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Sample records for fermilab central computing

  1. The Fermilab Central Computing Facility architectural model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS Cluster interactive front end, an Amdahl VM computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This presentation will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. 2 figs.

  2. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  3. Computer networking at FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, G.

    1986-05-01

    Management aspects of data communications facilities at Fermilab are described. Local area networks include Ferminet, a broadband CATV system which serves as a backbone-type carrier for high-speed data traffic between major network nodes; micom network, four Micom Micro-600/2A port selectors via private twisted pair cables, dedicated telephone circuits, or Micom 800/2 statistical multiplexors; and Decnet/Ethernet, several small local area networks which provide host-to-host communications for about 35 VAX computers systems. Wide area (off site) computer networking includes an off site Micom network which provides access to all of Fermilab's computer systems for 10 universities via leased lines or modem; Tymnet, used by many European and Japanese collaborations: Physnet, used for shared data processing task communications by large collaborations of universities; Bitnet, used for file transfer, electronic mail, and communications with CERN; and Mfenet, for access to supercomputers. Plans to participate in Hepnet are also addressed. 3 figs. (DWL)

  4. Future computing needs for Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The following recommendations are made: (1) Significant additional computing capacity and capability beyond the present procurement should be provided by 1986. A working group with representation from the principal computer user community should be formed to begin immediately to develop the technical specifications. High priority should be assigned to providing a large user memory, software portability and a productive computing environment. (2) A networked system of VAX-equivalent super-mini computers should be established with at least one such computer dedicated to each reasonably large experiment for both online and offline analysis. The laboratory staff responsible for mini computers should be augmented in order to handle the additional work of establishing, maintaining and coordinating this system. (3) The laboratory should move decisively to a more fully interactive environment. (4) A plan for networking both inside and outside the laboratory should be developed over the next year. (5) The laboratory resources devoted to computing, including manpower, should be increased over the next two to five years. A reasonable increase would be 50% over the next two years increasing thereafter to a level of about twice the present one. (6) A standing computer coordinating group, with membership of experts from all the principal computer user constituents of the laboratory, should

  5. Fermilab computing at the Intensity Frontier

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Group, Craig; Fuess, S.; Gutsche, O.; Kirby, M.; Kutschke, R.; Lyon, A.; Norman, A.; Perdue, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2015-12-23

    The Intensity Frontier refers to a diverse set of particle physics experiments using high- intensity beams. In this paper I will focus the discussion on the computing requirements and solutions of a set of neutrino and muon experiments in progress or planned to take place at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory located near Chicago, Illinois. In addition, the experiments face unique challenges, but also have overlapping computational needs. In principle, by exploiting the commonality and utilizing centralized computing tools and resources, requirements can be satisfied efficiently and scientists of individual experiments can focus more on the science and less onmore » the development of tools and infrastructure.« less

  6. Fermilab computing at the Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Craig; Fuess, S.; Gutsche, O.; Kirby, M.; Kutschke, R.; Lyon, A.; Norman, A.; Perdue, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2015-12-23

    The Intensity Frontier refers to a diverse set of particle physics experiments using high- intensity beams. In this paper I will focus the discussion on the computing requirements and solutions of a set of neutrino and muon experiments in progress or planned to take place at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory located near Chicago, Illinois. In addition, the experiments face unique challenges, but also have overlapping computational needs. In principle, by exploiting the commonality and utilizing centralized computing tools and resources, requirements can be satisfied efficiently and scientists of individual experiments can focus more on the science and less on the development of tools and infrastructure.

  7. Fermilab Computing at the Intensity Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuess, S.; Gutsche, O.; Kirby, M.; Kutschke, R.; Lyon, A.; Norman, A.; Perdue, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Intensity Frontier refers to a diverse set of particle physics experiments using high- intensity beams. In this paper I will focus the discussion on the computing requirements and solutions of a set of neutrino and muon experiments in progress or planned to take place at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory located near Chicago, Illinois. The experiments face unique challenges, but also have overlapping computational needs. In principle, by exploiting the commonality and utilizing centralized computing tools and resources, requirements can be satisfied efficiently and scientists of individual experiments can focus more on the science and less on the development of tools and infrastructure.

  8. The Fermilab computing farms in 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, S.

    1998-02-15

    The farms in 1997 went through a variety of changes. First, the farms expansion, begun in 1996, was completed. This boosted the computing capacity to something like 20,000 MIPS (where a MIP is a unit defined by running a program, TINY, on the machine and comparing the machine performance to a VAX 11/780). In SpecInt92, it would probably rate close to 40,000. The use of the farms was not all that large. The fixed target experiments were not generally in full production in 1997, but spent time tuning up code. Other users processed on the farms, but tended to come and go and not saturate the resource. Some of the old farms were retired, saving the lab money on maintenance and saving the farms support staff effort.

  9. The Fermilab experience: Integration of UNIX systems in a HEP computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pabrai, U.

    1991-03-01

    There is an increased emphasis within organizations to migrate to a distributed computing environment. Among the factors responsible for this migration are: (1) a proliferation of high performance systems based on processors such as the Intel 80{times}86, Motorola 680{times}0, RISC architecture CPU's such as MIPS R{times}000, Sun SPARC, Motorola 88000 and Intel 860 series; (2) a significant reduction in hardware costs; (3) configuration based on existing local area network technology; and (4) the same (to a large extent) operating system on all platforms. A characteristic of distributed computing is that communication takes the form of request-reply pairs. This is also referred to as the client-server model. The client-server model is rapidly growing in popularity and in many scientific and engineering environments is replacing transaction-based and mainframe systems. Over the last few years, Fermilab has been in the process of migrating to a client-server model of computing.

  10. Linux support at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Yocum, C. Sieh, D. Skow, S. Kovich, D. Holmgren and R. Kennedy

    1998-12-01

    In January of 1998 Fermilab issued an official statement of support of the Linux operating system. This was the result of a ground swell of interest in the possibilities of a cheap, easily used platform for computation and analysis culminating with the successful demonstration of a small computation farm as reported at CHEP97. This paper will describe the current status of Linux support and deployment at Fermilab. The collaborative development process for Linux creates some problems with traditional support models. A primary example of this is that there is no definite OS distribution ala a CD distribution from a traditional Unix vendor. Fermilab has had to make a more definite statement about what is meant by Linux for this reason. Linux support at Fermilab is restricted to the Intel processor platform. A central distribution system has been created to mitigate problems with multiple distribution and configuration options. This system is based on the Red Hat distribution with the Fermi Unix Environment (FUE) layered above it. Deployment of Linux at the lab has been rapidly growing and by CHEP there are expected to be hundreds of machines running Linux. These include computational farms, trigger processing farms, and desktop workstations. The former groups are described in other talks and consist of clusters of many tens of very similar machines devoted to a few tasks. The latter group is more diverse and challenging. The user community has been very supportive and active in defining needs for Linux features and solving various compatibility issues. We will discuss the support arrangements currently in place.

  11. A Computer Program to Measure the Energy Spread of Multi-turn Beam in the Fermilab Booster at Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Jovan; Bhat, Chandrashekhara; Hendricks, Brian

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a computer program interfaced with the ACNET environment for Fermilab accelerators in order to measure the energy spread of the injected proton beam from the LINAC, at the energy of 400 MeV. This program allows the user to configure a digitizing oscilloscope and timing devices to optimize data acquisition from a resistive wall current monitor. When the program is launched, it secures control of the oscilloscope and then generates a ``one-shot'' timeline which initiates injection into the Booster. Once this is complete, a kicker is set to create a notch in the beam and the line charge distribution data is collected by the oscilloscope. The program then analyzes this data in order to obtain notch width, beam revolution period, and beam energy spread. This allows the program to be a possible useful diagnostic tool for the beginning of the acceleration cycle for the proton beam. Thank you to the SIST program at Fermilab.

  12. Real-time data reorganizer for the D0 central fiber tracker trigger system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano Marco Rapisarda, Jamieson T Olsen and Neal George Wilcer

    2002-12-13

    A custom digital data Mixer system has been designed to reorganize, in real time, the data produced by the Fermilab D0 Scintillating Fiber Detector. The data is used for the Level 1 and Level 2 trigger generation. The Mixer System receives the data from the front-end digitization electronics over 320 Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) links running at 371 MHz. The input data is de-serialized down to 53 MHz by the LVDS receivers, clock/frame re-synchronized and multiplexed in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The data is then reserialized at 371 MHz by LVDS transmitters over 320 LVDS output links and sent to the electronics responsible for Level 1 and Level 2 trigger decisions. The Mixer System processes 311 Gigabits per second of data with an input to output delay of 200 nanoseconds.

