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Sample records for femoral tunnel orientation

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Isometry Is Affected by the Orientation of the Femoral Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, Gregg M; Eckerle, Paul; Farrow, Lutul D; Cutuk, Adnan; Bledsoe, Gary; Kaar, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft length and tension throughout knee range of motion with transtibial, anteromedial (AM) portal, and all-epiphyseal drilling techniques with suspensory and apical femoral fixation. Methods The three different femoral tunnel drilling techniques using the same intra-articular starting point within the center of the femoral footprint were performed on fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. All groups underwent standard tibial drilling in the center of the ACL tibial footprint. FiberWire (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL) was used to simulate anatomic single bundle reconstructions. Changes in graft length and tension were measured at knee flexion angles of 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 135 degrees. Results Graft length and tension decreased from 0 through 60 degrees and subsequently increased from 90 to 135 degrees for all groups. The transtibial, AM portal suspensory, and apical fixation groups were similar. However, the all-epiphyseal tunnel with suspensory fixation had a significantly increased change in length (90, 120, and 135 degrees) and tension (120 and 135 degrees). Conclusion Transtibial and AM portal suspensory fixation and apical fixation demonstrate similar changes in length and tension throughout knee range of motion. The all-epiphyseal tunnel with suspensory fixation was associated with greater length and tension changes at higher degrees of knee flexion. All techniques demonstrated decreased graft length and tension with knee flexion to 60 degrees after which they increased with further knee flexion. Clinical Relevance ACL graft length and tension change throughout knee range of motion and also depend on femoral tunnel orientation and fixation type. The use of an all-epiphyseal tunnel with suspensory fixation should be studied further for evidence of graft elongation. PMID:26190786

  2. Determinants of Femoral Tunnel Length in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: CT Analysis of the Influence of Tunnel Orientation on the Length

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Easwar Thirunellai; Rajan, David Vaithyalingam; Krishnamoorthy, Ajith; Sahanand, Santhosh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to identify the femoral tunnel orientation that consistently results in a tunnel length of more than 35 mm in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Materials and Methods Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 30 patients who did not have any pathology in the distal femur. Virtual tunnels were marked on 3D (3-dimensional) reconstructed CT images after determining the orientation defined by sagittal inclination and axial angle. The length of a femoral tunnel in 64 different combinations of orientations (between 30° and 65° in 5° increments in two planes) was measured on 3D reconstructed images in both knees in 30 patients. Reliability of measurement was assessed with correlation coefficient for intra-observer and inter-observer measurements. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. Results The mean femoral tunnel length varied significantly with each 10° change in orientation in both planes (p<0.05, ANOVA). A femoral tunnel of more than 35 mm in length could be obtained only with a sagittal inclination of more than 50° and axial angle of 30°-45°. When the axial angle was kept constant, the tunnel length increased with the increase in sagittal inclination. Higher sagittal inclinations consistently resulted in longer tunnels (r>0.9) and reduced the incidence of posterior cortical breakage. Conclusions A tunnel orientation with an axial angle between 30°-45° and a sagittal inclination of more than 50° can result in a tunnel length of more than 35 mm. PMID:24368999

  3. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  4. Femoral Tunnel Malposition in ACL Revision Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific “technical cause of failure.” Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  5. Editorial Commentary: Anatomic Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Does It Really Matter?

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-01-01

    An anatomic anteromedial portal and outside-in technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel may improve rotational stability but shows no published differences in clinical outcomes. PMID:26743417

  6. The Correlation of Tunnel Position, Orientation and Tunnel Enlargement in Outside-in Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Won; Rhee, Seung Jun; Kim, In Woo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tunnel widening after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a frequently described phenomenon. The possible etiology is multi-factorial with some mechanical and biological factors. Among those, we intended to determine the relation between the location and orientation of the femoral tunnel and the femoral tunnel enlargement after outside-in single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods A retrospective study including 42 patients who received single-bundle ACL reconstruction with the outside-in technique was conducted. Femoral and tibial tunnel locations were evaluated with the quadrant method and bird's-eye view using volume-rendering computed tomography. The angle and diameter of bone tunnel and the degree of tunnel enlargement were evaluated using standard radiographs. Results The degree of femoral tunnel enlargements were 42% and 36% on the anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs, respectively, and the degree of tibial tunnel enlargements were 22% and 23%, respectively. Shallower location of the femoral tunnel was significantly correlated with greater femoral tunnel enlargement on the AP radiograph (r=0.998, p=0.004) and the lateral radiograph (r=0.72, p=0.005) as was the higher location of the femoral tunnel on the AP radiograph (r=-0.47, p=0.01) and the lateral radiograph (r=-0.36, p=0.009) at 12 months after surgery. Conclusions This study revealed that more anterior and higher location and more horizontal orientation of the femoral tunnel in coronal plane could result in widening of the femoral tunnel in outside-in single-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26672479

  7. Direct Visualization of Existing Footprint and Outside-In Drilling of the Femoral Tunnel in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, E. Grant; Anderson, John A.; Garrett, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Improper femoral tunnel placement in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a significant problem and may be a cause of ACL graft failure and abnormal kinematics, which may lead to late degenerative changes after reconstruction. Recently, there has been concern that the transtibial approach may contribute to nonanatomic placement of the femoral tunnel, resulting in abnormal knee kinematics. Tibial-independent techniques can provide more anatomic placement of the ACL graft, but these can be technically demanding. This technical note describes the senior author's technique to directly identify the femoral ACL remnant and use the center of the femoral ACL footprint and retrograde drilling to create an anatomic femoral socket for single-bundle reconstruction. This technique provides femoral tunnel placement based on identification of a patient-specific ACL footprint instead of averaged anatomic measurements from large groups. This technique has been shown to produce anatomic ACL graft position and orientation and restore more normal knee kinematics. PMID:26052485

  8. THA Retrievals: The Need to Mark the Anatomic Orientation of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Anneliese D; Kruger, Karen M; Tikekar, Nishant M; Callaghan, John J; Lannutti, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2015-06-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the rotational orientation of femoral head damage would greatly affect the volumetric wear rate of the opposing polyethylene (PE) liner. Damage on twenty retrieved cobalt-chromium femoral heads was simulated in a validated damage-feature-based finite element model. For each individual retrieval, the anatomic orientation of the femoral head about the femoral neck axis was systematically varied, in 30° increments. The PE wear rate differential between the maximum- versus minimum-wear orientations was often sizable, as high as 7-fold. Knowing the correct femoral head anatomic orientation is therefore important when analyzing the effects of femoral head damage on PE liner wear. Surgeons retrieving modular femoral heads should routinely mark the anatomic orientation of those components. PMID:25682206

  9. How much hamstring graft needs to be in the femoral tunnel? A MOON cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mitchell, Joshua; Pedroza, Angela D.; Jones, Morgan H.; Andrish, Jack T.; Parker, Richard D.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Flanigan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence that smaller hamstring graft diameter is associated with increased failure risk following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has increased the popularity of graft configurations that increase graft diameter at the expense of graft length. A key question is how much graft needs to be in contact with the femoral tunnel to ensure that healing occurs. We hypothesize that no difference in two-year patient-reported outcomes or failure risk exists based on the amount of graft in the femoral tunnel. Methods Through the use of prospectively collected cohort data augmented with retrospective chart review, 120 of 181 consecutive patients (66.3 %) undergoing primary ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft were evaluated. Patient and surgical factors along with pre-operative and two-year postoperative knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores and whether each patient underwent revision ACL reconstruction during the two-year follow-up period were recorded. Results No differences in two-year patient-reported outcome scores were noted between patients with graft length in the femoral tunnel less than 25 mm and those with graft length in the femoral tunnel of at least 25 mm. Controlling for age, sex, BMI, and femoral tunnel technique, no correlation was noted between KOOS or IKDC scores and either the length of graft in the femoral tunnel or the contact area between the graft and the tunnel. Conclusions Variation of the length of hamstring autograft in the femoral tunnel between 14 and 35 mm does not predict KOOS or IKDC scores at 2 years postoperative. PMID:25984246

  10. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  11. A three-dimensional axis for the study of femoral neck orientation

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Noémie; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Simonis, Caroline; Puymerail, Laurent; Baylac, Michel; Tardieu, Christine; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    A common problem in the quantification of the orientation of the femoral neck is the difficulty to determine its true axis; however, this axis is typically estimated visually only. Moreover, the orientation of the femoral neck is commonly analysed using angles that are dependent on anatomical planes of reference and only quantify the orientation in two dimensions. The purpose of this study is to establish a method to determine the three-dimensional orientation of the femoral neck using a three-dimensional model. An accurate determination of the femoral neck axis requires a reconsideration of the complex architecture of the proximal femur. The morphology of the femoral neck results from both the medial and arcuate trabecular systems, and the asymmetry of the cortical bone. Given these considerations, two alternative models, in addition to the cylindrical one frequently assumed, were tested. The surface geometry of the femoral neck was subsequently used to fit one cylinder, two cylinders and successive cross-sectional ellipses. The model based on successive ellipses provided a significantly smaller average deviation than the two other models (P < 0.001) and reduced the observer-induced measurement error. Comparisons with traditional measurements and analyses on a sample of 91 femora were also performed to assess the validity of the model based on successive ellipses. This study provides a semi-automatic and accurate method for the determination of the functional three-dimensional femoral neck orientation avoiding the use of a reference plane. This innovative method has important implications for future studies that aim to document and understand the change in the orientation of the femoral neck associated with the acquisition of a bipedal gait in humans. Moreover, the precise determination of the three-dimensional orientation has implications in current research involved in developing clinical applications in diagnosis, hip surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:22967192

  12. Effect of Femoral Tunnel Placement for Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament on Tibial Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ristanis, Stavros; Stergiou, Nicholas; Siarava, Eleftheria; Ntoulia, Aikaterini; Mitsionis, Grigorios; Georgoulis, Anastasios D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rotational knee movement after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been difficult to quantify. The purpose of this study was to identify in vivo whether a more horizontal placement of the femoral tunnel (in the ten o'clock position rather than in the eleven o'clock position) can restore rotational kinematics, during highly demanding dynamic activities, in a knee in which a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft had been used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. Methods: We evaluated ten patients in whom a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft had been used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament with the femoral tunnel in the eleven o'clock position, ten patients who had had the same procedure with the femoral tunnel in the ten o'clock position, and ten healthy controls. Kinematic data were collected while the subjects (1) descended from a stairway, made foot contact, and then pivoted 90° on the landing lower limb and (2) jumped from a platform, landed with both feet on the ground, and pivoted 90° on the right or left lower limb. The dependent variable that we examined was tibial rotation during pivoting. Results: The results demonstrated that reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with the femoral tunnel in either the ten or the eleven o'clock position successfully restored anterior tibial translation. However, both techniques resulted in tibial rotation values, during the dynamic activities evaluated, that were significantly larger than those in the intact contralateral lower limbs and those in the healthy controls. Tibial rotation did not differ significantly between the two reconstruction groups or between the healthy controls and the intact contralateral lower limbs. However, we noticed that positioning the tunnel at ten o'clock resulted in slightly decreased rotation values that may have clinical relevance but not statistical significance. Conclusions: Regardless of which of the two tested positions was utilized to

  13. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  14. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning. PMID:26736858

  15. Radiological analysis on femoral tunnel positioning between isometric and anatomical reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; de Pinho Tavares, Leonardo Augusto; Pace Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos; da Cunha, Fernando Amaral; de Melo Lisboa, Lucas Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study was to radiologically evaluate the femoral tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions using the isometric and anatomical techniques. Methods a prospective analytical study was conducted on patients undergoing ACL reconstruction by means of the isometric and anatomical techniques, using grafts from the knee flexor tendons or patellar tendon. Twenty-eight patients were recruited during the immediate postoperative period, at the knee surgery outpatient clinic of FCMMG-HUSJ. Radiographs of the operated knee were produced in anteroposterior (AP) view with the patient standing on both feet and in lateral view with 30° of flexion. The lines were traced out and the distances and angles were measured on the lateral radiograph to evaluate the sagittal plane. The distance from the center of the screw to the posterior cortical bone of the lateral condyle was measured and divided by the Blumensaat line. In relation to the height of the screw, the distance from the center of the screw to the joint surface of the lateral condyle of the knee was measured. On the AP radiograph, evaluating the coronal plane, the angle between the anatomical axis of the femur and a line traced at the center of the screw was measured. Results with regard to the p measurement (posteriorization of the interference screw), the tests showed that the p-value (0.4213) was greater than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was not rejected and it could be stated that there was no statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. With regard to the H measurement (height of the screw in relation to the lower cortical bone of the knee), the p-value observed (0.0006) was less than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was rejected and it could be stated that there was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. It can be concluded that the

  16. Time to get rid of the clock: intraobserver and interobserver reliability in determination of the o'clock position of the femoral tunnel in ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Jocelyn Ross; Garrett, William E

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates intraobserver and interobserver agreement in reporting the o'clock position of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Four PGY2 residents, four PGY5 residents, and four sports medicine orthopedic surgeons reported the o'clock position of the femoral ACL tunnel in 10 arthroscopic pictures on two occasions 3 months apart. Intraobserver agreement was determined using the intraobserver correlation coefficient (r > 0.576 for 0.05 significance level). Interobserver agreement between members of each group and between reviewer groups was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.75 considered good agreement). Poor interobserver agreement was demonstrated between the attending and PGY2 groups (ICC = 0.1685), between the attending and PGY5 groups (ICC = 0.2982), and between the PGY5 and PGY2 groups (ICC = 0.267). Attending surgeons, PGY5s, and PGY2s demonstrated poor interobserver agreement amongst themselves (ICC = 0.2244, 0.471, and 0.0859, respectively). PGY2s and PGY5s demonstrated good intraobserver agreement, but attending surgeons demonstrated poor intraobserver agreement. Attending orthopedic surgeons and residents of different levels of training interpret the o'clock position of the femoral tunnel differently. Greater years of experience does not improve intraobserver or interobserver agreement on the o'clock position. The clock face terminology for femoral tunnel placement may not be a reliable descriptor for scientific investigations or clinical instruction. PMID:24227399

  17. The effects of necrotic lesion size and orientation of the femoral component on stress alterations in the proximal femur in hip resurfacing - a finite element simulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the advantages of its bone-conserving nature, hip resurface arthroplasty (HRA) has recently gained the interest of orthopedic surgeons for the treatment of young and active patients who have osteonerosis of the femoral head. However, in long-term follow-up studies after HRA, narrowing of the femoral neck has often been found, which may lead to fracture. This phenomenon has been attributed to the stress alteration (stress shielding). Studies addressing the effects of necrotic size and the orientation of the implant on stress alterations are lacking. Methods Computed tomography images of a standard composite femur were used to create a three-dimensional finite-element (FE) intact femur model. Based on the intact model, FE models simulating four different levels of necrotic regions (0°, 60°, 100°, 115°) and three different implant insertion angles (varus 10°, neutral, valgus 10°) were created. The von Mises stress distributions and the displacement of the stem tip of each model were analyzed and compared for loading conditions that simulated a single-legged stance. Results Stress shielding occurred at the femoral neck after HRA. More severe stress shielding and an increased displacement of the stem tip were found for femoral heads that had a wider necrotic lesion. From a biomechanics perspective, the results were consistent with clinical evidence of femoral neck narrowing after HRA. In addition, a varus orientation of the implant resulted in a larger displacement of the stem tip, which could lead to an increased risk of implant loosening. Conclusions A femoral head with a wide necrotic lesion combined with a varus orientation of the prosthesis increases the risk of femoral neck narrowing and implant loosening following HRA. PMID:25095740

  18. Evaluating the distance between the femoral tunnel centers in anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yasutaka; Okazaki, Ken; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to clarify the distance between the anteromedial (AM) bundle and posterolateral (PL) bundle tunnel-aperture centers by simulating the anatomical femoral tunnel placement during double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using 3-D computer-aided design models of the knee, in order to discuss the risk of tunnel overlap. Relationships between the AM to PL center distance, body height, and sex difference were also analyzed. Patients and methods The positions of the AM and PL tunnel centers were defined based on previous studies using the quadrant method, and were superimposed anatomically onto the 3-D computer-aided design knee models from 68 intact femurs. The distance between the tunnel centers was measured using the 3-D DICOM software package. The correlation between the AM–PL distance and the subject’s body height was assessed, and a cutoff height value for a higher risk of overlap of the AM and PL tunnel apertures was identified. Results The distance between the AM and PL centers was 10.2±0.6 mm in males and 9.4±0.5 mm in females (P<0.01). The AM–PL center distance demonstrated good correlation with body height in both males (r=0.66, P<0.01) and females (r=0.63, P<0.01). When 9 mm was defined as the critical distance between the tunnel centers to preserve a 2 mm bony bridge between the two tunnels, the cutoff value was calculated to be a height of 160 cm in males and 155 cm in females. Conclusion When AM and PL tunnels were placed anatomically in simulated double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, the distance between the two tunnel centers showed a strong positive correlation with body height. In cases with relatively short stature, the AM and PL tunnel apertures are considered to be at a higher risk of overlap when surgeons choose the double-bundle technique. PMID:26170727

  19. Induced Superconductivity and Engineered Josephson Tunneling Devices in Epitaxial (111)-Oriented Gold/Vanadium Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Katmis, Ferhat; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2016-04-01

    We report a unique experimental approach to create topological superconductors by inducing superconductivity into epitaxial metallic thin film with strong spin-orbit coupling. Utilizing molecular beam epitaxy technique under ultra-high vacuum condition, we are able to achieve (111) oriented single phase of gold (Au) thin film grown on a well-oriented vanadium (V) s-wave superconductor film with clean interface. We obtained atomically smooth Au thin films with thicknesses even down to below a nanometer showing near-ideal surface quality. The as-grown V/Au bilayer heterostructure exhibits superconducting transition at around 4 K. Clear Josephson tunneling and Andreev reflection are observed in S-I-S tunnel junctions fabricated from the epitaxial bi-layers. The barrier thickness dependent tunneling and the associated subharmonic gap structures (SGS) confirmed the induced superconductivity in Au (111), paving the way for engineering thin film heterostructure based p-wave superconductors and nano devices for Majorana fermion.

  20. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn12 acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, x-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn12 acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis. Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for a single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by reanalyzing the old data on a powdered sample of nonoriented micron-size crystals of Mn12 acetate. Our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.

  1. Atomistic Insights Into the Oriented Attachment of Tunnel-Based Oxide Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yifei; Wood, Stephen M; He, Kun; Yao, Wentao; Tompsett, David; Lu, Jun; Nie, Anmin; Islam, M. Saiful; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the grand challenges facing materials scientists. In particular, how tunnel-based nanomaterials aggregate during synthesis while maintaining their well-aligned tunneled structure is not fully understood. Here, we describe the atomistic mechanism of oriented attachment (OA) during solution synthesis of tunneled α-MnO2 nanowires based on a combination of in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), aberration-corrected scanning TEM with subangstrom spatial resolution, and first-principles calculations. It is found that primary tunnels (1 × 1 and 2 × 2) attach along their common {110} lateral surfaces to form interfaces corresponding to 2 × 3 tunnels that facilitate their short-range ordering. The OA growth of α-MnO2 nanowires is driven by the stability gained from elimination of {110} surfaces and saturation of Mn atoms at {110}-edges. During this process, extra [MnOx] radicals in solution link the two adjacent {110} surfaces and bond with the unsaturated Mn atoms from both surface edges to produce stable nanowire interfaces. Our results provide insights into the controlled synthesis and design of nanomaterials in which tunneled structures can be tailored for use in catalysis, ion exchange, and energy storage applications.

  2. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amore » single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.« less

  3. Imaging of stacking faults in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite using scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.R.; Foecke, T.; White, H.S.; Gerberich, W.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy images of the (0001) plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite show defect regions consisting of an extensive network of partial dislocations that form extended and contracted nodes. The partial dislocations in hexagonal graphite enclose triangular regions ({similar to}1000 nm on a side) of faulted material comprised of rhombohedral graphite. Electronic and elastic interactions of the tip with the HOPG surface are proposed to explain the observed image contrast between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite.

  4. Induced Superconductivity and Engineered Josephson Tunneling Devices in Epitaxial (111)-Oriented Gold/Vanadium Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Katmis, Ferhat; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2016-04-13

    We report a unique experimental approach to create topological superconductors by inducing superconductivity into epitaxial metallic thin film with strong spin-orbit coupling. Utilizing molecular beam epitaxy technique under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, we are able to achieve (111) oriented single phase of gold (Au) thin film grown on a well-oriented vanadium (V) s-wave superconductor film with clean interface. We obtained atomically smooth Au thin films with thicknesses even down to below a nanometer showing near-ideal surface quality. The as-grown V/Au bilayer heterostructure exhibits superconducting transition at around 3.9 K. Clear Josephson tunneling and Andreev reflection are observed in S-I-S tunnel junctions fabricated from the epitaxial bilayers. The barrier thickness dependent tunneling and the associated subharmonic gap structures (SGS) confirmed the induced superconductivity in Au (111), paving the way for engineering thin film heterostructures based on p-wave superconductivity and nano devices exploiting Majorana Fermions for quantum computing. PMID:26943807

  5. Fabrication of [001]-oriented tungsten tips for high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chaika, A. N.; Orlova, N. N.; Semenov, V. N.; Postnova, E. Yu.; Krasnikov, S. A.; Lazarev, M. G.; Chekmazov, S. V.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Glebovsky, V. G.; Bozhko, S. I.; Shvets, I. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the [001]-oriented single crystalline tungsten probes sharpened in ultra-high vacuum using electron beam heating and ion sputtering has been studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electron microscopy data prove reproducible fabrication of the single-apex tips with nanoscale pyramids grained by the {011} planes at the apexes. These sharp, [001]-oriented tungsten tips have been successfully utilized in high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of HOPG(0001), SiC(001) and graphene/SiC(001) surfaces. The electron microscopy characterization performed before and after the high resolution STM experiments provides direct correlation between the tip structure and picoscale spatial resolution achieved in the experiments. PMID:24434734

  6. Mechanism of Orientation-Dependent Asymmetric Charge Transport in Tunneling Junctions Comprising Photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Castañeda Ocampo, Olga E; Gordiichuk, Pavlo; Catarci, Stefano; Gautier, Daniel A; Herrmann, Andreas; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-07-01

    Recently, photoactive proteins have gained a lot of attention due to their incorporation into bioinspired (photo)electrochemical and solar cells. This paper describes the measurement of the asymmetry of current transport of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the entire photosystem I (PSI) protein complex (not the isolated reaction center, RCI), on two different "director SAMs" supported by ultraflat Au substrates. The director SAMs induce the preferential orientation of PSI, which manifest as asymmetry in tunneling charge-transport. We measured the oriented SAMs of PSI using eutectic Ga-In (EGaIn), a large-area technique, and conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), a single-complex technique, and determined that the transport properties are comparable. By varying the temperatures at which the measurements were performed, we found that there is no measurable dependence of the current on temperature from ±0.1 to ±1.0 V bias, and thus, we suggest tunneling as the mechanism for transport; there are no thermally activated (e.g., hopping) processes. Therefore, it is likely that relaxation in the electron transport chain is not responsible for the asymmetry in the conductance of SAMs of PSI complexes in these junctions, which we ascribe instead to the presence of a large, net dipole moment present in PSI. PMID:26057523

  7. Mechanism of Orientation-Dependent Asymmetric Charge Transport in Tunneling Junctions Comprising Photosystem I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, photoactive proteins have gained a lot of attention due to their incorporation into bioinspired (photo)electrochemical and solar cells. This paper describes the measurement of the asymmetry of current transport of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the entire photosystem I (PSI) protein complex (not the isolated reaction center, RCI), on two different “director SAMs” supported by ultraflat Au substrates. The director SAMs induce the preferential orientation of PSI, which manifest as asymmetry in tunneling charge-transport. We measured the oriented SAMs of PSI using eutectic Ga–In (EGaIn), a large-area technique, and conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), a single-complex technique, and determined that the transport properties are comparable. By varying the temperatures at which the measurements were performed, we found that there is no measurable dependence of the current on temperature from ±0.1 to ±1.0 V bias, and thus, we suggest tunneling as the mechanism for transport; there are no thermally activated (e.g., hopping) processes. Therefore, it is likely that relaxation in the electron transport chain is not responsible for the asymmetry in the conductance of SAMs of PSI complexes in these junctions, which we ascribe instead to the presence of a large, net dipole moment present in PSI. PMID:26057523

  8. Direct observation of oriented molecular adsorption at step edges: a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, E. R.; Chen, X. X.; Hamers, R. J.

    1995-07-01

    A cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope has been used to investigate the adsorption of thiophene, 2,5-dimethylthiophene, and 2,2'-bithiophene on the Ag(111) surface at 120 K. STM images reveal that all three molecules preferentially bond at step edges. Images of 2,2'-bithiophene and 2,5-dimethylthiophene at the step edge show them to be elongated, while thiophene molecules appear nearly circular. The observed elongation for 2,2'-bithiophene and 2,5-dimethylthiophene is attributed to geometric contrast reflecting the intrinsic shape of these molecules. All molecules of a given chemical identity appear to be oriented in the same direction with respect to the step edge, demonstrating that the interactions between the molecules and the step edge are sufficiently strong and sufficiently local to hold the molecules in specific rotational configurations at the step edge.

  9. Quantum tunnelling of the magnetization in a monolayer of oriented single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Mannini, M; Pineider, F; Danieli, C; Totti, F; Sorace, L; Sainctavit, Ph; Arrio, M-A; Otero, E; Joly, L; Cezar, J C; Cornia, A; Sessoli, R

    2010-11-18

    A fundamental step towards atomic- or molecular-scale spintronic devices has recently been made by demonstrating that the spin of an individual atom deposited on a surface, or of a small paramagnetic molecule embedded in a nanojunction, can be externally controlled. An appealing next step is the extension of such a capability to the field of information storage, by taking advantage of the magnetic bistability and rich quantum behaviour of single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Recently, a proof of concept that the magnetic memory effect is retained when SMMs are chemically anchored to a metallic surface was provided. However, control of the nanoscale organization of these complex systems is required for SMMs to be integrated into molecular spintronic devices. Here we show that a preferential orientation of Fe(4) complexes on a gold surface can be achieved by chemical tailoring. As a result, the most striking quantum feature of SMMs-their stepped hysteresis loop, which results from resonant quantum tunnelling of the magnetization-can be clearly detected using synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques. With the aid of multiple theoretical approaches, we relate the angular dependence of the quantum tunnelling resonances to the adsorption geometry, and demonstrate that molecules predominantly lie with their easy axes close to the surface normal. Our findings prove that the quantum spin dynamics can be observed in SMMs chemically grafted to surfaces, and offer a tool to reveal the organization of matter at the nanoscale. PMID:20981008

  10. [The "tunnel task": a method for examination of cognitive processes in spatial orientation performance].

    PubMed

    Schönebeck, B; Thanhäuser, J; Debus, G

    2001-01-01

    We report on the theoretical development and empirical testing of a new spatial cognition task, during which participants complete a tour through a virtual tunnel. Upon arrival they are asked to specify a "homing" vector by pointing an arrow towards the starting point of their virtual journey. Systematic experimental variations include number, length and sharpness of turns. Solving the task requires the development of a spatial representation, as alternative strategic cues (e.g., visual landmarks) are not available. Performance measures discriminate between general training effects and specific task variables. As an example, "side errors" indicate a loss of orientation and "position hits" reflect the accuracy of the spatial representation. Participants use either an egocentric or allocentric frame of reference. The task does not imply the use of egocentric vs. allocentric spatial co-ordinates, yet it allows for a reliable a-priori identification of individually preferred strategies. Our data indicate that the spatial representations formed by both groups are functionally equivalent. However, the groups differ with respect to specific patterns of orientation errors. PMID:11688148

  11. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  12. POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH AUTOGRAFT OF THE DOUBLE SEMITENDINOSUS MUSCLES AND MIDDLE THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS TENDON WITH DOUBLE FEMORAL AND SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNELS: CLINICAL RESULTS IN TWO YEARS FOLLOW UP

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Avakian, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical aspects that may offer good anatomic and functional results in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using an autologous graft of the quadriceps tendon and double semitendinosus through a double femoral tunnel. Methods: Fourteen patients with isolated PCL lesions, instability and pain were operated on by arthroscopy and evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scales. Posterior knee laxity was examined with a KT1000 arthrometer. Results: The mean postoperative posterior side-to-side difference was between 0-2 mm in 57.1% of patients and between 3 and 5 mm in 35.7% of cases. The average Lysholm score was 93 points in the final follow-up. In the IKDC evaluation, 3 patients were graded A, 10 were graded B, and 1 patient was graded C. Conclusions: Double bundle arthroscopic PCL reconstruction based on the anatomical positioning of the tunnels, with double semitendinosus tendon and single quadriceps, provides a clinically evident reduction in symptoms and restores satisfactory stability, although no statistically significant difference was found due to the small sample. PMID:27027083

  13. Lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia: an anatomical insight.

    PubMed

    Dias Filho, L C; Valença, M M; Guimarães Filho, F A V; Medeiros, R C; Silva, R A M; Morais, M G V; Valente, F P; França, S M L

    2003-07-01

    A detailed anatomic study was carried out on the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve to better understand the etiology and treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. As it passed from the pelvis into the thigh, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve ran through an "aponeuroticofascial tunnel," beginning at the iliopubic tract and ending at the inguinal ligament; as it passed through the tunnel, an enlargement in its side-to-side diameter was observed, suggesting that the fascial structures proximal to the inguinal ligament may be implicated in the genesis of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. The finding of pseudoneuromas at this location, distant from the inguinal ligament, supports this hypothesis. The anterior superior iliac spine is located approximately 0.7 cm from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and serves as the bony landmark for nerve localization. Within the first 3 cm of leaving the pelvis, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed deep to the fascia lata; therefore, surgical dissection within the subcutaneous fascia may be conducted with relative impunity near the anterior superior iliac spine just inferior to the inguinal ligament. In 36% of cases there was no posterior branch of the nerve, which is correlated to lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia symptoms often being limited to the anterior branch region. An accessory nerve was found in 30% of cases. PMID:12794914

  14. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  15. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  16. Electron-bombarded ⟨110⟩-oriented tungsten tips for stable tunneling electron emission.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T K; Abe, T; Nazriq, N M K; Irisawa, T

    2016-03-01

    A clean tungsten (W) tip apex with a robust atomic plane is required for producing a stable tunneling electron emission under strong electric fields. Because a tip apex fabricated from a wire by aqueous chemical etching is covered by impurity layers, heating treatment in ultra-high vacuum is experimentally known to be necessary. However, strong heating frequently melts the tip apex and causes unstable electron emissions. We investigated quantitatively the tip apex and found a useful method to prepare a tip with stable tunneling electron emissions by controlling electron-bombardment heating power. Careful characterizations of the tip structures were performed with combinations of using field emission I-V curves, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (transmitted Debye-Scherrer and Laue) with micro-parabola capillary, field ion microscopy, and field emission microscopy. Tips were chemically etched from (1) polycrystalline W wires (grain size ∼1000 nm) and (2) long-time heated W wires (grain size larger than 1 mm). Heating by 10-40 W (10 s) was found to be good enough to remove oxide layers and produced stable electron emission; however, around 60 W (10 s) heating was threshold power to increase the tip radius, typically +10 ± 5 nm (onset of melting). Further, the grain size of ∼1000 nm was necessary to obtain a conical shape tip apex. PMID:27036780

  17. Electron-bombarded <110>-oriented tungsten tips for stable tunneling electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T. K.; Abe, T.; Nazriq, N. M. K.; Irisawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    A clean tungsten (W) tip apex with a robust atomic plane is required for producing a stable tunneling electron emission under strong electric fields. Because a tip apex fabricated from a wire by aqueous chemical etching is covered by impurity layers, heating treatment in ultra-high vacuum is experimentally known to be necessary. However, strong heating frequently melts the tip apex and causes unstable electron emissions. We investigated quantitatively the tip apex and found a useful method to prepare a tip with stable tunneling electron emissions by controlling electron-bombardment heating power. Careful characterizations of the tip structures were performed with combinations of using field emission I-V curves, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (transmitted Debye-Scherrer and Laue) with micro-parabola capillary, field ion microscopy, and field emission microscopy. Tips were chemically etched from (1) polycrystalline W wires (grain size ˜1000 nm) and (2) long-time heated W wires (grain size larger than 1 mm). Heating by 10-40 W (10 s) was found to be good enough to remove oxide layers and produced stable electron emission; however, around 60 W (10 s) heating was threshold power to increase the tip radius, typically +10 ± 5 nm (onset of melting). Further, the grain size of ˜1000 nm was necessary to obtain a conical shape tip apex.

  18. Band to band tunneling in III-V semiconductors: Implications of complex band structure, strain, orientation, and off-zone center contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Kausik

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, we use a tight binding Hamiltonian with spin orbit coupling to study the real and complex band structures of relaxed and strained GaAs. A simple d orbital on-site energy shift coupled with appropriate scaling of the off-diagonal terms is found to correctly reproduce the band-edge shifts with strain. Four different 〈100〉 strain combinations, namely, uniaxial compressive, uniaxial tensile, biaxial compressive, and biaxial tensile strain are studied, revealing rich valence band structure and strong relative orientation dependent tunneling. It is found that complex bands are unable to provide unambiguous tunneling paths away from the Brillouin zone center. Tunneling current density distribution over the Brillouin zone is computed using non-equilibrium Green's function approach elucidating a physical picture of band to band tunneling.

  19. Semiclassical complex-time method for tunneling ionization: Molecular suppression and orientational dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, Gordon A.; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2010-03-15

    We apply a previously developed semiclassical complex time method to the calculation of tunneling ionization of several diatomic molecules and CO{sub 2}. We investigate the presence or absence of the molecular suppression effect by calculating ionization rates of N{sub 2} versus Ar, O{sub 2} versus Xe, F{sub 2} versus Ar, and CO versus Kr. Comparisons with other theories, including the molecular-orbital-Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (MO-ADK) model and the strong-field approximation, are given. We also analyze the dependence of the ionization rate on the angle {theta}{sub F} between the molecular axis and the field direction. The theoretical results agree quite well with experiment for N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} but give too low a value of the peak angle {theta}{sub F} for CO{sub 2}. Our calculations give small values of the ionization rates for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at {theta}{sub F}=0 and 90 deg., in agreement with experiment. Other calculations, including the MO-ADK model and methods involving a numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, exhibit substantially weaker suppression at these angles.

  20. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for a single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.

  1. Reconstruction of medial patello-femoral ligament: Comparison of two surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2016-06-01

    The medial patello-femoral ligament is considered the most important passive patellar stabilizer and its proper functionality is essential for the patello-femoral joint stability. In this work, 18 human knees were randomly divided into two groups and reconstructed through two different surgical techniques: the "Through tunnel tendon" and the "Double converging tunnel" reconstructions. Subsequently, the samples were mechanically tested to evaluate the structural properties of reconstructed femur-MPFL-Patella complex (rFMPC). Particular attention was given to maintain the anatomical orientation between the patella and the graft. Both procedures showed lower stiffness and higher ultimate strain and absorbed energy compared to the native MPFL, but the advantages of the double converging tunnel technique are related to the restoration of the native MPFL sail-shape, to a better stress distribution on the patella, to the use of a single interference screw as fixation device and to the simplicity, rapidity and cost-effectivity of the surgical procedure. The evaluation of the structural properties of rMPFL is fundamental to evaluate the adequacy of the different techniques to restore the physiological structural properties of the native MPFL. PMID:26894660

  2. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  3. Magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations and tunnel magnetoresistance effect at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Taro Matsuda, Yuya; Tate, Kazuya; Kawai, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nozomi; Hiratani, Shungo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yanase, Takashi; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2014-09-08

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is a ferrimagnetic spinel ferrite that exhibits electric conductivity at room temperature (RT). Although the material has been predicted to be a half metal according to ab-initio calculations, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes have demonstrated a small tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. Not even the sign of the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio has been experimentally established. Here, we report on the magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations. The films exhibited apparent crystal orientation dependence on hysteresis curves. In particular, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) films exhibited in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With respect to the squareness of hysteresis, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) demonstrated the largest squareness. Furthermore, we fabricated MTJs with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) electrodes and obtained a TMR effect of −12% at RT. The negative TMR ratio corresponded to the negative spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predicted from band calculations.

  4. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball of the hip joint from the thigh bone (femur) at ... A slipped capital femoral epiphysis may affect both hips. An epiphysis is an area at the end of a long bone . ...

  5. RigidFix femoral fixation: a test for detecting inaccurate cross pin positioning.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Pappis, Georgios; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-11-01

    The RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of graft in ACL reconstruction. In some cases, though, cross pins miss the femoral tunnel resulting in inadequate proximal graft fixation. We present a simple test to detect the incorrect placement of cross pins. The pinholes are drilled through the guide frame, leaving 2 sleeves for cross pins insertion. The manufacturer's recommendations, at this stage, are to reinsert the femoral tunnel guidewire, remove the guide frame, and insert the graft without verifying accurate pinhole positioning. We reinsert the femoral tunnel guidewire without removing the guide frame, and a second guidewire is introduced through each of the sleeves in turn. In case of appropriate pinhole placement, the 2 guidewires will meet in the cannulated rod of the guide frame and the surgeon will have the metal-to-metal feeling. If the pinhole misses the femoral tunnel, the 2 guidewires will not meet and the surgeon will not have the metal-to-metal feeling. In our practice, 9 cases of inaccurate pinhole placement were detected with this test and verified by direct vision of the femoral tunnel with the arthroscope. We find this test simple, reliable, and not time consuming. PMID:17986419

  6. Prevascular femoral hernia and its relation with inferior epigastric vessels: a rare presentation of the femoral hernia sac.

    PubMed

    Boshnaq, Mohamed; Phan, Yih Chyn; Akhtar, Mansoor; Hamade, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with a 2-week history of a painful lump on his right groin. A diagnosis of an irreducible right femoral hernia was made. As such, an urgent operation was carried out on the same day, and the patient was found to have a rare prevascular femoral hernia in which the sac was lying over the femoral vessels and split by the inferior epigastric vessels into 2 components resembling 2 trouser limbs. The hernia sac presented in a different and challenging way that necessitated meticulous dissection and full orientation of the anatomy of the femoral triangle. Complete dissection and control of the inferior epigastric vessels, and complete reduction of the sac followed by repair with a prosthetic mesh plug were performed successfully. The patient was discharged home the next day. PMID:27090547

  7. Self-assembly of [Et,Et]-bacteriochlorophyll cF on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Möltgen, H; Kleinermanns, K; Jesorka, A; Schaffner, K; Holzwarth, A R

    2002-06-01

    The chlorosomal light-harvesting antennae of green phototrophic bacteria consist of large supramolecular aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c). The supramolecular structure of (3(1)-R/S)-BChl c on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). On MoS2, we observed single BChl c molecules, dimers or tetramers, depending on the polarity of the solvent. On HOPG, we observed extensive self-assembly of the dimers and tetramers. We propose C=O...H-O...Mg bonding networks for the observed dimer chains, in agreement with former ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopic work. The BChl c moieties in the tetramers are probably linked by four C=O...H-O hydrogen bonds to form a circle and further stabilized by Mg...O-H bondings to underlying BChl c layers. The tetramers form highly ordered, distinct chains and extended two-dimensional networks. We investigated semisynthetic chlorins for comparison by STM but observed that only BChl c self-assembles to well-structured large aggregates on HOPG. The results on the synthetic chlorins support our structure proposition. PMID:12081324

  8. Electric field control of spin re-orientation in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions—CoFeB and MgO thickness dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Hao; Naik, Vinayak Bharat; Liu, Ruisheng; Han, Guchang

    2014-07-28

    We report an investigation of electric-field (EF) control of spin re-orientation as functions of the thicknesses of CoFeB free layer (FL) and MgO layer in synthetic-antiferromagnetic pinned magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. It is found that the EF modulates the coercivity (Hc) of the FL almost linearly for all FL thicknesses, while the EF efficiency, i.e., the slope of the linearity, increases as the FL thickness increases. This linear variation in Hc is also observed for larger MgO thicknesses (≥1.5 nm), while the EF efficiency increases only slightly from 370 to 410 Oe nm/V when MgO thickness increases from 1.5 to 1.76 nm. We have further observed the absence of quasi-DC unipolar switching. We discuss its origin and highlight the underlying challenges to implement the EF controlled switching in a practical magnetic memory.

