SCFE, and whether in situ fixation is the best treatment method for SCFE. This article presents and discusses the latest diagnostic and treatment modalities for SCFE. PMID:24267209

  8. Arthroscopic pubic symphysis debridement and adductor enthesis repair in athletes with athletic pubalgia: technical note and video illustration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sascha; Tumin, Masjudin; Wilhelm, Peter; Pohlemann, Tim; Kelm, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We elaborately describe our novel arthroscopic technique of the symphysis pubis in athletes with osteitis pubis and concomitant adductor enthesopathy who fail to conservative treatment modalities. The symphysis pubis is debrided arthroscopically and the degenerated origin of adductor tendon (enthesis) is excised and reattached. With our surgical procedure the stability of the symphysis pubis is successfully preserved and the adductor longus enthesopathy simultaneously addressed in the same setting. PMID:25055756

  9. Correlation Between Asymmetric Resection of Posterior Femoral Condyles and Femoral Component Rotation in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Harun Reşit; Ök, Nusret; Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Semih; Kıter, Esat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Pertaining to peculiar designs of current knee prostheses, more bone is removed from posteromedial femoral condyle than posterolateral condyle to obtain desired femoral component rotation. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the asymmetry of the cuts and the femoral component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. Methods: We built a model to simulate anterior chamfer cut (ACC) performed during total knee arthroplasty for measuring posterior condylar offset (PCO). Right knee axial MRI slices of a total 290 consecutive patients (142 male, 138 female, and mean age 31.39 ± 6.6) were examined. A parallel line to surgical transepiphyseal axis was drawn, and placed at the deepest part of trochlear groove. Posteromedial and posterolateral condylar offsets were measured by drawing perpendicular lines to ACC beginning from the intersection points of both anteromedial and anterolateral cortices to posterior joint line (PJL), respectively. Differences between posteromedial and posterolateral PCO were calculated, and femoral rotation angles (FRA) relative to PJL were measured. Results: The mean surgical FRA was 4.76 ± 1.16 degrees and the mean PCO differencesss- was 4.35 ± 1.04 mm for the whole group and there was no statistically significant difference between genders. There was a strong correlation between surgical FRA and PCO difference (p<0.0001, r=0.803). Linear regression analyses revealed that 0.8 mm of difference between the anteroposterior dimensions of medial and lateral PCO corresponds to 1 degree of surgical FRA (p<0.0001, R2=0.645). Conclusion: Correlation between the asymmetry of posterior chamfer cuts and achieved femoral component rotation can verify the accuracy of desired rotation, intraoperatively. However, further clinical investigations should be planned to test the results of our morphometric study.

  10. Accuracy of femoral templating in reproducing anatomical femoral offset in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Davies, H; Foote, J; Spencer, R F

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of hip biomechanics is a crucial component of successful total hip replacement. Preoperative templating is recommended to ensure that the size and orientation of implants is optimised. We studied how closely natural femoral offset could be reproduced using the manufacturers' templates for 10 femoral stems in common use in the UK. A series of 23 consecutive preoperative radiographs from patients who had undergone unilateral total hip replacement for unilateral osteoarthritis of the hip was employed. The change in offset between the templated position of the best-fitting template and the anatomical centre of the hip was measured. The templates were then ranked according to their ability to reproduce the normal anatomical offset. The most accurate was the CPS-Plus (Root Mean Square Error 2.0 mm) followed in rank order by: C stem (2.16), CPT (2.40), Exeter (3.23), Stanmore (3.28), Charnley (3.65), Corail (3.72), ABG II (4.30), Furlong HAC (5.08) and Furlong modular (7.14). A similar pattern of results was achieved when the standard error of variability of offset was analysed. We observed a wide variation in the ability of the femoral prosthesis templates to reproduce normal femoral offset. This variation was independent of the seniority of the observer. The templates of modern polished tapered stems with high modularity were best able to reproduce femoral offset. The current move towards digitisation of X-rays may offer manufacturers an opportunity to improve template designs in certain instances, and to develop appropriate computer software. PMID:19197861

  11. [The changes of bone architecture in atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Takahash, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    The feature of atypical femoral fracture is stress induced cortical bone reaction. It was considered to be the accumulation of microdamage which come from increasing of mechanical stress by femoral lateral bowing, and the decreased of ability of microdamage repair system. PMID:23811584

  12. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  13. Complete guidewire retention after femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Cat, Bahar Gulcay; Guler, Sertac; Soyuduru, Murat; Guven, Ibrahim; Ramadan, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used for various purposes in the emergency departments (ED). The main uses of CVCs in the EDs are emergent hemodialysis, in situations where peripheral vein catheterization cannot be achieved, and continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The complications related to CVC insertion are usually mechanical and observed in the near term after the procedure. Retained CVC guidewire after catheterization is a rare complication in the published reports and usually related with intra- or postoperative settings and jugular or subclavian vein. The present study reported a young female patient who underwent left femoral vein catheterization 6 months earlier in an intensive care unit of another hospital and was diagnosed with complete guidewire retention in the ED. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case in published reports with a diagnosis of retained CVC guidewire with retrograde migration into the femoral vein. Surprisingly, the patient developed no thrombotic or embolic complication during this 6-month period. PMID:26657235

  14. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure. PMID:26716087

  15. Occult fracture of the femoral neck associated with extensive osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the subchondral portion of the femoral head is a common site for collapse in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), femoral-neck fracture rarely occurs during the course of ONFH. We report a case of occult insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck without conditions predisposing to insufficiency fractures, occurring in association with ONFH. Presentation of case We report a case of occult fracture of the femoral neck due to extensive ONFH in a 60-year-old man. No abnormal findings suggestive of ONFH were identified on radiographs, and the fracture occurred spontaneously without any trauma or unusual increase in activity. The patient’s medical history, age, and good bone quality suggested ONFH as a possible underlying cause. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was useful in determining whether the fracture was caused by ONFH or was instead a simple insufficiency fracture caused by steroid use. Discussion The patient was treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty, but if we had not suspected ONFH as a predisposing condition, the undisplaced fracture might have been treated by osteosynthesis, and this would have led to nonunion or collapse of the femoral head. To avoid providing improper treatment, clinicians should consider ONFH as a predisposing factor in pathologic fractures of the femoral neck. Conclusion ONFH should be included in the differential diagnosis of insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck. PMID:26275737

  16. Arthroscopic Bioabsorbable Screw Fixation of Unstable Osteochondritis Dissecans in Adolescents: Clinical Results, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Second-Look Arthroscopic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Keun Churl; Kim, Kwang Mee; Jeong, Ki Joon; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in adolescent patients with unstable lesions causing pain. Methods The study included 11 patients (10 males and 1 female) with OCD who underwent arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation between July 2007 and February 2014 and were available for follow-up for more than 12 months. The mean age at diagnosis was 16.3 years (range, 11 to 19 years), and the average follow-up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 91 months). Clinical results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm knee score, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score measured before surgery and at follow-up. Functional evaluation was made using the Tegner activity scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second-look arthroscopy were performed at the 12-month follow-up. Results Between the preoperative assessment and follow-up, improvements were seen in the KOOS (range, 44.9 to 88.1), Lysholm knee score (range, 32.6 to 82.8), and IKDC score (range, 40.8 to 85.6). The Tegner activity scale also improved from 2.8 to 6.1. Based on postoperative MRI, there were eight Dipaola grade I cases and three grade II cases. No complications due to fixation failure developed in any case. Second-look arthroscopy at 12 months postoperatively revealed that the lesion was covered with cartilage in all cases. Conclusions For unstable OCD lesions causing pain in adolescents, arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation provided favorable outcomes with reduced pain and restoration of movement. Therefore, it should be considered as an effective treatment for OCD. PMID:26929800

  17. Arthroscopic treatment of the discoid lateral meniscus. Technique and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, H

    1982-07-01

    Forty-five patients (49 knees) who had torn complete or incomplete discoid lateral menisci were treated during the period from 1968 to 1980. Both instrumentation and specific techniques considerably evolved in the arthroscopic complete excision the torn discoid meniscus. The current technique involves the initial removal of the anterior portion of the meniscus, as this allows clearer visualization during the procedure, more space for manipulating surgical instruments, and a reduced operative time. Twenty-four knees (22 patients) were followed for a mean of four years three months. Of this group, 78% were rated excellent or good and 21% were rated fair. There were no poor results. The results in the group treated by total meniscectomy were better than those in the group treated with partial meniscectomy. Three patients were treated by peripheral meniscal repair under arthroscopic control, but the long-term results are not available. PMID:6896480

  18. Arthroscopic Microfracture Technique for Cartilage Damage to the Lateral Condyle of the Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Minami, Ginjiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the use of arthroscopic microfracture to treat a 10-year-old female patient with extensive damage to the cartilage of the lateral condyle of the tibia before epiphyseal closure, resulting in good cartilage recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a defect in part of the load-bearing surface of the articular cartilage of the condyle articular of the tibia. The patient was diagnosed with damage to the lateral condyle cartilage of the tibia following meniscectomy, and arthroscopic surgery was performed. The cartilage defect measured approximately 20 × 20 mm, and microfracture was performed. Arthroscopy performed four months postoperatively showed that the cartilage defect was completely covered with fibrous cartilage, and the patient was allowed to resume sports activities. Four years postoperatively, she has had no recurrence of pain or hydrarthrosis. PMID:26345523

  19. A simplified arthroscopic bone graft transfer technique in chronic glenoid bone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nebelung, Wolfgang; Reichwein, Frank; Nebelung, Sven

    2016-06-01

    In severe shoulder instability, chronic glenoid bone deficiency is a challenge for arthroscopic shoulder surgeons. This paper presents a new all-arthroscopic technique of iliac crest bone graft transfer for those patients. Transportation through the rotator interval and repositioning into the glenoid defect is achieved by use of a tracking suture, while fixation of the graft is performed by biodegradable or titanium double-helix screws. Overall, the feasibility and reproducibility of this new reconstruction technique in recreating the bony and soft tissue anatomy of the antero-inferior glenoid could be demonstrated. So far, preliminary outcomes of 24 patients operated on using this technique are promising. Level of evidence Case series with no comparison group, Level IV. PMID:24803016

  20. Osteoid osteoma (OO) of the coracoid: a case report of arthroscopic excision and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Said, Hatem Galal

    2015-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) of the coracoid is a rare entity that may present with variable symptoms from shoulder leading to delay in diagnosis and treatment. We present the clinical and radiological findings and management of one such case along with a review of similar cases reported in the literature. There was a delay of 2 years in diagnosis, which was later confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The lesion was accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. “OO” should be included in the differential diagnosis of shoulder pain in young patients not responding to long-term conservative treatment. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:27163073

  1. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1991-05-01

    Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

  2. Arthroscopic knee surgery using the advanced flat panel high-resolution color head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Scott A.; Jones, D. E. Casey; St. Pierre, Patrick; Sampson, James B.

    1997-06-01

    The first ever deployed arthroscopic knee surgeries have been performed using a high resolution color head-mounted display (HMD) developed under the DARPA Advanced Flat Panel HMD program. THese procedures and several fixed hospital procedures have allowed both the system designers and surgeons to gain new insight into the use of a HMD for medical procedures in both community and combat support hospitals scenarios. The surgeons demonstrated and reported improved head-body orientation and awareness while using the HMD and reported several advantages and disadvantages of the HMD as compared to traditional CRT monitor viewing of the arthroscopic video images. The surgeries, the surgeon's comments, and a human factors overview of HMDs for Army surgical applications are discussed here.

  3. Pustulotic arthro-osteitis report of a case successfully treated with laser-assisted arthroscopic synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Imaizumi, T; Uemura, M

    1999-02-01

    A 61-year-old man with palmoplantar pustulosis had pain and swelling persisting in his left knee for more than 3 years. The rheumatoid factor and HLA B 27 antigen were absent. Plain radiographs of the knee revealed no abnormalities despite the persistent synovitis. The bone scintigraphy showed increased uptake in the manubriosternal joint as well as in the knee. Eventually, the patient underwent arthroscopic synovectomy assisted with a holmium: YAG laser. No postoperative complications such as hemarthrosis were noted. The patient was pain free with full range of motion of the knee 22 months after surgery. Peripheral arthritis associated with palmoplantar pustulosis is usually transient. This unique case suggests that laser-assisted arthroscopic synovectomy would be a useful therapeutic option for persistent severe synovitis resistant to conservative treatment in pustulotic arthro-osteitis. PMID:19078345

  4. Dorsal ganglion of the wrist: results of treatment by arthroscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Shih, Jui-Tien; Hung, Sheng-Tsai; Lee, Hung-Maan; Tan, Chuan-Ming

    2002-07-01

    Between September 1997 and September 2000, 32 patients (20 males and 12 females; average age 23.7 years) received arthroscopic surgery for dorsal wrist ganglion. Five of the patients (15.6%) experienced recurrences after open surgery. All patients complained of pain or a cosmetic problem due to the lump. Before the operation, they were all sonographically examined using a high-resolution 7.5 MHz real-time probe. After operation, they were followed-up by telephone after 15 to 37 months (mean 26.8 months). No recurrences occurred in our series. Arthroscopic resection is safe and addresses the anatomic pathology. Recurrences have been fewer than in the reported results of the open surgery. The approach is reasonable for operatively treating the dorsal ganglion. PMID:12365042

  5. An Arthroscopic Technique for Long Head of Biceps Tenodesis With Double Knotless Screw.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Ren; Ling, Florence Y; Hong, Chih-Kai; Chang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Kai-Chen; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a frequently performed procedure during shoulder arthroscopy for the treatment of degenerative, traumatic, or inflammatory lesions of the LHB tendon. Arthroscopic techniques for LHB tenodesis using knotless screw techniques offer the advantage of circumventing the need for arthroscopic knot tying. In 2012 Song and Williams described a novel tenodesis technique that does not require any knot-tying procedures by using a knotless anchor. However, a single-anchor configuration may not offer adequate stabilization of the LHB tendon. Therefore we propose a modified method that uses a double knotless anchor that offers advantages over the single knotless anchor, such as an increase in the contact area between the tendon and bone to facilitate tendon-to-bone healing and strengthening of the tenodesis construct. PMID:26759780

  6. An Arthroscopic Technique for Long Head of Biceps Tenodesis With Double Knotless Screw

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wei-Ren; Ling, Florence Y.; Hong, Chih-Kai; Chang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Kai-Chen; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a frequently performed procedure during shoulder arthroscopy for the treatment of degenerative, traumatic, or inflammatory lesions of the LHB tendon. Arthroscopic techniques for LHB tenodesis using knotless screw techniques offer the advantage of circumventing the need for arthroscopic knot tying. In 2012 Song and Williams described a novel tenodesis technique that does not require any knot-tying procedures by using a knotless anchor. However, a single-anchor configuration may not offer adequate stabilization of the LHB tendon. Therefore we propose a modified method that uses a double knotless anchor that offers advantages over the single knotless anchor, such as an increase in the contact area between the tendon and bone to facilitate tendon-to-bone healing and strengthening of the tenodesis construct. PMID:26759780

  7. Interstitial Tear of the Subscapularis Tendon, Arthroscopic Findings and Technique of Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been significantly recognized as a source of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the past decade, thanks to arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder and biomechanical and anatomical studies of the tendon. Current classification of subscapularis tendon tear is based on insertion site of the tendon. Recently, a classification for non-insertional types of subscapularis tendon tear has been published. Interstitial tear of subscapularis tendon has not been described in classifications available in the literature. This report describes significant interstitial tear of the subscapularis tendon. This tear looks normal in superior, bursal and articular sides. Then its specific arthroscopic findings as “Air bag sign” and repair technique of the pathology is explained. PMID:27200399

  8. Study of the Clinical Outcome between Traumatic and Degenerative (non-traumatic) Meniscal Tears after Arthroscopic Surgery: A 4-Years Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Nietiayurk Aminake; Wei, Ji-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The meniscus is a biconcave fibrocartilage in the knee joint interpose between the femoral condyles and tibial plateau; the meniscus has functions in load bearing, load transmission, shock absorption joint stability, joint lubrication, and joint congruity. Aim The aim of this study is to provide orthopeadic surgeon a base of reference in the choice of the optimal course of management for meniscal tears. Materials and Methods One hundred and seventeen patients met the criteria of inclusion for the present study. Patients were divided in two groups T and NT according to the presence of distinct previous traumatic events to the knees. Two subgroups were formed in each groups T and NT respectively at a mean follow up of 1 and 4 years. Postoperative clinical outcome were assessed using Lysholm scores and Rand SF-36 survey. Results One hundred and seventeen patients were included in the present study with 60(51.28%) patients in the traumatic group and 57(48.71%) in the degenerative group. 95(81.19%) patients in total were satisfied with their health status at end of follow up. The mean value of Lysholm scores at 1 year were respectively 85.25±8.78 for traumatic group and 86.38±12.14 for non-traumatic group and at 4 years were respectively 92.63±7.31 for traumatic group and 72.90±20.77 for non-traumatic group. According to Rand SF-36 health, traumatic group showed better improvements compare to non-traumatic group between 1 and 4 years after arthroscopic meniscus surgery. Conclusion A total of 95(81.19%) patients in total were satisfied with their health status at follow up, however, we found that arthroscopy as a treatment for meniscal tear have a relatively better mid-term clinical outcome for traumatic meniscal tears compare to non-traumatic/degenerative meniscal tears. PMID:27190905

  9. An arthroscopic analysis of lateral meniscal variants and a comparison with MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Goo; Ihn, Joo-Chul; Park, Seong-Ki; Kyung, Hee-Soo