  13. Fermilab E791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaldi, L. M.; Aitala, E. M.; Almeida, F. M. L.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Astorga, J.; Banerjee, S.; Beck, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R.; Carter, T.; Costa, I.; Denisenko, K.; Darling, C.; Gagnon, P.; Gerzon, S.; Gounder, K.; Granite, D.; Halling, M.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lundberg, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Milburn, R.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; d'Oliveira, A. B.; Peng, K. C.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Ramalho, A. J.; Reay, N. W.; Reibel, K.; Reidy, J. J.; Rubin, H.; Santha, A.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Carvalho, H. da Silva; Slaughter, J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N.; Sugano, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A.; Trumer, D.; Watanabe, S.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yi, D.

    1992-02-01

    Fermilab E791, a very high statistics charm particle experiment, recently completed its data taking at Fermilab's Tagged Photon Laboratory. Over 20 billion events were recorded through a loose transverse energy trigger and written to 8mm tape in the 1991-92 fixed target run at Fermilab. This unprecedented data sample containing charm is being analyzed on many-thousand MIP RISC computing farms set up at sites in the collaboration. A glimpse of the data taking and analysis effort is presented. We also show some preliminary results for common charm decay modes. Our present analysis indicates a very rich yield of over 200K reconstructed charm decays.

  14. Central Computational Facility CCF communications subsystem options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A MITRE study which investigated the communication options available to support both the remaining Central Computational Facility (CCF) computer systems and the proposed U1108 replacements is presented. The facilities utilized to link the remote user terminals with the CCF were analyzed and guidelines to provide more efficient communications were established.

  15. Fermilab`s DART DA system

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.; Anderson, J.; Berg, D.; Black, D.; Forster, R.; Franzen, J.; Kent, S.; Kwarciany, R.; Meadows, J.; Moore, C.

    1994-04-01

    DART is the new data acquisition system designed and implemented for six Fermilab experiments by the Fermilab Computing Division and the experiments themselves. The complexity of the experiments varies greatly. Their data taking throughput and event filtering requirements range from a few (2-5) to tens (80) of CAMAC, FASTBUS and home built front end crates; from a few 100 KByte/sec to 160 MByte/sec front end data collection rates; and from 0-3000 Mips of level 3 processing. The authors report on the architecture and implementation of DART to this date, and the hardware and software components that are being developed and supported.

  16. Integrating data acquisition and offline processing systems for small experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, J.; Corbin, B.; Taylor, C.

    1995-10-01

    Two small experiments at Fermilab are using the large UNIX central computing facility at Fermilab (FNALU) to analyze data. The data acquisition systems are based on {open_quotes}off the shelf{close_quotes} software packages utilizing VAX/VMS computers and CAMAC readout. As the disk available on FNALU approaches the sizes of the raw data sets taken by the experiments (50 Gbytes) we have used the Andrew File System (AFS) to serve the data to experimenters for analysis.

  17. Fermilab and Latin America

    SciTech Connect

    Lederman, Leon M.

    2006-09-25

    As Director of Fermilab, starting in 1979, I began a series of meetings with scientists in Latin America. The motivation was to stir collaboration in the field of high energy particle physics, the central focus of Fermilab. In the next 13 years, these Pan American Symposia stirred much discussion of the use of modern physics, created several groups to do collaborative research at Fermilab, and often centralized facilities and, today, still provides the possibility for much more productive North-South collaboration in research and education. In 1992, I handed these activities over to the AAAS, as President. This would, I hoped, broaden areas of collaboration. Such collaboration is unfortunately very sensitive to political events. In a rational world, it would be the rewards, cultural and economic, of collaboration that would modulate political relations. We are not there yet.

  18. Fermilab and Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, Leon M.

    2006-09-01

    As Director of Fermilab, starting in 1979, I began a series of meetings with scientists in Latin America. The motivation was to stir collaboration in the field of high energy particle physics, the central focus of Fermilab. In the next 13 years, these Pan American Symposia stirred much discussion of the use of modern physics, created several groups to do collaborative research at Fermilab, and often centralized facilities and, today, still provides the possibility for much more productive North-South collaboration in research and education. In 1992, I handed these activities over to the AAAS, as President. This would, I hoped, broaden areas of collaboration. Such collaboration is unfortunately very sensitive to political events. In a rational world, it would be the rewards, cultural and economic, of collaboration that would modulate political relations. We are not there yet.

  19. Computed tomography of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bentson, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to review the most pertinent articles published during the past year on the subject of computed tomography of the central nervous system. The chapter contains sections on pediatric computed tomography, and on the diagnostic use of CT in white matter disease, in infectious disease, for intracranial aneurysms, trauma, and intracranial tumors. Metrizamide flow studies and contrast enhancement are also examined. (KRM)

  20. Central control element expands computer capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Redundant processing and multiprocessing modes can be obtained from one computer by using logic configuration. Configuration serves as central control element which can automatically alternate between high-capacity multiprocessing mode and high-reliability redundant mode using dynamic mode switching in real time.

  1. The CDF Central Analysis Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.H.; Neubauer, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Weems, L.; Wurthwein, F.; /UC, San Diego

    2004-01-01

    With Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron well underway, many computing challenges inherent to analyzing large volumes of data produced in particle physics research need to be met. We present the computing model within CDF designed to address the physics needs of the collaboration. Particular emphasis is placed on current development of a large O(1000) processor PC cluster at Fermilab serving as the Central Analysis Farm for CDF. Future plans leading toward distributed computing and GRID within CDF are also discussed.

  2. Fermilab Software Tools Program: Fermitools

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.

    1995-10-01

    The Fermilab Software Tools Program (Fermitools) was established in 1994 as an intiative under which Fermilab provides software it has developed to outside collaborators. During the year and a half since its start ten software products have been packaged and made available on the official Fermilab anonymous ftp site, and backup support and information services have been made available for them. During the past decade, institutions outside the Fermilab physics experiment user community have in general only been able to obtain and use Fermilab developed software on an adhoc or informal basis. With the Fermitools program the Fermilab Computing Division has instituted an umbrella under which software that is regarded by its internal user community as useful and of high quality can be provided to users outside of High Energy Physics experiments. The main thrust of the Fermitools program is stimulating collaborative use and further development of the software. Having established minimal umbrella beaurocracy makes collaborative development and support easier. The published caveat given to people who take the software includes the statement ``Provision of the software implies no commitment of support by Fermilab. The Fermilab Computing Division is open to discussing other levels of support for use of the software with responsible and committed users and collaborator``. There have been no negative comments in response to this and the policy has not given rise to any questions or complaints. In this paper we present the goals and strategy of the program and introduce some of the software made available through it. We discuss our experiences to date and mention the perceived benefits of the Program.

  3. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, Eugene; Butler, Joel; Dawson, Sally; Edwards, Helen; Himel, Thomas; Holmes, Stephen; Kim, Young-Kee; Lankford, Andrew; McGinnis, David; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the industrialization of ILC components

  4. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steering Group, Fermilab; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOvA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the industrialization of ILC components

  5. Introduction to the LaRC central scientific computing complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, John N.

    1993-01-01

    The computers and associated equipment that make up the Central Scientific Computing Complex of the Langley Research Center are briefly described. The electronic networks that provide access to the various components of the complex and a number of areas that can be used by Langley and contractors staff for special applications (scientific visualization, image processing, software engineering, and grid generation) are also described. Flight simulation facilities that use the central computers are described. Management of the complex, procedures for its use, and available services and resources are discussed. This document is intended for new users of the complex, for current users who wish to keep appraised of changes, and for visitors who need to understand the role of central scientific computers at Langley.

  6. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. These efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  7. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in bothmore » software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Furthermore, these efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.« less

  8. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Furthermore, these efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  9. Empirical Foundation of Central Concepts for Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendler, Andreas; Spannagel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The design of computer science curricula should rely on central concepts of the discipline rather than on technical short-term developments. Several authors have proposed lists of basic concepts or fundamental ideas in the past. However, these catalogs were based on subjective decisions without any empirical support. This article describes the…

  10. Economics of Computing: The Case of Centralized Network File Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Martin B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses computer networking and the cost effectiveness of decentralization, including local area networks. A planned experiment with a centralized approach to the operation and management of file servers at the University of South Carolina is described that hopes to realize cost savings and the avoidance of staffing problems. (Contains four…

  11. Fermilab Program and Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    This article is a short summary of the talk presented at 2014 Instrumentation Conference in Novosibirsk about Fermilab's experimental program and future plans. It includes brief description of the P5 long term planning progressing in US as well as discussion of the future accelerators considered at Fermilab.

  12. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  13. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  14. Simulation Needs and Priorities of the Fermilab Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Elvira, V. D.; Genser, K. L.; Hatcher, R.; Perdue, G.; Wenzel, H. J.; Yarba, J.

    2015-06-11

    Over a two-year period, the Physics and Detector Simulations (PDS) group of the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division (SCD), collected information from Fermilab Intensity Frontier experiments on their simulation needs and concerns. The process and results of these activities are documented here.

  15. Photoproduction of charm particles at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cumalat, John P.

    1997-03-15

    A brief description of the Fermilab Photoproduction Experiment E831 or FOCUS is presented. The experiment concentrates on the reconstruction of charm particles. The FOCUS collaboration has participants from several Central American and Latin American institutions; CINVESTAV and Universidad Autonoma de Puebla from Mexico, University of Puerto Rico from the United States, and Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro from Brasil.

