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Sample records for fene dumbbell model

  1. Simulation of dilute polymeric fluids in a three-dimensional contraction using a multiscale FENE model

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M. E-mail: ruettgers@ins.uni-bonn.de; Rüttgers, A. E-mail: ruettgers@ins.uni-bonn.de

    2014-05-15

    The multiscale FENE model is applied to a 3D square-square contraction flow problem. For this purpose, the stochastic Brownian configuration field method (BCF) has been coupled with our fully parallelized three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver NaSt3DGPF. The robustness of the BCF method enables the numerical simulation of high Deborah number flows for which most macroscopic methods suffer from stability issues. The results of our simulations are compared with that of experimental measurements from literature and show a very good agreement. In particular, flow phenomena such as a strong vortex enhancement, streamline divergence and a flow inversion for highly elastic flows are reproduced. Due to their computational complexity, our simulations require massively parallel computations. Using a domain decomposition approach with MPI, the implementation achieves excellent scale-up results for up to 128 processors.

  2. Hydrodynamic repulsion of elastic dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L.; Bukowicki, Marek; Gruca, Marta

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of two identical elastic dumbbells, settling under gravity in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number are analyzed within the point-particle model. Initially, the dumbbells are vertical, their centers are aligned horizontally, and the springs which connect the dumbbell's beads are at the equilibrium. The motion of the beads is determined numerically with the use of the Runge-Kutta method. After an initial relaxation phase, the system converges to a universal time-dependent solution. The elastic dumbbells tumble while falling, but their relative motion is not periodic (as in case of rigid dumbbells or pairs of separated beads). The elastic constraints break the time-reversal symmetry of the motion. As the result, the horizontal distance between the dumbbells slowly increases - they are hydrodynamically repelled from each other. This effect can be very large even though the elastic forces are always much smaller than gravity. The dynamics described above are equivalent to the motion of a single elastic dumbbell under a constant external force which is parallel to a flat free surface. The dumbbell migrates away from the interface and its tumbling time increases.

  3. A dumbbell model with five parameters describing nuclear fusion or fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qian; Shangguan, Dan-Hua; Bao, Jing-Dong

    2013-01-01

    We propose a five-parameter dumbbell model to describe the fusion and fission processes of massive nuclei, where the collective variables are: the distance ρ between the center-of-mass of two fusing nuclei, the neck parameter υ, asymmetry D, two deformation variables β1 and β2. The present model has macroscopic qualitative expression of polarization and nuclear collision of head to head, sphere to sphere, waist to waist and so on. The conception of the “projectile eating target" based on open mouth and swallow is proposed to describe the nuclear fusion process, and our understanding of the probability of fusion and quasi-fission is in agreement with some previous work. The calculated fission barriers of a lot of compound nuclei are compared with the experimental data.

  4. The raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. I. Periodic arrays of spheres and dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lukas P.; Peter, Toni; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and Langevin molecular dynamics scheme for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. This technique has been used in many simulation studies on the behavior of colloids. However, there are fundamental questions with regards to the use of this model. In this paper, we examine the accuracy with which the raspberry method is able to reproduce Stokes-level hydrodynamic interactions when compared to analytic expressions for solid spheres in simple-cubic crystals. To this end, we consider the quality of numerical experiments that are traditionally used to establish these properties and we discuss their shortcomings. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobility reproduced by the simple raspberry model and present a way to numerically remedy this problem by adding internal coupling points. Finally, we examine a non-convex shape, namely, a colloidal dumbbell, and show that the filled raspberry model replicates the desired hydrodynamic behavior in bulk for this more complicated shape. Our investigation is continued in de Graaf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084108 (2015)], wherein we consider the raspberry model in the confining geometry of two parallel plates.

  5. Activity-induced clustering in model dumbbell swimmers: the role of hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Akira; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    Using a fluid-particle dynamics approach, we numerically study the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the collective dynamics of active suspensions within a simple model for bacterial motility: each microorganism is modeled as a stroke-averaged dumbbell swimmer with prescribed dipolar force pairs. Using both simulations and qualitative arguments, we show that, when the separation between swimmers is comparable to their size, the swimmers' motions are strongly affected by activity-induced hydrodynamic forces. To further understand these effects, we investigate semidilute suspensions of swimmers in the presence of thermal fluctuations. A direct comparison between simulations with and without hydrodynamic interactions shows these to enhance the dynamic clustering at a relatively small volume fraction; with our chosen model the key ingredient for this clustering behavior is hydrodynamic trapping of one swimmer by another, induced by the active forces. Furthermore, the density dependence of the motility (of both the translational and rotational motions) exhibits distinctly different behaviors with and without hydrodynamic interactions; we argue that this is linked to the clustering tendency. Our study illustrates the fact that hydrodynamic interactions not only affect kinetic pathways in active suspensions, but also cause major changes in their steady state properties. PMID:25215734

  6. Reference interaction site model and optimized perturbation theories of colloidal dumbbells with increasing anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Munaò, Gianmarco Costa, Dino; Caccamo, Carlo; Gámez, Francisco; Giacometti, Achille

    2015-06-14

    We investigate thermodynamic properties of anisotropic colloidal dumbbells in the frameworks provided by the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) theory and an Optimized Perturbation Theory (OPT), this latter based on a fourth-order high-temperature perturbative expansion of the free energy, recently generalized to molecular fluids. Our model is constituted by two identical tangent hard spheres surrounded by square-well attractions with same widths and progressively different depths. Gas-liquid coexistence curves are obtained by predicting pressures, free energies, and chemical potentials. In comparison with previous simulation results, RISM and OPT agree in reproducing the progressive reduction of the gas-liquid phase separation as the anisotropy of the interaction potential becomes more pronounced; in particular, the RISM theory provides reasonable predictions for all coexistence curves, bar the strong anisotropy regime, whereas OPT performs generally less well. Both theories predict a linear dependence of the critical temperature on the interaction strength, reproducing in this way the mean-field behavior observed in simulations; the critical density—that drastically drops as the anisotropy increases—turns to be less accurate. Our results appear as a robust benchmark for further theoretical studies, in support to the simulation approach, of self-assembly in model colloidal systems.

  7. Tracer motion in an active dumbbell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suma, Antonio; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Gonnella, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The diffusion properties of spherical tracers coupled through a repulsive potential to a system of active dumbbells are analyzed. We model the dumbbells’ dynamics with Langevin equations and the activity with a self-propulsive force of constant magnitude directed along the main axis of the molecules. Two types of tracers are considered. Thermal tracers are coupled to the same bath as the dumbbells while athermal tracers are not; both interact repulsively with the dumbbells. We focus our attention on the intruders’ mean square displacement and how it compares to the one of the dumbbells. We show that the dynamics of thermal intruders, with mass similar to the one of the dumbbells, display the typical four time-lag regimes of the dumbbells’ mean square displacement. The thermal tracers’ late-time diffusion coefficient depends on their mass very weakly and it is close to the one of the dumbbells at low Péclet only. Athermal tracers only have ballistic and late-time diffusive regimes. The late time diffusion coefficients of athermal tracers and dumbbells have similar values at high Péclet number when their masses are of the same order, while at low Péclet number this coefficient gets close to the one of the dumbbells only when the tracers are several order of magnitude heavier than the dumbbells. We propose a generalization of the Enskog law for dilute hard disks, that describes the athermal tracers’ mean square displacement in the form of a scaling law in terms of their mass.

  8. Magnetophoresis of flexible DNA-based dumbbell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2008-02-01

    Controlled movement and manipulation of magnetic micro- and nanostructures using magnetic forces can give rise to important applications in biomedecine, diagnostics, and immunology. We report controlled magnetophoresis and stretching, in aqueous solution, of a DNA-based dumbbell structure containing magnetic and diamagnetic microspheres. The velocity and stretching of the dumbbell were experimentally measured and correlated with a theoretical model based on the forces acting on individual magnetic beads or the entire dumbbell structures. The results show that precise and predictable manipulation of dumbbell structures is achievable and can potentially be applied to immunomagnetic cell separators.

  9. Diffuse X-ray emission from the Dumbbell Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kwitter, Karen B.; Kaler, James B.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter pointed observations of the Dumbbell Nebula and find that the previously reported 'extended' X-ray emission is an instrumental electronic ghost image at the softest energy band. At slightly higher energy bands, the image of the Dumbbell is not very different from that of the white dwarf HZ43. We conclude that the X-ray emission of the Dumbbell Nebula comes from its central star. A blackbody model is fitted to the spectrum and the best-fit temperature of not greater than 136,000 +/- 10,000 K is in excellent agreement with the Zanstra temperatures.

  10. Mode bifurcation of a bouncing dumbbell with chirality.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshitsugu; Inagaki, Shio; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2015-05-01

    We studied the behavior of a dumbbell bouncing upon a sinusoidally vibrating plate. By introducing chiral asymmetry to the geometry of the dumbbell, we observed a cascade of bifurcations with an increase in the vibration amplitude: spinning, orbital, and rolling. In contrast, for an achiral dumbbell, bifurcation is generated by a change from random motion to vectorial inchworm motion. A simple model particle was considered in a numerical simulation that reproduced the essential aspects of the experimental observation. The mode bifurcation from directional motion to random motion is interpreted analytically by a simple mechanical discussion. PMID:26066227

  11. Dumbbell Rattling in Thermoelectric Zinc Antimony

    SciTech Connect

    Schweika, W.; Prager, M.; Persson, J.; Hermann, R. P.; Keppens, V.

    2007-09-21

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on thermoelectric Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} reveal a dominant soft local phonon mode at 5.3(1) meV. The form factor of this local mode is characteristic for dumbbells vibrating preferably along the dumbbell axis and can be related to a vibration of Sb dimers along the c axis. The Lorentzian width of the mode corresponds to short phonon lifetimes of 0.39(2) ps and yields an estimate of the thermal conductivity that agrees quantitatively with recent steady state measurements. Heat capacity measurements are consistent with an Einstein mode model describing the local Sb-dimer rattling mode with an Einstein temperature of 62(1) K. Our study suggests that soft localized phonon modes in crystalline solids are not restricted to cagelike structures and are likely to be a universal feature of good thermoelectric materials.

  12. Chaotic Dynamics of an Elastically Bouncing Dumbbell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Colin; Franklin, Scott

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of an elastically bouncing dumbbell is analogous to those of an ball bouncing on a sinusoidally oscillating surface with one important exception: the dumbbell's angular velocity, analogous to the surface's oscillation frequency, changes with each bounce, making the subsequent motion significantly more complicated. We investigate this dynamical system over a range of aspect ratios and initial energy, finding periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic motions. As the initial energy is increased, the dumbbell can flip over and tumble. We find for large aspect ratios, however, narrow bands of energies well above this minimum where tumbling suddenly ceases. Because energy is conserved, the dynamics of a bounce are uniquely determined by the angle and angular velocity. The Lyapunov exponents of paths in this two dimensional phase space can be calculated, with the hope of identifying periodic islands within the chaotic sea. Finally, for certain parameters, the angle at each collision moves from its initial value in a subdiffusive manner, and we determine the characteristic exponents.

  13. Pressure of a gas of underdamped active dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyeux, Marc; Bertin, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The pressure exerted on a wall by a gas at equilibrium does not depend on the shape of the confining potential defining the walls. In contrast, it has been shown recently [A. P. Solon et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 673 (2015), 10.1038/nphys3377] that a gas of overdamped active particles exerts on a wall a force that depends on the confining potential, resulting in a net force on an asymmetric wall between two chambers at equal densities. Here, considering a model of underdamped self-propelled dumbbells in two dimensions, we study how the behavior of the pressure depends on the damping coefficient of the dumbbells, thus exploring inertial effects. We find in particular that the force exerted on a moving wall between two chambers at equal density continuously vanishes at low damping coefficient, and exhibits a complex dependence on the damping coefficient at low density, when collisions are scarce. We further show that this behavior of the pressure can to a significant extent be understood in terms of the trajectories of individual particles close to and in contact with the wall.

  14. Pressure of a gas of underdamped active dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Marc; Bertin, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The pressure exerted on a wall by a gas at equilibrium does not depend on the shape of the confining potential defining the walls. In contrast, it has been shown recently [A. P. Solon et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 673 (2015)] that a gas of overdamped active particles exerts on a wall a force that depends on the confining potential, resulting in a net force on an asymmetric wall between two chambers at equal densities. Here, considering a model of underdamped self-propelled dumbbells in two dimensions, we study how the behavior of the pressure depends on the damping coefficient of the dumbbells, thus exploring inertial effects. We find in particular that the force exerted on a moving wall between two chambers at equal density continuously vanishes at low damping coefficient, and exhibits a complex dependence on the damping coefficient at low density, when collisions are scarce. We further show that this behavior of the pressure can to a significant extent be understood in terms of the trajectories of individual particles close to and in contact with the wall. PMID:27078412

  15. Presentation of large DNA molecules for analysis as nanoconfined dumbbells

    PubMed Central

    Kounovsky-Shafer, Kristy L.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Jo, Kyubong; Odijk, Theo; de Pablo, Juan J.; Schwartz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of very large DNA molecules intrinsically supports long-range, phased sequence information, but requires new approaches for their effective presentation as part of any genome analysis platform. Using a multi-pronged approach that marshaled molecular confinement, ionic environment, and DNA elastic properties–but tressed by molecular simulations–we have developed an efficient and scalable approach for presentation of large DNA molecules within nanoscale slits. Our approach relies on the formation of DNA dumbbells, where large segments of the molecules remain outside the nanoslits used to confine them. The low ionic environment, synergizing other features of our approach, enables DNA molecules to adopt a fully stretched conformation, comparable to the contour length, thereby facilitating analysis by optical microscopy. Accordingly, a molecular model is proposed to describe the conformation and dynamics of the DNA molecules within the nanoslits; a Langevin description of the polymer dynamics is adopted in which hydrodynamic effects are included through a Green’s function formalism. Our simulations reveal that a delicate balance between electrostatic and hydrodynamic interactions is responsible for the observed molecular conformations. We demonstrate and further confirm that the “Odijk regime” does indeed start when the confinement dimensions size are of the same order of magnitude as the persistence length of the molecule. We also summarize current theories concerning dumbbell dynamics. PMID:24683272

  16. DEM simulation of flow of dumbbells on a rough inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sandip; Khakhar, Devang

    2015-11-01

    The rheology of non-spherical granular materials such as food grains, sugar cubes, sand, pharmaceutical pills, among others, is not understood well. We study the flow of non-spherical dumbbells of different aspect ratios on a rough inclined plane by using soft sphere DEM simulations. The dumbbells are generated by fusing two spheres together and a linear spring dashpot model along with Coulombic friction is employed to calculate inter-particle forces. At steady state, a uni-directional shear flow is obtained which allows for a detailed study of the rheology. The effect of aspect ratio and inclination angle on mean velocity, volume fraction, shear rate, shear stress, pressure and viscosity profiles is examined. The effect of aspect ratio on probability distribution of angles, made by the major axes of the dumbbells with the flow direction, average angle and order parameter is analyzed. The dense flow rheology is well explained by Bagnold's law and the constitutive laws of JFP model. The dependencies of first and second normal stress differences on aspect ratio are studied. The probability distributions of translational and rotational velocity are analyzed.

  17. [A Dumbbell-Type Thoracic Spinal Lipoma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Soichiro; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Sasamori, Toru; Seki, Toshitaka; Saito, Hisatoshi

    2016-06-01

    Spinal lipomas are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all spinal tumors. Most are associated with spinal dysraphism. Spinal lipomas without spinal dysraphism are uncommon;they are typically subpial tumors. Some tumors are located both inside and outside the dura mater (so-called "dumbbell-type"). Herein, we report a patient with a dumbbell-type thoracic spinal lipoma. A man in his 50's complained of progressive gait disturbance, dysesthesia in his left leg, and hyperesthesia in his right leg. His symptoms were worsened by exercise. CT and MRI revealed a thoracic spinal lipoma extending from the spinal cord to the intervertebral foramen at the Th 6-8 level. He underwent partial tumor removal and untethering. Postoperatively he reported gradual symptom abatement. Dumbbell-type spinal lipomas are very rare. Besides partial removal of the tumor, untethering should be considered when symptoms are associated with tethering of the spinal cord. PMID:27270148

  18. The configurations of a FENE bead-spring chain in transient rheological flows and in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massah, Heshmat; Kontomaris, Kostas; Schowalter, William R.; Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1993-04-01

    The changes in the configuration of a FENE bead-spring chain in a direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow and in some simple rheological flows are examined. Unraveling occurs both in uniaxial and shear flows, but the uniaxial flow is more effective. A vortex with a large rotation rate perpendicular to the principal strain of a uniaxial flow has only a minor retarding effect while a small rotation rate delays the unraveling substantially. In a turbulent flow, the chain unravels the most in the viscous sublayer, to about 90% of its fully extended length. It aligns at a 7° angle with the direction of mean flow. In the buffer zone, it unravels and coils up and takes different orientations at different times. Outside the wall region, the chain assumes a coiled configuration. The unraveling of the chain strongly depends on the relaxation time of the chain normalized with the wall shear rate, λ+. A value of λ+=10 exhibits strong unraveling while very weak unraveling is observed below λ+=1.

  19. Dumb-bell neurinoma of the hypoglossal nerve1

    PubMed Central

    Bartal, A. D.; Djaldetti, M. M.; Mandel, E. M.; Lerner, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    A unique case of dumb-bell neurinoma of the hypoglossal nerve is presented. The importance of hemiatrophy of the tongue is stressed for early diagnosis of the lesion. The myelocisternogram is the single most important contrast study confirming the intracranial extension of the tumour. Total dissection of the tumour capsule may not be feasible in all cases. Images PMID:4542406

  20. Phase segregation in a system of active dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnella, Giuseppe; Lamura, Antonio; Suma, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A systems of self-propelled dumbbells interacting by a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson potential is considered. At sufficiently low temperatures the system phase separates into a dense phase and a gas-like phase. The kinetics of the cluster formation and the growth law for the average cluster size are analyzed.

  1. Facile synthesis of dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doermbach, Karla; Pich, Andrij

    2015-05-28

    In this article we report on the controlled synthesis of asymmetric lemon-shaped and dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles (MCPs) with a reactive surface and interesting morphology. In our approach we utilize partial coating of hematite ellipsoids with a hydrophobic polymer layer followed by selective silica deposition on the non-coated surface. Ellipsoidal hematite particles provide a non-centric asymmetry, which is strongly enhanced during the seeded emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric growth of polymers on the hematite particle surface is driven by phase separation phenomena, which lead to a reduction of the interfacial tension. We found the tips of the hematite ellipsoids to be uncovered after polymerization. A selective deposition of silica onto the free tips leads to dumbbell-shaped particles with hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts. PMID:25946401

  2. Recent Progress in Syntheses and Applications of Dumbbell-like Nanoparticles**

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Chenjie

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research progress in syntheses and applications of dumbbell-like nanoparticles. It first describes the general synthesis of dumbbell-like nanoparticles containing noble metal and magnetic NPs/or quantum dots. It then outlines the interesting optical and magnetic properties found in these dumbbell nanoparticles. The review further highlights several exciting application potentials of these nanoparticles in catalysis and biomedicine. PMID:20011128

  3. Effect of the shoulder position on the biceps brachii emg in different dumbbell curls

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Liliam F.; Matta, Thiago T.; Alves, Daniel S.; Garcia, Marco A.C.; Vieira, Taian M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Incline Dumbbell Curl (IDC) and Dumbbell Preacher Curl (DPC) are two variations of the standard Dumbbell Biceps Curl (DBC), generally applied to optimize biceps brachii contribution for elbow flexion by fixing shoulder at a specific angle. The aim of this study is to identify changes in the neuromuscular activity of biceps brachii long head for IDC, DPC and DBC exercises, by taking into account the changes in load moment arm and muscle length elicited by each dumbbell curl protocol. A single cycle (concentric-eccentric) of DBC, IDC and DPC, was applied to 22 subjects using a submaximal load of 40% estimated from an isometric MVC test. The neuromuscular activity of biceps brachii long head was compared by further partitioning each contraction into three phases, according to individual elbow joint range of motion. Although all protocols elicited a considerable level of activation of the biceps brachii muscle (at least 50% of maximum RMS), the contribution of this muscle for elbow flexion/extension varied among exercises. The submaximal elbow flexion (concentric) elicited neuro muscular activity up to 95% of the maximum RMS value during the final phase of IDC and DBC and 80% for DPC at the beginning of the movement. All exercises showed significant less muscle activity for the elbow extension (eccentric). The Incline Dumbbell Curl and the classical Dumbbell Biceps Curl resulted in similar patterns of biceps brachii activation for the whole range of motion, whereas Dumbbell Preacher Curl elicited high muscle activation only for a short range of elbow joint angle. Key pointsThe Incline Dumbbell Curl and the Dumbbell Biceps Curl resulted in a considerable neuromuscular effort throughout the whole elbow range of motion.The Incline Dumbbell Curl and the Dumbbell Biceps Curl may be preferable for the improvement of biceps brachii force in training programs. PMID:24150552

  4. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stable dumbbell stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-02-01

    Topological property of the dumbbell (DB) stanene, more stable than the stanene with a honeycomb lattice, is investigated by using ab initio methods. The magnetic DB stanene demonstrates an exotic quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect due to inversion of the Sn spin-up px,y and spin-down pz states. The QAH gap is found to be opened at Γ point rather than the usual K and K' points, beneficial to observe the effect in experiments. When a 3% tensile strain is applied, a large nontrivial gap (˜50 meV) is achieved. Our results provide another lighthouse for realizing QAH effects in two-dimensional systems.

  5. Facile synthesis of dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doermbach, Karla; Pich, Andrij

    2015-05-01

    In this article we report on the controlled synthesis of asymmetric lemon-shaped and dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles (MCPs) with a reactive surface and interesting morphology. In our approach we utilize partial coating of hematite ellipsoids with a hydrophobic polymer layer followed by selective silica deposition on the non-coated surface. Ellipsoidal hematite particles provide a non-centric asymmetry, which is strongly enhanced during the seeded emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric growth of polymers on the hematite particle surface is driven by phase separation phenomena, which lead to a reduction of the interfacial tension. We found the tips of the hematite ellipsoids to be uncovered after polymerization. A selective deposition of silica onto the free tips leads to dumbbell-shaped particles with hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts.In this article we report on the controlled synthesis of asymmetric lemon-shaped and dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles (MCPs) with a reactive surface and interesting morphology. In our approach we utilize partial coating of hematite ellipsoids with a hydrophobic polymer layer followed by selective silica deposition on the non-coated surface. Ellipsoidal hematite particles provide a non-centric asymmetry, which is strongly enhanced during the seeded emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric growth of polymers on the hematite particle surface is driven by phase separation phenomena, which lead to a reduction of the interfacial tension. We found the tips of the hematite ellipsoids to be uncovered after polymerization. A selective deposition of silica onto the free tips leads to dumbbell-shaped particles with hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of silica coating without a polymer layer, experiments for removal of the polymer by solvent extraction, TEM images of spherical α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an asymmetric PSGD coating, and additional FESEM

  6. Non-integrability of the dumbbell and point mass problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Simpson, Leon; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2013-11-01

    This paper discusses a constrained gravitational three-body problem with two of the point masses separated by a massless inflexible rod to form a dumbbell. This problem is a simplification of a problem of a symmetric rigid body and a point mass, and has numerous applications in Celestial Mechanics and Astrodynamics. The non-integrability of this system is proven. This was achieved thanks to an analysis of variational equations along a certain particular solution and an investigation of their differential Galois group. Nowadays this approach is the most effective tool for study integrability of Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian systems.

  7. Assembly of open clusters of colloidal dumbbells via droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Van, Hai; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of a mixture of asymmetric colloidal dumbbells and emulsion droplets by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The evaporation of the droplets and the competition between droplet-colloid attraction and colloid-colloid interactions lead to the formation of clusters built up of colloid aggregates with both closed and open structures. We find that stable packings and hence complex colloidal structures can be obtained by changing the relative size of the colloidal spheres and/or their interfacial tension with the droplets.