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed 164 consecutive cases (158 patients) of arthroscopic examinations for lateral meniscal variants during the last 10 years. We classified lateral meniscal variants into four types by arthroscopic appearance, into six tear patterns by modifying O'Connor's classification, and compared magnetic resonance images (MRI) with arthroscopic findings. Regarding the four types, 131 cases were complete, 25 cases were incomplete, 4 cases were Wrisberg, and 4 cases were ring-shaped meniscus. The six tear patterns were as follows: 33 simple horizontal, 21 combined horizontal, 37 longitudinal, 27 central, 14 complex, and 12 radial tear. Among the 31 knees with a central tear or ring-shaped meniscus, we reviewed 25 MR images. Fifteen (60%) MRI findings were interpreted to represent a bucket-handle (displaced) tear of the normal C-shaped meniscus; 7(28%) MRI findings, a discoid meniscal tear; and the remaining 3(12%) MRI findings, a simple meniscal tear. Moreover, all ring-shaped menisci were interpreted as a displaced lateral meniscal tear on the MRI findings. Twelve patients (13 knees, 7.9%) had osteochondritis dissecans: Nine patients (10 knees) of them had a central tear, two patients (2 knees) of them had a simple horizontal tear of the discoid meniscus, and one patient (1 knee) had a ring-shaped meniscus. Twenty three patients (92.6%) with a central tear of the discoid meniscus did not have any traumatic events. For the differential diagnosis of a central tear or a ring-shaped meniscus from a bucket-handle tear of the normal C-shaped meniscus, we should take a careful history, in particular any traumatic events, we should also consider the possibility of misinterpreting the MR images though these images can provide additional information about associated abnormalities and probe carefully in the arthroscopic operations. PMID:15905996

  10. Epidemiologic, clinical and arthroscopic study of the discoid meniscus variant in Greek population.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Anestis; Karathanasis, Alexandros; Kirkos, John M; Kapetanos, George A

    2009-06-01

    This retrospective study was aimed to investigate the epidemiologic, clinical and arthroscopic features of discoid meniscus variant in Greek population. We reviewed the cases of 2,132 patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 1986 and 2004 and diagnosis of discoid lateral meniscus was established in 39 patients with mean age of 31.7 +/- 9.4 years old. Incidence of the discoid lateral meniscus variant was recorded at rate of 1.8% presenting no significant differences according to patient gender or lesion body side. Regarding the type of discoid dysmorphy, 23 cases attributed to complete type, 15 were incomplete and in one case, Wrisberg type was observed. Predictive values of the most commonly recorded physical signs in the clinical diagnosis of the discoid meniscus were analysed. Comparative evaluation of the long-term results of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy performed in patients with intact or torn discoid lateral meniscus and torn normally shaped lateral meniscus was carried out using Lysholm and IKDC scoring systems. Also, we investigated any correlation between dysmorphy type and tear pattern analysing the arthroscopic findings. Results demonstrated that the discoid meniscus lesion represents an atypical clinical entity in adults and no significant predictive value of the signs encountered in the clinical examination of the patients with discoid meniscus was observed. Clinical outcome after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy regarding the intact discoid meniscus group was superior in comparison with that of torn discoid meniscus cases. On other hand, no difference in the result of partial meniscectomy between discoid and normal lateral meniscus tear groups was found. No statistically significant relationship between the type of discoid menisci and tear pattern or incidence rate of concomitant intraarticular lesions was confirmed. PMID:19132346

  11. International trends in arthroscopic hip preservation surgery—are we treating the same patient?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Frank, Rachel M.; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.; Harris, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the entire arthroscopic hip preservation literature to answer the question, ‘Across the world, are we treating the same patient?’ There are significant differences in arthroscopic hip preservation publications, subjects and techniques based on both continent and country published. A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed with PRISMA guidelines using three publicly available databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting arthroscopic hip preservation were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Statistics were calculated using Student's t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, chi-squared and two-proportion Z-tests. There were 134 studies included in the analysis (10 752 subjects; 11 007 hips; 51% female; mean 37.6 years of age; mean 27.2 months length of follow-up), which had a low Modified Coleman Methodology Score (mean 32.4; poor). North America published the largest number of studies (58%) and the most subjects (55%) and hips (56%). Australia (22%) and Europe (18%) operated on subjects with some amount of osteoarthritis most commonly. North America (2.7%) and Europe (2.0%) operated on subjects with dysplasia or borderline dysplasia most commonly. The Modified Harris Hip Score was the most frequently utilized outcome score (24% of studies). The quantity and quality of arthroscopic hip preservation literature is significantly increasing with time. Several significant differences in study, subject and surgical technique demographics between continents and countries were identified. Deficiencies in use of clinical outcome scores and definitions of treated pathologies preclude complete subject comparisons and serve as an impetus for future study quality improvements. PMID:27011812

  12. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42–70 years). The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4–8 years 10 months). The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly (P < 0.001). There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor. PMID:27512219

  13. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. Results The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P < 0.001). The body temperatures at 60 minutes after admission to the post-anesthesia care unit were 35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 35.2 ± 0.2℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P < 0.001). The concentrations of desflurane at 0, 15, and 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia were 6.0 vs. 6.0% (P = 0.330), 5.0 ± 0.8% vs. 5.8 ± 0.4% (P = 0.001), and 3.4 ± 0.4% vs. 7.1 ± 0.9% (P < 0.001) in group GB vs. GO, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that preoperative IBPB could reduce both the intraoperative concentration of desflurane and the reduction in body temperature during and after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. PMID:27482313

  14. Extensor tendon lacerations from arthroscopic excision of dorsal wrist ganglion: case report.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anna R; Elfar, John C

    2013-10-01

    Arthroscopy is an accepted technique for the resection of wrist ganglions. The reported complication rate is comparable with open resection at 2%; however, this rate may be underestimated. Most reported complications are relatively benign and self-limited. In this case report, we detail lacerations of multiple digital extensor tendons from arthroscopic resection of a dorsal ganglion and describe our management of this complication. PMID:23993041

  15. Editorial Commentary: To Screw or to Sew--Which Is Better for Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    As the popularity of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis continues to grow, surgeons must choose between performing a soft-tissue tenodesis and performing a bony tenodesis. Although there is no difference in visual analog scale, Constant, or American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores at greater than 2 years' follow-up, elbow flexion strength index and fixation failure rates favor bony tenodesis, important factors to consider when deciding which procedure to perform. PMID:27039679

  16. Arthroscopic Knotless, Double-Row, Extended Linked Repair for Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, Joshua A; Petri, Maximilian; Millett, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    The management of massive rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for physicians, with failure rates being higher when compared with smaller tears. Many surgical treatment options exist including debridement with biceps tenodesis, complete repair, partial repair, repair with augmentation devices, superior capsule reconstruction, tendon transfer, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for a complete arthroscopic repair using an extended linked, knotless, double-row construct. PMID:27330944

  17. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Esposito, John G; Ono, Yohei; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC) separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH)” OR “acromioclavicular* (text)” OR “coracoclavicular* (text)” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH)” OR “Arthroscop* (text)” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence IV Results A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26.8% of patients. Conclusion Arthroscopic AC reconstruction techniques carry a distinct complication profile. The TightRope/Endobutton techniques, when performed acutely, provide good radiographic outcomes at the expense of hardware irritation. In contrast, graft reconstructions in patients with chronic AC separations demonstrated a high risk for loss of reduction. Fractures of the coracoid/clavicle remain a significant complication occurring predominately with

  18. Arthroscopic Treatment of Shoulder Instability: A Systematic Review of Capsular Plication Versus Thermal Capsulorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Kasey

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Shoulder instability is a common disorder of the shoulder that can result in debilitating pain and decreased function. Poorly treated cases of instability result in excessive mobility, possibly leading to labral tears and degenerative arthritis. The purpose of my systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of 2 popular arthroscopic techniques used to reduce shoulder instability: capsular plication and thermal capsulorrhaphy. Data Sources: Articles were retrieved from PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Ovid/MEDLINE searches using the terms capsular plication, capsular shift, capsular shrinkage, shoulder capsulorrhaphy, and treatment of shoulder instability. Study Selection: I sought cohort studies, case reviews, and randomized controlled trials published from 2000 through March 2013 that evaluated the outcomes of the 2 surgical procedures, which resulted in a total of 12 studies. Data Extraction: Outcome measures were range of motion, satisfaction, and return to previous activity level. Data Synthesis: The overall success rates of the reviewed studies were 91% for arthroscopic capsular plication and 76.5% for thermal capsulorrhaphy. Conclusions: Arthroscopic capsular plication had a higher rate of success than thermal capsulorrhaphy. However, postoperative management varied more among the thermal capsulorrhaphy studies and was generally less conservative than management involving standardized capsular-plication protocols. Future authors should investigate operative techniques and postoperative management, which may help to improve thermal capsulorrhaphy outcomes. PMID:25329347

  19. Results of Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tears Associated with New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Hyung; Jang, Sung-Won; Cha, Hong-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To introduce and evaluate the clinical results of a new arthroscopic technique for partial meniscectomy of symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus using a knife. Materials and Methods From March 2005 to October 2010, 60 knees of 58 patients underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomies for lateral discoid meniscus. The average age was 28.9 years (range, 12 to 63 years), and average follow-up was 26 months (range, 8 to 72 years). In this procedure, using a No. 11 knife holder inserted through the high far anteromedial portal, a stab incision on the anterior meniscal horn and following piecemeal meniscal excision were made. Clinical results were assessed using the scale of Ikeuchi and Lysholm score. Results Meniscus shape was complete in 32 knees (53.3%) and incomplete in 28 knees (46.6%). The shape of tears in complete type lesions was horizontal cleavage in 17 knees (53.1%), flap or complex degenerated tears in 10 knees (31.2%) and radial tears in 5 knees (15.6%). Clinical results assessed using the scale of Ikeuchi were excellent in 38 (63.3%), good in 13 (21.6%), fair in 8 (13.3%) and poor in 1 knee (1.6%). The average Lysholm score was improved from 82.8 preoperatively to 95.4 postoperatively. Conclusions Our new arthroscopic technique in lateral discoid partial meniscectomy suggests convenient methods and successful clinical results. PMID:23508292

  20. Treatment of ischiofemoral impingement: results of diagnostic injections and arthroscopic resection of the lesser trochanter.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark D; Keene, James S

    2016-07-01

    Ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) is an often unrecognized cause of hip pain caused by abnormal contact between the lesser trochanter and the ischium. To date, surgical treatment for those whose pain is not relieved by activity modification and steroid injections has not been defined. This study describes our imaging protocol and reports the results of arthroscopic, lesser trochanteric resections that were performed to treat this condition. Seven patients with symptomatic, MRI-documented IFI had ultrasound injections of ropivicaine and steroid into their ischiofemoral space. The injections provided complete but only transient relief of their groin and buttock pain and thus, all seven ultimately had an arthroscopic resection of their lesser trochanter. All hips were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively with Byrd's modified Harris hip scoring system. Average age of the seven patients was 46 years and there were five females and one male. Preoperative scores averaged 43 points. After surgery, all patients used crutches for 4-6 weeks, and had 6-week scores that averaged 58 points. The patients and their scores continued to improve and at 6 and 12 months, their scores averaged 86 and 91 points, and none had chronic hip flexor weakness or recurrence of their hip pain or snapping. Arthroscopic iliopsoas tenotomies in combination with a resection of the lesser trochanter will provide complete relief of the painful snapping, groin and buttock pain caused by ischiofemoral impingement. PMID:27583151

  1. Biceps tenoscopy in arthroscopic treatment of primary synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Maier, Dirk; Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P

    2014-08-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis (PSC) of the shoulder is a rare condition and usually necessitates operative therapy. Arthroscopic partial synovectomy with removal of loose osteochondromas may be regarded as the current surgical treatment of choice. However, involvement of the biceps tendon sheath (BTS) occurs in almost half of the patients and required additional open surgery in all previously reported cases. We successfully performed tenoscopy of the BTS and long head of the biceps tendon during arthroscopic treatment of PSC in a 26-year-old male competitive wrestler. Biceps tenoscopy enabled minimally invasive partial (teno)synovectomy and removal of all osteochondromas within the BTS. The symptoms of PSC fully subsided within 2 postoperative weeks. There were no functional restrictions at the 3-month follow-up examination. These preliminary results support the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of biceps tenoscopy as a complement in arthroscopic treatment of PSC of the shoulder, dispensing with the need for additional open surgery. The spectrum of indications for biceps tenoscopy has still to be defined. Conceivable indications are proposed. This first report of a diagnostic and interventional biceps tenoscopy entails a detailed step-by-step description of the surgical technique. PMID:25264517

  2. Arthroscopic eminoplasty for habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Segami, N; Kaneyama, K; Tsurusako, S; Suzuki, T

    1999-12-01

    A unique surgical technique, arthroscopic eminoplasty was undertaken in 16 joints of 11 patients with habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). There were 10 joints with subluxation and 6 joints with complete dislocation in 4 male and 7 female patients with a mean age of 33 +/- 20 years. The procedure consisted of conventional diagnostic arthroscopy, followed by shaving of approximately 3 to 5 mm in height of the articular eminence with an electric motorized shaver with bone files, depending on the bone thickness as detected by preoperative imaging. The arthroscopic eminoplasty was accomplished without any peri- or postoperative complication. During the postoperative follow-up period of 19 months on average (6-36 months), all patients were free of dislocation of the TMJ, except for one joint. The patients could open their mouth 42 +/- 6 mm without arthralgia 2 weeks after surgery, and finally 47 +/- 7 mm without any subjective symptom but small joint noises (clicking or crepitus) in 10 joints. On postoperative radiographs only minor changes of the mandibular condyle were apparent in four joints. Arthroscopic eminoplasty might become a significant procedure for habitual dislocation of the TMJ and seems to produce results comparable to open arthrotomy. Further study will be required to assess this method as an acceptable modality in the future. PMID:10870759

  3. Arthroscopic management of proximal tibial fractures: technical note and case series presentation

    PubMed Central

    BENEA, HOREA; TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE; MARTIN, ARTUR; BARDAS, CIPRIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The purpose of this article is to describe a new surgical method of arthroscopy assisted treatment of intraarticular proximal tibial fractures (ARIF – arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation), analyzing its efficiency and safety on a series of patients. Tibial plateau fractures affect the proximal tibial metaphyseal and articular surface, representing 1.2% of all fractures and up to 8% of all fractures in elderly. Patients and method Our case series consists of 6 patients with Schatzker types I-III tibial plateau fractures, treated in the Orthopedic and Traumatology Clinic of Cluj-Napoca from July 2012 to August 2014. Patients included in the study presented Schatzker type I-III tibial plateau fracture. Results The results obtained with the arthroscopic method were excellent in 5 cases (mean Rasmussen score 27.60 points) and good in 1 case (mean score 23.75). The radiological consolidation appeared after a mean of 12 weeks. No major complication was noted. Conclusions Diagnosis and treatment of associated lesions, shortening of hospitalization length and postoperative rehabilitation, but also the lower rate of complications, can make arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation the method of choice for the operative treatment of selected Schatzker I-III types of proximal tibial fractures. PMID:26528076

  4. Arthroscopic evaluation for omalgia patients undergoing the clavicular hook plate fixation of distal clavicle fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the anatomic changes in the shoulder joints responsible for omalgia after the clavicular hook plate fixation under arthroscope. Methods Arthroscopic examination was carried out for 12 omalgia patients who underwent clavicular hook plate fixation due to distal clavicle fractures. Functional outcome of shoulder was measured by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before and after the withdrawal of the fixation plate. Results The rotator cuff compression by the clavicular hook was arthroscopically observed in 11 of the 12 cases. The JOA scores of the shoulder were significantly improved at 1 month after the withdrawal of the fixation plate (pain, 28 ± 2.4 vs. 15 ± 5.2; function, 19.2 ± 1.0 vs. 11.7 ± 1.9; range of movements, 26.8 ± 2.6 vs. 14.8 ± 3.4) compared with before. Conclusions The impingement of the hook to the rotator cuff may be the main cause for the omalgia. The appropriate hook and plate that fit to the curve of the clavicle as well as the acromion are necessary to decrease the severity of omalgia. PMID:24917508

  5. Is there a niche for arthroscopic laser surgery of the temporomandibular joint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Bachmaier, Uli; Schiessl, Robert; Rueschoff, Josef; Meister, Joerg

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare effects of currently available laser systems at different wavelengths (XeCl excimer laser, Holmium:YAG laser, Erbium:YAG laser) on porcine articulating facets, capsule and meniscus of the temporomandibular joint via photomacroscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. From a critical review of the relevant literature and the preliminary observations of this investigation, it appears that the Neodymium:YAG laser is inappropriate for TMJ arthroscopic surgery with regard to the huge thermal injury caused to the remaining tissue. The Holmium:YAG laser suffers from remarkable photomechanical and photothermal side effects, whereas the Erbium:YAG laser ablates temporomandibular joint tissue efficiently with minimal adjacent damage--similar to the XeCl excimer laser, without entailing the risk of potential mutagenity. To sum up, it can be concluded that there is a clinical need for laser- assisted arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation. Nevertheless, at present none of the available laser systems meet the medical demands completely. Currently, the Erbium:YAG laser seems to be the most suitable for TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

  6. ASSESMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC ELBOW SYNOVECTOMY OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Ortiz, Rodrigo Tormin; Mariz Pinto, Eduardo César Moreira; Checchia, Sergio Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review functional outcomes of arthroscopic elbow synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Between May 1999 and December 2005, 15 patients were submitted to elbow synovectomy using an arthroscopic approach. Three cases were bilateral, totaling 18 elbows. There were two male and 13 female patients. The mean age was 44 years and five months. The mean time of previous diagnosis was six years and eight months. All patients reported preoperative pain, and on seven elbows, instability was present. The mean preoperative values for joint motion were: flexion, 118°; extension, −24°, supine, 80°, and; prone, 71°. Result: The mean postoperative follow-up time was 39 months. The mean postoperative joint motion was 133° for flexion, −20° for extension, 84° supine, and 78° prone. On nine elbows (50%) an improved postoperative range of motion was reported, reaching functional levels. Twelve cases (66.6%) showed pain resolution or improvement to a level not interfering on the activities of daily life. According to Bruce's assessment method, the results were as follows: seven excellent, three good, two fair and six poor results, with an average of 85.5 points. Synovitis recurrence was found in six cases (33.3%), and evolution to osteoarthrosis was found in four (22.2%). Conclusion: Arthroscopic elbow synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis leads to pain improvement in 66.6% of the cases; however, it does not cause a significant range of motion improvement. PMID:27077058