  16. CPS and the Fermilab farms

    SciTech Connect

    Fausey, M.R.

    1992-06-01

    Cooperative Processes Software (CPS) is a parallel programming toolkit developed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. It is the most recent product in an evolution of systems aimed at finding a cost-effective solution to the enormous computing requirements in experimental high energy physics. Parallel programs written with CPS are large-grained, which means that the parallelism occurs at the subroutine level, rather than at the traditional single line of code level. This fits the requirements of high energy physics applications, such as event reconstruction, or detector simulations, quite well. It also satisfies the requirements of applications in many other fields. One example is in the pharmaceutical industry. In the field of computational chemistry, the process of drug design may be accelerated with this approach. CPS programs run as a collection of processes distributed over many computers. CPS currently supports a mixture of heterogeneous UNIX-based workstations which communicate over networks with TCP/IR CPS is most suited for jobs with relatively low I/O requirements compared to CPU. The CPS toolkit supports message passing remote subroutine calls, process synchronization, bulk data transfers, and a mechanism called process queues, by which one process can find another which has reached a particular state. The CPS software supports both batch processing and computer center operations. The system is currently running in production mode on two farms of processors at Fermilab. One farm consists of approximately 90 IBM RS/6000 model 320 workstations, and the other has 85 Silicon Graphics 4D/35 workstations. This paper first briefly describes the history of parallel processing at Fermilab which lead to the development of CPS. Then the CPS software and the CPS Batch queueing system are described. Finally, the experiences of using CPS in production on the Fermilab processor farms are described.

  17. Highlights from Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    DISCUSSION by CHAIRMAN: P.J. ODDONE, Scientific Secretaries: W. Fisher, A. Holzner Note from Publisher: The Slides of the Lecture: "Highlights from Fermilab" can be found at http://www.ccsem.infn.it/issp2007/

  18. Highlights from Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    In these two lectures I will chose some highlights from the Tevatron experiments (CDF/D0) and the Neutrino experiments and then discuss the future direction of physics at Fermilab after the Tevatron collider era.

  19. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-08-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  20. Fermilab: Science at Work

    ScienceCinema

    Brendan Casey; Herman White; Craig Hogan; Denton Morris; Mary Convery; Bonnie Fleming; Deborah Harris; Dave Schmitz; Brenna Flaugher; Aron Soha

    2013-02-14

    Six days. Three frontiers. One amazing lab. From 2010 to 2012, a film crew followed a group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab and filmed them at work and at home. This 40-minute documentary shows the diversity of the people, research and work at Fermilab. Viewers catch a true behind-the-scenes look of the United States' premier particle physics laboratory while scientists explain why their research is important to them and the world.

  1. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-23

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  2. Fermilab: Science at Work

    SciTech Connect

    Brendan Casey; Herman White; Craig Hogan; Denton Morris; Mary Convery; Bonnie Fleming; Deborah Harris; Dave Schmitz; Brenna Flaugher; Aron Soha

    2013-02-01

    Six days. Three frontiers. One amazing lab. From 2010 to 2012, a film crew followed a group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab and filmed them at work and at home. This 40-minute documentary shows the diversity of the people, research and work at Fermilab. Viewers catch a true behind-the-scenes look of the United States' premier particle physics laboratory while scientists explain why their research is important to them and the world.

  3. Lattice QCD clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, D.; Mackenzie, Paul B.; Singh, Anitoj; Simone, Jim; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    As part of the DOE SciDAC ''National Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Computing'' project, Fermilab builds and operates production clusters for lattice QCD simulations. This paper will describe these clusters. The design of lattice QCD clusters requires careful attention to balancing memory bandwidth, floating point throughput, and network performance. We will discuss our investigations of various commodity processors, including Pentium 4E, Xeon, Opteron, and PPC970. We will also discuss our early experiences with the emerging Infiniband and PCI Express architectures. Finally, we will present our predictions and plans for future clusters.

  4. Central nervous system leukemia and lymphoma: computed tomographic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.; Libshitz, H.I.; Wallace, S.; Hayman, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in the brain were identified in 31 of 405 patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Abnormalities included neoplastic masses (15), hemorrhage (nine), abscess (two), other brain tumors (four), and methotrexate leukoencephalopathy (one). CT was normal in 374 patients including 148 with meningeal disease diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid cytologic examination. Prior to treatment, malignant masses were isodense or of greater density with varying amounts of edema. Increase in size or number of the masses indicated worsening. Response to radiation and chemotherapy was manifested by development of a central low density region with an enhancing rim. CT findings correlated with clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings. The differential diagnosis of the various abnormalities is considered.

  5. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-11

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). Lastly, this work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  6. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-11

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture andmore » the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). Lastly, this work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.« less

  7. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  8. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  9. Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

  10. The Fermilab physics class library

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.; Brown, W.; Gaines, I.; Kennedy, R.D.; Marraffino, J.; Michelotti, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Yoh, J.; Adams, D.; Paterno, M.

    1997-02-01

    The Fermilab Physics Class Library Task Force has been formed to supply classes and utilities, primarily in support of efforts by CDF and D0 toward using C++. A collection of libraries and tools will be assembled via development by the task force, collaboration with other HEP developers, and acquisition of existing modules. The main emphasis is on a kit of resources which physics coders can incorporate into their programs, with confidence in robustness and correct behavior. The task force is drawn from CDF, DO and the FNAL Computing and Beams Divisions. Modules-containers, linear algebra, histograms, etc.-have been assigned priority, based on immediate Run II coding activity, and will be available at times ranging from now to late May.

  11. Fermilab Library projects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P.; Ritchie, D.

    1990-05-03

    Preprint database management as done at various centers -- the subject of this workshop -- is hard to separate from the overall activities of the particular center. We therefore present the wider context at the Fermilab Library into which preprint database management fits. The day-to-day activities of the Library aside, the dominant activity at present is that of the ongoing Fermilab Library Automation. A less dominant but relatively time-consuming activity is that of doing more online searches in commercial databases on behalf of laboratory staff and visitors. A related activity is that of exploring the benefits of end-user searching of similar sources as opposed to library staff searching of the same. The Library Automation Project, which began about two years ago, is about to go fully online.'' The rationale behind this project is described in the documents developed during the December 1988--February 1989 planning phase.

  12. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Evaluating Computer Technology Integration in a Centralized School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluated the current situation in Cyprus elementary classrooms regarding computer technology integration in an attempt to identify ways of expanding teachers' and students' experiences with computer technology. It examined how Cypriot elementary teachers use computers, and the factors that influence computer integration in their…

  14. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π∓, φφ and D*±. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D*±.

  15. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π, φφ and D. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D.

  16. Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

    2010-01-01

    In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

  17. The Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project: Experiences and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen users were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. Each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) line, a BRI Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking.

  18. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2010-01-08

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  20. Fermilab DART run control

    SciTech Connect

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.

    1995-05-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by Fermilab in collaboration with seven High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run control, which has been developed over the past year and is a flexible, distributed, extensible system for the, control and monitoring of the data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting concepts of the run control and some of our experiences in developing it. We also give a brief update and status of the whole DART system.

  1. Status of the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The author presents the current operational status of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. Using a mix of stochastic and electron cooling, we prepare antiproton beams for the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program. Included are discussion of stashing and cooling performance, operational scenarios, and collider performance.

  2. Progress on the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-12-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. The progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide.

  3. Process as Content in Computer Science Education: Empirical Determination of Central Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendler, A.; Spannagel, C.; Klaudt, D.

    2008-01-01

    Computer science education should not be based on short-term developments but on content that is observable in multiple domains of computer science, may be taught at every intellectual level, will be relevant in the longer term, and is related to everyday language and/or thinking. Recently, a catalogue of "central concepts" for computer science…

  4. The Fermilab lattice information repository

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Michelotti, L.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Kriss, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Over the years, it has become increasingly obvious that a centralized lattice and machine information repository with the capability of keeping track of revision information could be of great value. This is especially true in the context of a large accelerator laboratory like Fermilab with six rings and sixteen beamlines operating in various modes and configurations, constantly subject to modifications, improvements and even major redesign. While there exist a handful of potentially suitable revision systems--both freely available and commercial--our experience has shown that expecting beam physicists to become fully conversant with complex revision system software used on an occasional basis is neither realistic nor practical. In this paper, we discuss technical aspects of the FNAL lattice repository, whose fully web-based interface hides the complexity of Subversion, a comprehensive open source revision system. The FNAL repository has been operational since September 2004; the unique architecture of ''Subversion'' has been a key ingredient of the technical success of its implementation.