  9. A preliminary scanning tunnelling microscopy study of the surface-organised structures of gramicidin S hydrochloride on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    PubMed

    Brown, N M; You, H X

    1991-12-01

    For an initial study of potentially surface-structural self-organising systems of biological significance by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), gramicidin S, a pseudocentrosymmetric cyclodecapeptide with antibiotic properties, was chosen as prototype, recognising its structure as having both intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen-bond forming propensity. The surface-organised structures, based on gramicidin S hydrochloride deposited on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate, have been observed by STM in air under ambient conditions. These are characterised in the main by rectangular or rectangle-like structural elements identified with the individual gramicidin S hydrochloride molecules. Two kinds of arrangements of gramicidin S hydrochloride in a two-dimensional array are found, i.e., as a centred rectangular lattice and a primitive rectangular lattice. The STM topographical arrays and the molecular dimensions obtained are in good quantitative agreement with the corresponding X-ray crystallographic data. The differences between the STM results, the theoretical models, and the X-ray crystallographic data are attributed to the intermolecular interactions present in the three-dimensional gramicidin S crystal but absent in the lower dimensional arrays and to the environments in which a gramicidin S hydrochloride molecule finds itself during deposition and drying on the HOPG substrate. PMID:1725492

  10. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    At the present time proximal femoral fractures account for 30% of all fractures referred to hospitals for treatment. Our population is ageing, the proportion of patients with post-menopausal or senile osteoporosis is increasing and therefore the number of proximal femoral fractures requiring urgent treatment is growing too. In the age category of 50 years and older, the incidence of these fractures has increased exponentially. Our department serves as a trauma centre for half of Prague and part of the Central Bohemia Region with a population of 1 150 000. Prague in particular has a high number of elderly citizens. Our experience is based on extensive clinical data obtained from the Register of Proximal Femoral Fractures established in 1997. During 14 years, 4280 patients, 3112 women and 1168 men, were admitted to our department for treatment of proximal femoral fractures. All patients were followed up until healing or development of complications. In the group under study, 82% were patients older than 70 years; 72% of those requiring surgery were in their seventies and eighties. Men were significantly younger than women (p<0.001) and represented 30% of the group. The fractures were 2.3-times more frequent in women than in men. In the category under 60 years, men significantly outnumbered women (p<0.001). The patients with pertrochanteric fractures were, on the average, eight years older than the patients with intertrochanteric fractures, which is a significant difference (p<0.001). The mortality rate within a year of injury was about 30%. Trochanteric fractures accounted for 54.7% and femoral neck fractures for 45.3% of all fractures. The inter-annual increase was 5.9%, with more trochanteric than femoral neck fractures. There was a non-significant decrease in intertrochanteric (AO 31-A3) fractures. On the other hand, the number of pertrochanteric (AO 31-A1+2) fractures increased significantly (p<0.001). A total of 1 394 fractures were treated with a proximal

  11. Disadvantages and advantages of transtibial technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral socket.

    PubMed

    Robin, Brett N; Lubowitz, James H

    2014-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) femoral socket techniques have distinct advantages and disadvantages when considering the following techniques: transtibial, anteromedial portal, outside-in, and outside-in retroconstruction. There is no one perfect technique and we have an incomplete understanding of anatomical, biomechanical, isometry, stability, and clinical outcomes. Our primary focus is transtibial technique for creating the ACL femoral socket. Advantages include less invasive, isometric graft placement, stable Lachman exam, and minimal graft impingement with the tunnel and notch. Disadvantages include nonanatomic vertical graft placement that can cause rotational instability and positive pivot shift, interference screw divergence, graft-tunnel length mismatch, femoral socket constraint, posterior cruciate ligament impingement, and a short, oblique tibial tunnel that may undermine the medial plateau in an attempt to achieve anatomic ACL reconstruction. PMID:24951951

  12. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  13. Accuracy of femoral templating in reproducing anatomical femoral offset in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Davies, H; Foote, J; Spencer, R F

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of hip biomechanics is a crucial component of successful total hip replacement. Preoperative templating is recommended to ensure that the size and orientation of implants is optimised. We studied how closely natural femoral offset could be reproduced using the manufacturers' templates for 10 femoral stems in common use in the UK. A series of 23 consecutive preoperative radiographs from patients who had undergone unilateral total hip replacement for unilateral osteoarthritis of the hip was employed. The change in offset between the templated position of the best-fitting template and the anatomical centre of the hip was measured. The templates were then ranked according to their ability to reproduce the normal anatomical offset. The most accurate was the CPS-Plus (Root Mean Square Error 2.0 mm) followed in rank order by: C stem (2.16), CPT (2.40), Exeter (3.23), Stanmore (3.28), Charnley (3.65), Corail (3.72), ABG II (4.30), Furlong HAC (5.08) and Furlong modular (7.14). A similar pattern of results was achieved when the standard error of variability of offset was analysed. We observed a wide variation in the ability of the femoral prosthesis templates to reproduce normal femoral offset. This variation was independent of the seniority of the observer. The templates of modern polished tapered stems with high modularity were best able to reproduce femoral offset. The current move towards digitisation of X-rays may offer manufacturers an opportunity to improve template designs in certain instances, and to develop appropriate computer software. PMID:19197861

  14. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive. PMID:25362879

  15. An audit of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Topliss, C; Webb, J

    2001-03-01

    We audited 114 primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Notes were reviewed and tunnel positions assessed on lateral and AP radiographs. A literature review established optimal tunnel position. Sixteen surgeons performed 57 arthroscopic and 57 open reconstructions, using 24 hamstring and 90 bone-tendon-bone autografts. Eighty-five sets of radiographs were available for review. Sixty-five percent of femoral tunnels and 59% of the tibial tunnels were malpositioned in the sagittal plane. Guidelines for best practice are required for key procedures in each speciality. Tunnel position in ACL reconstruction can be easily measured and should be correct in at least 90% of cases. PMID:11248570

  16. Femoral approach to lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mulpuru, Siva K; Hayes, David L; Osborn, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Laser and radiofrequency energy-assisted lead extraction has greatly facilitated this complex procedure. Although success rates are high, in some instances alternate methods of extraction are required. In this review, we discuss techniques for femoral extraction of implanted leads and retained fragments. The major tools available, including commonly used snares and delivery tools, are discussed. We briefly describe combined internal jugular and femoral venous extraction approaches, as well as complimentary utilization of more than one technique via the femoral vein. Animated and procedural sequences are included to help the reader visualize the key components of these techniques. PMID:25311643

  17. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  18. Quantifying lateral femoral condyle ellipticalness in chimpanzees, gorillas, and humans.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D; Pfisterer, Theresa

    2012-11-01

    Articular surfaces of limb bones provide information for understanding animal locomotion because their size and shape are a reflection of habitual postures and movements. Here we present a novel method for quantifying the ellipticalness (i.e., departure from perfectly circular) of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC), applying this technique to hominid femora. Three-dimensional surface models were created for 49 Homo sapiens, 34 Pan troglodytes and 25 Gorilla gorilla femora. Software was developed that fit separate cylinders to each of the femoral condyles. These cylinders were constrained to have a single axis, but could have different radii. The cylinder fit to the LFC was allowed to assume an elliptical cross-section, while the cylinder fit to the medial condyle was constrained to remain circular. The shape of the elliptical cylinder (ratio of the major and minor axes of the ellipse) was recorded, and the orientation of the elliptical cylinder quantified as angles between the major axis of the ellipse and the anatomical and mechanical axes of the femur. Species were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc multiple comparisons tests. Confirming qualitative descriptions, human LFCs are more elliptical than those of chimpanzees and gorillas. Human femora exhibit a narrow range for the angle between the major axis of the elliptical cylinder and femoral axes. Conversely, the chimpanzee sample is bimodal for these angles, exhibiting two ellipse orientations, while Gorilla shows no preferred angle. Our results suggest that like modern human femora, chimpanzee femoral condyles have preferentially used regions. PMID:23042636

  19. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  20. Bone scintigraphy in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, M.J.; Strife, J.L.; Graham, E.J.; Crawford, A.H.

    1983-12-01

    Tc-/sub 99m/ diphosphonate bone scans were performed on 11 children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis. On pinhole hip images, seven hips in seven patients had increased radionuclide uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis where the slip had occurred. Three hips in three patients had decreased radionuclide uptake in the femoral head on the side of the slipped epiphysis, indicating compromise of the femoral head blood supply. Three or more months following internal fixation, three children had scintigraphy that showed loss of the usual focal uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis. Bone scintigraphy in pediatric patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is valuable in defining the metabolic status of the femoral head. Absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the affected femoral head indicates that the femoral head is at risk for development of radiographic changes associated with aseptic necrosis.

  1. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  2. The suitability of the femoral vein for permanent vascular access.

    PubMed

    Pecorari, M

    2004-01-01

    In our dialysis unit, we commonly position permanent catheters (the Tesio twin catheter) in femoral veins with 'high' exit sites, in the abdominal area. We prefer this method because of its intrinsic safety in patients immediately requiring hemodialysis (HD), because there is no need for ultrasound guidance and a low incidence of complications during and after positioning. In addition, we consider that this method is suitable for older patients without good native vessels for an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). Sixty-nine femoral catheters were positioned in 61 patients (mean age 70.8 yrs): 307 observational months/patients (mean duration 4.45 months) demonstrated the following results: a) no incidents during catheter positioning; b) four iliac-femoral thromboses (in three cases complete recanalization with heparin treatment); c) two catheters were removed due to an infection of the tunnel; d) no generalized, life-threatening sepsis. Therefore, we recommend this solution as a 'bridge-access' between the immediate need for HD and the successive best strategy for the treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:16596552

  3. Current-induced switching of magnetic tunnel junctions: Effects of field-like spin-transfer torque, pinned-layer magnetization orientation, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. K.; Jhon, M. H.; Ng, N.; Gan, C. K.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    2014-01-13

    We study current-induced switching in magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of a field-like spin-transfer torque and titled pinned-layer magnetization in the high current limit at finite temperature. We consider both the Slonczewski and field-like torques with coefficients a{sub J} and b{sub J}, respectively. At finite temperatures, σ=b{sub J}/a{sub J}=±1 leads to a smaller mean switching time compared that with σ=0. The reduction of switching time in the presence of the field-like term is due to the alignment effect (for σ>0) and the initial torque effect.

  4. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  5. Tibial hemimelia and femoral bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Ali Akin; Sungur, Ibrahim; Akyildiz, Mustafa Fehmi; Ercin, Ersin

    2010-02-01

    Femoral bifurcation and tibial agenesis are rare anomalies and have been described in both the Gollop-Wolfgang complex and tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome. This article presents a case of Gollop-Wolfgang complex without hand ectrodactyly. Tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome and Gollop-Wolfgang complex are variants of tibial field defect, which includes distal femoral duplication, tibial aplasia, oligo-ectrodactylous toe defects, and preaxial polydactyly, occasionally associated with hand ectrodactyly.This article describes the case of a patient with bilateral tibial hemimelia and left femoral bifurcation. The proximal tibial anlage had not been identified in the patient's left leg. After failed fibular transfer procedure, the knee was disarticulated. The other leg was treated with tibiofibular synostosis and centralization of fibula to os calcis. At 7-year follow-up, the patient ambulates with an above-knee prosthesis and uses an orthopedic boot for ankle stability.In patients with a congenital absence of the tibia, accurate diagnosis is of the utmost importance in planning future treatment. In the absence of proximal tibial anlage, especially in patients with femoral bifurcation, the knee should be disarticulated. Tibiofibular synostosis is a good choice in the presence of a proximal tibial anlage and good quadriceps function. PMID:20192156

  6. Applying Cross-Pin System in Both Femoral and Tibial Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Xue, Jing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Junliang; Qu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Use of the RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, tibial fixation is still limited to the use of interference screws and post fixation, and few surgeons apply the femoral RigidFix system in tibial fixation. Meanwhile, tunnel enlargement is still a problem that affects the outcome of ACLR with hamstring grafts. We have used the femoral RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. The rod top of the guide frame should be placed under the level of the subchondral bone at the proximal end of the tibial tunnel to ensure that the pins will not be inserted into the joint. The pins are inserted through the center of the lateral tibia. Using our technique, the fixation points of the femur and tibia are close to the anterior cruciate ligament insertions, and full contact of the graft with the tunnel wall can be accomplished. On the basis of our preliminary observations and investigation, we are optimistic about the prospect of performing ACLR using the RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. PMID:26697293

  7. Arthroscopic Suture Fixation in Femoral-Sided Avulsion Fracture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Umprai, Vantawat; Laohathaimongkol, Thongchai; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2015-01-01

    A femoral-sided avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a rare and challenging condition. Most reported cases have occurred in childhood or adolescence. Many techniques of ACL repair have been reported, and in recent years, techniques in arthroscopic surgery have been developed and have become ever more popular with orthopaedic surgeons. We created a technique of arthroscopic ACL repair with suture anchor fixation for a femoral-sided ACL avulsion fracture. This technique saves the natural ACL stump. It is available for cases in which creation of a tibial tunnel is not allowed. Moreover, it does not require a skin incision for fixation on the far femoral cortex and, therefore, does not require a second operation to remove the fixation device. The arthroscopic technique also has a good cosmetic outcome. PMID:26258035

  8. Femoral Footprint Reconstruction With a Direct Viewing of the Posterior Insertion Using a Trans-Septal Portal in the Outside-In Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2015-01-01

    We established a technique for femoral tunnel preparation through direct vision of the femoral footprint with maximum preservation to the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remnant using a posterior trans-septal portal. Anterior arthroscopy is difficult for the proper tunnel placement without sacrificing the ACL remnant. Posterior arthroscopy could be helpful for viewing the posterior insertion of the ACL remnant that provides excellent femoral footprint exposure without sacrificing the native ACL remnant. Therefore, a posterolateral portal technique using a 70° arthroscope through a posterolateral portal is introduced. However, using the 70° arthroscope, an oblique view is displayed and distorted view could be seen. Therefore, to achieve the goal of posterior arthroscopy and avoid obstacles of the posterolateral view with the 70° arthroscope, we introduce this technique that uses the posterior trans-septal portal with a 30° arthroscope that provides an excellent viewing to the femoral footprint through a hole of the posterior septum. PMID:27073766

  9. Water tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the uses of water tunnels are demonstrated through the description of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. It is concluded that water tunnels are capable of providing a quick and inexpensive means of flow visualization and can aid in the understanding of complex fluid mechanics phenomena.

  10. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  11. Conservative femoral stem revision: avoiding therapeutic escalation.

    PubMed

    Pinaroli, Alban; Lavoie, Frédéric; Cartillier, Jean-Claude; Neyret, Philippe; Selmi, Tarik Ait Si

    2009-04-01

    A conservative approach to femoral revision is assessed. We report on 41 femoral revisions using an extensively coated hydroxyapatite primary femoral stem. Clinical, operative, and radiological data were gathered. Harris hip scores increased from 65/100 to 90/100 at the minimal follow-up of 1 year (P < .05). All stems showed signs of osseous integration. No significant migration was measured. No patient had to be reoperated because of problems related to the stem. Good results are reported for femoral revision with Paprosky type I and II bone defects with no significant difference between the 2 subgroups, hereby proving that conservative femoral revision is a reasonable treatment alternative. Reproducible results with such a technique may bring surgeons to be more aggressive when noticing early signs of femoral loosening. PMID:18534426

  12. Tunneling machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L.L.

    1980-02-19

    A diametrically compact tunneling machine for boring tunnels is disclosed. The machine includes a tubular support frame having a hollow piston mounted therein which is movable from a retracted position in the support frame to an extended position. A drive shaft is rotatably mounted in the hollow piston and carries a cutter head at one end. The hollow piston is restrained against rotational movement relative to the support frame and the drive shaft is constrained against longitudinal movement relative to the hollow piston. A plurality of radially extendible feet project from the support frame to the tunnel wall to grip the tunnel wall during a tunneling operation wherein the hollow piston is driven forwardly so that the cutter head works on the tunnel face. When the hollow piston is fully extended, a plurality of extendible support feet, which are fixed to the rearward and forward ends of the hollow piston, are extended, the radially extendible feet are retracted and the support frame is shifted forwardly by the piston so that a further tunneling operation may be initiated.

  13. Hip contact stress and femoral neck retroversion: a biomechanical study to evaluate implication of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Jibanananda; Kannan, Arun; Owen, John R.; Wayne, Jennifer S.; Hull, Jason R.; Jiranek, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The current literature on femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is focused on acetabular orientation and femoral head asphericity, with little emphasis on the effect of version of the femoral neck. A biomechanical model was developed to determine the causative effect, if any, of femoral retroversion on hip contact stress and, if present, delineate the type of FAI with femoral neck retroversion. Five pairs of cadaveric hips (n = 10) were tested by loading the hip in 90° of flexion and measured the peak joint pressure and the location of the peak joint pressure. The experiment was repeated after performing a subtrochanteric osteotomy and retroverting the proximal femur by 10°. Ten hips were successfully tested, with one hip excluded due to an outlier value for peak joint pressure. Retroversion of the proximal femur significantly increased the magnitude of mean peak joint pressure. With retroversion, the location of the peak joint pressure was shifted posteroinferiorly in all cases. In conclusion, femoral neck retroversion increases peak joint pressure in the flexed position and may act as a cause of femoroacetabular impingement. The location of peak joint pressure suggests a pincer-type impingement with retroversion. The version of femoral neck should be assessed as a possible causative factor in patients with FAI, especially those with pincer-type impingement. PMID:27011851

  14. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  15. [Aneurysm of the femoral and popliteal vein].

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Boris, P

    1986-04-01

    Aneurysms of the popliteal and femoral veins are rare and may be seen as casual findings with no clinical manifestations whatsoever. On the other hand they may be potential source of recurrent pulmonary embolism. A case is reported, where an aneurysm of the femoral vein was found in a clinically symptomless woman aged 48. PMID:3715020

  16. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  17. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  18. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  19. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  20. Spin-valley filter and tunnel magnetoresistance in asymmetrical silicene magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dali; Huang, Zeyuan; Zhang, Yongyou; Jin, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    The spin and valley transports and tunnel magnetoresistance are studied in a silicene-based asymmetrical magnetic tunnel junction consisting of a ferromagnetic tunnel barrier, sandwiched between a ferromagnetic electrode and a normal electrode. For such an asymmetrical silicene junction, a general formulism is established. The numerical results show that the spin-valley resolved conductances strongly depend on the magnetization orientation of the ferromagnetic tunnel barrier, and the fully spin-valley polarized current can be realized by tuning a perpendicularly applied electric field. We also find that the tunnel magnetoresistance in this case can be effectively modified by the external electric field when the conductance is fully spin-valley polarized. In particular, the exchange field in the ferromagnetic electrode can further substantially enhance the tunnel magnetoresistance of the system. Our work provides a practical method for electric and magnetic manipulation of valley/spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance.

  1. Visualization of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction bone tunnels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Non-anatomic bone tunnel placement is the most common cause of a failed ACL reconstruction. Accurate and reproducible methods to visualize and document bone tunnel placement are therefore important. We evaluated the reliability of standard radiographs, CT scans, and a 3-dimensional (3D) virtual reality (VR) approach in visualizing and measuring ACL reconstruction bone tunnel placement. Methods 50 consecutive patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstructions were evaluated postoperatively by standard radiographs, CT scans, and 3D VR images. Tibial and femoral tunnel positions were measured by 2 observers using the traditional methods of Amis, Aglietti, Hoser, Stäubli, and the method of Benereau for the VR approach. Results The tunnel was visualized in 50–82% of the standard radiographs and in 100% of the CT scans and 3D VR images. Using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the inter- and intraobserver agreement was between 0.39 and 0.83 for the standard femoral and tibial radiographs. CT scans showed an ICC range of 0.49–0.76 for the inter- and intraobserver agreement. The agreement in 3D VR was almost perfect, with an ICC of 0.83 for the femur and 0.95 for the tibia. Interpretation CT scans and 3D VR images are more reliable in assessing postoperative bone tunnel placement following ACL reconstruction than standard radiographs. PMID:21999625

  2. Distal femoral fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, F Winston; Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Kahler, David; Hurwitz, Shepard; Cui, Quanjun

    2010-10-01

    The diversity of surgical options for the management of distal femoral fractures reflects the challenges inherent in these injuries. These fractures are frequently comminuted and intra-articular, and they often involve osteoporotic bone, which makes it difficult to reduce and hold them while maintaining joint function and overall limb alignment. Surgery has become the standard of care for displaced fractures and for patients who must obtain rapid return of knee function. The goal of surgical management is to promote early knee motion while restoring the articular surface, maintaining limb length and alignment, and preserving the soft-tissue envelope with a durable fixation that allows functional recovery during bone healing. A variety of surgical exposures, techniques, and implants has been developed to meet these objectives, including intramedullary nailing, screw fixation, and periarticular locked plating, possibly augmented with bone fillers. Recognition of the indications and applications of the principles of modern implants and techniques is fundamental in achieving optimal outcomes. PMID:20889949

  3. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction procedure using a suspensory femoral fixation system.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kan, Hiroyuki; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Terauchi, Ryu; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2013-11-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocation has recently been treated with anatomic medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a semitendinosus muscle tendon. Although it is necessary to add tension to fix the tendon graft without loading excess stress on the patellofemoral joint, adjustment of the tension can be difficult. To resolve this problem, we developed an MPFL reconstruction procedure using the ToggleLoc Fixation Device (Biomet, Warsaw, IN), in which the semitendinosus muscle tendon is folded and used as a double-bundle tendon graft and 2 bone tunnels and 1 bone tunnel are made on the patellar and femoral sides, respectively. The patellar side of the tendon graft is fixed with an EndoButton (Smith & Nephew, London, England), and the femoral side is fixed with the ToggleLoc. Stepless adjustment of tension of the tendon graft is possible by reducing the size of the loop of the ToggleLoc hung onto the tendon graft. It may be useful to position the patella in the center of the femoral sulcus by confirming the patellofemoral joint fitting. Stability can be confirmed by loading lateral stress on the patella in the extended knee joint. This procedure is less invasive because opening of the lateral side of the femur is not necessary, and it may be useful for MPFL reconstruction. PMID:24892014

  4. "Grand piano sign," a marker for proper femoral component rotation during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Thomas F; Hughes, Richard E; Urquhart, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    A malpositioned femoral component is an established risk factor for patellar instability and pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In the assessment of femoral rotation, several axes, including the transepicondylar axis, the posterior condylar axis, and the anteroposterior axis, are useful. However, these axes are not always easily applicable, particularly when significant deformity exists. An anecdotal method used by some surgeons involves assessing the shape of the anterior femoral surface osteotomy. Our observations from saw bone models and TKA led to our hypothesis that proper femoral component placement is indicated by a bimodal peak on the anterior femur, approximately twice as high on the lateral side than on the medial side. We use the term "grand piano sign" to describe the shape of the trochlea after the osteotomy is correctly completed. To our knowledge, this common observation has not been studied either in the laboratory or in vivo. Our cadaveric models demonstrated that the grand piano sign correlated with proper femoral rotation during TKA. Surgeons who are knowledgeable about this marker should find it helpful when orienting components during knee replacement surgery. PMID:22013571

  5. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  6. Removal of a broken guide wire entrapped in a fractured femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-hua; Ye, Tian-wen; Guo, Yong-fei; Wang, Chong-li; Chen, Ai-min

    2013-01-01

    Guide wire plays an important role in the fixation of femoral neck fracture with dynamic hip screw (DHS). Breakage of a guide wire during operation is a very rare condition. We met such a dilemma in DHS fixation of a 54-year-old male patient who sustained Garden type IV fracture of the right femoral neck. The distal end of the guide wire broke and was entrapped in the fractured femoral neck. We tried to get the broken part out by a cannulated drill. Reaming was started with the cannulated drill slowly rotating around the guide K-wire until the reamer fully contained the target under fluoroscope. A bone curette was used to get the broken wire out but failed, so we had to use the cannuated drill to dredge this bone tunnel. Finally the broken wire end was taken out, mixed with blood and bone fragments. Through the existing drilling channel, DHS fixation was easily finished. The patient had an uneventful recovery without avascular necrosis of femoral head or non-union of the fracture at one year's follow-up. A few methods can be adopted to deal with the broken guide wire. The way used in our case is less invasive but technically challenging. When the guide wire is properly positioned, this method is very practical and useful. PMID:23910678

  7. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  8. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  9. Atypical periprosthetic femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woo, S B; Choi, S T; Chan, W L

    2016-08-01

    We report an 82-year-old woman who underwent fixation with a long-spanning cable-plate for a bisphosphonate-induced Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture. Non-union and breakage of the plate occurred at 16 months and necessitated revision surgery using a long-stem femoral prosthesis augmented with a cable-plate construct. Bone union was achieved eventually after 10 months. PMID:27574277

  10. Stress changes ahead of an advancing tunnel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abel, J.F.; Lee, F.T.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumentation placed ahead of three model tunnels in the laboratory and ahead of a crosscut driven in a metamorphic rock mass detected stress changes several tunnel diameters ahead of the tunnel face. Stress changes were detected 4 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into nearly elastic acrylic, 2??50 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into concrete, and 2 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into Silver Plume Granite. Stress changes were detected 7??50 diameters ahead of a crosscut driven in jointed, closely foliated gneisses and gneissic granites in an experimental mine at Idaho Springs, Colorado. These results contrast markedly with a theoretical elastic estimate of the onset of detectable stress changes at 1 tunnel diameter ahead of the tunnel face. A small compressive stress concentration was detected 2 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in acrylic, 1.25 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in concrete, and 1 diameter ahead of the model tunnel in granite. A similar stress peak was detected about 6 diameters ahead of the crosscut. No such stress peak is predicted from elastic theory. The 3-dimensional in situ stress determined in the field demonstrate that geologic structure controls stress orientations in the metamorphic rock mass. Two of the computed principal stresses are parallel to the foliation and the other principal stress is normal to it. The principal stress orientations vary approximately as the foliation attitude varies. The average horizontal stress components and the average vertical stress component are three times and twice as large, respectively, as those predicted from the overburden load. An understanding of the measured stress field appears to require the application of either tectonic or residual stress components, or both. Laboratory studies indicate the presence of proportionately large residual stresses. Mining may have triggered the release of strain energy, which is controlled by geologic structure. ?? 1973.

  11. Clinical-radiographic correlation of the femoral insertion point of the graft in reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; de Moraes, Vinícius Vidigal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the radiographic positioning of the femoral tunnel and correlate this with the postoperative clinical results among patients undergoing reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) alone. Method This was a retrospective study in which 30 knees of 26 patients with recurrent dislocation of the patella that underwent MPFL reconstruction were evaluated. The femoral insertion point of the graft and the postoperative clinical condition were analyzed and correlated using the Kujala and Lysholm scales. Results 22 knees presented a femoral tunnel in the anatomical area (group A) and 8 outside of this location (group B). In group A, the mean score on the Kujala scale was 89.68 points and on the Lysholm scale was 92.45 points. In group B, the mean score on the Kujala scale was 84.75 points and on the Lysholm scale was 92 points. The difference between the means was not significant on either of the two scales. Conclusion Correlation with the clinical results did not show any difference in relation to the positioning of the femoral insertion of the graft. PMID:27218083

  12. Tunneling Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Emil; Fujisawa, Sho; Barlas, Afsar; Romin, Yevgeniy; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes are actin-based cytoplasmic extensions that function as intercellular channels in a wide variety of cell types.There is a renewed and keen interest in the examination of modes of intercellular communication in cells of all types, especially in the field of cancer biology. Tunneling nanotubes –which in the literature have also been referred to as “membrane nanotubes,” “’intercellular’ or ‘epithelial’ bridges,” or “cytoplasmic extensions” – are under active investigation for their role in facilitating direct intercellular communication. These structures have not, until recently, been scrutinized as a unique and previously unrecognized form of direct cell-to-cell transmission of cellular cargo in the context of human cancer. Our recent study of tunneling nanotubes in human malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinomas demonstrated efficient transfer of cellular contents, including proteins, Golgi vesicles, and mitochondria, between cells derived from several well-established cancer cell lines. Further, we provided effective demonstration that such nanotubes can form between primary malignant cells from human patients. For the first time, we also demonstrated the in vivo relevance of these structures in humans, having effectively imaged nanotubes in intact solid tumors from patients. Here we provide further analysis and discussion on our findings, and offer a prospective ‘road map’ for studying tunneling nanotubes in the context of human cancer. We hope that further understanding of the mechanisms, methods of transfer, and particularly the role of nanotubes in tumor-stromal cross-talk will lead to identification of new selective targets for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23060969

  13. Femoral intercondylar notch shape and dimensions in ACL-injured patients.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Martins, Cesar A Q; Vyas, Shail M; Celentano, Umberto; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-09-01

    The femoral intercondylar notch has been an anatomic site of interest as it houses the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The objective of this study was to arthroscopically evaluate the femoral notch in patients with known ACL injury. This evaluation included establishing a classification for notch shapes, identifying the shape frequency, measuring notch dimensions, and determining correlation between notch shape, notch dimensions, and demographic patient data. In this clinical cohort study, 102 consecutive patients underwent diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation of the notch. Several intra-operative photos, videos, and measurements were taken of the notch. Demographic data for each patient were recorded including age, gender, height, weight, and BMI. Three categories of notch shape were established: 1. A-shaped; 2. U-shaped; and 3. W-shaped. Two blinded independent orthopedic surgeons were asked to categorize the recorded notches. Notch shape, dimensions, and demographic factors were correlated. Of the 102 notches evaluated, 55 notches were found to be "A-shaped," 42 "U-shaped," and 5 "W-shaped." "A-shaped" notches were narrower in all width dimensions than "U-shaped" notches. Only patient height was found to influence notch shape with a positive association between taller patients and "U-shaped" and "W-shaped" notches (P = 0.011). Women had a smaller notch width at the base and middle of the notch. With this data, surgeons who enter the knee and appreciate an "A-shaped" notch should consider placing the arthroscope in the anteromedial portal and drill the femoral tunnel through an accessory medial portal to improve visualization and accuracy in anatomic femoral tunnel creation. PMID:20390246

  14. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  15. Removal of a well-fixed cementless femoral component with an extended proximal femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Younger, T I; Bradford, M S; Paprosky, W G

    1995-05-01

    Removal of a stable, well-fixed cementless femoral arthroplasty component occasionally is necessary because of infection, component malposition, persistent pain, or incompatibility with a femoral revision component. Restricted access to ingrowth surfaces may make implant removal exceedingly difficult and increases the risk of iatrogenic damage to the proximal femur. A new extended proximal femoral osteotomy technique is described for use in removing well-fixed cementless femoral components. Previous techniques have been modified to allow access to the bone-implant interface and to provide straight-shot access to the femoral canal for proper sizing and positioning of the revision implant. The osteotomy can be extended to accommodate the entire length of the porous coating on the revision component. If a shorter osteotomy is desired, access to the prosthesis for transection with a metal-cutting burr is possible. The osteotomy is easily repositioned with cerclage wires or cables and reliable healing has been demonstrated. PMID:10150358

  16. Domino Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Peter R; Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Gerbig, Dennis; Ley, David; Sarka, János; Császár, Attila G; Vaughn, Alexander; Allen, Wesley D

    2015-06-24

    Matrix-isolation experiments near 3 K and state-of-the-art quantum chemical computations demonstrate that oxalic acid [1, (COOH)2] exhibits a sequential quantum mechanical tunneling phenomenon not previously observed. Intensities of numerous infrared (IR) bands were used to monitor the temporal evolution of the lowest-energy O-H rotamers (1cTc, 1cTt, 1tTt) of oxalic acid for up to 19 days following near-infrared irradiation of the matrix. The relative energies of these rotamers are 0.0 (1cTc), 2.6 (1cTt), and 4.0 (1tTt) kcal mol(-1). A 1tTt → 1cTt → 1cTc isomerization cascade was observed with half-lives (t1/2) in different matrix sites ranging from 30 to 360 h, even though the sequential barriers of 9.7 and 10.4 kcal mol(-1) are much too high to be surmounted thermally under cryogenic conditions. A general mathematical model was developed for the complex kinetics of a reaction cascade with species in distinct matrix sites. With this model, a precise, global nonlinear least-squares fit was achieved simultaneously on the temporal profiles of nine IR bands of the 1cTc, 1cTt, and 1tTt rotamers. Classes of both fast (t(1/2) = 30-50 h) and slow (t(1/2) > 250 h) matrix sites were revealed, with the decay rate of the former in close agreement with first-principles computations for the conformational tunneling rates of the corresponding isolated molecules. Rigorous kinetic and theoretical analyses thus show that a "domino" tunneling mechanism is at work in these oxalic acid transformations. PMID:26027801

  17. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  18. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    Median nerve decompression; Carpal tunnel decompression; Surgery - carpal tunnel ... The median nerve and the tendons that flex (or curl) your fingers go through a passage called the carpal tunnel in ...

  19. Femoral lipectomy increases postprandial lipemia in women.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Bessesen, Daniel H; Cox-York, Kimberly A; Erickson, Christopher B; Law, Christopher K; Anderson, Molly K; Wang, Hong; Jackman, Matthew R; Van Pelt, Rachael E

    2015-07-01

    Femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) appears to be cardioprotective compared with abdominal SAT, possibly through better triglyceride (TG) sequestration. We hypothesized that removal of femoral SAT would increase postprandial TG through a reduction in dietary fatty acid (FA) storage. Normal-weight (means ± SD; BMI 23.9 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) women (n = 29; age 45 ± 6 yr) were randomized to femoral lipectomy (LIPO) or control (CON) and followed for 1 yr. Regional adiposity was measured by DEXA and CT. A liquid meal labeled with [(14)C]oleic acid was used to trace the appearance of dietary FA in plasma (6-h postprandial TG), breath (24-h oxidation), and SAT (24-h [(14)C]TG storage). Fasting LPL activity was measured in abdominal and femoral SAT. DEXA leg fat mass was reduced after LIPO vs. CON (Δ-1.4 ± 0.7 vs. 0.1 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.001) and remained reduced at 1 yr (-1.1 ± 1.4 vs. -0.2 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.05), as did CT thigh subcutaneous fat area (-39.6 ± 36.6 vs. 4.7 ± 14.6 cm(2), P < 0.05); DEXA trunk fat mass and CT visceral fat area were unchanged. Postprandial TG increased (5.9 ± 7.7 vs. -0.6 ± 5.3 × 10(3) mg/dl, P < 0.05) and femoral SAT LPL activity decreased (-21.9 ± 22.3 vs. 10.5 ± 26.5 nmol·min(-1)·g(-1), P < 0.05) 1 yr following LIPO vs. CON. There were no group differences in (14)C-labeled TG appearing in abdominal and femoral SAT or elsewhere. In conclusion, femoral fat remained reduced 1 yr following lipectomy and was accompanied by increased postprandial TG and reduced femoral SAT LPL activity. There were no changes in storage of meal-derived FA or visceral fat. Our data support a protective role for femoral adiposity on circulating TG independent of dietary FA storage and visceral adiposity. PMID:25968576

  20. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  1. Carpal tunnel biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012: ...

  2. Tissue level microstructure and mechanical properties of the femoral head in the proximal femur of fracture patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linwei; Meng, Guangwei; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the regional variations of trabecular morphological parameters and mechanical parameters of the femoral head, as well as to determine the relationship between trabecular morphological and mechanical parameters. Seven femoral heads from patients with fractured proximal femur were scanned using a micro-CT system. Each femoral head was divided into 12 sub-regions according to the trabecular orientation. One trabecular cubic model was reconstructed from each sub-region. A total of 81 trabecular models were reconstructed, except three destroyed sub-regions from two femoral heads during the surgery. Trabecular morphological parameters, i.e. trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), specific bone surface (BS/BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structural model index (SMI), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were measured. Micro-finite element analyses were performed for each cube to obtain the apparent Young's modulus and tissue level von Mises stress distribution under 1 % compressive strain along three orthogonal directions, respectively. Results revealed significant regional variations in the morphological parameters (). Young's moduli along the trabecular orientation were significantly higher than those along the other two directions. In general, trabecular mechanical properties in the medial region were lower than those in the lateral region. Trabecular mechanical parameters along the trabecular orientation were significantly correlated with BS/BV, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and DA. In this study, regional variations of microstructural features and mechanical properties in the femoral head of patients with proximal femur fracture were thoroughly investigated at the tissue level. The results of this study will help to elucidate the mechanism of femoral head fracture for reducing fracture risk and developing treatment strategies for the elderly.

  3. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  4. Guide wire migration during femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Rozita; Sadigh, Gelareh

    2010-10-01

    Central vein catheterization is a routine and relatively safe procedure in critically ill patients. Complications with this procedure depend to the site of catheterization and the skill of the operator. In addition to the common complications with femoral vein catheterization there are some rare usually preventable side effects related to guide wire and catheter. In our patient who underwent femoral catheterization for acute hemodialysis, we report migration of guide wire through the systemic circulation from the femoral vein to the jugular vein. This is a very rare complication that is a human error and is totally preventable by doing the procedure by a skilled doctor and considering the standards described for central vein catheter insertion. PMID:20852377

  5. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  6. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  7. Adventitial cystic disease of common femoral vein

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Bo-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Adventitial cystic disease (ACD) of venous system is an extremely rare condition. Very few reports of ACD in venous system have been described. In this report we discuss two cases of common femoral vein ACD that presented with a swollen leg by the obstruction of the vein. Ultrasound imaging showed the typical hypoechoic fluid filled cyst with a posterior acoustic window. Computed tomography scan and ascending venogram showed a stenosis to flow in the common femoral vein caused by an extrinsic mass. Trans-adventitial evacuation of cyst with removal of vein wall was performed for both cases. During operation we found the gelatinous material in the cysts arising in the wall of the common femoral vein and compressing the lumen. The patients were released after short hospitalization and have remained symptom free with no recurrence. PMID:22066091

  8. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  9. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  10. Intramedullary nailing of pediatric femoral shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Harish S; Pandya, Nirav K; Cho, Robert H; Glaser, Diana A; Moor, Molly A; Herman, Martin J

    2011-08-01

    Intramedullary nail fixation of pediatric long bone fracture, particularly femoral shaft fracture, has revolutionized the care and outcome of these complex injuries. Nailing is associated with a high rate of union and a low rate of complications. Improved understanding of proximal femoral vascularity has led to changes in nail insertion methodology. Multiple fixation devices are available; selection is based on fracture type, patient age, skeletal maturity, and body mass index. A thorough knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics is required to achieve optimal results without negatively affecting skeletal development. PMID:21807915

  11. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  12. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Constructing the forms for the foundation of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000. The first step was to pour the foundation for the tunnel and the housing which would encase the wind tunnel.