  7. Treatment of ischiofemoral impingement: results of diagnostic injections and arthroscopic resection of the lesser trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark D.; Keene, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) is an often unrecognized cause of hip pain caused by abnormal contact between the lesser trochanter and the ischium. To date, surgical treatment for those whose pain is not relieved by activity modification and steroid injections has not been defined. This study describes our imaging protocol and reports the results of arthroscopic, lesser trochanteric resections that were performed to treat this condition. Seven patients with symptomatic, MRI-documented IFI had ultrasound injections of ropivicaine and steroid into their ischiofemoral space. The injections provided complete but only transient relief of their groin and buttock pain and thus, all seven ultimately had an arthroscopic resection of their lesser trochanter. All hips were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively with Byrd’s modified Harris hip scoring system. Average age of the seven patients was 46 years and there were five females and one male. Preoperative scores averaged 43 points. After surgery, all patients used crutches for 4–6 weeks, and had 6-week scores that averaged 58 points. The patients and their scores continued to improve and at 6 and 12 months, their scores averaged 86 and 91 points, and none had chronic hip flexor weakness or recurrence of their hip pain or snapping. Arthroscopic iliopsoas tenotomies in combination with a resection of the lesser trochanter will provide complete relief of the painful snapping, groin and buttock pain caused by ischiofemoral impingement. PMID:27583151

  8. EVALUATION OF RESULTS AND COMPLICATIONS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SUTURE OF SLAP LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Soares, André Lopes; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results and complications from arthroscopic suturing of SLAP lesions. Methods: Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of SLAP lesions between July 1995 and May 2008 were evaluated. The procedures were performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fernandinho Simonsen Wing, Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil. Associated lesions were seen in 68 of the 71 patients evaluated (96%), and the other three (4%) had SLAP lesions alone. Results: The associated lesions most frequently found in the patients under 40 years of age were labral lesions (69%), while in patients aged 40 years or over, impact syndrome with or without rotator cuff injury was the most commonly associated condition (71.4%). According to the UCLA method, 79% of our results (56 cases) were good or excellent. Postoperative complications occurred in 15 cases (21%); among these, the most common was the presence of residual pain (46.6%), followed by adhesive capsulitis (33.3%). Conclusions: There was a great association between SLAP lesions and other shoulder lesions, which varied according to the patients' age groups. Arthroscopic suturing of the SLAP lesions provided excellent results in the majority of the cases, but complications occurred in 21%. PMID:27026986

  9. Adult tibial eminence fracture fixation: arthroscopic procedure using K-wire folded fixation.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Nicolas; Jeunet, Laurent; Obert, Laurent; Dejour, David

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a new and simple technique for arthroscopic fixation of tibial intercondylar eminence avulsion fractures using folded surgical pin. This technique allows reduction and fixation of the bone fragment without using special equipment. After standard arthroscopic procedure to explore the knee and to remove fracture debris and blood clot, the bone block is reduced and advanced with the spike of the anterior cruciate ligament tibial drill guide. A 1.8-mm K-wire is drilled through the guide from the proximal tibia into the reduced fragment. It is bent on its end into the joint with a strong needle case. The K-wire is then pulled back until good fragment compression to the tibia appears with the wire starting unbending. Next, the other side is bent on the anterior tibial cortex and cut. This arthroscopic fixation allows elastic compression fragment stabilization that authorizes early weight bearing and rehabilitation programs. The material is extracted by traction after 6 months. PMID:17235617

  10. Open Versus Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis: A Comparison of Subsequent Procedures in a Large Database.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Youichi; Vig, Khushdeep S; Murawski, Christopher D; Desai, Payal; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Kennedy, John G

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic and open ankle arthrodesis have been compared in very few studies, and no consensus has been reached regarding the incidence of postoperative revision surgery associated with each technique. The purpose of the present study was to compare these 2 approaches for the incidence of postsurgical operations. Patients who had undergone either arthroscopic or open ankle arthrodesis were identified between January 2005 to December 2011 in the PearlDiver(™) database using a predetermined algorithm and searched for the following postsurgical operations: revision ankle arthrodesis, midfoot arthrodesis, and hindfoot arthrodesis. In the current database, 7322 cases were performed with an open technique and 1152 arthroscopically. The incidence of revision arthrodesis was not significantly different statistically between the 2 techniques. However, the incidence of subsequent adjacent joint arthrodesis was greater for the open cohort (5.6% versus 2.6%; odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.49 to 3.16). In the open cohort, the incidence of hindfoot arthrodesis was greater than the incidence of midfoot arthrodesis (3.9% versus 1.6%, odds ratio 2.43, 95% confidence interval 1.95 to 3.01). The results showed that although open ankle arthrodesis is more commonly performed, it is associated with a greater incidence of subsequent adjacent joint arthrodesis specifically in the hindfoot. PMID:27067198

  11. Radial tunnel syndrome caused by ganglion cyst: treatment by arthroscopic cyst decompression.

    PubMed

    Mileti, Joseph; Largacha, Mauricio; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2004-05-01

    Compressive neuropathies of the radial nerve at the elbow can lead to one of 2 clinical entities. Posterior interosseous syndrome is primarily a motor deficiency of the posterior interosseous nerve, and radial tunnel syndrome presents as pain along the radial tunnel and extensor muscle mass. The radial nerve can be compressed at a number of sites around the elbow. In addition, numerous mass lesions reported in the literature can cause compressive neuropathy of the radial nerve at the elbow. Standard surgical management for persistent radial tunnel syndrome that is refractory to nonsurgical treatment is open decompression of the radial nerve. Cysts occurring in other joints are commonly treated arthroscopically. Supraglenoid cysts of the shoulder, meniscal cysts in the knee, and dorsal wrist ganglia are routinely treated with arthroscopic decompression or excision with management of the underlying etiology of the cyst. We present a case of radial tunnel syndrome caused by a ganglion cyst of the proximal radioulnar joint that was treated using arthroscopic excision of the cyst and decompression of the radial nerve. PMID:15122155

  12. Results and complications in dorsal and volar wrist Ganglia arthroscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, L; Canal, A; Pelaez, J; Fanfani, F; Catalano, F

    2006-01-01

    The authors present the procedure and results of five years of arthroscopic treatment of wrist radiocarpal and midcarpal ganglia. Thirty cases of dorsal ganglia and seventeen cases of volar ganglia were operated on arthroscopically. The technique was easy to perform in all the radiocarpal ganglia, not easy in midcarpal dorsal ganglia and very difficult in midcarpal volar ganglia. The results were recorded with a mean follow-up of 15 months. Twenty-seven cases of dorsal ganglia and twelve cases of volar ganglia had excellent results with active motion recovery, no complications, absence of scars and no recurrence. Two cases had a recurrence. There were four complications: a case of injury of a radial artery branch, a case of extensive haematoma, and two cases of neuropraxia. In three cases the procedure was converted into open surgery: they had a longer time of healing and a residual scar. The arthroscopic resection has been in our experience effective and safe for the treatment of all radiocarpal ganglia. Good results have been obtained also in the treatment of dorsal midcarpal ganglia. Concerning the uncommon cases of volar midcarpal (STT) ganglia, an open approach seems still indicated. PMID:17080524

  13. RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ISOLATED TEARS OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Freita, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Taglietti, Thiago Martins; Guevara, Carlos Leonidas Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes and identify prognostic factors in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of isolated tears of the subscapularis tendon. Methods: Between January 2003 and May 2009, we identified 18 shoulders with isolated tears or deinsertions that were complete or affected at least one third of the subscapularis tendon and underwent arthroscopic repair. Results: Three shoulders (17%) showed lesions in the upper third of the subscapularis; nine shoulders (50%) showed lesions in the upper two thirds; and six shoulders (33%) presented complete tears. In comparing the range of lateral rotation of the injured shoulder between before surgery and the time of the reevaluation, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.091). The LHBT was damaged in 11 shoulders (61%). According to the Constant score validation, we had excellent and good results in 83% of the cases and 17% were reasonable. The reevaluations on three patients showed re-tearing on MRI. Acromioplasty was performed on ten patients and this procedure did not represent statistical differences in the final results (p = 0.57). Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in relation to preoperative lateral rotation between the injured shoulder and the contralateral side. There was no significant loss of lateral rotation after surgery. The LHBT may be normal in deinsertions of the subscapularis tendon. Acromioplasty did not influence the results. The re-tearing rate for arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon was 16.6%. PMID:27042642

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Yucel, Bulent; Mutlu, Serhat; Tuna, Serkan; Mutlu, Harun; Komur, Baran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Synovial chondromatosis is a mono-articular arthropathy rarely seen in diarthrodial joints. The classic treatment for synovial chondromatosis is open arthrotomy, synovectomy and complete removal of the free fragments. With recent advances in arthroscopic techniques and methods, the indications for arthroscopic treatment have been extended. Presentation of case A 33-year old female presented with complaints of pain in the right shoulder. On the radiological examination, there were seen to be multiple calcified radio-opaque lesions filling all area of the glenohumeral joint. On computed tomography (CT) examination, again multiple radio-opaque free fragments were determined. Arthroscopy was applied to the right shoulder. The free fragments were completely removed. Approximately 33 free fragments, ranging in size from 0.5 to 1.3 cm, were removed. Discussion Cases of synovial chondromatosis in the shoulder have been rarely reported in literature. Generally the disease is self-limiting. Clinically, symptoms are generally not specific. Restrictions in the joint range of movement occur associated with the mechanical effect of the free fragments and in periods of active use, local pain and swelling may be seen in the shoulder. Simple removal of the free fragments, others have stated that removal with synovectomy is necessary to prevent recurrence of the cartilaginous metaplastic focus. Recurrence rates vary from 0 to 31%. Conclusion Arthroscopic surgery can be successfully applied in the treatment of synovial chondromatosis. The advantages of the method include good visualisation during surgery, low morbidity and early healing. PMID:26005571

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC RELEASE OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE: SURGICAL TECHNIQUE AND EVALUATION OF CLINICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Júnior, José Carlos; Paccola, Ana Maria Ferreira; Tonoli, Cristiane; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    To describe a specific surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and evaluate its preliminary results. Methods: Ten shoulders of nine patients were operated using a technique with portals differing from the already-known techniques, which did not use traction and made use of materials available within the public healthcare system. Results: Among the ten shoulders of nine patients, eight were right shoulders and two were left shoulders. The mean age was 69.5 years. The UCLA score increased from 11.7 to 26.1 points over the postoperative follow-up of 16.6 months. The SF-36 questionnaire score was 122.9 and the raw pain scale value was 88%. Conclusion: Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN in accordance with the described technique is reproducible and less traumatic than the open techniques. The patients achieved improvements in many of the parameters evaluated, particularly with regard to pain. Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN may be a therapeutic option for pathological compression of the SSN. PMID:27027028

  16. Time Interval between Trauma and Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair Has No Influence on Clinical Survival.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Robert J P; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the gold standard for longitudinal peripheral meniscal tears. The time interval between trauma and meniscal repair remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate failure rates and clinical outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in relation to chronicity of injury. A total of 238 meniscal repairs were performed in 234 patients. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was reconstructed in almost all ACL-deficient knees (130 out of 133). Time interval between injury and repair was divided into acute (< 2 weeks), subacute (> 2 to < 12 weeks), and chronic (> 12 weeks). Patients completed postal questionnaires to evaluate clinical outcome and failure rates. Study instruments included Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Tegner scoring systems. At a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range [IQR], 34-53 months) 55 medial and 10 lateral meniscal repairs failed (overall failure rate, 27%). There was a significant higher failure rate for medial meniscal repair (p < 0.05) and ACL-deficient knees without ACL reconstruction. Functional outcome scores showed only significant differences on the KOOS subscale "function in daily living" (95% confidence interval, 1.05-15.27, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for any interval between trauma and repair. The interval between trauma and arthroscopic meniscal repair has no influence on the failure rate. Differences in survival rate of meniscal repair are more dependent on location of the lesion and ACL status, rather than chronicity of injury. PMID:26516071

  17. Morphological Study of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias

    2014-01-01

    A morphology study was essential to the development of the cementless femoral stem because accurate dimensions for both the periosteal and endosteal canal ensure primary fixation stability for the stem, bone interface, and prevent stress shielding at the calcar region. This paper focused on a three-dimensional femoral model for Asian patients that applied preoperative planning and femoral stem design. We measured various femoral parameters such as the femoral head offset, collodiaphyseal angle, bowing angle, anteversion, and medullary canal diameters from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below the osteotomy level to determine the position of the isthmus. Other indices and ratios for the endosteal canal, metaphyseal, and flares were computed and examined. The results showed that Asian femurs are smaller than Western femurs, except in the metaphyseal region. The canal flare index (CFI) was poorly correlated (r < 0.50) to the metaphyseal canal flare index (MCFI), but correlated well (r = 0.66) with the corticomedullary index (CMI). The diversity of the femoral size, particularly in the metaphyseal region, allows for proper femoral stem design for Asian patients, improves osseointegration, and prolongs the life of the implant. PMID:25025068

  18. Comparison of the Sliding and Femoral Head Rotation among Three Different Femoral Head Fixation Devices for Trochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chinzei, Nobuaki; Niikura, Takahiro; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, various femoral head fixation devices (HFDs) for trochanteric fractures have become available. However, there are some cases in which femoral head rotation with excessive sliding of the HFD is observed and it is often followed by cutout. The purpose of this study is to compare the ability of the three types of HFDs to prevent femoral head rotation. Methods Between July 2005 and December 2009, 206 patients aged over 60 years with trochanteric fractures who had undergone surgical treatment using a short femoral nail in our institution were enrolled into the study. We used the gamma 3 nail (GMN) as the screw-type HFD in 66 cases, the gliding nail (GLN) as a non-cylindrical blade in 76 cases, and the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) as a cylindrical blade in 64 cases. The sliding length of HFDs and the occurrence of femoral head rotation were evaluated by assessing radiographs as the main outcome, and the results were compared among these devices. Results A comparison of the degree of sliding in the GMN group showed that femoral head rotation was observed significantly more frequently in cases with rotation. Further, it appeared that femoral head rotation occurred more frequently in comminuted fractures. However, no significant differences between the sliding lengths of the different HFDs were observed among three groups. Femoral head rotation was observed in 15 cases of GMN (22.7%), 0 case of GLN, and 5 case of PFNA (7.8%). Significant differences with regard to the occurrence of femoral head rotation were observed among the three groups. Furthermore, significant differences were also observed between GLN and PFNA with respect to the occurrence of femoral head rotation. Conclusions The ability to stabilize femoral head appears to be greater with blade-type materials than with screw-type materials. Furthermore, we believe that a non-cylindrical blade is preferable to a cylindrical blade for the surgical treatment of comminuted, unstable

  19. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  20. Femoral lengthening with a motorized intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Joachim; Grimsrud, Øyvind; Dagsgard, Anita Hoddevik; Huhnstock, Stefan; Steen, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We assessed whether an intramedullary lengthening device would reduce the problems normally associated with the external fixation technique. We also wanted to determine whether it is a reliable construct for limb lengthening and deformity correction in the femur. Patients and methods We conducted a matched-pair comparison of 30 femoral lengthenings, 15 with a motorized intramedullary nail (the nail group) and 15 lengthenings with an external ring fixator (the fixator group). The patients were matched based on age, sex, amount of lengthening, and the etiology of leg length discrepancy. Mean lengthening was 35 (25–55) mm in the nail group and 38 (15–75) mm in the fixator group. Outcome measures were: lengthening and alignment achieved, consolidation index, knee range of motion (ROM), and complications. Results The pairs in this matched-pair study were similar in terms of age, sex, diagnosis, and amount of lengthening. The planned amount of lengthening was achieved in all patients in both groups and axis correction was considered sufficient. The mean radiographic consolidation index in the nail group, at 1.5 (0.9–3.0) months/cm, was better than the mean value for the fixator group (1.9 (0.9–3.4) months/cm) (p = 0.01). Knee ROM was better in the nail group during the lengthening, 6 weeks after lengthening was completed, and 6 months after lengthening was completed (p < 0.001). A larger number of complications were observed in the fixator group than in the nail group. Interpretation A lengthening nail may be superior to external fixation in femoral lengthening, when the anatomical conditions and the complexity of the deformity allow the use of an intramedullary nail. PMID:25191936

  1. Acetabular Paralabral Cyst: An Unusual Cause of Femoral Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kullar, Raj S.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Ihnat, Daniel; Aoki, Stephen K.; Maak, Travis G.