  5. The Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    The Particle Astrophysics Center was established in fall of 2004. Fermilab director Michael S. Witherell has named Fermilab cosmologist Edward ''Rocky'' Kolb as its first director. The Center will function as an intellectual focus for particle astrophysics at Fermilab, bringing together the Theoretical and Experimental Astrophysics Groups. It also encompasses existing astrophysics projects, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, and the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory, as well as proposed projects, including the SuperNova Acceleration Probe to study dark energy as part of the Joint Dark Energy Mission, and the ground-based Dark Energy Survey aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state.

  6. Research Activities at Fermilab for Big Data Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Wu, Wenji; Kim, Hyun W; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko; DeMar, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation of 100GE Networking Infrastructure is the next step towards management of Big Data. Being the US Tier-1 Center for the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the central data center for several other large-scale research collaborations, Fermilab has to constantly deal with the scaling and wide-area distribution challenges of the big data. In this paper, we will describe some of the challenges involved in the movement of big data over 100GE infrastructure and the research activities at Fermilab to address these challenges.

  7. The Fermilab neutrino beam program

    SciTech Connect

    Rameika, Regina A.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    This talk presents an overview of the Fermilab Neutrino Beam Program. Results from completed experiments as well as the status and outlook for current experiments is given. Emphasis is given to current activities towards planning for a future program.

  8. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  9. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2004-10-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  10. Bunch coalescing in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.; Martin, P.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    A new rf system has been installed in the Fermilab Main Ring to coalesce up to 13 individual bunches of protons or antiprotons into a single high-intensity bunch. The coalescing process consists of adiabatically reducing the h = 1113 Main Ring rf voltage from 1 MV to less than 1 kV, capturing the debunched beam in a linearized h = 53 and h = 106 bucket, rotating for a quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period, and then recapturing the beam in a single h = 1113 bucket. The new system will be described and the results of recent coalescing experiments will be compared with computer-generated particle tracking simulations.

  11. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  12. Resistive-wall instability at Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen B.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities have been computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

  13. Review of programmable systems associated with Fermilab experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    The design and application of programmable systems for Fermilab experiments are reviewed. The high luminosity fixed target environment at Fermilab has been a very fertile ground for the development of sophisticated, powerful triggering systems. A few of these are integrated systems designed to be flexible and to have broad application. Many are dedicated triggers taking advantage of large scale integrated circuits to focus on the specific needs of one experiment. In addition, the data acquisition requirements of large detectors, existing and planned, are being met with programmable systems to process the data. Offline reconstruction of data places a very heavy load on large general purpose computers. This offers a potentially very fruitful area for new developments involving programmable dedicated systems. Some of the present thinking at Fermilab regarding offline reconstruction processors will be described.

  14. Integrating Micro-computers with a Centralized DBMS: ORACLE, SEED AND INGRES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerger, J.

    1984-01-01

    Users of ADABAS, a relational-like data base management system (ADABAS) with its data base programming language (NATURAL) are acquiring microcomputers with hopes of solving their individual word processing, office automation, decision support, and simple data processing problems. As processor speeds, memory sizes, and disk storage capacities increase, individual departments begin to maintain "their own" data base on "their own" micro-computer. This situation can adversely affect several of the primary goals set for implementing a centralized DBMS. In order to avoid this potential problem, these micro-computers must be integrated with the centralized DBMS. An easy to use and flexible means for transferring logic data base files between the central data base machine and micro-computers must be provided. Some of the problems encounted in an effort to accomplish this integration and possible solutions are discussed.

  15. Computation of Baarda's lower bound of the non-centrality parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, C.; Demirel, H.

    2005-03-01

    Baarda's reliability measures for outliers, as well as sensitivity and separability measures for deformations, are functions of the lower bound of the non-centrality parameter (LBNP). This parameter, which is taken from Baarda's well-known nomograms, is actually a non-centrality parameter of the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the non-central χ2-distribution yielding a complementary probability of the desired power of the test, i.e. probability of Type II error. It is investigated how the LBNP can be computed for desired probabilities (power of the test and significance level) and known degrees of freedom. Two recursive algorithms, namely bisection and the Newton algorithm, were applied to compute the LBNP after the definition of a stable and accurate algorithm for the computation of the corresponding CDF. Despite the fact that the recursive algorithms ensure some desired accuracy, it is presented numerically that the Newton algorithm has a faster convergence to the solution than the bisection algorithm.

  16. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were:

  17. Eddy current scanning at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Foley, M.; Brinkmann, A.; Ozelis, J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2005-07-01

    In the framework of SRF cavity development, Fermilab is creating the infrastructure needed for the characterization of the material used in the cavity fabrication. An important step in the characterization of ''as received'' niobium sheets is the eddy current scanning. Eddy current scanning is a non-destructive technique first adopted and further developed by DESY with the purpose of checking the cavity material for sub-surface defects and inclusions. Fermilab has received and further upgraded a commercial eddy current scanner previously used for the SNS project. The upgrading process included developing new filtering software. This scanner is now used daily to scan the niobium sheets for the Fermilab third harmonic and transverse deflecting cavities. This paper gives a status report on the scanning results obtained so far, including a discussion of the typology of signals being detected. We also report on the efforts to calibrate this scanner, a work conducted in collaboration with DESY.

  18. Using the central VAX 8700 computer at ANL (Argonne National Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Lark, D.T.; Caruthers, C.M.; Bragg, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    This paper is a manual for using the VAX 8700 computer at ANL. The chapters include: The central VAX cluster: What it is and how it works; Training and other available assistance; Getting started with the VAX 8700 computer and VAX/VMS; Using the VAX/VMS file system; Developing programs in VMS; Using batch; Using available software; and Using graphics in VAX/VMS. (LSP)

  19. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  20. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Jon A Bakken et al.

    2003-02-06

    Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

  1. Beam Trail Tracking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; Carmichael, Linden Ralph; Neswold, Richard; Yuan, Zongwei

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for acquiring and sorting data from select devices depending on the destination of each particular beam pulse in the Fermilab accelerator chain. The 15 Hz beam that begins in the Fermilab ion source can be directed to a variety of additional accelerators, beam lines, beam dumps, and experiments. We have implemented a data acquisition system that senses the destination of each pulse and reads the appropriate beam intensity devices so that profiles of the beam can be stored and analysed for each type of beam trail. We envision utilizing this data long term to identify trends in the performance of the accelerators

  2. Fermilab's Satellite Refrigerator Expansion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    Each of Fermilab's 24 satellite refrigerators includes two reciprocating expanders, a "wet" engine and a "dry" engine. The wet engines and all but eleven of the dry engines were manufactured by Koch Process Systems (Westboro, Massachusetts). These are basically Koch Model 1400 expaaders installed in cryostats designed by Fermilab. The other eleven dry engines are an in-hou~e design referred to as "Gardner-Fermi" engines since they evolved from the GX3-2500 engines purchas~d from Gardner Cryogenics. Table I surmnarizes the features of our three types of expanders....

  3. Accelerator neutrino program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The accelerator neutrino programme in the USA consists primarily of the Fermilab neutrino programme. Currently, Fermilab operates two neutrino beamlines, the Booster neutrino beamline and the NuMI neutrino beamline and is the planning stages for a third neutrino beam to send neutrinos to DUSEL. The experiments in the Booster neutrino beamline are miniBooNE, SciBooNE and in the future microBooNE, whereas in the NuMI beamline we have MINOS, ArgoNut, MINERVA and coming soon NOvA. The major experiment in the beamline to DUSEL will be LBNE.

  4. The Organization and Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted, Centralized Immunization Registry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeser, Helen; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Evaluation of a computer-assisted, centralized immunization registry after one year shows that 93 percent of eligible health practitioners initially agreed to provide data and that 73 percent continue to do so. Immunization rates in audited groups have improved significantly. (GC)

  5. Using the central VAX (Virtual Address Extension) 8700 computer at ANL

    SciTech Connect

    Bennington, T.A.; Savage, M.A.; Lifka, D.A.

    1990-05-01

    This report discusses: the central VAX cluster: what it is and how it works; getting started with the VAX8700 computer and VAX/VMS; training and other available assistance; using the VAX/VMS file system; tape management; printing VMS files; developing programs in VMS; using VMS batch, command procedures, and subprocesses; using available software; and using graphics in VAX/VMS.

  6. 51. VIEW OF LORAL ADS 100A COMPUTERS LOCATED CENTRALLY ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. VIEW OF LORAL ADS 100A COMPUTERS LOCATED CENTRALLY ON NORTH WALL OF TELEMETRY ROOM (ROOM 106). SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND THROUGH WINDOW IN NORTH WALL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. A Computer Program for Training Eccentric Reading in Persons with Central Scotoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasten, Erich; Haschke, Peggy; Meinhold, Ulrike; Oertel-Verweyen, Petra

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the effectiveness of a computer program--Xcentric viewing--for training eccentric reading in persons with central scotoma. The authors conducted a small study to investigate whether this program increases the reading capacities of individuals with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Instead of a control group, they…

  8. The Holometer: A Fermilab Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron

    2015-12-16

    Do we live in a two-dimensional hologram? A group of Fermilab scientists has designed an experiment to find out. It’s called the Holometer, and this video gives you a behind-the-scenes look at the device that could change the way we see the universe.