  13. History of femoral head fracture and coronal fracture of the femoral condyles.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, Jan; Rammelt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The first known description of the coronal fracture of the lateral femoral condyle was published by Busch in 1869. Hoffa used Busch's drawing in the first edition of his book in 1888 and accompanied it only with one sentence. A full case history of this fracture pattern was described by Braun in 1891. However, Braun's article fell into oblivion and so the fracture was popularized only in the fourth edition of Hoffa's textbook, particularly thanks to the drawing, rather than the brief description. Therefore, a fracture of the posterior femoral condyle, or more specifically, of the lateral condyle, could properly be called "Busch-Hoffa fracture". Femoral head fracture was initially described by Birkett in 1869. Of essential importance in this respect were the publications by Christopher in 1924 and, particularly, Pipkin's study of 1957, including his classification that is still in use today. A historically correct eponym for a femoral head fracture would therefore be "Birkitt-Pipkin fracture". PMID:25787681

  14. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  15. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  16. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  17. Femoral mononeuropathy caused by a malignant sarcoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Patrícia; Pumarola, Martí; Zamora, Angels; Espada, Ivonne; Lloret, Albert; Añor, Sònia

    2008-11-01

    A 9-year old miniature poodle and a 6-year old American Staffordshire terrier were evaluated for slowly progressive lameness and atrophy of the left pelvic limb. Neurological examinations of both animals were consistent with femoral nerve lesions. In both cases, neoplastic masses were identified within the left psoas muscle, invading the left femoral nerve or, in one case, its nerve roots. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate and histopathological examination of the masses revealed that these were malignant sarcomas. Femoral mononeuropathies are very rare in dogs, and most descriptions of femoral nerve lesions are caused by traumatic injuries. Descriptions of neoplastic processes affecting the femoral nerve are limited to peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNST). These cases provide the first descriptions of malignant neoplasms other than PNSTs that infiltrate the femoral nerve or its nerve roots and cause unilateral femoral mononeuropathy and lameness of obscure origin. PMID:17889576

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy on graphite and gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichar, G. M.; Han, B.; Morand, M.; Belkaid, M. S.

    1993-03-01

    A compact, UHV-compatible scanning tunneling microscope has been built together with the necessary controlling electronics. We report on the design, development and evaluation of this setup. Some experimental results performed on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite and gold evaporated on stainless steel samples are presented.

  19. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  20. Planar Quasiparticle Tunneling Spectroscopy of Bi2212 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, H.; Pugel, D. E.; Greene, L. H.; Jian, S.; Hinks, D.

    2000-03-01

    Using techniques of quasi-particle planar tunneling spectroscopy, the in-plane density of states of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2212 is investigated. The 0.3 mm thick single crystals used allow tunneling into crystal faces of various crystallographic orientations, and a newly-developed technique allows for exposing these crystal faces with little damage. The planar tunnel junction is fabricated with the insulating dielectric CaF2 as the tunnel barrier and a noble metal counter-electrode. The tunneling conductance measured with the current injected perpendicular to the copper-oxide planes differs substantially from that measured with the current injected parallel to the planes. The in-plane tunneling density of states exhibits a zero-bias conductance peak which is attributed to the formation of an Andreev bound state, as predicted to occur at the ab-plane oriented surface of a d-wave superconductor. Tunneling spectra as a function of temperature, magnetic field and crystallographic orientation will be presented. These results will be discussed and compared with those obtained previously on YBCO-based tunnel junctions. This research was supported by the NSF-STCS (NSF-DMR 91-20000). DGH acknowledges support by the US DOE (W-31-109-ENG-38).

  1. Anatomic Tunnel Placement in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Aman; Gallo, Robert A; Lynch, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction concept has developed in part from renewed interest in the insertional anatomy of the ACL, using surgical techniques that can reproduce this anatomy reliably and accurately during surgical reconstruction. Several technical tools are available to help identify and place the tibial and femoral grafts anatomically, including arthroscopic anatomic landmarks, a malleable ruler device, and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The changes in technique for anatomic tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction follow recent biomechanical and kinematic data that demonstrate improved time zero characteristics. A better re-creation of native ACL kinematics and biomechanics is achieved with independent femoral drilling techniques that re-create a central footprint single-bundle ACL reconstruction or double-bundle reconstruction. However, to date, limited short-term and long-term clinical outcome data have been reported that support using either of these techniques rather than a transtibial drilling technique. This lack of clear clinical advantage for femoral independent and/or double-bundle techniques may arise because of the potentially offsetting biologic incorporation challenges of these grafts when placed using these techniques or could result from modifications made in traditional endoscopic transtibial techniques that allow improved femoral and tibial footprint restoration. PMID:27243794

  2. Cryogenic wind tunnels. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Specific problems pertaining to cryogenic wind tunnels, including LN(2) injection, GN(2) exhaust, thermal insulation, and automatic control are discussed. Thermal and other physical properties of materials employed in these tunnels, properties of cryogenic fluids, storage and transfer of liquid nitrogen, strength and toughness of metals and nonmetals at low temperatures, and material procurement and qualify control are considered. Safety concerns with cryogenic tunnels are covered, and models for cryogenic wind tunnels are presented, along with descriptions of major cryogenic wind-tunnel facilities the United States, Europe, and Japan. Problems common to wind tunnels, such as low Reynolds number, wall and support interference, and flow unsteadiness are outlined.

  3. Secure fixation of femoral bone plug with a suspensory button in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    PubMed Central

    TAKETOMI, SHUJI; INUI, HIROSHI; NAKAMURA, KENSUKE; YAMAGAMI, RYOTA; TAHARA, KEITARO; SANADA, TAKAKI; MASUDA, HIRONARI; TANAKA, SAKAE; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the efficacy and safety of using a suspensory button for femoral fixation in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft have not been established. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate bone plug integration onto the femoral socket and migration of the bone plug and the EndoButton (EB) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA, USA) after rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Methods thirty-four patients who underwent anatomical rectangular ACL reconstruction with BPTB graft using EB for femoral fixation and in whom three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) was performed one week and one year after surgery were included in this study. Bone plug integration onto the femoral socket, bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation were evaluated on 3D CT. The clinical outcome was also assessed and correlated with the imaging outcomes. Results the bone plug was integrated onto the femoral socket in all cases. The incidence of bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation was 15, 15, 9 and 56%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the imaging outcomes. The postoperative mean Lysholm score was 97.1 ± 5.0 points. The postoperative side-to-side difference, evaluated using a KT-2000 arthrometer, averaged 0.5 ± 1.3 mm. There were no complications associated with EB use. Imaging outcomes did not affect the postoperative KT side-to-side difference. Conclusions the EB is considered a reliable device for femoral fixation in anatomical rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889465

  4. Postcatheterization Femoral Arteriovenous Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran Kosar, Sule; Gumus, Terman; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Akpek, Sergin

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To report our results of stent-graft implantation for the endovascular treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) occurring between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein.Methods: Endovascular treatment of iatrogenic femoral AVFs as a result of arterial puncture for coronary angiography and/or angioplasty was attempted in 10 cases. Balloon-expandable stent-grafts, one for each lesion, were used to repair the fistulas, which were between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein in all cases. Stent-graft implantation to the deep femoral artery was performed by a contralateral retrograde approach.Results: All stent-grafts were deployed successfully. Complete closure of the fistulas was accomplished immediately in nine of 10 cases. In one case, complete closure could not be obtained but the fact that the complaint subsided was taken to indicate clinical success. In three cases, side branch occlusion of the deep femoral artery occurred. No complications were observed after implantation. Follow-up for 8-31 months (mean 18.5 months) with color Doppler ultrasonography revealed patency of the stented arterial segments without recurrent arteriovenous shunting in those nine patients who had successful immediate closure of their AVFs.Conclusion: Our results with a mean follow-up 18.5 months suggest that stent-graft implantation for the closure of postcatheterization femoral AVFs originating from the deep femoral artery is an effective, minimally invasive alternative procedure.

  5. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  6. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  7. Atypical femoral fracture following zoledronic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Ataoğlu, Baybars; Kaptan, Ahmet Yiğit; Eren, Toygun Kağan; Yapar, Ali Ekber; Berkay, Ahmet Fırat

    2016-04-01

    A 68-year-old female patient admitted to our clinic with right anterior thigh pain ongoing for six months and which increased in last two months. The patient had no trauma history. The patient had been followed-up for 15 years because of osteoporosis and administrated alendronate and ibandronate treatment for 10 years. Patient had three shots of zoledronate once a year during the last three years. Her pain was increasing when she was walking. Physical examination revealed pain in her right thigh. Radiogram showed thickened lateral cortex of the subtrochanteric area. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed thickening and edema of the same area. These images were correlated with atypical fracture in right femoral subthrochanteric zone. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed that T score was -3.3 in lumbar region and -2.5 in femoral neck. Zoledronate treatment was ended. Prophylactic surgical fixation was performed with titanium elastic nails. PMID:26874637

  8. Tunneling spectroscopy of anisotropic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Koyanagi, Masao; Kajimura, Koji; Tanaka, Yukio

    1996-12-31

    Tunneling spectroscopy of normal-insulator-superconductor junction is investigated theoretically. In anisotropic superconductors, differently from the case of isotropic superconductor, the effective pair potentials felt by quasiparticles depend on the direction of their motion. By taking this effect into account, it is shown that the conductance spectra strongly depend on the crystal orientation. Using Green`s function method, local density of states (LDOS) in superconductor is also calculated. The close relation between conductance spectra and LDOS is presented. The calculation is compared with experimental spectra of high-{Tc} superconductors.

  9. Femoral midshaft fractures: expandable versus locked nailing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen-Tao; Song, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Xiao-Zhong; Zhou, Hai-Bin; Luo, Zong-Ping; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2015-04-01

    Femoral midshaft fracture is one of the most common clinical injuries and is often caused by high-energy traffic accidents. Intramedullary nailings, plates, and external fixators are all used as treatment alternatives for a variety of patients depending on fracture location, displacement, comminution, soft tissue condition, and local tradition. Locked intramedullary nailing is currently the preferred treatment method for most diaphyseal fractures and has good clinical results. The goal of this study was to compare expandable and locked intramedullary nailing for the treatment of AO type 32A and 32B1 femoral midshaft fractures. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 46 patients (33 men and 13 women; mean age, 32.3 years; range, 22-52 years) with femoral midshaft fractures who were divided into 2 groups-one treated with an expandable intramedullary nailing method and the other with a conventional locked intramedullary nailing. The 2 groups were compared with respect to operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, hospitalization time, healing time, and complications. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. The results of this study showed that all of the patients achieved bone union within 12 to 24 months. Expandable nailing performed better than locked nailing in operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, and healing time (P<.001). There was no difference in hospitalization time and no visible shortening or severe complications were observed in either group. Based on the results of this study, the expandable intramedullary nailing is an easy and effective treatment for AO type 32A and 32B1 diaphyseal femoral fractures. PMID:25901625

  10. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing.

    PubMed

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-10-18

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  11. Major SSC tunneling begins

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-11

    In Texas, work has been completed on the first on the Superconducting Supercollider's major shafts. Now a boring machine has started driving the fifty-four mile elliptical accelerator tunnel. To date, contracts let for the tunnel have come in far below preliminary estimates. Five of the main fourteen foot diameter tunnel contracts have been awarded for a total of 107.4 million dollars, about forty million dollars below estimates. These contracts represent %60 percent of the total tunneling project.

  12. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  13. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  14. Squeezable electron tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J.; Alexander, S.; Cox, M.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Hansma, P. K.

    1983-09-01

    We report a versatile new technique for constructing electron tunneling junctions with mechanically-adjusted artificial barriers. I-V curves are presented for tunneling between Ag electrodes with vacuum, gas, liquid or solid in the barrier. An energy gap is apparent in the measured I-V curve when tunneling occurs between superconducting Pb electrodes.

  15. Incomplete transposition of the common femoral artery and vein.

    PubMed

    Leite, J O; Carvalho Ventura, I; Botelho, F E; Costa Galvao, W

    2010-02-01

    Anatomical variations of the great saphenous vein, femoral artery and femoral vein at the inguinal level are rare. Modifications in the anatomical relationships among theses vessel can cause technical difficulties. There are two reports in the literature of the complete transposition of the femoral artery and vein. Both patients had large varicose veins only in the limb that presented the variation, which suggested an extrinsic compression. In the present paper, we report a case study of a patient with an incomplete transposition of the femoral artery and vein. Specifically, the common femoral vein and the saphenofemoral junction were completely overlapped by the common femoral artery. Although this anatomical variation did not present any clinical signs, it required a more complex surgical procedure. PMID:20224538

  16. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anteromedial portal technique for drilling of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated by many surgeons as allowing improved access to the anatomical footprint. Furthermore, suspensory fixation of soft tissue grafts has become popularized because of complications associated with cross-pin fixation. Concerns regarding the use of both have recently arisen. Purpose: To raise awareness of the increased risk of graft failure when using the anteromedial portal technique with suspensory femoral fixation during ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From November 1998 to August 2012, a total of 465 primary ACL reconstructions were performed using quadrupled hamstring autograft tendons, with drilling of the femoral tunnel performed via the transtibial portal. Graft fixation on the femur was achieved with cross-pin fixation, while interference screw fixation was used on the tibia. From September 2012 to October 2013, there were 69 reconstructions performed through an anteromedial portal. While there was no change in graft choice, a change was made to using suspensory femoral fixation. No other surgical or postoperative rehabilitation changes were made. Results: During the 14-year period in which ACL reconstructions were performed via the transtibial portal and with cross-pin fixation, 2 graft failures (0.4% failure rate) were reported. After switching to the anteromedial portal with suspensory fixation, 7 graft failures (10.1% failure rate) were reported over a 13-month period. These were 5 male and 2 female patients, with a mean age of 18.8 years—all elite athletes. The same surgical technique was used in all patients, and all patients had at least an 8 mm–diameter graft. Patients were cleared to return to sport at an average of 8.4 months postoperatively, after completing functional performance tests. Of the 7 patients, 6 sustained a rerupture of the graft within

  17. Incidence of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Jong-Keon; Byun, Young-Soo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Shon, Hyun Chul; Park, Ki Chul; Kim, Jung Jae; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and to identify risk factors for developing AVNFH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral shaft fractures treated with antegrade intramedullary nailing at 10 institutions. Among the 703 patients enrolled, 161 patients were excluded leaving 542 patients in the study. Average age was 42.1 years with average follow-up of 26.3 months. Patient characteristics and fracture patterns as well as entry point of femoral nails were identified and the incidence of AVNFH was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to open versus closed physis, open versus closed fractures, and age (<20 versus ≥20 years). Overall incidence of AVNFH was 0.2% (1 of 542): the patient was 15-year-old boy. Of 25 patients with open physis, the incidence of AVNFH was 4%, whereas none of 517 patients with closed physis developed AVNFH (P < 0.001). The incidence of AVNFH in patients aged < 20 versus ≥20 years was 1.1% (1 of 93) and 0.0% (0 of 449), respectively (P = 0.172), which meant that the incidence of AVNFH was 0% in adult with femur shaft fracture. Of 61 patients with open fractures, the incidence of AVNFH was 0%. The number of cases with entry point at the trochanteric fossa or tip of the greater trochanter (GT) was 324 and 218, respectively, and the incidence of AVNFH was 0.3% and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.412). In patients aged ≥20 years with isolated femoral shaft fracture, there was no case of AVNFH following antegrade intramedullary nailing regardless of the entry point. Therefore, our findings suggest that the risk of AVNFH following antegrade femoral nailing is extremely low in adult patients. PMID:26844518

  18. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb. PMID:23341246

  19. Operative Management of Crossover Femoral-femoral Graft Erosion into Bladder: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Motiani, Karan; Mahdy, Ayman

    2016-09-01

    Erosion of vascular grafts is not uncommon as seen in the recent literature. There have been many case reports documenting the work up and management of erosion of these grafts into bowel. We report a case of a crossover femoral-femoral graft that eroded into the anterior bladder wall and was incidentally found as an adherent bladder stone during cystoscopy. We demonstrate the importance of having a high level of clinical suspicion for eroding vascular grafts when preoperative imaging shows close proximity of graft to bladder. PMID:27462547

  20. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  1. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  2. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  3. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay. PMID:27289256

  4. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  5. Three-dimensional analysis of alignment error in using femoral intramedullary guides in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ma, Burton; Long, William; Rudan, John F; Ellis, Randy E

    2006-02-01

    We used computerized simulations with 3-dimensional models of 20 cadaver femora, calculated from computed tomographic scans, and a model of a rod measuring 200 x 5 mm to study femoral alignment accuracy for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty via minimally invasive reconstruction. The anatomical axis and insertion site were identified on each femur. A simulation of all feasible flexion-extension and varus-valgus orientations was performed. The average rod orientation was 3.2 degrees flexion and 2.5 degrees valgus. The range of orientation was 3.2 degrees extension to 9.7 degrees flexion and 4.5 degrees varus to 8.9 degrees valgus. The study suggests that a short narrow intramedullary rod inserted according to the manufacturer's specifications does not accurately find the anatomical axis and may lead to poor alignment of the femoral prosthesis. Given our finding of consistent bias toward excessive flexion and valgus alignment, we recommend that the operating surgeon carefully plan the insertion point of the intramedullary rod during surgery to compensate for this bias. PMID:16520218

  6. Validation of the femoral anteversion measurement method used in imageless navigation.

    PubMed

    Turley, Glen A; Ahmed, Shahbaz M Y; Williams, Mark A; Griffin, Damian R

    2012-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty restores lost mobility to patients suffering from osteoarthritis and acute trauma. In recent years, navigated surgery has been used to control prosthetic component placement. Furthermore, there has been increasing research on what constitutes correct placement. This has resulted in the definition of a safe-zone for acetabular cup orientation. However, there is less definition with regard to femoral anteversion and how it should be measured. This study assesses the validity of the femoral anteversion measurement method used in imageless navigation, with particular attention to how the neutral rotation of the femur is defined. CT and gait analysis methodologies are used to validate the reference which defines this neutral rotation, i.e., the ankle epicondyle piriformis (AEP) plane. The findings of this study indicate that the posterior condylar axis is a reliable reference for defining the neutral rotation of the femur. In imageless navigation, when these landmarks are not accessible, the AEP plane provides a useful surrogate to the condylar axis, providing a reliable baseline for femoral anteversion measurement. PMID:22681336

  7. Anatomic Double Bundle single tunnel Foreign Material Free ACL-Reconstruction – a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Felmet, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Summary The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) consists of two bundles, the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral bundle (PM). Double bundle reconstructions appear to give better rotational stability. The usual technique is to make two tunnels in the femur and two in the tibia. This is difficult and in small knees may not even be possible. We have developed a foreign material free press fit fixation for double bundle ACL reconstruction using a single femoral tunnel (R). This is based on the ALL PRESS FIT ACL reconstruction. It is suitable for the most common medium and, otherwise difficult, small sizes of knees. Method: Using diamond edged wet grinding hollow reamers, bone cylinders in different diameters are harvested from the implantation tunnels of the tibia and femur and used for the press fit fixation. Using the press fit technique the graft is first fixed in tibia. It is then similarly fixed under tension in the femoral side with the knee in 120 degree flexion. This is called Bottom To Top Fixation (BTT). On extending the knee the graft tension is self adapting. Depending on the size of the individual knee, the diameter of the femoral bone plug is varied from 8 to 13 mm to achieve an anatomic spread with a double bundle-like insertion. The tibia tunnel can be applied with two 7 or 8 mm diameter tunnels overlapping to a semi oval tunnel between 10 to 13 mm. Results: Since May 2003 we have carried out ACL-reconstructions with Hamstring grafts without foreign material using the ALL PRESS FIT technique. Initially, an 8 mm press fit fixation was used proximally with good results. Since April 2008, the range of diameters was increased up to 13 mm. The results of the Lachman tests have been good to excellent. Results of the Pivot shift test suggested more stability with femoral broader diameters of 9,5 to 13 mm. Conclusions: The foreign material free fixation of ham-string in the ALL PRESS FIT Bottom To Top Fixation is a successful method for ACL Reconstruction. The

  8. Effectiveness of Fulkerson Osteotomy with Femoral Nerve Stimulation for Patients with Severe Femoral Trochlear Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Crebs, D.T.; Anthony, C.A.; McCunniff, P.T.; Nieto, M.J.; Beckert, M.W.; Albright, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with femoral trochlear dysplasia are at risk for chronic recurrent patellofemoral dislocations, with extreme cases often requiring a surgical procedure. Anteromedialization of the tibial tubercle with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent medial patella-femoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a previously reported method of maximizing patello-femoral congruency. We hypothesize the Fulkerson osteotomy with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent MPFL reconstruction in patients with severe trochlear dysplasia provides equivalent postoperative clinical outcomes to the same procedure in patients with low level trochlear dysplasia. Methods 48 knees underwent Fulkerson osteotomy with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent MPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellar dislocations. MRI, surgeon intraoperative assessment, and X-ray were used to assess degrees of trochlear dysplasia; inter-observer and intra-observer error were measured. The knees positive for severe dysplasia on MRI, intraoperative assessment, and X-ray were considered as a comparison cohort to the rest of the study population. We considered postoperative dislocation events and patellar tracking kinematics as outcome measures. Independent student t tests and Fisher exact tests were used to evaluate differences between groups. Significance was set at P<0.05. Results 11 knees were positive for severe dysplasia (SD) by combined MRI, surgeon intraoperative assessment, and X-ray with the remaining 37 knees categorized as low dysplasia (LD). No patients in either group exhibited apprehension or required re-operation. Mean sulcus angle in the SD group was 175.8 +−2.45 degrees (95% CI 171.0–180.6); the LD group mean sulcus angle was 154.3 +− 0.98 degrees (95% CI 152.4–156.2) (P<.001). Postoperatively there was no significant difference in dislocation events between the SD group (0/11) and the LD group (2/37) (P>0.999). Patellar

  9. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: what's new?

    PubMed

    Peck, Kathryn; Herrera-Soto, José

    2014-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip disorder among adolescents, whereby the epiphysis is displaced posteriorly and inferiorly to the metaphysis. Treatment modalities aim to stabilize the epiphysis, prevent further slippage, and avoid complications associated with long-term morbidity, such as osteonecrosis and chondrolysis. Controversy exists with SCFE regarding prophylactic fixation of the contralateral, painless, normal hip, the role of femoroacetabular impingement with SCFE, and whether in situ fixation is the best treatment method for SCFE. This article presents and discusses the latest diagnostic and treatment modalities for SCFE. PMID:24267209

  10. Correlation Between Asymmetric Resection of Posterior Femoral Condyles and Femoral Component Rotation in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Harun Reşit; Ök, Nusret; Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Semih; Kıter, Esat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Pertaining to peculiar designs of current knee prostheses, more bone is removed from posteromedial femoral condyle than posterolateral condyle to obtain desired femoral component rotation. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the asymmetry of the cuts and the femoral component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. Methods: We built a model to simulate anterior chamfer cut (ACC) performed during total knee arthroplasty for measuring posterior condylar offset (PCO). Right knee axial MRI slices of a total 290 consecutive patients (142 male, 138 female, and mean age 31.39 ± 6.6) were examined. A parallel line to surgical transepiphyseal axis was drawn, and placed at the deepest part of trochlear groove. Posteromedial and posterolateral condylar offsets were measured by drawing perpendicular lines to ACC beginning from the intersection points of both anteromedial and anterolateral cortices to posterior joint line (PJL), respectively. Differences between posteromedial and posterolateral PCO were calculated, and femoral rotation angles (FRA) relative to PJL were measured. Results: The mean surgical FRA was 4.76 ± 1.16 degrees and the mean PCO differencesss- was 4.35 ± 1.04 mm for the whole group and there was no statistically significant difference between genders. There was a strong correlation between surgical FRA and PCO difference (p<0.0001, r=0.803). Linear regression analyses revealed that 0.8 mm of difference between the anteroposterior dimensions of medial and lateral PCO corresponds to 1 degree of surgical FRA (p<0.0001, R2=0.645). Conclusion: Correlation between the asymmetry of posterior chamfer cuts and achieved femoral component rotation can verify the accuracy of desired rotation, intraoperatively. However, further clinical investigations should be planned to test the results of our morphometric study.

  11. The effect of accelerated, brace free, rehabilitation on bone tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons: a CT study.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Antonio; Iorio, Raffaele; De Carli, Angelo; Argento, Giuseppe; Di Sanzo, Vincenzo; Conteduca, Fabio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    The mechanism of bone tunnel enlargement following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is not yet clearly understood. Many authors hypothesized that aggressive rehabilitation protocols may be a potential factor for bone tunnel enlargement, especially in reconstructions performed with hamstrings autograft. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a brace free rehabilitation on the tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction using doubled semitendinosus and gracilis tendons (DGST): our hypothesis was that early post-operative knee motion increase the diameters of the tibial and femoral bone tunnels. Forty-five consecutive patients undergoing ACL reconstruction for chronic ACL deficiency were selected. All patients were operated by the same surgeon using autologous DGST and the same fixation devices. Patients with associated ligaments injuries and or severe chondral damage were excluded. The patients were randomly assigned to enter the control group (group A, standard post-operative rehabilitation) and the study group (group B, brace free accelerated rehabilitation). A CT scan was used to exactly determine the diameters of both femoral and tibial tunnels at various levels of lateral femoral condyle and proximal tibia, using a previously described method [17]. Measurements were done by an independent radiologist in a blinded fashion the day after the operation and at a mean follow-up of 10 months (range 9-11). Statistical analysis was performed using paired t-test. The mean femoral tunnel diameter increased significantly from 9.04 +/- 0.05 (post-operative) to 9.30 +/- 0.8 mm (follow-up) in group A and from 9.04 +/- 0.03 to 9.94 +/- 1.12 mm in group B. The mean tibial tunnel diameter increased significantly from 9.03 +/- 0.04 to 10.01 +/- 0.80 mm in group A and from 9.04 +/- 0.03 to 10.60 +/- 0.78 mm in group B. The increase in femoral and tunnel diameters observed in the study group was significantly higher than that observed in the control

  12. [The changes of bone architecture in atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Takahash, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    The feature of atypical femoral fracture is stress induced cortical bone reaction. It was considered to be the accumulation of microdamage which come from increasing of mechanical stress by femoral lateral bowing, and the decreased of ability of microdamage repair system. PMID:23811584

  13. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  14. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  15. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  16. Complete guidewire retention after femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Cat, Bahar Gulcay; Guler, Sertac; Soyuduru, Murat; Guven, Ibrahim; Ramadan, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used for various purposes in the emergency departments (ED). The main uses of CVCs in the EDs are emergent hemodialysis, in situations where peripheral vein catheterization cannot be achieved, and continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The complications related to CVC insertion are usually mechanical and observed in the near term after the procedure. Retained CVC guidewire after catheterization is a rare complication in the published reports and usually related with intra- or postoperative settings and jugular or subclavian vein. The present study reported a young female patient who underwent left femoral vein catheterization 6 months earlier in an intensive care unit of another hospital and was diagnosed with complete guidewire retention in the ED. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case in published reports with a diagnosis of retained CVC guidewire with retrograde migration into the femoral vein. Surprisingly, the patient developed no thrombotic or embolic complication during this 6-month period. PMID:26657235

  17. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure. PMID:26716087

  18. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  19. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  20. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established. PMID:25793165

  1. The Design of Wind Tunnels and Wind Tunnel Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P; Norton, F H; Hebbert, C M

    1919-01-01

    Report discusses the theory of energy losses in wind tunnels, the application of the Drzewiecki theory of propeller design to wind tunnel propellers, and the efficiency and steadiness of flow in model tunnels of various types.

  2. Occult fracture of the femoral neck associated with extensive osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the subchondral portion of the femoral head is a common site for collapse in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), femoral-neck fracture rarely occurs during the course of ONFH. We report a case of occult insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck without conditions predisposing to insufficiency fractures, occurring in association with ONFH. Presentation of case We report a case of occult fracture of the femoral neck due to extensive ONFH in a 60-year-old man. No abnormal findings suggestive of ONFH were identified on radiographs, and the fracture occurred spontaneously without any trauma or unusual increase in activity. The patient’s medical history, age, and good bone quality suggested ONFH as a possible underlying cause. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was useful in determining whether the fracture was caused by ONFH or was instead a simple insufficiency fracture caused by steroid use. Discussion The patient was treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty, but if we had not suspected ONFH as a predisposing condition, the undisplaced fracture might have been treated by osteosynthesis, and this would have led to nonunion or collapse of the femoral head. To avoid providing improper treatment, clinicians should consider ONFH as a predisposing factor in pathologic fractures of the femoral neck. Conclusion ONFH should be included in the differential diagnosis of insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck. PMID:26275737

  3. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  4. Development of Background-Oriented Schlieren for NASA Langley Research Center Ground Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Borg, Stephen; Jones, Stephen; Overmeyer, Austin; Walker, Eric; Goad, William; Clem, Michelle; Schairer, Edward T.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent wind tunnel tests performed at the NASA Langley Research Center where the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) technique was used to provide information pertaining to flow-field density disturbances. The facilities in which the BOS technique was applied included the National Transonic Facility (NTF), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, 15-Inch Mach 6 High-Temperature Air Tunnel, Rotor Test Cell at the 14 by 22 Subsonic Tunnel, and a 13-Inch Low-Speed Tunnel.

  5. Tunneling Magnetothermopower in Magnetic Tunnel Junction Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, N.; Serrano-Guisan, S.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2011-10-01

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%.

  6. Tunneling magnetothermopower in magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Liebing, N; Serrano-Guisan, S; Rott, K; Reiss, G; Langer, J; Ocker, B; Schumacher, H W

    2011-10-21

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10  μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100  μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%. PMID:22107572

  7. Morphological Study of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias

    2014-01-01

    A morphology study was essential to the development of the cementless femoral stem because accurate dimensions for both the periosteal and endosteal canal ensure primary fixation stability for the stem, bone interface, and prevent stress shielding at the calcar region. This paper focused on a three-dimensional femoral model for Asian patients that applied preoperative planning and femoral stem design. We measured various femoral parameters such as the femoral head offset, collodiaphyseal angle, bowing angle, anteversion, and medullary canal diameters from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below the osteotomy level to determine the position of the isthmus. Other indices and ratios for the endosteal canal, metaphyseal, and flares were computed and examined. The results showed that Asian femurs are smaller than Western femurs, except in the metaphyseal region. The canal flare index (CFI) was poorly correlated (r < 0.50) to the metaphyseal canal flare index (MCFI), but correlated well (r = 0.66) with the corticomedullary index (CMI). The diversity of the femoral size, particularly in the metaphyseal region, allows for proper femoral stem design for Asian patients, improves osseointegration, and prolongs the life of the implant. PMID:25025068

  8. Whose Orientations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." While the "menu" Levisohn describes in his groundbreaking work on orientations to the teaching of rabbinic texts will almost certainly be refined over time, even as it stands this article should be of…

  9. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  10. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  11. Electron-Tunneling Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Steven B.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-tunneling magnetometer is conceptual solid-state device operating at room temperature, yet offers sensitivity comparable to state-of-art magnetometers such as flux gates, search coils, and optically pumped magnetometers, with greatly reduced volume, power consumption, electronics requirements, and manufacturing cost. Micromachined from silicon wafer, and uses tunneling displacement transducer to detect magnetic forces on cantilever-supported current loop.

  12. Micromachined Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Stephen B.; Kaiser, William J.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    Separation of tunneling electrodes adjusted by varying electrostatic force. Major components of tunneling transducer formed on two silicon chips by microfabrication techniques. Use of electrostatic deflection reduces sensitivity of transducer to thermal drift and simplifies design. Sensitivity suitable for applications in which larger acceleration-sensing instruments required.

  13. Comparison of the Sliding and Femoral Head Rotation among Three Different Femoral Head Fixation Devices for Trochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chinzei, Nobuaki; Niikura, Takahiro; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, various femoral head fixation devices (HFDs) for trochanteric fractures have become available. However, there are some cases in which femoral head rotation with excessive sliding of the HFD is observed and it is often followed by cutout. The purpose of this study is to compare the ability of the three types of HFDs to prevent femoral head rotation. Methods Between July 2005 and December 2009, 206 patients aged over 60 years with trochanteric fractures who had undergone surgical treatment using a short femoral nail in our institution were enrolled into the study. We used the gamma 3 nail (GMN) as the screw-type HFD in 66 cases, the gliding nail (GLN) as a non-cylindrical blade in 76 cases, and the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) as a cylindrical blade in 64 cases. The sliding length of HFDs and the occurrence of femoral head rotation were evaluated by assessing radiographs as the main outcome, and the results were compared among these devices. Results A comparison of the degree of sliding in the GMN group showed that femoral head rotation was observed significantly more frequently in cases with rotation. Further, it appeared that femoral head rotation occurred more frequently in comminuted fractures. However, no significant differences between the sliding lengths of the different HFDs were observed among three groups. Femoral head rotation was observed in 15 cases of GMN (22.7%), 0 case of GLN, and 5 case of PFNA (7.8%). Significant differences with regard to the occurrence of femoral head rotation were observed among the three groups. Furthermore, significant differences were also observed between GLN and PFNA with respect to the occurrence of femoral head rotation. Conclusions The ability to stabilize femoral head appears to be greater with blade-type materials than with screw-type materials. Furthermore, we believe that a non-cylindrical blade is preferable to a cylindrical blade for the surgical treatment of comminuted, unstable

  14. Three-dimensional characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament's femoral footprint.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Robert; Sybrowsky, Christian; Ramme, Austin; Amedola, Annuziati; Wolf, Brian R

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing use of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) for researching anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions and tunnel placement. However, there is limited 3D CT data on the ACL footprint. The purpose of this study is to define the native ACL femoral footprint using 3D surface reconstructions of computed tomography (CT) imaging of cadaveric knees. The femoral insertion of the ACL was meticulously dissected and marked with drill holes in seven cadaveric knees. CT scans were performed on each specimen, and 3D computer models were created. Distance from the condyle edges to the margins of the footprint were referenced to the total condylar size. This was performed both parallel and perpendicular to the femoral axis as well as the intercondylar notch. The mean condylar depth (c/C) ratios along the axis of the femur were 0.45 ± 0.06 for the anterior border, 0.44 ± 0.08 for the posterior border, 0.26 ± 0.07 for the proximal border, and 0.63 ± 0.08 for the distal border. The mean notch (n/N) ratios for the four margins were 0.37 ± 0.04 for the anterior border, 0.67 ± 0.08 for the posterior border, 0.49 ± 0.07 for the proximal margin, and 0.50 ± 0.06 for the distal border. The mean c/C ratios parallel the intercondylar notch measured 0.23 ± 0.03 for the anterior border, 0.27 ± 0.04 for the posterior border, 0.37 ± 0.04 for the proximal border, and 0.12 ± 0.02 for the distal border. The mean n/N ratios perpendicular to the intercondylar notch measured 0.11 ± 0.06 for the anterior border, 0.52 ± 0.09 the posterior border, 0.29 ± 0.06 for the proximal border, and 0.30 ± 0.06 for the distal border. This study provides reference measures of the femoral footprint of the ACL using 3D CT. It will assist future studies that use advanced imaging to evaluate accuracy of ACL reconstruction. PMID:23765876

  15. The impact of proximal femoral morphology on failure strength with a mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Michael; Al Saied, Mohamed; Morison, Zachary; Sellan, Michael; Waddell, James P; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-12-01

    Mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty is a conservative alternative to conventional total hip replacement and addresses proximal fixation challenges in patients not suitable for hip resurfacing. It is unclear whether proximal femoral morphology impacts the ultimate failure load of mid-head resection implanted femurs, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of native neck-shaft angle (NSA) and coronal implant alignment on proximal femoral strength. In total, 36 synthetic femurs with two different proximal femoral morphologies were utilized in this study. Of them, 18 femurs with a varus NSA of 120° and 18 femurs with a valgus NSA of 135° were each implanted with a mid-head resection prosthesis. Femurs within the two different femoral morphology groups were divided into three equal coronal implant alignment groups: 10° valgus, 10° varus or neutral alignment. Prepared femurs were tested for stiffness and to failure in axial compression. There was no significant difference in stiffness nor failure load between femurs implanted with valgus-, varus- or neutrally aligned implants in femurs with a NSA of 120° (p = 0.396, p = 0.111, respectively). Femurs implanted in valgus orientation were significantly stiffer and failed at significantly higher loads than those implanted in varus alignment in femurs with a NSA of 135° (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). A mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty seems less sensitive to clinically relevant variations of coronal implant alignment and may be more forgiving upon implantation in some femoral morphologies, however, a relative valgus component alignment is recommended. PMID:25515228

  16. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  17. Coherent revival of tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a tunneling effect by a driving field, referred to as coherent revival of tunneling (CRT), corresponding to complete tunneling (transmission coefficient =1 ) that is revived from the circumstance of total reflection (transmission coefficient ≈0 ) through application of an appropriate perpendicular high-frequency ac field. To illustrate CRT, we simulate electron transport through fish-bone-like quantum-dot arrays by using single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory, and we explore the corresponding current-field amplitude characteristics as well as current-polarization characteristics. In regard to the two characteristics, we show that CRT exhibits entirely different features than coherent destruction of tunneling and photon-assisted tunneling. We also discuss two practical conditions for experimental realization of CRT.