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a known cause of hip pain in the young, active patient. Labral tears can be due to trauma, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, dysplasia, and degenerative pathology. Paralabral cysts are relatively common in association with labral tears of the hip, with cysts seen on magnetic resonance imaging studies in as many as 50% to 70% of patients with labral tears. In some cases the cysts can become sizeable and cause neurovascular compression. Nonoperative interventions for the management of paralabral cysts in the shoulder and knee have shown high recurrence rates. In the shoulder and knee, arthroscopic debridement of paralabral cysts has shown good results with lower recurrence rates and resolution of neurovascular function. In the hip there is limited literature regarding surgical management of paralabral cysts. We present a surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of acetabular paralabral cysts combined with labral repair. PMID:25973371

  2. Risk of Anterior Femoral Notching in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and risk factors after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using an image-free navigation system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 consecutive TKAs in 130 patients beginning in July 2005. Seventy knees (62 patients) underwent conventional TKA, and 78 knees (68 patients) received navigated TKA. We investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and measured notching depth by conventional and navigated TKA. Additionally, the navigated TKA group was categorized into two subgroups according to whether anterior femoral notching had occurred. The degree of preoperative varus deformity, femoral bowing, and mediolateral suitability of the size of the femoral component were determined by reviewing preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The resection angle on the sagittal plane and the angle of external rotation that was set by the navigation system were checked when resecting the distal femur. Clinical outcomes were compared using range of motion (ROM) and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAX) scores between the two groups. Results The prevalence of anterior femoral notching by conventional TKA was 5.7%, and that for navigated TKA was 16.7% (p = 0.037). Mean notching depth by conventional TKA was 2.92 ± 1.18 mm (range, 1.8 to 4.5 mm) and 3.32 ± 1.54 mm (range, 1.55 to 6.93 mm) by navigated TKA. Preoperative anterior femoral bowing was observed in 61.5% (p = 0.047) and both anterior and lateral femoral bowing in five cases in notching group during navigated TKA (p = 0.021). Oversized femoral components were inserted in 53.8% of cases (p = 0.035). No differences in clinical outcomes for ROM or the HSS and WOMAX scores were observed between the groups. A periprosthetic fracture, which was considered a notching-related side effect, occurred in one case each in the conventional and navigated TKA groups

  3. Improved Squat and Gait Biomechanics 6-Months Post-Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Cvetanovich, Gregory; Farkas, Gary Jordan; Rajan, Kumar; Espinoza, Alejandro; Nho, Shane Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess gait and squat biomechanics 6-months following arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement. Methods: Symptomatic patients with clinical and radiographic diagnosis of FAI who had failed non-operative treatment underwent gait and squat analysis preoperatively and at 6-months postoperatively following arthroscopic surgery for FAI. Age- and BMI-matched controls without radiographic FAI or other lumbar or lower extremity pathology underwent a single analysis for comparison. Comparisons between preoperative and 6-month postoperative gait and squat parameters as well as comparison to the control group were performed using paired and independent sample t-tests. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Fifteen FAI patients and 9 controls were analyzed. Age for the patients vs. controls was 28.7±9.6 y vs. 27.8±6.5 y (p>0.05), respectively; while BMI was 23.5±5.1 kg/m2 vs. 22.8±3.5 kg/m2 (p>0.05). All gait parameters were unchanged between preoperative and 6-month postoperative testing (p>0.05), with a trend toward significance for hip external rotation moment (p=0.056) (Table 1). Squat testing revealed that FAI arthroscopic surgery increased maximum hip extension (p=0.011), with a trend toward significance for hip adduction moment (p=0.059). All other squat parameters did not differ from preoperative to 6-month follow-up (p>0.05). Compared to the control group, preoperative FAI patients had reduced hip external rotation moment during gait (p=0.024), with a trend toward significance for hip abduction moment (p=0.082). No other gait or squat differences were detected between FAI patients preoperatively or 6-months postoperatively compared to controls (p>0.05). Conclusion: Biomechanical gait and squat analysis at 6-month follow-up from arthroscopic FAI surgery revealed a tendency to improve external hip rotation during gait and maximum hip extension and hip adduction during squat. Arthroscopic surgery for FAI may

  4. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluation of an All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Patel, Ronak M.; Nair, Rueben; Deshmane, Prashant P.; Harnden, Galen; Terry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a well-recognized cause of shoulder pain in the adult population and can be managed surgically with tenotomy or tenodesis. Purpose: To compare the biomechanical strength of an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique that places the LHB distal to the bicipital groove in the suprapectoral region with a more traditional mini-open subpectoral tenodesis. This study also evaluates the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent biceps tenodesis using the all-arthroscopic technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: For the biomechanical evaluation of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, in which the biceps tendon is secured to the suprapectoral region distal to the bicipital groove with an interference screw, 14 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders (7 matched pairs) were used to compare load to failure and displacement at peak load with a traditional open subpectoral location. For the clinical evaluation, 49 consecutive patients (51 shoulders) with a mean follow-up of 2.4 years who underwent an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis were evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score preoperatively and at last follow-up, as well as the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Score at last follow-up. Results: On biomechanical evaluation, there was no significant difference in peak failure load, displacement at peak load, or displacement after cyclic testing between the arthroscopic suprapectoral and mini-open subpectoral groups. In the clinical evaluation, the mean preoperative ASES score was 65.4, compared with 87.1 at last follow-up. The mean UCLA score at last follow-up was 30.2. Forty-eight (94.1%) patients reported satisfaction with the surgery. In subgroup analysis comparing patients who had a rotator cuff repair or labral repair at time of tenodesis with patients who did not have either of these

  5. Significantly lower femoral neck growth in screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Wölfle-Roos, Julia V; Urlaub, Stefanie; Reichel, Heiko; Taurman, Rita

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing debate on which fixation technique should be preferred for the prophylactic fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). In the case of Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, there is a possibility of secondary loss of fixation because of longitudinal growth of the physis, whereas in screw fixation, physeal growth of the femoral neck might be impaired. The aim of this matched-pair study was to compare the longitudinal growth of the femoral neck in screw fixation versus K-wire fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in SCFE. All 18 patients (female : male=3 : 15), who had undergone screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip between 9/2001 and 9/2011, were matched according to age, bone age, sex, and time to follow-up to another 18 patients with K-wire fixation. The length of the femoral neck of the contralateral hip was measured in parallel to either screw or K-wire from the apex of the femoral head to the opposite cortical bone. The ratio of the femoral neck length measured directly after surgery and on follow-up was defined as femoral neck growth. There was no significant difference between groups with respect to age, modified Oxford Bone age score, and time to follow-up. We found a significant difference in femoral neck growth between patients with screw fixation (5.5±4.3%) compared with K-wire fixation (8.9±5.7%, P=0.048 matched Wilcoxon test). The difference in femoral neck growth of patients with K-wire or screw fixation of the contralateral asymptomatic hip in SCFE was small, but statistically significant. Thus, despite high rates of secondary loss of fixation, K-wire fixation should still be considered, especially in very young patients. PMID:26919622

  6. Development and Validation of Cognitive Rehearsal as a Training Strategy for Arthroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David; Hodgins, Justin Lane; Lowe, Dylan T.; He, Janice; Popkin, Charles Aaron; Lynch, Thomas Sean; Ahmad, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical performance is a highly intellectual activity that involves the processing of perceptual information from the five senses. Strategies to process, organize, and retain this perceptual information may benefit learning techniques. Once such strategy, cognitive rehearsal, is the activity where a skill is rehearsed in memory prior to the actual performance. This study aimed to develop and validate a cognitive rehearsal strategy for arthroscopic knee surgery in orthopaedic residents. We hypothesized that this training tool will lead to increased comfort and confidence with arthroscopic surgery performance. Methods: An expert surgeon was filmed performing an arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using patellar bone-tendon-bone autograft. An instructional training video was then created incorporating the extracorporeal and arthroscopic footage with voice over and subtitles. Following the surgery, cognitive recall of the procedure was conducted with the surgeon to identify key visual, cognitive, and kinesthetic cues to develop a mental imagery script to enhance rehearsal of arthroscopic surgery. Orthopaedic residents from two academic training programs were invited to participate. Demographic information including training level, previous musical experience, organized sports participation, and preferred learning style was collected. The training session consisted of a relaxation exercise, instructional video of an expert performing the procedure, learning the mental imagery script, and rehearsing the procedure out loud with a partner. The residents’ ability to rehearse the procedure was assessed before and after the training session with a modified version of a previously validated questionnaire, and a post-training session survey was administered to define which components of the rehearsal seemed most beneficial. Statistical analysis included a reliability analysis for internal consistency, and a nonparametric Wilcoxon test to compare the composite

  7. Arthroscopic Treatment of Subchondral Bony Cyst in Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint Using Allogeneic Bone Graft: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gi-Soo; Kang, Chan; Lee, Jung-Bum; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Subchondral bony cyst, large solitary or multiple cysts in acetabular dome usually exacerbate progression to degenerative osteoarthritis in the hip joint. But it can be treated through arthroscopic intervention. We report two cases that treated by arthroscopic curettage and bone graft for subchondral bony cysts in early osteoarthritis of the hip joint, and it may delay progression to moderate osteoarthritis.

  8. [How to determine the rotation of the femoral component].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Roehner, E

    2015-04-01

    The different landmarks for determination of the rotation of the femoral component are shown and specific pros and cons are discussed. The videos demonstrate how to identify them intraoperatively. PMID:25874402

  9. Editorial Commentary: Anatomic Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Does It Really Matter?

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-01-01

    An anatomic anteromedial portal and outside-in technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel may improve rotational stability but shows no published differences in clinical outcomes. PMID:26743417

  10. Circumflex femoral vein thrombosis misinterpreted as acute hamstring strain.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Natsis, Constantinos; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-07-01

    The case of a 24-year-old female professional, long-distance runner who presented with acute proximal posterior thigh pain is reported. History and clinical findings were consistent with acute hamstring strain but MRI demonstrated circumflex femoral vein thrombosis. This is the first case of proximal posterior thigh pain caused by circumflex femoral vein thrombosis reported in the literature. Doctors dealing with sports injuries should be aware of this clinical entity that mimics hamstring strain. PMID:17224439

  11. Circumflex femoral vein thrombosis misinterpreted as acute hamstring strain

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Natsis, Constantinos; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 24‐year‐old female professional, long‐distance runner who presented with acute proximal posterior thigh pain is reported. History and clinical findings were consistent with acute hamstring strain but MRI demonstrated circumflex femoral vein thrombosis. This is the first case of proximal posterior thigh pain caused by circumflex femoral vein thrombosis reported in the literature. Doctors dealing with sports injuries should be aware of this clinical entity that mimics hamstring strain. PMID:17224439

  12. CIRCUMFERENTIAL PROXIMAL FEMORAL ALLOGRAFTS IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY REVISION SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Bruno Dutra; Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Júnior, Antero Camisa; Lampert, Henrique Bonotto; da Silva, Matheus Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from patients who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 32 patients (33 hips) who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Among these patients, 28 (29 hips) fulfilled all the requirements for this study. The mean follow-up was five years and two months. The clinical evaluation was done in accordance with the Harris Hip Score. Radiographically, the patients were assessed regarding reabsorption and consolidation of the allograft, migration of the greater trochanter, stability of the femoral component and heterotypic calcification. Results: The average preoperative Harris Hip Score was 32 points. At the last postoperative follow-up, the average score was 82 points. Allograft resorption of some degree was seen in nine hips (31%). Regarding consolidation, 24 cases (82.8%) showed full consolidation, three (10.3%) showed partial consolidation and two (6.9%) showed pseudarthrosis. All femoral components were stable. According to the criteria established, 27 cases (93.1%) were considered to be successful reconstructions after a mean follow-up of five years and two months. Conclusion: From the results obtained, it was concluded that use of circumferential proximal femoral allografts in selected cases of femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of arthroplasty presented a high survival rate from the reconstruction over an average follow-up of five years and two months. PMID:27047896

  13. Proximal femoral reconstruction with a constrained acetabulum in oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Muhammad Umar; Brien, Earl W

    2014-02-01

    Metallic endoprostheses are used for oncological reconstruction around the proximal femur and hip joint. Common modes of failure with hemiarthroplasty or standard hip arthroplasty after proximal femoral replacement include dislocation, late hip pain, and infection. The authors reviewed hospital records to identify patients undergoing constrained tripolar hip arthroplasty for oncological reasons between 2002 and 2012. Inclusion criterion was at least 12-cm proximal femoral resection, including patients with total femur reconstruction. A total of 33 patients were reviewed. Information regarding demographics, length of follow-up, treatment characteristics, and patient outcomes was extracted. Average follow-up for all patients was 912.33 days (30.4 months). Average follow-up was 1396.1 days for living patients and 428.6 days for deceased patients. Average estimated blood loss was 462.12 cc: an average of 1080 cc for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 315.8 cc for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average operative time was 137.7 minutes: an average of 205 minutes for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 119.1 minutes for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score was 21.7. There were no dislocations in the cohort. A constrained tripolar device can be safely used for oncological proximal femoral reconstructions while minimizing the risk of dislocation. Positioning of the acetabular implant in neutral anatomic version in conjunction with a neutral-placed femoral component provides the greatest range of motion, reduction of liner impingement, and improved hip stability. PMID:24679207

  14. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  15. Prevascular femoral hernia and its relation with inferior epigastric vessels: a rare presentation of the femoral hernia sac.

    PubMed

    Boshnaq, Mohamed; Phan, Yih Chyn; Akhtar, Mansoor; Hamade, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with a 2-week history of a painful lump on his right groin. A diagnosis of an irreducible right femoral hernia was made. As such, an urgent operation was carried out on the same day, and the patient was found to have a rare prevascular femoral hernia in which the sac was lying over the femoral vessels and split by the inferior epigastric vessels into 2 components resembling 2 trouser limbs. The hernia sac presented in a different and challenging way that necessitated meticulous dissection and full orientation of the anatomy of the femoral triangle. Complete dissection and control of the inferior epigastric vessels, and complete reduction of the sac followed by repair with a prosthetic mesh plug were performed successfully. The patient was discharged home the next day. PMID:27090547

  16. FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE ARTHROSCOPIC DEBRIDEMENT TO TREAT MASSIVE AND IRREPARABLE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Veado, Marco Antônio de Castro; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of extensive irreparable rotator cuff injuries. Methods: 27 patients were operated between 2003 and 2007, and 22 of them were evaluated. The surgical procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement of the stumps of the tendons involved, bursectomy, removal of acromial osteophytes and, possibly, biceps tenotomy and tuberoplasty. Results: All the patients showed involvement of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons at the preoperative stage. In the postoperative evaluation, 14 patients had a complete teres minor muscle, and three had partial tears of the subscapularis tendon. There was an improvement in the UCLA criteria, from 15 preoperatively to 31 postoperatively. There was no improvement in muscle strength, but there was a reduction in the pain. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement is a recommended procedure for elderly patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, good range of motion and low functional demand, when the main objective is to diminish pain. PMID:27022590

  17. Articular ganglia of the volar aspect of the wrist: arthroscopic resection compared with open excision. A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Canal, Alessandra; Fanfani, Francesco; Catalano, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to compare two methods of treatment of ganglia on the volar aspect of the wrist (the open excision done through a longitudinal volar skin incision and the arthroscopic resection through two or three dorsal ports), to see if arthroscopy could reduce the risks of operating in this area and the time to healing. Twenty radiocarpal and five midcarpal volar ganglia were operated on by open approach and an equivalent group was treated by arthroscopy. Fifteen radiocarpal and five midcarpal ganglia were treated with good results in the open group and 18 radiocarpal and one midcarpal ganglia in the arthroscopic group (no visible or palpable ganglion, a full range of active wrist movement, grip strength equal to preoperatively, no pain, and a cosmetically acceptable scar). In the open group there were four injuries to a branch of the radial artery, two cases of partial stiffness of the wrist associated with a painful scar, one case of neuropraxia, and one recurrence (all of which were among the 20 radiocarpal ganglia). In the arthroscopic group there was one case of neuropraxia, one injury to a branch of the radial artery, and three recurrences (three of the complications were among the five midcarpal ganglia). The mean functional recovery time was equal to 15 (6) days in the open group and 6 (2) days in the arthroscopic group. The mean time lost from work was equal to 23 (11) days in the open group and 10 (5) days in the arthroscopic group. Our results suggest that arthroscopic resection is a reasonable alternative to open excision in treating radiocarpal volar ganglia because it has less postoperative morbidity and a better cosmetic result. Midcarpal volar ganglia, however, should still be treated by open operation. PMID:18791910

  18. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  19. Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery during Proximal Femoral Nailing Following an Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Kook; Park, Junyoung; Oyunbat, Choidog; Kim, Taehwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we experienced a case where the diagnosis and management of a deep femoral artery rupture was delayed. This vascular complication occurred during the insertion of a distal interlocking screw of a proximal femoral nail for the fixation of an intertrochanteric femur fracture. A 79-year-old male patient was diagnosed with a right intertrochanteric fracture after a fall. We fixed the fracture with a proximal femoral nail (Zimmer® Natural Nail™ System). One day after the procedure, the patient complained of pain and swelling on the anteromedial side of his middle thigh followed by hypotension, anemia and prolonged thigh swelling. Computed tomography angiography was performed 7 days after the procedure. We found a pseudoaneurysm of the perforating artery caused by injury to the deep femoral artery and an intramuscular hematoma in the anterior thigh muscle. We successfully treated the pseudoaneurysm using coil embolization. Throughout the management of intertrochanteric femoral fractures, it is important to be aware and monitor signs and symptoms related to the possibility of blood vessel damage. When a patient presents with swelling and pain on the middle thigh and/or unexplained anemia postoperatively, the possibility that these symptoms are caused by an injury to the femoral artery must be considered.