  8. Granular dynamics of a vibrated bed of dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. D.; Beecham, J.; Freeman, T. L.

    2009-12-01

    A two-dimensional vibrated bed of dumbbells was investigated using experiment and numerical simulation. Experimentally, high speed photography in combination with image analysis and tracking software was used to determine the location of the centre of mass and the locations and direction of motion of the component particles of the dumbbells. Numerically, a geometry analogous to that used experimentally was employed and the equations of motion for each of the particles were solved using the distinct element method. It was found that, despite some differences, the numerical simulations agreed reasonably well with the experimental results. Subsequently, the simulation method was used to explore the behaviour of the bed over a range of densities. The moments of the velocity distributions were determined as a function of height for a range of numbers of particles, and it was found that a normal distribution of velocities is a good approximation, except close to the vibrating base where there were suggestions that the distribution of the vertical component of the velocities is a composite of two sets of particles, one pre-collision with the base, and the other post-collision.

  9. Unusual dumbbell tumours of the mediastinum and thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Dalokay; Erdogan, Bulent; Sener, Levent; Sahin, Ekber; Caner, Hakan; Hatipoglu, Ahmet

    2006-11-01

    Due to a lack of large clinical series in the literature of chondrosarcomas and hydatid disease presenting as mediastinal dumbbell tumours, clinicians have limited experience on this topic. We present three unusual cases of dumbbell tumour involving the spinal canal; two patients had chondrosarcoma originating from Th8-Th9 and Th10-Th12; one patient had a hydatid cyst at Th5-Th6. We performed a single-stage combined thoracic-neurosurgical approach in two patients, and a double-staged approach in one patient. During the intraspinal dissection, an operating microscope was used under electrophysiological monitoring. Spinal canal reconstruction was not required for any of the cases. Preoperative knowledge of neuroforaminal extension and the relations between the tumour and adjacent neural-vascular structures is essential to prevent spinal cord damage and plan the surgical approach. In chondrosarcomas, prognosis depends on patient age, histological grade, extent of surgery and response to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. In this article, the diagnostic and surgical difficulties of these unusual tumours and current treatment modalities are discussed with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:16857360

  10. [Development of Self-assembled Dumbbell-like Fe3O4 Micro/nanomaterial for Application in Thermocatalytic Degradation of Polybrominated Biphenyls].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-chen; Zong, Gang; Liu, Ye-xuan; Lu, Hui-jie; Li, Qian-qian; Li, Bin-ke; Zhao, Yan-hui; Su, Gui-jin

    2016-02-15

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are a group of new persistent organic pollutants, which have high toxicity and long-term bioaccumulation, and cause potential risks to human beings and aquatic ecosystem. Self-assembled dumbbell-like Fe3O4 was synthesized via ethylene-glycol mediated method to degrade PBBs, using BB209 as a model compound. The results showed that the growth process of dumbbell-like Fe3O4 precursor had two stages involving a fast nucleation of amorphous primary particles followed by a slow aggregation and crystallization of primary particles. Dumbbell-like Fe3O4 showed high activity for degradation of BB209 at the reaction time of 30 min with the degradation efficiency of nearly 100% at 300 degrees C. A whole series of nonabromobiphenyl to monobromobiphenyl and biphenyls were detected as the degradation products of BB209 by dumbbell-like Fe3O4, indicating the occurrence of successive hydrodebromination reaction. Furthermore, the amounts of three NoBB isomers followed the order of BB207 > BB208 > BB206, indicating that the reactivity of C--Br of BB209 was in order of meta- > para- > ortho-positions. PMID:27363171

  11. Double dumbbell shaped AgNi alloy by pulsed electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanapal, K.; Vasumathi, M.; Santhi, Kalavathy; Narayanan, V. Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Silver-Nickel is the well-known thermally immiscible system that makes them quite complex for the formation of alloy. This kind of alloy can be attained from electrodeposition method. In the present work, AgNi alloy was synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition in a single bath two electrode system with the use of anodic alumina membrane. The prepared AgNi alloy and pure Ag were characterized with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for structural confirmation, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for morphological, and magnetic properties by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer, respectively. The X-ray Diffraction study shows the formation of cubic structure for pure Ag. SEM analysis reveals the double dumbbell morphology for AgNi alloy and spherically agglomeration for pure silver. Hysteresis behaviour from VSM measurement indicates that the AgNi alloy have good ferro-magnetic properties.

  12. Nonequilibrium structure of colloidal dumbbells under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptner, Nils; Chu, Fangfang; Lu, Yan; Lindner, Peter; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of dense, plastic-crystalline suspensions of mildly anisotropic colloidal hard dumbbells under the action of an oscillatory shear field by employing Brownian dynamics computer simulations. In particular, we extend previous investigations, where we uncovered nonequilibrium phase transitions, to other aspect ratios and to a larger nonequilibrium parameter space, that is, a wider range of strains and shear frequencies. We compare and discuss selected results in the context of scattering and rheological experiments. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate that the previously found transitions from the plastic crystal phase with increasing shear strain also occur at other aspect ratios. We explore the transition behavior in the strain-frequency phase and summarize it in a nonequilibrium phase diagram. Additionally, the experimental rheology results hint at a slowing down of the colloidal dynamics with higher aspect ratio.

  13. Magnetic field aligned assembly of nonmagnetic composite dumbbells in nanoparticle-based aqueous ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hayato; Nagao, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kanako; Ishii, Haruyuki; Konno, Mikio

    2015-05-26

    Monodisperse, nonmagnetic, asymmetrical composite dumbbells in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles (ferrofluid) were aligned by application of an external magnetic field to the ferrofluid. The asymmetrical composite dumbbells were prepared by two-step soap-free emulsion polymerization consisting of the first polymerization to coat spherical silica cores with cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell and the second polymerization to protrude a polystyrene (PSt) lobe from the core-shell particles. A chain structure of nonmagnetic dumbbells oriented to the applied magnetic field was observed at nanoparticle content of 2.0 vol % and field strengths higher than 1.0 mT. A similar chain structure of the dumbbells was observed under application of alternating electric field at strengths higher than 50 V/mm. Parallel and orthogonally combined applications of the electric and magnetic fields were also conducted to examine independence of the electric and magnetic applications as operational factors in the dumbbell assembling. Dumbbell chains stiffer than those in a single application of external field were formed in the parallel combined application of electric and magnetic fields. The orthogonal combination of the different applied fields could form a magnetically aligned chain structure of the nonmagnetic dumbbells oriented to the electric field. The present work experimentally indicated that the employment of inverse magnetorheological effect for nonmagnetic, anisotropic particles can be a useful method for the simultaneous controls over the orientation and the positon of anisotropic particles in their assembling. PMID:25927488

  14. Dynamics of flexible active Brownian dumbbells in the absence and the presence of shear flow.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Roland G

    2016-04-20

    The dynamical properties of a flexible dumbbell composed of active Brownian particles are analytically analyzed. The dumbbell is considered as a simplified description of a linear active polymer. The two beads are independently propelled in directions which change in a diffusive manner. The relaxation behavior of the internal degree of freedom is tightly coupled to the dumbbell activity. The latter dominates the dynamics for strong propulsion. As is shown, limitations in bond stretching strongly influence the relaxation behavior. Similarly, under shear flow, activity determines the relaxation and tumbling behavior at strong propulsion. Moreover, shear leads to a preferred alignment and consequently to shear thinning. Thereby, a different power-law dependence on the shear rate compared to passive dumbbells under flow is found. PMID:26980630

  15. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    SciTech Connect

    Okihira, K.; Hara, H.; Ikeda, N.; Inoue, F.; Sennyu, K.; Geng, Rongli; Rimmer, Robert A.; Kako, E.

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  16. Au@Ag core/shell cuboids and dumbbells: Optical properties and SERS response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Liu, Zhonghui; Ye, Jian; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have conclusively shown that the plasmonic properties of Au nanorods can be finely controlled by Ag coating. Here, we investigate the effect of asymmetric silver overgrowth of Au nanorods on their extinction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties for colloids and self-assembled monolayers. Au@Ag core/shell cuboids and dumbbells were fabricated through a seed-mediated anisotropic growth process, in which AgCl was reduced by use of Au nanorods with narrow size and shape distribution as seeds. Upon tailoring the reaction rate, monodisperse cuboids and dumbbells were synthesized and further transformed into water-soluble powders of PEGylated nanoparticles. The extinction spectra of AuNRs were in excellent agreement with T-matrix simulations based on size and shape distributions of randomly oriented particles. The multimodal plasmonic properties of the Au@Ag cuboids and dumbbells were investigated by comparing the experimental extinction spectra with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The SERS efficiencies of the Au@Ag cuboids and dumbbells were compared in two options: (1) individual SERS enhancers in colloids and (2) self-assembled monolayers formed on a silicon wafer by drop casting of nanopowder solutions mixed with a drop of Raman reporters. By using 1,4-aminothiophenol Raman reporter molecules, the analytical SERS enhancement factor (AEF) of the colloidal dumbbells was determined to be 5.1×106, which is an order of magnitude higher than the AEF=4.0×105 for the cuboids. This difference can be explained by better fitting of the dumbbell plasmon resonance to the excitation laser wavelength. In contrast to the colloidal measurements, the AEF=5×107 of self-assembled cuboid monolayers was almost twofold higher than that for dumbbell monolayers, as determined with rhodamine 6G Raman reporters. According to TEM data and electromagnetic simulations, the better SERS response of the self-assembled cuboids is due to uniform

  17. Single stage transforaminal retrojugular tumor resection: The spinal keyhole for dumbbell tumors in the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Bobinski, Lukas; Henchoz, Yves; Sandu, Kishore; Duff, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dumbbell tumors are defined as having an intradural and extradural component with an intermediate component within an expanded neural foramen. Complete resection of these lesions in the subaxial cervical spine is a challenge, and it has been achieved through a combined posterior/anterior or anterolateral approach. This study describes a single stage transforaminal retrojugular (TFR) approach for dumbbell tumors resection in the cervical spine. Methods: This is a retrospective review of a series of 17 patients treated for cervical benign tumors, 4 of which were “true” cervical dumbbell tumors operated by a simplified retrojugular approach. The TFR approach allows a single stage gross total resection of both the extraspinal and intraspinal/intradural components of the tumor, taking advantage of the expanded neural foramen. All patients were followed clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Gross total resection was confirmed in all four patients by postoperative MRI. Minimal to no bone resection was performed. No fusion procedure was performed and no delayed instability was seen. At follow up, one patient had a persistent mild hand weakness and Horners syndrome following resection of a hemangioblastoma of the C8 nerve root. The other three patients were neurologically normal. Conclusions: The TFR approach appears to be a feasible surgical option for single stage resection in selective cases of dumbbell tumors of the cervical spine. PMID:25883845

  18. A dumbbell-shaped meningioma mimicking a schwannoma in the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Soo; Eun, Jong-Pil; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2011-09-01

    A 50-year-old man presented bilateral hypesthesia on and below the T6 dermatome and paresthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an intraspinal extradural tumor, which located from the 6th thoracic vertebral body to the upper margin of the 7th vertebral body, continuing dumbbell-like through the intervertebral foramen into the right middle thorax suggesting a neurogenic tumor (neurofibroma or neurilemmoma). With the patient in a prone position, we exposed and excised the tumor via a one stage posterior approach through a hemi-laminictomy of T6. Histologic examination showed a grade 1 meningothelial meningioma, according to the World Health Organization classification. Initially, we assumed the mass was a schwannoma because of its location and dumbbell shape. However, the tumor was actually a meningioma. Postoperatively, hypesthesia resolved completely and motor power of the leg gradually full recovered. A postoperative MRI revealed no evidence of residual tumor. PMID:22102962

  19. Dumb-bell galaxies in southern clusters: Catalog and preliminary statistical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vettolani, G.; Gregorini, L.; Parma, P.; Deruiter, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant galaxy of a rich cluster is often an object whose formation and evolution is closely connected to the dynamics of the cluster itself. Hoessel (1980) and Schneider et al. (1983) estimate that 50 percent of the dominant galaxies are either of the dumb-bell type or have companions at projected distances less than 20 kpc, which is far in excess of the number expected from chance projection (see also Rood and Leir 1979). Presently there is no complete sample of these objects, with the exception of the listing of dumb-bell galaxies in BM type I and I-II clusters in the Abell statistical sample of Rood and Leir (1979). Recent dynamical studies of dumb-bell galaxies in clusters (Valentijn and Casertano, 1988) still suffer from inhomogeneity of the sample. The fact that it is a mixture of optically and radio selected objects may have introduced an unknown biases, for instance if the probability of radio emission is enhanced by the presence of close companions (Stocke, 1978, Heckman et al. 1985, Vettolani and Gregorini 1988) a bias could be present in their velocity distribution. However, this situation is bound to improve: a new sample of Abell clusters in the Southern Hemisphere has been constructed (Abell et al., 1988 hereafter ACO), which has several advantages over the original northern catalog. The plate material (IIIaJ plates) is of better quality and reaches fainter magnitudes. This makes it possible to classify the cluster types with a higher degree of accuracy, as well as to fainter magnitudes. The authors therefore decided to reconsider the whole problem constructing a new sample of dumb-bell galaxies homogeneously selected from the ACO survey. Details of the classification criteria are given.

  20. Analytic solution of two-density integral equations for sticky Janus dumbbells with arbitrary monomer diameters.

    PubMed

    Gazzillo, Domenico; Munaò, Gianmarco; Prestipino, Santi

    2016-06-21

    We study a pure fluid of heteronuclear sticky Janus dumbbells, considered to be the result of complete chemical association between unlike species in an initially equimolar mixture of hard spheres (species A) and sticky hard spheres (species B) with different diameters. The B spheres are particles whose attractive surface layer is infinitely thin. Wertheim's two-density integral equations are employed to describe the mixture of AB dumbbells together with unbound A and B monomers. After Baxter factorization, these equations are solved analytically within the associative Percus-Yevick approximation. The limit of complete association is taken at the end. The present paper extends to the more general, heteronuclear case of A and B species with size asymmetry a previous study by Wu and Chiew [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6641 (2001)], which was restricted to dumbbells with equal monomer diameters. Furthermore, the solution for the Baxter factor correlation functions qij (αβ)(r) is determined here in a fully analytic way, since we have been able to find explicit analytic expressions for all the intervening parameters. PMID:27334176

  1. Dumbbell silicene: a strain-induced room temperature quantum spin Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tian; Zeng, Zhao-Yi; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-04-01

    By the generalized gradient approximation in the framework of density functional theory, we find a new silicon allotrope (called dumbbell silicene) with high stability, which can turn a quantum spin Hall insulator with an inverted band gap through tuning external compression strain, just like in previous silicene. However, the obtained maximum topological nontrivial band gap about 12 meV under isotropic strain is much larger than that for previous silicene, and can be further improved to 36 meV by tuning extra anisotropic strain, which is sufficiently large to realize quantum spin Hall effect even at room-temperature, and thus is beneficial to the fabrication of high-speed spintronics devices. Furthermore, we confirm that the boron nitride sheet is an ideal substrate for the experimental realization of the dumbbell silicene under external strain, maintaining its nontrivial topology. These properties make the two-dimensional dumbbell silicene a good platform to study novel quantum states of matter, showing great potential for future applications in modern silicon-based microelectronics industry.

  2. Analytic solution of two-density integral equations for sticky Janus dumbbells with arbitrary monomer diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzillo, Domenico; Munaò, Gianmarco; Prestipino, Santi

    2016-06-01

    We study a pure fluid of heteronuclear sticky Janus dumbbells, considered to be the result of complete chemical association between unlike species in an initially equimolar mixture of hard spheres (species A) and sticky hard spheres (species B) with different diameters. The B spheres are particles whose attractive surface layer is infinitely thin. Wertheim's two-density integral equations are employed to describe the mixture of AB dumbbells together with unbound A and B monomers. After Baxter factorization, these equations are solved analytically within the associative Percus-Yevick approximation. The limit of complete association is taken at the end. The present paper extends to the more general, heteronuclear case of A and B species with size asymmetry a previous study by Wu and Chiew [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6641 (2001)], which was restricted to dumbbells with equal monomer diameters. Furthermore, the solution for the Baxter factor correlation functions qi j α β ( r ) is determined here in a fully analytic way, since we have been able to find explicit analytic expressions for all the intervening parameters.

  3. Nasal Dermal Sinus Associated with a Dumbbell-Shaped Dermoid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shimogawa, Takafumi; Morioka, Takato; Onozawa, Hisasuke; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Kira, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    Nasal dermal sinus is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of the dermal sinus associated with a dumbbell-shaped dermoid and demonstrate the detailed anatomy. The patient was a boy aged 1 year and 4 months with a small pit at his nasion from birth and developed swelling of the forehead. The sagittal view of a T2-weighted image demonstrated a dumbbell-shaped, mixed intense dermoid at the foramen cecum. The sinus tract was depicted as a strand of isointensity between the dermoid and the nasion. Serial sagittal views of T1-weighted images revealed the capsule of the dermoid enhanced with contrast medium, and that the subcutaneous abscess was in continuity with the dermoid. On diffusion-weighted imaging, both the dermoid and subcutaneous abscess were demonstrated as a hyperintensity. Serial sections of the sagittal and coronal computed tomography scans clearly showed an enlarged fonticulus frontalis and foramen cecum remnant and dehiscence of the crista galli. The purulent dermoid cyst including the capsule and the dermal sinus tract were removed completely. We describe our detailed anatomical relationship between the sinus tract with dumbbell-shaped dermoid and the surrounding structures, and emphasize the importance of these anatomy for operation. PMID:27330927

  4. Comparison of the Shake Weight® Modality Exercises When Compared to Traditional Dumbbells

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Jordan M.; Cook, Isaac; Di Brezzo, Ro; Gray, Michelle; Vincenzo, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals are continuously looking for faster, more efficient methods with which to develop physical fitness. This has led to the development of products and programs marketed towards increasing physical fitness in minimal time. The Shake Weight® (SW) has been advertised to increase muscular strength among other factors in less time than traditional weightlifting. The purpose of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the SW to a traditional dumbbell (DB) performing the same exercises. Twelve men (22.9 ± 1.6 years) and 13 women (23.0 ± 1.9 years) volunteered to participate in this study. Subjects performed the chest shake (CS), biceps shake (BS), and triceps shake (TS) using the SW and DW. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) were exhibited for all muscles. EMG activity was recorded for the pectoralis major (PM), triceps brachii (TB), biceps brachii (BB), anterior deltoid (AD), trapezius (TR), and rectus abdominus (RA) and compared to detect differences between modalities. EMG activity for each muscle group was reported as a percentage of each subject’s individual MVIC. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significant differences between the SW and DB modalities during each exercise for all muscles except the BB (p < 0.05). During the CS exercise muscle activity was significantly greater for DB in the BB muscle when compared to the SW mode (50.8 ± 28.9%; 35.8 ± 30.8%). The SW did not have any advantage over the DB for any exercise, nor for any muscle group. Further, no muscle group during any of the SW trials exhibited an MVIC over 60%, the level necessary to increase muscular strength. Key points An oscillating dumbbell is not significantly effective for eliciting muscle activity when compared to traditional dumbbells performing the same exercises. The SW modality did not elicit >60% MVIC which is reportedly required for increases in muscle strength. PMID:24150082

  5. Germanium Dumbbells in a New Superconducting Modification of BaGe3.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Rodrigo; Baranov, Alexey I; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Cardoso-Gil, Raul; Schnelle, Walter; Bobnar, Matej; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We report the high-pressure high-temperature synthesis (P = 15 GPa, T = 1300 K) of BaGe3(tI32) adopting a CaGe3-type crystal structure. Bonding analysis reveals layers of covalently bonded germanium dumbbells being involved in multicenter Ba-Ge interactions. Physical measurements evidence metal-type electrical conductivity and a transition to a superconducting state at 6.5 K. Chemical bonding and physical properties of the new modification are discussed in comparison to the earlier described hexagonal form BaGe3(hP8) with a columnar arrangement of Ge3 triangles. PMID:27064595

  6. The optical trapping dumbbell assay for nonprocessive motors or motors that turn around filaments.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Rice, Sarah E; Rock, Ronald S; Purcell, Thomas J; Warrick, Hans M

    2011-11-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This protocol describes the preparation of biotin-actin filaments and coverslips coated with polystyrene beads. These are then used in optical trapping dumbbell assays to study interactions between motors and filaments. PMID:22046050

  7. The Optical Trapping Dumbbell Assay for Nonprocessive Motors or Motors That Turn around Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This protocol describes the preparation of biotin–actin filaments and coverslips coated with polystyrene beads. These are then used in optical trapping dumbbell assays to study interactions between motors and filaments. PMID:22046050

  8. Surgical Management of Mandibular Central Incisors with Dumbbell Shaped Periapical Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Patil, Jayaprakash D.; Jayaprakash, Thumu; Chaitanya, C. H. Krishna; Kalluru, Rama S.