  18. Femoral lengthening with a motorized intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Joachim; Grimsrud, Øyvind; Dagsgard, Anita Hoddevik; Huhnstock, Stefan; Steen, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We assessed whether an intramedullary lengthening device would reduce the problems normally associated with the external fixation technique. We also wanted to determine whether it is a reliable construct for limb lengthening and deformity correction in the femur. Patients and methods We conducted a matched-pair comparison of 30 femoral lengthenings, 15 with a motorized intramedullary nail (the nail group) and 15 lengthenings with an external ring fixator (the fixator group). The patients were matched based on age, sex, amount of lengthening, and the etiology of leg length discrepancy. Mean lengthening was 35 (25–55) mm in the nail group and 38 (15–75) mm in the fixator group. Outcome measures were: lengthening and alignment achieved, consolidation index, knee range of motion (ROM), and complications. Results The pairs in this matched-pair study were similar in terms of age, sex, diagnosis, and amount of lengthening. The planned amount of lengthening was achieved in all patients in both groups and axis correction was considered sufficient. The mean radiographic consolidation index in the nail group, at 1.5 (0.9–3.0) months/cm, was better than the mean value for the fixator group (1.9 (0.9–3.4) months/cm) (p = 0.01). Knee ROM was better in the nail group during the lengthening, 6 weeks after lengthening was completed, and 6 months after lengthening was completed (p < 0.001). A larger number of complications were observed in the fixator group than in the nail group. Interpretation A lengthening nail may be superior to external fixation in femoral lengthening, when the anatomical conditions and the complexity of the deformity allow the use of an intramedullary nail. PMID:25191936

  19. Risk of Anterior Femoral Notching in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and risk factors after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using an image-free navigation system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 consecutive TKAs in 130 patients beginning in July 2005. Seventy knees (62 patients) underwent conventional TKA, and 78 knees (68 patients) received navigated TKA. We investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and measured notching depth by conventional and navigated TKA. Additionally, the navigated TKA group was categorized into two subgroups according to whether anterior femoral notching had occurred. The degree of preoperative varus deformity, femoral bowing, and mediolateral suitability of the size of the femoral component were determined by reviewing preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The resection angle on the sagittal plane and the angle of external rotation that was set by the navigation system were checked when resecting the distal femur. Clinical outcomes were compared using range of motion (ROM) and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAX) scores between the two groups. Results The prevalence of anterior femoral notching by conventional TKA was 5.7%, and that for navigated TKA was 16.7% (p = 0.037). Mean notching depth by conventional TKA was 2.92 ± 1.18 mm (range, 1.8 to 4.5 mm) and 3.32 ± 1.54 mm (range, 1.55 to 6.93 mm) by navigated TKA. Preoperative anterior femoral bowing was observed in 61.5% (p = 0.047) and both anterior and lateral femoral bowing in five cases in notching group during navigated TKA (p = 0.021). Oversized femoral components were inserted in 53.8% of cases (p = 0.035). No differences in clinical outcomes for ROM or the HSS and WOMAX scores were observed between the groups. A periprosthetic fracture, which was considered a notching-related side effect, occurred in one case each in the conventional and navigated TKA groups

  20. Significantly lower femoral neck growth in screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Wölfle-Roos, Julia V; Urlaub, Stefanie; Reichel, Heiko; Taurman, Rita

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing debate on which fixation technique should be preferred for the prophylactic fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). In the case of Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, there is a possibility of secondary loss of fixation because of longitudinal growth of the physis, whereas in screw fixation, physeal growth of the femoral neck might be impaired. The aim of this matched-pair study was to compare the longitudinal growth of the femoral neck in screw fixation versus K-wire fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in SCFE. All 18 patients (female : male=3 : 15), who had undergone screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip between 9/2001 and 9/2011, were matched according to age, bone age, sex, and time to follow-up to another 18 patients with K-wire fixation. The length of the femoral neck of the contralateral hip was measured in parallel to either screw or K-wire from the apex of the femoral head to the opposite cortical bone. The ratio of the femoral neck length measured directly after surgery and on follow-up was defined as femoral neck growth. There was no significant difference between groups with respect to age, modified Oxford Bone age score, and time to follow-up. We found a significant difference in femoral neck growth between patients with screw fixation (5.5±4.3%) compared with K-wire fixation (8.9±5.7%, P=0.048 matched Wilcoxon test). The difference in femoral neck growth of patients with K-wire or screw fixation of the contralateral asymptomatic hip in SCFE was small, but statistically significant. Thus, despite high rates of secondary loss of fixation, K-wire fixation should still be considered, especially in very young patients. PMID:26919622

  1. The aeolian wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The aeolian wind tunnel is a special case of a larger subset of the wind tunnel family which is designed to simulate the atmospheric surface layer winds to small scale (a member of this larger subset is usually called an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel or environmental wind tunnel). The atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel is designed to simulate, as closely as possible, the mean velocity and turbulence that occur naturally in the atmospheric boundary layer (defined as the lowest portion of the atmosphere, of the order of 500 m, in which the winds are most greatly affected by surface roughness and topography). The aeolian wind tunnel is used for two purposes: to simulate the physics of the saltation process and to model at small scale the erosional and depositional processes associated with topographic surface features. For purposes of studying aeolian effects on the surface of Mars and Venus as well as on Earth, the aeolian wind tunnel continues to prove to be a useful tool for estimating wind speeds necessary to move small particles on the three planets as well as to determine the effects of topography on the evolution of aeolian features such as wind streaks and dune patterns.

  2. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  3. [How to determine the rotation of the femoral component].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Roehner, E

    2015-04-01

    The different landmarks for determination of the rotation of the femoral component are shown and specific pros and cons are discussed. The videos demonstrate how to identify them intraoperatively. PMID:25874402

  4. Analyzing Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Archaeoastronomical field survey typically involves the measurement of structural orientations (i.e., orientations along and between built structures) in relation to the visible landscape and particularly the surrounding horizon. This chapter focuses on the process of analyzing the astronomical potential of oriented structures, whether in the field or as a desktop appraisal, with the aim of establishing the archaeoastronomical "facts". It does not address questions of data selection (see instead Chap. 25, "Best Practice for Evaluating the Astronomical Significance of Archaeological Sites", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_25) or interpretation (see Chap. 24, "Nature and Analysis of Material Evidence Relevant to Archaeoastronomy", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_22). The main necessity is to determine the azimuth, horizon altitude, and declination in the direction "indicated" by any structural orientation. Normally, there are a range of possibilities, reflecting the various errors and uncertainties in estimating the intended (or, at least, the constructed) orientation, and in more formal approaches an attempt is made to assign a probability distribution extending over a spread of declinations. These probability distributions can then be cumulated in order to visualize and analyze the combined data from several orientations, so as to identify any consistent astronomical associations that can then be correlated with the declinations of particular astronomical objects or phenomena at any era in the past. The whole process raises various procedural and methodological issues and does not proceed in isolation from the consideration of corroborative data, which is essential in order to develop viable cultural interpretations.

  5. Circumflex femoral vein thrombosis misinterpreted as acute hamstring strain.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Natsis, Constantinos; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-07-01

    The case of a 24-year-old female professional, long-distance runner who presented with acute proximal posterior thigh pain is reported. History and clinical findings were consistent with acute hamstring strain but MRI demonstrated circumflex femoral vein thrombosis. This is the first case of proximal posterior thigh pain caused by circumflex femoral vein thrombosis reported in the literature. Doctors dealing with sports injuries should be aware of this clinical entity that mimics hamstring strain. PMID:17224439

  6. Circumflex femoral vein thrombosis misinterpreted as acute hamstring strain

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Natsis, Constantinos; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 24‐year‐old female professional, long‐distance runner who presented with acute proximal posterior thigh pain is reported. History and clinical findings were consistent with acute hamstring strain but MRI demonstrated circumflex femoral vein thrombosis. This is the first case of proximal posterior thigh pain caused by circumflex femoral vein thrombosis reported in the literature. Doctors dealing with sports injuries should be aware of this clinical entity that mimics hamstring strain. PMID:17224439

  7. CIRCUMFERENTIAL PROXIMAL FEMORAL ALLOGRAFTS IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY REVISION SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Bruno Dutra; Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Júnior, Antero Camisa; Lampert, Henrique Bonotto; da Silva, Matheus Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from patients who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 32 patients (33 hips) who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Among these patients, 28 (29 hips) fulfilled all the requirements for this study. The mean follow-up was five years and two months. The clinical evaluation was done in accordance with the Harris Hip Score. Radiographically, the patients were assessed regarding reabsorption and consolidation of the allograft, migration of the greater trochanter, stability of the femoral component and heterotypic calcification. Results: The average preoperative Harris Hip Score was 32 points. At the last postoperative follow-up, the average score was 82 points. Allograft resorption of some degree was seen in nine hips (31%). Regarding consolidation, 24 cases (82.8%) showed full consolidation, three (10.3%) showed partial consolidation and two (6.9%) showed pseudarthrosis. All femoral components were stable. According to the criteria established, 27 cases (93.1%) were considered to be successful reconstructions after a mean follow-up of five years and two months. Conclusion: From the results obtained, it was concluded that use of circumferential proximal femoral allografts in selected cases of femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of arthroplasty presented a high survival rate from the reconstruction over an average follow-up of five years and two months. PMID:27047896

  8. Proximal femoral reconstruction with a constrained acetabulum in oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Muhammad Umar; Brien, Earl W

    2014-02-01

    Metallic endoprostheses are used for oncological reconstruction around the proximal femur and hip joint. Common modes of failure with hemiarthroplasty or standard hip arthroplasty after proximal femoral replacement include dislocation, late hip pain, and infection. The authors reviewed hospital records to identify patients undergoing constrained tripolar hip arthroplasty for oncological reasons between 2002 and 2012. Inclusion criterion was at least 12-cm proximal femoral resection, including patients with total femur reconstruction. A total of 33 patients were reviewed. Information regarding demographics, length of follow-up, treatment characteristics, and patient outcomes was extracted. Average follow-up for all patients was 912.33 days (30.4 months). Average follow-up was 1396.1 days for living patients and 428.6 days for deceased patients. Average estimated blood loss was 462.12 cc: an average of 1080 cc for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 315.8 cc for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average operative time was 137.7 minutes: an average of 205 minutes for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 119.1 minutes for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score was 21.7. There were no dislocations in the cohort. A constrained tripolar device can be safely used for oncological proximal femoral reconstructions while minimizing the risk of dislocation. Positioning of the acetabular implant in neutral anatomic version in conjunction with a neutral-placed femoral component provides the greatest range of motion, reduction of liner impingement, and improved hip stability. PMID:24679207

  9. RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF BONE TUNNEL POSITION IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY: COMPARISON BETWEEN THE OPEN TECHNIQUE AND ARTHROSCOPY VIA AN ANTEROMEDIAL PORTAL

    PubMed Central

    Dambrós, Jean Marcel; Florêncio, Rodrigo; Júnior, Osmar Valadão Lopes; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare bone tunnel positioning in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery using the arthroscopic technique and the open technique consisting of arthrotomy. Method: A comparative retrospective study on 70 patients with ACL lesions was conducted. Thirty-five patients underwent ACL reconstruction by means of the open technique and 35 by means of the arthroscopic technique using an anteromedial portal. All the patients underwent ACL reconstruction using an autologous graft from the middle third of the patellar tendon, fixed using interference screws. The postoperative radiographs were reviewed and the positioning of the femoral tunnel was evaluated using the methods proposed by Harner et al. and Aglietti et al., while the tibial tunnel was assessed using the method proposed by Rauschning and Stäubli. Results: Fifty-four of the patients were male and 16 were female. Their mean age at the time of the procedure was 34 years and 3 months, with a range from 17 to 58 years. The arthroscopic technique was shown to be more accurate than the open technique for positioning both the femoral and the tibial bone tunnels. Conclusions: Radiological analysis on the knees subjected to ACL reconstruction showed that the positioning of both the femoral and the tibial bone tunnels presented less variation when the surgery was performed arthroscopically. PMID:27027019

  10. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  11. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the base of your hand. It contains nerve and tendons. Sometimes, thickening from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms usually start gradually. As ...

  12. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and nerves. One of these structures is the posterior tibial nerve, which is the focus of tarsal tunnel ... syndrome is a compression, or squeezing, on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms anywhere along the path ...

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... through NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine are investigating the effects of acupuncture on pain, loss of median nerve function, and changes in the brain associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, a ...

  14. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is the incriminating structure in carpal tunnel syndrome. As it increases in size, the pressures within the ... you can visualize the movement of the tendons as I move the fingers, the tendons are gliding ...

  15. Carpal tunnel biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative ... Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... also need to make changes in your work duties or home and sports activities. Some of the ... Call for an appointment with your provider if: You have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome Your symptoms ...

  17. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in a magnetic tunnel junction with half-metallic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) is the difference in resistance of a magnetic tunnel junction due to a change in magnetization direction of one or both magnetic electrodes with respect to the flow of current. We present the results of first-principles density functional calculations of the TAMR effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with L a0.7S r0.3Mn O3 (LSMO) electrodes and a SrTi O3 (STO) tunneling barrier. We find an ˜500 % difference in resistance between magnetization in the plane and out of the plane. This large TAMR effect originates from the half-metallic nature of LSMO: When magnetization is out of plane spin-orbit coupling (SOC) contributions to the transmission come only from spin-flip scattering, which is intrinsically small due to the half-metallicity. For in-plane magnetization, however, there is a large non-spin-flip SOC contribution to the conductance. The large magnitude of the effect stems from the additional fact that there is an inherent polar discontinuity between LSMO and STO which leads to quasilocalized states at the interface whose influence on tunneling is strongly dependent on the magnetization orientation.

  18. Tunnelling in carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Hirvonen, Viivi; Wu, Chia-Hua; Tyberg, Joseph L; Allen, Wesley D; Schreiner, Peter R

    2016-06-14

    The cis,trans-conformer of carbonic acid (H2CO3), generated by near-infrared radiation, undergoes an unreported quantum mechanical tunnelling rotamerization with half-lives in cryogenic matrices of 4-20 h, depending on temperature and host material. First-principles quantum chemistry at high levels of theory gives a tunnelling half-life of about 1 h, quite near those measured for the fastest rotamerizations. PMID:27248671

  19. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  20. Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery during Proximal Femoral Nailing Following an Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Kook; Park, Junyoung; Oyunbat, Choidog; Kim, Taehwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we experienced a case where the diagnosis and management of a deep femoral artery rupture was delayed. This vascular complication occurred during the insertion of a distal interlocking screw of a proximal femoral nail for the fixation of an intertrochanteric femur fracture. A 79-year-old male patient was diagnosed with a right intertrochanteric fracture after a fall. We fixed the fracture with a proximal femoral nail (Zimmer® Natural Nail™ System). One day after the procedure, the patient complained of pain and swelling on the anteromedial side of his middle thigh followed by hypotension, anemia and prolonged thigh swelling. Computed tomography angiography was performed 7 days after the procedure. We found a pseudoaneurysm of the perforating artery caused by injury to the deep femoral artery and an intramuscular hematoma in the anterior thigh muscle. We successfully treated the pseudoaneurysm using coil embolization. Throughout the management of intertrochanteric femoral fractures, it is important to be aware and monitor signs and symptoms related to the possibility of blood vessel damage. When a patient presents with swelling and pain on the middle thigh and/or unexplained anemia postoperatively, the possibility that these symptoms are caused by an injury to the femoral artery must be considered.

  1. Seasonal variation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Douglas, A Stuart

    2002-01-01

    During the 18-year period 1980-1997, 1103 patients were treated as in-patients for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in Scottish hospitals. This paper reports a significant seasonal variation, especially in male patients, with an excess admitted in the autumn. Examining the physiological seasonality of the monthly increment of growth in height and weight in childhood, we hypothesised that these physiological rhythms, while not pathogenetic, may be responsible for the timing of the seasonal features of SCFE. Previously published studies suggest that the average time between first symptoms and diagnosis is 3 to 5 months. The condition may start with the spring peak in growth and become more symptomatic with the autumn peak in weight. In conclusion, we report a new epidemiological finding, but, in accordance with other studies, we cannot provide a certain aetiological explanation. The timing, but not the pathogenesis, of admission to hospital for a SCFE might be related to the timing in the year of seasonal increments of height in spring and weight in autumn. It is tempting to draw attention to associations with environmental features. For example, in autumn there is the most rapid annual fall in temperature, and the hours of darkness are increasing from the autumn equinox to the winter solstice. However, there is no reason to conclude that these associations have anything to do with aetiology. PMID:11866078

  2. Intraosseous Lipoma of the Femor: Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Hadi Rokni; Rasouli, Bahman; Borhani, Ali; Noorollahi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous lipoma is a rare benign bone disease. Long and cancellous bones are the most locationsthat can be affected. Almost all lesions were discovered incidentally on imaging modalities that were done during an unrelated investigation. As it is rare, it may be mistaken for nonossifying fibroma, aneurismal bone cyst, simple bone cyst, bone infarct or chondroid tumors. Recently with the high quality imaging modalities such as CT scan and/or MR imaging, the diagnosis of intramedullary lipoma and some other bone lesions can be done without the need for bone biopsy and surgery. Case Report: We’re reporting a rare case of intraosseous lipoma of the distal femur. Plain film radiography showed barely visible medullary expansion and lucency in the distal left femoral diaphysis. The patient underwent further evaluation with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI). According to the MRI and CT scan findings, intraosseous lipoma was confirmed and the need for more diagnostic tests were eliminated. Conclusion: Although Intraosseous lipoma doesn’t have any manifestations clinically but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone pains. MRI has an important role in characterization of soft tissue and bone marrow lesions therefore non-surgical approach for most of the patients with intraosseous lipoma would be beneficial. PMID:27298943

  3. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  4. 'Oxide-free' tip for scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, R. J.; Baker, S. M.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new tip for scanning tunneling microscopy and a tip repair procedure that allows one to reproducibly obtain atomic images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with previously inoperable tips are reported. The tips are shown to be relatively oxide-free and highly resistant to oxidation. The tips are fabricated with graphite by two distinct methods.

  5. Femoral articular shape and geometry. A three-dimensional computerized analysis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Siu, D; Rudan, J; Wevers, H W; Griffiths, P

    1996-02-01

    An average, three-dimensional anatomic shape and geometry of the distal femur were generated from x-ray computed tomography data of five fresh asymptomatic cadaver knees using AutoCAD (AutoDesk, Sausalito, CA), a computer-aided design and drafting software. Each femur model was graphically repositioned to a standardized orientation using a series of alignment templates and scaled to a nominal size of 85 mm in mediolateral and 73 mm in anteroposterior dimensions. An average generic shape of the distal femur was synthesized by combining these pseudosolid models and reslicing the composite structure at different elevations using clipping and smoothing techniques in interactive computer graphics. The resulting distal femoral geometry was imported into a computer-aided manufacturing system, and anatomic prototypes of the distal femur were produced. Quantitative geometric analyses of the generic femur in the coronal and transverse planes revealed definite condylar camber (3 degrees-6 degrees) and toe-in (8 degrees-10 degrees) with an oblique patellofemoral groove (15 degrees) with respect to the mechanical axis of the femur. In the sagittal plane, each condyle could be approximated by three concatenated circular arcs (anterior, distal, and posterior) with slope continuity and a single arc for the patellofemoral groove. The results of this study may have important implications in future femoral prosthesis design and clinical applications. PMID:8648311

  6. Management of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures by distal femoral locking plate: A retrospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, Rajiv; Marya, SKS; Singh, Chandeep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures is difficult. Osteoporosis, comminution and bone loss, compromise stability with delayed mobility and poor functional outcomes. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with anatomic distal femoral (DF) locking plate permits early mobilization. However, this usually necessitates bone grafting (BG). Biological fixation using minimally invasive techniques minimizes periosteal stripping and morbidity. Materials and Methods: 31 patients with comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures were reviewed retrospectively from October 2006 to September 2012. All patients underwent fixation using a DF locking compression plate (Synthes). 17 patients underwent ORIF with primary BG, whereas 14 were treated by closed reduction (CR) and internal fixation using biological minimally invasive techniques. Clinical and radiological followup were recorded for an average 36 months. Results: Mean time to union for the entire group was 5.6 months (range 3-9 months). Patients of ORIF group took longer (Mean 6.4 months, range 4.5-9 months) than the CR group (mean 4.6 months, range 3-7 months). Three patients of ORIF and one in CR group had poor results. Mean knee society scores were higher for CR group at 6 months, but nearly identical at 12 months, with similar eventual range of motion. Discussion: Locked plating of comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures permits stable rigid fixation and early mobilization. Fixation using minimally invasive biological techniques minimizes morbidity and may obviate the need for primary BG. PMID:26015610

  7. Full circle: 3D femoral mapping demonstrates age-related changes that influence femoral implant positioning.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Damien; Surup, Timm; Petersik, Andreas; Kelly, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of the femur is important in the final position of an intramedullary implant; we hypothesised that the femoral geometry changes with age and this may predispose the elderly to anterior mal-positioning of these implants. We used CT DICOM data of 919 intact left femora and specialist software that allowed us to defined landmarks for measurement reference - such as the linea aspera - on a template bone that could be mapped automatically to the entire database. We found that older (>80 years) cortical bone is up to 1.5 mm thinner anteriorly and 2 mm thinner posteriorly than younger (<40 years) bone but the rate of change of posterior to anterior cortex thickness is greater in the older bone. We also found the isthmus in the elderly to be more distal and less substantial than in the younger bone. This study has demonstrated femoral geometry changes with age that may explain our perception that the elderly are at increased risk for anterior mal-positioning of intramedullary implants. PMID:26686594

  8. Radiological assessment of the femoral bowing in Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Ahmed Hamed Kassem; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Morsy, Ahmad Fawaz; Miwa, Shinji; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Rubio, Donnel A.; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Differences in the magnitude of bowing between races are well-known characteristics of the femur. Asian races have an increased magnitude of femoral bowing but most of the orthopedic implants designed for the femur do not match this exaggerated bowing. We calculated the sagittal and coronal femoral bowing in the Japanese population at different levels of the femur and addressed its surgical significance. Material and methods: We calculated the sagittal and coronal bowing of 132 Japanese femora using CT scan of the femur. A mathematical calculation of the radius of curvature at proximal, middle, and distal regions of the femur was used to determine the degree of femoral bowing. Results: Mean sagittal bowing of the femur was 581, 188, and 161 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the femur and mean lateral bowing was 528, 5092, and 876 mm, respectively. Mean sagittal and coronal bowing for the whole femur was 175 and 2640 mm, respectively. No correlation was found between age, gender, length of femur, and the degree of bowing. Conclusion: Our study reveals that femoral bowing in the Japanese population is 175 mm in the sagittal plane and 2640 mm in the coronal plane; these values are greater than the femoral bowing in other ethnic groups studied in the literature. This may result in varying degrees of mismatch between the western-manufactured femoral intramedullary implants and the Japanese femur. We recommend that orthopedic surgeons to accurately perform preoperative evaluation of the femoral bowing to avoid potential malalignment, rotation, and abnormal stresses between the femur and implant. PMID:27163091

  9. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, I. A. Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Popova, K. S. Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-17

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young’s modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220–265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  10. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Popova, K. S.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young's modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220-265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  11. ACL mismatch reconstructions: influence of different tunnel placement strategies in single-bundle ACL reconstructions on the knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Mirco; Lenschow, Simon; Fu, Freddie H; Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of tibial and femoral tunnel position in ACL reconstruction on knee kinematics, we compared ACL reconstruction with a tibial and femoral tunnel in anteromedial (AM-AM reconstruction) and in posterolateral footprint (PL-PL reconstruction) with a reconstruction technique with tibial posterolateral and femoral anteromedial tunnel placement (PL-AM reconstruction). In 9 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees, the knee kinematics under simulated Lachman (134 N anterior tibial load) and a simulated pivot shift test (10 N/m valgus and 4 N/m internal tibial torque) were determined at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. Kinematics were recorded for intact, ACL-deficient, and single-bundle ACL reconstructed knees using three different reconstruction strategies in randomized order: (1) PL-AM, (2) AM-AM and (3) PL-PL reconstructions. Under simulated Lachman test, single-bundle PL-AM reconstruction and PL-PL reconstructions both showed significantly increased anterior tibial translation (ATT) at 60° and 90° when compared to the intact knee. At all flexion angles, AM-AM reconstruction did not show any statistical significant differences in ATT compared to the intact knee. Under simulated pivot shift, PL-AM reconstruction resulted in significantly higher ATT at 0°, 30°, and 60° knee flexion and AM-AM reconstructions showed significantly higher ATT at 30° compared to the intact knee. PL-PL reconstructions did not show any significant differences to the intact knee. AM-AM reconstructions restore the intact knee kinematics more closely when compared to a PL-AM technique resembling a transtibial approach. PL-PL reconstructions showed increased ATT at higher flexion angles, however, secured the rotational stability at all flexion angles. Due to the independent tibial and femoral tunnel location, a medial portal technique may be superior to a transtibial approach. PMID:20461359

  12. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

    PubMed

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R; Abrahamsen, Bo; Adler, Robert A; Brown, Thomas D; Cheung, Angela M; Cosman, Felicia; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Dell, Richard; Dempster, David; Einhorn, Thomas A; Genant, Harry K; Geusens, Piet; Klaushofer, Klaus; Koval, Kenneth; Lane, Joseph M; McKiernan, Fergus; McKinney, Ross; Ng, Alvin; Nieves, Jeri; O'Keefe, Regis; Papapoulos, Socrates; Sen, Howe Tet; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Weinstein, Robert S; Whyte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete atypical femoral fractures and recommends that all major features, including their location in the subtrochanteric region and femoral shaft, transverse or short oblique orientation, minimal or no associated trauma, a medial spike when the fracture is complete, and absence of comminution, be present to designate a femoral fracture as atypical. Minor features include their association with cortical thickening, a periosteal reaction of the lateral cortex, prodromal pain, bilaterality, delayed healing, comorbid conditions, and concomitant drug exposures, including BPs, other antiresorptive agents, glucocorticoids, and proton pump inhibitors. Preclinical data evaluating the effects of BPs on collagen cross-linking and maturation, accumulation of microdamage and advanced glycation end products, mineralization, remodeling, vascularity, and angiogenesis lend biologic plausibility to a potential association with long-term BP use. Based on published and unpublished data and the widespread use of BPs, the incidence of atypical femoral fractures associated with BP therapy for osteoporosis appears to be very low, particularly compared with the number of vertebral, hip, and other fractures that are prevented by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of

  13. Industrial Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasor, Leslie; Brooks, Valerie

    These eight modules for an industrial orientation class were developed by a project to design an interdisciplinary program of basic skills training for disadvantaged students in a Construction Technology Program (see Note). The Drafting module overviews drafting career opportunities, job markets, salaries, educational requirements, and basic…

  14. Application of a medial buttress plate may prevent many treatment failures seen after fixation of vertical femoral neck fractures in young adults.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hassan; Collinge, Cory

    2015-05-01

    Femoral neck fractures in young adults with normal bone are mostly vertically oriented and may have variable amounts of comminution, which result from shearing forces during high-energy trauma. These factors play a role in the high rate of complications after this injury, including nonunion, malunion, failure of fixation, and avascular necrosis. These problems often occur together and inter-relate, for example, nonunion or malunion frequently result from fixation failure and varus collapse of the femoral head after reconstruction. The orthopaedic surgeon's goals of obtaining and maintaining anatomic reduction until bony union have been addressed by a number of surgical approaches and fixation constructs, however, complications are still common and no consensus exists on how these problematic fractures may be best treated. For optimal treatment of vertical femoral neck fractures, anatomic reduction must be achieved and fixation must be able to resist the high shear forces across the fracture with hip motion, weight-bearing, and muscle tone. Buttress plate fixation is a common method for stabilizing fractures that require resistance to shear forces and stands as one of the basic principles of fracture care. This technique has not been widely applied to this injury pattern. We propose that the concepts of modern fracture care should be applied together for vertical femoral neck fractures in young adults. Specifically, we propose that anatomic reduction and fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures with the addition of a medial buttress plate to resist shearing forces will improve on the historically high rate of complications after these difficult injuries. PMID:25744726

  15. Single Electron Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-07-25

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  17. 20-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Construction of a typical model used in the 20-Foot Spin Tunnel. >From 'Characteristics of Nine Research Wind Tunnels of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory': 'Dynamic models are used for free-spinning tunnel tests. A dynamic model is one for which geometric similarity between model and airplane is extended to obtain geometric similarity of the paths of motion of corresponding points by maintaining constant, in addition to the scale ratio of linear dimensions, three other ratios, that of force, mass, and time. In model testing, however, complete similarity can generally not be duplicated and some compromise is necessary. For free-spinning-model tests in the NACA 20-foot tunnel, the ratio of inertia to frictional or viscous forces (Reynolds number) is not maintained constant, but the ratio of inertia to gravity forces (Froude number) is maintained constant.' 'Models used in the spin tunnel until recently [this report was written in 1957] were made primarily of balsa and reinforced with hardwood. Now, plastic models are being used almost entirely, because they are more durable and when properly constructed are no heavier than balsa models. The models are constructed accurately to scale by pressing plastic material and class cloth into a previously constructed mold. A typical mod is shown in [this picture]. The model is swung as a torsional pendulum and is ballasted to obtain dynamic similarity by placing lead weights in suitable locations within the model wings and fuselage. Corrections are made for the effect of ambient and entrapped air.'

  18. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  19. [Delayed hypoxia after the surgical correction of femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Goh, R; Mori, K; Abe, T; Kohyama, A; Minato, A

    1996-11-01

    We investigated perioperative blood gas changes in 26 patients scheduled for surgical correction of femoral neck fracture under epidural anesthesia. Arterial blood gases during spontaneous air respiration were measured eight times during the femoral neck prosthetic replacements (n = 16), and four times during osteosynthesis (n = 10). In the patients who received femoral neck replacements using bone cement (n = 8), arterial oxygen tension decreased significantly four hours after insertion of prosthesis, and did not recover during two postoperative days. In contrast, in the patients who received cementless femoral neck replacements (n = 8), arterial oxygen tension tended to decrease but not significantly, and returned to normal on the second postoperative day. In the patients who received osteosynthesis, arterial oxygen tension did not change. We suspected that the causes of delayed hypoxia in the femoral neck replacements were vascular endothelial cell injury in the lung by free fatty acid originating from fat embolism, and/or microthrombosis resulting from activated coagulation system. Bone cement was thought to intensify fat embolism because of elevated intramedullary pressure in the femur. PMID:8953864

  20. East portal of Tunnel No. 1292, Indigo Tunnel, showing interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East portal of Tunnel No. 1292, Indigo Tunnel, showing interior timber framing, looking southwest. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  1. West portal of Tunnel No. 1292, Indigo Tunnel at milepost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West portal of Tunnel No. 1292, Indigo Tunnel at milepost 129.95, largely obscured by overgrowth. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  2. View of entrance tunnel. Tunnel right to Control Center, left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of entrance tunnel. Tunnel right to Control Center, left to Antenna Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R.B.; Antiochos, S.K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of {ital orthogonal} magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can {open_quotes}tunnel{close_quotes} through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch {gt}1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, {ge}2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and {open_quotes}pass{close_quotes} through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  5. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  6. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Antiochos, S. K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can ``tunnel'' through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >>1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, >=2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and ``pass'' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  7. View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and walkway of metal grating, side tunnel to tank 3 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Diesel Purification Plant, North Road near Pierce Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Rapid resolution of femoral head osteonecrosis after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Masahiko; Matsuda, Keiji; Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Kim, Sungon; Maeda, Kouichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Kubota, Reiko; Hayashi, Kentaro; Nagayama, Masataka; Kaneko, Haruka

    2008-12-01

    The natural history of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is generally thought to be one of progressive deterioration if no intervention is undertaken. However, it is unknown whether surgical intervention is beneficial for patients with a small region of osteonecrosis. We observed rapid improvement of MRI findings after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) was performed in a young patient with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The band-like low signal area on T2-weighted images almost resolved by six months after surgery. He returned to work as an electrician by six months after surgery. Early surgical intervention such as RAO that alters the mechanical force acting on the necrotic region of the femoral head may accelerate the recovery of osteonecrosis and the improvement of symptoms. PMID:19384490

  9. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process. PMID:26927602

  10. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  11. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  12. High-speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1936-01-01

    Wind tunnel construction and design is discussed especially in relation to subsonic and supersonic speeds. Reynolds Numbers and the theory of compressible flows are also taken into consideration in designing new tunnels.

  13. Two-dimensional wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Information on the Japanese National Aerospace Laboratory two dimensional transonic wind tunnel, completed at the end of 1979 is presented. Its construction is discussed in detail, and the wind tunnel structure, operation, test results, and future plans are presented.

  14. Wind tunnel wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Barnwell, Richard W.; Kemp, William B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    About a decade ago, interest in alleviating wind tunnel wall interference was renewed by advances in computational aerodynamics, concepts of adaptive test section walls, and plans for high Reynolds number transonic test facilities. Selection of NASA Langley cryogenic concept for the National Transonic Facility (NTF) tended to focus the renewed wall interference efforts. A brief overview and current status of some Langley sponsored transonic wind tunnel wall interference research are presented. Included are continuing efforts in basic wall flow studies, wall interference assessment/correction procedures, and adaptive wall technology.

  15. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  16. Venting during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastases: current orthopedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Dalgorf, Dustin; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Stephen, David J.G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Reamed intramedullary nailing, recommended for impending fracture of a femur weakened by bone metastases, causes a rise in intramedullary pressure and increases the risk of a fat embolism syndrome. The pressure can be equalized by the technique of venting — drilling a hole into the distal cortex of the femur. Our objective was to study the current practice of orthopedic surgeons in Ontario with respect to venting during prophylactic intramedullary nailing for an impending femoral fracture due to bone metastases. Methods We mailed a questionnaire to all orthopedic surgeons from the Province of Ontario listed in the 1999 Canadian Medical Directory or on the Canadian Orthopaedic Association membership list, asking if they vent when prophylactically nailing an impending pathologic femoral fracture. The responses were modelled as a function of surgeon volume and year of graduation. Results Of the 415 surveys mailed, 223 (54%) surgeons responded. Of these, 81% reported having prophylactically treated a femoral metastatic lesion during the previous year; 67% treated 1 to 3 metastatic lesions and 14% treated more than 3; 19% did not treat a metastatic femoral lesion prophylactically. Over two-thirds of surgeons had never considered venting, whereas one-third always or sometimes vented the femoral canal. More recent graduates were 3 times more likely to vent than earlier (before 1980) graduates (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–6.5) as were those who treat a greater number of impending fractures (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.7). Conclusions Although there is a theoretical rationale for routine venting, there is disagreement among Ontario orthopedic surgeons regarding the use of this technique during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastatic lesions. Prospective evidence will be required to warrant a change in the standard of care. PMID:14680349

  17. Biophysical stimulation in osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Massari; Milena, Fini; Ruggero, Cadossi; Stefania, Setti; GianCarlo, Traina

    2009-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is the endpoint of a disease process that results from insufficient blood flow and bone-tissue necrosis, leading to joint instability, collapse of the femoral head, arthritis of the joint, and total hip replacement. Pain is the most frequent clinical symptom. Both bone tissue and cartilage suffer when osteonecrosis of the femoral head develops. Stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been shown to be useful for enhancing bone repair and for exerting a chondroprotective effect on articular cartilage. Two Italian studies on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with PEMFs were presented in this review. In the first study, 68 patients suffering from avascular necrosis of the femoral head were treated with PEMFs in combination with core decompression and autologous bone grafts. The second one is a retrospective analysis of the results of treatment with PEMFs of 76 hips in 66 patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. In both studies clinical information and diagnostic imaging were collected at the beginning of the treatment and at the time of follow up. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test. Both authors hypothesize that the short-term effect of PEMF stimulation may be to protect the articular cartilage from the catabolic effect of inflammation and subchondral bone-marrow edema. The long-term effect of PEMF stimulation may be to promote osteogenic activity at the necrotic area and prevent trabecular fracture and subchondral bone collapse. PEMF stimulation represents an important therapeutic opportunity to resolve the Ficat stage-I or II disease or at least to delay the time until joint replacement becomes necessary. PMID:19753174

  18. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve. PMID:24972443

  19. How to Minimize Rotational Conflict between Femoral & Tibial Component in Total Knee Arthroplasty: The Use of Femoro-Tibial Axial Synchronizer (Linker)

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan; Kim, Sang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between rotational axes of femur and tibia with the use of Linker. Materials and Methods This study was carried out from August 2009 to February 2010 on 54 patients (106 knees), who were diagnosed with simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty. With the use of postoperative computed tomography scans, it was investigated how much the rotational angle of femoral and tibial components matched. Results The tibial component was internally rotated for the femoral component at an angle of 0.8°. The femoral component was externally rotated for the surgical transepicondylar axis (TEA) at an angle of 1.6 (range: from 4.8° of internal rotation to 7.9° of external rotation, SD=2.2°), and the tibial component was externally rotated for the surgical TEA at an average angle of 0.9 (range: from 5.1° of internal rotation to 8.3° of external rotation, SD=3.1°). Conclusion The femoro-tibial synchronizer helped to improve the orientation and positioning of both femoral component and tibial component, and also increase the correlation of the rotational axes of the two components. PMID:25683995

  20. Patellofemoral dysbalance due to femoral deformities - diagnostic, therapy and results

    PubMed Central

    Dickschas, Jörg; Strecker, Wolf; Harrer, Jörg; Ferner, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Anterior knee pain or patellofemoral instability are typical symptoms of patellofemoral dysbalance. Beside other reasons, this pathology can be caused by a femoral deformity. The two dimensions leading to this problems are torsional- and valgus deformities. This constellation often stays unrecognized. When diagnosed and analyzed, a femoral torsional or varization-osteotomy is the adequate treatment. Aim of this study was to show the diagnostic approach, the gold standard of therapy and the follow up results. Can patellofemoral stability be archived? Is the pain relief significant and how do clinical scores develop at the follow up? Materials and Methods: 33 femoral torsional osteotomies and 18 femoral varization osteotomies were included in this study, 5 of these were combined femoral varization and torsional corrections so that 46 knees are included in 41 patients, as 5 patients were operated on both legs. Major symptoms were patellofemoral dislocations in 28 cases and anterior knee pain in 26 cases. Beside clinical and radiographic evaluation full weight bearing long leg views and a torsional computertomography was always performed. Follow up examination was after 41 (6-113) months. Visual analog scala score, Japanese Knee Society Score, Tegner activity score and Lysholm score were taken before surgery and at the follow up. Results: Mechanical femorotibial valgus was on average 6,4° (5°-10°), femoral internal torsion was in average 40,9° (29°-66°; normal: 24°). Surgical treatment was performed with an arthroscopy followed by an acute femoral varization 7,2°(5°-10°) and / or external torsion osteotomy of 13.8° (5°-26°). Tegner activity score, Japanese knee society score and Lysholm score all significantly improved. Pain relief could be demonstrated as shown by a significant decrease of the VAS score. No further dislocation was reported during the follow up period. Conclusion: Valgus or torsional deformities of the femur frequently

  1. Parallel manipulator robot assisted femoral fracture reduction on traction table.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Wang, J Q; Han, W

    2013-01-01

    The principle of femoral shaft fracture reduction is to restore its pre-fractured limb length and mechanical axis. The current documented treatment method with traction table reduction does not conform to the quantitative alignment and reduction. There is also a great amount of X-Ray radiation exposure to both surgeon and patient during the procedure. For this reason, we introduced an innovated Parallel Manipulator Robot (PMR) application: A Femoral Shaft Fracture Reduction with Parallel Manipulator Robot on Traction Table. With this application, the quantitative control on fracture reduction and alignment can be achieved and the radiation exposure to both surgeons and patients can be greatly reduced. PMID:24110820

  2. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  3. Bone SPECT/CT of Femoral Head Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Goro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-09-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head may be confused with osteonecrosis, mainly because of radiological overlap. SPECT/CT with Tc-99 m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate images in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those from 11 patients with symptomatic early osteonecrosis. In all of the hips with subchondral insufficiency fracture, SPECT/CT showed increased uptake at the subchondral lesions of the femoral head. On the other hand, in all of the hips with osteonecrosis, absence of uptake was confirmed at the subchondral lesions. SPECT/CT may assist in differentiating subchondral insufficiency fracture from osteonecrosis. PMID:26164176

  4. Traumatic Hip Dislocation with Associated Femoral Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dortaj, H.; Emamifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip is a critical injury that results from high-energy trauma. This paper describes a case of posterior dislocation of the right hip in a 35-year-old woman with associated ipsilateral femoral head fracture. Initial treatment included reduction of the right hip through posterior approach and fixation of the femoral head fracture with three absorbable screws. After 15-month follow-up, a full range of motion has been achieved and there are no signs of avascular necrosis, hip instability, or limping. The authors describe their method of surgery. PMID:25874147

  5. A rare case of femoral herniation of female internal genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Ambedkar, Vivek; Singh, Abhilash; Bain, Jayanta; Singh, Lal Mani

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case with herniation of the uterus, fallopian tube, and ovary in a femoral hernia. A female patient was admitted with complain of the painful lump in the left groin. Clinical examination indicated strangulated femoral hernia, which necessitated an emergency surgery. During surgical procedure, the uterine tube, left fallopian tube and left ovary, were observed as the contents of the hernia. The contents were reduced back into the pelvic cavity, and the hernia was repaired. The patient made good recovery postsurgery. PMID:26283851

  6. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  7. Failure load of patellar tendon grafts at the femoral side: 10- versus 20-mm-bone blocks.