  9. Future hadron physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  10. Development of Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Chaurize, S.; Drennan, C.; Pellico, W.; Triplett, A. K.; Waller, A.

    2015-01-30

    The development of magnetic cogging is part of the Fermilab Booster upgrade within the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The Booster is going to send 2.25E17 protons/hour which is almost double the present flux, 1.4E17 protons/hour to the Main Injector (MI) and Recycler (RR). The extraction kicker gap has to synchronize to the MI and RR injection bucket in order to avoid a beam loss at the rising edge of the extraction and injection kickers. Magnetic cogging is able to control the revolution frequency and the position of the gap using the magnetic field from dipole correctors while radial position feedback keeps the beam at the central orbit. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss due to the orbit changes and reduce beam energy loss when the gap is created. The progress of the magnetic cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  11. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  12. Neutrino Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In this talk I will give a brief description of Project X and an outline of the Neutrino Physics possibilities it provides at Fermilab. Project X is the generic name given to a new intense proton source at Fermilab. This source would produce more than 2 MW of proton power at 50 to 120 GeV, using the main injector, which could be used for a variety of long baseline neutrino experiments. A new 8 GeV linac would be required with many components aligned with a possible future ILC. In addition to the beam power from the main injector there is an additional 200 kW of 8 GeV protons that could be used for kaon, muon, experiments.

  13. Fermilab recycler stochastic cooling commissioning and performance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Broemmelsiek; Ralph Pasquinelli

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring located in the Fermilab Main Injector tunnel near the ceiling. The Recycler has two roles in Run II. First, to store antiprotons from the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator so that the antiproton production rate is no longer compromised by large numbers of antiprotons stored in the Accumulator. Second, to receive antiprotons from the Fermilab Tevatron at the end of luminosity periods. To perform each of these roles, stochastic cooling in the Recycler is needed to preserve and cool antiprotons in preparation for transfer to the Tevatron. The commissioning and performance of the Recycler stochastic cooling systems will be reviewed.

  14. Computer and photogrammetric general land use study of central north Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R.; Larsen, P. A.; Campbell, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    The object of this report is to acquaint potential users with two computer programs, developed at NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center. They were used in producing a land use survey and maps of central north Alabama from Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) digital data. The report describes in detail the thought processes and analysis procedures used from the initiation of the land use study to its completion, as well as a photogrammetric study that was used in conjunction with the computer analysis to produce similar land use maps. The results of the land use demonstration indicate that, with respect to computer time and cost, such a study may be economically and realistically feasible on a statewide basis.

  15. Neuromotor recovery from stroke: computational models at central, functional, and muscle synergy level

    PubMed Central

    Casadio, Maura; Tamagnone, Irene; Summa, Susanna; Sanguineti, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Computational models of neuromotor recovery after a stroke might help to unveil the underlying physiological mechanisms and might suggest how to make recovery faster and more effective. At least in principle, these models could serve: (i) To provide testable hypotheses on the nature of recovery; (ii) To predict the recovery of individual patients; (iii) To design patient-specific “optimal” therapy, by setting the treatment variables for maximizing the amount of recovery or for achieving a better generalization of the learned abilities across different tasks. Here we review the state of the art of computational models for neuromotor recovery through exercise, and their implications for treatment. We show that to properly account for the computational mechanisms of neuromotor recovery, multiple levels of description need to be taken into account. The review specifically covers models of recovery at central, functional and muscle synergy level. PMID:23986688

  16. Speeding Up Network Layout and Centrality Measures for Social Computing Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Puneet; Khurana, Udayan; Shneiderman, Ben; Scharrenbroich, Max; Locke, John

    This paper presents strategies for speeding up calculation of graph metrics and layout by exploiting the parallel architecture of modern day Graphics Processing Units (GPU), specifically Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) by Nvidia. Graph centrality metrics like Eigenvector, Betweenness, Page Rank and layout algorithms like Fruchterman - Rheingold are essential components of Social Network Analysis (SNA). With the growth in adoption of SNA in different domains and increasing availability of huge networked datasets for analysis, social network analysts require faster tools that are also scalable. Our results, using NodeXL, show up to 802 times speedup for a Fruchterman-Rheingold graph layout and up to 17,972 times speedup for Eigenvector centrality metric calculations on a 240 core CUDA-capable GPU.

  17. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  18. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Neutrino SuperBeams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-23

    In this talk I will give a brief description of long baseline neutrino physics, the LBNE experiment and Project X at Fermilab. A brief outline of the physics of long baseline neutrino experiments, LBNE and Project X at Fermilab is given in this talk.

  20. Progress on the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments project at Fermilab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercialmore » cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. Hence, the progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide« less

  1. Progress on the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments project at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. Hence, the progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide

  2. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  3. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  4. The Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a new, far-reaching initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division to drive the future of computing services for experiments at FNAL and elsewhere. It is a collaborative effort between computing professionals and experiment scientists to produce an end-to-end, fully integrated set of services for computing on the grid and clouds, managing data, accessing databases, and collaborating within experiments. FIFE includes 1) easy to use job submission services for processing physics tasks on the Open Science Grid and elsewhere, 2) an extensive data management system for managing local and remote caches, cataloging, querying, moving, and tracking the use of data, 3) custom and generic database applications for calibrations, beam information, and other purposes, 4) collaboration tools including an electronic log book, speakers bureau database, and experiment membership database. All of these aspects will be discussed in detail. FIFE sets the direction of computing at Fermilab experiments now and in the future, and therefore is a major driver in the design of computing services worldwide.

  5. The Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a new, far-reaching initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division to drive the future of computing services for experiments at FNAL and elsewhere. It is a collaborative effort between computing professionals and experiment scientists to produce an end-to-end, fully integrated set of services for computing on the grid and clouds, managing data, accessing databases, and collaborating within experiments. FIFE includes 1) easy to use job submission services for processing physics tasks on the Open Science Grid and elsewhere; 2) an extensive data management system for managing local and remote caches, cataloging, querying, moving, and tracking the use of data; 3) custom and generic database applications for calibrations, beam information, and other purposes; 4) collaboration tools including an electronic log book, speakers bureau database, and experiment membership database. All of these aspects will be discussed in detail. FIFE sets the direction of computing at Fermilab experiments now and in the future, and therefore is a major driver in the design of computing services worldwide.

  6. Computer model of Raritan River Basin water-supply system in central New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, Paul; Tasker, Gary D.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a computer model of the Raritan River Basin water-supply system in central New Jersey. The computer model provides a technical basis for evaluating the effects of alternative patterns of operation of the Raritan River Basin water-supply system during extended periods of below-average precipitation. The computer model is a continuity-accounting model consisting of a series of interconnected nodes. At each node, the inflow volume, outflow volume, and change in storage are determined and recorded for each month. The model runs with a given set of operating rules and water-use requirements including releases, pumpages, and diversions. The model can be used to assess the hypothetical performance of the Raritan River Basin water- supply system in past years under alternative sets of operating rules. It also can be used to forecast the likelihood of specified outcomes, such as the depletion of reservoir contents below a specified threshold or of streamflows below statutory minimum passing flows, for a period of up to 12 months. The model was constructed on the basis of current reservoir capacities and the natural, unregulated monthly runoff values recorded at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow- gaging stations in the basin.

  7. Centralized Monitoring of the Microsoft Windows-based computers of the LHC Experiment Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela Rodriguez, F.

    2011-12-01

    The control system of each of the four major Experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is distributed over up to 160 computers running either Linux or Microsoft Windows. A quick response to abnormal situations of the computer infrastructure is crucial to maximize the physics usage. For this reason, a tool was developed to supervise, identify errors and troubleshoot such a large system. Although the monitoring of the performance of the Linux computers and their processes was available since the first versions of the tool, it is only recently that the software package has been extended to provide similar functionality for the nodes running Microsoft Windows as this platform is the most commonly used in the LHC detector control systems. In this paper, the architecture and the functionality of the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) client developed to provide centralized monitoring of the nodes running different flavour of the Microsoft platform, as well as the interface to the SCADA software of the control systems are presented. The tool is currently being commissioned by the Experiments and it has already proven to be very efficient optimize the running systems and to detect misbehaving processes or nodes.

  8. Increasing the energy of the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab has reached its eleventh year of operation since being commissioned in 1983. Last summer, four significant upgrades to the cryogenic system became operational which allow Tevatron operation at higher energy. This came after many years of R&D, power testing in sectors (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation. The improvements include the addition of cold helium vapor compressors, supporting hardware for subatmospheric operation, a new satellite refrigerator control system, and a higher capacity central helium liquefier. A description of each cryogenic upgrade, commissioning experience, and attempts to increase the energy of the Tevatron are presented.