  20. Seasonal variation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Douglas, A Stuart

    2002-01-01

    During the 18-year period 1980-1997, 1103 patients were treated as in-patients for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in Scottish hospitals. This paper reports a significant seasonal variation, especially in male patients, with an excess admitted in the autumn. Examining the physiological seasonality of the monthly increment of growth in height and weight in childhood, we hypothesised that these physiological rhythms, while not pathogenetic, may be responsible for the timing of the seasonal features of SCFE. Previously published studies suggest that the average time between first symptoms and diagnosis is 3 to 5 months. The condition may start with the spring peak in growth and become more symptomatic with the autumn peak in weight. In conclusion, we report a new epidemiological finding, but, in accordance with other studies, we cannot provide a certain aetiological explanation. The timing, but not the pathogenesis, of admission to hospital for a SCFE might be related to the timing in the year of seasonal increments of height in spring and weight in autumn. It is tempting to draw attention to associations with environmental features. For example, in autumn there is the most rapid annual fall in temperature, and the hours of darkness are increasing from the autumn equinox to the winter solstice. However, there is no reason to conclude that these associations have anything to do with aetiology. PMID:11866078

  1. Intraosseous Lipoma of the Femor: Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Hadi Rokni; Rasouli, Bahman; Borhani, Ali; Noorollahi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous lipoma is a rare benign bone disease. Long and cancellous bones are the most locationsthat can be affected. Almost all lesions were discovered incidentally on imaging modalities that were done during an unrelated investigation. As it is rare, it may be mistaken for nonossifying fibroma, aneurismal bone cyst, simple bone cyst, bone infarct or chondroid tumors. Recently with the high quality imaging modalities such as CT scan and/or MR imaging, the diagnosis of intramedullary lipoma and some other bone lesions can be done without the need for bone biopsy and surgery. Case Report: We’re reporting a rare case of intraosseous lipoma of the distal femur. Plain film radiography showed barely visible medullary expansion and lucency in the distal left femoral diaphysis. The patient underwent further evaluation with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI). According to the MRI and CT scan findings, intraosseous lipoma was confirmed and the need for more diagnostic tests were eliminated. Conclusion: Although Intraosseous lipoma doesn’t have any manifestations clinically but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone pains. MRI has an important role in characterization of soft tissue and bone marrow lesions therefore non-surgical approach for most of the patients with intraosseous lipoma would be beneficial. PMID:27298943

  2. The Combined “Double Pulley”–Simple Knot Technique for Arthroscopic Shoulder Posterior Labral Repair and Capsular Shift

    PubMed Central

    Parnes, Nata; Carey, Paul; Morman, Monica; Carr, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder instability is more prevalent than traditionally believed. Surgical repairs of posterior shoulder instability have overall good success rates. However, in elite overhead and throwing athletes, a low rate of return to the preinjury level of play after repair remains a challenge. The 2 goals of posterior shoulder stabilization surgery are secure fixation of the labrum to the glenoid and retensioning of the posterior capsulolabral complex. Recent studies have shown significant advantages of arthroscopic anatomic repair over open nonanatomic techniques. We report a combined double pulley–simple knot technique for arthroscopic fixation of posterior labral tears and capsular shift. The technique incorporates several advantages of this hybrid fixation method. PMID:27069863

  3. Morphologic and histologic changes in canine temporomandibular joint tissues following arthroscopic guided neodymium:YAG laser exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bradrick, J.P.; Eckhauser, M.L.; Indresano, A.T. )

    1989-11-01

    A neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam was introduced by a quartz fiber passed arthroscopically into the superior joint space of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of five mongrel dogs, with one joint serving as a control without laser wounds. Immediate postoperative death and examination of the disc grossly and histologically revealed different patterns for contact and noncontact burn wounds. The wounds exhibited signs of thermal coagulation necrosis similar to those reported in other tissues. The potential implications of the adaptation of the Nd:YAG laser to TMJ arthroscopic surgery are discussed.

  4. Experimental model in cadavera of arthroscopic resection of calcaneonavicular coalition and its first in-vivo application: preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Molano-Bernardino, Carlos; Bernardino, Carlos Molano; Golanó, Pau; Garcia, Maria Angeles; López-Vidriero, Emilio

    2009-11-01

    Open surgical resection of calcaneonavicular coalition is indicated after the failure of conservative treatment. Our objectives are to develop the arthroscopic surgical technique and to check the feasibility of the arthroscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular coalition. We designed and performed endoscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular ligament and part of the anterior process of calcaneus as a simulation of the coalition resection on four cadaver specimens. After this procedure, we successfully performed the first resection in a 12-year-old girl, without any soft tissue interposition. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hindfoot Scale was 55 before surgery, 98 after 10 weeks, and 100 after 2 years without recurrence. PMID:19623084

  5. A RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF ISOKINETIC VERSUS ISOTONIC REHABILITATION PROGRAM AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC MENISCECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Koutras, Georgios; Letsi, Magdalini; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Gigis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although both isotonic and isokinetic exercises are commonly used in the rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic meniscectomy no studies have compared their effect on strength recovery and functional outcomes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two rehabilitation programs (isotonic and isokinetic) on muscle strength and functional performance after partial knee meniscectomy. A secondary purpose was to assess the correlation between isokinetic strength deficits and hop test performance deficits. Methods: Twenty male patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy volunteered for the study. Both isotonic and isokinetic training were performed with the same equipment thereby blinding subjects to the mode of exercise. Main outcome measures were collected on the 14th and 33rd postoperative days and included isokinetic strength of the knee extensors and flexors, functional performance (single, triple, and vertical hopping) and the Lysholm questionnaire. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to assess the effects of the independent variables on the isokinetic variables, functional tests, and Lysholm score. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between isokinetic strength deficits and functional performance deficits. Results: Isokinetic measures, functional tests, and the Lysholm score all increased between initial and final assessment (p≤0.003). However, there were no group or group*time effects on any of the outcome variables (p≥0.33). Functional tests were better predictors of isokinetic deficits in the 14th compared to the 33rd postoperative day. Conclusion: No differences were found in the outcomes of patients treated using an isokinetic and an isotonic protocol for rehabilitation after arthroscopic meniscectomy. More than half of patients did not meet the 90% criterion in the hop tests for safe return to sports five weeks after meniscectomy. There were

  6. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIRS OF COMPLETE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Benegas, Eduardo; de Santis Prada, Flavia; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shoulder functional results and the retear rate of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).Methods: Prospective case series with single-row arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with PRP. Only cases of isolated supraspinatus tears with retraction of less than 3 cm were included in this series. The PRP used was obtained by apheresis. It was applied on liquid consistency in its activated form, with the addition of autologous thrombin. Patients were evaluated after 12 months of the surgical procedure. The Constant-Murley, UCLA and VAS scales were used, and the retear rate was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Fourteen patients were evaluated (14 shoulders). The mean Constant-Murley score was 45.64 ± 12.29 before the operation and evolved to 80.78 ± 13.22 after the operation (p < 0.001). The UCLA score increased from 13.78 ± 5.66 to 31.43 ± 3.9 (p < 0.001). The patients’ pain level decreased from a median of 7.5 (p25% = 6, p75% = 8) to 0.5 (p25% = 0, p75% = 3) (p = 0.0013) according to the VAS score. None of the patients presented complete retear. Three patients (21.4%) showed partial retear, without transfixation. Only one patient developed complications (adhesive capsulitis). Conclusion: Patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with PRP showed significant functional improvement and none of them had complete retearing. PMID:27047894

  7. Arthroscopic Resection of a Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor in the Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Han, Youngshin; Lee, Malrey

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The treatment for giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath is surgical therapy, but surgical recurrence rates were reported to be as high as 50% in some cases. Therefore, complete radical excision of the lesion is the treatment of choice. If the tumor originates from the joint, it is important to perform capsulotomy. Here, the authors report the first case of successful treatment of a localized intra-articular giant cell tumor in the wrist by arthroscopic resection. A 28-year-old right-handed woman visited the clinic because of left wrist ulnar-side pain, which had been aggravated during the previous 15 days. Vague ulnar-side wrist pain had begun 2 years ago. When the authors examined the patient, the wrist showed mild swelling on the volo-ulnar aspect and the distal radioulnar joint, as well as volar joint line tenderness. She showed a positive result on the ulnocarpal stress test and displayed limited range of motion. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intra-articular mass with synovitis in the ulnocarpal joint. Wrist arthroscopy was performed using standard portals under regional anesthesia. The arthroscopic findings revealed a large, well-encapsulated, yellow lobulated soft-tissue mass that was attached to the volar side of the ulnocarpal ligament and connected to the extra-articular side. The mass was completely excised piece by piece with a grasping forceps. Histopathologic examination revealed that the lesion was an intra-articular localized form of a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. At 24-month follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic and had full range of motion in her left wrist, and no recurrence was found in magnetic resonance imaging follow-up evaluations. The authors suggest that the arthroscopic excision of intra-articular giant cell tumors, as in this case, may be an alternative method to open excisions, with many advantages. PMID:26496348

  8. Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions: Clinical and anatomic follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Trantalis, John N.; Sohmer, Stephen; More, Kristie D.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Wong, Ben; Dyke, Corinne H.; Thornton, Gail M.; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to evaluate the clinical and anatomic outcome of arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions. Materials and Methods: The senior author performed isolated repairs of 25 type II SLAP lesions in 25 patients with a mean age of 40.0 ± 12 years. All tears were repaired using standard arthroscopic suture anchor repair to bone. All patients were reviewed using a standardized clinical examination by a blinded, independent observer, and using several shoulder outcome measures. Patients were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram at a minimum of 1-year postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Two-tailed paired t-test were used to determine significant differences in preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes scores. In addition, a Fisher's exact test was used. Results: At a mean follow-up of 54-month, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index (ASES) scores improved from 52.1 preoperatively to 86.1 postoperatively (P < 0.0001) and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores from 7.7 to 10.6 (P < 0.0002). Twenty-two out of the 25 patients (88%) stated that they would have surgery again. Of the 21 patients who had postoperative magnetic resonance imaging arthrographys (MRAs), 9 patients (43%) demonstrated dye tracking between the labrum bone interface suggestive of a recurrent tear and 12 patients (57%) had a completely intact repair. There was no significant difference in ASES, SST, and patient satisfaction scores in patients with recurrent or intact repairs. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions demonstrated improvements in clinical outcomes. However, MRA imaging demonstrated 43% of patients with recurrent tears. MRA results do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome. PMID:26288536

  9. Arthroscopic tenodesis through positioning portals to treat proximal lesions of the biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ji; Gao, Qing-feng; Zhang, Yao; He, Yao-hua

    2014-12-01

    Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is a good choice for treating proximal lesions of the biceps tendon. However, there are few descriptions of the surgical approach. We introduce a technique for proximal biceps tenodesis using positioning portals and placing suture anchors. Our patients had a minimum of 12 months of follow-up. Between January 2010 and June 2012, a total of 49 patients (21 men, 28 women) underwent arthroscopic biceps tenodesis. The pathology was mainly associated with proximal lesions of the biceps tendon, with the diagnosis confirmed in all patients. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and then up to and including the final follow-up. Their pain and conditions were assessed using the Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores for pain; range of active forward flexion; and active range of motion. All data were analyzed statistically. All patients were operated on successfully. They achieved good healing during the follow-up (mean 14 months; range 12-34 months). Before surgery the ASES, Constant, and UCLA scores were 17.0, 39.4, and 15.4, respectively. After surgery they were 33.6, 89.1, and 31.2, respectively. The scores had significantly improved: ASES scores from 17.0 to 33.6 (P < 0.05); Constant scores from 39.4 to 89.1 (P < 0.05); UCLA scores from 15.4 to 31.2 (P < 0.05). Arthroscopic tenodesis through positioning portals to treat proximal lesions of the biceps tendon produces satisfactory clinical outcomes. This technique is convenient and safe. PMID:25239022

  10. All arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fiberwire and endobutton system

    PubMed Central

    Spoliti, Marco; De Cupis, Mauro; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is common in athletes and in contact sports and about 9% of shoulder injuries involves this joint. The majority of these AC lesions can be successfully treated conservatively but high grade dislocation and some cases of type III dislocation need a surgical treatment. Many different operative techniques have been described over the years. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic stabilization of AC joint dislocation with TightRope® system. Materials and methods: nineteen patients with acute AC dislocation were treated by arthroscopic fixation with TightRope® system. Any associated lesions were repaired. All patients were assessed before surgery (T0), at 3 months (T1), at 6 months (T2) and at 1 year after the surgery (T3) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). All patients were evaluated with X-ray. Results: six AC-joint dislocations involved the right shoulder and thirteen the left shoulder. Ten were type III dislocation, three were type IV and six were type V dislocation. We found a statistically significant reduction of pain (p< 0.01) at T1 compared to the pretreatment scores. The CMS measures showed an improvement between T1, T2 and T3, but the difference was statistically significant only between T1 and T3 (p= 0.017). The postoperative X-Ray of the shoulder showed a good reduction of the AC joint dislocation. We had 1 case of recurrence and 2 cases of loss of intraoperative reduction. Conclusion: arthroscopic technique for acute AC joint dislocations with the use of the TightRope® device is minimally invasive and it allows an anatomic restoration of the joint. It is a safe and effective procedure ensuring stable AC joint reconstruction and good cosmetic results. PMID:25767774

  11. Management of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures by distal femoral locking plate: A retrospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, Rajiv; Marya, SKS; Singh, Chandeep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures is difficult. Osteoporosis, comminution and bone loss, compromise stability with delayed mobility and poor functional outcomes. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with anatomic distal femoral (DF) locking plate permits early mobilization. However, this usually necessitates bone grafting (BG). Biological fixation using minimally invasive techniques minimizes periosteal stripping and morbidity. Materials and Methods: 31 patients with comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures were reviewed retrospectively from October 2006 to September 2012. All patients underwent fixation using a DF locking compression plate (Synthes). 17 patients underwent ORIF with primary BG, whereas 14 were treated by closed reduction (CR) and internal fixation using biological minimally invasive techniques. Clinical and radiological followup were recorded for an average 36 months. Results: Mean time to union for the entire group was 5.6 months (range 3-9 months). Patients of ORIF group took longer (Mean 6.4 months, range 4.5-9 months) than the CR group (mean 4.6 months, range 3-7 months). Three patients of ORIF and one in CR group had poor results. Mean knee society scores were higher for CR group at 6 months, but nearly identical at 12 months, with similar eventual range of motion. Discussion: Locked plating of comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures permits stable rigid fixation and early mobilization. Fixation using minimally invasive biological techniques minimizes morbidity and may obviate the need for primary BG. PMID:26015610

  12. Full circle: 3D femoral mapping demonstrates age-related changes that influence femoral implant positioning.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Damien; Surup, Timm; Petersik, Andreas; Kelly, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of the femur is important in the final position of an intramedullary implant; we hypothesised that the femoral geometry changes with age and this may predispose the elderly to anterior mal-positioning of these implants. We used CT DICOM data of 919 intact left femora and specialist software that allowed us to defined landmarks for measurement reference - such as the linea aspera - on a template bone that could be mapped automatically to the entire database. We found that older (>80 years) cortical bone is up to 1.5 mm thinner anteriorly and 2 mm thinner posteriorly than younger (<40 years) bone but the rate of change of posterior to anterior cortex thickness is greater in the older bone. We also found the isthmus in the elderly to be more distal and less substantial than in the younger bone. This study has demonstrated femoral geometry changes with age that may explain our perception that the elderly are at increased risk for anterior mal-positioning of intramedullary implants. PMID:26686594

  13. Radiological assessment of the femoral bowing in Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Ahmed Hamed Kassem; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Morsy, Ahmad Fawaz; Miwa, Shinji; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Rubio, Donnel A.; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Differences in the magnitude of bowing between races are well-known characteristics of the femur. Asian races have an increased magnitude of femoral bowing but most of the orthopedic implants designed for the femur do not match this exaggerated bowing. We calculated the sagittal and coronal femoral bowing in the Japanese population at different levels of the femur and addressed its surgical significance. Material and methods: We calculated the sagittal and coronal bowing of 132 Japanese femora using CT scan of the femur. A mathematical calculation of the radius of curvature at proximal, middle, and distal regions of the femur was used to determine the degree of femoral bowing. Results: Mean sagittal bowing of the femur was 581, 188, and 161 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the femur and mean lateral bowing was 528, 5092, and 876 mm, respectively. Mean sagittal and coronal bowing for the whole femur was 175 and 2640 mm, respectively. No correlation was found between age, gender, length of femur, and the degree of bowing. Conclusion: Our study reveals that femoral bowing in the Japanese population is 175 mm in the sagittal plane and 2640 mm in the coronal plane; these values are greater than the femoral bowing in other ethnic groups studied in the literature. This may result in varying degrees of mismatch between the western-manufactured femoral intramedullary implants and the Japanese femur. We recommend that orthopedic surgeons to accurately perform preoperative evaluation of the femoral bowing to avoid potential malalignment, rotation, and abnormal stresses between the femur and implant. PMID:27163091

  14. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, I. A. Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Popova, K. S. Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-17

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young’s modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220–265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  15. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Popova, K. S.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young's modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220-265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  16. Prospective Randomized Study of Arthroscopic Proximal vs Open Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Gobezie, Reuben; Shishani, Yousef; Flocken, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The biceps tendon is recognized as a significant source of pain in the shoulder for many patients. Operative techniques for tenodesis of the biceps tendon vary widely. No studies have been conducted directly comparing arthroscopic proximal vs. open subpectoral biceps tenodesis using a prospective study. We aim to compare the functional outcomes, pain relief, and complications of proximal vs. subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Methods: A prospective randomized study of 129 consecutive patients requiring biceps tenodesis for treatment of biceps tendon tears, biceps instability or superior labral tears was performed. Clinical outcome measures used to conduct the study included active range of motion, VAS pain score, ASES score and SANE scores. Complications and revisions were also documented. Results: Mean follow-up was 13.2 months (12-24 months) with 50 subpectoral tenodesis and 46 proximal tenodesis patients reaching minimum follow-up of 12 months. In the subpectoral group, the VAS improved from 5.7 to 2.0 (p < 0.001), ASES score improved from 49.8 to 77.7 (p< 0.001), and SANE scores improved from 42.1% to 77.7% (p<0.001). In the arthroscopic proximal tenodesis group, the VAS pain score improved from 5.9 to 1.8 (p<0.001), ASES score improved from 52.0 to 82.5 (p<0.001), and SANE scores improved from 42.8% to 78.6% (p<0.001). The revision rate for the subpectoral group was 4% (2/50 patients). The revision rate for the arthroscopic proximal tenodesis group was 8.6% (4/46). Twelve patients had persistent tenderness over the bicipital groove: 7 following proximal tenodesis and 5 following subpectoral tenodesis. No significant difference was found between methods in any outcome measures evaluated. Conclusion: This study found no difference in the functional outcomes or pain relief between proximal vs subpectoral biceps tenodesis. However, revision rates and occurrence of post-operative persistent bicipital groove pain for arthroscopic proximal tenodesis with

  17. Arthroscopic Excision of Juxta-articular Osteoid Osteoma of the Calcaneum

    PubMed Central

    Tauheed, Mohammed; Korula, Ravi Jacob; Shankarnarayanan, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the foot is a rare condition particularly of the calcaneum. This condition is difficult to diagnose and is more difficult to treat particularly if it involves deeper part of the joints. We present an arthroscopic technique to deal with a case of juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneum using two portals: the anterolateral portal for instrumentation and the anterior anterolateral portal for visualization of the subtalar joint. Because this approach is minimally invasive, it offers early recovery and reduced morbidity compared with the conventional techniques. PMID:27073769