    2014-01-01

    Dental traumatic injuries may affect the teeth and alveolar bone directly or indirectly. Pulpal necrosis and chronic and apical periodontitis with cystic changes are the most common sequelae of the dental traumatic injuries, if the teeth are not treated immediately. This case report focuses on the conventional and surgical management of mandibular central incisors. A twenty-four-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular central incisors. Radiographic examination revealed mandibular central incisors with dumbbell shaped periapical lesion. After root canal treatment, parendodontic surgery was performed for mandibular central incisors. After one-year recall examination, the teeth were asymptomatic and periapical lesion had healed. PMID:25105031

  9. Multipetal-Structured and Dumbbell-Structured Gold-Polymer Composite Particles with Self-Modulated Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingmeng; Otanicar, Todd P; Phelan, Patrick E; Dai, Lenore L

    2015-12-01

    A simple synthesis route for gold-polymer composite particles with controlled structure (multipetal structure and dumbbell structure) is developed. It is intriguing to observe that by controlling the reaction time and size of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), tetrapetal-, tripetal-, and dumbbell-structured gold-polystyrene composite are obtained via seeded polymerization. The average number of petals on a single AuNP increases with the AuNP diameter. These particles show potential applications as building blocks for advanced ordered and hierarchical supracolloidal materials. Further, with the incorporation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm), "smart" thermoresponsive dumbbell-structured gold-PNIPAm/polystyrene composite particles are formed. Significant size variation is validated for particles with 83 and 91 wt % PNIPAm content around lower critical solution temperature (LCST), which results in self-modulated catalytic activity. PMID:26445163

  10. Analysis of effects caused by the irregularity of small bodies: the case of contact binaries and dumbbell-shaped bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    Since a few decades ago, varieties of asteroids have been discovered and observed in detail, stimulating scientists' interests. As for the closed-orbit dynamics about these objects, the dynamics around a simple model and an estimated shape obtained by light curve and radar observations have been actively studied. For the simple model, since the dynamics can easily be understood, several model were sug-gested. Chauvineau et al. (1993) numerically studied orbits on the equilateral plane of a highly elongated body, by using a triaxial ellipsoid model, the two-connected-mass model, and the mass-distribution model. Scheeres (1994) considered the closed-orbit dynamics about a uni-formly rotating triaxial ellipsoid. As for the two-mass-rotating system, Prieto-Llanos et al. (1994) investigated the dynamics around an elongated body in the case of the ratio of the gravitational to centripetal force more than 1 and applied to the Mars-Phobos system. On the other hand, using the same model, Hirabayashi et al. (2010) derived the stability condition about collinear equilibrium points for the ratio less than 1, the fast rotating case, applying it to Asteroid 2000EB14. Analyses with the spherical harmonic function (Kaula, 1966) have also been presented. Scheeres et al. (1996) studied closed orbits to Asteroid Castalia, taking into account coefficients up to order 16 obtained by Hudson and Ostro (1994). They pointed out that for the Castalia case C20 and C22 are important factors. Closed orbits about Toutatis, a non-uniformly rotating asteroid, was also analyzed by Scheeres et al. (1998). Also, Scheeres et al.(2000) studied the dynamics in orbit about Asteroid Eros, a target of NEAR mission. Yoshikawa et al. (1997), on the other hand, suggested the orbital stability around an irregularly shaped body in terms of the inclination angle, considering C20 and C22. The paper studies orbital disturbances around an irregular body such as a contact binary body or a dumbbell shaped body and

  11. A Giant Dumbbell Shaped Vesico-Prostatic Urethral Calculus: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Tiwari, Rahul; Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Calculi in the urethra are an uncommon entity. Giant calculi in prostatic urethra are extremely rare. The decision about treatment strategy of calculi depends upon the size, shape, and position of the calculus and the status of the urethra. If the stone is large and immovable, it may be extracted via the perineal or the suprapubic approach. In most of the previous reported cases, giant calculi were extracted via the transvesical approach and external urethrotomy. A 38-year-old male patient presented with complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms. Further investigations showed a giant urethral calculus secondary to stricture of bulbo-membranous part of the urethra. Surgical removal of calculus was done via transvesical approach. Two calculi were found and extracted. One was a huge dumbbell calculus and the other was a smaller round calculus. This case was reported because of the rare size and the dumbbell nature of the stone. Giant urethral calculi are better managed by open surgery. PMID:23762742

  12. Dumbbell Defects in FeSe Films: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and First-Principles Investigation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dennis; Webb, Tatiana A; Song, Can-Li; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Hoffman, Jennifer E

    2016-07-13

    The properties of iron-based superconductors (Fe-SCs) can be varied dramatically with the introduction of dopants and atomic defects. As a pressing example, FeSe, parent phase of the highest-Tc Fe-SC, exhibits prevalent defects with atomic-scale "dumbbell" signatures as imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These defects spoil superconductivity when their concentration exceeds 2.5%. Resolving their chemical identity is a prerequisite to applications such as nanoscale patterning of superconducting/nonsuperconducting regions in FeSe as well as fundamental questions such as the mechanism of superconductivity and the path by which the defects destroy it. We use STM and density functional theory to characterize and identify the dumbbell defects. In contrast to previous speculations about Se adsorbates or substitutions, we find that an Fe-site vacancy is the most energetically favorable defect in Se-rich conditions and reproduces our observed STM signature. Our calculations shed light more generally on the nature of Se capping, the removal of Fe vacancies via annealing, and their ordering into a √5 × √5 superstructure in FeSe and related alkali-doped compounds. PMID:27282020

  13. Validation of a Dumbbell Body Sway Test in Olympic Air Pistol Shooting

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Daniel; Zakynthinaki, Maria S.; Cordente, Carlos A.; Monroy Antón, Antonio; López Jiménez, David

    2014-01-01

    We present and validate a test able to provide reliable body sway measurements in air pistol shooting, without the use of a gun. 46 senior male pistol shooters who participated in Spanish air pistol championships participated in the study. Body sway data of two static bipodal balance tests have been compared: during the first test, shooting was simulated by use of a dumbbell, while during the second test the shooters own pistol was used. Both tests were performed the day previous to the competition, during the official training time and at the training stands to simulate competition conditions. The participantś performance was determined as the total score of 60 shots at competition. Apart from the commonly used variables that refer to movements of the shooters centre of pressure (COP), such as COP displacements on the X and Y axes, maximum and average COP velocities and total COP area, the present analysis also included variables that provide information regarding the axes of the COP ellipse (length and angle in respect to X). A strong statistically significant correlation between the two tests was found (with an interclass correlation varying between 0.59 and 0.92). A statistically significant inverse linear correlation was also found between performance and COP movements. The study concludes that dumbbell tests are perfectly valid for measuring body sway by simulating pistol shooting. PMID:24756067

  14. Validation of a dumbbell body sway test in olympic air pistol shooting.

    PubMed

    Mon, Daniel; Zakynthinaki, Maria S; Cordente, Carlos A; Monroy Antón, Antonio; López Jiménez, David

    2014-01-01

    We present and validate a test able to provide reliable body sway measurements in air pistol shooting, without the use of a gun. 46 senior male pistol shooters who participated in Spanish air pistol championships participated in the study. Body sway data of two static bipodal balance tests have been compared: during the first test, shooting was simulated by use of a dumbbell, while during the second test the shooters own pistol was used. Both tests were performed the day previous to the competition, during the official training time and at the training stands to simulate competition conditions. The participantś performance was determined as the total score of 60 shots at competition. Apart from the commonly used variables that refer to movements of the shooters centre of pressure (COP), such as COP displacements on the X and Y axes, maximum and average COP velocities and total COP area, the present analysis also included variables that provide information regarding the axes of the COP ellipse (length and angle in respect to X). A strong statistically significant correlation between the two tests was found (with an interclass correlation varying between 0.59 and 0.92). A statistically significant inverse linear correlation was also found between performance and COP movements. The study concludes that dumbbell tests are perfectly valid for measuring body sway by simulating pistol shooting. PMID:24756067

  15. Spinal Burkitt's Lymphoma Mimicking Dumbbell Shape Neurogenic Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sub; Choi, Ki-Young; Jang, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a disease which may involve the spine, is frequently associated with advanced disease. Radiculopathy caused by spinal root compression as the initial presentation in patients with NHL is very rare and thought to occur in less than 5% of cases. A 69-year-old woman complained of a history of low back pain with right sciatica for 1 month prior to admission. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine showed a dumbbell-shape epidural mass lesion extending from L2 to L3, which was suggestive of a neurogenic tumor. After paraspinal approach and L2 lower half partial hemilaminectomy, total excision of the tumor was achieved, followed by rapid improvement of back pain and radiating pain. The lesion was confirmed to be Burkitt's lymphoma by histopathological examination. We then checked whole-body PET-CT, which showed multifocal malignant lesions in the intestine, liver, bone and left supraclavicular lymph node. Although a rare situation, Burkitt's lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with back and lumbar radicular pain without a prior history of malignancy. Burkitt's lymphoma could be the cause of dumbbell-shape spinal tumor. PMID:26512290

  16. Gel-limited synthesis of dumbbell-like Fe3O4-Ag composite microspheres and their SERS applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Niu, Chunyu; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhou, Shaomin; Liu, Jin

    2014-11-01

    A novel gel-limited strategy was developed to synthesize dumbbell-like Fe3O4-Ag composite microspheres through a simple one-pot solvothermal method. In such a reaction system, a special precursor solution containing oleic, water, ethanol and silver ions was used and transformed into a bulk gel under heating at the very beginning of the reaction, thus all the subsequent reactions proceeded in the interior of the gel. The gel-limited reactions had two advantages, on the one hand, the magnetic Fe3O4 microspheres were fixed in the gel which avoided them aggregating together, whereas on the other hand, the silver ions stored in the gel could be gradually released and tended to diffuse towards the nearest Fe3O4 microsphere, which favored the generation of a dumbbell-like Fe3O4-Ag structure. From the time-dependent experiments under optimal conditions, the typical growth process of dumbbell-like structures clearly demonstrated that a silver seed first appeared on the surface of a single Fe3O4 microsphere, which then grew bigger slowly and finally formed a dumbbell-like Fe3O4-Ag structure. Moreover, the formation of the gel was found to be strongly affected by the ratio of water and ethanol in the precursor solution, which further influenced the morphologies of the Fe3O4-Ag microspheres. Furthermore, the effect of lattice match between Fe3O4 and Ag on the final products was also proven from the control experiments by using a template with a different surface crystalline structure. When used as SERS substrates, the final dumbbell-like Fe3O4-Ag microspheres show fast magnetic separation and the selective detection of thiram for the surface capped oleic chain during the growth process. PMID:25188029

  17. Side-to-Side Cold Welding for Controllable Nanogap Formation from "Dumbbell" Ultrathin Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaole; Wang, Binjun; Xu, Shang; Lu, Yang; Shen, Yajing

    2016-06-01

    Cold welding has been regarded as a promising bottom-up nanofabrication technique because of its ability to join metallic nanostructures at room temperature with low applied stress and without introducing damage. Usually, the cold welding process can be done instantaneously for ultrathin nanowires (diameter <10 nm) in "head-to-head" joining. Here, we demonstrate that "dumbbell" shaped ultrathin gold nanorods can be cold welded in the "side-to-side" mode in a highly controllable manner and can form an extremely small nanogap via a relatively slow welding process (up to tens of minutes, allowing various functional applications). By combining in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis and molecular dynamic simulations, we further reveal the underlying mechanism for this "side-to-side" welding process as being dominated by atom kinetics instead of thermodynamics, which provides critical insights into three-dimensional nanosystem integration as well as the building of functional nanodevices. PMID:27173140

  18. System noise analysis of the dumbbell tethered satellite for gravity-gradient measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the dumbbell gravity gradiometer concept for measuring short wavelength variations in the earth's gravity gradient is presented. Variations in the gradient are recorded by measuring tension variations in a vertically stabilized satellite consisting of heavy masses connected by a long wire or rod. Tension noise arises from the excitation of various mechanical oscillations of the system. The principal noise sources that were identified are fluctuations in atmospheric drag heating and drag force resulting from density variations and winds. Approximate analytical expressions are presented for the tension noise as a function of the system design parameters for various possible configurations. Computer simulations using numerical integration were performed to study the tension noise for several sample cases. Three designs consistent with Shuttle launch capabilities are discussed.

  19. Stability solutions of a dumbbell-like system in an elliptical orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza dos Santos, Denilson Paulo; Brito de Aguiã Morant, Simão António da Rocha e.; Guerman, Anna D.; Burov, Alexander A.

    2015-10-01

    A dumbbell-like system is analyzed, considering two mass points connected with a massless and rigid tether with length variations, and the center of mass described by Keplerian orbits. This kind of system, in a certain type of configuration, is a simple conceptualization of the space elevator. The system motion is obtained with the Lagrangian Formulation in a Central Gravitational Field, and the perturbations of motion are neglected. Laws of control are considered for the angle of systems rotation around the center of mass. Those include uniform rotations or no rotation at all. Stability conditions were obtained for the first case, analyzing its neighborhood and using Floquet Theory. The results shown there are regions of eccentricities were stability is found. Lastly, a dynamic numerical simulator was created, where the implementation of the results could be tested. The dynamic behavior of the system showed regular and chaotic properties.

  20. Does the Dumbbell-Carrying Position Change the Muscle Activity in Split Squats and Walking Lunges?

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Michal; Zaatar, Amr M.Z.; Svoboda, Zdenek; Xaverova, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stastny, P, Lehnert, M, Zaatar, AMZ, Svoboda, Z, and Xaverova, Z. Does the dumbbell-carrying position change the muscle activity in split squats and walking lunges? J Strength Cond Res 29(11): 3177–3187, 2015—The forward walking lunge (WL) and split squat (SSq) are similar exercises that have differences in the eccentric phase, and both can be performed in the ipsilateral or contralateral carrying conditions. This study aimed to determine the effects of dumbbell-carrying position on the kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes of the gluteus medius (Gmed), vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris during WLs and SSqs. The resistance-trained (RT) and the non–resistance-trained (NT) groups (both n = 14) performed ipsilateral WLs, contralateral WLs, ipsilateral SSqs, and contralateral SSqs in a randomized order in a simulated training session. The EMG amplitude, expressed as a percentage of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC), and the kinematics, expressed as the range of motion (ROM) of the hip and knee, were measured during 5 repetition maximum for both legs. The repeated measure analyses of variance showed significant differences between the RT and NT groups. The NT group showed a smaller knee flexion ROM (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.36) during both types of WLs, whereas the RT group showed a higher eccentric Gmed amplitude (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.46) during all exercises and a higher eccentric VL amplitude (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.63) during contralateral WLs. Further differences were found between contralateral and ipsilateral WLs in both the RT (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.69) and NT groups (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.80), and contralateral WLs resulted in higher eccentric Gmed amplitudes. Contralateral WLs highly activated the Gmed (90% MVIC); therefore, this exercise can increase the Gmed maximal strength. The ipsilateral loading condition did not increase the Gmed or VM activity in the RT or NT group. PMID:25968228

  1. Differences in unilateral chest press muscle activation and kinematics on a stable versus unstable surface while holding one versus two dumbbells

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Jeffrey M.; Oppenheimer, Nicole E.; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Training the bench press exercise on a traditional flat bench does not induce a level of instability as seen in sport movements and activities of daily living. Twenty participants were recruited to test two forms of instability: using one dumbbell rather than two and lifting on the COR bench compared to a flat bench. Electromyography (EMG) amplitudes of the pectoralis major, middle trapezius, external oblique, and internal oblique were recorded and compared. Differences in range of motion (ROM) were evaluated by measuring an angular representation of the shoulder complex. Four separate conditions of unilateral bench press were tested while lifting on a: flat bench with one dumbbell, flat bench with two dumbbells, COR Bench with one dumbbell, and COR Bench with two dumbbells. The results imply that there are no differences in EMG amplitude or ROM between the COR bench and traditional bench. However, greater ROM was found to be utilized in the single dumbbell condition, both in the COR bench and the flat bench. PMID:26528421

  2. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  3. The transformation of ZnO submicron dumbbells into perfect hexagonal tubular structures using CBD: a post treatment route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borade, P.; Joshi, K. U.; Gokarna, A.; Lerondel, G.; Jejurikar, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of dumbbell-shaped ZnO structures and their subsequent transformation into perfect hexagonal tubes by the extended chemical bath deposition (CBD) method, retaining all advantages such as reproducibility, simplicity, quickness and economical aspect. Well-dispersed sub-micron-sized dumbbell-shaped ZnO structures were synthesized on a SiO2/Si substrate by the CBD method. As an extension of the CBD process the synthesized ZnO dumbbells were exposed to the evaporate coming out of the chemical bath for a few minutes (simply by adjusting the height of the deposit so that it remained just above the solution) to convert them into hexagonal tubes via the dissolution process. The possible dissolution mechanism responsible for the observed conversion is discussed. The optical properties (photo-luminescence) recorded at low temperature on both the structures showed an intense, sharp excitonic peak located at ∼370 nm. The improved intensity and low FWHM of the UV peak observed in the hexagonal tubular structures assures high optical quality, and hence can be used for optoelectronic applications.

  4. First-Principles Prediction of Ultralow Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Dumbbell Silicene: A Comparison with Low-Buckled Silicene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Rongjun; Lu, Hongliang; Zhang, David Wei; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-08-17

    The dumbbell structure of two-dimensional group IV material offers alternatives to grow thin films for diverse applications. Thermal properties are important for these applications. We obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of low-buckled (LB) and dumbbell (DB) silicene by using first-principles calculations and the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons. For LB silicene, the calculated lattice thermal conductivity with naturally occurring isotope concentrations is 27.72 W/mK. For DB silicene, the calculated value is 2.86 W/mK. The thermal conductivity for DB silicene is much lower than LB silicene due to stronger phonon scattering. Our results will induce further theoretical and experimental investigations on the thermoelectric (TE) properties of DB silicene. The size-dependent thermal conductivity in both LB and DB silicene is investigated as well for designing TE devices. This work sheds light on the manipulation of phonon transport in two-dimensional group IV materials by dumbbell structure formed from the addition of adatoms. PMID:27460331

  5. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H+-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H+-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H+-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H+-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H+-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H+-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H+-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H+-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  6. Molecular hydrogen maps of extended planetary nebulae - the Dumbbell, the Ring, and NGC 2346

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Gatley, I.

    1988-01-01

    The 3.8-m United Kingdom Infrared Telecsope at Mauna Kea was used to obtain complete H2 maps of three extended planetary nebulae (PNs) that are representative of two of the most common PN morphologies, bow tie and bipolar ring: the Dumbbell (NGC 6853), the Ring (NGC 6720), and the NG 2346, are discussed. The results of map analysis indicates that the S(1) emission from H2 closely follows the optical morphology of the three nebulae. The H2 emission is more extended than the main emitting mass of ionized gas and, in NGCC 2346, there is evidence for a dense torus of hot H2 surrounding the central star. The H2 emissionl appears to be shock-excited. Examinations of existing H2 measurements indicate that strong H2 emission is preferentially present in PNs that lie at small galactic latitude, implying that massive main-sequence stars produce ionization-bounded PNs, whereas low-mass stars produce density-bounded PNs. Thus, maps of H2 emission may not only be used to determine whether a given PN is ionization-bounded or density-bounded, but also to estimate the mass of the progenitor star. 83 references.

  7. Ultrasonic assisted synthesis, characterization and influence factors of monodispersed dumbbell-like YF(3) nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yonghong; Li, Guoyan; Hong, Jianming

    2010-03-01

    In the present paper, we reported the successful synthesis of dumbbell-like YF(3) nanostructures with a high yield in a mixed system of water/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) under the assistance of ultrasound waves of 40kHz with the ultrasonic power of 100% (200W) at 65 degrees C for 2h, employing Y(2)O(3) (99.99%) and NH(4)F as the starting reactants. The product was characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Some factors influencing the morphology of YF(3) nanostructures, including the ultrasonic time and power, the amount of NH(4)F, and the ratio of water/DMF, were systematically investigated. Research showed that the morphology of YF(3) could be tuned by the volume ratio of water/DMF. The roles of DMF and the ultrasonic wave in the formation of YF(3) nanostructures were discussed. PMID:19751989

  8. Target-protecting dumbbell molecular probe against exonucleases digestion for sensitive detection of ATP and streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyang; Liu, Yucheng; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a versatile dumbbell molecular (DM) probe was designed and employed in the sensitively homogeneous bioassay. In the presence of target molecule, the DM probe was protected from the digestion of exonucleases. Subsequently, the protected DM probe specifically bound to the intercalation dye and resulted in obvious fluorescence signal which was used to determine the target molecule in return. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and no sophisticated fluorescence labeling. Integrating the idea of target-protecting DM probe with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) involved ligation reaction, the DM probe with 5'-end phosphorylation was successfully constructed for ATP detection, and the limitation of detection was found to be 4.8 pM. Thanks to its excellent selectivity and sensitivity, this sensing strategy was used to detect ATP spiked in human serum as well as cellular ATP. Moreover, the proposed strategy was also applied in the visual detection of ATP in droplet-based microfluidic platform with satisfactory results. Similarly, combining the principle of target-protecting DM probe with streptavidin (SA)-biotin interaction, the DM probe with 3'-end biotinylation was developed for selective and sensitive SA determination, which demonstrated the robustness and versatility of this design. PMID:27131994

  9. Effects of exhaustive dumbbell exercise after isokinetic eccentric damage: recovery of static and dynamic muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Akihiro; Maruyama, Takeo; Naito, Hisashi; Sinclair, Peter James

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the recovery of static and dynamic muscle performance after eccentric damage with and without repeated exercise, using different exercise modes between the initial and subsequent exercise bouts. Twelve nonweight-trained adults performed both control and repeated exercise conditions. Soreness, limb circumference, static joint angles, creatine kinase (CK), isometric strength, and dynamic muscle performance involving a stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) were monitored for 7 days to evaluate the recovery. After baseline measures, subjects performed 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions (90 degrees/second) of the elbow flexors in each experiment. For the control condition, no treatment was applied. For the repeated exercise condition, 5 sets of arm curls using dumbbells (70% isometric maximal voluntary contraction of each testing day) were performed until failure on days 1, 2, 3, and 5 of recovery. Significant condition vs. time interactions existed in circumference (p = 0.012), static relaxed angle (p = 0.013), isometric strength (p = 0.039), and dynamic extension angle (p = 0.039), suggesting a slightly delayed onset of recovery with the repeated exercise. SSC performance changed more in parallel with soreness after eccentric exercise than did the other measures. It was concluded that the repeated bout effect was present, although slightly reduced, when subsequent exercise performed before recovery was intense and differed in mode from the initial eccentric exercise. Practical applications of this research are that resistance training may be continued after eccentric damage; however, a minor delay in the onset of recovery may occur depending on training modes. Muscle soreness is a good indicator of performance decrement during dynamic movements following eccentric damage. PMID:19910828

  10. A New Surgical Procedure “Dumbbell-Form Resection” for Selected Hilar Cholangiocarcinomas With Severe Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Li, Dajiang; He, Yu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a new surgical procedure, dumbbell-form resection (DFR), for hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) with severe jaundice. In DFR, liver segments I, IVb, and partial V above the right hepatic pedicle are resected. Hemihepatectomy is recognized as the preferred procedure; however, its application is limited in HCCAs with severe jaundice. Thirty-eight HCCA patients with severe jaundice receiving DFR and 70 receiving hemihepatectomy from January 2008 to January 2013 were included. Perioperative parameters, operation-related morbidity and mortality, and post-operative survival were analyzed. A total of 21.1% patients (8/38) in the DFR group received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), which was significantly <81.4% (57/70) in the hemihepatectomy group. The TBIL was higher in the DFR group at operation (243.7 vs 125.6 μmol/L, respectively). The remnant liver volume was significantly higher after DFR. The operation-related morbidity was significantly lower after DFR than after hemihepatectomy (26.3% vs 48.6%, respectively). None of the patients died during the perioperative period after DFR, whereas 3 died after hemihepatectomy. There was no difference in margin status, histological grade, lymph-node involvement, and distant metastasis between the 2 groups. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates after DFR (68.4%, 32.1%, and 21.4%, respectively) showed no significant difference with those after hemihepatectomy (62.7%, 34.6%, and 23.3%, respectively). Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that overall survival and recurrence after DFR demonstrated no significant difference compared with hemihepatectomy. DFR appears to be feasible for selected HCCA patients with severe jaundice. However, its indications should be restricted. PMID:26765439

  11. Does the Dumbbell-Carrying Position Change the Muscle Activity in Split Squats and Walking Lunges?

    PubMed

    Stastny, Petr; Lehnert, Michal; Zaatar, Amr M Z; Svoboda, Zdenek; Xaverova, Zuzana

    2015-11-01

    The forward walking lunge (WL) and split squat (SSq) are similar exercises that have differences in the eccentric phase, and both can be performed in the ipsilateral or contralateral carrying conditions. This study aimed to determine the effects of dumbbell-carrying position on the kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes of the gluteus medius (Gmed), vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris during WLs and SSqs. The resistance-trained (RT) and the non-resistance-trained (NT) groups (both n = 14) performed ipsilateral WLs, contralateral WLs, ipsilateral SSqs, and contralateral SSqs in a randomized order in a simulated training session. The EMG amplitude, expressed as a percentage of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC), and the kinematics, expressed as the range of motion (ROM) of the hip and knee, were measured during 5 repetition maximum for both legs. The repeated measure analyses of variance showed significant differences between the RT and NT groups. The NT group showed a smaller knee flexion ROM (p < 0.001, η = 0.36) during both types of WLs, whereas the RT group showed a higher eccentric Gmed amplitude (p < 0.001, η = 0.46) during all exercises and a higher eccentric VL amplitude (p < 0.001, η = 0.63) during contralateral WLs. Further differences were found between contralateral and ipsilateral WLs in both the RT (p < 0.001, η = 0.69) and NT groups (p < 0.001, η = 0.80), and contralateral WLs resulted in higher eccentric Gmed amplitudes. Contralateral WLs highly activated the Gmed (90% MVIC); therefore, this exercise can increase the Gmed maximal strength. The ipsilateral loading condition did not increase the Gmed or VM activity in the RT or NT group. PMID:25968228

  12. Polarity assignment in ZnTe, GaAs, ZnO, and GaN-AlN nanowires from direct dumbbell analysis.

    PubMed

    de la Mata, Maria; Magen, Cesar; Gazquez, Jaume; Utama, Muhammad Iqbal Bakti; Heiss, Martin; Lopatin, Sergei; Furtmayr, Florian; Fernández-Rojas, Carlos J; Peng, Bo; Morante, Joan Ramon; Rurali, Riccardo; Eickhoff, Martin; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Xiong, Qihua; Arbiol, Jordi

    2012-05-01

    Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging and the newly developed annular bright field (ABF) imaging are used to define a new guideline for the polarity determination of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) from binary compounds in two extreme cases: (i) when the dumbbell is formed with atoms of similar mass (GaAs) and (ii) in the case where one of the atoms is extremely light (N or O: ZnO and GaN/AlN). The theoretical fundaments of these procedures allow us to overcome the main challenge in the identification of dumbbell polarity. It resides in the separation and identification of the constituent atoms in the dumbbells. The proposed experimental via opens new routes for the fine characterization of nanostructures, e.g., in electronic and optoelectronic fields, where the polarity is crucial for the understanding of their physical properties (optical and electronic) as well as their growth mechanisms. PMID:22493937

  13. Micro-optical coherence tomography tracking of magnetic gene transfection via Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Liu, Xinyu; Wei, Chao; Xu, Zhichuan J.; Sim, Stanley Siong Wei; Liu, Linbo; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-10-01

    Heterogeneous Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles (NPs) are composed of Au NPs and Fe3O4 NPs that bring in optical and magnetic properties respectively. This article reports the engineering of Au-Fe3O4 NPs as gene carriers for magnetic gene transfection as well as contrast agents for micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT). As a proof-of-concept, Au-Fe3O4 NPs are used to deliver the green fluorescent protein to HEK 293T cells and their entrance into the cells is monitored through μOCT.Heterogeneous Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles (NPs) are composed of Au NPs and Fe3O4 NPs that bring in optical and magnetic properties respectively. This article reports the engineering of Au-Fe3O4 NPs as gene carriers for magnetic gene transfection as well as contrast agents for micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT). As a proof-of-concept, Au-Fe3O4 NPs are used to deliver the green fluorescent protein to HEK 293T cells and their entrance into the cells is monitored through μOCT. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05459a

  14. Effects of viscoelasticity on droplet dynamics and break-up in microchannels: a Lattice Boltzmann study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anupam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscoelasticity on the dynamics and break-up of liquid threads in microfluidic devices, i.e., T-junctions & Cross-Junction, are investigated using numerical simulations of dilute polymeric solutions for a wide range of Capillary numbers (Ca), i.e., changing the balance between the viscous forces and the surface tension at the interface. A Navier-Stokes (NS) description of the solvent based on the lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) is here coupled to constitutive equations for finite extensible non-linear elastic dumbbells with the closure proposed by Peterlin (FENE-P model). The various model parameters of the FENE-P constitutive equations, including the polymer relaxation time and the finite extensibility parameter, are changed to provide quantitative details on how the dynamics and break-up properties are affected by viscoelasticity. European Research Council under the Europeans Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC Grant Agreement N. 297004.