  9. Double diffraction dissociation at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Borras, K; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van Den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes Da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M

    2001-10-01

    We present results from a measurement of double diffraction dissociation in pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The production cross section for events with a central pseudorapidity gap of width Deltaeta(0)>3 (overlapping eta = 0) is found to be 4.43+/-0.02(stat)+/-1.18(syst) mb [ 3.42+/-0.01(stat)+/-1.09(syst) mb] at square root of (s) = 1800[630] GeV. Our results are compared with previous measurements and with predictions based on Regge theory and factorization. PMID:11580642

  10. Supporting multiple control systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Fermilab control system, ACNET, is used for controlling the Tevatron and all of its pre-accelerators. However, other smaller experiments at Fermilab have been using different controls systems, in particular DOOCS and EPICS. This paper reports some of the steps taken at Fermilab to integrate support for these outside systems. We will describe specific tools that we have built or adapted to facilitate interaction between the architectures. We also examine some of the difficulties that arise from managing this heterogeneous environment. Incompatibilities as well as common elements will be described.

  11. Operation and maintenance of Fermilab`s satellite refrigerator expansion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.M.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab`s superconducting Tevatron accelerator is cooled to liquid helium temperatures by 24 satellite refrigerators, each of which uses for normal operations a reciprocating `wet` expansion engine. These expanders are basically Process System (formerly Koch) Model 1400 expanders installed in standalone cryostats designed by Fermilab. This paper will summarize recent experience with operations and maintenance of these expansion engines. Some of the statistics presented will include total engine hours, mean time between major and minor maintenance, and frequent causes of major maintenance.

  12. Consequences of stochastic release of neurotransmitters for network computation in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Burnod, Y; Korn, H

    1989-01-01

    Neuronal membrane potentials vary continuously due largely to background synaptic noise produced by ongoing discharges in their presynaptic afferents and shaped by probabilistic factors of transmitter release. We investigated how the random activity of an identified population of interneurons with known release properties influences the performance of central cells. In stochastic models such as thermodynamic ones, the probabilistic input-output function of a formal neuron is sigmoid, having its maximal slope inversely related to a variable called "temperature." Our results indicate that, for a biological neuron, the probability that given excitatory input signals reach threshold is also sigmoid, allowing definition of a temperature that is proportional to the mean number of quanta comprising noise and can be modified by activity in the presynaptic network, a notion which could be included in neural models. By introducing uncertainty to the input-output relation of central neurons, synaptic noise could be a critical determinant of neuronal computational systems, allowing assemblies of cells to undergo continuous transitions between states. Images PMID:2563165

  13. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Tompson

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the world�s most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  14. Fermilab Recycler damper requirements and design

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Hu, M.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The design of transverse dampers for the Fermilab Recycler storage ring is described. An observed instability and analysis of subsequent measurements where used to identify the requirements. The digital approach being implemented is presented.

  15. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Tompson.

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the worlds most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  16. The Fermilab long-baseline neutrino program

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.; MINOS Collaboration

    1997-10-01

    Fermilab is embarking upon a neutrino oscillation program which includes a long-baseline neutrino experiment MINOS. MINOS will be a 10 kiloton detector located 730 km Northwest of Fermilab in the Soudan underground laboratory. It will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations with parameters above {Delta}m{sup 2} {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}) {approximately} 0.02.

  17. Central mechanisms for force and motion--towards computational synthesis of human movement.

    PubMed

    Hemami, Hooshang; Dariush, Behzad

    2012-12-01

    Anatomical, physiological and experimental research on the human body can be supplemented by computational synthesis of the human body for all movement: routine daily activities, sports, dancing, and artistic and exploratory involvements. The synthesis requires thorough knowledge about all subsystems of the human body and their interactions, and allows for integration of known knowledge in working modules. It also affords confirmation and/or verification of scientific hypotheses about workings of the central nervous system (CNS). A simple step in this direction is explored here for controlling the forces of constraint. It requires co-activation of agonist-antagonist musculature. The desired trajectories of motion and the force of contact have to be provided by the CNS. The spinal control involves projection onto a muscular subset that induces the force of contact. The projection of force in the sensory motor cortex is implemented via a well-defined neural population unit, and is executed in the spinal cord by a standard integral controller requiring input from tendon organs. The sensory motor cortex structure is extended to the case for directing motion via two neural population units with vision input and spindle efferents. Digital computer simulations show the feasibility of the system. The formulation is modular and can be extended to multi-link limbs, robot and humanoid systems with many pairs of actuators or muscles. It can be expanded to include reticular activating structures and learning. PMID:23142849

  18. Central Weighted Non-Oscillatory (CWENO) and Operator Splitting Schemes in Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovski, Stavro

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution shock-capturing schemes (HRSC) are known to be the most adequate and advanced technique used for numerical approximation to the solution of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Since most of the astrophysical phenomena can be described by means of system of (M)HD conservation equations, finding most ac- curate, computationally not expensive and robust numerical approaches for their solution is a task of great importance for numerical astrophysics. Based on the Central Weighted Non-Oscillatory (CWENO) reconstruction approach, which relies on the adaptive choice of the smoothest stencil for resolving strong shocks and discontinuities in central framework on staggered grid, we present a new algorithm for systems of conservation laws using the key idea of evolving the intermediate stages in the Runge Kutta time discretization in primitive variables . In this thesis, we introduce a new so-called conservative-primitive variables strategy (CPVS) by integrating the latter into the earlier proposed Central Runge Kutta schemes (Pareschi et al., 2005). The advantages of the new shock-capturing algorithm with respect to the state-of-the-art HRSC schemes used in astrophysics like upwind Godunov-type schemes can be summarized as follows: (i) Riemann-solver-free central approach; (ii) favoring dissipation (especially needed for multidimensional applications in astrophysics) owing to the diffusivity coming from the design of the scheme; (iii) high accuracy and speed of the method. The latter stems from the fact that the advancing in time in the predictor step does not need inversion between the primitive and conservative variables and is essential in applications where the conservative variables are neither trivial to compute nor to invert in the set of primitive ones as it is in relativistic hydrodynamics. The main objective of the research adopted in the thesis is to outline the promising application of the CWENO (with CPVS) in the problems of the

  19. Gun and optics calculations for the Fermilab recirculation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.

    1997-10-01

    Fermilab is investigating electron cooling to recycle 8 Gev antiprotons recovered from the Tevatron. To do so, it is developing an experiment to recirculate 2 Mev electrons generated by a Pelletron at National Electrostatics Corporation. This paper reports on the optics calculations done in support of that work. We have used the computer codes EGN2 and MacTrace to represent the gun area and acceleration columns respectively. In addition to the results of our simulations, we discuss some of the problems encountered in interfacing the two codes.

  20. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct'' CP violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} ({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}) = {minus}0.0004 {plus minus} 0.0014 (stat) {plus minus} 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 00} {minus} {phi}{sub {plus minus}} between the two CP violating parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub {plus minus}}. We fine {Delta}{phi} = {minus}0.3{degrees} {plus minus} 2.4{degree}(stat) {plus minus} 1.2{degree}(syst). Using this together with the world average {phi}{sub {plus minus}}, we fine that the phase of the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing parameter {var epsilon} is 44.5{degree} {plus minus} 1.5{degree}. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Bunch coalescing and bunch rotation in the Fermilab Main Ring: Operational experience and comparison with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.; Wildman, D.W.

    1988-07-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron I proton-antiproton collider project requires that the Fermilab Main Ring produce intense bunches of protons and antiprotons for injection into the Tevatron. The process of coalescing a small number of harmonic number h=1113 bunches into a single bunch by bunch-rotating in a lower harmonic rf system is described.The Main Ring is also required to extract onto the antiproton production target bunches with as narrow a time spread as possible. This operation is also discussed. The operation of the bunch coalescing and bunch rotation are compared with simulations using the computer program ESME. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  2. UNIX trademark in high energy physics: What we can learn from the initial experiences at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1991-03-01

    The reasons why Fermilab decided to support the UNIX operating system are reviewed and placed in the content of an overall model for high energy physics data analysis. The strengths and deficiencies of the UNIX environment for high energy physics are discussed. Fermilab's early experience in dealing with a an open'' multivendor environment, both for computers and for peripherals, is described. The human resources required to fully exploit the opportunities are clearly growing. The possibility of keeping the development and support efforts within reasonable bounds may depend on our ability to collaborate or at least to share information even more effectively than we have in the past. 7 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Big Data over a 100G network at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Mhashilkar, Parag; Kim, Hyunwoo; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko

    2014-01-01

    As the need for Big Data in science becomes ever more relevant, networks around the world are upgrading their infrastructure to support high-speed interconnections. To support its mission, the high-energy physics community as a pioneer in Big Data has always been relying on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to be at the forefront of storage and data movement. This need was reiterated in recent years with the data-taking rate of the major LHC experiments reaching tens of petabytes per year. At Fermilab, this resulted regularly in peaks of data movement on the Wide area network (WAN) in and out of the laboratory of about 30 Gbit/s and on the Local are network (LAN) between storage and computational farms of 160 Gbit/s. To address these ever increasing needs, as of this year Fermilab is connected to the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) through a 100 Gb/s link. To understand the optimal system-and application-level configuration to interface computational systems with the new highspeed interconnect, Fermilab has deployed a Network Research & Development facility connected to the ESnet 100G Testbed. For the past two years, the High Throughput Data Program (HTDP) has been using the Testbed to identify gaps in data movement middleware [5] when transferring data at these high-speeds. The program has published evaluations of technologies typically used in High Energy Physics, such as GridFTP [4], XrootD [9], and Squid [8]. Furthermore, this work presents the new R&D facility and the continuation of the evaluation program.