  18. INDIRECT ARTHROSCOPIC DECOMPRESSION OF SPINOGLENOID CYST WITH SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve compression is rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with shoulder pain and external rotation deficit. Spinoglenoidal cysts may cause compression, and posterosuperior glenoid labrum lesions are the most likely hypothesis to explain their appearance. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography define the diagnosis. Indirect arthroscopic decompression of the cyst and repair of the glenoid labrum enable complete neurological recovery. The authors report two cases of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle caused by compression due to spinoglenoidal cysts that were treated by means of arthroscopy, and present the pre and postoperative assessments. PMID:27022558

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of the proximal tibiofibular joint should be kept in mind in the evaluation of lateral knee pain. They include osteoarthrosis, rheumatic disease, traumatic subluxation or dislocation, ganglion or synovial cysts, synostosis, synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis and hypomobility of the joint. Peroneal nerve can be at risk with pathologies of the joint either by compressive effect or formation of intra-neural ganglion. A case of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint was reported which presented with lateral knee pain. It was successfully treated by arthroscopic synovectomy. Level of evidence V. PMID:24788187

  20. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays

  1. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A.; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  2. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  3. Treatment of tibial eminence fractures with arthroscopic suture fixation technique: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanhao; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yanjie; Wang, Zhanchao

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to investigate the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic suture fixation in treating tibial eminence fracture with a retrospective study design of two years’ follow-up. Methods: A total of 33 patients with imaging evidence of tibial eminence avulsion fractures who underwent arthroscopic surgery between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. The inclusion criteria for the study were a displaced tibial eminence avulsion fracture and anterior knee instability of grade II or higher inskeletally mature patients. These patients were treated with arthroscopic suture fixation and followed with a mean period of 24 months. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained 3 months postoperatively to assess fracture healing. At 24 months after surgery, all patients were evaluated by an independent orthopaedic professor with clinical examination like anteroposterior laxity (Lachman-Noulis and anterior drawer tests) and Rolimeter knee tester (Aircast, Vista, CA). Knee range of motion was evaluated actively and passively with a goniometer. Knee function was evaluated by the Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Knee radiographs in standing anteroposterior, standing lateral, and Merchant views were examined for alignment, joint space narrowing, and degenerative knee changes. Results: No major complication like infection, deep venous thrombosis, or neurovascular deficit happened peri-operatively. At the final follow-up, there were no symptoms of instability and no clinical signs of ACL deficiency. Radiographs showed that all fractures healed 3 months post-operative, but at the last follow-up, there was one person with degenerative changes like joint space narrowing in radiographs. Anterior translation of the tibia was 0.47 mm on average (0 to 2.5 mm) compared with the uninjured side. Range-of-motion measurement showed a mean extension deficit of 1.5° (0° to 5°) and a mean flexion deficit of 2.7° (0° to 10

  4. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Alvaro G.; Santschi, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging. PMID:25694665

  5. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Alvaro G; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2015-02-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging. PMID:25694665

  6. Arthroscopic surgical treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the elbow: case report.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Marlon Araujo; Balsini, Niso Eduardo; Ramos, Fernando; Machado, Luiz Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    This case concerns a male patient complaining of pain and discomfort in his right elbow, associated with decreased range of motion. Elbow radiography showed an osteolytic lesion in the metaphyseal region of the distal humerus and magnetic resonance imaging showed intra-articular tumor formation with swelling that suggested pigmented villonodular synovitis. Arthroscopic treatment was performed in order to obtain a synovial biopsy and then to carry out total synovectomy. Anatomopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The patient presented excellent progress through the physiotherapeutic rehabilitation proposed and continued to be asymptomatic 12 months after the operation. PMID:27517031

  7. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  8. [Delayed hypoxia after the surgical correction of femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Goh, R; Mori, K; Abe, T; Kohyama, A; Minato, A

    1996-11-01

    We investigated perioperative blood gas changes in 26 patients scheduled for surgical correction of femoral neck fracture under epidural anesthesia. Arterial blood gases during spontaneous air respiration were measured eight times during the femoral neck prosthetic replacements (n = 16), and four times during osteosynthesis (n = 10). In the patients who received femoral neck replacements using bone cement (n = 8), arterial oxygen tension decreased significantly four hours after insertion of prosthesis, and did not recover during two postoperative days. In contrast, in the patients who received cementless femoral neck replacements (n = 8), arterial oxygen tension tended to decrease but not significantly, and returned to normal on the second postoperative day. In the patients who received osteosynthesis, arterial oxygen tension did not change. We suspected that the causes of delayed hypoxia in the femoral neck replacements were vascular endothelial cell injury in the lung by free fatty acid originating from fat embolism, and/or microthrombosis resulting from activated coagulation system. Bone cement was thought to intensify fat embolism because of elevated intramedullary pressure in the femur. PMID:8953864

  9. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  10. Arthroscopic Bone Grafting of Deep Acetabular Cysts Using a Curved Delivery Device

    PubMed Central

    Garabekyan, Tigran; Chadayammuri, Vivek; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular intraosseous cysts are frequently encountered in patients with dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement. Small cysts are typically addressed by removing the cyst lining and stimulating healing via microfracture or abrasion chondroplasty. In contrast, larger cysts involving 1-3 cm3 frequently require additional fortification with bone graft material to facilitate osseous ingrowth and cyst healing. Previous arthroscopic reports have described the use of rim trimming to access the extra-articular side of the cyst, with subsequent use of straight metal cannulas for delivery of bone graft material. The downsides of this technique include the requirement for rim trimming, which may be ill advised in patients with normal coverage or dysplasia, as well as the creation of a second breach in the cyst wall, precluding pressurization of the bone graft material. We describe an arthroscopic technique using a curved delivery device allowing for deeper penetration into the cyst cavity through the articular side and greater delivery of bone graft material. PMID:27073770

  11. Effects of arthroscopic meniscectomy on the long-term prognosis for the discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chun, Yong-Min; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Ryu, Sang-Wook; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Lubis, Andri M T

    2007-11-01

    This study compared the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes, according to the extent of arthroscopic meniscectomy, of complete and incomplete types of the discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 125 discoid menisci (74 complete and 51 incomplete types) without significant cartilage erosion at the time of surgery were included. The extent of meniscectomy was decided along with tear patterns and the stability of the discoid meniscus. Both clinical and radiological results were evaluated after total or partial meniscectomy. In the complete type of discoid meniscus with less than 5 years of follow-up, the total meniscectomy group showed better clinical results than the partial meniscectomy group. However, with over 5 years of follow-up, there were no differences between the two groups. In the radiological results, there was no significant difference between the two groups during the first 5 years after operation. However, with more than 5 years of follow-up, the partial meniscectomy group showed better results than the total meniscectomy group. In the incomplete-type discoid meniscus, clinical results were better in the partial meniscectomy group regardless of the follow-up periods. In the radiological results, the partial meniscectomy group showed better results for only more than 5 years of follow-up. The long-term prognosis after arthroscopic meniscectomy for the torn discoid lateral meniscus was related to the volume of the meniscus removed. PMID:17762931

  12. MRI-Arthroscopic Correlation in Rotator Cuff Tendon Pathologies; A Comparison between Various Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Momenzadeh, Omid Reza; Dehghani, Sakineh; Gerami, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been considered a perfect imaging study for evaluation of shoulder pathologies despite occasional discrepancies between MR reports and arthroscopic findings. In this study we aim to evaluate impact of imaging center as an indicator of image quality on accuracy of MRI reports in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon pathologies. Methods: We reviewed MR reports of 64 patients who underwent arthroscopy in university center hospital. MRIs were done in various centers including both university-affiliated and out-centers. All studies were reported by two radiologists in consensus unaware of the arthroscopic results or previous reports. An inter-observer agreement analysis using the kappa statistics was performed to determine consistency among imaging and surgical reports. Results: Kappa values for out-centers were as follows: 0.785 for biceps, 0.469 for suscapularis, 0.846 for supraspinatus and 0.785 for infraspinatus tendons. In university centers values were 0.799 for biceps, 0.802 for suscapularis, 0.789 for supraspinatus and 0.770 for infraspinatus tendons. Conclusion: Image reporting in university centers with proficient sequences increased accuracy of diagnosis in 3/4 of evaluated features and showed subtle decreased inter-observer agreement in 1/4 of features. Uniformity of the scanners and protocols as well as evaluation on a workstation rather than hard copies cumulatively resulted in a meaningful increase in the accuracy of the same radiologists in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon tear. PMID:27200392

  13. Direct “Cystoscopic” Approach for Arthroscopic Decompression of an Intraosseous Ganglion of the Lunate

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Deepak N.

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts (IOGs) are uncommon lesions of the carpal bones and can present with persistent pain and stiffness of the wrist. Surgical decompression is recommended, and a variety of approaches to decompress symptomatic IOGs of the wrist have been described. We describe an arthroscopic approach that can be performed with only 2 portals and offers excellent access for visualization and instrumentation. The procedure involves creating a 3.2-mm tunnel into the lunate cyst; this is performed through the dorsal non-articular surface of the lunate, under direct vision, and the position is confirmed with fluoroscopy. A 2.4-mm arthroscope is passed through the drill hole, and a direct “cystoscopic” view of the IOG is obtained. Biopsy of the cyst contents is performed under direct vision, and small-joint shavers and burrs are used for effective debridement. Advantages of this technique are actual visualization of the pathology, complete intracystic debridement, and simultaneous treatment of any coexistent intra-articular pathology. In addition, the minimal 3.2-mm lunate tunnel access maintains the structural integrity of the lunate and reduces the need for additional bone graft supplementation. PMID:26258034

  14. The "all inside" arthroscopic Broström procedure: a prospective study of 40 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Rigby, Ryan B

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are the most common injury in sports. Nonoperative therapy is recommended initially, including functional rehabilitation. Surgery might be an option for those patients in whom nonoperative attempts fail. Various surgical approaches have been described in published studies for treating chronic lateral ankle instability. The procedures are typically grouped into 2 main categories: anatomic and nonanatomic repair of the lateral ligament complex. The open modified Broström-Gould anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. In the present study, we used an arthroscopic approach to treat chronic anterior talofibular ligament tears without the extensive open incisions common in the traditional modified Broström-Gould procedure. Our hypothesis was that the use of an all-inside arthroscopic Broström procedure would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. We also wished to explore the complication rates and interval to return to weightbearing activity. A total of 40 ankles in 40 consecutive patients were included in the cohort. PMID:23669003

  15. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, José Maria; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100° of flexion and 30° extension. The range of active motion was 40-90°. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9-3 and its arc of active motion was 110° to -20° of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities. PMID:26535210

  16. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review☆

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, José Maria; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100° of flexion and 30° extension. The range of active motion was 40–90°. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9–3 and its arc of active motion was 110° to −20° of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities. PMID:26535210

  17. Arthroscopic approach to the posterior compartment of the knee using a posterior transseptal portal

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the posterior compartment of the knee is difficult when only two anterior portals are used for access because of the inaccessibility of the back of the knee. Since its introduction, the posterior transseptal portal has been widely employed to access lesions in the posterior compartment. However, special care should be taken to avoid neurovascular injuries around the posteromedial, posterolateral, and transseptal portals. Most importantly, popliteal vessel injury should be avoided when creating and using the transseptal portal during surgery. Purpose of the present study is to describe how to avoid the neurovascular injuries during establishing the posterior three portals and to introduce our safer technique to create the transseptal portal. To date, we have performed arthroscopic surgeries via the transseptal portal in the posterior compartments of 161 knees and have not encountered nerve or vascular injury. In our procedure, the posterior septum is perforated with a 1.5-3.0-mm Kirschner wire that is protected by a sheath inserted from the posterolateral portal and monitored from the posteromedial portal to avoid popliteal vessel injury. PMID:26301179

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of avulsed tibial spine fractures using a transosseous sutures technique.

    PubMed

    Wagih, Ahmad M

    2015-03-01

    Severely displaced tibial spine fractures should be treated surgically to restore joint congruity and cruciate integrity with reduction and fixation through an arthrotomy or arthroscopic techniques. Arthroscopy is preferred as it allows for accurate diagnosis and treatment of associated injuries and reduction and fixation of all types of tibial spine fractures while reducing the morbidity associated with open techniques. We report the clinical and radiographical results of 11 cases treated with a technique of arthroscopic internal fixation with non-absorbable sutures, after an average follow-up of 16.3 months (range, 11 to 21 months). The clinical examination using the IKDC system revealed all patients to have a negative Lachman test and no quadriceps weakness except one patient with some laxity (hard end 1+ Lachman test). One patient had a minor extension deficit of approximately 5°. The other patients showed a full range of motion without extension loss. This technique is simple, reproducible and very useful in dealing with these fractures. PMID:26280867

  19. All-arthroscopic repair of arcuate avulsion fracture with suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hong, Lei; Wang, Xue-Song; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xin; Feng, Hua

    2011-05-01

    Arcuate avulsion fractures are very rare but present pathologic posterolateral rotation instability. Untreated instability may lead to overload of the reconstructed posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) graft. Surgical treatment and clinical results have not yet been reported to our knowledge. This study presents the case of a 45-year-old man with PCL injury and an arcuate avulsion fracture of the fibular head. The dial test was positive preoperatively, and magnetic resonance imaging showed an "arcuate" sign. The avulsed bone fragment was reduced and fixed with a suture anchor by an all-arthroscopic technique. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient had resumed all his normal activities, including sports. He scored 1+ on the posterior drawer test, and external rotation was 1° less than that in his contralateral normal knee. Compared with the values in the contralateral normal knee, the posterior tibial translation was reduced from 15.5 mm preoperatively to 6.3 mm postoperatively. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans showed that the reconstructed PCL graft and the osseous fragment of the styloid process of the fibular head attached to the popliteofibular ligament were reduced. This technical note describes an all-arthroscopic reduction and fixation technique of arcuate avulsed fracture of the fibular head. PMID:21398077

  20. Femur-mounted navigation system for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. H.; Hwang, D. S.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement stems from an abnormal shape of the acetabulum and proximal femur. It is treated by resection of damaged soft tissue and by the shaping of bone to resemble normal features. The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has many advantages, including minimal incisions, rapid recovery, and less pain. However, in some cases, revision is needed owing to the insufficient resection of damaged bone from a misreading of the surgical site. The limited view of arthroscopy is the major reason for the complications. In this research, a navigation method for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is developed. The proposed navigation system consists of femur attachable measurement device and user interface. The bone mounted measurement devices measure points on head-neck junction for registration and position of surgical instrument. User interface shows the three-dimensional model of patient's femur and surgical instrument position that is tracked by measurement device. Surgeon can know the three-dimensional anatomical structure of hip joint and surgical instrument position on surgical site using navigation system. Surface registration was used to obtain relation between patient's coordinate at the surgical site and coordinate of three-dimensional model of femur. In this research, we evaluated the proposed navigation system using plastic model bone. It is expected that the surgical tool tracking position accuracy will be less than 1 mm.

  1. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of SLAP lesions through the O’Brien portal☆

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Fabiano; Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Rocha, Ricardo Dantas; Filardi, Cantídio Salvador; da Costa, Miguel Pereira; Filho, Romulo Brasil; Junior, Antonio Carlos Tenor

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional results from arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions through the portal described by O’Brien. Methods A retrospective evaluation was conducted on 19 shoulders in 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions through the O’Brien portal between November 2007 and January 2012. Results Nineteen shoulders in 18 patients were evaluated: 16 male patients (84.2%) and three female patients (15.7%). The patients’ ages ranged from 27 to 40 years (mean of 34.3 years). There were 12 patients (63.1%) with injuries on the right shoulder, six (31.5%) with injuries on the left shoulder and one (5.2%) with bilateral injury. In relation to dominance, 13 patients (68.4%) presented the injury on the dominant limb and five (26.3%) were affected on the non-dominant limb. We observed that nine cases (47.3%) had SLAP lesions alone and 10 cases (52.6%) were related to glenohumeral instability. There was one case (5.2%) of recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation, but this patient chose not to undergo a new surgical intervention. According to the UCLA and ASES scales translated and adapted to the Portuguese language, 96% of the results were good or excellent. Conclusion The approach for treating SLAP lesions through the portal described by O’Brien et al. is easy to reproduce, with a high rate of good and excellent results and a low complication rate. PMID:26229936

  2. An arthroscopic device to assess articular cartilage defects and treatment with a hydrogel.

    PubMed

    McCarty, William J; Luan, Anna; Sundaramurthy, Priya; Urbanczyk, Caryn; Patel, Atal; Hahr, Jacob; Sotoudeh, Mohammad; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Sah, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    The hydraulic resistance R across osteochondral tissue, especially articular cartilage, decreases with degeneration and erosion. Clinically useful measures to quantify and diagnose the extent of cartilage degeneration and efficacy of repair strategies, especially with regard to pressure maintenance, are still developing. The hypothesis of this study was that hydraulic resistance provides a quantitative measure of osteochondral tissue that could be used to evaluate the state of cartilage damage and repair. The aims were to (1) develop a device to measure R in an arthroscopic setting, (2) determine whether the device could detect differences in R for cartilage, an osteochondral defect, and cartilage treated using a hydrogel ex vivo, and (3) determine how quickly such differences could be discerned. The apparent hydraulic resistance of defect samples was ~35% less than intact cartilage controls, while the resistance of hydrogel-filled groups was not statistically different than controls, suggesting some restoration of fluid pressurization in the defect region by the hydrogel. Differences in hydraulic resistance between control and defect groups were apparent after 4 s. The results indicate that the measurement of R is feasible for rapid and quantitative functional assessment of the extent of osteochondral defects and repair. The arthroscopic compatibility of the device demonstrates the potential for this measurement to be made in a clinical setting. PMID:21107696