    PubMed

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Niggebrugge, Marnix J N; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether use of short bone blocks is safe in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Our hypothesis was that the smaller 10-mm-length bone blocks will fail at lower loads than 20-mm-bone blocks. Ten paired human cadaver knees were randomly assigned to the 10- or 20-mm group (group 1 and 2) and underwent bone-patellar tendon-bone femoral fixation with interference screw. Tensile tests were performed using a tensile testing machine (Instron). Stiffness, failure load and failure mode were recorded. Median stiffness was 72 N/mm (16-103) for 10-mm-bone blocks and 91 N/mm (40-130) for 20-mm-bone blocks. Median failure loads were 402 N (87-546) for 10-mm-long bone block and 456 N (163-636) for 20-mm-bone blocks. There was no statistically significant difference between groups (P = 0.35). All bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts were pulled out of the femoral tunnel with interference screw, due to slippage. We concluded that a 10-mm-long bone block was not significantly weaker than a 20-mm-long bone block. Failure loads of a 10-mm-bone block exceeded loading values at passive and active extension of the knee under normal conditions. Ten millimetre bone blocks offered sufficient fixation strength in ACL reconstruction. PMID:18839146

  8. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  9. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  20. Magnetic Fluxtube Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos,, Spiro K.; Norton, D.

    1996-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of two initially orthogonal, twisted, force free field magnetic fluxtubes. The simulations were carried out using a new three dimensional explicit parallelized Fourier collocation algorithm for solving the viscoresistive equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the fluxtubes can 'tunnel' through each other. Two key conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch much greater than 1, and the magnetic Lundquist number must be somewhat large, greater than or equal to 2880. This tunneling behavior has not been seen previously in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic fluxtube interactions. An examination of magnetic field lines shows that tunneling is due to a double reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections and 'pass' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  1. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  2. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  3. Wind Tunnel Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P; Norton, F H

    1920-01-01

    Report embodies a description of the balance designed and constructed for the use of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field, and also deals with the theory of sensitivity of balances and with the errors to which wind tunnel balances of various types are subject.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  5. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  6. The critical current of point symmetric Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations. The shape of the junction determines the specific form of the magnetic-field dependence of its Josephson current. Here we address the magnetic diffraction patterns of specially shaped planar Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations. We focus on a wide ensemble of junctions whose shape is invariant under point reflection. We analyze the implications of this type of isometry and derive the threshold curves of junctions whose shape is the union or the relative complement of two point symmetric plane figures.

  7. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  8. Low-disturbance wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckwith, I. E.; Applin, Z. T.; Stainback, P. C.; Maestrello, L.

    1986-01-01

    During the past years, there was an extensive program under way at the Langley Research Center to upgrade the flow quality in several of the large wind tunnels. This effort has resulted in significant improvements in flow quality in these tunnels and has also increased the understanding of how and where changes in existing and new wind tunnels are most likely to yield the desired improvements. As part of this ongoing program, flow disturbance levels and spectra were measured in several Langley tunnels before and after modifications were made to reduce acoustic and vorticity fluctuations. A brief description of these disturbance control features is given for the Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, the 4 x 7 Meter Tunnel, and the 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. To illustrate typical reductions in disturbance levels obtained in these tunnels, data from hot-wire or acoustic sensors are presented. A concept for a subsonic quiet tunnel designed to study boundary layer stability and transition is also presented. Techniques developed at Langley in recent years to eliminate the high intensity and high-frequency acoustic disturbances present in all previous supersonic wind tunnels are described. In conclusion, the low-disturbance levels present in atmospheric flight can now be simulated in wind tunnels over the speed range from low subsonic through high supersonic.

  9. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  10. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  11. Unusual Foreign Bone Fragment in Femoral Open Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Hanon; Arti, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Femoral shaft fracture is one of the typical bone fractures due to high energy trauma and may occur as an open fracture. Some foreign materials may enter the fracture site such as sand, cloth particles and so on. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old motorcycle riding military member and his collaborator were received in the hospital because of multiple traumas due to a fall in a hollow during a surveillance mission. His collaborator died because of head trauma and multiple severe open fractures. When fixing the patients femoral fracture, a large femoral butterfly fragment was removed from the patient’s thigh as a foreign segment. The patient’s femur was fixed with a plate and screws. No femoral defect was detected during surgery or post-operative X-rays and CT scan. The removed segment was not a part of the patient’s femur. Conclusions: Surgical and post-surgical findings showed that this segment was not related to the patient’s femur. The foreign segment may have belonged to the other victim of this trauma.

  12. Chronic common femoral vein occlusion secondary to endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Keldahl, Mark L.; Rodriguez, Heron E.

    2016-01-01

    Venous occlusion is sometimes caused by external compression due to adjacent masses. Endometriosis, the presence of functioning endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, is a rare cause of venous occlusion. We report a case of chronic common femoral vein occlusion due to endomctrioma causing severe leg edema and groin pain that was treated with resection and venous bypass. PMID:26993188

  13. Rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Daniele Antonio; Iapicca, Mario Luigi; Gotti, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    We describe here various surgical options to obtain a correct rotational alignment of femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The correct rotational alignment is the key point to obtain a rectangular balanced flexion gap as well to have a good patellar tracking. For that reason, rotation alignment largely affects postoperative kinematic results particularly during flexion. PMID:26855940

  14. Spontaneous capital femoral physeal fracture in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Galya

    2013-01-01

    A young neutered male cat was presented with a 1-week history of left hind limb lameness. Pain and crepitus were identified on manipulation of the left coxofemoral joint. Radiographic evaluation led to the diagnosis of physeal dysplasia with slipped capital femoral epiphysis of the left femur, which did not respond to conservative management. PMID:24155467

  15. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In the second paper of this series, the effect of transverse femoral stresses due to locomotion in theropod dinosaurs of different sizes was examined for the case of an unchanging leg geometry. Students are invariably thrilled to learn about theropod dinosaurs, and this activity applies the concepts of torque and stress to the issue of theropod…

  16. Does vitamin D affect femoral cartilage thickness? An ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Malas, Fevziye Unsal; Kara, Murat; Aktekin, Lale; Ersöz, Murat; Ozçakar, Levent

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the association between vitamin D levels and distal femoral cartilage thickness in healthy subjects. Eighty patients who were admitted to our outpatient clinic between May and July 2013 were classified into three subgroups according to their 25-OH vitamin D levels of <10, 10-20, and ≥20 ng/mL. Distal femoral cartilage thickness was measured from the midpoints of the right medial condyle (RMC), right lateral condyle (RLC), right intercondylar area (RIA), left medial condyle (LMC), left lateral condyle (LLC), and left intercondylar area (LIA) by using musculoskeletal ultrasound (US). The group with severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/mL) had thinner femoral cartilage thickness at LMC (p = 0.005). Positive correlations were determined only between vitamin D levels and US measurements in the severe vitamin D deficiency group at RLC (r = 444, p = 0.020), LMC (r = 357, p = 0.067), and LLC (r = 568, p = 0.002). Low levels of vitamin D seem to affect the femoral cartilage thickness, adversely. Further studies are necessary to ascertain the clinical relevance of this change in cartilage thickness and whether vitamin D supplementation can reverse the cartilage thinning process or the allied clinical symptoms in the course of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24221506

  17. Distal Femoral Oblique Fracture in a Young Male Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David Naji; Al Khateeb, Hesham; Safwat, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here, we report a case of a distal femoral fracture in a 23-year-old male army cadet who presented to the Accident and Emergency department following a twisting injury while participating in a routine military marching exercise. A pathological fracture was considered but this suspicion was put to rest following thorough investigations, leaving only a diagnosis of a nontraumatic spontaneous femoral fracture. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of distal femoral fractures associated with nontraumatic military exercises, with the majority of injuries instead related to stress fractures. A vigilant literature search yielded no cases of similar injury nature, which is the primary reason we believe that those interested in orthopaedics or military doctors would find themselves drawn to this case. The patient presented with severe pain in his left thigh and on examination there was a deformity of his left thigh. In terms of investigations, a bone profile, plain film radiographs, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and tumor markers were all preformed and proved unremarkable. The definitive treatment was by open reduction and internal fixation. Femoral fractures often require significant amounts of force, particularly in young, healthy individuals. Generally, these injuries in this demographic follow high-energy traumas, with the lion's share occurring following a road traffic accident or other high-speed impact. More often than not, the treatment is surgical. Given the extraordinary manner of this such, one must be attentive and exhaustive in their investigation of such presentations. PMID:27258509

  18. Postmortem angiography using femoral cannulation and postmortem microbiology.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Egger, Coraline; Grabherr, Silke; Jaton-Ogay, Katia; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Despite the undeniable advantages of postmortem angiography, numerous questions have arisen concerning the influence that the injected contrast media may exercise on biological fluids and tissues collected for toxicological and biochemical investigations. Moreover, cardiac blood for microbiological investigations cannot be obtained post-angiography. In this study, we examined whether the peripheral blood collected prior to postmortem angiography, using percutaneous access to femoral vessels after skin surface disinfection, could be suitable for microbiological investigations when postmortem angiography with femoral vessel cannulation is also performed. A total of 66 cases were included in the study and were divided into two subgroups (angiography and bacteriology group, 33 cases and control group, 33 cases). Autopsies, histology, toxicology, bacteriology, and biochemical investigations (procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and soluble triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells type 1) were performed in all cases. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were noted, and identified category distribution (death unrelated to infection, true infection, false positive, and undetermined) was rather similar in both studied populations. These preliminary results suggest that postmortem angiography using a femoral approach does not constitute an impediment to the collection of peripheral blood for microbiology and vice versa. Moreover, the use of femoral blood for microbiology does not lead to an increased risk of doubtful results. PMID:25381195

  19. Risk factors in selected patients undergoing femoral embolectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D. J.; Davies, A. H.; Horrocks, M.

    1989-01-01

    Mortality rates after femoral embolectomy (FE) in patients with an acutely ischaemic leg vary from 20-40%. In the last 3 years we have adopted a policy of proceeding directly to femoral embolectomy in those patients with a strong clinical suspicion of an embolus. Where doubt exists about the diagnosis, arteriography is performed in combination with local streptokinase, balloon dilatation and/or reconstruction. In a prospective study between September 1984 and March 1987, 43 patients underwent femoral embolectomy with a limb salvage rate of 87%. The early mortality (within 30 days) was 16%, the late mortality was 26%, with a mean follow-up of 22 months. Of the seven patients who died within 30 days, one had a successful embolectomy but died from a cerebrovascular accident. The remaining six failed to improve clinically, all had poor backbleeding and no return of the peripheral pulses. None of these patients had an amputation. We recommend that femoral embolectomy be performed in those patients with a short history of ischaemia (less than 72 h), a risk factor suggesting an embolic source and no past history of intermittent claudication. If all three criteria are not met, arteriography should be performed with a view to fibrinolytic therapy or vascular reconstruction. In those patients who have had a failed embolectomy or where the circulation cannot be restored promptly, despite fibrinolytic therapy and/or distal reconstruction, early major amputation may be life-saving. PMID:2774451

  20. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  1. Femoral mycotic aneurysm presenting as arthritis and purpura.

    PubMed

    Feldman, C; Mason, P; Jones, R R; Kelley, C

    1985-11-01

    A case is described with recurrent arthritis and skin rash confined to the right lower limb and exacerbated on each occasion by exercise. Investigation established this to be due to a mycotic aneurysm of the right common femoral artery. Treatment with excision and grafting and antibiotics resulted in full recovery. Mycotic aneurysm and the unusual presenting features in this case are discussed. PMID:3840709

  2. Hybrid Anterolateral Approach for Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Daniels, Alan H; Lareau, Craig R; Christino, Melissa A; Kane, Patrick M; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2015-07-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures in physiologically young patients are best treated with anatomic reduction and stable fixation. Several surgical approaches to the femoral neck have previously been described, although they are fraught with disadvantages such as poor visualization, the need for 2 incisions, and risk of injury to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and branches of the medial femoral circumflex artery. The authors' hybrid anterolateral approach to the hip allows for excellent visualization of femoral neck fractures and for placement of plate and/or screw constructs through a single incision. This surgical technique additionally minimizes risk to neurovascular structures. PMID:26186310

  3. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  4. Femoral head diameter considerations for primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Girard, J

    2015-02-01

    The configuration of total hip arthroplasty (THA) implants has constantly evolved since they were first introduced. One of the key components of THA design is the diameter of the prosthetic femoral head. It has been well established that the risk of dislocation is lower as the head diameter increases. But head diameter impacts other variables beyond joint stability: wear, cam-type impingement, range of motion, restoration of biomechanics, proprioception and groin pain. The introduction of highly cross-linked polyethylene and hard-on-hard bearings has allowed surgeons to implant large-diameter heads that almost completely eliminate the risk of dislocation. But as a result, cup liners have become thinner. With femoral head diameters up to 36 mm, the improvement in joint range of motion, delay in cam-type impingement and reduction in dislocation risk have been clearly demonstrated. Conversely, large-diameter heads do not provide any additional improvements. If an "ecologically sound" approach to hip replacement is embraced (e.g. keeping the native femoral head diameter), hip resurfacing with a metal-on-metal bearing must be carried out. The reliability of large-diameter femoral heads in the longer term is questionable. Large-diameter ceramic-on-ceramic bearings may be plagued by the same problems as metal-on-metal bearings: groin pain, squeaking, increased stiffness, irregular lubrication, acetabular loosening and notable friction at the Morse taper. These possibilities require us to be extra careful when using femoral heads with a diameter greater than 36 mm. PMID:25596984

  5. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-09-18

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  6. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  7. Techniques For Mass Production Of Tunneling Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Podosek, Judith A.; Reynolds, Joseph K.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Vote, Erika C.; Kaiser, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for mass production of tunneling electrodes developed from silicon-micromachining, lithographic patterning, and related microfabrication processes. Tunneling electrodes named because electrons travel between them by quantum-mechanical tunneling; tunneling electrodes integral parts of tunneling transducer/sensors, which act in conjunction with feedback circuitry to stabilize tunneling currents by maintaining electrode separations of order of 10 Angstrom. Essential parts of scanning tunneling microscopes and related instruments, and used as force and position transducers in novel microscopic accelerometers and infrared detectors.

  8. The effect of a twin tunnel on the propagation of ground-borne vibration from an underground railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.; Hussein, M. F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate predictions of ground-borne vibration levels in the vicinity of an underground railway are greatly sought after in modern urban centres. Yet the complexity involved in simulating the underground environment means that it is necessary to make simplifying assumptions about this system. One such commonly made assumption is to ignore the effects of neighbouring tunnels, despite the fact that many underground railway lines consist of twin-bored tunnels, one for the outbound direction and one for the inbound direction. This paper presents a unique model for two tunnels embedded in a homogeneous, elastic fullspace. Each of these tunnels is subject to both known, dynamic train forces and dynamic cavity forces. The net forces acting on the tunnels are written as the sum of those tractions acting on the invert of a single tunnel, and those tractions that represent the motion induced by the neighbouring tunnel. By apportioning the tractions in this way, the vibration response of a two-tunnel system is written as a linear combination of displacement fields produced by a single-tunnel system. Using Fourier decomposition, forces are partitioned into symmetric and antisymmetric modenumber components to minimise computation times. The significance of the interactions between two tunnels is quantified by calculating the insertion gains, in both the vertical and horizontal directions, that result from the existence of a second tunnel. The insertion-gain results are shown to be localised and highly dependent on frequency, tunnel orientation and tunnel thickness. At some locations, the magnitude of these insertion gains is greater than 20 dB. This demonstrates that a high degree of inaccuracy exists in any surface vibration prediction model that includes only one of the two tunnels. This novel two-tunnel solution represents a significant contribution to the existing body of research into vibration from underground railways, as it shows that the second tunnel has a significant

  9. Orienting hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed. PMID:25928677

  10. Resected femoral anthropometry for design of the femoral component of the total knee prosthesis in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dai-Soon; Han, Suhyoun; Han, Chang Whan

    2010-01-01

    We measured the mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) length, height and widths of the anterior, posterior and inferior section of the resected distal femurs using three dimensional computer tomographic measurements in 200 knees from 100 cadavers. We also calculated the aspect ratio (ML/AP) and compared the measured parameters with that of six conventionally used total knee femoral prostheses. We found that the average ML (70.2±5.5 mm) and AP (53.9±3.8 mm) dimensions from our study were lower than those reported from Western populations. The aspect ratio showed a progressive decline with an increasing antero-posterior dimension. All of the compared designs showed undersizing for the mediolateral dimension distally and for the widths of the resected medial and lateral posterior femoral condyles. But some of the compared designs showed oversizing for the height of the resected medial and lateral posterior femoral condyles. This study provides guidelines for designing a suitable femoral component for total knee prostheses that fit Asian populations. PMID:21212865

  11. 20-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1941-01-01

    The large structure on the left of the photograph is the Free-Spinning Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of modern airplanes are tested to determine their spinning characteristics and ability to recover from spins from movement of the control surfaces. From the information obtained in this manner, the spin recovery characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted. The large sphere on the right is 60 feet in diameter and houses the NACA 12-Foot Free-Flight Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of airplanes are flown in actual controlled flight to provide information from which the stability characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted.

  12. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  13. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  14. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L. L.

    1985-07-09

    A tunnel boring machine for controlled boring of a curvilinear tunnel including a rotating cutter wheel mounted on the forward end of a thrust cylinder assembly having a central longitudinal axis aligned with the cutter wheel axis of rotation; the thrust cylinder assembly comprising a cylinder barrel and an extendable and retractable thrust arm received therein. An anchoring assembly is pivotally attached to the rear end of the cylinder barrel for anchoring the machine during a cutting stroke and providing a rear end pivot axis during curved cutting strokes. A pair of laterally extending, extendable and retractable arms are fixedly mounted at a forward portion of the cylinder barrel for providing lateral displacement in a laterally curved cutting mode and for anchoring the machine between cutting strokes and during straight line boring. Forward and rear transverse displacement and support assemblies are provided to facilitate cutting in a transversely curved cutting mode and to facilitate machine movement between cutting strokes.

  15. Tunneling in Molecular Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Avinash

    This thesis is about the tunneling dynamics of the Fe8 molecule in the presence of an environment. Although a lot of progress has been made experimentally to determine among many things the extremely small tunnel splitting energies of this macromolecule, the question of how the environment affects the molecule has still not been properly understood. It is the purpose of this thesis to put forward a coherent model for the decoherence processes that affect the Fe8 molecule. The decoherence allows us to treat the Fe8 molecules as classical objects and we can write down rate equations that determine the relaxation dynamics of the entire Fe8 solid. The theoretical predictions are in very good agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of spherical samples. We believe that the model developed can be generalized to different geometries and also improvised to tackle the different experimental protocols that have been undertaken on these macroscopic molecules.

  16. On tunneling across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  17. Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel: In this aerial photograph of construction in the early 1950s, the return air passages are shown in the rear, center. This area was later covered with walls and a roof so that upon completion of the facility, it was not visible from the exterior. Three air storage spheres and the cooling tower are at the extreme right of the building. The spheres store dry air at 150 pounds per square inch. The cooling tower dissipates heat from coolers that control the test air temperature. One of many research facilities at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is used for experimental investigations at supersonic speeds.

  18. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  19. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel was built to study spinning characteristics of aircraft. It was an open throat tunnel capable of a maximum speed of 80 mph. NACA engineer Charles H. Zimmerman designed the tunnel starting in 1928. Construction was completed in December 1929. It was one of two tunnels which replaced the original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (The other was the 7x10-Foot Wind Tunnel.). In NACA TR 387 (p. 499), Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris report that 'the tunnel passages are constructed of 1/8-inch sheet iron, stiffened with angle iron and bolted together at the corners. The over-all dimensions are: Height 31 feet 2 inches; length, 20 feet 3 inches; width, 10 feet 3 inches.' The tunnel was partially constructed in the Langley hanger as indicated by the aircraft in the background. Published in NACA TR 387, 'The Vertical Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Carl J. Wenzinger and Thomas A. Harris, 1931.

  20. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Dillingham, R.G.; Hamburger, H.

    1982-09-14

    A tunneling machine is disclosed which includes a hollow shield, a nonrotatable outer housing mounted in the shield for longitudinal movement, and inner housing rotatably mounted within the outer housing, an excavator including a boom and bucket pivotally mounted on the forward end of the inner housing, and a boom cylinder having a forward portion pivotally engaged with the boom and a rear portion mounted at the rearward portion of the inner housing.

  1. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Installation of Full Scale Tunnel (FST) power plant. Virginia Public Service Company could not supply adequate electricity to run the wind tunnels being built at Langley. (The Propeller Research Tunnel was powered by two submarine diesel engines.) This led to the consideration of a number of different ideas for generating electric power to drive the fan motors in the FST. The main proposition involved two 3000 hp and two 1000 hp diesel engines with directly connected generators. Another, proposition suggested 30 Liberty motors driving 600 hp DC generators in pairs. For a month, engineers at Langley were hopeful they could secure additional diesel engines from decommissioned Navy T-boats but the Navy could not offer a firm commitment regarding the future status of the submarines. By mid-December 1929, Virginia Public Service Company had agreed to supply service to the field at the north end of the King Street Bridge connecting Hampton and Langley Field. Thus, new plans for FST powerplant and motors were made. Smith DeFrance described the motors in NACA TR No. 459: 'The most commonly used power plant for operating a wind tunnel is a direct-current motor and motor-generator set with Ward Leonard control system. For the FST it was found that alternating current slip-ring induction motors, together with satisfactory control equipment, could be purchased for approximately 30 percent less than the direct-current equipment. Two 4000-horsepower slip-ring induction motors with 24 steps of speed between 75 and 300 r.p.m. were therefore installed.'

  2. Giant spin-dependent thermoelectric effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiwei; Hehn, Michel; Chaput, Laurent; Negulescu, Béatrice; Andrieu, Stéphane; Montaigne, François; Mangin, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures and the so-called spin caloritronics are attracting much interest. Indeed it provides a new way to control and manipulate spin currents, which are key elements of spin-based electronics. Here we report on a giant magnetothermoelectric effect in a magnetic tunnel junction. The thermovoltage in this geometry can reach 1 mV. Moreover a magnetothermovoltage effect could be measured with ratio similar to the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio. The Seebeck coefficient can then be tuned by changing the relative magnetization orientation of the two magnetic layers in the tunnel junction. Therefore, our experiments extend the range of spintronic devices application to thermoelectricity and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of thermal spin transport. PMID:22434187

  3. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Schematic drawing of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: 'The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5%. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  4. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  5. Smart tunnel: Docking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schliesing, John A. (Inventor); Edenborough, Kevin L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A docking mechanism is presented for the docking of a space vehicle to a space station comprising a flexible tunnel frame structure which is deployable from the space station. The tunnel structure comprises a plurality of series connected frame sections, one end section of which is attached to the space station and the other end attached to a docking module of a configuration adapted for docking in the payload bay of the space vehicle. The docking module is provided with trunnions, adapted for latching engagement with latches installed in the vehicle payload bay and with hatch means connectable to a hatch of the crew cabin of the space vehicle. Each frame section comprises a pair of spaced ring members, interconnected by actuator-attenuator devices which are individually controllable by an automatic control means to impart relative movement of one ring member to the other in six degrees of freedom of motion. The control means includes computer logic responsive to sensor signals of range and attitude information, capture latch condition, structural loads, and actuator stroke for generating commands to the onboard flight control system and the individual actuator-attenuators to deploy the tunnel to effect a coupling with the space vehicle and space station after coupling. A tubular fluid-impervious liner, preferably fabric, is disposed through the frame sections of a size sufficient to accommodate the passage of personnel and cargo.

  6. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  7. Evaluating tunnel kiln performance

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, K.R.; Carty, W.M.; Ninos, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Process improvements in the production of whitewares provide the potential for substantial savings for manufacturers. A typical whiteware manufacturer incurs an annual defective product loss of {approximately}$20 million when accounting for raw materials, energy, labor and waste disposal. Reduction in defective product loss of 1% could result in a savings in excess of $1 million annually. This study was designed to establish benchmarks for two conventional tunnel kilns used to bisque-fire dinnerware at Buffalo China Inc. (Buffalo, NY). The benchmark was established by assessing the current conditions and variability of the two tunnel kilns as a function of the fracture strength of sample bars that were made from production body. Sample bars were fired in multiple locations in both kilns to assess the conditions and variability of firing within each kiln. Comparison of strength results between the two kilns also was assessed. These comparisons were accomplished through applied statistical analysis, wherein significant statistical variations were identified and isolated for both tunnel kilns. The statistical methods and tools used in this analysis are readily accessible to manufacturers, thus allowing implementation of similar analysis, or benchmarking, in-house.

  8. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  9. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation Versus Reverse Less Invasive Stabilization System-distal Femur for Treating Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, XinLong; Ma, JianXiong; Wang, Chen; Zhang, ChengBao; Han, Zhe; Sun, Lei; Lu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of 2 surgical techniques that are used to treat proximal femoral fractures. A systematic literature search (up to December 2014) was conducted in Medline, Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to screen for studies comparing proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) with less invasive stabilization system–distal femur (LISS-DF) for proximal femoral fractures. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and extracted data. Surgical information and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. A total of 7 studies with 361 patients who satisfied the eligibility criteria included 3 randomized controlled trials and 4 case-controlled trials associated with PFNA versus LISS in treating proximal femoral fractures. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant reduction in hospital stay and time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing for PFNA compared with LISS (odds ratio [OR] −1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.92 to −0.05; OR −7.08, 95% CI −8.32 to −5.84; OR −2.71, 95% CI −4.76 to 0.67). No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups for operative time, blood loss volume, Harris hip score, and incidence of complications. Based on the results of this analysis, we inferred that PFNA is safer and more effective than reverse LISS-DF in patients undergoing osteosynthesis for proximal femoral fractures, and that PFNA is associated with reduced hospital stays and reduced time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing. Nonetheless, in certain cases in which PFNA is not suitable due to abnormal structure of the proximal femur or particularly unstable fractures, the LISS plate technique could be a useful alternative. PMID:27057840

  10. Statistical Shape Modeling of Proximal Femoral Shape Deformities in Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease and Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elaine F.; Farnsworth, Christine L.; Koziol, James A.; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The current understanding of morphological deformities of the hip such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD), and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is based on 2-dimensional metrics, primarily involving the femoral head, that only partially describe the complex skeletal morphology. Objective This study aimed to improve the 3-dimensional understanding of shape variations during normal growth, and in LCPD and SCFE, through statistical shape modeling. Design Thirty-two patients with asymptomatic, LCPD, and SCFE hips, determined from physical and radiographic examination, were scanned using 3-D CT at a voxel size of (0.5–0.9mm)2 in-plane and 0.63mm slice thickness. Statistical shape modeling was performed on segmented proximal femoral surfaces to determine modes of variation and shape variables quantifying 3-D shape. In addition, conventional variables were determined for all femora. Results Proximal femur shape was described by 8 modes of variation and corresponding shape variables. Statistical shape variables were distinct with age and revealed coordinated, growth-associated differences in neck length-to-width ratio, femoral head medialization, and trochanter protrusion. After size and age-based shape adjustment, diseased proximal femora were characterized by shape variables distinct from those of asymptomatic hips. The shape variables defined morphology in health and disease, and were correlated with certain conventional variables of shape, including neck-shaft angle, head diameter, and neck diameter. Conclusion 3-D quantitative analyses of proximal femoral bone shape during growth and in disease are useful for furthering the understanding of normal and abnormal shape deviations which affect cartilage biomechanics and risk of developing osteoarthritis. PMID:23274103

  11. A new automatic landmark extraction framework on ultrasound images of femoral condyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Sibut, Agnès; Nakib, Amir; Petit, Eric; Leitner, François

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS), surgeons have to acquire some anatomical landmarks as inputs to the system. To do so, they use manual pointers that are localized in the Operating Room (OR) space using an infrared camera. When the needed landmark is not reachable through an opening, it is palpated directly on skin and there is a loss of precision that can vary from several millimeters to centimeters depending on the thickness of soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a new framework based on three main steps to register the bone surface and extract automatically anatomical landmarks with an ultrasound probe. This framework is based on an oriented gradient calculation, a simulated-compound and a contour closure using a graph representation. The oriented gradient allows extracting a set of pixels that probably belong to the bone surface. The simulatedcompound step allows using ultrasound images properties to define a set of small segments which may belong to the bone surface, and the graph representation allows eliminating false positive detection among remaining segments. The proposed method has been validated on a database of 230 ultrasound images of anterior femoral condyles (on the knee). The average computation time is 0.11 sec per image, and average errors are: 0.54 mm for the bone surface extraction, 0.31 mm for the condylar line, and 1.4 mm for the trochlea middle.

  12. Three Point Bending Test of Human Femoral Tissue: An Essay in Ancient and Modern Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Bárcenas, L. A.; Trejo-Camacho, H.; Suárez-Estrella, I.; Heredia, A.; Magaña, C.; Bucio, L.; Orozco, E.

    2003-09-01

    Some procedures for characterising the mechanical properties of femur diaphysis are reviewed here. We have used the three point bending test to measure the relative rupture modulus of ancient healthy human tissues (1250, 800, 614, and 185 years BP) as well as recent bones. The maximum resistance to fracture was measured applying a force (by a wedge) over the femoral inner surface. The maximum rupture strength was about 150 MPa for recent bone and decreased as the antiquity increased. The typical anisotropy that is observed in this kind of tissues is due to the anisotropical orientation of fibres as well as the textured orientation of the apatite crystals over the collagen fibres. Therefore we found that ancient bones show less fracture strength probably due to an abiotic crystal growth phenomenon during the diagenesis process. By LVSEM analysis we have found that in recent samples the fracture surface is irregular due to the crosslinking interactions between the collagen molecules, in comparison with the ancient samples, where a smooth surface is clearly appreciated as the antiquity of the sample increases. The results reported here strongly suggest that these composites should contain a fibrillar phase as a matrix constituted mainly by a natural polymer (i.e. collagen, cellulose, etc.). Moreover, this composite must have a minimum rupture strength of about 150 MPa.

  13. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  14. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. PMID:24741323

  15. Modified T-Graft for Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Patient with Small-Caliber Femoral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Daniel; El-Banayosy, Aly; Koerner, Michael M.; Reed, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is generally used as a last resort to provide cardiopulmonary support in patients whose advanced cardiac or respiratory failure does not respond to less invasive treatments. Lower-limb ischemia secondary to the large diameter of the arterial cannula is one of ECMO's major limitations: in patients who have small-caliber arteries, the cannulas can reduce native blood flow. The creation of a T-graft—a well-described technique to avoid limb ischemia—enables flow into the ECMO cannula without jeopardizing blood flow to the limb. However, leaving the graft exposed through an open groin wound can result in dislodgment, and it increases the risk of infection. We describe our modification of a conventional T-graft in an 18-year-old woman who had systolic heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and small-caliber femoral vessels. We tunneled a polytetrafluoroethylene graft inside a Dacron graft, then ran the combined graft through a subcutaneous tunnel similar to that created for a peripheral bypass. Thus, the graft was protected from environmental exposure and the risk of infection. Our technique seems safer and more secure than the original T-graft technique, and we recommend its consideration during ECMO cannulation. PMID:26664305

  16. Successful Return to Sport Following Distal Femoral Varus Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Voleti, Pramod Babu; Degen, Ryan; Tetreault, Danielle; Krych, Aaron John; Williams, Riley J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Distal femoral varus osteotomy is an effective treatment for unloading valgus knee malalignment; however, there is limited evidence on the ability for patients to return to athletics following this procedure. The purpose of this study is to report the functional outcomes and return to sport for athletic patients that underwent distal femoral varus osteotomy. Methods: A consecutive series of athletic patients that had undergone distal femoral varus osteotomy for symptomatic lateral compartment overload and valgus knee malalignment were prospectively reviewed. All patients had a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Radiographs were assessed to determine pre-operative and post-operative alignment. Details regarding sport of interest, ability to return to sport, and timing of return were obtained from the patients. Prospective institutional registries were utilized to collect pre-operative and post-operative Marx Activity Scale and International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC) scores; these values were compared using paired t-tests with p < 0.05 as the threshold for significance. Results: A total of 13 patients with a mean age of 24 years (range: 17-35) and a mean follow-up of 43 months (range: 24-74) were included in the study. Six patients underwent medial closing wedge osteotomy, and seven patients underwent lateral opening wedge osteotomy. The mean alignment correction was 8 degrees (range: 5-13). Nine patients underwent one or more concomitant procedures at the time of the osteotomy: 6 lateral femoral condyle osteochondral allografts, 2 partial lateral meniscectomies, 1 lateral meniscus allograft transplantation, and 1 revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. All patients were able to successfully return to their sport of choice (4 soccer, 2 softball, 2 running, 1 football, 1 basketball, 1 ice hockey, 1 volleyball, 1 rowing) at a mean of 11 months (range: 9-13). Furthermore, all 13 patients demonstrated an

  17. Differences in Femoral Geometry and Structure Due to Immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiratli, Beatrice Jenny; Yamada, M.; Smith, A.; Marcus, R. M.; Arnaud, S.; vanderMeulen, M. C. H.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Reduction in bone mass of the lower extremity is well documented in individuals with paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). The consequent osteopenia leads to elevated fracture risk with fractures occurring more commonly in the femoral shaft and supracondylar regions than the hip. A model has recently been described to estimate geometry and structure of the femoral midshaft from whole body scans by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Increases in femoral geometric and structural properties during growth were primarily related to mechanical loading as reflected by body mass. In this study, we investigate the relationship between body mass and femoral geometry and structure in adults with normal habitual mechanical loading patterns and those with severely reduced loading. The subjects were 78 ambulatory men (aged 20-72 yrs) and 113 men with complete paralysis from SCI of more than 4 years duration (aged 21 73 yrs). Subregional analysis was performed on DXA whole body scans to obtain bone mineral content (BMC, g), cortical thickness (cm), crosssectional moment of inertia (CSMI, cm4), and section modulus (cm3) of the femoral midshaft. All measured bone variables were significantly lower in SCI compared with ambulatory subjects: -29% (BMC), -33% (cortical thickness), -23% (CSMI), and -22% (section modulus) while body mass was not significantly different. However, the associations between body mass and bone properties were notably different; r2 values were higher for ambulatory than SCI subjects in regressions of body mass on BMC (0.48 vs 0.20), CSMI (0.59 vs 0.32), and section modulus (0.59 vs 0.31). No association was seen between body mass and cortical thickness for either group. The greatest difference between groups is in the femoral cortex, consistent with reduced bone mass via endosteal expansion. The relatively lesser difference in geometric and structural properties implies that there is less effect on mechanical integrity than would be expected from

  18. Comparison of short-term results of bone tunnel enlargement between EndoButton CL and cross-pin fixation systems after chronic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autologous quadrupled hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Kuskucu, S M

    2008-01-01

    We performed arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions of chronic ACL rupture with autologous hamstring tendon grafts in males (mean age 23.9 years). Thirty-two cross-pin fixations and 24 EndoButton CL fixations were performed on the femoral side. Distal fixations on the tibial side were maintained with interference screws plus a staple. Tunnel enlargement was evaluated using X-rays. Femoral and tibial tunnels were measured at three levels 5 mm apart, and average enlargement was calculated after correction for magnification. Tunnel enlargement 12 months after surgery was greater for the EndoButton CL system (femoral side 43.71%, tibial side 51.11%) than for the cross-pin system (femoral side 32.61%, tibial side 25.62%); the difference was significant only on the tibial side. Both proximal fixation techniques were judged clinically successful (follow-up 16 - 36 months). The far fixation point in the EndoButton CL group may be related to mechanical loosening. PMID:18230264

  19. Oriental noodles.

    PubMed

    Hou, G

    2001-01-01

    Oriental noodles have been consumed for thousands of years and remain an important part in the diet of many Asians. There is a wide variety of noodles in Asia with many local variations as result of differences in culture, climate, region and a host of other factors. In this article noodle classification, formulation, processing and evaluation are reviewed, with emphasis on eight major types. Wheat quality requirements, basic flour specifications, ingredient functions, and production variables are identified for different noodles. In the evaluation of flour for noodle making, three key quality attributes are considered: processability, noodle color and texture. Noodle process behavior is particularly important in the modern industrial production. Each noodle type has its own unique color and texture characteristics. Flour color, protein content, ash content, yellow pigment and polyphenol oxidase activity are important factors responsible for noodle color. Starch characteristics, protein content and quality play major roles in governing the texture of cooked noodles. However, the relative importance of starch and proteins varies considerably with noodle type. Starch pasting quality is the primary trait determining the eating quality of Japanese and Korean noodles that are characterized by soft and elastic texture, while protein quantity and strength are very important to Chinese-type noodles that require firm bite and chewy texture. Other factors such as ingredients added in the noodle formula and processing variables used during noodle preparation also affect the cooked noodle texture as well. PMID:11285682

  20. Unstable semiclassical trajectories in tunneling.

    PubMed

    Levkov, D G; Panin, A G; Sibiryakov, S M

    2007-10-26

    Some tunneling phenomena are described, in the semiclassical approximation, by unstable complex trajectories. We develop a systematic procedure to stabilize the trajectories and to calculate the tunneling probability, including both the suppression exponent and prefactor. We find that the instability of tunneling solutions modifies the power-law dependence of the prefactor on Planck's variant as compared to the case of stable solutions. PMID:17995308

  1. Topography-specific isotropic tunneling in nanoparticle monolayer with sub-nm scale crevices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guisheng; Jiao, Weihong; Yi, Lizhi; Zhang, Yuejiao; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Chao; Lv, Xianglong; Qian, Lihua; Li, Jianfeng; Yuan, Songliu; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Material used in flexible devices may experience anisotropic strain with identical magnitude, outputting coherent signals that tend to have a serious impact on device reliability. In this work, the surface topography of the nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to be a parameter to control the performance of strain gauge based on tunneling behavior. In contrast to anisotropic tunneling in a monolayer of spherical NPs, electron tunneling in a monolayer of urchin-like NPs actually exhibits a nearly isotropic response to strain with different loading orientations. Isotropic tunneling of the urchin-like NPs is caused by the interlocked pikes of these urchin-like NPs in a random manner during external mechanical stimulus. Topography-dependent isotropic tunneling in two dimensions reported here opens a new opportunity to create highly reliable electronics with superior performance. PMID:27575748

  2. Observation of surface states on gold films by electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, J.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of the insulating layer in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. A detailed study of electron tunneling in aluminum-aluminum oxide-gold (Al-Al2O3-Au) tunnel junctions has been conducted with an overall goal of exploring possible mechanisms in such a thin film device useful for chemical sensing. For an understanding of the electronic effects in the presence of chemicals in a junction, the electronic surface properties of the metallic films in a clean tunnel junction must be established. The present investigation is concerned with room temperature observations of electronic states on the surface of highly oriented gold film in Al-Al2O3-Au junctions.

  3. Influence of Geological Conditions on Deformation Behavior of Tunnel-A Case Study on Tseng-Wen Reservoir Transbasin Diversion Tunnel, Tainan, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, C. C.; Ku, C. Y.; Chen, C. S.; Hsu, S. M.; Yang, C. H.