  4. Big Data over a 100G network at Fermilab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Mhashilkar, Parag; Kim, Hyunwoo; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko

    2014-01-01

    As the need for Big Data in science becomes ever more relevant, networks around the world are upgrading their infrastructure to support high-speed interconnections. To support its mission, the high-energy physics community as a pioneer in Big Data has always been relying on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to be at the forefront of storage and data movement. This need was reiterated in recent years with the data-taking rate of the major LHC experiments reaching tens of petabytes per year. At Fermilab, this resulted regularly in peaks of data movement on the Wide area network (WAN) in and out ofmore » the laboratory of about 30 Gbit/s and on the Local are network (LAN) between storage and computational farms of 160 Gbit/s. To address these ever increasing needs, as of this year Fermilab is connected to the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) through a 100 Gb/s link. To understand the optimal system-and application-level configuration to interface computational systems with the new highspeed interconnect, Fermilab has deployed a Network Research & Development facility connected to the ESnet 100G Testbed. For the past two years, the High Throughput Data Program (HTDP) has been using the Testbed to identify gaps in data movement middleware [5] when transferring data at these high-speeds. The program has published evaluations of technologies typically used in High Energy Physics, such as GridFTP [4], XrootD [9], and Squid [8]. Furthermore, this work presents the new R&D facility and the continuation of the evaluation program.« less

  5. Big Data Over a 100G Network at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Mhashilkar, Parag; Kim, Hyunwoo; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko

    2014-06-01

    As the need for Big Data in science becomes ever more relevant, networks around the world are upgrading their infrastructure to support high-speed interconnections. To support its mission, the high-energy physics community as a pioneer in Big Data has always been relying on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to be at the forefront of storage and data movement. This need was reiterated in recent years with the data-taking rate of the major LHC experiments reaching tens of petabytes per year. At Fermilab, this resulted regularly in peaks of data movement on the Wide area network (WAN) in and out of the laboratory of about 30 Gbit/s and on the Local are network (LAN) between storage and computational farms of 160 Gbit/s. To address these ever increasing needs, as of this year Fermilab is connected to the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) through a 100 Gb/s link. To understand the optimal system-and application-level configuration to interface computational systems with the new highspeed interconnect, Fermilab has deployed a Network Research & Development facility connected to the ESnet 100G Testbed. For the past two years, the High Throughput Data Program (HTDP) has been using the Testbed to identify gaps in data movement middleware [5] when transferring data at these high-speeds. The program has published evaluations of technologies typically used in High Energy Physics, such as GridFTP [4], XrootD [9], and Squid [8]. This work presents the new R&D facility and the continuation of the evaluation program.

  6. Computed Tomography-Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement in a Patient with Superior Vena Cava and Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, Maria A.; Shaw, Dennis W.W.; Schaller, Robert T. Jr.

    1999-01-15

    An 18-year-old man with a gastrointestinal hypomotility syndrome required lifelong parenteral nutrition. Both the superior and inferior vena cava were occluded. Computed tomography guidance was used to place a long-term central venous catheter via a large tributary to the azygos vein.

  7. Comparison of measured and computed plasma loading resistance in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) central cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mett, R.R.

    1984-08-01

    The plasma loading resistance vs density plots computed with McVey's Code XANTENA1, agree well with experimental measurements in the TMX-U central cell. The agreement is much better for frequencies where ..omega../..omega../sub ci/ <1 than for ..omega../..omega../sub ci/ greater than or equal to 1.

  8. Feasibility Study for a Remote Terminal Central Computing Facility Serving School and College Institutions. Volume II, Preliminary Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., White Plains, NY.

    Preliminary specifications of major equipment and programing systems characteristics for a remote terminal central computing facility serving 25-75 secondary schools are presented. Estimation techniques developed in a previous feasibility study were used to delineate workload demands for four model regions with different numbers of institutions…

  9. Identification of Misconceptions in the Central Limit Theorem and Related Concepts and Evaluation of Computer Media as a Remedial Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong Ho; And Others

    Central limit theorem (CLT) is considered an important topic in statistics, because it serves as the basis for subsequent learning in other crucial concepts such as hypothesis testing and power analysis. There is an increasing popularity in using dynamic computer software for illustrating CLT. Graphical displays do not necessarily clear up…

  10. Functional Analysis and Preliminary Specifications for a Single Integrated Central Computer System for Secondary Schools and Junior Colleges. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1968

    The present report proposes a central computing facility and presents the preliminary specifications for such a system. It is based, in part, on the results of earlier studies by two previous contractors on behalf of the U.S. Office of Education. The recommendations are based upon the present contractors considered evaluation of the earlier…

  11. U.S. EPA computational toxicology programs: Central role of chemical-annotation efforts and molecular databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is engaged in high-profile research efforts to improve the ability to more efficiently and effectively prioritize and screen thousands of environmental chemicals for potential toxicity. A central component of these efforts invol...

  12. The Science Training Program for Young Italian Physicists and Engineers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Bellettini, Giorgio; Donati, Simone

    2015-03-12

    Since 1984 Fermilab has been hosting a two-month summer training program for selected undergraduate and graduate Italian students in physics and engineering. Building on the traditional close collaboration between the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) and Fermilab, the program is supported by INFN, by the DOE and by the Scuola Superiore di Sant`Anna of Pisa (SSSA), and is run by the Cultural Association of Italians at Fermilab (CAIF). This year the University of Pisa has qualified it as a “University of Pisa Summer School”, and will grant successful students with European Supplementary Credits. Physics students join the Fermilab HEP research groups, while engineers join the Particle Physics, Accelerator, Technical, and Computing Divisions. Some students have also been sent to other U.S. laboratories and universities for special trainings. The programs cover topics of great interest for science and for social applications in general, like advanced computing, distributed data analysis, nanoelectronics, particle detectors for earth and space experiments, high precision mechanics, applied superconductivity. In the years, over 350 students have been trained and are now employed in the most diverse fields in Italy, Europe, and the U.S. In addition, the existing Laurea Program in Fermilab Technical Division was extended to the whole laboratory, with presently two students in Master’s thesis programs on neutrino physics and detectors in the Neutrino Division. And finally, a joint venture with the Italian Scientists and Scholars North-America Foundation (ISSNAF) provided this year 4 professional engineers free of charge for Fermilab. More details on all of the above can be found below.

  13. Charm and beauty measurements at Fermilab fixed target

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1993-10-01

    Eighteen months after a successful run of the Fermilab fixed target program, interesting results from several experiments are available. This is the first time that more than one Fermilab fixed target experiment has reported the observation of beauty mesons. In this paper we review recent results from charm and beauty fixed target experiments at Fermilab.

  14. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed.

  15. The 1994 Fermilab Fixed Target Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, J. |

    1994-11-01

    This paper highlights the results of the Fermilab Fixed Target Program that were announced between October, 1993 and October, 1994. These results are drawn from 18 experiments that took data in the 1985, 1987 and 1990/91 fixed target running periods. For this discussion, the Fermilab Fixed Target Program is divided into 5 major topics: hadron structure, precision electroweak measurements, heavy quark production, polarization and magnetic moments, and searches for new phenomena. However, it should be noted that most experiments span several subtopics. Also, measurements within each subtopic often affect the results in other subtopics. For example, parton distributions from hadron structure measurements are used in the studies of heavy quark production.

  16. Electron cloud in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Simulations of the Fermilab Booster reveal a substantial electron-cloud buildup both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, when the second-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is discussed.

  17. Cloud services for the Fermilab scientific stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Mhashilkar, P.; Boyd, J.; Bernabeu, G.; Sharma, N.; Peregonow, N.; Kim, H.; Noh, S.; Palur, S.; Raicu, I.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic ray simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. We present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality.

  18. Cloud services for the Fermilab scientific stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Mhashilkar, P.; Boyd, J.; Bernabeu, G.; Sharma, N.; Peregonow, N.; Kim, H.; Noh, S.; Palur, S.; Raicu, I.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic ray simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. As a result, we present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality.

  19. Cloud services for the Fermilab scientific stakeholders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timm, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Mhashilkar, P.; Boyd, J.; Bernabeu, G.; Sharma, N.; Peregonow, N.; Kim, H.; Noh, S.; Palur, S.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic raymore » simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. As a result, we present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality.« less

  20. Charm and beauty physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.

    1992-01-01

    The status of charm and beauty physics studies at Fermilab is reviewed. Data from fixed target experiments on charm production, semi-leptonic decay, and Cabibbo suppressed decays as well as charmonium studies in antiproton annihilation are described. In addition beauty results from CDF and E653 are reviewed and prospects for studies of B physics at collider detectors are discussed.