  15. Planar spoof plasmonic ultra-wideband filter based on low-loss and compact terahertz waveguide corrugated with dumbbell grooves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Yang, Bao Jia

    2015-05-10

    Although subwavelength planar terahertz (THz) plasmonic devices can be implemented based on planar spoof surface plasmons (SPs), they still suffer from a little high propagation loss. Here the dispersion and propagation characteristics of the spoof plasmonic waveguide composed of double metal strips corrugated with dumbbell shaped grooves have been investigated. It has been found that much lower propagation loss and longer propagation length can be achieved based on the waveguide compared with the conventional spoof plasmonic waveguide with rectangular grooves. Moreover, the waveguide can implement a decrease in size of about 22%. An ultra-wideband THz plasmonic filter for planar circuits has been demonstrated based on the proposed waveguide. The experimental verification at the microwave frequency has been conducted by scaling up the geometry size of the filter. PMID:25967512

  16. Production of dumbbell probe through hairpin cleavage-ligation and increasing RCA sensitivity and specificity by circle to circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Tang, Suming; Hu, Tianyu; Zhao, Guojie; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    Dumbbell probe (DP) attracts increasing interests in rolling circle amplification (RCA). A universal DP production method through cleavage-ligation of hairpin was proposed and optimized. The production is characterized by restriction endonuclease (RE)-induced cleavage ends ligation. It has the advantage of phosphorylation-free, splint-free and purification-free. To optimize designing, we found that the position of RE cleavage sequence in the stem and the primer position in the loop affected the formation and amplification of DP obviously. Both sticky and blunt ends cleaved by RE produce DP efficiently. Moreover, we introduced this DP into circle to circle (C2C) RCA based on the same cleavage-ligation principle, and acquired high sensitivity. By combining a two-ligation design and the C2C strategy, specificity for detecting let-7 family members was increased extremely. Furthermore, coreaction of different steps facilitated convenient formation and amplification process of DP. PMID:27385060

  17. Homemade Firearm Suicide With Dumbbell Pipe Triggering by an Air-Compressed Gun: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Le Garff, Erwan; Delannoy, Yann; Mesli, Vadim; Berthezene, Jean Marie; Morbidelli, Philippe; Hédouin, Valéry

    2015-12-01

    Firearm suicides are frequent and well described in the forensic literature, particularly in Europe and the United States. However, the use of homemade and improvised firearms is less well described. The present case reports a suicide with an original improvised gun created using an air-compressed pellet gun and a dumbbell pipe. The aims of this study were to describe the scene, the external examination of the corpse, the body scan, and the autopsy; to understand the mechanism of death; and to compare the results with a review of the forensic literature to highlight the epidemiology of homemade firearm use, the tools used for homemade and improvised firearms in suicides versus homicides, and the manners in which homemade firearms are used (homicide or suicide, particularly in complex suicide cases). PMID:26375571

  18. Large-scale controllable synthesis of dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} photocatalysts with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yang; Luo Yongsong; Kong Dezhi; Zhang Deyang; Jia Yonglei; Zhang Xinwei

    2012-02-15

    The controllable synthesis of novel dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures has been successfully obtained via a simple hydrothermal route. The as-synthesized products were studied by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the nucleation and growth of the nanodumbbells were governed by an oriented aggregation growth mechanism. It is noteworthy that the concentration of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and the volume ratio of H{sub 2}O to CH{sub 3}COOH were crucial to the growth of the final nanoarchitectures. Control experiments were also carried out to investigate the factors which impact on the morphology of the products. Furthermore, the as-prepared BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures demonstrated the superior visible-light-driven photocatalytic efficiency, which is helpful for the separation and recycle considering their promising applications in harmful pollutants disposal. - Graphical Abstract: The controllable synthesis of novel dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures has been successfully obtained via a simple hydrothermal route; the as-prepared BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures demonstrated the superior visible-light-driven photocatalytic efficiency. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} structures were synthesized and characterized for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The volume ratios of H{sub 2}O to CH{sub 3}COOH were crucial to the final morphologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their photocatalytic activity was up to 90% under visible-light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} structures may utilize the pollutant disposal.

  19. Cobalt carbonate dumbbells for high-capacity lithium storage: A slight doping of ascorbic acid and an enhancement in electrochemical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiqiang; Wei, Shanshan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuxi; Yu, Yue; Shen, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Synthesis of materials with desirable nanostructures is a hot research topic owing to their enhanced performances in contrast to the bulk counterparts. Herein, dumbbell-shaped cobalt carbonate (CoCO3) nano architectures and the bulk counterpart of CoCO3 rhombohedra are prepared via a facile hydrothermal route in the presence and absence of ascorbic acid (AA), respectively. By comparison, it has been found that: the addition of AA in the hydrothermal crystallization system changes the shape of the building blocks from Co2CO3(OH)2 nanosheets to CoCO3 nanoparticles, and then further influences the final configuration of the products. When applied as anodes of lithium ion batteries, CoCO3 dumbbells deliver a 100th capacity of 1042 mAh g-1 at 200 mA g-1 and even exhibit a long-term value of 824 mAh g-1 over 500 cycles at 1000 mA g-1, which are much higher than the rhombohedral counterparts with corresponding 540 and 481 mAh g-1 respectively. The much higher capacity, better cycling stability and enhanced rate performance of CoCO3 dumbbells can be attributed to the higher specific surface area, smaller charge transport resistance and better structure stability resulting from the slight doping (∼4.6 wt%) of AA, and also relate with a novel lithium storage mechanism in CoCO3.

  20. Exploring protein-DNA interactions in 3D using in situ construction, manipulation, and visualization of individual DNA-dumbbells with optical traps, microfluidics, and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Anthony L.; Dombrowski, Christopher C.; Amitani, Ichiro; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    In this Protocol, we describe a procedure to generate ‘DNA-dumbbells’ — single molecules of DNA with a microscopic bead attached at each end — and techniques for manipulating individual DNA-dumbbells. We also detail the design and fabrication of a microfluidic device (flow cell) used in conjunction with dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA-dumbbells and to visualize individual protein–DNA complexes by single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy. Our design of the flow cell enables the rapid movement of trapped molecules between laminar flow channels and a flow-free ‘reservoir’. The reservoir provides the means to examine formation of DNA–protein complexes in solution in the absence of external flow forces, while still maintaining a predetermined end-to-end extension of the DNA. These features facilitate examination of the role of three-dimensional DNA conformation and dynamics in protein–DNA interactions. Preparation of flow cells and reagents requires two days each; in situ DNA-dumbbell assembly and imaging of single protein–DNA complexes requires another day. PMID:23411634

  1. Optimization of Optical and Electronic properties of Carbon Fullerenes: Symmetry-Reduced C60 and Dumbbell-Like Novel Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M R

    2008-06-13

    Using quantum chemical density functional calculations, we study two possible pathways for manipulating the optical and electronic properties of all-carbon fullerenes structures. In the first, the optical properties of C{sub 60} are shown to be enhanced via reduction of the perfectly spherical Ih symmetry structure to energetically feasible lower symmetries. A D{sub 3d} symmetry structure of C{sub 60} proved to be 39 meV lower in energy than the Ih conformation. This reduction in symmetry activates otherwise silent modes in the IR and Raman spectra, possibly achievable via solvation effects. In the second pathway, fusing a building block of an-all carbon hexagonal unit as a connector between two C{sub 60} cages is considered. Optimizations on a resulting series of dumbbell-like structures, molecular C{sub 126}, C{sub 132}, C{sub 138}, C{sub 144}, and C{sub 180}, impart distinct variation in the electronic properties of these novel structures with size. These structures are further shown to support stable anionic radical forms.

  2. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S; Kevin, Beyer; et al

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatchmore » between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.« less

  3. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wustite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite

  4. Charge transport in C60-based dumbbell-type molecules: mechanically induced switching between two distinct conductance states.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Pavel; La Rosa, Andrea; Kolivoška, Viliam; Bermejo, Daniel; Hong, Wenjing; Yoshida, Koji; Baghernejad, Masoud; Filippone, Salvatore; Broekmann, Peter; Wandlowski, Thomas; Martín, Nazario

    2015-02-18

    Single molecule charge transport characteristics of buckminsterfullerene-capped symmetric fluorene-based dumbbell-type compound 1 were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (STM-BJ), current sensing atomic force microscopy break junction (CS-AFM-BJ), and mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) techniques, under ambient conditions. We also show that compound 1 is able to form highly organized defect-free surface adlayers, allowing the molecules on the surface to be addressed specifically. Two distinct single molecule conductance states (called high G(H)(1) and low G(L)(1)) were observed, depending on the pressure exerted by the probe on the junction, thus allowing molecule 1 to function as a mechanically driven molecular switch. These two distinct conductance states were attributed to the electron tunneling through the buckminsterfullerene anchoring group and fully extended molecule 1, respectively. The assignment of conductance features to these configurations was further confirmed by control experiments with asymmetrically designed buckminsterfullerene derivative 2 as well as pristine buckminsterfullerene 3, both lacking the G(L) feature. PMID:25651069

  5. Dumbbell-shaped metallothionein-templated silver nanoclusters with applications in cell imaging and Hg(2+) sensing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengqiang; Ye, Baoyu; Yi, Xinyao; Cao, Zhize; Wu, Daohong; Shen, Congcong; Wang, Jianxiu

    2016-08-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a cysteine-rich, low-molecular-weight protein, which adopts a unique dumbbell-shaped structure with a stable C-terminal α-domain and a reactive N-terminal β-domain. The specific configuration serves as a unique scaffold for the synthesis of ultra-small fluorescent metal nanoclusters (NCs). For the first time, MT-templated Ag NCs (MT-Ag NCs) with excellent antioxidant capacity and superior biocompatibility were facilely synthesized. The NCs were thoroughly characterized by various techniques. Zn(2+) in the β-domain was preferentially replaced by Ag(+), which was then reduced by NaBH4 to yield Ag NCs, while Zn(2+) in the α-domain was intactly tetrahedrally-coordinated through thiolate ligands in MT. Fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells was achieved by attaching folic acid (FA) to MT-Ag NCs. Due to the strong binding capacity toward the thiolate ligands in the α-domain, Hg(2+) was assayed via quenching the fluorescence of Ag NCs by an energy transfer process. The methodology described herein may be extended to the synthesis of other metal NCs with potential applications in biosensing and cell imaging. PMID:27216684

  6. Precision measurement of a low-loss cylindrical dumbbell-shaped sapphire mechanical oscillator using radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhill, J.; Ivanov, E.; Tobar, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present first results from a number of experiments conducted on a 0.53-kg cylindrical dumbbell-shaped sapphire crystal. Here we report on an optomechanical experiment utilizing a modification to the typical cylindrical architecture. Mechanical motion of the crystal structure alters the dimensions of the crystal, and the induced strain changes the permittivity. These two effects result in parametric frequency modulation of resonant microwave whispering gallery modes that are simultaneously excited within the crystal. A microwave readout system is implemented, allowing extremely low noise measurements of this frequency modulation near our modes of interest, having a phase noise floor of -165 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz. Fine tuning of the crystal's suspension has allowed for the optimization of mechanical quality factors in preparation for cryogenic experiments, with a value of Q =8 ×107 achieved at 127 kHz. This results in a Q ×f product of 1013, equivalent to the best measured values in a macroscopic sapphire mechanical system. Results are presented that demonstrate the excitation of mechanical modes via radiation pressure force, allowing an experimental method of determining the transducer's displacement sensitivity d f /d x and calibrating the system. Finally, we demonstrate parametric backaction phenomenon within the system. These are all important steps towards the goal of achieving quantum limited measurements of a kilogram-scale macroscopic device for the purpose of detecting deviations from standard quantum theory resulting from quantum gravitational effects.

  7. Synthesis and crystal structure of Ba{sub 26}B{sub 12}Si{sub 5}N{sub 27} containing [Si{sub 2}] dumbbells

    SciTech Connect

    Takayuki, Hashimoto; Yamane, Hisanori; Becker, Nils; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-10-15

    Black, metallic luster, platelet single crystals of Ba{sub 26}B{sub 12}Si{sub 5}N{sub 27} were grown on a BN crucible wall by slowly cooling from 900 °C to 27 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that Ba{sub 26}B{sub 12}Si{sub 5}N{sub 27} crystallizes in an orthorhombic cell (a=17.6942(4) Å, b=34.1437(6) Å, c=10.0410(2) Å; space group Fdd2). Isolated nitridoborate anionic groups [BN{sub 2}]{sup 3–}, dumbbell-type Zintl polyanions [Si{sub 2}]{sup 2.8–}, and nitride anions N{sup 3–} are included in the structure. The structural formula is represented as (Ba{sup 2+}){sub 26}([BN{sub 2}]{sup 3–}){sub 12}[([Si{sub 2}]{sup 2.8–}){sub 1.25}(N{sup 3–}){sub 2×0.75}]{sub 2}. The [Si{sub 2}]{sup 2.8–} dumbbell with a Si–Si length of 2.177(5) Å has a bond order of 2.6, which is close to the triple bond of Si. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of Ba{sub 26}B{sub 12}Si{sub 5}N{sub 27} grown by slow cooling from 900 °C have an orthorhombic crystal structure with space group Fdd2, containing nitridoborate anionic groups [BN{sub 2}]{sup 3–}, dumbbell-type Zintl polyanions [Si{sub 2}]{sup 2.8–}, and nitride anions N{sup 3–}. - Highlights: • A novel compound, Ba{sub 26}B{sub 12}Si{sub 5}N{sub 27}, was synthesized by slow cooling from 900 °C. • Single crystal X-ray diffraction clarified a new crystal structure. • Anionic groups [BN{sub 2}]{sup 3–} and dumbbell-type Zintl polyanions [Si{sub 2}]{sup 2.8–} are contained. • The [Si{sub 2}]{sup 2.8–} dumbbell has a bond order of 2.6, which is close to the triple bond.

  8. A New Surgical Procedure "Dumbbell-Form Resection" for Selected Hilar Cholangiocarcinomas With Severe Jaundice: Comparison With Hemihepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuguang; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Li, Dajiang; He, Yu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a new surgical procedure, dumbbell-form resection (DFR), for hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) with severe jaundice. In DFR, liver segments I, IVb, and partial V above the right hepatic pedicle are resected.Hemihepatectomy is recognized as the preferred procedure; however, its application is limited in HCCAs with severe jaundice.Thirty-eight HCCA patients with severe jaundice receiving DFR and 70 receiving hemihepatectomy from January 2008 to January 2013 were included. Perioperative parameters, operation-related morbidity and mortality, and post-operative survival were analyzed.A total of 21.1% patients (8/38) in the DFR group received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), which was significantly <81.4% (57/70) in the hemihepatectomy group. The TBIL was higher in the DFR group at operation (243.7 vs 125.6 μmol/L, respectively). The remnant liver volume was significantly higher after DFR. The operation-related morbidity was significantly lower after DFR than after hemihepatectomy (26.3% vs 48.6%, respectively). None of the patients died during the perioperative period after DFR, whereas 3 died after hemihepatectomy. There was no difference in margin status, histological grade, lymph-node involvement, and distant metastasis between the 2 groups. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates after DFR (68.4%, 32.1%, and 21.4%, respectively) showed no significant difference with those after hemihepatectomy (62.7%, 34.6%, and 23.3%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that overall survival and recurrence after DFR demonstrated no significant difference compared with hemihepatectomy.DFR appears to be feasible for selected HCCA patients with severe jaundice. However, its indications should be restricted. PMID:26765439

  9. Effects of momentum-based dumbbell training on cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jiaojiao; Sun, Mingyun; Liang, Leichao; Feng, Yi; Pan, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of an innovative momentum-based dumbbell-training intervention on cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Subjects and methods A total of 45 community-dwelling older adults with MCI were randomly assigned to either a dumbbell-training group (DTG; n=22) or a control group (CG; n=23). Participants in the DTG participated in exercise sessions three times weekly for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measures were cognitive function, including the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS) – Cognitive subscale, Trail Making Test part B, Digit Span Test (DST) – forward, and DST – backward, with secondary outcome measures being Timed Up and Go, functional reach, and the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale. Results In an intent-to-treat analysis, participants in the DTG had significantly improved ADAS – Cognitive subscale scores compared to those in the CG (5.02 points, P=0.012). There was a significant within-group change (improvement) in Trail Making Test part B (33.32 seconds, P<0.001) and DST – backward (0.41 points, P=0.025) scores. No change was observed for the DST – forward measure. Participants in the DTG also improved their functional mobility compared to those in the CG (Timed Up and Go, 0.81 seconds; P=0.043). Conclusion There is preliminary evidence showing the potential benefit of momentum-based dumbbell training for improving cognitive function in older adults with MCI. PMID:26766905

  10. 99mTc radiolabelling of Fe3O4-Au core-shell and Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell-like nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, M.; Alberto, R.

    2015-04-01

    The development of nanoparticle-based dual-modality probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is increasingly growing in importance. One of the most commonly used radionuclides for clinical SPECT imaging is 99mTc and the labelling of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with 99mTc was shown to be a successful strategy to obtain dual-modality imaging agents. In this work, we focus on gold containing magnetic nanomaterials. The radiolabelling of magnetic Fe3O4-Au core-shell and Fe3O4-Au dumbbell-like nanoparticles with the [99mTc(CO)3]+ fragment is described. The key elements for this 99mTc labelling approach are novel coating ligands, consisting of an anchor for the Au surface, a polyethylene glycol linker and a strong chelator for the [99mTc(CO)3]+ moiety.The development of nanoparticle-based dual-modality probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is increasingly growing in importance. One of the most commonly used radionuclides for clinical SPECT imaging is 99mTc and the labelling of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with 99mTc was shown to be a successful strategy to obtain dual-modality imaging agents. In this work, we focus on gold containing magnetic nanomaterials. The radiolabelling of magnetic Fe3O4-Au core-shell and Fe3O4-Au dumbbell-like nanoparticles with the [99mTc(CO)3]+ fragment is described. The key elements for this 99mTc labelling approach are novel coating ligands, consisting of an anchor for the Au surface, a polyethylene glycol linker and a strong chelator for the [99mTc(CO)3]+ moiety. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Analyses of Fe3O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles; analyses of Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell-like nanoparticles; 99mTc labelling of Fe3O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles; 99mTc complexes; 99mTc labelling of Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell-like nanoparticles; syntheses coating ligands. See

  11. Radiation characteristics and effective optical properties of dumbbell-shaped cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    This study presents experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. during their exponential growth in F medium. Their scattering phase function at 633 nm average spectral absorption and scattering cross-sections between 400 and 750 nm were measured. In addition, an inverse method was used for retrieving the spectral effective complex index of refraction of overlapping or touching bispheres and quadspheres from their absorption and scattering cross-sections. The inverse method combines a genetic algorithm and a forward model based on Lorenz-Mie theory, treating bispheres and quadspheres as projected area and volume-equivalent coated spheres. The inverse method was successfully validated with numerically predicted average absorption and scattering cross-sections of suspensions consisting of bispheres and quadspheres, with realistic size distributions, using the T-matrix method. It was able to retrieve the monomers' complex index of refraction with size parameter up to 11, relative refraction index less than 1.3, and absorption index less than 0.1. Then, the inverse method was applied to retrieve the effective spectral complex index of refraction of Synechocystis sp. approximated as randomly oriented aggregates consisting of two overlapping homogeneous spheres. Both the measured absorption cross-section and the retrieved absorption index featured peaks at 435 and 676 nm corresponding to chlorophyll a, a peak at 625 nm corresponding to phycocyanin, and a shoulder around 485 nm corresponding to carotenoids. These results can be used to optimize and control light transfer in photobioreactors. The inverse method and the equivalent coated sphere model could be applied to other optically soft particles of similar morphologies.

  12. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs. PMID:26454831

  13. Effects of Bi3+ ions on luminescence of dumbbell-like SrMoO4 and SrMoO4:Eu3+ microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yanhong; Bai, Chunyan; Mo, Guoli

    2015-09-01

    Bi3+ doped SrMoO4 and SrMoO4:Eu3+ microcrystals are synthesized by the precipitation method at room temperature. The synthesized samples show pure tetragonal phase with an I41/a space group. The TEM images indicate that all samples have the morphology of dumbbell. The doping Bi3+ ions for SrMoO4 induce the decreases of excitation and emission intensities. But enhanced red emission for SrMoO4:Eu3+ is obtained by co-doping Bi3+ ions. For a fixed Eu3+ concentration of 3.0%, there is an optimal Bi3+ concentration, at which the maximum emission intensity is obtained. The optimal concentration of Bi3+ is 2.0% for SrMoO4:3.0%Eu3+.

  14. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for dumbbell-shaped hypoglossal schwannomas: Two cases of long-term follow-up and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Lou, Jinrong; Qiu, Shujun; Guo, Yutian; Pan, Mianshun

    2016-01-01

    Cases of hypoglossal schwannoma are extremely rare. Historically, microsurgical resection has been the standard treatment, but it may not always be feasible; thus, it is crucial to investigate alternative treatments. We herein present the cases of two patients, both of whom presented with tongue deviation and hemiatrophy, accompanied by headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dumbbell-shaped tumor originating from the hypoglossal nerve that was adjacent to the cranial base in each patient. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used to treat the tumors, with a total dose of 30 Gy in 3-Gy fractions delivered to the planning target volume. Several months later, the tumors had significantly decreased in size and the symptoms of the two patients had gradually improved. PMID:27446582

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman trajectories on a nano-dumbbell: transition from field to charge transfer plasmons as the spheres fuse.