    2009-04-01

    . Several papers and reports were indicated the variations of longitudinal deformations of the tunnel depend on the geological conditions ahead of its face. To the excavation of tunnels, precise prediction of the geological conditions ahead of the tunnel face is important for the economy, safety and efficiency of the project. In particular, sections of poor ground, such as faults and fracture zones, are likely to require changes in construction methods as well as tunnel support patterns, and could thus impede the progress of construction. Therefore, it is desirable to obtain high quality data on geology and properties of rock masses in advance. In this study, a three-dimensional numerical code, called FLAC3D, was used to analyze the Tseng-Wen Reservoir Transbasin Diversion Tunnel, Taiwan deformation when excavation through the interface of different geological conditions. This study presents the results from a systematic three-dimensional analysis in varying ground conditions, which compares vertical (radial) displacements measured at the roof, vector orientations associated with these roof displacements and tunnel face displacements. These numerical results suggest that the vector orientation provided additional information not obtained from traditional radial displacements or face extrusion. The deformations of crown and longitudinal of tunnel would be increased if the rock is weak ground ahead of the excavation. If the rock is hard ground ahead of the excavation, the deformation would be decreased. The plots of influence lines and trend lines were used to predict the geological condition ahead of the excavation face. The results showed that the variations of influence lines and trend lines were depended on the geological conditions. Additionally, the numerical analyses were also carried out with the transition interface inclined at the degrees of 90 and 120 with respect to tunnel axis. The results were found that when the transition interface is at an angle, vertical

  4. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Characteristics of the Femoral Canal Isthmus: An Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu-yun; Zhao, Jing-xin; Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Li-cheng; Li, Chen; Li, Jian-tao; Zhou, Jian-feng; Zhang, Li-hai; Tang, Pei-fu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To establish a new approach for measuring and locating the femoral intramedullary canal isthmus in 3-dimensional (3D) space. Methods. Based on the computed tomography data from 204 Chinese patients, 3D models of the whole femur and the corresponding femoral isthmus tube were reconstructed using Mimics software (Materialise, Haasrode, Belgium). The anatomical parameters of the femur and the isthmus, including the femur length and radius, and the isthmus diameter and height, were measured accordingly. Results. The mean ratio of the isthmus height versus the femoral height was 55 ± 4.8%. The mean diameter of the isthmus was 10.49 ± 1.52 mm. The femoral length, the isthmus diameter, and the isthmus tube length were significantly larger in the male group. Significant correlations were observed between the femoral length and the isthmus diameter (r = 0.24, p < 0.01) and between the femoral length and the isthmus height (r = 0.6, p < 0.01). Stepwise linear regression analyses demonstrated that the femoral length and radius were the most important factors influencing the location and dimension of the femoral canal isthmus. Conclusion. The current study developed a new approach for measuring the femoral canal and for optimization of customer-specific femoral implants. PMID:26137483

  5. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  6. Isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Avaro, J P; Biance, N; Savoie, P H; Peycru, T; Bonnet, P M; Balandraud, P

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma with dissection and secondary ischaemia. A 21-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being stabbed during acute alcoholic intoxication. He presented with a stab wound on the left leg and blunt trauma in the right groin. The surgical exploration of the left-sided wound did not disclose any vascular injury. After a 12-hour period of observation, the patient was discharged. Six hours later, he came back with severe ischaemia on the right leg caused by a femoral artery dissection. The patient underwent surgical revascularization, and fully recovered. Isolated artery blunt trauma is a rare event. In this observation, the absence of early symptoms resulted in delayed diagnosis. PMID:19241930

  7. Periprosthetic Femur Fracture Occuring after Contralateral Neglected Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Toprak, Ali; IKilic, Enver; Bingol, Olgun; Tabak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are uncommon, but at times may lead to complications especially in elderly patients. As treatment of these fractures is difficult, prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems. Case Report: A periprosthetic right femur fracture associated with a neglected left femoral neck fracture in the contralateral femur in a 78-year-old elder woman patient is reported in the present article. We discuss the prevention of periprosthetic fractures after hip arthroplasty and address the risk factors associated with this complication. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of investigating and treating the cause of sudden onset of restriction on full weight-bearing in the contralateral limb, to prevent periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty in elderly patients. PMID:27299115

  8. Bilateral Simultaneous Femoral Neck and Shafts Fractures - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghifar, Amirreza; Saied, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous fractures of the femoral neck and shaft are not common injuries, though they cannot be considered rare. Herein, we report our experience with a patient with bilateral occurance of this injury. Up to the best of our knowkedge this is the first case reported in literature in which correct diagnosis was made initially. Both femurs were fixed using broad 4.5 mm dynamic compression plate and both necks were fixed using 6.5 mm cannulated screws. Femur fixation on one side was converted to retrograde nailing because of plate failure. Both neck fractures healed uneventfully. In spite of rarity of concomitant fractures of femoral neck and shaft, this injury must be approached carefully demanding especial attention and careful device selection. PMID:25692158

  9. Hip Arthroscopy for Excision of Osteoid Osteoma of Femoral Neck

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, AbdulRahman; AbdelSalam El-Assal, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

  10. Confronting Hip Resurfacing and Big Femoral Head Replacement Gait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampinas, Panagiotis K.; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Vlamis, John; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Korres, Dimitrios S.

    2014-01-01

    Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS). On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR) is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated. PMID:24744841

  11. Osteochondral Fractures of the Lateral Femoral Trochlea in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Method: Between May 2012 and September 2014 cluster of five patients with large osteochondral fractures of the lateral femoral trochlea were treated at our institution. These all occurred in high level male athletes, one at a decathlete and the other four soccer players. The MRI scan showed a characteristic appearance of a large subchondral fracture involving most of the lateral femoral trochlea. All patients were symptomatic. The patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using headless compression screws. The operative technique and short term results will be outlined. Results: Fixation appears successful in most cases. Conclusion: This appears to be a repetitive trauma related injury that occurs in young high-level athletes.

  12. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy for avascular necrosis of femoral head.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Yip, Han-Kan; Russo, Sergio

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is multifactorial. Treatment of ONFH is disease stage dependent. For early stages, femoral head preservation procedures are preferred including core decompression, muscle pedicle grafting and de-rotational osteotomy. Core decompression with bone grafting is considered the gold standard. However, the results are inconsistence and unpredictable. An effective non-invasive method of treatment is imperative. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has shown beneficial effects in ONFH. ESWT improves pain and function of the hip and regression of the ONFH lesion. ESWT is more effective than core decompression with or without bone grafting, cocktail therapy that combined HBO, ESWT and oral alendronate is shown effective for patients with early osteonecrosis. The purpose of the article is to review, update and summarize the clinical treatment of ONFH using shockwave therapy. PMID:26188081

  13. PROXIMAL FEMORAL EPIPHYSIOLYSIS AND SUBCLINICAL HYPOTHYROIDISM: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Grasiele Correa; Grossi, Gabriela; Coelho, Sílvio Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Proximal femoral epiphysiolysis is an orthopedic disease that is prevalent during adolescence, because this coincides with the time of greatest growth of osteomuscular structures. Curiously, some patients present this disease early, and this outcome converts to the possible etiological explanation that the slippage might occur through a growth spurt. For these patients, the genesis of the slippage has not yet been elucidated, but endocrine disorders have been noted as possible causes. In an attempt to strengthen the theory of endocrinological etiology and present the results from surgical treatment for this pathological condition, the case of a male patient aged 9 years and 3 months with proximal femoral epiphysiolysis and subclinical hypothyroidism who was diagnosed and treated at our university's teaching hospital is reported here. PMID:27047883

  14. A Case of Femoral Fracture in Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  15. Osteomyelitis of Bilateral Femoral Heads After Childbirth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Kong, Sangwon; Kim, Junho; Kim, Taikon; Choi, Chan Beom; Kim, Yee-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Hip and pelvic pain during pregnancy or after delivery is a common problem in young females, and in most cases this problem has a self-limiting course. The patient described in this case suffered from severe hip pain after childbirth. MR imaging study was performed and it showed arthritis of bilateral hip joints and osteomyelitis of femoral heads with an abscess in the surrounding muscle. Infection, such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis, is an extremely rare cause of peripartum joint pain. The patient's clinical symptoms and laboratory findings improved with antibiotic therapy. However, limitation of motion of the bilateral hip joints persisted although the patient continued rehabilitative therapy for 15 months, and the patient had to undergo bilateral total hip replacement. Hereby, we present a case of severe osteomyelitis and pyogenic arthritis of bilateral femoral heads and hip joints after delivery, which eventually required bilateral total hip replacement. PMID:26161359

  16. [Treatment of early stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Zhu, He-Yu; Zhu, Bing

    2012-07-01

    Avascular necrosis is a progressively devastating disease and primarily affects weight-bearing joints. The hip is the most commonly affected joint. In early stage, nonoperative (including pharmacologic intervention and biophysical treatments) and operative modalities for protecting hip joint have become the main therapeutic methods. However there is still no satisfied mothod with reasonable effect. According to the treatment of the avascular necrosis of the femoral head of the pre-collapse stage, core decompression with modification of technique is still one of the safest and most commonly employed procedures. Recently there have been attempts to enhance the effect of core decompression with use of various growth and differentiation factors. Which is the hot spot of current research. Early diagnosis is the key to the treatment of the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Comprehensive treatment which is based on the core decompression is still the main treatment of today. PMID:23116002

  17. Computer assisted measurement of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Yixun; Chen, Foster; Summers, Ronald M.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Radiographic features such as femoral cortex thickening have been frequently observed with atypical subtrochanteric fractures. These features may be a valuable finding to help prevent fractures before they happen. The current practice of manual measurement is often subjective and inconsistent. We developed a semi-automatic tool to consistently measure and monitor the progress of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs. By placing two seed points on each side of the femur, the program automatically extracts the periosteal and endosteal layers of the cortical shell by active contour models and B-spline fitting. Several measurements are taken along the femur shaft, including shaft diameter, cortical thickness, and integral area for medial and lateral cortex. The experiment was conducted on 52 patient datasets. The semi-automatic measurements were validated against manual measurements on 52 patients and demonstrated great improvement in consistency and accuracy (p<0.001).

  18. Hydrocele of Femoral Hernial Sac-an Extremely Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Madhivanan, S; Jain, Ravindra Kumar

    2016-06-01

    A previously healthy 40-year-old woman presented with a right groin swelling for the last 2 years. Diagnosed preoperatively as uncomplicated, irreducible epiplocele of right femoral hernia, later per-operatively was diagnosed as hydrocele of femoral hernial sac also known as "femorocele"; ultrasound abdomen and groin demonstrated as a cystic mass right groin with no precise origin. All other basic line investigations within normal limits, except anemia 7 gm %, corrected to 10 gm %, by preoperative transfusions of 2 units of complete fresh blood. After low approach incision, excision of hydrocele sac, and feormal hernia repair were done with approximation of iliopectineal ligament to inguinal ligament, patient was discharged on 5th postoperative day with satisfactory wound healing and uneventful hospitalization. PMID:27358521

  19. Development of phantom limb pain after femoral nerve block.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sadiah; Sifonios, Anthony N; Le, Vanny; Martinez, Marc E; Eloy, Jean D; Kaufman, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Historically, phantom limb pain (PLP) develops in 50-80% of amputees and may arise within days following an amputation for reasons presently not well understood. Our case involves a 29-year-old male with previous surgical amputation who develops PLP after the performance of a femoral nerve block. Although there have been documented cases of reactivation of PLP in amputees after neuraxial technique, there have been no reported events associated with femoral nerve blockade. We base our discussion on the theory that symptoms of phantom limb pain are of neuropathic origin and attempt to elaborate the link between regional anesthesia and PLP. Further investigation and understanding of PLP itself will hopefully uncover a relationship between peripheral nerve blocks targeting an affected limb and the subsequent development of this phenomenon, allowing physicians to take appropriate steps in prevention and treatment. PMID:24872817

  20. First-principles study of spin transport in Fe-SiCNT-Fe magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Jalu, Surendra

    2015-08-01

    We report first-principles calculations of spin-dependent quantum transport in Fe-SiCNT-Fe magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Perfect spin filtration effect and substantial tunnel magnetoresistance are obtained, which suggests SiCNTs as a suitable candidate over CNTs for implementing 1D MTJs. The calculated tunnel magnetoresistance is several hundred percent at zero bias voltage, it reduces to nearly zero after the bias voltage of about 1 V. When the orientation of magnetic configurations of both electrodes is parallel, the zero bias spin injection factor is staggering 99% and remains reasonably high in the range of 60%-75% after the bias voltage of 0.6 V.

  1. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy investigation of reversibly switched dipolar vanadyl phthalocyanine on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jialin; Wang, Zhunzhun; Li, Zhenyu E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg; Niu, Tianchao; Chen, Wei E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg

    2014-03-17

    We report a spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) investigation of reversibly switchable dipolar vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) on graphite by using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. VOPc molecule can be switched between O-up and O-down configurations by changing the polarity of the pulse voltage applied to the tip, actuated by the inelastic tunneling electrons. The spatially resolved STS measurements allow the identification of the electronic structures of VOPc with different dipole orientation. The present approach provides geometry images and electronic characterization of a molecular switch on surface spontaneously.

  2. View of entrance tunnel outside Portal elevator. Tunnel ahead to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of entrance tunnel outside Portal elevator. Tunnel ahead to Control Center, right to Launchers, left to Antenna Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at left of image to Launch Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aroori, Somaiah; Spence, Roy AJ

    2008-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common peripheral neuropathies. It affects mainly middle aged women. In the majority of patients the exact cause and pathogenesis of CTS is unclear. Although several occupations have been linked to increased incidence and prevalence of CTS the evidence is not clear. Occupational CTS is uncommon and it is essential to exclude all other causes particularly the intrinsic factors such as obesity before attributing it to occupation. The risk of CTS is high in occupations involving exposure to high pressure, high force, repetitive work, and vibrating tools. The classic symptoms of CTS include nocturnal pain associated with tingling and numbness in the distribution of median nerve in the hand. There are several physical examination tests that will help in the diagnosis of CTS but none of these tests are diagnostic on their own. The gold standard test is nerve conduction studies. However, they are also associated with false positive and false negative results. The diagnosis of CTS should be based on history, physical examination and results of electrophysiological studies. The patient with mild symptoms of CTS can be managed with conservative treatment, particularly local injection of steroids. However, in moderate to severe cases, surgery is the only treatment that provides cure. The basic principle of surgery is to increase the volume of the carpal tunnel by dividing transverse carpal ligament to release the pressure on the median nerve. Apart from early recovery and return to work there is no significant difference in terms of early and late complications and long-term pain relief between endoscopic and open carpal tunnel surgery. PMID:18269111

  5. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  6. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  7. Tunneling Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Fe Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, T. V.; Miwa, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect is related to the relative orientation of the magnetizations of the two ferromagnetic electrodes in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) effect is related to the orientation of the magnetization with respect to the current direction or the crystallographic axes. Beyond the TMR, the TAMR is not only present in MTJs in which both electrodes are ferromagnetic but may also appear in tunnel structures with a single magnetic electrode. We investigated the magnetotransport properties in an Au/MgO/Fe nanoparticles/MgO/Cu tunnel junction. We found that both the TMR and TAMR can appear in tunnel junctions with Fe nanoparticles embedded in an MgO matrix. The TMR is attributed to spin-dependent tunneling between Fe nanoparticles, so the device resistance depends on the magnetization directions of adjacent Fe nanoparticles. The TAMR is attributed to the interfacial spin-orbit interaction, so the device resistance depends on each magnetization direction of an Fe nanoparticle. This is the first observation of the TAMR in Fe nanoparticles embedded in an MgO matrix.

  8. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  9. Femoral neck non-union treatment by valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy in femoral neck non-union. METHODS : Forty-two patients with femoral neck fractures with non-union treated using Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy were reviewed. Demographics, time elapsed between fracture and surgery, follow--up, osteosynthesis used, Garden's classification, limb shortening, and x-rays were evaluated. RESULTS : Twenty-two men and 20 women were reviewed. The youngest patient was 18 years old and the oldest 65 years old, with a mean age of 42.4 years (±11.2). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with a mean of 10.2 years. The average time elapsed between initial fracture and osteotomy was 6.5 months. Twel-ve cases were neglected femoral neck fractures. Nineteen patients were classified as Garden III, and 23 patients as Garden IV. After valgus osteotomy, non-union healing was observed in 38 patients (38/42; 90.4%). Healing of thirty-seven cases of pseudoarthrosis were obtained after the first-attempt osteotomy, and one case required two operations for healing. The osteotomy failed in four cases. Conside-ring the healed osteotomies, good to excellent functional results were achieved in 80.9% (34/42) of the patients. Total hip replacement was subsequently performed in 14.2% (6/42) of the patients for unfavoura-ble outcomes (two for cutting out, two for osteonecrosis, and two for osteoarthritis). CONCLUSIONS : Valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy has a high success rate in archiving healing in femoral neck non-union with good functional results. It is a biological and effective method. Level of Evidence IV, Therapeutic Study. PMID:27057146

  10. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis caused by neurogenic heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sam Yeol; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok; Chung, Chin Youb; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2013-11-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is rare in nonambulatory patients, as mechanical factors play important roles in the development of the disease. We report a case of SCFE, which occurred in a 12-year-old girl with a nonambulatory status after cerebral infarction. SCFE occurred after she received passive range of motion exercise and extracorporeal shock wave treatment for neurogenic heterotopic ossification around the hip joint. The patient was successfully managed by a stepwise approach, with radiological and clinical improvements. PMID:23969564

  11. Robotic assisted reduction of femoral shaft fractures using Stewart platform.

    PubMed

    Majidifakhr, Kamran; Kazemirad, Siavash; Farahmand, Farzam

    2009-01-01

    A robotic system with 6 DOF mobility was proposed for reduction of femoral shaft fractures based on Stewart platform. A plan for implementing the platform on bone fragments was introduced and a step by step strategy for performing the reduction procedure, based on the system's inverse kinematic solution, was proposed. The efficacy of the system was evaluated in some case studies and it was shown that it can be locked to act as an external fixator. PMID:19377143

  12. Pathogenesis, Management and Prevention of Atypical Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung-Hyo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the relationship between atypical femoral fractures (AFF) and use of bisphosphonates (BPs). While a significant cause-effect relationship was not established in earlier studies, more recent data shows a growing relationship between AFF and BPs use. The definition of an 'AFF' has also undergone significant changes. This review briefly summarizes the definition, pathogenesis, and management of AFF. PMID:25774358

  13. Femoral prosthesis subsidence in asymptomatic patients. A stereophotogrammetric assessment.

    PubMed

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K

    1984-01-01

    A radiographic stereophotogrammetric technique (SPG) was used to evaluate quantitatively the presence of early femoral prosthesis subsidence after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This paper focuses on the measurement of subsidence in 12 patients who remained asymptomatic during the first two years after surgery. Only one of these had SPG estimated subsidence in excess of one millimeter at any timepoint. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that early postoperative subsidence is not a common finding among asymptomatic THA patients. PMID:6469528

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  15. Cortical bone distribution in the femoral neck of strepsirhine primates.

    PubMed

    Demes, B; Jungers, W L; Walker, C

    2000-10-01

    The thickness of the inferior and superior cortices of the femoral neck was measured on X-rays of 181 strepsirhine primate femora representing 24 species. Neck length, neck depth and neck-shaft angle were also measured. The strength of the femoral neck in frontal bending was estimated by modeling the neck as a hollow cylinder, with neck depth as the outer diameter and cortical thickness representing the superior and inferior shell dimensions. Results indicate that the inferior cortex is always thicker than the superior cortex. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is highly variable but distinguishes two of the three locomotor groups in the sample. Vertical clingers and leapers have higher ratios (i.e., a more even distribution of cortical bone) than quadrupeds. The slow climbers tend to have the lowest ratios, although they do not differ significantly from the leapers and quadrupeds. These results do not confirm prior theoretical expectations and reported data for anthropoid primates that link greater asymmetry of the cortical shell to more stereotypical hip excursions. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is unrelated to body mass, femoral neck length, and neck-shaft angle, calling into question whether the short neck of strepsirhine primates acts as a cantilever beam in bending. On the other hand, the estimated section moduli are highly correlated with body mass and neck length, a correlation that is driven primarily by body mass. In conclusion, we believe that an alternative interpretation to the cantilever beam model is needed to explain the asymmetry in bone distribution in the femoral neck, at least in strepsirhine primates (e.g., a thicker inferior cortex is required to reinforce the strongly curved inferior surface). As in prior studies of cross-sectional geometry of long bones, we found slightly positive allometry of cortical dimensions with body mass. PMID:11006046

  16. Electroacupuncture Helped Ease Carpal Tunnel in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159240.html Electroacupuncture Helped Ease Carpal Tunnel in Study But experts say finding is preliminary, didn't ... condition known as carpal tunnel syndrome. In the study, electroacupuncture helped carpal tunnel patients with long-lasting ...

  17. Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  18. Virtual-detector approach to tunnel ionization and tunneling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling times in atomic ionization are studied theoretically by a virtual detector approach. A virtual detector is a hypothetical device that allows one to monitor the wave function's density with spatial and temporal resolution during the ionization process. With this theoretical approach, it becomes possible to define unique moments when the electron enters and leaves with highest probability the classically forbidden region from first principles and a tunneling time can be specified unambiguously. It is shown that neither the moment when the electron enters the tunneling barrier nor when it leaves the tunneling barrier coincides with the moment when the external electric field reaches its maximum. Under the tunneling barrier as well as at the exit the electron has a nonzero velocity in the electric field direction. This nonzero exit velocity has to be incorporated when the free motion of the electron is modeled by classical equations of motion.

  19. An Advanced Quantitative Echosound Methodology for Femoral Neck Densitometry.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Sergio; Peccarisi, Marco; Pisani, Paola; Franchini, Roberto; Greco, Antonio; De Marco, Tommaso; Grimaldi, Antonella; Quarta, Laura; Quarta, Eugenio; Muratore, Maruizio; Conversano, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the clinical feasibility and the accuracy in femoral neck densitometry of the Osteoporosis Score (O.S.), an ultrasound (US) parameter for osteoporosis diagnosis that has been recently introduced for lumbar spine applications. A total of 377 female patients (aged 61-70 y) underwent both a femoral dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and an echographic scan of the proximal femur. Recruited patients were sub-divided into a reference database used for ultrasound spectral model construction and a study population for repeatability assessments and accuracy evaluations. Echographic images and radiofrequency signals were analyzed through a fully automatic algorithm that performed a series of combined spectral and statistical analyses, providing as a final output the O.S. value of the femoral neck. Assuming DXA as a gold standard reference, the accuracy of O.S.-based diagnoses resulted 94.7%, with k = 0.898 (p < 0.0001). Significant correlations were also found between O.S.-estimated bone mineral density and corresponding DXA values, with r(2) up to 0.79 and root mean square error = 5.9-7.4%. The reported accuracy levels, combined with the proven ease of use and very good measurement repeatability, provide the adopted method with a potential for clinical routine application in osteoporosis diagnosis. PMID:27033331

  20. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  1. Natural frequency analysis of osseointegration for trans-femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Xu, W; Crocombe, A; Ewins, D

    2007-05-01

    Osseointegration trans-femoral implants are a new orthopaedic anchoring method to attach prosthetic limbs. The clinical success of this promising technique depends on the effectiveness of osseointegration achieved after implantation. The aim of this study is to use the resonant characteristics of the implant system to determine the changes in stability as a reflection of boundary condition of the implant. With a small mechanical excitation, Vibration responses of the trans-femoral implant to a small mechanical excitation were measured using an accelerometer and the vibration signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) software to obtain the fundamental natural frequency (NF) of the implant system. In-vitro study was conducted using different silicone rubbers to simulate the interface condition. The result showed that a high NF corresponded to a high elastic modulus of the interface material between the implant and bone. A preliminary in-vivo study with one osseointegration trans-femoral implant patient showed that there was a decrease of NF after initial weight bearing rehabilitation. After continued weight bearing, the NF gradually returned to the pre-loading level at around day 24 and the general trend of the NF reached a stable state 38 days after the first weight bearing exercise. PMID:17377843

  2. Variations in treatment of femoral neck fractures in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Marilyn; Yang, Qian; Scharfenberger, Angela; Johnson, David; Carrière, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To examine, in the province of Alberta, temporal trends, regional variations in treatment options and in-hospital death rates after a femoral neck fracture. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients Six years’ data were abstracted from the Alberta Morbidity File, the Alberta Health Stakeholder File and the Alberta Health Care Claims File. Patients were included if they were Alberta residents, aged 65 years or older, had sustained a femoral neck fracture and had undergone internal fixation, hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. Main outcome measures Death rates, arthroplasty rates and hospital stay. Results In-hospital death rates were similar across hospitals, with risks being higher for men, patients aged 80 years or older and those with more comorbid conditions. Arthroplasty rates varied from 58% to 77% among hospitals, and hospital stays associated with arthroplasty were significantly longer than those associated with internal fixation. The chance of undergoing arthroplasty varied from hospital to hospital by gender and by the number of comorbid conditions. Conclusion Regional variations suggest lack of agreement among Alberta’s surgeons as to how best to treat femoral neck fractures. PMID:12174977

  3. Necrosis of the femoral head after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lausten, G S; Lemser, T; Jensen, P K; Egfjord, M

    1998-12-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 750 patients (445 men, 305 women), who had received a kidney transplant during the period 1968-1995, for any sign of necrosis of the femoral head. For post-operative immunosuppression, 374 patients had received high-dose corticosteroids (average 12.5 g during the first year post-operatively), while 376 patients had received low-dose corticosteroids (average 6.5 g during the first year post-operatively) and cyclosporin A. Survival curves according to Kaplan and Meier (J Am Stat Ass 1958: 53: 457-481) were constructed. In the high-dose steroid group, 42/374 patients (11.2%) developed femoral head necrosis, at an average of 26.2 months post-transplantation. In the low-dose steroid group, only 19/376 (5.1%) patients developed this complication, at an average of 20.5 months post-transplantation. This difference in numbers of femoral head necroses was highly significant (p < 0.005). We conclude that steroid doses should be minimized whenever feasible in post-transplant immunosuppression therapy. PMID:9850453

  4. Patient doses in abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examinations.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Parry, C; Thompson, W; Loeffler, C

    1998-11-01

    Radiation doses to adult male patients from abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examinations in a medical center were determined with the help of a dose-area product meter. The abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examination consisted of scout radiographs, fluoroscopy (to position a catheter near the area of interest), and serial films (to record the flow of contrast media). Measurements were converted to effective doses with the help of published results from Monte Carlo simulation calculations. Data from 19 male adult patients weighing 53 to 86 kg were analyzed. The resulting total effective dose had a value of 14.0 +/- 4A mSv (mean and standard deviation). The percent contribution by fluoroscopy was 18.5 +/- 9.9%. The fluoroscopy effective dose had a stronger correlation with the dose-area product (correlation coefficient of 0.97) than with duration of exposure (correlation coefficient of 0.84). Most of the radiation exposure in the observed abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examination was attributed to radiography. PMID:9790557

  5. Large diameter femoral heads: is bigger always better?

    PubMed

    Cooper, H J; Della Valle, C J

    2014-11-01

    Dislocation remains among the most common complications of, and reasons for, revision of both primary and revision total hip replacements (THR). Hence, there is great interest in maximising stability to prevent this complication. Head size has been recognised to have a strong influence on the risk of dislocation post-operatively. As femoral head size increases, stability is augmented, secondary to an increase in impingement-free range of movement. Larger head sizes also greatly increase the 'jump distance' required for the head to dislocate in an appropriately positioned cup. Level-one studies support the use of larger diameter heads as they decrease the risk of dislocation following primary and revision THR. Highly cross-linked polyethylene has allowed us to increase femoral head size, without a marked increase in wear. However, the thin polyethylene liners necessary to accommodate larger heads may increase the risk of liner fracture and larger heads have also been implicated in causing soft-tissue impingement resulting in groin pain. Larger diameter heads also impart larger forces on the femoral trunnion, which may contribute to corrosion, metal release, and adverse local tissue reactions. Alternative large bearings including large ceramic heads and dual mobility bearings may mitigate some of these risks, and several of these devices have been used with clinical success. PMID:25381403

  6. The Langley Wind Tunnel Enterprise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kumar, Ajay; Kegelman, Jerome T.

    1998-01-01

    After 4 years of existence, the Langley WTE is alive and growing. Significant improvements in the operation of wind tunnels have been demonstrated and substantial further improvements are expected when we are able to truly address and integrate all the processes affecting the wind tunnel testing cycle.

  7. Modeling Indirect Tunneling in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Edward

    Indirect tunneling in silicon p-n junctions catches people's attention again in recent years. First, the phenomenon induces a serious leakage problem, so called gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) effect, in modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Second, it is utilized to develop a novel tunneling transistor with the sharp turn-on ability for continuing ITRS roadmap. Although the indirect tunneling is important for the state-of-the-art transistor-technology, the accuracy of the present tunneling models in technology computer-aided design (TCAD) tools is still vague. In the research work, the theory of indirect tunneling in silicon has been thoroughly studied. The phonon-assisted tunneling model has been developed and compared with the existing ones in the Sentaurus-Synopsys, Medici-Synopsys, and Atlas-Silvaco TCAD tools. Beyond these existing models, ours successfully predicts the indirect tunneling current under the different field direction in silicon. In addition, bandgap narrowing in heavily-doped p-n junctions under the reverse-biased condition is also studied during the model development. At the end of the research work, the application to low standby power (LSTP) transistors is demonstrated to show the capability of our tunneling model in the device level.

  8. Two tunnels to inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the formation via tunneling of inflating (false-vacuum) bubbles in a true-vacuum background, and the reverse process. Using effective potentials from the junction condition formalism, all true- and false-vacuum bubble solutions with positive interior and exterior cosmological constant, and arbitrary mass are catalogued. We find that tunneling through the same effective potential appears to describe two distinct processes: one in which the initial and final states are separated by a wormhole (the Farhi-Guth-Guven mechanism), and one in which they are either in the same hubble volume or separated by a cosmological horizon. In the zero-mass limit, the first process corresponds to the creation of an inhomogenous universe from nothing, while the second mechanism is equivalent to the nucleation of true- or false-vacuum Coleman-De Luccia bubbles. We compute the probabilities of both mechanisms in the WKB approximation using semiclassical Hamiltonian methods, and find that--assuming both process are allowed--neither mechanism dominates in all regimes.

  9. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  10. Femoral head viability following hip fracture. Prognostic role of radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Rudd, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    A retrospective study was made of all radionuclide (RN) bone images performed at our institution over a two-year period to evaluate femoral head viability after nonpathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Twelve patients had avascular femoral heads during the perioperative period, of which nine had adequate follow-up. Seven of these nine patients had follow-up bone images. Revascularization occurred in four patients, while three had persistent absence of femoral head uptake. With clinical follow-up ranging from four to 29 months (median: 14 months), only two of these nine patients developed clinical or radiographic evidence of osteonecrosis. RN bone imaging performed in the perioperative period does not reliably predict the development of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head and, at present, should not be used to determine prospectively method of treatment of femoral neck fracture.

  11. Comparison of vertebral and femoral bone mineral density in adult females

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Seong; Lee, Jae Hong; Min, Dong Ki; Shin, So Hong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed vertebral and femoral bone mineral density in adult females. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 314 females in their 40s to 70s were divided into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups and their vertebral and femoral bone mineral densities were compared. [Results] Comparisons of T scores revealed significant differences among measurements of the third lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, Ward’s triangle, and femoral trochanter. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess differences between the vertebral and femoral measurements, and significant differences and positive correlations were observed among third lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, Ward’s triangle, and femur trochanter in the normal group. [Conclusion] Females in the normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups showed significant differences in their third lumbar vertebrae. The lack of significant differences among measurements in the osteoporosis group in this study suggests that patients with osteoporosis require careful and accurate diagnosis. PMID:27390449

  12. Perthes’ disease and femoroacetabular impingement in a child with proximal femoral focal deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Terence; Stokes, Oliver M; Chow, Wang; To, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A girl with known proximal femoral focal deficiency presented with Perthes’ disease at 5 years of age. Her treatment involved a Salter osteotomy. This in conjunction with articular incongruence, due to deformity of the femoral head, resulted in mixed type femoroacetabular impingement when she was 10 years old. Surgical hip dislocation and femoral neck osteochondroplasty successfully relieved her symptoms of impingement. This is the first reported case of Perthes’ disease in a patient with proximal femoral focal deficiency. The case highlights the importance of thoroughly investigating pain in patients with proximal femoral focal deficiency, a condition which is normally painless. Timely diagnosis of Perthes’ disease and containment procedures can prevent collapse of the femoral head and the resultant sequelae. Acetabular over-coverage should be avoided in pelvic osteotomy to prevent the development of femoroacetabular impingement. PMID:23148394

  13. Comparison of vertebral and femoral bone mineral density in adult females.

    PubMed

    Choe, Han Seong; Lee, Jae Hong; Min, Dong Ki; Shin, So Hong

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed vertebral and femoral bone mineral density in adult females. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 314 females in their 40s to 70s were divided into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups and their vertebral and femoral bone mineral densities were compared. [Results] Comparisons of T scores revealed significant differences among measurements of the third lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, Ward's triangle, and femoral trochanter. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess differences between the vertebral and femoral measurements, and significant differences and positive correlations were observed among third lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, Ward's triangle, and femur trochanter in the normal group. [Conclusion] Females in the normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups showed significant differences in their third lumbar vertebrae. The lack of significant differences among measurements in the osteoporosis group in this study suggests that patients with osteoporosis require careful and accurate diagnosis. PMID:27390449

  14. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  15. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Tian, B B; Wang, J L; Fusil, S; Liu, Y; Zhao, X L; Sun, S; Shen, H; Lin, T; Sun, J L; Duan, C G; Bibes, M; Barthélémy, A; Dkhil, B; Garcia, V; Meng, X J; Chu, J H

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  16. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates.

  17. Atypical femoral fractures bilaterally in a patient receiving bisphosphonate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moghnie, Alessandro; Scamacca, Veronica; De Fabrizio, Giovanni; Valentini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Atypical femoral fractures are often associated with prolonged bisphosphonate use. The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) has set the diagnosis criteria for atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures by classifying them according to their major and minor criteria. Prolonged bisphosphonate use is correlated with AFF, but the pathogenetic mechanism that causes this kind of fracture has not been defined yet. We describe simultaneous bilaterally femoral fractures in a 76-year-old woman. PMID:27252749

  18. A low-energy femoral shaft fracture from performing a yoga posture.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Andrew; Ellanti, Prasad; Hogan, Niall

    2015-01-01

    The femoral shaft is rarely the site of a low-energy fracture in a healthy individual. The vast majority of these fractures are due to major trauma such as motor vehicle accidents. Although low-energy femoral shaft fractures do occur, they are typically in patients with osteoporotic bone, or prosthesis related. In this case report, we present a man in his late 30s who was practising a specific yoga stance when he experienced a femoral shaft fracture. PMID:26452743

  19. Significance of Geological Parameters for Predicting Water Inflow in Hard Rock Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmøy, K. H.; Nilsen, B.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of tunnelling is prognostication of water inflows. More reliable prediction of groundwater inflow may give considerable economical saving for future tunnel projects and may also prevent damage of environment and installations on the surface. This paper is discussing the significance of eight hypotheses regarding geological parameters for predicting water inflow in tunnels. The respective hypotheses have been tested as part of a recent research project in Norway. Six Norwegian tunnels with different geological conditions were selected for the research; the Romeriksporten, Frøya, T-baneringen, Lunner, Skaugum, and Storsand tunnels. Based on detailed study of these tunnels, the hypotheses are tested by comparing water inflow with geological parameters and factors such as Q value, faulting, rock stress orientation, rock cover, thickness of permeable soil or depth of lake/sea above the tunnel, rock type, and width of weakness zones. It is found that four out of the eight tested hypotheses are supported, two have low to medium support and two are not supported. One unexpected result is that for the tunnels covered by this study, the water inflow was found to increase with rock cover.

  20. Use of an anatomic long-stemmed component in femoral impaction grafting.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W; Timperley, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We describe a challenging femoral revision for aseptic loosening in a relatively young and active man. The femur had gross osteolysis, an absent calcar and a cortical diaphyseal defect at the level of the isthmus (Paprosky 3b defect). The cortical defects were repaired and the whole femur then restored with Femoral Impaction Grafting (FIG) using custom-made impaction instruments and an anatomic shaped collarless, polished, tapered femoral component.In the active adult, bone restoring revision techniques such as impaction grafting should be considered to give a realistic prospect of host bone augmentation rather than simply aiming for a distally fixed stem in a patulous femoral canal. PMID:26692247

  1. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Min, Byung-Woo; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature. PMID:27536624

  2. Investigation of creep mechanical characteristics of femoral prostheses by simulated hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GUANG-YAO; JIN, YAN; LI, PENG

    2013-01-01

    In order to provide creep mechanical parameters for the clinical application of both traditional and reserved anatomy femoral artificial joint replacements, simulated hip replacement femoral stress relaxation and creep experiments were performed. Twenty-four corpse femoral specimens were obtained, with 8 specimens being randomly assigned to the control group and 8 specimens being randomly assigned to the traditional prosthesis group. Our results showed that the retaining femoral neck prosthesis and traditional prosthesis groups have different stress relaxation and creep mechanical properties. PMID:23596489

  3. Subtrochanteric femur fracture after removal of screws for femoral neck fracture in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook

    2015-01-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures are rare in children and are associated with a high rate of complications. Subtrochanteric fractures after cannulated screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in adults are well recognized, and there are several reports on the topic. However, there are no reports on complications related to hardware or subtrochanteric fractures after removal of the screws in the treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Here we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after the screw removal and healing that followed a femoral neck fracture. PMID:25566556

  4. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature.

  5. Outcome of Kidney Allografts in Recipients With a Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Özdemir-van Brunschot, Denise M D; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; van Hamersvelt, Henk W; Warlé, Michiel C

    2016-09-01

    Two patients, who were on hemodialysis over a femoral arteriovenous fistula, were transplanted in our center. Despite adequate blood pressure, perfusion of the renal allograft remained poor after completion of the vascular anastomoses. Ligation of the femoral arteriovenous fistula (1.6 L/min) led to adequate perfusion. Initial graft function was good. Although it remains unclear whether ischemia of a renal allograft is caused by venous hypertension or vascular steal due to a femoral arteriovenous fistula, it might be necessary to ligate a femoral arteriovenous fistula to obtain adequate graft perfusion. PMID:27313989

  6. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  7. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al2O3/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  8. Tunnelling microscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selci, Stefano; Cricenti, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris (1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with a high resolution Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The STM operated simultaneously in the constant-current and gap-modulated mode. Highly reproducible STM images have been obtained and interpreted in terms of expected DNA structure. The main periodicity, regularly presented in molecules several hundred Ångstrom long, ranges from 25 Å to 35 Å with an average diameter of 22 Å. Higher resolution images of the minor groove have revealed the phosphate groups along the DNA backbones. Constant-current images of TAPO deposited on gold show a crystalline structure of rows of molecules with a side-by-side spacing of 3 Å.

  9. The virtual wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levit, Creon

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the design and implementaion of a virtual environment linked to a graphics workstation for the visualization of complex fluid flows. The user wears a stereo head-tracked display which displays 3D information and an instrumented glove to intuitively position flow-visualization tools. The idea is to create for the user an illusion that he or she is actually in the flow manipulating visualization tools. The user's presence does not disturb the flow so that sensitive flow areas can be easily investigated. The flow is precomputed and can be investigated at any length scale and with control over time. Particular attention is given to the visualization structures and their interfaces in the virtual environment, hardware and software, and the performance of the virtual wind tunnel using flow past a tapered cylinder as an example.

  10. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Jefferies, Sharon; Howe, A. Scott; Howard, Robert; Mary, Natalie; Watson, Judith; Lewis, Ruthan

    2016-01-01

    When the first human visitors on Mars prepare to return to Earth, they will have to comply with stringent planetary protection requirements. Apollo Program experience warns that opening an EVA hatch directly to the surface will bring dust into the ascent vehicle. To prevent inadvertent return of potential Martian contaminants to Earth, careful consideration must be given to the way in which crew ingress their Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel that eliminates extravehicular activity (EVA) ingress is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications, such as rover to habitat transfer, once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The study team began by identifying the minimum set of functional requirements needed for the tunnel to perform its primary mission, as this would presumably be the simplest design, with the lowest mass and volume. This Minimum Functional Tunnel then becomes a baseline against which various tunnel design concepts and potential alternatives can be traded, and aids in assessing the mass penalty of increased functionality. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mass of a single-mission tunnel is about 237 kg, not including mass growth allowance.