  3. Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Stabilization With an Iliac Bone Graft and Capsular Repair: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tomas; Goede, Fabian; Struck, Melena; Wellmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Several surgical approaches have been described for the treatment of recurrent posterior shoulder instability. Many authors have performed posterior bone block procedures with good results not only in the presence of glenoid bone loss or dysplasia but also in the case of capsular hyperlaxity and poor soft-tissue quality. Open techniques often require an extensive approach with the disadvantage of a poor cosmetic result and possible insufficiency of the deltoid muscle. Furthermore, the treatment of concomitant pathologies and the correct placement of the bone graft are difficult. Therefore we describe an all-arthroscopic posterior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac bone graft and capsular repair that is intended to improve the pre-existing open procedure. The key steps of the operation are the precise placement and screw fixation of the bone block at the posterior glenoid under arthroscopic control and the subsequent posterior capsular refixation and plication using 2 suture anchors to create an extra-articular graft position. PMID:23766993

  4. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft. PMID:17684731

  5. Arthroscopic meniscal repair and needle aspiration for meniscal tear with meniscal cyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ko-Hsiu

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with meniscal cysts of the meniscus usually requires surgery. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the involved torn meniscus with intra-articular cyst drainage has become the accepted intervention. However, if the meniscal tear is peripheral, a lot of healthy meniscal tissue is needlessly sacrificed with subtotal meniscectomy. Moreover, the meniscal cyst is not a true cyst, so it may be treated more conservatively after the underlying disease has been corrected. We report a case of a meniscal cyst arising from the anterior segment of the lateral torn meniscus that was arthroscopically repaired with an outside-in technique. With the use of a 19-gauge long needle to penetrate the peripheral rim inframeniscally, a nonabsorbable No. 3-0 nylon suture was passed into the joint and brought out suprameniscally to loop the meniscal fragment. The second suture was passed and was used to secure the meniscal rim and fragment by the same means approximately 8 to 10 mm from the first one. Then the cyst was aspirated. A good result was obtained, and no recurrence of the cyst or mechanical problems occurred after a follow-up of 14 months. PMID:17157745

  6. Arthroscopically assisted fixation of the lesser trochanter fracture: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Aditya; Raz, Guy; Bosley, Belinda; Ludger, Gerdesmeyer; Al Muderis, Munjed

    2014-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the lesser trochanter in adolescents are uncommon. This injury is a result of a sudden forceful contraction of the iliopsoas tendon. It usually occurs during vigorous sport activity. Historically, these injuries were treated non-operatively, with guarded results, including weak hip flexor strength and non-union, hindering return to competitive sport. We report a series of three arthroscopically assisted fracture fixations performed by the senior author, using cannulated screw fixation in two cases and an anchor in one case. Mobilization was commenced immediately following surgery, allowing weight bearing as tolerated using crutches for 4 weeks, thereafter unaided walking was allowed. Patients were assessed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 1-year post-operatively. Radiographs were utilized to confirm full union. All three patients were able to mobilize unaided by 4 weeks post-operatively and two of the three patients returned to competitive sport at 3 months. Near—anatomical union was achieved in all cases. No complications were noted during surgery and the peri-operative period in our series. The utilization of arthroscopic reduction and fixation of avulsion of the lesser trochanter results in good fixation and allows a faster recovery with a return to sports activity, and therefore, we suggest it as a viable treatment option for such injuries. PMID:27011799

  7. Arthroscopically assisted fixation of the lesser trochanter fracture: a case series.

    PubMed

    Khemka, Aditya; Raz, Guy; Bosley, Belinda; Ludger, Gerdesmeyer; Al Muderis, Munjed

    2014-07-01

    Avulsion fractures of the lesser trochanter in adolescents are uncommon. This injury is a result of a sudden forceful contraction of the iliopsoas tendon. It usually occurs during vigorous sport activity. Historically, these injuries were treated non-operatively, with guarded results, including weak hip flexor strength and non-union, hindering return to competitive sport. We report a series of three arthroscopically assisted fracture fixations performed by the senior author, using cannulated screw fixation in two cases and an anchor in one case. Mobilization was commenced immediately following surgery, allowing weight bearing as tolerated using crutches for 4 weeks, thereafter unaided walking was allowed. Patients were assessed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 1-year post-operatively. Radiographs were utilized to confirm full union. All three patients were able to mobilize unaided by 4 weeks post-operatively and two of the three patients returned to competitive sport at 3 months. Near-anatomical union was achieved in all cases. No complications were noted during surgery and the peri-operative period in our series. The utilization of arthroscopic reduction and fixation of avulsion of the lesser trochanter results in good fixation and allows a faster recovery with a return to sports activity, and therefore, we suggest it as a viable treatment option for such injuries. PMID:27011799

  8. Ligamentum teres injuries - an observational study of a proposed new arthroscopic classification.

    PubMed

    Porthos Salas, Antonio; O'Donnell, John M

    2015-10-01

    Ligamentum teres (LT) Injuries or tears have been said to be a common cause of groin discomfort and pain, and they have been identified in 8-51% of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Currently, in the literature there exist three arthroscopic classifications for LT injuries and tears: the first classification was established by Gray and Villar, Botser and Domb proposed the second one which they called a descriptive classification according to the degree of partial thickness LT tears and more recently the last classification by Cerezal et al. (RadioGraphics 2010; 30:1637-51), where they take into account the one by Gray and Villar but adding an avulsion fracture and absence of the LT. We propose a new classification, which also takes into account, observed LT pathologies, as well as the possible pathological mechanism of LT tears, and offer a guide to treatment. This classification is based on direct arthroscopic observation and dynamic rotational maneuvers of the hip under distraction. This classification incorporates those pathologies, which have been observed as a result of this more focused examination of the LT. PMID:27011847

  9. Arthroscopic Patelloplasty and Circumpatellar Denervation for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yujie; Yuan, Bangtuo; Shen, Xuezhen; Qu, Feng; Wang, Jiangtao; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Juanli; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA). Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years) treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect. Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV. Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression. PMID:25563318

  10. Direct "Cystoscopic" Approach for Arthroscopic Decompression of an Intraosseous Ganglion of the Lunate.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2015-06-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts (IOGs) are uncommon lesions of the carpal bones and can present with persistent pain and stiffness of the wrist. Surgical decompression is recommended, and a variety of approaches to decompress symptomatic IOGs of the wrist have been described. We describe an arthroscopic approach that can be performed with only 2 portals and offers excellent access for visualization and instrumentation. The procedure involves creating a 3.2-mm tunnel into the lunate cyst; this is performed through the dorsal non-articular surface of the lunate, under direct vision, and the position is confirmed with fluoroscopy. A 2.4-mm arthroscope is passed through the drill hole, and a direct "cystoscopic" view of the IOG is obtained. Biopsy of the cyst contents is performed under direct vision, and small-joint shavers and burrs are used for effective debridement. Advantages of this technique are actual visualization of the pathology, complete intracystic debridement, and simultaneous treatment of any coexistent intra-articular pathology. In addition, the minimal 3.2-mm lunate tunnel access maintains the structural integrity of the lunate and reduces the need for additional bone graft supplementation. PMID:26258034

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR TRAUMATIC ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION: FIRST EPISODE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Botelho, Vinicius; Duarte, Clodoaldo; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical results obtained of patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment following a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Between August 2000 and October 2008, 14 shoulders of 14 patients were treated by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of Santa Casa Hospital, São Paulo. Thirteen patients (93%) were male and one (7%) was female; their ages ranged from 17 to 41 years, with a mean of 28 years. All of the patients evaluated were regularly practicing a sports activity (which required physical vigor of the upper limbs). The time that had elapsed between the trauma and the surgical treatment ranged from seven to 60 days, with a mean of 20 days. The surgical procedure was performed with arthroscopic viewing, with the patient positioned in lateral decubitus. Fixation of the labral-ligamentous complex was achieved using bioabsorbable anchors. The postoperative clinical assessment was made using Rowe and UCLA criteria. Joint mobility was measured according to the guidance from ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons). The length of postoperative follow-up ranged from 24 to 120 months, with a mean of 45 months. Results: All the patients achieved satisfactory results, (85% excellent and 15% good), as shown by UCLA, while 100% of the results were excellent according Rowe. The “grip test” was negative for all the patients. Conclusion: Surgical treatment after a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation seems to be a good therapeutic option for young active patients who practice sports activities. PMID:27042625

  12. Arthroscopic debridement in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the elbow, based on computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Miyake, J; Shimada, K; Oka, K; Tanaka, H; Sugamoto, K; Yoshikawa, H; Murase, T

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively assessed the value of identifying impinging osteophytes using dynamic computer simulation of CT scans of the elbow in assisting their arthroscopic removal in patients with osteoarthritis of the elbow. A total of 20 patients were treated (19 men and one woman, mean age 38 years (19 to 55)) and followed for a mean of 25 months (24 to 29). We located the impinging osteophytes dynamically using computerised three-dimensional models of the elbow based on CT data in three positions of flexion of the elbow. These were then removed arthroscopically and a capsular release was performed. The mean loss of extension improved from 23° (10° to 45°) pre-operatively to 9° (0° to 25°) post-operatively, and the mean flexion improved from 121° (80° to 140°) pre-operatively to 130° (110° to 145°) post-operatively. The mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 62 (30 to 85) to 95 (70 to 100) post-operatively. All patients had pain in the elbow pre-operatively which disappeared or decreased post-operatively. According to their Mayo scores, 14 patients had an excellent clinical outcome and six a good outcome; 15 were very satisfied and five were satisfied with their post-operative outcome. We recommend this technique in the surgical management of patients with osteoarthritis of the elbow. PMID:24493190

  13. Arthroscopic-assisted repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in distal radioulnar joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Jong; Jegal, Midum; Park, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal insertion can lead to distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability accompanied by ulnar-sided pain, weakness, snapping, and limited forearm rotation. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with TFCC foveal tears treated with arthroscopic-assisted repair. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients underwent foveal repair of avulsed TFCC with the assistance of arthroscopy between 2011 and 2013. These patients were followed up for an average of 19 months (range 14–25 months). The avulsed TFCC were reattached to the fovea using a transosseous pull-out suture or a knotless suture anchor. At the final followup, the range of motion, grip strength and DRUJ stability were measured as objective outcomes. Subjective outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH score) and return to work. Results: Based on the DRUJ stress test, 5 patients had normal stability and 7 patients showed mild laxity as compared with the contralateral side. Postoperatively, the mean range of pronation supination increased from 141° to 166°, and the mean VAS score for pain decreased from 5.3 to 1.7 significantly. The PRWE and DASH questionnaires also showed significant functional improvement. All patients were able to return to their jobs. However, two patients complained of persistent pain. Conclusions: Arthroscopically assisted repair of TFCC foveal injury can provide significant pain relief, functional improvement and restoration of DRUJ stability. PMID:27293286

  14. Arthroscopic suprapectoral tenodesis of the long head biceps: reproducing an anatomic length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    David, Tal S; Schildhorn, Jeffrey C

    2012-09-01

    Tenodesis is an accepted treatment option in the management of pathology involving the long head of the biceps (LHB). Among the common causes for revision surgery after tenodesis are residual pain within the bicipital groove, cramping, early biceps fatigue, and biceps deformity. Most technical descriptions of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis involve fixation of the LHB tendon within or proximal to the intertubercular sulcus and thus fail to address the described sources of pain within this proximal anatomic location. Suprapectoral tenodesis offers the surgeon the ability to remove the LHB from within the bicipital groove by fixating the biceps more distally. Cramping, early fatigue, and biceps deformity have been described when the appropriate length-tension relation of the biceps tendon has not been restored after LHB tenodesis. Our described procedure allows for a more consistent restoration of the anatomic length-tension relation of the LHB, therefore reducing the symptoms associated with this variable. This all-arthroscopic, suprapectoral biceps tenodesis with interference fixation addresses the most common causes for revision surgery and offers a comprehensive solution for LHB pathology. PMID:23766967

  15. Effect of a Sleep Aid in Analgesia after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Young-Kuk; Shin, Hong-Kwan; Hwang, Ilseon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and safety of a sleep aid for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods Seventy-eight patients were prospectively assigned to either the zolpidem group (multimodal analgesia+zolpidem; 39 patients) or the control group (multimodal analgesia; 39 patients). Self-rated pain levels were assessed twice a day using a visual analog scale (VAS). The need for additional rescue analgesic, duration of functional recovery, and adverse effects were assessed for the first 5 days after surgery. Results The mean number of times that additional rescue analgesic was required during 5 days after surgery was 2.1±2.0 in the zolpidem group and 3.3±2.8 in the control group, a significant difference. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery, although the zolpidem group had lower VAS pain scores than the control group. Additionally, there were no significant differences in duration of functional recovery and adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusion The use of zolpidem for analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provided a significant reduction in the need for rescue analgesic without increasing adverse effects. Nevertheless, mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery did not differ between the zolpidem group and the control group. PMID:25837184

  16. Massive bone loss from fungal infection after anterior cruciate ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, D Luis; Carbo, Lisandro; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Makino, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Although there are numerous reports of septic pyogenic arthritis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is limited information regarding the outcomes of fungal infection. We determined the outcomes of six patients with mycotic infection after regular ACL reconstruction. There were four males and two females with a mean age of 33 years. We determined the number of procedures performed, bone loss originating to control infection, and final reconstruction in these patients. An average of five arthroscopic lavage procedures had been performed at the referring centers. Fungal infection was diagnosed based on pathologic samples; five infections were the result of mucormycosis and one was Candida. After final débridement, the mean segmental bone loss was 12.8 cm. All patients were treated with intravenous antifungal coverage and cement spacers before final reconstruction. At final followup, all patients were free of clinical infection. Three had reconstruction with an allograft-prosthesis composite, two with hemicylindrical allografts, and one with an intercalary allograft arthrodesis. Despite the extremely unusual presentation of this complication, surgeons should be aware of potential and catastrophic consequences of this severe complication after ACL reconstruction. PMID:19190972

  17. Technical guide and tips on the all-arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Claudio; Bongiorno, Vito; Samitier, Gonzalo; Dumont, Guillaume D; Szöllösy, Gregor; Lafosse, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Shoulder dislocation and subsequent anterior instability is a common problem in young athletes. The arthroscopic Bankart repair was originally described by Morgan et al. in 1987. The procedure has benefited from many technical advancements over the past 25 years and currently remains the most commonly utilized procedure in the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability without glenoid bone loss. Capsulolabral repair alone may not be sufficient for treatment of patients with poor capsular tissue quality and significant bony defects. In the presence of chronic anterior glenoid bony defects, a bony reconstruction should be considered. The treatment of anterior shoulder instability with transfer of the coracoid and attached conjoint tendon such as the Latarjet procedure has provided reliable results. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure was described in 2007 by the senior author, who has now performed the procedure over 450 times. The initial surgical technique has evolved considerably since its introduction, and this article presents a comprehensive update on this demanding but well-defined procedure. This article reviews technical tips to help the surgeon perform the surgery more smoothly, navigate through challenging situations, and avoid potential complications. Level of evidence V. PMID:24817106

  18. A review of important medical and surgical considerations for obese patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Prodromo, John; Rackley, Justin; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2016-09-01

    Obesity represents a unique challenge in orthopaedic surgery, the impact of which is seen through all phases of injury: in the development of disease, during the operative procedure, and throughout the rehabilitation period. Given the high prevalence of obesity in the United States and around the world, this patient population represents a substantial proportion of patients in need of orthopedic care. The effects of this disease constrain both medical and financial resources. For obese patients undergoing orthopedic procedures, adequate steps must be taken to minimize the risks that occur before, during, and after surgical intervention. This literature review discusses the impact of obesity on arthroscopic procedures, with a focus on procedures involving the shoulder, hip, and knee. The management of obese patients during the perioperative period should address the specific concerns relating to these patients. Obesity is a risk factor for numerous comorbidities, is associated with surgical complications, and is a predictor of poor functional outcomes following arthroscopy. Efforts to minimize the negative impact of obesity on arthroscopic procedures are crucial. PMID:27578242

  19. Arthroscopic Distal Clavicular Autograft for Treating Shoulder Instability With Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tokish, John M.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly; Cook, Jay B.; Mallon, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Glenoid bone loss is a significant risk factor for failure after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Multiple options are available to reconstruct this bone loss, including coracoid transfer, iliac crest bone graft, and osteoarticular allograft. Each technique has strengths and weaknesses. Coracoid grafts are limited to anterior augmentation and, along with iliac crest, do not provide an osteochondral reconstruction. Osteochondral allografts do provide a cartilage source but are challenged by the potential for graft rejection, infection, cost, and availability. We describe the use of a distal clavicular osteochondral autograft for bony augmentation in cases of glenohumeral instability with significant bone loss. This graft has the advantages of being readily available and cost-effective, it provides an autologous osteochondral transplant with minimal donor-site morbidity, and it can be used in both anterior and posterior bone loss cases. The rationale and technical aspects of arthroscopic performance will be discussed. Clinical studies are warranted to determine the outcomes of the use of the distal clavicle as a graft in shoulder instability. PMID:25264509

  20. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  1. SYNOVIAL CHONDROMATOSIS OF THE POSTERIOR COMPARTMENT OF THE KNEE: A Case Report & Literature Review Focusing on Arthroscopic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sebaaly, Amer; Maalouf, Ghassan; Bayyoud, Wael; Bachour, Falah

    2016-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare panarticular synovial disease affecting large joints and especially the knee. When the disease is localized in the knee, it affects the anterior compartment. We report the case of a posterior localized disease with a review of the literature focusing on arthroscopic treatment. PMID:27169166

  2. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  3. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  4. Rapid resolution of femoral head osteonecrosis after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Masahiko; Matsuda, Keiji; Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Kim, Sungon; Maeda, Kouichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Kubota, Reiko; Hayashi, Kentaro; Nagayama, Masataka; Kaneko, Haruka