    PubMed

    Banik, Mayukh; El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Nag, Amit; Rodriguez-Perez, Alejandro; Guarrottxena, Nekane; Bazan, Guillermo C; Apkarian, Vartkess A

    2012-11-27

    By taking advantage of the tensor nature of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we track trajectories of the linker molecule and a CO molecule chemisorbed at the hot spot of a nano-dumbbell consisting of dibenzyldithio-linked silver nanospheres. The linear Stark shift of CO serves as an absolute gauge of the local field, while the polyatomic spectra characterize the vector components of the local field. We identify surface-enhanced Raman optical activity due to a transient asperity in the nanojunction in an otherwise uneventful SERS trajectory. During fusion of the spheres, we observe sequential evolution of the enhanced spectra from dipole-coupled Raman to quadrupole- and magnetic dipole-coupled Raman, followed by a transition from line spectra to band spectra, and the full reversal of the sequence. From the spectrum of CO, the sequence can be understood to track the evolution of the junction plasmon resonance from dipolar to quadrupolar to charge transfer as a function of intersphere separation, which evolves at a speed of ∼1 Å/min. The crossover to the conduction limit is marked by the transition of line spectra to Stark-broadened and shifted band spectra. As the junction closes on CO, the local field reaches 1 V/Å, limited to a current of 1 electron per vibrational cycle passing through the molecule, with associated Raman enhancement factor via the charge transfer plasmon resonance of 10(12). The local field identifies that a sharp protrusion is responsible for room-temperature chemisorption of CO on silver. The asymmetric phototunneling junction, Ag-CO-Ag, driven by the frequency-tunable charge transfer plasmon of the dumbbell antenna, combines the design elements of an ideal rectifying photocollector. PMID:23092179

  16. Multifunctional Dumbbell-Shaped DNA-Templated Selective Formation of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters or Copper Nanoparticles for Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyang; Ji, Xinghu; Tinnefeld, Philip; He, Zhike

    2016-01-27

    In this work, a multifunctional template for selective formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) or copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) is put forward. This dumbbell-shaped (DS) DNA template is made up of two cytosine hairpin loops and an adenine-thymine-rich double-helical stem which is closed by the loops. The cytosine loops act as specific regions for the growth of AgNCs, and the double-helical stem serves as template for the CuNPs formation. By carefully investigating the sequence and length of DS DNA, we present the optimal design of the template. Benefiting from the smart design and facile synthesis, a simple, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection is proposed. Through the systematic comparison, it is found that the strategy based on CuNPs formation is more sensitive for ATP assay than that based on AgNCs synthesis, and the detection limitation was found to be 81 pM. What's more, the CuNPs formation-based method is successfully applied in the detection of ATP in human serum as well as the determination of cellular ATP. In addition to small target molecule, the sensing strategy was also extended to the detection of biomacromolecule (DNA), which illustrates the generality of this biosensor. PMID:26719979

  17. Interlocking Detachable Coil Embolization by Technique of Dumbbell-Shaped Framing and Filling and Bridge Formation Under Balloon Dilatation for Huge Conglomerate Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Nobuyuki Sato, Morio Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki Nakai, Tomoki Ikoma, Akira Sawa, Munehisa Sahara, Shinya Nakata, Kouhei Tanaka, Takami Takasaka, Isao Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2011-12-15

    A 60-year-old woman presented with a conglomerate pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) size 8.2 Multiplication-Sign 7.2 cm on chest X-ray. Feeding arteries were A{sub a}{sup 7} and A{sub b}{sup 7}, A{sup 8}, and A{sup 10}. The diameter and length of the A{sub b}{sup 7} neck were 15.5 and 16 mm, respectively. After percutaneous transcatheter embolization of A{sup 8} and A{sup 10}, PTE of A{sub a}{sup 7} and A{sub b}{sup 7} was conducted under balloon occlusion with interlocking detachable coils using a technique of dumbbell-shaped framing and filling, making a bridge from A{sub b}{sup 7} to the trunk of A{sup 9} and A{sup 10}across A{sup 7}. Follow-up computed tomography 10 months after treatment showed marked shrinkage of the PAVM.

  18. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S; Kevin, Beyer; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.

  19. Viscoelastic models of tear film drainage after a blink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R. J.; Cook, L. P.

    2004-11-01

    Tiffany (Intl. Opthalmol. 15, (1991) 371-376) measured the viscosity of human tear fluid and found that the Cross equation can describe the shear thinning behavior of the tear film; the model predicts a -2/3 power for the decrease in viscosity with shear rate. We fit that data with FENE-P and Giesekus fluid models which incorporate shear thinning and elasticity. We apply lubrication theory to the drainage of the tear film for these fluids. The results show that localized thinning near the meniscus is exaggerated compared to a relative lack of motion in the interior of the film, when the Newtonian case is used as a reference. Extension to models including film formation and drainage will be discussed.

  20. 3-D dumbbell-like LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode materials assembled with nano-building blocks for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Lim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Won-Keun; Kwon, HyukSang

    2014-07-01

    Dumbbell-like microsphere carbonate precursors including multi-transition metal components (Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3CO3) assembled with nano-building blocks were synthesized by urea-assisted solvo/hydrothermal method, and layered cathode materials (LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2) were subsequently prepared using the similarly shaped carbonate precursors for Li-ion batteries. For the synthesis of hierarchical microsphere structures, the partial addition of viscous organic solvent (e.g. ethylene glycol) in aqueous solution played a crucial role, not only in suppressing the sudden particle growth but also in regulating the directional crystallization of carbonate particles on the surface. The dumbbell-like LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 assembled with nanocubes prepared via the urea-assisted solvo/hydrothermal method exhibited better electrochemical characteristics, such as initial discharge capacity, cyclic performance, and rate-capability as a cathode material of Li-ion batteries, compared with the LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 materials prepared via the conventional co-precipitation method.

  1. Effects of viscoelasticity on droplet dynamics and break-up in microfluidic T-Junctions: a lattice Boltzmann study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anupam; Sbragaglia, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The effects of viscoelasticity on the dynamics and break-up of fluid threads in microfluidic T-junctions are investigated using numerical simulations of dilute polymer solutions at changing the Capillary number (Ca), i.e. at changing the balance between the viscous forces and the surface tension at the interface, up to Ca ≈ 3×10(-2). A Navier-Stokes (NS) description of the solvent based on the lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) is here coupled to constitutive equations for finite extensible non-linear elastic dumbbells with the closure proposed by Peterlin (FENE-P model). We present the results of three-dimensional simulations in a range of Ca which is broad enough to characterize all the three characteristic mechanisms of break-up in the confined T-junction, i.e. squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes. The various model parameters of the FENE-P constitutive equations, including the polymer relaxation time τP and the finite extensibility parameter L2, are changed to provide quantitative details on how the dynamics and break-up properties are affected by viscoelasticity. We will analyze cases with Droplet Viscoelasticity (DV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the dispersed (d) phase, as well as cases with Matrix Viscoelasticity (MV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the continuous (c) phase. Moderate flow-rate ratios Q ≈ O(1) of the two phases are considered in the present study. Overall, we find that the effects are more pronounced in the case with MV, as the flow driving the break-up process upstream of the emerging thread can be sensibly perturbed by the polymer stresses. PMID:26810396

  2. Influence of Anion and Mole Ratio on the Coordination Behavior of an NO2S3-Macrocycle: The Formation of a Dumbbell-Shaped Macrocyclic Cadmium(II) Iodide Complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Hwan; Lee, Eunji; Ju, Huiyeong; Kim, Seulgi; Park, In-Hyeok; Lee, Shim Sung

    2016-03-01

    Anion and mole ratio dependent formations of cadmium(II) complexes with an NO2S3-macrocycle (L) incorporating a pyridine subunit are reported. When the cadmium(II) salts (1-10 equiv) with different halide ions (Br(-) or I(-)) were reacted with L, CdBr2 afforded a monomer complex, [Cd(L)Br]2[Cd2Br6]·CH2Cl2 (1), with three separated parts in the whole mole ratio range: two 1:1 stoichiometric complex cation parts and one Cd2Br6 cluster anion part. After separation of 1 by filtration, [Cd(L)Br]2[CdBr4]·CH2Cl2 (2) with similar composition was afforded, except the cluster was isolated from the filtrate. Unlike the CdBr2 complexation, CdI2 afforded the mole ratio dependent products (3-5). Below 2.5 equiv of CdI2, [Cd(L)I]2[CdI4]·CH2Cl2 (3) and [Cd(L)I]2[Cd2I6]·0.5CH2Cl2 (4) with different cadmium(II) iodide clusters were isolated as kinetic (3) and a thermodynamic (4) products. Notably, the use of 3 equiv or above amount of CdI2 gave a dumbbell-shaped complex, {[Cd(L)]2(μ-Cd4I12)} (5), in which two mononuclear macrocyclic complex units are linked by a (μ-Cd4I12)(4-) cluster. To monitor the mole ratio dependency as well as their reactivities, the systematic powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis has also been applied. PMID:26900712

  3. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  4. Hybrid Lattice Boltzmann/Finite Difference simulations of viscoelastic multicomponent flows in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Sbragaglia, M.; Scagliarini, A.

    2015-06-01

    We propose numerical simulations of viscoelastic fluids based on a hybrid algorithm combining Lattice-Boltzmann models (LBM) and Finite Differences (FD) schemes, the former used to model the macroscopic hydrodynamic equations, and the latter used to model the polymer dynamics. The kinetics of the polymers is introduced using constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids with finitely extensible non-linear elastic dumbbells with Peterlin's closure (FENE-P). The numerical model is first benchmarked by characterizing the rheological behavior of dilute homogeneous solutions in various configurations, including steady shear, elongational flows, transient shear and oscillatory flows. As an upgrade of complexity, we study the model in presence of non-ideal multicomponent interfaces, where immiscibility is introduced in the LBM description using the "Shan-Chen" interaction model. The problem of a confined viscoelastic (Newtonian) droplet in a Newtonian (viscoelastic) matrix under simple shear is investigated and numerical results are compared with the predictions of various theoretical models. The proposed numerical simulations explore problems where the capabilities of LBM were never quantified before.

  5. Modeling Vortex Cavitation Inception Delay in a Swirl Chamber by Polymer Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Zhang, Q.; Hsiao, C. T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2011-11-01

    Experimental studies have shown tip vortex cavitation can be delayed with injection of drag reducing dilute polymer solutions. We present here numerical simulations conducted to understand the mechanisms responsible for cavitation suppression with local polymer injection. A canonical flow in a linear vortex chamber was simulated by using the NS solver, 3DYNAFS-VIS, equipped with a FENE-P viscoelastic model for the polymer solution and a transport equation to track its concentration. The simulation showed that injection of dilute polymer can delay cavitation inception at a much lower injection flow rate than needed with massive injection of water or a higher viscosity liquid. Injection of polymer increases the pressure along the vortex axis and a much earlier vortex breakdown created by the elasticity of the polymers appears to be responsible for the strong modification of the flow character. This results in a fast reduction of the rotational velocity, increase of the pressure, and delay of cavitation inception. The dependency of polymer effects on the injection flow rate and polymer concentration was also investigated, finding good consistency with experimental observations. ONR Contract N00014-04-C-0110, monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  6. Present status of the VMI and related models

    SciTech Connect

    Scharff-Goldhaber, G

    1980-05-01

    This article traces the evolution of the Variable Moment of Inertia model in its relation to the shell model, the Bohr-Mottelson model and the Interacting Boson Model. The discovery of a new type of spectrum, that of pseudomagic nuclei (isobars of doubly magic nuclei) is reported, and an explanation for their dynamics is suggested. The type of rotational motion underlying the ground state band of an e-e nucleus is shown to depend on whether the minimum number of valence nucleon pairs of one kind (neutrons or protons) is less than or equal to 2 or > 2. In the former case the alpha-dumbbell model holds; in the latter the two-fluid model.

  7. Analysis of Optogalvanic Transients at 621.7 nm, 633.4 nm and 640.2 nm of Neon in a Discharge Plasma Fitted with a Monte Carlo Mathematical Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogungbemi, Kayode; Han, Xianming; Blosser, Micheal; Misra, Prabhakar; LASER Spectroscopy Group Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Optogalvanic transitions have been recorded and fitted for 1s5 - 2p7\\ (621.7 nm), 1s5 - 2p8 (633.4 nm) and 1s5 - 2p9 (640.2 nm) transitions of neon in a Fe-Ne hollow cathode plasma discharge as a function of current (2-19 mA) and time evolution (0-50 microsec). The optogalvanic waveforms have been fitted to a Monte carlo mathematical model. The variation in the excited population of neon is governed by the rate of collision of the atoms involving the common metastable state (1s5) for the three transitions investigated. The concomitant changes in amplitudes and intensities of the optogalvanic signal waveforms associated with these transitions have been studied rigorously and the fitted parameters obtained using the Monte Carlo algorithm to help better understand the physics of the hollow cathode discharge. Thanks to Laser Spectroscopy group in Physics and Astronomy Dept. Howard University Washington DC.

  8. Mesoscale constitutive modeling of magnetic dispersions.

    PubMed

    Bhandar, Anand S; Wiest, John M

    2003-01-15

    A constitutive model for dispersions of acicular magnetic particles has been developed by modeling the particles as rigid dumbbells dispersed in a solvent. The effects of Brownian motion, anisotropic hydrodynamic drag, a steric force in the form of the Maier-Saupe potential, and, most importantly, a mean-field magnetic potential are included in the model. The development is similar to previous models for liquid-crystalline polymers. The model predicts multiple orientational states for the dispersion, and this phase behavior is described in terms of an orientational order parameter S and an average alignment parameter J; the latter is introduced because the magnetic particles have distinguishable direction due to polarity. A transition from isotropic to nematic phases at equilibrium is predicted. Multiple nematic phases-both prolate and oblate-are predicted in the presence of steady shear flow and external magnetic field parallel to the flow. The effect of increasing magnetic interparticle interactions and particle concentration is also presented. Comparisons with experimental data for the steady shear viscosity show very good agreement. PMID:16256493

  9. First-principles study of point defects in an fcc Fe-10Ni-20Cr model alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piochaud, J. B.; Klaver, T. P. C.; Adjanor, G.; Olsson, P.; Domain, C.; Becquart, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the local environment on vacancy and self-interstitial formation energies has been investigated in a face-centered-cubic (fcc) Fe-10Ni-20Cr model alloy by analyzing an extensive set of first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. Chemical disorder has been considered by designing special quasirandom structures and four different collinear magnetic structures have been investigated in order to determine a relevant reference state to perform point defect calculations at 0 K. Two different convergence methods have also been used to characterize the importance of the method on the results. Although our fcc Fe-10Ni-20Cr would be better represented in terms of applications by the paramagnetic state, we found that the antiferromagnetic single-layer magnetic structure was the most stable at 0 K and we chose it as a reference state to determine the point defect properties. Point defects have been introduced in this reference state, i.e., vacancies and Fe-Fe, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, Cr-Cr, Ni-Ni, and Ni-Cr dumbbell interstitials oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the single layer antiferromagnetic planes. Each point defect studied was introduced at different lattice sites to consider a sufficient variety of local environments and analyze its influence on the formation energy values. We have estimated the point defect formation energies with linear regressions using variables which describe the local environment surrounding the point defects. The number and the position of Ni and Cr first nearest neighbors to the point defects were found to drive the evolution of the formation energies. In particular, Ni is found to decrease and Cr to increase the vacancy formation energy of the model alloy, while the opposite trends are found for the dumbbell interstitials. This study suggested that, to a first approximation, the first nearest atoms to point defects can provide reliable estimates of point defect formation energies.

  10. THE EXPANDING NEBULAR REMNANT OF THE RECURRENT NOVA RS OPHIUCHI (2006). II. MODELING OF COMBINED HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING AND GROUND-BASED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J. E-mail: mfb@astro.livjm.ac.u

    2009-10-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, obtained 155 and 449 days after the 2006 outburst of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, together with ground-based spectroscopic observations, obtained from the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional en San Pedro Martir, Baja California, Mexico and at the Observatorio AstrofIsico Guillermo Haro, at Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. The observations at the first epoch were used as inputs to model the geometry and kinematic structure of the evolving RS Oph nebular remnant. We find that the modeled remnant comprises two distinct co-aligned bipolar components; a low-velocity, high-density innermost (hour glass) region and a more extended, high-velocity (dumbbell) structure. This overall structure is in agreement with that deduced from radio observations and optical interferometry at earlier epochs. We find that the asymmetry observed in the west lobe is an instrumental effect caused by the profile of the HST filter and hence demonstrate that this lobe is approaching the observer. We then conclude that the system has an inclination to the line of sight of 39{sup +10}{sub -10}. This is in agreement with the inclination of the binary orbit and lends support to the proposal that this morphology is due to the interaction of the outburst ejecta with either an accretion disk around the central white dwarf and/or a pre-existing red giant wind that is significantly denser in the equatorial regions of the binary than at the poles. The second epoch HST observation was also modeled. However, as no spectra were taken at this epoch, it is more difficult to constrain any model. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that between the two HST epochs the outer dumbbell structure seems to have expanded linearly. For the central (hour glass) region, there may be evidence of deceleration, but it is harder to draw firm conclusions in this case.

  11. The Expanding Nebular Remnant of the Recurrent Nova RS Ophiuchi (2006). II. Modeling of Combined Hubble Space Telescope Imaging and Ground-based Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Harman, D. J.; Newsam, A. M.; O'Brien, T. J.; Bohigas, J.; Echevarría, J. M.; Bond, H. E.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Costero, R.; Coziol, R.; Evans, A.; Eyres, S. P. S.; León-Tavares, J.; Richer, M. G.; Tovmassian, G.; Starrfield, S.; Zharikov, S. V.

    2009-10-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, obtained 155 and 449 days after the 2006 outburst of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, together with ground-based spectroscopic observations, obtained from the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional en San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, México and at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, at Cananea, Sonora, México. The observations at the first epoch were used as inputs to model the geometry and kinematic structure of the evolving RS Oph nebular remnant. We find that the modeled remnant comprises two distinct co-aligned bipolar components; a low-velocity, high-density innermost (hour glass) region and a more extended, high-velocity (dumbbell) structure. This overall structure is in agreement with that deduced from radio observations and optical interferometry at earlier epochs. We find that the asymmetry observed in the west lobe is an instrumental effect caused by the profile of the HST filter and hence demonstrate that this lobe is approaching the observer. We then conclude that the system has an inclination to the line of sight of 39+1°-10. This is in agreement with the inclination of the binary orbit and lends support to the proposal that this morphology is due to the interaction of the outburst ejecta with either an accretion disk around the central white dwarf and/or a pre-existing red giant wind that is significantly denser in the equatorial regions of the binary than at the poles. The second epoch HST observation was also modeled. However, as no spectra were taken at this epoch, it is more difficult to constrain any model. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that between the two HST epochs the outer dumbbell structure seems to have expanded linearly. For the central (hour glass) region, there may be evidence of deceleration, but it is harder to draw firm conclusions in this case.

  12. Modeling the relaxation time of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Tree, Douglas R.; Wang, Yanwei; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a mapping between a Rouse dumbbell model and fine-grained Monte Carlo simulations, we have computed the relaxation time of λ-DNA in a high ionic strength buffer confined in a nanochannel. The relaxation time thus obtained agrees quantitatively with experimental data [Reisner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 196101 (2005)] using only a single O(1) fitting parameter to account for the uncertainty in model parameters. In addition to validating our mapping, this agreement supports our previous estimates of the friction coefficient of DNA confined in a nanochannel [Tree et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 228105 (2012)], which have been difficult to validate due to the lack of direct experimental data. Furthermore, the model calculation shows that as the channel size passes below approximately 100 nm (or roughly the Kuhn length of DNA) there is a dramatic drop in the relaxation time. Inasmuch as the chain friction rises with decreasing channel size, the reduction in the relaxation time can be solely attributed to the sharp decline in the fluctuations of the chain extension. Practically, the low variance in the observed DNA extension in such small channels has important implications for genome mapping. PMID:24309551

  13. Galactic Centre hypershell model for the North Polar Spurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Y.; Habe, A.; Kataoka, J.; Totani, T.; Inoue, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Matsui, H.; Akita, M.

    2016-06-01

    The bipolar-hypershell (BHS) model for the North Polar Spurs (NPS-E, -W, and Loop I) and counter southern spurs (SPS-E and -W) is revisited based on numerical hydrodynamical simulations. Propagations of shock waves produced by energetic explosive events in the Galactic Centre are examined. Distributions of soft X-ray brightness on the sky at 0.25, 0.7, and 1.5 keV in the ±50° × ±50° region around the Galactic Centre are modelled by thermal emission from high-temperature plasma in the shock-compressed shell considering shadowing by the interstellar H I and H2 gases. The result is compared with the ROSAT wide field X-ray images in R2, 4, and 6 bands. The NPS and southern spurs are well reproduced by the simulation as shadowed dumbbell-shaped shock waves. We discuss the origin and energetics of the event in relation to the starburst and/or active galactic nucleus activities in the Galactic Centre.

  14. Modeling the Relaxation Time of DNA Confined in a Nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Tree, Douglas R.; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2014-03-01

    Using a mapping between a dumbbell model and fine-grained Monte Carlo simulations, we have computed the relaxation time of λ-DNA in a high ionic strength buffer confined in a nanochannel (Tree et al., Biomicrofluidics 2013, 7, 054118). The relaxation time thus obtained agrees quantitatively with experimental data (Reisner et al., PRL 2005, 94, 196101) using only a single O(1) fitting parameter to account for the uncertainty in model parameters. In addition to validating our mapping, this agreement supports our previous estimates of the friction coefficient of DNA confined in a nanochannel (Tree et al., PRL 2012, 108, 228105), which have been difficult to validate due to the lack of direct experimental data. Furthermore, our calculation shows that as the channel size passes below ~100 nm (or roughly the Kuhn length of DNA) there is a dramatic drop in the relaxation time. Inasmuch as the chain friction rises with decreasing channel size, the reduction in the relaxation time can be solely attributed to the sharp decline in the fluctuations of the chain extension. Practically, the low variance in the observed DNA extension in such small channels has important implications for genome mapping. This work was supported by the NIH (R01-HG005216 and R01-HG006851) and the NSFC (21204061) and was carried out in part using computing resources at the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  15. Kinetic modeling and design of colloidal lock and key assembly.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Solomon, Michael J; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of colloidal lock and key particle assembly by modeling transitions between free, non-specifically and specifically (dumbbells) bound pairs to enable the rapid formation of specific pairs. We expand on a model introduced in a previous publication (Colón-Meléndez et al., 2015) to account for the shape complementarity between the lock and the key particle. Specifically we develop a theory to predict free energy differences between specific and non-specific states based on the interaction potential between arbitrary surfaces and apply this to the interaction of a spherical key particle with the concave dimple surface. Our results show that a lock particle dimple slightly wider than the key particle radius results in optimal binding, but also show escape rates much smaller than those observed in experimental measurements described in the paper cited above. We assess the possible sources of error in experiments and in analysis, including spatial and temporal resolution of the confocal microscopy method used to measure kinetic coefficients, the polydispersity of the lock dimple size, and the sedimentation of the particles in a quasi-two-dimensional layer. We find that the largest sources of variation are in the limited temporal resolution of the experiments, which we account for in our theory, and in the quasi-two-dimensional nature of the experiment that leads to misidentification of non-specific pairs as specific ones. Accounting for these sources of variation results in very good quantitative agreement with experimental data. PMID:26550782

  16. Transport coefficient computation based on input/output reduced order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Joshua L.

    equation. Its a recursive method that solves nonlinear ODE's by solving a LTV systems at each iteration to obtain a new closer solution. LTV models are derived for both Gosling and Lees-Edwards type models. Particular attention is given to SLLOD Lees-Edwards models because they are in a form most amenable to performing Taylor series expansion, and the most commonly used model to examine viscosity. With linear models developed a method is presented to calculate viscosity based on LTI Gosling models but is shown to have some limitations. To address these issues LTV SLLOD models are analyzed with both Balanced Truncation and POD and both show that significant order reduction is possible. By examining the singular values of both techniques it is shown that Balanced Truncation has a potential to offer greater reduction, which should be expected as it is based on the input/output mapping instead of just the state information as in POD. Obtaining reduced order systems that capture the property of interest is challenging. For Balanced Truncation reduced order models for 1-D LJ and FENE systems are obtained and are shown to capture the output of interest fairly well. However numerical challenges currently limit this analysis to small order systems. Suggestions are presented to extend this method to larger systems. In addition reduced 2nd order systems are obtained from POD. Here the challenge is extending the solution beyond the original period used for the projection, in particular identifying the manifold the solution travels along. The remaining challenges are presented and discussed.