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ACL RECONSTRUCTION WITH ANATOMICAL POSITIONING OF THE TUNNELS USING THE PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS HAMSTRING TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Pádua, Vitor Barion Castro; Maldonado, Hilário; Vilela, Júlio César Rodrigues; Provenza, Alexandre Ribeira; Monteiro, Cleverson; de Oliveira Neto, Heleno Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the hamstring or patellar tendons. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 52 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using the Chambat's technique, with anatomical positioning of the tunnels drilled outside in. They were divided into group A, with 27 patients, using the patellar tendon as a graft, and group B, with 25 patients, using the hamstring. Results: In group A 26 patients were very satisfied or satisfied and 1 unhappy, in group B. 25 patients were very satisfied or satisfied with the procedure (p = 0.990). According to the Lysholm scale, group A had a mean score of 96.11 and group B, 95.32 (p=0.594). In relation to preoperative IKDC, 100% of the patients in group A and 92% of those in group B were IKDC C or D (p = 0.221); in the assessment with a minimum of two-year follow-up, 96% of group A and 92% of group B were IKDC A or B (p = 0.256). The Lachman test, pivot shift, return to sports activities, and the comparative difference in anterior translation (RolimeterTM) also showed no statistically significant difference. In group A, 5 patients (18.5%) were unable to kneel on a hard surface, whereas no patient in group B had this complaint. Conclusion: The anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction presents similar results using the hamstring or patellar tendon with anatomical positioning of the tunnels. Drilling the femoral tunnel outside in is a reproducible and accurate option in the correct placement the femoral tunnel. PMID:27027082

  12. Spin tunneling in conducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovsky, A.

    1998-12-31

    Different tunneling mechanisms in conventional and half-metallic ferromagnetic tunnel junctions are analyzed within the same general method. Direct tunneling is compared with impurity-assisted, surface state assisted, and inelastic contributions to a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Theoretically calculated direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to experimentally observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. The authors find that tunneling via resonant defect states in the barrier radically decreases the TMR (down to 4% with Fe-based electrodes), and a resonant tunnel diode structure would give a TMR of about 8%. With regards to inelastic tunneling, magnons and phonons exhibit opposite effects: one-magnon emission generally results in spin mixing and, consequently, reduces the TMR, whereas phonons are shown to enhance the TMR. The inclusion of both magnons and phonons reasonably explains an unusually bias dependence of the TMR. The model presented here is applied qualitatively to half-metallics with 100% spin polarization, where one-magnon processes are suppressed and the change in resistance in the absence of spin-mixing on impurities may be arbitrarily large. Even in the case of imperfect magnetic configurations, the resistance change can be a few 1,000%. Examples of half-metallic systems are CrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and CrO{sub 2}/RuO{sub 2}, and an account of their peculiar band structures is presented. The implications and relation of these systems to CMR materials, which are nearly half-metallic, are discussed.

  13. Dual-Element Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1994-01-01

    Improved micromachined tunneling accelerometer contains two deflecting transducer elements: One an elastically supported proof mass having relatively low resonant frequency; other cantilever tunneling transducer that tracks displacement of proof mass and has relatively high resonant frequency ({sup a} 10 kHz). Deflection voltage generated by circuit like described in "Wideband Feedback Circuit for Tunneling Sensor" (NPO-18866). Accelerometers of this type suited for underwater acoustic measurements, detecting vibrations associated with malfunctions in vehicles, detecting seismic signals, monitoring and controlling vibrations in structures, and other applications.

  14. Pathophysiology of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aboonq, Moutasem S.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common median nerve neuropathy, accounting for 90% of all neuropathies. Carpal tunnel syndrome presents in 3.8% of the general population, with a higher prevalence among women. There are several risk factors associated with CTS, including both medical and non medical factors. The pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the median nerve compression and traction are thought to be complex, and as yet are not fully understood. The present review aimed to provide an overview of the pathophysiology of median nerve neuropathy in the carpal tunnel, and subsequent development of CTS. PMID:25630774

  15. Resonant torus-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Kim, Chil-Min

    2016-01-01

    We report a new type of dynamical tunneling, which is mediated by a resonant torus, i.e., a nonisolated periodic orbit. To elucidate the phenomenon, we take an open elliptic cavity and show that a pair of resonances localized on two classically disconnected tori tunnel through a resonant torus when they interact with each other. This so-called resonant torus-assisted tunneling is verified by using Husimi functions, corresponding actions, Husimi function distributions, and the standard deviations of the actions. PMID:26871067

  16. Optical Detection of Tunneling Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoef, Aart J.; Mitrofanov, Alexander V.; Kartashov, Daniil V.; Baltuska, Andrius

    2010-04-23

    We have experimentally detected optical harmonics that are generated due to a tunneling-ionization-induced modulation of the electron density. The optical signature of electron tunneling can be isolated from concomitant optical responses by using a noncollinear pump-probe setup. Whereas previously demonstrated tools for attosecond metrology of gases, plasmas, and surfaces rely on direct detection of charged particles, detection of the background-free time-resolved optical signal, which uniquely originates from electron tunneling, offers an interesting alternative that is especially suited for systems in which free electrons cannot be directly measured.

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Van Meir, Nathalie; De Smet, Luc

    2003-10-01

    transverse carpal ligament. Intensive sports practice has been reported as an aetiological factor in several cases of childhood CTS. Nerve territory oriented macrodactily, a benign localised form of gigantism, is another unusual cause of CTS in children, as are fibrolipomas of the median nerve or intraneural perineuroma or haemangioma of the median nerve. Acute cases have been reported in children with haemophilia, secondary to local bleeding. Another local cause is a musculotendinous malformation of the palmaris longus, the flexor digitorum superficialis, the flexor carpi radialis brevis (a supernumerary muscle), the first lumbricalis or the palmaris brevis. Isolated cases of childhood CTS have also been reported in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, in Poland's syndrome and in scleroderma. Finally, several cases have been noted following trauma, most often related with epiphysiolysis of the distal radius. Immediate reduction has cleared the problem in most cases, but exploration of the median nerve should be considered otherwise, and also in cases with delayed occurrence of symptoms. Overall 145 of the 163 reviewed cases have undergone open carpal tunnel release. Childhood CTS often has an unusual presentation, with modest complaints and children are often too young to communicate their problem. In CTS with specific aetiologies such as storage disease, the symptoms may be masked by the skeletal dysplasia and joint stiffness. Every child with even mild symptoms must be thoroughly examined and a family history must be taken. Children with storage disease may benefit from early clinical and electrophysiological screening before they develop obvious clinical signs. PMID:14648946

  18. Automated segmentation of necrotic femoral head from 3D MR data.

    PubMed

    Zoroofi, Reza A; Sato, Yoshinobu; Nishii, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tamura, Shinichi

    2004-07-01

    Segmentation of diseased organs is an important topic in computer assisted medical image analysis. In particular, automatic segmentation of necrotic femoral head is of importance for various corresponding clinical tasks including visualization, quantitative assessment, early diagnosis and adequate management of patients suffering from avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH). Early diagnosis and treatment of ANFH is crucial since the disease occurs in relatively young individuals with an average age of 20-50, and since treatment options for more advanced disease are frequently unsuccessful. The present paper describes several new techniques and software for automatic segmentation of necrotic femoral head based on clinically obtained multi-slice T1-weighted MR data. In vivo MR data sets of 50 actual patients are used in the study. An automatic method built up to manage the segmentation task according to image intensity of bone tissues, shape of the femoral head, and other characters. The processing scheme consisted of the following five steps. (1) Rough segmentation of non-necrotic lesions of the femur by applying a 3D gray morphological operation and a 3D region growing technique. (2) Fitting a 3D ellipse to the femoral head by a new approach utilizing the constraint of the shape of the femur, and employing a principle component analysis and a simulated annealing technique. (3) Estimating the femoral neck location, and also femoral head axis by integrating anatomical information of the femur and boundary of estimated 3D ellipse. (4) Removal of non-bony tissues around the femoral neck and femoral head ligament by utilizing the estimated femoral neck axis. (5) Classification of necrotic lesions inside the estimated femoral head by a k-means technique. The above method was implemented in a Microsoft Windows software package. The feasibility of this method was tested on the data sets of 50 clinical cases (3000 MR images). PMID:15249072

  19. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis. PMID:26210779

  20. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  1. Wideband Feedback Circuit For Tunneling Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1994-01-01

    Improved feedback circuit designed for use in controlling tunneling displacement transducer. Features include stability and nearly flat frequency response up to 50 kHz. Transducer could be that in scanning tunneling microscope, or any of micromachined electromechanical transducers described in "Micromachined Electron-Tunneling Infrared Detectors" (NPO-18413), "Micromachined Tunneling Accelerometer" (NPO-18513), and "Improved Electromechanical Infrared Sensor" (NPO-18560).

  2. Experiments with a Model Water Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Abbott, Ira H

    1930-01-01

    This report describes a model water tunnel built in 1928 by the NACA to investigate the possibility of using water tunnels for aerodynamic investigations at large scales. The model tunnel is similar to an open-throat wind tunnel, but uses water for the working fluid.

  3. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  4. Multiple cannulated screw fixation of young femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yong; Kong, Gyu Min; Park, Dae Hyun; Kim, Dae Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We wanted to analyze the factors affecting the results of multiple cannulated screws fixation in patients less than 60 years old with femoral neck fracture (FNF). Methods: We reviewed 52 patients (30 males, 22 females) who were treated with multiple cannulated screws fixation for FNFs. They were followed up for more than one year during January 2002 to December 2012. They were classified by Garden’s classification. The anatomic reduction was evaluated by Garden’s alignment index on hip both anteroposterior and lateral images. Postoperative complications were analyzed during follow up periods. Results: By Garden’s classification, 6 cases were in stage I, 13 cases in stage II, 30 cases in stage III and 3 cases in stage IV. During follow up periods, avascular necrosis of the femoral head was observed in 12 cases (23%) and nonunion was observed in 5 cases (9%). The 16 patients who had complications underwent total hip arthroplasty (31%). In non-displaced fracture groups (Garde I, II) did not have AVN nor nonunion. The incidence of complications in displaced fracture group was 51.5%. The complicated cases showed tendency for increased apex anterior angulation of femoral neck on hip lateral images and the result was statistically significant. (p=0.0260). Conclusion: The patients less than 60 years old who were treated with multiple cannulated screws fixation for displaced FNFs showed the incidence of complications was more than 50%. It needs a cautious approach for anatomical reduction, especially related to anterior angulation on hip lateral image. PMID:26870127

  5. Risk of atypical femoral fracture during and after bisphosphonate use

    PubMed Central

    Schilcher, Jörg; Koeppen, Veronika; Aspenberg, Per; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Use of bisphosphonates in women is associated with higher risk of atypical femoral fractures. The risk in terms of timing of use and type of bisphosphonate, and in men, remains unclear. Patients and methods We reviewed radiographs of 5,342 Swedish women and men aged 55 years or more who had had a fracture of the femoral shaft in the 3-year period 2008–2010 (97% of those eligible), and found 172 patients with atypical fractures (93% of them women). We obtained data on medication and comorbidity. The risk of atypical fracture associated with bisphosphonate use was estimated in a nationwide cohort analysis. In addition, we performed a case-control analysis with comparison to 952 patients with ordinary shaft fractures. A short report of the findings has recently been presented (Schilcher et al. 2014a). Here we provide full details. Results The age-adjusted relative risk (RR) of atypical fracture associated with bisphosphonate use was 55 (95% CI: 39–79) in women and 54 (CI: 15–192) in men. In bisphosphonate users, women had a 3-fold higher risk than men (RR = 3.1, CI: 1.1–8.4). Alendronate users had higher risk than risedronate users (RR = 1.9, CI: 1.1–3.3). The RR after 4 years or more of use reached 126 (CI: 55–288), with a corresponding absolute risk of 11 (CI: 7–14) fractures per 10,000 person-years of use. The risk decreased by 70% per year since last use. Interpretation Women have a higher risk of atypical femoral fracture than men. The type of bisphosphonate used may affect risk estimates and the risk decreases rapidly after cessation. PMID:25582459

  6. Heterologous mesenchymal stem cells successfully treat femoral pseudarthrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effectiveness of treating pseudarthrosis in rats by using bone marrow cell suspensions or cultures of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells Methods Thirty-eight specific pathogen-free (SPF) animals were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1, Control, without surgical intervention; Group 2 (Placebo), experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated only with saline solution; Group 3, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with heterologous bone marrow cells suspension; Group 4, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with cultures of heterologous mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow. When pseudarthrosis was confirmed by simple radiological studies, digital radiography and histopathology after a 120-day postoperative period, Groups 2, 3 and 4 were treated as above. At 30, 60 and 90 days after the treatment, all animals were evaluated by simple radiological studies, and at the end of the experiment, the animals were assessed by computed axial tomography and anatomopathological and histomorphometric examinations. Results Injected cells were detected in the areas affected by pseudarthrosis using scintigraphy within the first 24 hours after their administration. After 60 days, the animals of Group 3 showed callus formation while the animals of Group 4 presented periosteal reaction and had some consolidated areas. In contrast, Group 2 showed a predominance of fibro-osteoid tissue. After 90 days, bone consolidation and remodeling was observed in all animals from Group 3 whereas animals from Group 4 exhibited partial consolidation and those ones from Group 2 persisted with pseudarthrosis. Conclusion The treatment with heterologous bone marrow cells suspension proved to be effective in the treatment of pseudarthrosis whereas cultures of heterologous bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells did not show the same potential to aid bone healing. PMID:22429995

  7. Complications With Long Cemented Stems in Proximal Femoral Replacement.

    PubMed

    Naik, Amish A; Lietman, Steven A

    2016-05-01

    This study attempted to determine whether patients undergoing cemented long-stem proximal femoral replacement had: (1) an increased short-term mortality rate; (2) greater intraoperative hemodynamic instability; (3) a greater need for resuscitation; and (4) a decreased risk of periprosthetic fracture. The current study reviewed intraoperative and short-term events related to clinical outcomes in 24 consecutive patients who were treated at a single institution over a 5-year period. These patients underwent primary long-stem (≥250 mm, n=13) vs short-stem (<250 mm, n=11) cemented proximal femoral replacement. Other than stem length, the 2 groups were not significantly different in terms of patient age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, diagnosis, or preoperative American Society of Anesthesiologists functional score. Primary outcomes were intraoperative death, blood loss, blood transfusions, fluid resuscitation, hypotension, oxygen desaturation, mortality up to 1 year, and need for revision surgery. At 1 year, a significantly increased mortality rate (77% vs 27%, P=.03) was noted in patients receiving long-stem vs short-stem arthroplasty. Patients who received longer stems also required more intraoperative blood transfusions and fluid resuscitation (P=.04) for greater hypotension (P=.04) and oxygen desaturation (P=.04). Two intraoperative deaths occurred in the long-stem group, and none occurred in the short-stem group. The findings suggest that there is an increased risk of intraoperative hemodynamic instability with long-stem vs short-stem proximal femoral replacement, with a need for greater resuscitative efforts and an increased risk of mortality at 1 year. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e423-e429.]. PMID:27064780

  8. Femoral neck anteversion measurement using linear slot scanning radiography.

    PubMed

    Chimhundu, Chipo; Sivarasu, Sudesh; Steiner, Stefan; Smit, Julian; Douglas, Tania S

    2016-02-01

    Measurements between anatomical landmarks on radiographs are useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in the orthopedic field. Direct measurement on single radiographic images, however, does not truly reflect spatial relationships, as depth information is lost. We used stereo images from a slot scanning X-ray machine to estimate coordinates of three-dimensional (3D) bony landmarks for femoral neck anteversion (FNA) measurement. A set of 7 landmarks consisting of the centre of the femoral head; the centre of the base of the femoral neck; the medial and lateral condyles; the medial and lateral posterior condyles; and finally the centre of the knee; were found to be identifiable and suitable for radiographic measurement. The reconstructed 3D coordinates were then used to define the 3D geometry of the anatomical axes required to estimate FNA. Stereophotogrammetric measurements on a sample of 30 dry right adult femurs were compared to reference values obtained using the Kingsley Olmstead method applied to photographic images. A strong positive correlation (0.998) was found and the mean ± standard deviation of the stereophotogrammetric approach (13.08 ± 6.87)° was comparable to that of the Kingsley Olmstead method (13.14 ± 6.88)°. Intra- and inter-observer reliability were high, with the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval above 0.98 for the intra-class correlation coefficient. The results merit further validation against three dimensional imaging technology such as computed tomography, to confirm stereophotogrammetry as a suitable alternative for FNA measurement. PMID:26776374

  9. A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan John Baker

    2003-08-05

    A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density

  10. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation.

  11. Possible Platelet Thrombi Formation in Dog and Human Femoral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Folts, John D.; Detmer, Donald E.; Nadler, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a ubiquitous condition that commonly produces vessel stenosis and progresses ultimately to vascular occlusion. It is thought by many that platelets collect on sites of atherosclerosis and exacerbate its progression. We have previously shown that platelet thrombi can form within 10 minutes in the stenosed coronary arteries of a dog and can produce acute cyclical reduction in blood flow measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF). This is followed by sudden restoration of flow as the platelet thrombus breaks loose and is carried distally (Circulation 54:365-370, 1976). In five dogs, blood flow was measured simultaneously in a femoral artery stenosed 70%, exposed proximally with an EMF, and monitored distally over intact skin with a Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter (DUF). Cyclical reductions in blood flow were detected by both the EMF and the DUF, presumably due to platelet thrombi forming in the stenosed femoral artery and then breaking loose and moving distally. These flow reductions could be consistently abolished with aspirin (ASA). In ten patients with angiographically proven substantial stenoses of the femoral or popliteal arteries who were not taking ASA, the popliteal blood flow velocity was measured with a DUF. Six of the ten patients showed cyclical blood flow velocity reductions during 30 minutes of observation. These flow velocity reductions were similar to those observed in the stenosed dog femoral arteries. One hour after taking 600 mg ASA orally, five of the six patients no longer showed flow velocity reductions. Eight male control subjects who were not on ASA and had no known stenoses had no flow velocity reductions when studied with the DUF. Since many factors, such as cigarette smoking, diabetes, and elevated plasma lipids, are known to increase human platelet aggregation, we postulate that platelet thrombi may form in stenosed peripheral arteries, hasten the development of atherosclerosis, and reduce blood flow. This postulate

  12. Femoral metastases from ovarian serous/endometroid adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beresford–Cleary, NJA; Mehdi, SA; Magowan, B

    2012-01-01

    Bony metastases from ovarian cancer are rare, tend to affect the axial skeleton and are associated with abdomino-pelvic disease. The median time interval between diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma and presentation of bony metastases is 44 months (1). We describe a rare case of high grade left ovarian serous / endometrioid adenocarcinoma presenting with a pathological right femoral fracture 4 weeks following diagnosis and optimal debulking of the ovarian tumour. Orthopaedic surgeons must be vigilant when planning treatment of fractures presenting in patients with a history of ovarian cancer. PMID:24960734

  13. The influence of a permanent dipole moment on the tunnelling ionization of a CO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Semiletov, Ivan M.; Zon, Boris A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the linear Stark effect due to a molecule permanent dipole moment does not influence the rate of molecule ionization by laser radiation in the multiphoton limit. However, it may influence the ionization rate in the tunnelling limit. A CO molecule is considered as an example. Its valence orbitals have σ symmetry. In this case, the tunnel effect rate is maximal if the permanent dipole moment (the molecule axis) is oriented along the direction of the laser-wave electric field, and the role of the linear Stark effect is the most noticeable. This situation differs from that when the valence orbitals have π symmetry which we have considered previously (Kornev and Zon 2014 Laser Phys. 24 115302). In that case, the tunnel effect rate is maximal if the molecule axis is oriented perpendicularly to the electric field direction and the role of the linear Stark effect is less significant. We consider the tunnel effect in both dc and ac fields, accounting for perturbation of vibrational motion by an external field. We show that the influence of the permanent dipole moment does not vanish even after averaging the tunnelling rate over the molecule orientations.

  14. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  15. Multisensor system for tunnel inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idoux, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    The system is aimed at assisting inspection and monitoring of the degradation of tunnels in order to minimize maintenance and repair time. ATLAS 70 is a complete sensors/software package which enables thorough diagnosis of tunnel wall conditions. The data collected locally are stored on a computer hard disk for subsequent analysis in a remote location via elaborate dedicated software. The sensors and local computer are loaded onto a rail and/or road vehicle of specific design, i.e. with even travelling speed of 2 to 5 km/h. Originally, the system has been developed for the Paris Underground Company and has since been applied to rail and road tunnels, large town sewage systems, clean water underground aqueducts and electric cable tunnels.

  16. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers. PMID:26222509

  17. The Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedgworth, Kevin; Woo, Alex C.

    1994-01-01

    The Unitary Plan Facility is the most heavily used wind tunnel in all of NASA. Every major commercial transport and almost every fighter built in the United States over the last 30 years has been tested in this tunnel. Also tested in this tunnel complex were models of the Space Shuttle, as well as the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo capsules. The wind tunnel represents a unique national asset of vital importance to the nation's defense and its competitive position in the world aerospace market. In 1985, the Unitary Plan Facility was named a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service because of 'its significant associations with the development of the American Space Program.'

  18. Electron tunneling in proteins program.

    PubMed

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-01

    We developed a unique integrated software package (called Electron Tunneling in Proteins Program or ETP) which provides an environment with different capabilities such as tunneling current calculation, semi-empirical quantum mechanical calculation, and molecular modeling simulation for calculation and analysis of electron transfer reactions in proteins. ETP program is developed as a cross-platform client-server program in which all the different calculations are conducted at the server side while only the client terminal displays the resulting calculation outputs in the different supported representations. ETP program is integrated with a set of well-known computational software packages including Gaussian, BALLVIEW, Dowser, pKip, and APBS. In addition, ETP program supports various visualization methods for the tunneling calculation results that assist in a more comprehensive understanding of the tunneling process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990540

  19. Tunnel construction for a desertron

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterberger, H.; Huson, F.R.

    1983-03-27

    The tunnel in this model of construction is 3-1/2 feet wide by 5 feet high. It is assumed that the tunnel contains a rail system and guidance system for: (1) An enclosed car used for transport of 2 people and some tools. (2) A magnet mover. This robot could pick up a magnet and transport it at about 10 miles per hour. (3) An alignment robot. The alignment robot would intercept E.M. waves (microwaves, lasers) to determine its position in the tunnel. Then workers could come along inside the tunnel hoop and nail it together and to the floor. The trench would then be back-filled with a 1 foot berm on top. A rail system would be installed and a support stand for the magnet.

  20. Successful management of simple fractures of the femoral neck with femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty in two free-living avian species.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Whittington, Julia K; Bennett, R Avery; McFadden, Mike; Mitchell, Mark; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-09-01

    A red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and a Canada goose (Branta canadensis) were evaluated for unilateral pelvic limb lameness. Physical examination findings and results of diagnostic imaging revealed femoral neck fractures in both birds. Both birds were treated with a femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty. The affected legs were not immobilized, and the birds were encouraged to use the legs immediately after surgery to encourage formation of a pseudoarthrosis. Within 2 weeks, both birds were using the affected limb well enough to be either successfully released or transferred to a wildlife rehabilitation facility. Femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty without immobilization of the limb is recommended for managing avian femoral neck fractures, especially in free-ranging species in which a rapid and complete or near complete return to function is vital for survival in the wild. PMID:22216722

  1. Limited femoral navigation versus conventional intramedullary femoral jig based instrumentation for achieving optimal restoration of mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty: a prospective comparative study of 200 knees.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra G; Dhawale, Amol S; Khedkar, Bipin M

    2015-04-01

    A prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between two groups: In the first group of 100 knees (ASM group) Articular Surface Mounted navigation system was used to guide the distal femoral cut. In the second group of 100 knees (JIG group) conventional intramedullary femoral jig was used. The postoperative mechanical axis of the leg was within 3° of neutral alignment in 90% of the TKA in the ASM group (mean 178.12°) as compared to 74% in the JIG group (mean 177.02°). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The data presented show that the use of limited femoral navigation leads to more accurate restoration of mechanical axis alignment when compared to conventional intramedullary femoral jigs. PMID:25466168

  2. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  3. Proteomic changes in plasma of broiler chickens with femoral head necrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) is a skeletal problem in broiler chickens where the proximal femoral head cartilage shows susceptibility to separation from its growth plate. The FHN selected birds showed higher bodyweights and reduced plasma cholesterol. The proteomic differences in the plasma of health...

  4. [Treatment strategy for posttraumatic complex deformity : After bilateral femoral shaft fractures].

    PubMed

    Ahrend, M; Ateschrang, A; Stöckle, U; Schröter, S

    2016-02-01

    A case of complex posttraumatic deformity after bilateral femoral shaft fractures is reported. Different possibilities for correction in cases of valgus malalignment combined with internal rotation deformity as well as shortening combined with external rotation deformity are presented. Oblique osteotomy and a motorized femoral extension nail were used. PMID:26187430

  5. Simultaneous Bilateral Fracture of Femoral Neck in Korea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwa-Jae; Shin, Hun-Kyu; Kim, Eugene; Ko, Taeg Su; Choi, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral femoral neck factures are common and their incidence is increasing. However, simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are rare. Although cases of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures have been reported, most were caused by strong muscle contractions during electroconvulsive therapy. Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall are an extremely rare injury; therefore, limited literature is available, and no case has been reported in Korea. We report herein a case of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall. An 83-year-old woman visited the emergency department with bilateral hip joint pain and gait disturbance, which developed 1 day after a fall. Tenderness and severe limitation in left hip joint range of motion and mild limitation in right hip joint range of motion were observed on a physical examination. A Garden type IV femoral neck fracture in the left hip joint and a Garden type I femoral neck fracture in the right hip joint were observed on plain radiography. She underwent right screw fixation and left bipolar hemiarthroplasty 2 days after admission. The patient could walk using a walker 4 weeks postoperatively. Bone union in the right femoral neck was observed at the 3 month follow-up. No specific findings were observed at the left hip hemiarthroplasty site.

  6. Fracture of the femoral component associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Yang, C Y; Cheng, C K

    1999-04-01

    Fracture of the femoral component associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not been well reported before. A 63-year-old man with osteoarthritis of the right knee underwent TKA with a New Jersey LCS Knee, with cementing on the tibia and patella but not on the femoral component. After 42 months, in addition to wearing of polyethylene of the tibia and patella, severe osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle was noted. Osteonecrosis caused loss of osseous support of the medial flange of the femoral component, and the bone ingrowth of the central and lateral flange to the distal femur was so good that it overcame the yield stress of the metal of the femoral component and caused fracture of the femoral component. The osteolytic area was filled with autogenous iliac bone, and a new femoral component was inserted and cemented. The patient's condition became satisfactory with relief of pain. Although uncommon, fracture of the femoral component does occur associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis. PMID:10220194

  7. Effect of the high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Day, B.; Shim, S.S.; Leung, G.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was done to study the effects of high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip and to further our knowledge of its physiologic basis. We have used established methods of study, including bone scans, microangiography, isotope clearance and perosseous venography, and based upon the results of these studies, we have reached certain conclusions. First, high femoral osteotomy increases the blood flow and vascularity in the hip joint, the femoral head and neck and the great trochanter. Second, bone scanning techniques using /sup 99m/Tc labeled diphosphonate have shown increased uptake in the femoral head and neck after high femoral osteotomy. The localization was done using a Digital Gamma III computer, and the activity on the osteotomy side at two weeks was 3.5 times as great as on the control side. By 16 weeks postoperatively, there was still two times as much activity on the osteotomy side. Third, microangiography showed increased vascularity both at the osteotomy site and in the femoral head and neck and the greater trochanter on that side. Such an increase in vascularity first became evident two weeks after osteotomy and persisted during the four month period studied. Fourth, the results of the /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate clearance study showed a 25 per cent increase in femoral head blood flow on the operative side. Fifth, perosseous venography of the femoral head and neck showed a marked increase in venous drainage through the osteotomy site in the immediate postosteotomy stage.

  8. Serum chemistry and histopathology of broiler femoral head necrosis and tibial dyschondroplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) are two major leg problems in young meat type poultry which cause lameness, bone deformity and infections. Whereas FHN results from disarticulation of the femoral growth plate from the articular cartilage, TD lesions are characterized by i...

  9. The effect of postural control and balance on femoral anteversion in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Karabicak, Gul Oznur; Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Gulsen, Mustafa; Ozturk, Basar; Cetin, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between femoral anteversion and functional balance and postural control in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty children with spastic cerebral palsy (mean age=12.4 ± 4.5) with grosss motor functional classification system levels I, II, and III were recruited for this study. Functional balance was evaluated using the Pediatric Balance Scale, postural control was evaluated using the Trunk Control Measurement Scale, and femoral anteversion was assessed with a handheld goniometer using the great trochanter prominence method. [Results] The results indicated that there was significant correlation between femoral anteversion and Trunk Control Measurement Scale dynamic reaching score. There were no significant correlation between femoral anteversion and the Trunk Control Measurement Scale static sitting balance, Trunk Control Measurement Scale selective movement control, total Trunk Control Measurement Scale and Pediatric Balance Scale results. [Conclusion] Increased femoral anteversion has not correlation with functional balance, static sitting, and selective control of the trunk. Femoral anteversion is related to dynamic reaching activities of the trunk, and this may be the result of excessive internal pelvic rotation. It is important for the health professionals to understand that increased femoral anteversion needs to be corrected because in addition to leading to femoral internal rotation during walking, it also effects dynamic reaching activities of spastic children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27390397

  10. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Hemiparetic Patients after Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc, Hakan; Oken, Oznur; Kara, Murat; Tiftik, Tulay; Dogu, Beril; Unlu, Zeliha; Ozcakar, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the femoral cartilage thicknesses of hemiparetic patients after stroke using musculoskeletal ultrasonography and to determine whether there is any correlation between cartilage thicknesses and the clinical characteristics of the patients. Femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured in 87 (33…

  11. A simplified technique of distal femoral screw insertion for the Grosse-Kempf interlocking nail.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, M; Gross, R H

    1988-01-01

    Failure accurately to determine distal femoral screw hole position can sometimes prolong operating time for placing an interlocking Grosse-Kempf rod. The described technique allows the distal femoral screw holes to be localized accurately with minimal radiation exposure. This technique utilizes readily available instruments and is not technically demanding. PMID:3335100

  12. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  14. Fracture of the femoral alignment stem of a hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mohammed A; Shah, Vinod B

    2011-02-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of osteoarthritis in a younger patient population. While the initial complication of femoral neck fracture is being addressed, we describe a fracture of the femoral alignment stem in a component two years from the primary procedure. PMID:21473460

  15. Histopathology and serum clinical chemistry evaluation of broilers with femoral head separation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head disarticulation (FHD) and necrosis is a sporadic leg problem of unknown etiology in broiler breeders. To determine the underlying physiology of FHD, the blood chemistry and the histopathology of the femoral heads of the affected chickens were compared with their age matched controls. Ch...

  16. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z. Z.; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field.

  17. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z Z; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F M

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field. PMID:20388970

  18. Guidelines for tunneling in enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Christopher C.; Ross Anderson, J. L.; Dutton, P. Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Summary Here we extend the engineering descriptions of simple, single-electron-tunneling chains common in oxidoreductases to quantify sequential oxidation-reduction rates of two-or-more electron cofactors and substrates. We identify when nicotinamides may be vulnerable to radical mediated oxidation-reduction and merge electron-tunneling expressions with the chemical rate expressions of Eyring. The work provides guidelines for the construction of new artificial oxidoreductases inspired by Nature but adopting independent design and redox engineering. PMID:20460101

  19. Large Diameter Femoral Heads Impose Significant Alterations on the Strains Developed on Femoral Component and Bone: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, E.G; Provatidis, C.G; Babis, G.C; Georgiou, C.S; Megas, P.D

    2011-01-01

    Total Hip Arthroplasty aims at fully recreating a functional hip joint. Over the past years modular implant systems have become common practice and are widely used, due to the surgical options they provide. In addition Big Femoral Heads have also been implemented in the process, providing more flexibility for the surgeon. The current study aims at investigating the effects that femoral heads of bigger diameter may impose on the mechanical behavior of the bone-implant assembly. Using data acquired by Computed Tomographies and a Coordinate Measurement Machine, a cadaveric femur and a Profemur-E modular stem were fully digitized, leading to a three dimensional finite element model in ANSYS Workbench. Strains and stresses were then calculated, focusing on areas of clinical interest, based on Gruen zones: the calcar and the corresponding below the greater trochanter area in the proximal femur, the stem tip region and a profile line along linea aspera. The performed finite elements analysis revealed that the use of large diameter heads produces significant changes in strain development within the bone volume, especially in the lateral side. The application of Frost’s law in bone remodeling, validated the hypothesis that for all diameters normal bone growth occurs. However, in the calcar area lower strain values were recorded, when comparing with the reference model featuring a 28mm femoral head. Along line aspera and for the stem tip area, higher values were recorded. Finally, stresses calculated on the modular neck revealed increased values, but without reaching the yield strength of the titanium alloy used. PMID:21792381

  20. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Ho; Garg, Anant Kumar; Oh, Jong-Keon; Oh, Chang-Wug; Lee, Sung-Jae; Myung-Rae, Cho; Kim, Min-Keun; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center) of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C) group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C) group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres. PMID:23325963

  1. [Joint and sensory branch block of the obturator and femoral nerves in a case of femoral head osteonecrosis and arthritis].

    PubMed

    Cortiñas-Sáenz, M; Salmerón-Velez, G; Holgado-Macho, I A

    2014-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the hip joint is complex. The joint and sensory branch block of the obturator and femoral nerves is effective for treating the pain caused due to different hip diseases. This could be an option to be considered in certain circumstances such as, being a surgical-anaesthetic high risk, or if there is significant overweight, It could also be useful on other occasions if the traumatoligist considers that it is better to delay hip replacement for a limited period. PMID:24656423

  2. Variational transition-state theory with optimized orientation of the dividing surface and semiclassical tunneling calculations for deuterium and muonium kinetic isotope effects in the free radical association reaction H + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, J. ||; Corchado, J.C. |; Gonzalez-Lafont, A.; Lluch, J.M.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have used canonical variational transition-state theory with multidimensional tunneling contributions (CVT/MT) to calculate 21 kinetic isotope effects (KIE) for the addition of hydrogen atom to ethylene. The potential energies are obtained by variable scaling of external correlation (VSEC). The reorientation of the dividing surface (RODS) algorithm is employed so that the same reaction path can be used for every isotopic substitution. The results show the importance of the tunneling effect for explaining the trends in the KIEs in this almost barrierless reaction. The authors have predicted the regioselectivity for three different isotopically substituted substrates and have shown how the addition to the most substituted carbon is kinetically favored, especially at low temperature. However, their calculations show no cis/trans selectivity for the isotopically substituted ethylene substrate.

  3. A simple new technique for the removal of fractured femoral stems: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The removal of broken femoral stems has become a major issue in revision surgery, and is a technically difficult and time-consuming procedure. Case presentation We present a case of a fracture of a cementless long femoral stem in a 65-year-old, white Caucasian man. The distal part was removed with a special longitudinal osteotomy through the anterior cortex extending distally for 10cm. It was then followed by a transversal osteotomy 2cm below the tip of the femoral stump to allow enough space for two locking pliers. Simultaneously using a lamina spreader on the distal part, the broken stem was extracted while hammering on two locking pliers. Conclusions We developed a simple and easy technique for the removal of a broken femoral stem that can be applied to all kinds of femoral stems and intramedullary nails regardless of their cross section. We used ordinary surgical instruments and spared the remaining bone stock. PMID:24886067

  4. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. PMID:25015169

  5. Intraoperative measurement of rotational stability of femoral components of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H; Mulroy, R D; Maloney, W J; Burke, D W; Chandler, H P; Zalenski, E B

    1991-05-01

    High out-of-plane forces acting on the hip joint can produce important rotational micromotion of the femoral component. This micromotion at the prosthesis interface may be detrimental to the stability of the implant. In cementless femoral implants this could prevent bone ingrowth, and in the cemented component this could cause generation of particulate debris, lysis, and loosening. The introduction of the torque wrench micrometer for assessment of intraoperative femoral component stability can quantify the initial stability of primary cementless femoral components and critically evaluate the stability (at either the initial or revision arthroplasty) of both cemented and cementless femoral components. It allows the surgeon to produce a known torque in the direction and magnitude of the out-of-plane forces that load the hip in vivo. PMID:2019039

  6. Experimental study on cheng zai wan for treatment of necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanping; Huang, Keqin; Lang, Fengping; Huang, Yongxun; Huang, Hui; Huang, Hong; Zhou, Chongguang; Zhang, Wanqiang

    2003-12-01

    Cheng Zai Wan ([symbol: see text]), a Chinese herbal preparation was administrated in the two-leg rat model of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head established by taking prednisone acetate for a long period and the osteoporosis model rat by castration in order to explore the effects of the prescription on necrosis of the femoral head. The results showed that after treatment, the pitting on the surface of the femoral head disappeared, the reticular structure with filling cells was restored; the fat droplets in bone cells or cartilage cells of the femoral head were significantly reduced; sparse capillaries were improved, density and width of the bone trabecula were increased somewhat; bone mineral density, bone weight, bone strength and rigidity were significantly increased; and the low level of estrin was improved. It is suggested that Cheng Zai Wan has definite therapeutic effects on aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:14719304

  7. Spontaneous and bilateral necrosis of the femoral head in a young experimental beagle dog

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Kurotaki, Tetsuro; Yamada, Naoaki; Kumabe, Shino; Doi, Takuya; Wako, Yumi; Tsuchitani, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the pathological characterizations of a rare case of necrosis of the femoral head that was spontaneous, bilateral, avascular and nontraumatic. A 14-month-old beagle dog was presented with pain in the hind limbs. At necropsy, the articular surface in the bilateral femoral head was markedly irregular. There were no gross abnormalities other than in the hip joints. Microscopically, a wide range of trabecular bone necrosis localized in the subchondral area was observed in both femoral heads. In the right femoral head, fibrosis and proliferative vessels were noted in the subchondral area. The articular cartilage was thickened irregularly, but there was no evidence of cartilage necrosis. The bone marrow adjacent to the affected area showed severe depression. In the metaphysis, atrophic bone marrow, but not bone necrosis, was observed. This was a rare case of spontaneous necrosis of the femoral head in an experimental beagle dog. PMID:26028821

  8. The development of a validated checklist for femoral venous catheterization: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Berg, Katherine; Berg, Dale; Davis, Joshua; Schaeffer, Arielle; Justice, Ellen M; Tinkoff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Femoral venous catheterization is a common, invasive procedure, which may lead to serious complications. Validated checklists are central to teaching and assessing procedural skills and may result in improved health care quality. The results of the first step of the validation of a femoral venous catheterization checklist are described. A comprehensive literature review of articles published on femoral venous catheterization did not yield a checklist validated by the Delphi method. A modified Delphi technique, involving a panel of 8 interdisciplinary, interinstitutional experts, was used to develop a femoral venous catheterization checklist. The internal consistency coefficient using Cronbach α was .99. Developing a 29-item checklist for teaching and assessing femoral venous catheterization is the first step in the validation process. For this checklist to become further validated, it should be implemented and studied in the simulation and clinical environments. PMID:24045368

  9. Hip Arthroscopic Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation for Treating Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takanori; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Watanuki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Akinori; Uchida, Soshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the femoral head is not a common source of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy is becoming a more frequent indication for intra-articular pathologies of the hip. Osteochondral autologous transplantation is a promising technique that theoretically can reconstruct osteochondral lesions of the femoral head. We describe our technique for arthroscopic antegrade osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of OCD of the femoral head. The advantages of this technique include that it is a less invasive method with the ability to assess and treat intra-articular pathologies associated with OCD of the femoral head at same time. Case series and outcomes after this technique are not currently reported in the literature; however, it could be a less invasive method and provide favorable clinical outcomes for patients with OCD lesions of the femoral head. PMID:26870645

  10. Do larger femoral heads improve the functional outcome in total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Allen, Charlotte L; Hooper, Gary J; Frampton, Christopher M A

    2014-02-01

    Use of larger diameter femoral heads has been popularised in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Recent studies have implicated larger femoral heads in early failure. We evaluated what effect the size of the femoral head had on the early functional outcome in order to determine the optimal head size for the maximal functional outcome. There were 726 patients who underwent elective THA and were divided into 3 groups according to head size then compared with respect to functional outcome scores and dislocation rates. This study failed to show that increasing the size of the femoral head significantly improved the functional outcome at 1 year after total hip arthroplasty but that the use of a 36 mm or greater femoral head did reduce the dislocation rate. PMID:23891058

  11. Directional change in tunneling of subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in response to decayed wood attractants.