    2008-12-01

    The natural history of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is generally thought to be one of progressive deterioration if no intervention is undertaken. However, it is unknown whether surgical intervention is beneficial for patients with a small region of osteonecrosis. We observed rapid improvement of MRI findings after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) was performed in a young patient with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The band-like low signal area on T2-weighted images almost resolved by six months after surgery. He returned to work as an electrician by six months after surgery. Early surgical intervention such as RAO that alters the mechanical force acting on the necrotic region of the femoral head may accelerate the recovery of osteonecrosis and the improvement of symptoms. PMID:19384490

  5. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process. PMID:26927602

  6. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  7. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  8. Venting during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastases: current orthopedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Dalgorf, Dustin; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Stephen, David J.G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Reamed intramedullary nailing, recommended for impending fracture of a femur weakened by bone metastases, causes a rise in intramedullary pressure and increases the risk of a fat embolism syndrome. The pressure can be equalized by the technique of venting — drilling a hole into the distal cortex of the femur. Our objective was to study the current practice of orthopedic surgeons in Ontario with respect to venting during prophylactic intramedullary nailing for an impending femoral fracture due to bone metastases. Methods We mailed a questionnaire to all orthopedic surgeons from the Province of Ontario listed in the 1999 Canadian Medical Directory or on the Canadian Orthopaedic Association membership list, asking if they vent when prophylactically nailing an impending pathologic femoral fracture. The responses were modelled as a function of surgeon volume and year of graduation. Results Of the 415 surveys mailed, 223 (54%) surgeons responded. Of these, 81% reported having prophylactically treated a femoral metastatic lesion during the previous year; 67% treated 1 to 3 metastatic lesions and 14% treated more than 3; 19% did not treat a metastatic femoral lesion prophylactically. Over two-thirds of surgeons had never considered venting, whereas one-third always or sometimes vented the femoral canal. More recent graduates were 3 times more likely to vent than earlier (before 1980) graduates (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–6.5) as were those who treat a greater number of impending fractures (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.7). Conclusions Although there is a theoretical rationale for routine venting, there is disagreement among Ontario orthopedic surgeons regarding the use of this technique during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastatic lesions. Prospective evidence will be required to warrant a change in the standard of care. PMID:14680349

  9. Biophysical stimulation in osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Massari; Milena, Fini; Ruggero, Cadossi; Stefania, Setti; GianCarlo, Traina

    2009-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is the endpoint of a disease process that results from insufficient blood flow and bone-tissue necrosis, leading to joint instability, collapse of the femoral head, arthritis of the joint, and total hip replacement. Pain is the most frequent clinical symptom. Both bone tissue and cartilage suffer when osteonecrosis of the femoral head develops. Stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been shown to be useful for enhancing bone repair and for exerting a chondroprotective effect on articular cartilage. Two Italian studies on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with PEMFs were presented in this review. In the first study, 68 patients suffering from avascular necrosis of the femoral head were treated with PEMFs in combination with core decompression and autologous bone grafts. The second one is a retrospective analysis of the results of treatment with PEMFs of 76 hips in 66 patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. In both studies clinical information and diagnostic imaging were collected at the beginning of the treatment and at the time of follow up. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test. Both authors hypothesize that the short-term effect of PEMF stimulation may be to protect the articular cartilage from the catabolic effect of inflammation and subchondral bone-marrow edema. The long-term effect of PEMF stimulation may be to promote osteogenic activity at the necrotic area and prevent trabecular fracture and subchondral bone collapse. PEMF stimulation represents an important therapeutic opportunity to resolve the Ficat stage-I or II disease or at least to delay the time until joint replacement becomes necessary. PMID:19753174

  10. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve. PMID:24972443

  11. Patellofemoral dysbalance due to femoral deformities - diagnostic, therapy and results

    PubMed Central

    Dickschas, Jörg; Strecker, Wolf; Harrer, Jörg; Ferner, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Anterior knee pain or patellofemoral instability are typical symptoms of patellofemoral dysbalance. Beside other reasons, this pathology can be caused by a femoral deformity. The two dimensions leading to this problems are torsional- and valgus deformities. This constellation often stays unrecognized. When diagnosed and analyzed, a femoral torsional or varization-osteotomy is the adequate treatment. Aim of this study was to show the diagnostic approach, the gold standard of therapy and the follow up results. Can patellofemoral stability be archived? Is the pain relief significant and how do clinical scores develop at the follow up? Materials and Methods: 33 femoral torsional osteotomies and 18 femoral varization osteotomies were included in this study, 5 of these were combined femoral varization and torsional corrections so that 46 knees are included in 41 patients, as 5 patients were operated on both legs. Major symptoms were patellofemoral dislocations in 28 cases and anterior knee pain in 26 cases. Beside clinical and radiographic evaluation full weight bearing long leg views and a torsional computertomography was always performed. Follow up examination was after 41 (6-113) months. Visual analog scala score, Japanese Knee Society Score, Tegner activity score and Lysholm score were taken before surgery and at the follow up. Results: Mechanical femorotibial valgus was on average 6,4° (5°-10°), femoral internal torsion was in average 40,9° (29°-66°; normal: 24°). Surgical treatment was performed with an arthroscopy followed by an acute femoral varization 7,2°(5°-10°) and / or external torsion osteotomy of 13.8° (5°-26°). Tegner activity score, Japanese knee society score and Lysholm score all significantly improved. Pain relief could be demonstrated as shown by a significant decrease of the VAS score. No further dislocation was reported during the follow up period. Conclusion: Valgus or torsional deformities of the femur frequently

  12. Parallel manipulator robot assisted femoral fracture reduction on traction table.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Wang, J Q; Han, W

    2013-01-01

    The principle of femoral shaft fracture reduction is to restore its pre-fractured limb length and mechanical axis. The current documented treatment method with traction table reduction does not conform to the quantitative alignment and reduction. There is also a great amount of X-Ray radiation exposure to both surgeon and patient during the procedure. For this reason, we introduced an innovated Parallel Manipulator Robot (PMR) application: A Femoral Shaft Fracture Reduction with Parallel Manipulator Robot on Traction Table. With this application, the quantitative control on fracture reduction and alignment can be achieved and the radiation exposure to both surgeons and patients can be greatly reduced. PMID:24110820

  13. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  14. Bone SPECT/CT of Femoral Head Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Goro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-09-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head may be confused with osteonecrosis, mainly because of radiological overlap. SPECT/CT with Tc-99 m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate images in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those from 11 patients with symptomatic early osteonecrosis. In all of the hips with subchondral insufficiency fracture, SPECT/CT showed increased uptake at the subchondral lesions of the femoral head. On the other hand, in all of the hips with osteonecrosis, absence of uptake was confirmed at the subchondral lesions. SPECT/CT may assist in differentiating subchondral insufficiency fracture from osteonecrosis. PMID:26164176

  15. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive. PMID:25362879

  16. Traumatic Hip Dislocation with Associated Femoral Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dortaj, H.; Emamifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip is a critical injury that results from high-energy trauma. This paper describes a case of posterior dislocation of the right hip in a 35-year-old woman with associated ipsilateral femoral head fracture. Initial treatment included reduction of the right hip through posterior approach and fixation of the femoral head fracture with three absorbable screws. After 15-month follow-up, a full range of motion has been achieved and there are no signs of avascular necrosis, hip instability, or limping. The authors describe their method of surgery. PMID:25874147

  17. A rare case of femoral herniation of female internal genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Ambedkar, Vivek; Singh, Abhilash; Bain, Jayanta; Singh, Lal Mani

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case with herniation of the uterus, fallopian tube, and ovary in a femoral hernia. A female patient was admitted with complain of the painful lump in the left groin. Clinical examination indicated strangulated femoral hernia, which necessitated an emergency surgery. During surgical procedure, the uterine tube, left fallopian tube and left ovary, were observed as the contents of the hernia. The contents were reduced back into the pelvic cavity, and the hernia was repaired. The patient made good recovery postsurgery. PMID:26283851

  18. Subtalar arthroscopy using a 2.4-mm zero-degree arthroscope: indication, technical experience, and results.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mashfiqul A; Chong, Keen Wai; Yeo, William; Rao, Mohana S; Rikhraj, Inderjeet S

    2010-08-01

    The subtalar joint is complex. With the advent of smaller diameter arthroscopes, subtalar arthroscopy has become an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool for subtalar joint disorders. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients who underwent arthroscopy for subtalar joint disorders using a 2.4-mm zero-degree arthroscope. In this prospective study, 6 patients who underwent subtalar arthroscopy from September 2008 to January 2009 in the authors' institution were included. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores were recorded preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Mean +/- SD age was 45.5 +/- 16.2 years (range, 27.5-63.2). Postoperative diagnosis included arthrofibrosis, osteoarthritis, and osteochondral disease of the subtalar joint. Mean +/- SD AOFAS scores improved from 49.67 +/- 18.83 (range, 22-76) to 67.33 +/- 14.92 (range, 53-91) at 3 months (P = .03) and 75 +/- 19.74 (range, 54-100) at 6 months (P = .004). Subtalar arthroscopy using the 2.4-mm zero-degree arthroscope shows promising results in the diagnosis and treatment of subtalar pathologies. Patients have a significant improvement in their AOFAS hindfoot scores as early as 3 months and continue to improve subsequently. Usage of the zero-degree arthroscope allows the "instrumentation hand" to maneuver more easily in space and perform the operative procedure without getting in the way of the "camera hand." It can also save on inventory costs for centers that already have the zero-degree arthroscope. The role of specialized imaging is still unclear. Diagnosis of sinus tarsi syndrome should be historical with direct visualization of the joint revealing exact etiology. PMID:20530192

  19. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  10. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  11. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and

  12. All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Hoburg, Arnd; Wilde, Sophie; Schatka, Imke; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fracture from its tibial insertion is a rare condition. Despite the further technical advent in refixation of avulsion fractures, the reported failure rate of current approaches remains high and the optimal surgical technique has not been elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study is to present an all-inside arthroscopic reconstruction technique for bony tibial avulsion fractures of the PCL and initial clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological examination of both knees at 3, 6, 12, 18, and if possible also at 24 months. Clinical evaluation included subjective and objective IKDC 2000, Lysholm score, and KOOS score. Radiographic imaging studies included CT scans for assessment of osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. In addition to that posterior stress radiographs of both knees using the Telos device (Arthrex, Naples, USA) were conducted to measure posterior tibial translation. Results: A total of four patients (1 female, 3 male; ø 38 (± 18) years), who underwent arthroscopic refixation of a PCL avulsion fracture using the Tight Rope device were enrolled in this study. Mean follow up was 22 [18–24] months. The mean subjective IKDC was 72.6% (± 9.9%). Regarding the objective IKDC three patients accounted for grade A, one patient for grade C. The Lysholm score yielded 82 (± 6.9) points. The KOOS score reached 75% (± 13%; symptoms 76%, pain 81%, function 76%, sports 66%, QoL 64%). All patients showed complete osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. The mean posterior tibial translation at final follow up was 2.8 [0–7] mm. Conclusions: All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament provides satisfactory clinical results in a preliminary patient cohort. It is a reproducible technique, which minimizes soft tissue damage and obviates a second surgery for hardware

  13. Clinical outcome of arthroscopic reduction and suture for displaced acute and chronic tibial spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports the clinical outcome of the arthroscopic reduction and pull-out suture technique in acute and chronic displaced tibial spine anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) avulsion fractures. Between April 1997 and December 2000, 14 patients received an arthroscopic reduction and pull-out suturing of displaced tibial spine fractures (ACL avulsion fractures of tibia). Of 14 cases, ten were acute fractures and four were chronic nonunion fractures, in which all patients showed extension limitation. The mean follow-up period was 51 months (ranging from 30 to 80 months). At final follow-up, review of range of motion, Lachman test, anterior drawer test, KT-2000 arthrometer, Lysholm knee score, and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score were evaluated. Compared to conventional pull-out suturing, several key modifications to surgical techniques were used. In all 14 patients, radiological bony union was detected at mean 12.3 weeks (range, 8-16 weeks) after surgery. All patients were able to return to their preinjury activity and sports level. At final follow-up, full range of motion was achieved in all patients. Anterior draw test, Lachman test, and KT-2000 (less than 3 mm side-to-side) were all negative in 13 patients. One female patient, who was 6 years old at the time of surgery, complained of no subjective instability, but showed Lachman grade I, and 5 mm side-to-side difference in KT-2000. She also revealed 10 degrees difference of genu recurvatum deformity. Two children (including the previously-mentioned 6-year-old female patient) showed leg-length discrepancy of 1 cm-the affected legs being longer-at final follow-up. The mean Lysholm knee scores were 95.6 (range, 92-100) and HSS knee scores were 96.4 (range, 91-100). Arthroscopic reduction with modified pull-out suturing technique in displaced tibial spine ACL avulsion fractures showed excellent union rate for both acute and chronic cases, without instability or extension limitations at minimum two

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up of Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus in Children

    PubMed Central

    Haskel, Jonathan D.; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Dare, David; Rodeo, Scott A.; Green, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The discoid meniscus, occurring almost exclusively on the lateral side, can lead to pain, popping, snapping, and decreased knee extension. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for the treatment of discoid lateral meniscus in children. Methods: A previous study at our institution identified 27 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscal saucerization by one of two surgeons between 1997 and 2002. These patients were included in this study if they were willing and able to complete the five outcomes questionnaires (IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation, Kujala Scoring Questionnaire, Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, Marx Activity Rating Scale and Tegner Activity Scale). Seven additional patients that were treated consecutively at least 10 years ago were also included in the study. Patients were also given the opportunity to receive a knee exam performed by one of the two treating surgeons. The exam was documented as per the IKDC knee examination protocol. Associations between outcome scores and discoid type, meniscal stability, location of instability, and age at time of surgery were identified. Results: Of the 34 eligible patients (23 female, 11 male), 22 patients were contacted, and 21 agreed to participate. The average length of follow-up was 13.7 years, ranging from 10.3 years to 16.6 years. Average age at the time of surgery was 9.3 years. Long-term follow-up revealed average IKDC, Kujala, and Lysholm scores of 82.87, 86.63 and 83.73, respectively. Additionally, average Marx and Tegner scores were 5.36 and 5.63, respectively. Stratifying the Lysholm scores revealed outcomes that were 45.4% excellent, 18.2% good, 27.3% fair, and 9.1% poor. The average IKDC Knee Examination score was A (normal). In total, 20.6% (7 of 34) of eligible patients underwent a subsequent surgical procedure on the affected knee. Conclusion: Numerous studies have demonstrated good to excellent short

  15. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  16. Unusual Foreign Bone Fragment in Femoral Open Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Hanon; Arti, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Femoral shaft fracture is one of the typical bone fractures due to high energy trauma and may occur as an open fracture. Some foreign materials may enter the fracture site such as sand, cloth particles and so on. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old motorcycle riding military member and his collaborator were received in the hospital because of multiple traumas due to a fall in a hollow during a surveillance mission. His collaborator died because of head trauma and multiple severe open fractures. When fixing the patients femoral fracture, a large femoral butterfly fragment was removed from the patient’s thigh as a foreign segment. The patient’s femur was fixed with a plate and screws. No femoral defect was detected during surgery or post-operative X-rays and CT scan. The removed segment was not a part of the patient’s femur. Conclusions: Surgical and post-surgical findings showed that this segment was not related to the patient’s femur. The foreign segment may have belonged to the other victim of this trauma.

  17. Chronic common femoral vein occlusion secondary to endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Keldahl, Mark L.; Rodriguez, Heron E.

    2016-01-01

    Venous occlusion is sometimes caused by external compression due to adjacent masses. Endometriosis, the presence of functioning endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, is a rare cause of venous occlusion. We report a case of chronic common femoral vein occlusion due to endomctrioma causing severe leg edema and groin pain that was treated with resection and venous bypass. PMID:26993188

  18. Rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Daniele Antonio; Iapicca, Mario Luigi; Gotti, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    We describe here various surgical options to obtain a correct rotational alignment of femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The correct rotational alignment is the key point to obtain a rectangular balanced flexion gap as well to have a good patellar tracking. For that reason, rotation alignment largely affects postoperative kinematic results particularly during flexion. PMID:26855940

  19. Quantifying lateral femoral condyle ellipticalness in chimpanzees, gorillas, and humans.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D; Pfisterer, Theresa

    2012-11-01

    Articular surfaces of limb bones provide information for understanding animal locomotion because their size and shape are a reflection of habitual postures and movements. Here we present a novel method for quantifying the ellipticalness (i.e., departure from perfectly circular) of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC), applying this technique to hominid femora. Three-dimensional surface models were created for 49 Homo sapiens, 34 Pan troglodytes and 25 Gorilla gorilla femora. Software was developed that fit separate cylinders to each of the femoral condyles. These cylinders were constrained to have a single axis, but could have different radii. The cylinder fit to the LFC was allowed to assume an elliptical cross-section, while the cylinder fit to the medial condyle was constrained to remain circular. The shape of the elliptical cylinder (ratio of the major and minor axes of the ellipse) was recorded, and the orientation of the elliptical cylinder quantified as angles between the major axis of the ellipse and the anatomical and mechanical axes of the femur. Species were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc multiple comparisons tests. Confirming qualitative descriptions, human LFCs are more elliptical than those of chimpanzees and gorillas. Human femora exhibit a narrow range for the angle between the major axis of the elliptical cylinder and femoral axes. Conversely, the chimpanzee sample is bimodal for these angles, exhibiting two ellipse orientations, while Gorilla shows no preferred angle. Our results suggest that like modern human femora, chimpanzee femoral condyles have preferentially used regions. PMID:23042636

  20. Spontaneous capital femoral physeal fracture in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Galya

    2013-01-01

    A young neutered male cat was presented with a 1-week history of left hind limb lameness. Pain and crepitus were identified on manipulation of the left coxofemoral joint. Radiographic evaluation led to the diagnosis of physeal dysplasia with slipped capital femoral epiphysis of the left femur, which did not respond to conservative management. PMID:24155467