  17. Existence of global weak solutions to compressible isentropic finitely extensible nonlinear bead-spring chain models for dilute polymers: The two-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Süli, Endre

    2016-07-01

    We prove the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to a general class of models that arise from the kinetic theory of dilute solutions of nonhomogeneous polymeric liquids, where the polymer molecules are idealized as bead-spring chains with finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) type spring potentials. The class of models under consideration involves the unsteady, compressible, isentropic, isothermal Navier-Stokes system in a bounded domain Ω in Rd, d = 2, for the density ρ, the velocity u ˜ and the pressure p of the fluid, with an equation of state of the form p (ρ) =cpργ, where cp is a positive constant and γ > 1. The right-hand side of the Navier-Stokes momentum equation includes an elastic extra-stress tensor, which is the classical Kramers expression. The elastic extra-stress tensor stems from the random movement of the polymer chains and is defined through the associated probability density function that satisfies a Fokker-Planck-type parabolic equation, a crucial feature of which is the presence of a centre-of-mass diffusion term. This extends the result in our paper J.W. Barrett and E. Süli (2016) [9], which established the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to the system for d ∈ { 2 , 3 } and γ >3/2, but the elastic extra-stress tensor required there the addition of a quadratic interaction term to the classical Kramers expression to complete the compactness argument on which the proof was based. We show here that in the case of d = 2 and γ > 1 the existence of global-in-time weak solutions can be proved in the absence of the quadratic interaction term. Our results require no structural assumptions on the drag term in the Fokker-Planck equation; in particular, the drag term need not be corotational. With a nonnegative initial density ρ0 ∈L∞ (Ω) for the continuity equation; a square-integrable initial velocity datum u˜0 for the Navier-Stokes momentum equation; and a nonnegative initial probability density function ψ0

  18. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Volume 3, part B: The modelling, dynamics, and stability of large Earth pointing orbiting structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of large orbiting flexible beams, and platforms and dish type structures oriented along the local horizontal are treated both analytically and numerically. It is assumed that such structures could be gravitationally stabilized by attaching a rigid light-weight dumbbell at the center of mass by a spring loaded hinge which also could provide viscous damping. For the beam, the small amplitude inplane pitch motion, dumbbell librational motion, and the anti-symmetric elastic modes are all coupled. The three dimensional equations of motion for a circular flat plate and shallow spherical shell in orbit with a two-degree-of freedom gimballed dumbbell are also developed and show that only those elastic modes described by a single nodal diameter line are influenced by the dumbbell motion. Stability criteria are developed for all the examples and a sensitivity study of the system response characteristics to the key system parameters is carried out.

  19. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  20. Molecular imaging of shear-induced polymer migration near a surface in dilute and semidilute solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lin

    The goal of our research is to optically visualize shear-induced polymer migration near a surface on the single molecular level, and to enhance current understanding of interactions between flowing polymer solutions with surfaces. By using epi-fluorescence microscopy, we measured the mean fractional stretch and concentrations of lambda-phage DNA molecules above a glass surface in shear flows in a microchannel and a torsional shear cell. We find that DNA molecules are driven away to create a depletion layer near the surface. The shear-induced migration is enhanced with a larger depletion layer at high Weissenberg number (Wi), in qualitative agreement with theories. We proposed a simple mechanism for this shear-induced migration based on hydrodynamic interaction (HI) between the surface and polymer chains. We find that the thickness of depletion layer of lambda-phage DNA molecules is about 10mum at Wi = 10.3, which is thinner than in the predictions for the FENE-P dumbbell model [Ma and Graham (2005)] and in Brownian dynamics simulations. The discrepancies suggest that current theoretical models of the polymer migration phenomenon are incomplete. We find that the time scale of DNA migration is on the order of the diffusion time over the distance of depletion layer, and that the mean fractional stretch of DNA molecules decreases near the surface over this same time scale. Experiments with deliberately fragmented DNA indicate that the decrease in mean fractional stretch near the surface might be caused by the selective retention of fragments in the DNA solution owing to weaker HI effects between the surface and shorter polymer chains. The shear-induced migration of DNA molecules exists in diminished form up to 3.0 c* (c* is the overlap concentration), implying that: in the traditionally defined dilute regime (c < c*), screening of wall hydrodynamics occurs over DNA concentration from 0.1 c* to 1.0 c*; and in the semidilute regime (c > c*); while the chains are

  1. Ab initio Based Modeling of Radiation Effects in Multi-Component Alloys: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Morgan

    2010-06-10

    The project began March 13, 2006, allocated for three years, and received a one year extension from March 13, 2009 to March 12, 2010. It has now completed 48 of 48 total months. The project was focused on using ab initio methods to gain insights into radiation induced segregation (RIS) in Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. The project had the following key accomplishments • Development of a large database of ab initio energetics that can be used by many researchers in the future for increased understanding of this system. For example, we have the first calculations showing a dramatic stabilization effect of Cr-Cr interstitial dumbbells in Ni. • Prediction of both vacancy and interstitial diffusion constants for Ni-Cr and Ni-Fe for dilute Cr and Fe. This work included generalization of widely used multifrequency models to make use of ab initio derived energetics and thermodynamics. • Prediction of qualitative trends of RIS from vacancy and interstitial mechanisms, suggesting the two types of defect fluxes drive Cr RIS in opposite directions. • Detailed kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of diffusion by vacancy mechanism in Ni-Cr as a function of Cr concentration. The results demonstrate that Cr content can have a significant effect on RIS. • Development of a quantitative RIS transport model, including models for thermodynamic factors and boundary conditions.

  2. A new generic model potential for mesogenic systems: square well line potential of variable range.

    PubMed

    Varga, Szabolcs; Vesely, Franz J

    2009-11-21

    A single-site pair potential is derived to approximate the linear n-site square well interaction. The resulting square well line (SWL) potential is analytical, fairly smooth, and reproduces the distance and orientation dependence of the multisite pair energy. It contains only three control parameters n, L, and s(2), in addition to the units of length s(1) and energy epsilon. The advantages of the new model over the traditional potentials such as Gay-Berne and Kihara are that n, L, and s(2) are physically meaningful quantities and that no additional adjustable parameters are introduced. With the SWL potential even very long square well chain molecules may be treated in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; moreover the model is well suited for perturbation theory. Using Onsager-like theories we test the effect of molecular elongation, temperature, and the range of the square well potential on the vapor-liquid and nematic-smectic A (NS) phase transitions. We find that the vapor-liquid binodal of the SWL fluid is in good agreement with MC results for square well dumbbells. For repulsive SWL particles, varying the interaction range s(2) results in a similar effect on the NS transition as the change in the ionic strength in a real suspension of fd viruses. PMID:19929059

  3. A new generic model potential for mesogenic systems: Square well line potential of variable range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Szabolcs; Vesely, Franz J.

    2009-11-01

    A single-site pair potential is derived to approximate the linear n-site square well interaction. The resulting square well line (SWL) potential is analytical, fairly smooth, and reproduces the distance and orientation dependence of the multisite pair energy. It contains only three control parameters n, L, and s2, in addition to the units of length s1 and energy ɛ. The advantages of the new model over the traditional potentials such as Gay-Berne and Kihara are that n, L, and s2 are physically meaningful quantities and that no additional adjustable parameters are introduced. With the SWL potential even very long square well chain molecules may be treated in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; moreover the model is well suited for perturbation theory. Using Onsager-like theories we test the effect of molecular elongation, temperature, and the range of the square well potential on the vapor-liquid and nematic-smectic A (NS) phase transitions. We find that the vapor-liquid binodal of the SWL fluid is in good agreement with MC results for square well dumbbells. For repulsive SWL particles, varying the interaction range s2 results in a similar effect on the NS transition as the change in the ionic strength in a real suspension of fd viruses.

  4. First-principles Modelling of Radiation Defects in Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Gryaznov, D.; Grimes, R. W.; Parfitt, D.; Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Mastrikov, Yuri A.; Van Uffelen, Paul; Rondinella, Vincenzo V.; Konings, RJ M.

    2008-06-01

    We present and discuss the results of the first-principles calculations of Frenkel defects and O impurities in uranium mononitride (UN) perspective for fast reactor nuclear fuels. Special attention is paid to the calculation of defect migration energies. We demonstrate that the interstitialcy mechanism (with the formation of a N–N dumbbell along the [111] axis) is energetically more favorable than the direct [100] hops. As a result, for the interstitial N ions we predict a diffusion mechanism similar to that known in isostructural fcc materials with a different chemical nature (KCl, MgO). The calculated effective N charge considerably depends on the ion position and environment (a host lattice site, interstitial or saddle point) which strongly limits the applicability of classical defect modelling based on formal invariant charges. Lastly, the calculated migration energy for the interstitial impurity O ions is quite low (2.84 eV), which indicates their high mobility and ability for reactions with other defects.

  5. A hybrid Brownian dynamics/constitutive model for yielding, aging, and rejuvenation in deforming polymeric glasses.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weizhong; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-08-10

    We present a hybrid model for polymeric glasses under deformation that combines a minimal model of segmental dynamics with a beads-and-springs model of a polymer, solved by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, whose relaxation is coupled to the segmental dynamics through the drag coefficient of the beads. This coarse-grained model allows simulations that are much faster than molecular dynamics and successfully capture the entire range of mechanical response including yielding, plastic flow, strain-hardening, and incomplete strain recovery. The beads-and-springs model improves upon the dumbbell model for glassy polymers proposed by Fielding et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108, 048301) by capturing the small elastic recoil seen experimentally without the use of ad hoc adjustments of parameters required in the model of Fielding et al. With appropriate choice of parameters, predictions of creep, recovery, and segmental relaxation are found to be in good agreement with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) data of Lee et al. (Science, 2009, 323, 231-234). Our model shows dramatic differences in behavior of the segmental relaxation time between extensional creep and steady extension, and between extension and shear. The non-monotonic response of the segmental relaxation time to extensional creep and the small elastic recovery after removal of stress are shown to arise from sub-chains that are trapped between folds, and that become highly oriented and stretched at strains of order unity, connecting the behavior of glassy polymers under creep to that of dilute polymer solutions under fast extensional flows. We are also able to predict the effects of polymer pre-orientation in the parallel or orthogonal direction on the subsequent response to extensional deformation. PMID:27453365

  6. A Multi-neutral-fluid model of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Jia, X.; Toth, G.; Hansen, K. C.; Tenishev, V.; Fougere, N.

    2014-12-01

    As comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Rosetta mission target, is approaching perihelion, the OSIRIS instrument observed the nucleus' very unique dumbbell-like shape recently. It arouses an interesting question as to what the coma will look like with the combination of the irregular shape and the rotation of the nucleus, as a result of solar radiation. A physics-based three dimensional coma model is highly desirable to study this topic. One candidate is Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and it has been successfully applied to such problems. However, since the comet may be considerably active closer to perihelion and the gas near the nucleus is dense, the time step in DSMC model has to be tiny to accommodate the small mean free path and the high collision frequency, which can make time-variable DSMC modeling computationally expensive. In this work, we develop a multi-neutral-fluid model based on BATS-R-US in the University of Michigan's SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework), which can serve as a useful alternative to DSMC methods to compute the inner coma. This model treats cometary heavy neutrals, hydrogen atoms and dusts of different particle sizes as separate fluids. In the model, we include different momentum and energy transfer coefficients for different fluids, heating from chemical reactions and frictions between gas and dust. With other necessary physics considered, it is able to give us a more physical picture than one fluid model. The preliminary results are presented and discussed. This work has been partially supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres program grant NNX14AG84G and US Rosetta contracts JPL #1266313 and JPL #1266314.

  7. Statistics of polymer extensions in turbulent channel flow.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Faranggis; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Perlekar, Prasad; Brandt, Luca

    2012-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow with passive Lagrangian polymers. To understand the polymer behavior we investigate the behavior of infinitesimal line elements and calculate the probability distribution function (PDF) of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and from them the corresponding Cramer's function for the channel flow. We study the statistics of polymer elongation for both the Oldroyd-B model (for Weissenberg number Wi<1) and the FENE model. We use the location of the minima of the Cramer's function to define the Weissenberg number precisely such that we observe coil-stretch transition at Wi ≈1. We find agreement with earlier analytical predictions for PDF of polymer extensions made by Balkovsky, Fouxon, and Lebedev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4765 (2000)] for linear polymers (Oldroyd-B model) with Wi <1 and by Chertkov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4761 (2000)] for nonlinear FENE-P model of polymers. For Wi >1 (FENE model) the polymer are significantly more stretched near the wall than at the center of the channel where the flow is closer to homogenous isotropic turbulence. Furthermore near the wall the polymers show a strong tendency to orient along the streamwise direction of the flow, but near the center line the statistics of orientation of the polymers is consistent with analogous results obtained recently in homogeneous and isotropic flows. PMID:23214883

  8. Statistics of polymer extensions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Faranggis; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Perlekar, Prasad; Brandt, Luca

    2012-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow with passive Lagrangian polymers. To understand the polymer behavior we investigate the behavior of infinitesimal line elements and calculate the probability distribution function (PDF) of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and from them the corresponding Cramer's function for the channel flow. We study the statistics of polymer elongation for both the Oldroyd-B model (for Weissenberg number Wi<1) and the FENE model. We use the location of the minima of the Cramer's function to define the Weissenberg number precisely such that we observe coil-stretch transition at Wi ≈1. We find agreement with earlier analytical predictions for PDF of polymer extensions made by Balkovsky, Fouxon, and Lebedev [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4765 84, 4765 (2000)] for linear polymers (Oldroyd-B model) with Wi <1 and by Chertkov [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4761 84, 4761 (2000)] for nonlinear FENE-P model of polymers. For Wi >1 (FENE model) the polymer are significantly more stretched near the wall than at the center of the channel where the flow is closer to homogenous isotropic turbulence. Furthermore near the wall the polymers show a strong tendency to orient along the streamwise direction of the flow, but near the center line the statistics of orientation of the polymers is consistent with analogous results obtained recently in homogeneous and isotropic flows.

  9. Modeling and experimental investigation of rheological properties of injectable poly(lactide ethylene oxide fumarate)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2006-05-01

    Injectable multiphasic polymer/ceramic composites are attractive as bioresorbable scaffolds for bone regeneration because they can be cross-linked in situ and are osteoconductive. The injectability of the composite depends on the nanoparticle content and the energetic interactions at the polymer/particle interface. The objective of this research was to determine experimentally the rheological properties of the PLEOF/apatite composite as an injectable biomaterial and to compare the viscoelastic response with the predictions of a linear elastic dumbbell model. A degradable in situ cross-linkable terpolymer based on low molecular weight poly(L-lactide) and poly(ethylene oxide) linked by unsaturated fumarate groups is synthesized. The poly(L-lactide-co-ethylene oxide-co-fumarate) (PLEOF) terpolymer interacts with the surface of the apatite nanoparticles by polar interactions and hydrogen bonding. A kinetic model is developed that takes into account the adsorption/desorption of polymer chains to/from the nanoparticle surface. Rheological properties of the aqueous dispersion of PLEOF terpolymer reinforced with nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA) particles are investigated using mechanical rheometry. To this end, we performed a series of rheological experiments on un-cross-linked PLEOF reinforced with different volume fractions of HA nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the observed nonlinear viscoelasticity at higher shear rates is controlled by the energetic interactions between the polymer chains and dispersed particle aggregates and by the rate of the adsorption/desorption of the chains to/from the surface of the nanoparticles. PMID:16677041

  10. Doubly self-consistent field theory of grafted polymers under simple shear in steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-03-21

    We present a generalization of the numerical self-consistent mean-field theory of polymers to the case of grafted polymers under simple shear. The general theoretical framework is presented, and then applied to three different chain models: rods, Gaussian chains, and finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) chains. The approach is self-consistent at two levels. First, for any flow field, the polymer density profile and effective potential are calculated self-consistently in a manner similar to the usual self-consistent field theory of polymers, except that the calculation is inherently two-dimensional even for a laterally homogeneous system. Second, through the use of a modified Brinkman equation, the flow field and the polymer profile are made self-consistent with respect to each other. For all chain models, we find that reasonable levels of shear cause the chains to tilt, but it has very little effect on the overall thickness of the polymer layer, causing a small decrease for rods, and an increase of no more than a few percent for the Gaussian and FENE chains. Using the FENE model, we also probe the individual bond lengths, bond correlations, and bond angles along the chains, the effects of the shear on them, and the solvent and bonded stress profiles. We find that the approximations needed within the theory for the Brinkman equation affect the bonded stress, but none of the other quantities.

  11. Modelling liquid crystal elastomers and potential application as a reversibly switchable adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, James

    2013-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbery materials that composed of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) crosslinked into a network. The rod-like mesogens incorporated into the LCPs are have random orientations in the high temperature isotropic phase, but can adopt the canonical liquid crystalline phases as the temperature is lowered. Smectic liquid crystal elastomers have highly anisotropic mechanical behaviour. This arises in side chain smectic-A systems because the smectic layers behave as if they are embedded in the rubber matrix. The macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these solids is sensitive to the buckling of the layers, so is a multiscale problem. A coarse grained free energy that includes the fine-scale buckling of the layers has been developed, which enables continuum modelling of these systems. In the first part of this talk I present a model of the mechanical behaviour of side chain smectic elastomers. The properties of nematic LCEs, such as their high loss tangent, and mechanical strain hardening, might enable them to be used as reversibly switchable pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). PSAs are typically made from viscoelastic polymers. The quality of their adhesion can be measured by the tack energy, which is the work required to separate two bodies. To obtain a high tack energy a PSA should be capable of a large strain. It should strain soften at low strain to produce crack blunting, and then strain harden at high strain to stiffen the fibrils formed late in the debonding process. I will present a model of the tack energy of weakly crosslinked nematic polymers. To describe the constitutive properties of this system the nematic dumbbell model of Maffettone et al. was used. This constutitive model was then combined with the block model of Yamaguchi et al. describing PSAs. It was found that the parallel orientation of the nematic has a higher tack energy than both the isotropic and the perpendicular director orientation. This work is supported by

  12. Structural Model of the Cytosolic Domain of the Plant Ethylene Receptor 1 (ETR1)

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Kaljunen, Heidi; Tuukkanen, Anne; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene initiates important aspects of plant growth and development through disulfide-linked receptor dimers located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptors feature a small transmembrane, ethylene binding domain followed by a large cytosolic domain, which serves as a scaffold for the assembly of large molecular weight complexes of different ethylene receptors and other cellular participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Here we report the crystallographic structures of the ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1) catalytic ATP-binding and the ethylene response sensor 1 dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains and the solution structure of the entire cytosolic domain of ETR1, all from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isolated dimeric ethylene response sensor 1 DHp domain is asymmetric, the result of different helical bending angles close to the conserved His residue. The structures of the catalytic ATP-binding, DHp, and receiver domains of ethylene receptors and of a homologous, but dissimilar, GAF domain were refined against experimental small angle x-ray scattering data, leading to a structural model of the entire cytosolic domain of the ethylene receptor 1. The model illustrates that the cytosolic domain is shaped like a dumbbell and that the receiver domain is flexible and assumes a position different from those observed in prokaryotic histidine kinases. Furthermore the cytosolic domain of ETR1 plays a key role, interacting with all other receptors and several participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Our model, therefore, provides the first step toward a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanics of this important signal transduction process in plants. PMID:25451923

  13. A unified model with a generalized gauge symmetry and its cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping; Cottrell, Kazuo O.

    2015-10-01

    A unified model is based on a generalized gauge symmetry with groups [SU3c]color×(SU2×U1)× [U1b×U1l]. It implies that all interactions should preserve conservation laws of baryon number, lepton number, and electric charge, etc. The baryonic U1b, leptonic U1l and color SU3c gauge transformations are generalized to involve nonintegrable phase factors. One has gauge invariant fourth-order equations for massless gauge fields, which leads to linear potentials in the [U1b×U1l] and color [SU3c] sectors. We discuss possible cosmological implications of the new baryonic gauge field. It can produce a very small constant repulsive force between two baryon galaxies (or between two anti-baryon galaxies), where the baryon force can overcome the gravitational force at very large distances and leads to an accelerated cosmic expansion. Based on conservation laws in the unified model, we discuss a simple rotating dumbbell universe with equal amounts of matter and anti-matter, which may be pictured as two gigantic rotating clusters of galaxies. Within the gigantic baryonic cluster, a galaxy will have an approximately linearly accelerated expansion due to the effective force of constant density of all baryonic matter. The same expansion happens in the gigantic anti-baryonic cluster. Physical implications of the generalized gauge symmetry on charmonium confining potentials due to new SU3c field equations, frequency shift of distant supernovae Ia and their experimental tests are discussed.

  14. Modeling phase transitions in mixtures of β-γ lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-09-21

    We analyze the experimentally determined phase diagram of a γD-βB1 crystallin mixture. Proteins are described as dumbbells decorated with attractive sites to allow inter-particle interaction. We use thermodynamic perturbation theory to calculate the free energy of such mixtures and, by applying equilibrium conditions, also the compositions and concentrations of the co-existing phases. Initially we fit the Tcloudversus packing fraction η measurements for a pure (x2 = 0) γD solution in 0.1 M phosphate buffer at pH = 7.0. Another piece of experimental data, used to fix the model parameters, is the isotherm x2vs. η at T = 268.5 K, at the same pH and salt content. We use the conventional Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules to describe cross interactions. This enables us to determine: (i) model parameters for pure βB1 crystallin protein and to calculate; (ii) complete equilibrium surface (Tcloud-x2-η) for the crystallin mixtures. (iii) We present the results for several isotherms, including the tie-lines, as also the temperature-packing fraction curves. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained. An interesting result of these calculations is evidence of the coexistence of three phases. This domain appears for the region of temperatures just out of the experimental range studied so far. The input parameters, leading good description of experimental data, revealed a large difference between the numbers of the attractive sites for γD and βB1 proteins. This interesting result may be related to the fact that γD has a more than nine times smaller quadrupole moment than its partner in the mixture. PMID:27526288

  15. Finite-amplitude solitary states in viscoelastic shear flow: computation and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. Arun; Graham, Michael D.

    2001-09-01

    Starting from stationary bifurcations in Couette Dean flow, we compute stationary nontrivial solutions in the circular Couette geometry for an inertialess finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE-P) dumbbell fluid. These solutions are isolated from the Couette flow branch arising at finite amplitude in saddle node bifurcations as the Weissenberg number increases. Spatially, they are strongly localized axisymmetric vortex pairs embedded in an arbitrarily long ‘far field’ of pure Couette flow, and are thus qualitatively, and to some extent quantitatively, similar to the ‘diwhirl’ (Groisman & Steinberg 1997) and ‘flame’ patterns (Baumert & Muller 1999) observed experimentally. For computationally accessible parameter values, these solutions appear only above the linear instability limit of the Couette base flow, in contrast to the experimental observations. Correspondingly, they are themselves linearly unstable. Nevertheless, extrapolation of the trend in the bifurcation points with increasing polymer extensibility suggests that for sufficiently high extensibility the diwhirls will come into existence before the linear instability, as seen experimentally.

  16. Free energy evaluation in polymer translocation via Jarzynski equality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondaini, Felipe; Moriconi, L.

    2014-05-01

    We perform, with the help of cloud computing resources, extensive Langevin simulations, which provide free energy estimates for unbiased three-dimensional polymer translocation. We employ the Jarzynski equality in its rigorous setting, to compute the variation of the free energy in single monomer translocation events. In our three-dimensional Langevin simulations, the excluded-volume and van der Waals interactions between beads (monomers and membrane atoms) are modeled through a repulsive Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and consecutive monomers are subject to the Finite-Extension Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) potential. Analysing data for polymers with different lengths, the free energy profile is noted to have interesting finite-size scaling properties.