    PubMed

    Su, Nan-Yao

    2005-04-01

    Wood discs decayed with brown rot fungi and polymer discs impregnated with acetone extract of decayed wood were embedded in sand of a two-dimensional foraging arena to evaluate their attractant potential in directing termite tunnels toward them. Termites were released near one arena corner and were guided to follow the physical guideline of the arena edges. In the absence of the attractants, termites generally formed a relatively linear tunnel along the edges. When decayed wood discs or treated polymer discs were placed in wet sand near one side of the arena, termite tunnels departed from the arena edges and were oriented toward them. The attraction distance ranged from 12 to 18 cm. The attractant properties were most likely water soluble and permeated through wet sand to cause termites to change their orientation. The results demonstrated that when such attractants are placed near a bait station in the field, they may be used to direct termite foraging toward the station. PMID:15889740

  12. Distal Femoral Complications Following Antegrade Intramedullary Nail Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fantry, Amanda J.; Elia, Gregory; Vopat, Bryan G.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1), nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2), and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3). Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature), consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization. PMID:25874066

  13. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  14. Mechanical properties of femoral cortical bone following cemented hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, G X; Lu, W W; Chiu, P K Y; Wang, Y; Li, Z Y; Zhang, Y G; Xu, B; Deng, L F; Luk, K D K

    2007-11-01

    Femoral bone remodeling following total hip replacement is a big concern and has never been examined mechanically. In this study, six goats underwent unilateral cemented hip hemiarthroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. Nine months later animals were sacrificed, and the femoral cortical bone slices at different levels were analysed using microhardness testing and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) scanning. Implanted femurs were compared to contralateral nonimplanted femurs. Extensive bone remodeling was demonstrated at both the proximal and middle levels, but not at the distal level. Compared with the nonimplanted side, significant decreases were found in the implanted femur in cortical bone area, bone mineral density, and cortical bone hardness at the proximal level, as well as in bone mineral density and bone hardness at the middle level. However, no significant difference was observed in either variable for the distal level. In addition, similar proximal-to-distal gradient changes were revealed both in cortical bone microhardness and bone mineral density. From the mechanical point of view, the results of the present study suggested that stress shielding is an important mechanical factor associated with bone adaptation following total hip replacement. PMID:17506504

  15. Normalization of chromium and cobalt values after femoral head replacement

    PubMed Central

    Iacobellis, Claudio; Berizzi, Antonio; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Biz, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) can be caused by metal-on-metal total hip arthoplasty. We treated a case of ARMD in a 61-year-old patient by limited prosthetic revision, replacing the metal head with a polyethylene one. Presentation of case Two years after metal-on-metal total arthoplasty of the left hip, radiographic control showed osteolysis of the patient’s greater trochanter. He underwent surgical curettage and the application of demineralized bone matrix. After a few months, blood Co and Cr increased, and at clinical evaluation, the patient had worsening paresthesias. He agreed to prosthetic revision after 14 months. Discussion During surgery, the acetabular cup and femoral stem appeared correctly osteointegrated; therefore, the cup was maintained, while the prosthetic femoral head was removed and replaced with a 50 mm polyethylene head. Conclusion Blood Cr and urinary Cr and Co decreased and normalized 3 months after surgery, and the patient no longer suffered paresthesias. Blood Co normalized 7 months after revision. Radiographic follow-up showed no change after 30 months post-operatively. We believe this case report could be a starting point for a future randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of the procedure used compared with complete implant revision. PMID:25841157

  16. Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Carey, James L; Brown, Gregory A; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2016-09-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed the Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) document Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain the best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 64 patient scenarios and 12 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Lastly, a separate, multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). PMID:27479835

  17. Wear and degradation on retrieved zirconia femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Nogiwa-Valdez, A A; Rainforth, W M; Stewart, T D

    2014-03-01

    Zirconia femoral heads retrieved from patients after different implantation periods (up to 13 years) were analysed using vertical scanning interferometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. A range of topographical and compositional changes on the surface of the retrievals are reported in this work. The study revealed that changes in roughness are the result of a combination of factors, i.e. scratching, surface upheaval due to transformation to the monoclinic phase and grain pull-out. Clusters of transformed monoclinic grains were observed on heads implanted for more than 3 years. The phase composition of these clusters was confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy. Increased abrasive wear and a higher monoclinic phase content concentrated on the pole of the femoral heads, confirming that the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation was not only induced by the tetragonal phase metastability and environmental conditions but mechanical and tribological factors, also affected the transformation kinetics. Additionally, the head implanted for 13 years showed evidence of a self-polishing mechanism leading to a considerable smoothening of the surface. These observations provide an insight into the interrelated mechanisms underlying the wear and transformation process on zirconia ceramics during implantation. PMID:24140384

  18. Proximal femoral diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry in Orrorin tugenensis.

    PubMed

    Bleuze, M

    2012-06-01

    Functional adaptations in femora attributed to Orrorin tugenensis provide a unique opportunity to examine locomotor behavior very early in the hominin lineage. This study examines relative cortical thickness, cortical area (CA) relative to the polar moment of area (J), and J relative to femoral head superoinferior diameter (FHD) in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis (BAR 1002'00 and BAR 1003'00), and compares patterns in this early hominin with those in a sample of modern humans (N=31), Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins (N=8), Pan troglodytes troglodytes (N=13), and Pan paniscus (N=3). Relative cortical thickness and CA relative to J in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis are comparable to patterns generally found in other fossil hominins. Proximal femoral diaphyseal J relative to FHD in BAR 1002'00 is similar to patterns found in fossil hominins typically attributed to a non-Homo genus (i.e. SK 82, SK 97, and KNM-ER 738). Cross-sectional geometric patterns in the proximal femur of Orrorin are not unlike those generally found in australopithecines and fossil Homo. While the results of this study cannot confirm unequivocally that Orrorin was an obligate biped, a mode of locomotion comparable to that proposed for australopithecines cannot be ruled out. PMID:22609080

  19. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  20. Spin-dependent tunneling effects in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li

    2009-03-01

    It has long been known that current extracted from magnetic electrodes through ultra thin oxide tunnel barriers is spin polarized. This current gives rise to two important properties: tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) when the tunnel barrier is sandwiched between two thin magnetic electrodes and, spin momentum transfer, which can be used to manipulate the magnetic state of the magnetic electrodes. In the first part of my talk I show how the structure of thin CoFe layers can be made amorphous by simply sandwiching them between two amorphous layers, one of them the tunnel barrier. No glass forming elements are needed. By slightly changing the thickness of these layers or by heating them above their glass transition temperature they become crystalline. Surprisingly, the TMR of the amorphous structure is significantly higher than of its crystalline counterpart. The tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance, which has complex voltage dependence, is also discussed. In the second part of my talk I discuss the microwave emission spectrum from magnetic tunnel junctions induced by spin torque from spin polarized dc current passed through the device. We show that the spectrum is very sensitive to small variations in device structures, even in those devices which exhibit similarly high TMR (˜120%) and which have similar resistance-area products (˜4-10 φμm^2). We speculate that these variations are due to non-uniform spatial magnetic excitation arising from inhomogeneous current flow through the tunnel barrier. [In collaboration with Xin Jiang, M. Hayashi, Rai Moriya, Brian Hughes, Teya Topuria, Phil Rice, and Stuart S.P. Parkin

  1. Electronic Signatures of all Four DNA Nucleosides in a Tunneling Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai

    2011-03-01

    New approaches to DNA sequencing are required to reduce costs and increase the availability of personalized genomics. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope as a tool, we report measurements of the current signals generated as free nucleosides diffuse into a tunnel junction in which both electrodes are functionalized with a reagent that presents a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor to the nucleosides. This functionalization serves to both limit the range of molecular orientations in the tunnel gap and reduce the contact resistance, increasing the selectivity of the tunneling signal, so that a direct readout may be possible with a few repeated reads. This work was supported by a grant from the Sequencing Technology Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute (HG004378).

  2. Density-gradient theory of tunneling: Physics and verification in one dimensiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, M. G.; Svizhenko, A.

    2008-10-01

    The application of an engineering-oriented continuum description of electron transport known as density-gradient theory to quantum mechanical tunneling is investigated, and its legitimacy, physical fidelity, and limitations are assessed using detailed comparisons with nonequilibrium Green's function simulations in one dimension. These comparisons demonstrate that despite the apparent contradiction, quantum tunneling can often be well represented by the classical field theory with the electron inertia term of Newton's second law playing a significant role. Moreover, the density-gradient approach is found to be quite accurate with the main source of error not being the description of the tunneling itself, but rather the representation of the carriers at high density inside the electrodes. A physical understanding of the ad hoc tunneling boundary conditions used in previous work is also provided.

  3. Troll Phase 1: Landfall tunnel inspection by use of virtual reality technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, J.H.; Skjei, S.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Troll Phase 1 landfall of both import and export pipelines to/from the Kollsnes onshore gas drying and compression plant is via a waterfilled 3,7 km long tunnel system with its deepest point 235 m below mean sea level. This paper describes the methods developed for inspection of the waterfilled tunnel system by utilization of a conventional Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV). These comprise three main elements, i.e., ROV intervention into a partially horizontal tunnel up to a length of 4 km, an inspection and reporting system developed for the presentation of survey data and the use of virtual reality techniques for representing the location and orientation of the ROV within the tunnel complex to the pilot in real time.

  4. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.

    1985-10-22

    A tunnel boring machine including the following elements: a full face rotary cutterhead; a cutterhead support on which the cutterhead is mounted; a gripper system carried by a gripper support frame for reacting thrust, steering, roll correction, and torque forces; a conveyor system for transporting muck from behind the rotary cutterhead to a dump point rearwardly of the machine; primary propel cylinders for advancing the cutterhead which are mounted between the gripper support frame and the cutterhead support, the primary propel cylinders consisting of a series of at least three pairs of double acting hydraulic cylinders arranged annularly in equally spaced apart locations and in a series of V-shaped configurations between the gripper support frame and the cutterhead support, each such pair of primary propel cylinders having an included angle between the cylinders of about 15/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/ and with a line bisecting the included angle between the cylinders extending generally parallel to the longitudinal centerline of the machine; and a hydraulic control system for controlling the pairs of primary propel cylinders to effect axial forward thrust on the cutterhead by simultaneous actuation of all the primary propel cylinders while transmitting the reaction torque exerted on the cutterhead support by rotation of the cutterhead, steering of the cutterhead support and the cutterhead by selective actuation of only a portion of the primary propel cylinders, and roll corrections of the cutterhead support and the cutterhead by selective actuation of alternate members of the primary propel cylinders.

  5. Majorana tunneling entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    In thermodynamics a macroscopic state of a system results from a number of its microscopic states. This number is given by the exponent of the system's entropy exp(S ) . In noninteracting systems with discrete energy spectra, such as large scale quantum dots, S as a function of the temperature has usually a plateau shape with integer values of exp(S ) on these plateaus. Plateaus with noninteger values of exp(S ) are fundamentally forbidden and would be thermodynamically infeasible. Here we investigate the entropy of a noninteracting quantum dot coupled via tunneling to normal metals with continuum spectra as well as to topological superconductors. We show that the entropy may have noninteger plateaus if the topological superconductors support weakly overlapping Majorana bound states. This brings a fundamental change in the thermodynamics of the quantum dot whose specific heat cV acquires low-temperature Majorana peaks which should be absent according to the conventional thermodynamics. We also provide a fundamental thermodynamic understanding of the transport properties, such as the linear conductance. In general our results show that the thermodynamics of systems coupled to Majorana modes represents a fundamental physical interest with diverse applications depending on versatility of possible coupling mechanisms.

  6. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically < 10 Hz) that the

  7. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris

    2015-02-23

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  8. The self streamlining wind tunnel. [wind tunnel walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two dimensional test section in a low speed wind tunnel capable of producing flow conditions free from wall interference is presented. Flexible top and bottom walls, and rigid sidewalls from which models were mounted spanning the tunnel are shown. All walls were unperforated, and the flexible walls were positioned by screw jacks. To eliminate wall interference, the wind tunnel itself supplied the information required in the streamlining process, when run with the model present. Measurements taken at the flexible walls were used by the tunnels computer check wall contours. Suitable adjustments based on streamlining criteria were then suggested by the computer. The streamlining criterion adopted when generating infinite flowfield conditions was a matching of static pressures in the test section at a wall with pressures computed for an imaginary inviscid flowfield passing over the outside of the same wall. Aerodynamic data taken on a cylindrical model operating under high blockage conditions are presented to illustrate the operation of the tunnel in its various modes.

  9. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures. PMID:25907394

  10. The modified Dunn procedure for slipped capital femoral epiphysis does not reduce the length of the femoral neck

    PubMed Central

    Cosma, Dan; Vasilescu, Dana Elena; Corbu, Andrei; Văleanu, Mădălina; Vasilescu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is evolving, with the development of new surgical techniques. |We wanted to study if modified Dunn procedure restores the normal alignment of the proximal femur and the risk of avascular necrosis is increased. Methods: This is a single centre, retrospective study, comparing the outcomes of in situ pinning and modified Dunn procedure. Between 2001 and 2014, 7 children (7 hips) underwent the modified Dunn procedure and 10 children (10 hips) pinning in situ for stable and unstable SCFE. Mean age of the patients was 12.7 years with a median follow-up of 18 months. Results: The radiological parameters improved in the modified Dunn procedure group, while the length of the femoral neck didn’t change significantly (p=0.09). Postoperative clinical outcomes were slightly better in the modified Dunn procedure group (6 hips out of 7 had good and excellent results) compared to the pinning in situ group (8 good and excellent results out of 10 hips) (p=0.04). No avascular necrosis was found and there were no cases of chondrolysis. Conclusion: Radiographic parameters of the proximal femur assessed in our study improved in all hips that underwent modified Dunn procedure, without the creation of secondary deformities. PMID:27182244

  11. In-plane quasi-particle tunneling into Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, H.; Pugel, D. E.; Badica, E.; Greene, L. H.; Jain, Sha; Hinks, D. G.

    2000-11-01

    Planar tunneling spectroscopy is performed into the a-b plane of the high-temperature superconductor Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8. The tunneling spectra exhibit a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP). Preliminary studies as a function of temperature, crystallographic orientation, magnetic field magnitude and direction confirm the ZBCP is an Andreev bound state (ABS) at zero energy. Below 5K, a depletion in the density of states at zero energy is observed

  12. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula. PMID:24224758

  13. Distal femoral derotational osteotomy with external fixation for correction of excessive femoral anteversion in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Skiak, Eyad; Karakasli, Ahmet; Basci, Onur; Satoglu, Ismail S; Ertem, Fatih; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) disorder often develop rotational hip deformity. Increasing deformities impair already diminished walking abilities; femoral osteotomies are often performed to maintain and improve walking abilities. Fixation of osteotomies with condylar plates has been used successfully, but does not often enable immediate postoperative full weight-bearing. To avoid considerable postoperative rehabilitation deficit and additional bone loss because of inactivity, a postoperative treatment with full weight-bearing, is therefore, desirable. Self-tapping Schanz screws with a unilateral external fixator crossing the knee joint providing stronger anchoring in osteopenic bone might fulfill these demands. A retrospective study was carried out on 27 ambulatory CP patients, mean age 17.5 years (range 9-22 years); 11 patients with bilateral severe intoeing deformities underwent a supracondylar femoral osteotomy between September 2008 and April 2012. All patients were allowed to bear their full weight postoperatively. The aim of this study was to describe the technique, the results of this technique, to evaluate the time required for bone healing, and the type of complications associated with a distal derotational femoral osteotomy fixed with a uniaxial external fixator crossing the knee joint. A total of 27 patients were studied [mean weight 48.8 kg (range 29.8-75 kg)]. The mean preoperative rotation included internal rotation of 69° and external rotation of 17°. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically for a minimum of 1 year after surgery. There was a significant decrease in the mean medial rotation from 69° to 32° (P=0.00034). The lateral rotation increased significantly from preoperative 17° to postoperative 45° (P=0.0011). The femoral anteversion decreased significantly from a mean of 55° preoperatively to a mean 17° postoperatively (P=0.030). All patients, except one, achieved solid fusion uneventfully. One patient was a

  14. Interface-modification-enhanced tunnel electroresistance in multiferroic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. J.; Miao, P. X.; Cong, J. Z.; Song, C.; Cui, B.; Peng, J. J.; Li, F.; Wang, G. Y.; Zhao, Y. G.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, L. R.; Pan, F.

    2014-08-01

    We report a large tunnel electroresistance (TER) effect up to ˜104% in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3/BaTiO3/Co (LSMO/BTO/Co) multiferroic tunnel junctions (MFTJs), which couples with well-defined tunnel magnetoresistance. The large TER is related to (LaAlO3)0.3(LaSrTaO6)0.7 substrates which guarantee a high-quality LSMO/BTO interface and robust ferroelectricity in BTO. The insert of 0.5 nm-thick Pt between the Co electrode and BTO barrier further enhances the TER value to 105% and improves the endurance of the MFTJs, ascribed to the shortened screening length and reduced oxidation of BTO/Co interface. Their use would advance the process towards practical MFTJs with four resistance states.

  15. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A lateral orientation is a position away from the midline of the body. For instance, the arms are lateral to the ... ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the ...

  16. Theories of Sexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storms, Michael D.

    1980-01-01

    Results indicated homosexuals, heterosexuals, and bisexuals did not differ within each sex on measures of masculinity and femininity. Strong support was obtained for the hypothesis that sexual orientation relates primarily to erotic fantasy orientation. (Author/DB)

  17. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  18. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Ahmed M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a debilitating disease in orthopedics, frequently progressing to femoral head collapse and osteoarthritis. It is thought to be a multifactorial disease. ONFH ultimately results in femoral head collapse in 75–85% of untreated patients. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) yields satisfactory results in the treatment of the end stage of the disease. However, disease typically affects males between the ages of 20 and 40 years and joint replacement is not the ideal option for younger patients. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet rich plasma (PRP) have been used as an adjunct to core decompression to improve clinical success in the treatment of precollapse hips. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 40 hips in 30 patients was done. There were 19 males and 11 females with a mean age 36.7 ± 6.93 years. The indication for the operation was restricted primarily to modified Ficat stages IIb and III. 16 hips (40%) had stage IIb and 24 hips (60%) had stage III ONFH. The period of follow up ranged between 36–50 months with a mean 41.4 ± 3.53 months. All patients were assessed clinically during pre- and post-operative period according to the Harris Hip Score (HHS), Visual Analog Score (VAS) and radiologically by X-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was done preoperatively to confirm the diagnosis and every 6 months postoperatively for assessment of healing. The operative procedure include removal of necrotic area with drilling then the cavity was filled with a composite of bone graft mixed with PRP. Results: The mean HHS improved from 46.0 ± 7.8 preoperatively to 90.28 ± 19 at the end of followup (P < 0.0001). The mean values of VAS were 78 ± 21 and 35 ± 19 at preoperatively period and final followup, respectively, with an average reduction of 43 points. Conclusion: We found that the use of PRP with collagen sheet can increase the reparable capacity after drilling of necrotic segment in stage IIb and

  19. Nonoperative treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a scientific study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of the Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis remains a cause of concern due to the fact that the true knowledge of the etiopathogeny is unknown, as well as one of its major complications: chondrolysis. The conservative treatment remains controversial; it has been overlooked in the studies and subjected to intense criticism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the results of treatment on the hip of patients displaying slipped capital femoral epiphysis, using the plaster cast immobilization method and its link to chondrolysis. Methods The research was performed based on the study of the following variables: symptomatology, and the degree of slipping. A hip spica cast and bilateral short/long leg casts in abduction, internal rotation with anti-rotational bars were used for immobilizing the patient's hip for twelve weeks. Statistical analysis was accomplished by Wilcoxon's marked position test and by the Fisher accuracy test at a 5% level. Results A satisfactory result was obtained in the acute group, 70.5%; 94%; in the chronic group (chronic + acute on chronic). Regarding the degree of the slipping, a satisfactory result was obtained in 90.5% of hips tested with a mild slip; in 76% with moderate slip and 73% in the severe slip. The statistical result revealed that a significant improvement was found for flexion (p = 0.0001), abduction (p = 0.0001), internal rotation (p = 0.0001) and external rotation (p = 0.02). Chondrolysis was present in 11.3% of the hips tested. One case of pseudoarthrosis with aseptic capital necrosis was presented. There was no significant variation between age and chondrolysis (p = 1.00).Significant variation between gender/non-white patients versus chondrolysis (p = 0.031) and (p = 0.037), respectively was verified. No causal association between plaster cast and chondrolysis was observed (p = 0.60). In regard to the symptomatology group and the slip degree versus chondrolysis, the p value was not statistically

  20. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  1. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Final Report summarizes the work carried out by a unique Government/Industry partnership during the period of June 1994 through May 1996. The objective of this partnership was to plan, design, build and activate 'world class' wind tunnel facilities for the development of future-generation commercial and military aircraft. The basis of this effort was a set of performance goals defined by the National Facilities Study (NFS) Task Group on Aeronautical Research and Development Facilities which established two critical measures of improved wind tunnel performance; namely, higher Reynolds number capability and greater productivity. Initial activities focused upon two high-performance tunnels (low-speed and transonic). This effort was later descoped to a single multipurpose tunnel. Beginning in June 1994, the NWTC Project Office defined specific performance requirements, planned site evaluation activities, performed a series of technical/cost trade studies, and completed preliminary engineering to support a proposed conceptual design. Due to budget uncertainties within the Federal government, the NWTC project office was directed to conduct an orderly closure following the Systems Design Review in March 1996. This report provides a top-level status of the project at that time. Additional details of all work performed have been archived and are available for future reference.

  2. Effect of triple pelvic osteotomy on the proximal femoral geometry in dysplastic dogs.

    PubMed

    Sarierler, Murat; Yildirim, Ismail Gokce; Ocal, Mehmet Kamil

    2012-02-01

    Triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO) is one of the surgical procedures for use to try to reduce subsequent degenerative joint disease or modify the progress of hip dysplasia in young dogs. Joint force and pressure distribution were changed by this procedure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out whether the remodeling of proximal femur exists or not after TPO in dysplastic dogs. Ten femora from five young dysplastic mongrel dogs, treated unilaterally with TPO using 20° canine pelvic osteotomy plates, were used. One year after TPO, neck-proximal shaft angle, femoral head, neck, diaphyseal and mid-shaft diameters, total femoral, femoral neck axis, and intertrochanteric, femoral head offset lengths as well as the lengths from head center to lateral margin of greater trochanter and to proximal femoral axis were measured from the bone. The significant differences between treatment and control side were determined in Norberg angle, neck-proximal shaft angle, neck diameter, diaphyseal diameter, mid-shaft diameter, length from head center to proximal femoral axis and femoral head offset length. In conclusion, although small number of cases was used, it was determined that the aforementioned variables are affected by TPO. So, these variables may be supply additional information about the changes to the joint following TPO in dysplastic dogs. PMID:21176929

  3. Identification of femoral head center of bipolar hemiarthroplasy in radiostereometric analysis with elementary geometrical shape models.

    PubMed

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Röhrl, Stephan M; von Schewelov, Thord; Nordsletten, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Elementary geometrical shape (EGS) models are useful in radiostereometric analysis (RSA) on hip stems because tantalum markers attached to the stems can be omitted. In order to create an EGS model of a femoral stem, the center of the femoral head has to be identified. The contour of the femoral head is recommended to be used. However, the contour of the femoral head cannot be detected exclusively by computer if it is combined with a bipolar head or a metal cup. We therefore hypothesized that the contour of the outer head of bipolar hemiarthroplasty can be included in the EGS model as well as the femoral head contour. We calculated the time required for the detection of the contour, the precision of analysis and the stem micromotion at 2 years using the two different methods in the same picture set and compared the results. The detection of the bipolar head contour was 10 times faster than that of the femoral head contour. The precision for subsidence was 0.16 mm in EGS RSA with the femoral head contour, and 0.15 mm with the bipolar head contour (p=0.68). The precisions were comparable and clinically acceptable. There was no significant difference between the results of the 2-year micromotion with the two different methods. We conclude that this new method is applicable to measure stem micromotion of hemi-arthroplasty with EGS RSA and the method facilitates the Radiostereometric analysis. PMID:26705109

  4. [Progress in diagnosis and treatment of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture].

    PubMed

    Du, C G; Zhang, Y Z; Chen, W

    2016-07-01

    Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures are rare injuries, which are often caused by high-energy trauma and combined with multiple injuries, such as thoracic and abdominal injury, head injuries, and fractures of other sites.Delayed or missed diagnosis of the ipsilateral femoral neck fracture often occurs.When patients with femoral shaft fractures caused by high-energy trauma are admitted into hospital, physical examination should be conducted carefully.In addition to femoral shaft fractures, radiographs of the ipsilater hip and knee joints should been taken, simultaneously taking into consideration the potential effect of anteversion angle on the demonstration of femoral neck fracture.Computed tomograph and magnetic resonance imaging are advised to perform if necessary to facilitate early and accurate diagnosis of ipsilateral femoral neck fracture.Comprehensive evaluation should be done based on age, physical condition, associated injuries as well as fracture site, classification and injury severity.Accordingly, proper and reasonable surgical plan is made.During the operation, anatomical reduction of the fractures, especially femoral neck fractures, should be achieved, and then fixed with appropriate internal implants.Besides, attention should also be paid to the treatment of associated injuries as well as the prevention and management of complications. PMID:27373484

  5. Management of femoral neck fractures in the young patient: A critical analysis review

    PubMed Central

    Pauyo, Thierry; Drager, Justin; Albers, Anthony; Harvey, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Femoral neck fractures account for nearly half of all hip fractures with the vast majority occurring in elderly patients after simple falls. Currently there may be sufficient evidence to support the routine use of hip replacement surgery for low demand elderly patients in all but non-displaced and valgus impacted femoral neck fractures. However, for the physiologically young patients, preservation of the natural hip anatomy and mechanics is a priority in management because of their high functional demands. The biomechanical challenges of femoral neck fixation and the vulnerability of the femoral head blood supply lead to a high incidence of non-union and osteonecrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of displaced femoral neck fractures. Anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are essentials in achieving the goals of treatment in this young patient population. Furthermore, other management variables such as surgical timing, the role of capsulotomy and the choice of implant for fixation remain controversial. This review will focus both on the demographics and injury profile of young patients with femoral neck fractures and the current evidence behind the surgical management of these injuries as well as their major secondary complications. PMID:25035822

  6. Femoral head diameter in subcapital fracture of the femur in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunlade, S O; Omololu, A B; Alonge, T O; Obajimi, M O

    2004-09-01

    Subcapital fracture of the femur is common in the elderly patients though the incidence is less in our environment than in the western world. Primary prosthetic replacement is the method of treatment in the majority of the patients. To facilitate this, a foreknowledge of the femoral head diameter is necessary. To determine the diameter of the femoral head and its magnification on radiograph among patients with hip fractures seen in South-West Nigeria, all patients with subcapital fracture of the neck of femur seen between March 1997 and February 2002 were included in the study. The femoral heads were measured on the radiographic film using a transparent ruler and after extraction of the femoral head during surgery using callipers. There were 25 patients in all, the mean age of patients was 73.2 years. Fall at home accounted for 70% of the cases. The femoral head diameter was between 42 mm and 50 mm in 92% of patients while magnification of femoral head diameter on radiograph was 10-14% in 92% of cases. The usaof 10-14% magnification of femoral head on radiograph would help the surgeon determine the size of prosthetic head before commencement of surgery. PMID:15819470

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Diagnosis of Femoral Osteomyelitis and Abscess.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Geoffrey E; Upshaw, Jana E; Bailey, Stephanie; Park, Daniel B

    2015-09-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections are common disease presentations to the pediatric emergency department, and rapid and accurate identification of potentially serious skin and soft tissue infections is critical. In cases of atraumatic musculoskeletal pain with systemic complaints, a bacterial etiology must be ruled out. Point-of-care ultrasonography is increasingly common in the pediatric emergency department and assists in rapid and accurate identification of a variety of disease processes. We present a case of a 14-year-old adolescent boy with atraumatic right knee pain to illustrate the benefits of point-of-care ultrasonography in the timely diagnosis of musculoskeletal and soft tissue pathology. Moreover, we describe the use of ultrasound in procedural guidance of deep-space fluid aspiration, with an eventual diagnosis of femoral osteomyelitis. Ultrasonographic techniques and the emergent work-up and management of osteomyelitis are reviewed. PMID:26335234

  8. Patella dislocation following distal femoral replacement after bone tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Toru; Kanda, Shotaro; Maeda, Akinori; Endo, Minoru; Saita, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old girl with patella dislocation following distal femur replacement for a malignant tumour. We performed a medial plication and lateral release procedure to treat her persistent patellar dislocation after distal femur replacement following malignant tumour resection. This treatment improved the patient's gait ability dramatically. A distal femur reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) system for tumour resection is a frequently performed procedure. The reported incidence of patella dislocation following distal femur reconstruction with a TKA is 2.3%. However, treatment procedures for patella dislocation following a distal femur replacement after malignant tumour resection have not been studied extensively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first English case report about patella dislocation following distal femoral replacement focusing on surgical treatment. Our experience suggests that treatment for patella dislocation following distal femur reconstruction with a TKA should be considered positively. PMID:25073529

  9. The Vascularized Medial Femoral Corticoperiosteal Flap for Thumb Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kavit; Darhouse, Nagham; Sivakumar, Bran; Floyd, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present an interesting method of shaping a vascularized medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap into a “neophalanx” for phalangeal reconstruction. Our patient presented with limited strength and function secondary to fracture nonunion of the proximal phalanx of the dominant thumb. Following excision of the pseudarthrosis, an MFC corticoperiosteal flap was harvested, sculpted into a prism shape and inset. The superomedial genicular pedicle was anastomosed to the princeps pollicis artery and a cephalic tributary. On follow-up, new bone growth was seen on radiographs and the patient had substantially improved function, with full metacarpophalangeal extension, a Kapandji score of 9, and a markedly reduced Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 2.68. The MFC flap is useful for reconstruction of bony defects, with minimal donor morbidity. This versatile vascularized flap can be crafted to requisite shapes and is useful for small defects in the hand, including phalangeal reconstruction. PMID:26495205

  10. Staining and histomorphometry of microcracks in the human femoral head.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, A R; Longo, J A; Weiner, G

    1994-03-01

    We developed staining techniques that permit identification and histomorphometric analysis of microcracks in the human femoral head 1) from thick, ground bone sections (100 microns) by prestaining with the Villanueva mineralized bone stain (MIBS), and 2) from plastic embedded, undecalcified thin bone sections (5-15 microns) by staining in gallocyanin chrome alum-Villanueva blood stain methods. Both methods represent a significant improvement in the stainability of the microcracks, cellular and tissue elements, and the simultaneous assessment of osteoid seams and tetracycline markers by histomorphometry. Shrinkage and other artifacts were minimized, which helped to clarify some of the uncertainties arising from artifacts resulting from some bone staining methods. Histomorphometric analyses of microcracks were conducted on thick, ground sections of subchondral and trabecular bone. Microcracks were more prevalent in the subchondral bone and osteochondral junction than in the more distant trabeculae. We have consistently localized microcrack areas in bone tissues prepared in these ways. PMID:7515700

  11. Orrorin tugenensis femoral morphology and the evolution of hominin bipedalism.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Brian G; Jungers, William L

    2008-03-21

    Bipedalism is a key human adaptation and a defining feature of the hominin clade. Fossil femora discovered in Kenya and attributed to Orrorin tugenensis, at 6 million years ago, purportedly provide the earliest postcranial evidence of hominin bipedalism, but their functional and phylogenetic affinities are controversial. We show that the O. tugenensis femur differs from those of apes and Homo and most strongly resembles those of Australopithecus and Paranthropus, indicating that O. tugenensis was bipedal but is not more closely related to Homo than to Australopithecus. Femoral morphology indicates that O. tugenensis shared distinctive hip biomechanics with australopiths, suggesting that this complex evolved early in human evolution and persisted for almost 4 million years until modifications of the hip appeared in the late Pliocene in early Homo. PMID:18356526

  12. [The sulcus angle of the femoral trochlea: ultrasonographic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Martino, F; De Serio, A; Macarini, L; Colaianni, P; Solarino, M; Fracella, M R

    1995-03-01

    The sulcus angle of femoral trochlea is particularly important to evaluate the femoro-patellar joint. Our study was aimed at studying the normal trochlea, and especially the sulcus angle, with US. The right knees of 11 normal subjects were examined with US and Computed Tomography (CT) on the same section planes. The US measurements of the sulcus angle were correlated with CT results, which were considered the gold standard. The US and CT data were compared and a direct correlation was found (r = 0.832). The intraobserver difference in US measurements was r = 0.943. The mean sulcus angle value was 132 degrees, in agreement with literature data. We conclude that the US measurements of the sulcus angle are reproducible and as sensitive as CT. PMID:7754110

  13. Modeling polyethylene wear acceleration due to femoral head dislocation damage.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Karen M; Tikekar, Nishant M; Heiner, Anneliese D; Lannutti, John J; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2014-08-01

    Scratching, scraping, and metal transfer to femoral heads commonly accompany acetabular shell contact during dislocation and closed reduction maneuvers. While head damage conceptually leads to accelerated wear, reports on this subject are mainly anecdotal, and differ widely on the potency of such effect. Towards better understanding this relationship, a physically validated finite element (FE) model was used to compute polyethylene wear acceleration propensity of specific head damage patterns on thirteen retrievals. These FE models estimated wear increases averaging half an order of magnitude when compared to simulations for undamaged heads. There was no correlation between the number of dislocations sustained and wear acceleration. These results underscore the importance of implant-gentle closed reduction, and heightened wear monitoring of successfully reduced dislocation patients. PMID:24851789

  14. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  15. Femoral neck fracture fixation: rigidity of five techniques compared.

    PubMed Central

    Mackechnie-Jarvis, A C

    1983-01-01

    Artificial cadaveric femoral neck fractures were internally fixed with five different devices and subjected to cyclical loading of 0-1.0 kilonewtons (approximately one body weight) whilst in an anatomical position. Displacement of the proximal fragment was detected by a transducer and charted. Bone strength was assessed by a preliminary control loading phase on the intact bone. Efficiency of each fracture fixator could then be directly compared by the relative movement in each case. Five specimens each were tested with Moore's Pins, Trifin Nail, Garden Screws and a sliding screw-plate (OEC Ltd). By the criteria of the experiment, which put a severe shearing load on the implant, none of these devices reliably bore the representative body weight. An extended barrel-plate, which supported the sliding screw almost up to the fracture line, was then made. This device, employing some of Charnley's concepts, tolerated body weight in four cases out of five. PMID:6887186

  16. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-03-01

    In the second paper1 of this series, the effect of transverse femoral stresses due to locomotion in theropod dinosaurs of different sizes was examined for the case of an unchanging leg geometry. Students are invariably thrilled to learn about theropod dinosaurs, and this activity applies the concepts of torque and stress to the issue of theropod locomotion. In this paper, our model calculation of Ref. 1 is extended to incorporate the fact that larger animals run with straighter legs. As in Ref. 1, students use geometric data for the femora of theropod dinosaurs to analyze their locomotion abilities. This can either be an in-class activity or given as a homework problem. Larger theropods are found to be less athletic in their movements than smaller theropods since the stresses in the femora of large theropods are closer to breaking their legs than smaller theropods.

  17. Imaging evaluation of patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Mont, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Imaging modalities for the diagnosis of osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head have been studied extensively, but there have been few reports strictly addressing radiographic evaluation. The purpose of this report is to examine the use and role of (1) plain radiographs, (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (3) computerized tomography (CT), (4) bone scanning, and (5) positron emission topography (PET) for the diagnostic evaluation of ON. Plain radiographs are a mainstay in diagnosis but have very low sensitivity for early ON. MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic evaluation but may not identify subchondral fractures on collapse as well as CT scan or tomogram. Bone scanning should not be used for diagnosis due to its low sensitivity. PET scanning does not have a definitive role in diagnosis yet. Future research should focus on the role of new imaging technologies in evaluation. PMID:26045084

  18. Subsidence of the femoral prosthesis. A stereophotogrammetric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K; Korn, E L

    1985-12-01

    A quantitative three-dimensional measurement method, radiographic stereophotogrammetry (SPG), was employed to assess the relation between early subsidence of the femoral prosthesis after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and subsequent clinical course. The SPG technique and the authors' error control mechanisms are described in 15 patients in the early postoperative period, and the findings are correlated with those of follow-up clinical examinations. Among the 12 patients who remained clinically asymptomatic with respect to pain, only one had an SPG estimate of subsidence in excess of 1 mm at any point in time. Each of the three patients who later became symptomatic had SPG estimates of subsidence in excess of 1.75 mm within six months of the operation. Thus far, the patient with the largest estimate of subsidence is the only one who required surgical revision. PMID:4064420

  19. A critical assessment of proximal macrotexturing on cemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Duffy, G P; Muratoglu, O K; Biggs, S A; Larson, S L; Lozynsky, A J; Harris, W H

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed the cement-metal interface of 3 different types of femoral components that had proximal macrotexturing after in vitro insertion and after fatigue testing designed to produce debonding and micromotion. These components were compared with clinical retrieval specimens. The cement did not flow into the macrotexturing; rather, hollow, brittle volcanoes or calderas were formed. These fragile protrusions of cement become worn down or abraded by debonded components. This abrasion of cement may contribute to the early and aggressive osteolysis seen in some of these early failures with proximal macrotextured components. The formation of these volcanos and calderas can be aborted by placing bone-cement onto the macrotexturing before stem insertion. This simple technique allows the macrotexturing to be filled with cement. PMID:11742450

  20. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work.

    PubMed

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome, and it frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes 'nuisance' symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe, CTS can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review discusses the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. CTS has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which are briefly discussed. There is a growing body of evidence for an association between CTS and various occupational factors, which is also explored. Management of CTS, conservative and surgical, is described. Finally, the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines are discussed. PMID:26612240