  17. A New Method for Stabilizing Non-Newtonian Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonidis, V.; Ma, X.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2002-11-01

    In this work we will demonstrate a robust and adjustable filtering method for viscoelastic flows, applied mainly on the FENE-P model, called the spectrally varying viscosity (SVV) method. We will present results demonstrating spectral accuracy and resolution studies on the benchmark two-dimensional flow around a cylinder in a symmetric channel, and in the analogous three-dimensional flow around a sphere in a tube. Unsteady results are included in three-dimensions, and we examine the flow around an ellipsoid in transitional and turbulent states. We demonstrate a set of stable parameters for the SVV filtering and compare these results with previous published works on the same benchmark problems.

  18. Assembly of an Axially Chiral Dynamic Redox System with a Perfluorobiphenyl Skeleton into Dumbbell- or Tripod-type Electron Donors.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, Hitomi; Katoono, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kenshu; Suzuki, Takanori

    2016-02-12

    The incorporation of F atoms endows a diethenylbiphenyl-based electron donor with configurational stability and SN Ar reactivity. The former enables the dynamic redox pair of (Rax)-1/(Rax ,R,R)-1(2+) to exhibit drastic UV/Vis and CD spectral changes upon electrolysis, whereas the latter makes it possible for (Rax)-1 to serve as a useful chiral synthon for the production of larger assemblies [(Rax ,Rax)-2 d,p,m and (Rax ,Rax ,Rax)-3] containing two or three dyrex units. These dyads and triad also exhibit a clean electrochiroptical response with isosbestic points owing to one-wave multi-electron transfer. PMID:26748461

  19. A Computational Study of Viscoelastic Effects on Drop Dynamics in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbassarov, Daulet; Muradoglu, Metin

    2013-11-01

    A front-tracking method is developed and applied to study effects of viscoelasticity on drop dynamics in microchannels. The FENE-CR and Oldroyd-B models are employed to model the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic model equations are solved fully coupled with the flow equations. An explicit semi-analytical time integration scheme is used for the viscoelastic model equations at low Deborah numbers and a log-conformation is used to alleviate the well-known difficulties at high Deborah numbers. The log-conformation is found to be stable and very robust for a wide range of Deborah numbers. The method is first validated for the benchmark single-phase viscoelastic flow through an axisymmetric channel with a 4:1 constriction and the results are found to be in a good agreement with earlier computational simulations. The algorithm is then used to study fluid dynamics of buoyancy-driven viscoelastic two-phase systems in a capillary tube. Extensive computations are performed to examine the effects of confinement and rheological properties of the phases on drop mobility and deformation. Finally, the method is applied to study the motion and deformation of a viscoelastic droplet in a pressure driven axisymmetric contraction/expansion micro-channel. Key Words:Viscoelastic fluid,FENE model. This work is supported by the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Grant No. 112M181.

  20. Synthesis of arborescent model polymer structures by living carbocationic polymerization for structure-property studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos Freire, Lucas

    Polyisobutylene is fully saturated, therefore exhibits outstanding chemical, oxidative and thermal stability,1 which makes it ideally suitable as a model to study mechanical and viscoelastic properties of elastomers, and to correlate properties with structure. The main objective of this dissertation was to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of the synthesis of arborescent (hyperbranched) polyisobutylene (arbPIB) by inimer-type (initiator-monomer) living carbocationic polymerization. The strategy for the effective synthesis of arbPIBs consists of copolymerizing the 4-(2-methoxyisopropyl)styrene (IUPAC name: p-vinylcumyl methyl ether) (IB) via controlled/living carbocationic polymerization using TiCl4 coinitiator. In situ FTIR monitoring showed that the self-condensing vinyl polymerization (SCVP) of MeOIM is possible, and that when copolymerizing MeOIM and IB, a nearly alternating structure and multiple end groups are obtained. arbPIB was synthesized and the repeatability of the polymerization was demonstrated. It was found that higher branching was obtained with increasing [MeOIM] and that branching did not further increase if additional IB was added after the MeOIM had reacted completely. No evident changes were observed when switching solvents from Hx/MeCl to a MeCHx/MeCl mixture. Branching parameters showed that arbPIBs have a behavior between polydisperse stars and polycondensates with the number of branches increasing linearly with molecular weight. Novel arbPIB-based block copolymers (TPEs) were synthesized and it was found that copolymers with low Tg short end blocks and less than 5 mol% of a second monomer exhibit thermoplastic elastomeric properties. The materials were strongly reinforced when compounded with carbon black. arbPIB-b-PS are prospective biomaterials and the establishment of reliable methods for evaluating their short and long term properties is a subject of great importance. A dynamic fatigue testing methodology was developed

  1. Evolution of vortical structures in Newtonian and viscoelastic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2010-11-01

    To study the influence of dynamical interactions between turbulent vortical structures and polymer stress on turbulent friction drag reduction, a series of simulations were performed for channel flow at Reτ=395. The initial eddy extracted by the conditional averages for the Q2 event from fully turbulent Newtonian flow is self-consistently evolved in the presence of polymer stresses by utilizing the FENE-P model (finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin). The initial polymer conformation fields are given by the solutions of FENE- P model equations for the Newtonian mean shear. For a relatively low Weissenberg number, defined as the ratio of fluid relxation time to the time scale of viscous diffusion, (Weτ=50) the generation of new vortices is inhibited by polymer-induced counter torques, which results in fewer vortices in the buffer layer. However, the head of primary hairpin unaffected by the polymer stress. For larger values of Weτ (>=100), the hairpin head becomes weaker and vortex auto-generation and Reynolds stress growth are almost entirely suppressed.

  2. The effects of long-chain polymers on tip vortex flow and cavitation inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments have shown that propeller/hydrofoil tip vortex cavitation can be suppressed by properly injecting dilute polymer solutions at the tip. However, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not well understood yet. To understand better the underlying flow physics the tip vortex flow generated by a rotating propeller in water and a dilute polymer solution (FENE-P model) was numerically simulated. It is found that the vortex flow structure is changed by the non-Newtonian features of polymers. Phenomenally the vortical rotation in a polymer solution is slower and the vortex center pressure is higher than in water. The non-Newtonian stress is much stronger than the Newtonian stresses in water. To further understand the non-Newtonian stresses contribution, the FENE-P model is also applied to a simplified quasi-cylindrical vortex. It is found analytically that in addition to the three normal stresses that are expected to be quadratic in the shear rate, one of the shear components is also quadratic. We also studied polymer effects on the dynamics of a bubble nucleus in the tip vortex. The bubble was found to grow to an elongated large cavity in water while it collapses in the polymer solution for the same cavitation number. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, Contract N00014-04-C-0110, monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  3. Leadership Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Thomas J.

    This paper discusses six different models of organizational structure and leadership, including the scalar chain or pyramid model, the continuum model, the grid model, the linking pin model, the contingency model, and the circle or democratic model. Each model is examined in a separate section that describes the model and its development, lists…

  4. Models and role models.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of action and was also utilized for the formulation of oral care products. In addition, we made use of intra-oral (in situ) models to study other features of the oral environment that drive the de/remineralization balance in individual patients. This model addressed basic questions, such as how enamel and dentine are affected by challenges in the oral cavity, as well as practical issues related to fluoride toothpaste efficacy. The observation that perhaps fluoride is not sufficiently potent to reduce dental caries in the present-day society triggered us to expand our knowledge in the bacterial aetiology of dental caries. For this we developed the Amsterdam Active Attachment biofilm model. Different from studies on planktonic ('single') bacteria, this biofilm model captures bacteria in a habitat similar to dental plaque. With data from the combination of these models, it should be possible to study separate processes which together may lead to dental caries. Also products and novel agents could be evaluated that interfere with either of the processes. Having these separate models in place, a suggestion is made to design computer models to encompass the available information. Models but also role models are of the utmost importance in bringing and guiding research and researchers. PMID:25871413

  5. MODEL DEVELOPMENT - DOSE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model Development

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of chemicals from multiple pathways and routes. These exposures may result from a single event or may accumulate over time if multiple exposure events occur. The traditional approach of assessing risk from a single chemica...

  6. Promoting Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  7. Direct simulation of polymer drag reduction in free shear flows and vortex dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlandi, P.; Homsy, G. M.; Azaiez, J.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most efficient techniques for drag reduction is the injection of polymers near a wall which can achieve a reduction in drag up to 80 percent. Several experimental observations tend to indicate that polymers modify the turbulence structures within the buffer layer and show that the changes consist of a weakening of the strength of the streamwise vortices. In this paper, we investigate the effects of viscoelasticity on two different types of flows: the vortex dipole impinging walls to model streamwise vortices in a turbulent boundary layer and the mixing layer that represents free shear flows. For this purpose, we examined three different rheological models: the Oldroyd-B model, the Jeffrey's corotational model, and the FENE-P model.

  8. Models, Part IV: Inquiry Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses models for information skills that include inquiry-oriented activities. Highlights include WebQuest, which uses Internet resources supplemented with videoconferencing; Minnesota's Inquiry Process based on the Big Six model for information problem-solving; Indiana's Student Inquiry Model; constructivist learning models for inquiry; and…

  9. Supermatrix models

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    Radom matrix models based on an integral over supermatrices are proposed as a natural extension of bosonic matrix models. The subtle nature of superspace integration allows these models to have very different properties from the analogous bosonic models. Two choices of integration slice are investigated. One leads to a perturbative structure which is reminiscent of, and perhaps identical to, the usual Hermitian matrix models. Another leads to an eigenvalue reduction which can be described by a two component plasma in one dimension. A stationary point of the model is described.

  10. Supermatrix models

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, S.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-09-30

    In this paper, random matrix models based on an integral over supermatrices are proposed as a natural extension of bosonic matrix models. The subtle nature of superspace integration allows these models to have very different properties from the analogous bosonic models. Two choices of integration slice are investigated. One leads to a perturbative structure which is reminiscent of, and perhaps identical to, the usual Hermitian matrix models. Another leads to an eigenvalue reduction which can be described by a two-component plasma in one dimension. A stationary point of the model is described.

  11. 0.4 μJ, 7 kW ultrabroadband noise-like pulse direct generation from an all-fiber dumbbell-shaped laser.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Chen, Shengping; Jiang, Zongfu; Hou, Jing

    2015-12-01

    We report the direct generation of 0.4 μJ, 7 kW ultrabroadband picosecond noise-like pulses from an Yb-doped all-fiber oscillator based on dual nonlinear optical loop mirrors (NOLMs). Under the highest pump power, the average power of the main output port reached 1.4 W, and the 3 dB spectral bandwidths reached 76 nm and 165 nm from the two output ports, respectively. The design of dual-NOLMs shows both exceptional compactness in construction and distinct flexibility on the engineering of the mode-locking behaviors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a watt-level dual-NOLM-based fiber laser. Based on this laser, the pulse energy and peak power of picosecond noise-like pulse from an all-fiber oscillator have been elevated by an order of magnitude. PMID:26625033

  12. ENTRAINMENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presented information on entrainment models. Entrainment models use entrainment hypotheses to express the continuity equation. The advantage is that plume boundaries are known. A major disadvantage is that the problems that can be solved are rather simple. The ...

  13. MODELS - 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models-3 is a third generation air quality modeling system that contains a variety of tools to perform research and analysis of critical environmental questions and problems. These tools provide regulatory analysts and scientists with quicker results, greater scientific accuracy ...

  14. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments at several levels of statistical turbulence modeling applicable to aerodynamics are briefly surveyed. Emphasis is on examples of model improvements for transonic, two-dimensional flows. Experience with the development of these improved models is cited to suggest methods of accelerating the modeling process necessary to keep abreast of the rapid movement of computational fluid dynamics into the computation of complex three-dimensional flows.

  15. Phoenix model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phoenix (formerly referred to as the Second Generation Model or SGM) is a global general equilibrium model designed to analyze energy-economy-climate related questions and policy implications in the medium- to long-term. This model disaggregates the global economy into 26 industr...

  16. Waveguide model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A model is presented which quantifies the electromagnetic modes (field configurations) in the immediate vicinity of the rectenna element. Specifically, the waveguide model characterizes the electromagnetic modes generated by planar waves normal to the array. The model applies only to incidence normal to the array.

  17. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  18. Hydrological models are mediating models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  19. Model Reduction in Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, W. W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Model reduction has been shown to be a very effective method for reducing the computational burden of large-scale simulations. Model reduction techniques preserve much of the physical knowledge of the system and primarily seek to remove components from the model that do not provide significant information of interest. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is a model reduction technique by which a system of ordinary equations is projected onto a much smaller subspace in such a way that the span of the subspace is equal to the span of the original full model space. Basically, the POD technique selects a small number of orthonormal basis functions (principal components) that span the spatial variability of the solutions. In this way the state variable (head) is approximated by a linear combination of these basis functions and, using a Galerkin projection, the dimension of the problem is significantly reduced. It has been shown that for a highly discritized model, the reduced model can be two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the original model and runs 1,000 faster. More importantly, the reduced model captures the dominating characteristics of the full model and produces sufficiently accurate solutions. One of the major tasks in the development of the reduced model is the selection of snapshots which are used to determine the dominant eigenvectors. This paper discusses ways to optimize the snapshot selection. Additionally, the paper also discusses applications of the reduced model to parameter estimation, Monte Carlo simulation and experimental design in groundwater modeling.

  20. Model Experiments and Model Descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Rodriguez, Jose; Sze, N. D.; Vohralik, Peter; Randeniya, Lakshman; Plumb, Ian

    1999-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Stratospheric Models and Measurements Workshop (M&M II) is the continuation of the effort previously started in the first Workshop (M&M I, Prather and Remsberg [1993]) held in 1992. As originally stated, the aim of M&M is to provide a foundation for establishing the credibility of stratospheric models used in environmental assessments of the ozone response to chlorofluorocarbons, aircraft emissions, and other climate-chemistry interactions. To accomplish this, a set of measurements of the present day atmosphere was selected. The intent was that successful simulations of the set of measurements should become the prerequisite for the acceptance of these models as having a reliable prediction for future ozone behavior. This section is divided into two: model experiment and model descriptions. In the model experiment, participant were given the charge to design a number of experiments that would use observations to test whether models are using the correct mechanisms to simulate the distributions of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. The purpose is closely tied to the needs to reduce the uncertainties in the model predicted responses of stratospheric ozone to perturbations. The specifications for the experiments were sent out to the modeling community in June 1997. Twenty eight modeling groups responded to the requests for input. The first part of this section discusses the different modeling group, along with the experiments performed. Part two of this section, gives brief descriptions of each model as provided by the individual modeling groups.

  1. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  2. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  3. Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate models is a very broad topic, so a single volume can only offer a small sampling of relevant research activities. This volume of 14 chapters includes descriptions of a variety of modeling studies for a variety of geographic regions by an international roster of authors. The climate research community generally uses the rubric climate models to refer to organized sets of computer instructions that produce simulations of climate evolution. The code is based on physical relationships that describe the shared variability of meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, precipitation rate, circulation, radiation fluxes, etc. Three-dimensional climate models are integrated over time in order to compute the temporal and spatial variations of these parameters. Model domains can be global or regional and the horizontal and vertical resolutions of the computational grid vary from model to model. Considering the entire climate system requires accounting for interactions between solar insolation, atmospheric, oceanic and continental processes, the latter including land hydrology and vegetation. Model simulations may concentrate on one or more of these components, but the most sophisticated models will estimate the mutual interactions of all of these environments. Advances in computer technology have prompted investments in more complex model configurations that consider more phenomena interactions than were possible with yesterday s computers. However, not every attempt to add to the computational layers is rewarded by better model performance. Extensive research is required to test and document any advantages gained by greater sophistication in model formulation. One purpose for publishing climate model research results is to present purported advances for evaluation by the scientific community.

  4. Phenomenological models

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, L.A.

    1990-09-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. A range of models covering different endpoints and phenomena has developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Building models

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-04-01

    As developers make progress on independent power projects around the world, models for success are beginning to emerge. Different models are evolving to create ownership structures that accomoate a complex system of regulatory requirements. Other frameworks make use of previously untapped fuel resources, or establish new sources of financing; however, not all models may be applied to a given project. This article explores how developers are finding new alternatives for overcoming development challenges that are common to projects in many countries.

  6. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  7. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  8. On the coherent drag-reducing and turbulence-enhancing behaviour of polymers in wall flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher M.; Terrapon, Vincent E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Moin, Parviz; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2004-09-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent polymer solutions using the FENE-P model are used to characterize the action of polymers on turbulence in drag-reduced flows. The energetics of turbulence is investigated by correlating the work done by polymers on the flow with turbulent structures. Polymers are found to store and to release energy to the flow in a well-organized manner. The storage of energy occurs around near-wall vortices as has been anticipated for a long time. Quite unexpectedly, coherent release of energy is observed in the very near-wall region. Large fluctuations of polymer work are shown to re-energize decaying streamwise velocity fluctuations in high-speed streaks just above the viscous sublayer. These distinct behaviours are used to propose an autonomous regeneration cycle of polymer wall turbulence, in the spirit of Jiménez & Pinelli (1999).

  9. Model Selection for Geostatistical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeting, Jennifer A.; Davis, Richard A.; Merton, Andrew A.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2006-02-01

    We consider the problem of model selection for geospatial data. Spatial correlation is typically ignored in the selection of explanatory variables and this can influence model selection results. For example, the inclusion or exclusion of particular explanatory variables may not be apparent when spatial correlation is ignored. To address this problem, we consider the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) as applied to a geostatistical model. We offer a heuristic derivation of the AIC in this context and provide simulation results that show that using AIC for a geostatistical model is superior to the often used approach of ignoring spatial correlation in the selection of explanatory variables. These ideas are further demonstrated via a model for lizard abundance. We also employ the principle of minimum description length (MDL) to variable selection for the geostatistical model. The effect of sampling design on the selection of explanatory covariates is also explored.

  10. Budget Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Olympia.

    Computerized formula-driven budget models are used by the Washington community college system to define resource needs for legislative budget requests and to distribute legislative appropriations among 22 community college districts. This manual outlines the sources of information needed to operate the model and illustrates the principles on which…

  11. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  12. Modeling Sunspots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok; Oh, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling in science has been studied by education researchers for decades and is now being applied broadly in school. It is among the scientific practices featured in the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS") (Achieve Inc. 2013). This article describes modeling activities in an extracurricular science club in a high…

  13. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  14. Zitterbewegung modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hestenes, D. )

    1993-03-01

    Guidelines for constructing point particle models of the electron with [ital zitterbewegung] and other features of the Dirac theory are discussed. Such models may at least be useful approximations to the Dirac theory, but the more exciting possibility is that this approach may lead to a more fundamental reality. 6 refs.

  15. Phonological Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, W.L.

    1968-01-01

    The article discusses models of synchronic and diachronic phonology and suggests changes in them. The basic generative model of phonology is outlined with the author's reinterpretations. The systematic phonemic level is questioned in terms of its unreality with respect to linguistic performance and its lack of validity with respect to historical…

  16. OSPREY Model

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to

  17. Phenomenological models.

    PubMed

    Braby, L A

    1991-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions which are modified by characteristics of the radiation, the timing of its administration, the chemical and physical environment, and the nature of the biological system. However, it is generally agreed that the health effects in animals originate from changes in individual cells, or possibly small groups of cells, and that these cellular changes are initiated by ionizations and excitations produced by the passage of charged particles through the cells. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. Different phenomena (LET dependence, dose rate effect, oxygen effect etc.) and different end points (cell survival, aberration formation, transformation, etc.) have been observed, and no single model has been developed to cover all of them. Instead, a range of models covering different end points and phenomena have developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified. PMID:1811477

  18. Stereometric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, P.

    2012-07-01

    These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : - the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program); - the shot visualization in two distinct windows - the stereoscopic viewing of the shot while modelling. Since the definition of "3D vision" is inaccurately referred to as the simple perspective of an object, it is required to add the word stereo so that "3D stereo vision " shall stand for "three-dimensional view" and ,therefore, measure the width, height and depth of the surveyed image. Thanks to the development of a stereo metric model , either real or virtual, through the "materialization", either real or virtual, of the optical-stereo metric model made visible with a stereoscope. It is feasible a continuous on line updating of the cultural heritage with the help of photogrammetry and stereometric modelling. The catalogue of the Architectonic Photogrammetry Laboratory of Politecnico di Bari is available on line at: http://rappresentazione.stereofot.it:591/StereoFot/FMPro?-db=StereoFot.fp5&-lay=Scheda&-format=cerca.htm&-view

  19. Model hydrographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, W.D.

    1972-01-01

    Model hydrographs are composed of pairs of dimensionless ratios, arrayed in tabular form, which, when modified by the appropriate values of rainfall exceed and by the time and areal characteristics of the drainage basin, satisfactorily represent the flood hydrograph for the basin. Model bydrographs are developed from a dimensionless translation hydrograph, having a time base of T hours and appropriately modified for storm duration by routing through reservoir storage, S=kOx. Models fall into two distinct classes: (1) those for which the value of x is unity and which have all the characteristics of true unit hydrographs and (2) those for which the value of x is other than unity and to which the unit-hydrograph principles of proportionality and superposition do not apply. Twenty-six families of linear models and eight families of nonlinear models in tabular form from the principal subject of this report. Supplemental discussions describe the development of the models and illustrate their application. Other sections of the report, supplemental to the tables, describe methods of determining the hydrograph characteristics, T, k, and x, both from observed hydrograph and from the physical characteristics of the drainage basin. Five illustrative examples of use show that the models, when properly converted to incorporate actual rainfall excess and the time and areal characteristics of the drainage basins, do indeed satisfactorily represent the observed flood hydrographs for the basins.

  20. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  1. Spatiotemporal evolution of hairpin eddies, Reynolds stress, and polymer torque in polymer drag-reduced turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2013-06-01

    To study the influence of dynamic interactions between turbulent vortical structures and polymer stress on turbulent friction drag reduction, a series of simulations of channel flow is performed. We obtain self-consistent evolution of an initial eddy in the presence of polymer stresses by utilizing the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin (FENE-P) model. The initial eddy is extracted by the conditional averages for the second quadrant event from fully turbulent Newtonian flow, and the initial polymer conformation fields are given by the solutions of the FENE-P model equations corresponding to the mean shear flow in the Newtonian case. At a relatively low Weissenberg number Weτ (=50), defined as the ratio of the polymer relaxation time to the wall time scale, the generation of new vortices is inhibited by polymer-induced countertorques. Thus fewer vortices are generated in the buffer layer. However, the head of the primary hairpin is unaffected by the polymer stress. At larger Weτ values (≥100), the hairpin head becomes weaker and vortex autogeneration and Reynolds stress growth are almost entirely suppressed. The temporal evolution of the vortex strength and polymer torque magnitude reveals that polymer extension by the vortical motion results in a polymer torque that increases in magnitude with time until a maximum value is reached over a time scale comparable to the polymer relaxation time. The polymer torque retards the vortical motion and Reynolds stress production, which in turn weakens flow-induced chain extension and torque itself. An analysis of the vortex time scales reveals that with increasing Weτ, vortical motions associated with a broader range of time scales are affected by the polymer stress. This is qualitatively consistent with Lumley's time criterion for the onset of drag reduction.

  2. Energy Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  3. Programming models

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, David J; Mc Pherson, Allen; Thorp, John R; Barrett, Richard; Clay, Robert; De Supinski, Bronis; Dube, Evi; Heroux, Mike; Janssen, Curtis; Langer, Steve; Laros, Jim

    2011-01-14

    A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

  4. The Extensional Rheology of Non-Newtonian Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegelberg, Stephen H.; McKinley, Gareth H.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the transient extensional stresses in dilute and semi-dilute viscoelastic polymer solutions are measured with a filament stretching rheometer of a design similar to that first introduced by Sridhar, et al. The solutions are polystyrene-based (PS) Boger fluids that are stretched at constant strain rates ranging from 0.6 less than or equal to epsilon(0) less than or equal to 4s(exp -1) and to Hencky strains of epsilon greater than 4. The test fluids all strain harden and Trouton ratios exceeding 1000 are obtained at high strains. The experimental data strain hardens at lower strain levels than predicted by bead-spring FENE models. In addition to measuring the transient tensile stress growth, we also monitor the decay of the tensile viscoelastic stress difference in the fluid column following cessation of uniaxial elongation as a function of the total imposed Hencky strain and the strain rate. The extensional stresses initially decay very rapidly upon cessation of uniaxial elongation followed by a slower viscoelastic relaxation, and deviate significantly from FENE relaxation predictions. The relaxation at long times t is greater than or equal to 5 s, is compromised by gravitational draining leading to non-uniform filament profiles. For the most elastic fluids, partial decohension of the fluid filament from the endplates of the rheometer is observed in tests conducted at high strain rates. This elastic instability is initiated near the rigid endplate fixtures of the device and it results in the progressive breakup of the fluid column into individual threads or 'fibrils' with a regular azimuthal spacing. These fibrils elongate and bifurcate as the fluid sample is elongated further. Flow visualization experiments using a modified stretching device show that the instability develops as a consequence of an axisymmetry-breaking meniscus instability in the nonhomogeneous region of highly deformed fluid near the rigid endplate.

  5. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) ``interaction`` of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) interaction'' of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  7. Modeling reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Although powerful computers have allowed complex physical and manmade hardware systems to be modeled successfully, we have encountered persistent problems with the reliability of computer models for systems involving human learning, human action, and human organizations. This is not a misfortune; unlike physical and manmade systems, human systems do not operate under a fixed set of laws. The rules governing the actions allowable in the system can be changed without warning at any moment, and can evolve over time. That the governing laws are inherently unpredictable raises serious questions about the reliability of models when applied to human situations. In these domains, computers are better used, not for prediction and planning, but for aiding humans. Examples are systems that help humans speculate about possible futures, offer advice about possible actions in a domain, systems that gather information from the networks, and systems that track and support work flows in organizations.

  8. Supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the /sup 56/Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed.

  9. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  10. Entrepreneurship Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger Lakes Regional Education Center for Economic Development, Mount Morris, NY.

    This guide describes seven model programs that were developed by the Finger Lakes Regional Center for Economic Development (New York) to meet the training needs of female and minority entrepreneurs to help their businesses survive and grow and to assist disabled and dislocated workers and youth in beginning small businesses. The first three models…

  11. Atmospheric Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although air quality models have been applied historically to address issues specific to ambient air quality standards (i.e., one criteria pollutant at a time) or welfare (e.g.. acid deposition or visibility impairment). they are inherently multipollutant based. Therefore. in pri...

  12. Ensemble Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ensemble forecasting has been used for operational numerical weather prediction in the United States and Europe since the early 1990s. An ensemble of weather or climate forecasts is used to characterize the two main sources of uncertainty in computer models of physical systems: ...

  13. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  14. Painting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  15. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  16. Modeling Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    As teachers learn new pedagogical strategies, they crave explicit demonstrations that show them how the new strategies will work with their students in their classrooms. Successful instructional coaches, therefore, understand the importance of modeling lessons to help teachers develop a vision of effective instruction. The author, an experienced…

  17. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  18. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  19. Time-reversible molecular dynamics algorithms with bond constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J.; Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2009-08-01

    Time-reversible molecular dynamics algorithms with bond constraints are derived. The algorithms are stable with and without a thermostat and in double precision as well as in single-precision arithmetic. Time reversibility is achieved by applying a central-difference expression for the velocities in the expression for Gauss' principle of least constraint. The imposed time symmetry results in a quadratic expression for the Lagrange multiplier. For a system of complex molecules with connected constraints the corresponding set of coupled quadratic equations is easily solved by a consecutive iteration scheme. The algorithms were tested on two models. One is a dumbbell model of Toluene, the other system consists of molecules with four connected constraints forming a triangle and a branch point of constraints. The equilibrium particle distributions and the mean-square particle displacements for the dumbbell model were compared to the corresponding functions obtained by GROMACS. The agreement is perfect within statistical error.

  20. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Model checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Automatic formal verification methods for finite-state systems, also known as model-checking, successfully reduce labor costs since they are mostly automatic. Model checkers explicitly or implicitly enumerate the reachable state space of a system, whose behavior is described implicitly, perhaps by a program or a collection of finite automata. Simple properties, such as mutual exclusion or absence of deadlock, can be checked by inspecting individual states. More complex properties, such as lack of starvation, require search for cycles in the state graph with particular properties. Specifications to be checked may consist of built-in properties, such as deadlock or 'unspecified receptions' of messages, another program or implicit description, to be compared with a simulation, bisimulation, or language inclusion relation, or an assertion in one of several temporal logics. Finite-state verification tools are beginning to have a significant impact in commercial designs. There are many success stories of verification tools finding bugs in protocols or hardware controllers. In some cases, these tools have been incorporated into design methodology. Research in finite-state verification has been advancing rapidly, and is showing no signs of slowing down. Recent results include probabilistic algorithms for verification, exploitation of symmetry and independent events, and the use symbolic representations for Boolean functions and systems of linear inequalities. One of the most exciting areas for further research is the combination of model-checking with theorem-proving methods.

  2. Modeling biomembranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steven James; Heffernan, Julieanne; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Frink, Laura J. Douglas

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the properties and behavior of biomembranes is fundamental to many biological processes and technologies. Microdomains in biomembranes or ''lipid rafts'' are now known to be an integral part of cell signaling, vesicle formation, fusion processes, protein trafficking, and viral and toxin infection processes. Understanding how microdomains form, how they depend on membrane constituents, and how they act not only has biological implications, but also will impact Sandia's effort in development of membranes that structurally adapt to their environment in a controlled manner. To provide such understanding, we created physically-based models of biomembranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations using these models were applied to phenomena such as microdomain formation, membrane fusion, pattern formation, and protein insertion. Because lipid dynamics and self-organization in membranes occur on length and time scales beyond atomistic MD, we used coarse-grained models of double tail lipid molecules that spontaneously self-assemble into bilayers. DFT provided equilibrium information on membrane structure. Experimental work was performed to further help elucidate the fundamental membrane organization principles.

  3. 10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 400' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL), AND GREENVILLE BRIDGE MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 360' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL). - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  4. Students' Models of Curve Fitting: A Models and Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shweta

    2010-01-01

    The Models and Modeling Perspectives (MMP) has evolved out of research that began 26 years ago. MMP researchers use Model Eliciting Activities (MEAs) to elicit students' mental models. In this study MMP was used as the conceptual framework to investigate the nature of students' models of curve fitting in a problem-solving environment consisting of…

  5. Biomimetic modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Julian F V

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetics is seen as a path from biology to engineering. The only path from engineering to biology in current use is the application of engineering concepts and models to biological systems. However, there is another pathway: the verification of biological mechanisms by manufacture, leading to an iterative process between biology and engineering in which the new understanding that the engineering implementation of a biological system can bring is fed back into biology, allowing a more complete and certain understanding and the possibility of further revelations for application in engineering. This is a pathway as yet unformalized, and one that offers the possibility that engineers can also be scientists. PMID:14561351

  6. Modeling fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Walton; Xu, Jin Zhong

    2002-01-01

    The American Board of Family Practice is developing a patient simulation program to evaluate diagnostic and management skills. The simulator must give temporally and physiologically reasonable answers to symptom questions such as "Have you been tired?" A three-step process generates symptom histories. In the first step, the simulator determines points in time where it should calculate instantaneous symptom status. In the second step, a Bayesian network implementing a roughly physiologic model of the symptom generates a value on a severity scale at each sampling time. Positive, zero, and negative values represent increased, normal, and decreased status, as applicable. The simulator plots these values over time. In the third step, another Bayesian network inspects this plot and reports how the symptom changed over time. This mechanism handles major trends, multiple and concurrent symptom causes, and gradually effective treatments. Other temporal insights, such as observations about short-term symptom relief, require complimentary mechanisms. PMID:12463924

  7. Modeling uncertainty: quicksand for water temperature modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty has been a hot topic relative to science generally, and modeling specifically. Modeling uncertainty comes in various forms: measured data, limited model domain, model parameter estimation, model structure, sensitivity to inputs, modelers themselves, and users of the results. This paper will address important components of uncertainty in modeling water temperatures, and discuss several areas that need attention as the modeling community grapples with how to incorporate uncertainty into modeling without getting stuck in the quicksand that prevents constructive contributions to policy making. The material, and in particular the reference, are meant to supplement the presentation given at this conference.

  8. The conformation of the poly(ethylene glycol) chain in mono-PEGylated lysozyme and mono-PEGylated human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sheetal S; Hammouda, Boualem; Hong, Kunlun; Pozzo, Danilo C; Przybycien, Todd M; Tilton, Robert D

    2011-11-16

    Covalent conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) or "PEGylation" has proven an effective strategy to improve pharmaceutical protein efficacy by hindering recognition by proteases, inhibitors, and antibodies and by retarding renal clearance. Because it determines the strength and range of intermolecular steric forces and the hydrodynamic properties of the conjugates, the configuration of protein-conjugated PEG chains is the key factor determining how PEGylation alters protein in vivo circulation time. Mono-PEGylated proteins are typically described as having a protective PEG shroud wrapped around the protein, but recent dynamic light scattering studies suggested that conjugates adopt a dumbbell configuration, with a relatively unperturbed PEG random coil adjacent to the globular protein. We used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to distinguish between the dumbbell model and the shroud model for chicken-egg lysozyme and human growth hormone covalently conjugated to a single 20 kDa PEG chain. The SANS contrast variation technique was used to isolate the PEG portion of the conjugate. Scattering intensity profiles were well described by the dumbbell model and inconsistent with the shroud model. PMID:21950579

  9. Pre-Modeling Ensures Accurate Solid Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2010-01-01

    Successful solid modeling requires a well-organized design tree. The design tree is a list of all the object's features and the sequential order in which they are modeled. The solid-modeling process is faster and less prone to modeling errors when the design tree is a simple and geometrically logical definition of the modeled object. Few high…

  10. Skylab Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph is of a model of the Skylab with the Command/Service Module being docked. In an early effort to extend the use of Apollo for further applications, NASA established the Apollo Applications Program (AAP) in August of 1965. The AAP was to include long duration Earth orbital missions during which astronauts would carry out scientific, technological, and engineering experiments in space by utilizing modified Saturn launch vehicles and the Apollo spacecraft. Established in 1970, the Skylab Program was the forerurner of the AAP. The goals of the Skylab were to enrich our scientific knowledge of the Earth, the Sun, the stars, and cosmic space; to study the effects of weightlessness on living organisms, including man; to study the effects of the processing and manufacturing of materials utilizing the absence of gravity; and to conduct Earth resource observations. The Skylab also conducted 19 selected experiments submitted by high school students. Skylab's 3 different 3-man crews spent up to 84 days in Earth orbit. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had responsibility for developing and integrating most of the major components of the Skylab: the Orbital Workshop (OWS), Airlock Module (AM), Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA), Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Payload Shroud (PS), and most of the experiments. MSFC was also responsible for providing the Saturn IB launch vehicles for three Apollo spacecraft and crews and a Saturn V launch vehicle for the Skylab.

  11. Disorder-Driven Spin-Orbital Liquid Behavior in the Ba3X Sb2O9 Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Mila, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Recent experiments on the Ba3X Sb2O9 family have revealed materials that potentially realize spin- and spin-orbital liquid physics. However, the lattice structure of these materials is complicated due to the presence of charged X2 +-Sb5 + dumbbells, with two possible orientations. To model the lattice structure, we consider a frustrated model of charged dumbbells on the triangular lattice, with long-range Coulomb interactions. We study this model using Monte Carlo simulation, and find a freezing temperature, Tfrz , at which the simulated structure factor matches well to low-temperature x-ray diffraction data for Ba3 CuSb2 O9 . At T =Tfrz we find a complicated "branching" structure of superexchange-linked X2 + clusters, which form a fractal pattern with fractal dimension df=1.90 . We show that this gives a natural explanation for the presence of orphan spins. Finally we provide a plausible mechanism by which such dumbbell disorder can promote a spin-orbital resonant state with delocalized orphan spins.

  12. CISNET lung models: Comparison of model assumptions and model structures

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Hazelton, William; Kimmel, Marek; Clarke, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Sophisticated modeling techniques can be powerful tools to help us understand the effects of cancer control interventions on population trends in cancer incidence and mortality. Readers of journal articles are however rarely supplied with modeling details. Six modeling groups collaborated as part of the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) to investigate the contribution of US tobacco control efforts towards reducing lung cancer deaths over the period 1975 to 2000. The models included in this monograph were developed independently and use distinct, complementary approaches towards modeling the natural history of lung cancer. The models used the same data for inputs and agreed on the design of the analysis and the outcome measures. This article highlights aspects of the models that are most relevant to similarities of or differences between the results. Structured comparisons can increase the transparency of these complex models. PMID:22882887

  13. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  14. I&C Modeling in SPAR Models

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Schroeder

    2012-06-01

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

  15. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using Modeller

    PubMed Central

    Eswar, Narayanan; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Madhusudhan, M.S.; Eramian, David; Shen, Min-yi; Pieper, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Functional characterization of a protein sequence is one of the most frequent problems in biology. This task is usually facilitated by accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structure of the studied protein. In the absence of an experimentally determined structure, comparative or homology modeling can sometimes provide a useful 3-D model for a protein that is related to at least one known protein structure. Comparative modeling predicts the 3-D structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. PMID:18428767

  16. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  17. Modeling cholera outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Longini, Ira M.; Morris, J. Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling can be a valuable tool for studying infectious disease outbreak dynamics and simulating the effects of possible interventions. Here, we describe approaches to modeling cholera outbreaks and how models have been applied to explore intervention strategies, particularly in Haiti. Mathematical models can play an important role in formulating and evaluating complex cholera outbreak response options. Major challenges to cholera modeling are insufficient data for calibrating models and the need to tailor models for different outbreak scenarios. PMID:23412687

  18. Uncertainty Modeling Via Frequency Domain Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The majority of literature on robust control assumes that a design model is available and that the uncertainty model bounds the actual variations about the nominal model. However, methods for generating accurate design models have not received as much attention in the literature. The influence of the level of accuracy of the uncertainty model on closed loop performance has received even less attention. The research reported herein is an initial step in applying and extending the concept of model validation to the problem of obtaining practical uncertainty models for robust control analysis and design applications. An extension of model validation called 'sequential validation' is presented and applied to a simple spring-mass-damper system to establish the feasibility of the approach and demonstrate the benefits of the new developments.

  19. Model selection for logistic regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duller, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Model selection for logistic regression models decides which of some given potential regressors have an effect and hence should be included in the final model. The second interesting question is whether a certain factor is heterogeneous among some subsets, i.e. whether the model should include a random intercept or not. In this paper these questions will be answered with classical as well as with Bayesian methods. The application show some results of recent research projects in medicine and business administration.

  20. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Zhaofeng; Huang Jianhua

    2007-02-15

    The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.

  1. China model: Energy modeling the modern dynasty

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Jason

    1996-05-01

    In this paper a node-based microeconomic analysis is used to model the Chinese energy system. This model is run across multiple periods employing Lagrangian Relaxation techniques to achieve general equilibrium. Later, carbon dioxide emissions are added and the model is run to answer the question, {open_quotes}How can greenhouse gas emissions be reduced{close_quotes}?

  2. Modeling transient rootzone salinity (SWS Model)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combined, water quality criteria for irrigation, water and ion processes in soils, and plant and soil response is sufficiently complex that adequate analysis requires computer models. Models for management are also needed but these models must consider that the input requirements must be reasona...

  3. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  4. Multilevel Model Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frees, Edward W.; Kim, Jee-Seon

    2006-01-01

    Multilevel models are proven tools in social research for modeling complex, hierarchical systems. In multilevel modeling, statistical inference is based largely on quantification of random variables. This paper distinguishes among three types of random variables in multilevel modeling--model disturbances, random coefficients, and future response…

  5. Building mental models by dissecting physical models.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to ensure focused learning; models that are too constrained require less supervision, but can be constructed mechanically, with little to no conceptual engagement. We propose "model-dissection" as an alternative to "model-building," whereby instructors could make efficient use of supervisory resources, while simultaneously promoting focused learning. We report empirical results from a study conducted with biology undergraduate students, where we demonstrate that asking them to "dissect" out specific conceptual structures from an already built 3D physical model leads to a significant improvement in performance than asking them to build the 3D model from simpler components. Using questionnaires to measure understanding both before and after model-based interventions for two cohorts of students, we find that both the "builders" and the "dissectors" improve in the post-test, but it is the latter group who show statistically significant improvement. These results, in addition to the intrinsic time-efficiency of "model dissection," suggest that it could be a valuable pedagogical tool. PMID:26712513

  6. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  7. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  8. Models of Magnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, A. Tarciso; Gilbert, John K.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the mental models that people construct about magnetic phenomena. Involves students, physics teachers, engineers, and practitioners. Proposes five models following a progression from simple description to a field model. Contains 28 references. (DDR)

  9. Orbital Debris Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation outlne: (1) The NASA Orbital Debris (OD) Engineering Model -- A mathematical model capable of predicting OD impact risks for the ISS and other critical space assets (2) The NASA OD Evolutionary Model -- A physical model capable of predicting future debris environment based on user-specified scenarios (3) The NASA Standard Satellite Breakup Model -- A model describing the outcome of a satellite breakup (explosion or collision)

  10. Forest succession models

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.; West, D.C.

    1980-05-01

    Studies in succession attempt to determine the changes in species composition and other ecosystem attributes expected to occur over periods of time. Mathematical models developed in forestry and ecology to study ecological succession are reviewed. Tree models, gap models and forest models are discussed. Model validation or testing procedures are described. Model applications can involve evaluating large-scale and long-term changes in the ambient levels of pollutants and assessing the effects of climate change on the environment. (RJC)

  11. Continuous system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, Francois E.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive and systematic introduction is presented for the concepts associated with 'modeling', involving the transition from a physical system down to an abstract description of that system in the form of a set of differential and/or difference equations, and basing its treatment of modeling on the mathematics of dynamical systems. Attention is given to the principles of passive electrical circuit modeling, planar mechanical systems modeling, hierarchical modular modeling of continuous systems, and bond-graph modeling. Also discussed are modeling in equilibrium thermodynamics, population dynamics, and system dynamics, inductive reasoning, artificial neural networks, and automated model synthesis.

  12. Regularized Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jacobucci, Ross; Grimm, Kevin J.; McArdle, John J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method is proposed that extends the use of regularization in both lasso and ridge regression to structural equation models. The method is termed regularized structural equation modeling (RegSEM). RegSEM penalizes specific parameters in structural equation models, with the goal of creating easier to understand and simpler models. Although regularization has gained wide adoption in regression, very little has transferred to models with latent variables. By adding penalties to specific parameters in a structural equation model, researchers have a high level of flexibility in reducing model complexity, overcoming poor fitting models, and the creation of models that are more likely to generalize to new samples. The proposed method was evaluated through a simulation study, two illustrative examples involving a measurement model, and one empirical example involving the structural part of the model to demonstrate RegSEM’s utility. PMID:27398019

  13. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4

  14. Better models are more effectively connected models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Bielders, Charles; Darboux, Frederic; Fiener, Peter; Finger, David; Turnbull-Lloyd, Laura; Wainwright, John

    2016-04-01

    The concept of hydrologic and geomorphologic connectivity describes the processes and pathways which link sources (e.g. rainfall, snow and ice melt, springs, eroded areas and barren lands) to accumulation areas (e.g. foot slopes, streams, aquifers, reservoirs), and the spatial variations thereof. There are many examples of hydrological and sediment connectivity on a watershed scale; in consequence, a process-based understanding of connectivity is crucial to help managers understand their systems and adopt adequate measures for flood prevention, pollution mitigation and soil protection, among others. Modelling is often used as a tool to understand and predict fluxes within a catchment by complementing observations with model results. Catchment models should therefore be able to reproduce the linkages, and thus the connectivity of water and sediment fluxes within the systems under simulation. In modelling, a high level of spatial and temporal detail is desirable to ensure taking into account a maximum number of components, which then enables connectivity to emerge from the simulated structures and functions. However, computational constraints and, in many cases, lack of data prevent the representation of all relevant processes and spatial/temporal variability in most models. In most cases, therefore, the level of detail selected for modelling is too coarse to represent the system in a way in which connectivity can emerge; a problem which can be circumvented by representing fine-scale structures and processes within coarser scale models using a variety of approaches. This poster focuses on the results of ongoing discussions on modelling connectivity held during several workshops within COST Action Connecteur. It assesses the current state of the art of incorporating the concept of connectivity in hydrological and sediment models, as well as the attitudes of modellers towards this issue. The discussion will focus on the different approaches through which connectivity

  15. PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.M.

    1992-02-26

    PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding; 3 in-situ combustion; 4 polymer flooding; and 5 steamflood. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes. The IBM PC/AT version includes a plotting capability to produces a graphic picture of the predictive model results.

  16. Biosphere Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Wu

    2003-07-16

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  17. Biosphere Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  18. Multimodeling and Model Abstraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The multiplicity of models of the same process or phenomenon is the commonplace in environmental modeling. Last 10 years brought marked interest to making use of the variety of conceptual approaches instead of attempting to find the best model or using a single preferred model. Two systematic approa...

  19. Qualitative Student Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancey, William J.

    The concept of a qualitative model is used as the focus of this review of qualitative student models in order to compare alternative computational models and to contrast domain requirements. The report is divided into eight sections: (1) Origins and Goals (adaptive instruction, qualitative models of processes, components of an artificial…

  20. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  1. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; Elettreby, M. F.

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here, we will introduce random version of BS model. We also generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  2. Biomass Scenario Model

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a unique, carefully validated, state-of-the-art dynamic model of the domestic biofuels supply chain which explicitly focuses on policy issues, their feasibility, and potential side effects. It integrates resource availability, physical/technological/economic constraints, behavior, and policy. The model uses a system dynamics simulation (not optimization) to model dynamic interactions across the supply chain.

  3. Efficient polarimetric BRDF model.

    PubMed

    Renhorn, Ingmar G E; Hallberg, Tomas; Boreman, Glenn D

    2015-11-30

    The purpose of the present manuscript is to present a polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model suitable for hyperspectral and polarimetric signature modelling. The model is based on a further development of a previously published four-parameter model that has been generalized in order to account for different types of surface structures (generalized Gaussian distribution). A generalization of the Lambertian diffuse model is presented. The pBRDF-functions are normalized using numerical integration. Using directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements, three of the four basic parameters can be determined for any wavelength. This simplifies considerably the development of multispectral polarimetric BRDF applications. The scattering parameter has to be determined from at least one BRDF measurement. The model deals with linear polarized radiation; and in similarity with e.g. the facet model depolarization is not included. The model is very general and can inherently model extreme surfaces such as mirrors and Lambertian surfaces. The complex mixture of sources is described by the sum of two basic models, a generalized Gaussian/Fresnel model and a generalized Lambertian model. Although the physics inspired model has some ad hoc features, the predictive power of the model is impressive over a wide range of angles and scattering magnitudes. The model has been applied successfully to painted surfaces, both dull and glossy and also on metallic bead blasted surfaces. The simple and efficient model should be attractive for polarimetric simulations and polarimetric remote sensing. PMID:26698753

  4. Generative Models of Disfluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a generative model for representing disfluent phenomena in human speech. This model makes use of observed syntactic structure present in disfluent speech, and uses a right-corner transform on syntax trees to model this structure in a very natural way. Specifically, the phenomenon of speech repair is modeled by explicitly…

  5. The Instrumental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Devin Rodney

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to enable better predictive models by engaging raw experimental data through the Instrumental Model. The Instrumental Model captures the protocols and procedures of experimental data analysis. The approach is formalized by encoding the Instrumental Model in an XML record. Decoupling the raw experimental data from…

  6. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Ahlers, H.H. Liu

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  7. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  8. Stable models of superacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Rajaraman, Arvind

    2007-05-15

    We discuss an instability in a large class of models where dark energy is coupled to matter. In these models the mass of the scalar field is much larger than the expansion rate of the Universe. We find models in which this instability is absent, and show that these models generically predict an apparent equation of state for dark energy smaller than -1, i.e., superacceleration. These models have no acausal behavior or ghosts.

  9. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  10. WASP TRANSPORT MODELING AND WASP ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on excercises will be used to introduce pollutant transport modeling with the U.S. EPA's general water quality model, WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program). WASP features include a user-friendly Windows-based interfa...