  1. Cloud Services for the Fermilab Scientific Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Mhashilkar, P.; Boyd, J.; Bernabeu, G.; Sharma, N.; Peregonow, N.; Kim, H.; Noh, S.; Palur, S.; Raicu, I.

    2015-12-23

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic ray simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. We present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality.

  2. Fermilab Recycler Stochastic Cooling for Luminosity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmelsiek, D.; Gattuso, C.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Recycler began regularly delivering antiprotons for Tevatron luminosity operations in 2005. Methods for tuning the Recycler stochastic cooling system are presented. The unique conditions and resulting procedures for minimizing the longitudinal phase space density of the Recycler antiproton beam are outlined.

  3. Exabyte helical scan devices at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Kaczar, K.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Votava, M.; White, V.; Hockney, G.; Bracker, S.; de Miranda, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Exabyte 8mm helical scan storage devices are in use at Fermilab in a number of applications. These devices have the functionality of magnetic tape, but use media which is much more economical and much more dense than conventional 9 track tape. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Slow extraction from the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Craig D. Moore et al.

    2001-07-20

    Slow resonant extraction from the Fermilab Main Injector through the extraction channel was achieved in February, 2000, with a spill length of 0.3 sec. Beam losses were small. Excellent wire chamber profiles were obtained and analyzed. The duty factor was not very good and needs to be improved.

  5. Recent results from Fermilab E791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A.; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Aryal, M.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Costa, I.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Dubbs, T.; Fernandez, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gerson, S.; Gounder, K.; Granite, D.; Halling, M.; Herrera, G.; Hurwitz, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lundberg, B.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; d'Oliveira, A. B.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A.; Sheaff, M.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Smith, J. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Stanton, N.; Sugano, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yi, D.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1995-07-01

    Fermilab E791 is a high statistics charm experiment using a 500 GeV/c π- beam incident on a segmented target. We present results based on one third of the 1991-1992 data, with particular emphasis on a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay D+→π+μ+μ-.

  6. Correction magnets for the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    James T Volk et al.

    2003-05-27

    In the commissioning of the Fermilab Recycler ring the need for higher order corrector magnets in the regions near beam transfers was discovered. Three types of permanent magnet skew quadrupoles, and two types of permanent magnet sextupoles were designed and built. This paper describes the need for these magnets, the design, assembly, and magnetic measurements.

  7. W+ jets production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, J.R.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    1997-05-01

    The production properties of jets in W events have been measured using {radical}s = 1.8 TeV pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Experimental results from several CDF and D0 analyses are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  8. The 'last mile' of data handling: Fermilab's IFDH tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Adam L.; Mengel, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    IFDH (Intensity Frontier Data Handling), is a suite of tools for data movement tasks for Fermilab experiments and is an important part of the FIFE[2] (Fabric for Intensity Frontier [1] Experiments) initiative described at this conference. IFDH encompasses moving input data from caches or storage elements to compute nodes (the 'last mile' of data movement) and moving output data potentially to those caches as part of the journey back to the user. IFDH also involves throttling and locking to ensure that large numbers of jobs do not cause data movement bottlenecks. IFDH is realized as an easy to use layer that users call in their job scripts (e.g. 'ifdh cp'), hiding the low level data movement tools. One advantage of this layer is that the underlying low level tools can be selected or changed without the need for the user to alter their scripts. Logging and performance monitoring can also be added easily. This system will be presented in detail as well as its impact on the ease of data handling at Fermilab experiments.

  9. The "last mile" of data handling: Fermilab's IFDH tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Adam L.; Mengel, Marc W.

    2014-06-01

    IFDH (Intensity Frontier Data Handling), is a suite of tools for data movement tasks for Fermilab experiments and is an important part of the FIFE[2] (Fabric for Intensity Frontier [1] Experiments) initiative described at this conference. IFDH encompasses moving input data from caches or storage elements to compute nodes (the "last mile" of data movement) and moving output data potentially to those caches as part of the journey back to the user. IFDH also involves throttling and locking to ensure that large numbers of jobs do not cause data movement bottlenecks. IFDH is realized as an easy to use layer that users call in their job scripts (e.g. "ifdh cp"), hiding the low level data movement tools. One advantage of this layer is that the underlying low level tools can be selected or changed without the need for the user to alter their scripts. Logging and performance monitoring can also be added easily. This system will be presented in detail as well as its impact on the ease of data handling at Fermilab experiments.

  10. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  11. Wide area network monitoring system for HEP experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Cottrell, Les; Logg, Connie; /SLAC

    2004-12-01

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centers. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

  12. Wide Area Network Monitoring System for HEP Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, M.

    2004-11-23

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centres. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

  13. Design of the 2 Tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D0 detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, B.; Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.; Kristalinski, A.; Lee, A.; Markley, D.; Mesin, A.; Orr, S.; Rucinski, R.

    1994-12-31

    A thin superconducting solenoid has been designed for an upgrade to the Fermilab D0 detector, one of two major hadron collider detectors at Fermilab. The original design of the D0 detector did not incorporate a central magnetic field which necessitates a retrofit within the parameters of the existing tracking volume of the detector. The two layer solenoid coil is indirectly cooled and provides a 2 T magnetic field for a central tracking system. To minimize end effects in this no iron configuration, the conductor width is varied thereby increasing current density at the ends and improving field uniformity. This paper summarizes the results of the conceptual design study for the D0 superconducting solenoid.

  14. Alveolar bone thickness around maxillary central incisors of different inclination assessed with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Sun, Hong-jing; Lv, Pin; Cao, Yu-ming; Yu, Mo; Yue, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the labial and lingual alveolar bone thickness in adults with maxillary central incisors of different inclination by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods Ninety maxillary central incisors from 45 patients were divided into three groups based on the maxillary central incisors to palatal plane angle; lingual-inclined, normal, and labial-inclined. Reformatted CBCT images were used to measure the labial and lingual alveolar bone thickness (ABT) at intervals corresponding to every 1/10 of the root length. The sum of labial ABT and lingual ABT at the level of the root apex was used to calculate the total ABT (TABT). The number of teeth exhibiting alveolar fenestration and dehiscence in each group was also tallied. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference test were applied for statistical analysis. Results The labial ABT and TABT values at the root apex in the lingual-inclined group were significantly lower than in the other groups (p < 0.05). Lingual and labial ABT values were very low at the cervical level in the lingual-inclined and normal groups. There was a higher prevalence of alveolar fenestration in the lingual-inclined group. Conclusions Lingual-inclined maxillary central incisors have less bone support at the level of the root apex and a greater frequency of alveolar bone defects than normal maxillary central incisors. The bone plate at the marginal level is also very thin. PMID:26445719

  15. 41 CFR 105-56.027 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.027 Section 105-56.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  16. 41 CFR 105-56.027 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.027 Section 105-56.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  17. 41 CFR 105-56.017 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.017 Section 105-56.017 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  18. 41 CFR 105-56.027 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.027 Section 105-56.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  19. 41 CFR 105-56.017 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.017 Section 105-56.017 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  20. 41 CFR 105-56.017 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.017 Section 105-56.017 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  1. 41 CFR 105-56.017 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.017 Section 105-56.017 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  2. 41 CFR 105-56.017 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.017 Section 105-56.017 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  3. 41 CFR 105-56.027 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.027 Section 105-56.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  4. 41 CFR 105-56.027 - Centralized salary offset computer match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... offset computer match. 105-56.027 Section 105-56.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... computer match. (a) Delinquent debt records will be compared with Federal employee records maintained by... a delegation of authority from the Secretary, has waived certain requirements of the...

  5. Central Issues in the Use of Computer-Based Materials for High Volume Entrepreneurship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Billy

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses issues relating to the use of computer-based learning (CBL) materials for entrepreneurship education at university level. It considers CBL as a means of addressing the increased volume and range of provision required in the current context. The issues raised in this article have importance for all forms of computer-based…

  6. Run control techniques for the Fermilab DART data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.

    1995-10-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by the Fermilab Computing Division in collaboration with eight High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run-control which implements flexible, distributed, extensible and portable paradigms for the control and monitoring of data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting aspects of the run-control - why we chose the concepts we did, the benefits we have seen from the choices we made, as well as our experiences in deploying and supporting it for experiments during their commissioning and sub-system testing phases. We emphasize the software and techniques we believe are extensible to future use, and potential future modifications and extensions for those we feel are not.

  7. Fermilab Booster Transition Crossing Simulations and Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.; Tan, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at 15 Hz. In the PIP (Proton Improvement Plan) era, it is required that Booster deliver 4.2 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse to extraction. One of the obstacles for providing quality beam to the users is the longitudinal quadrupole oscillation that the beam suffers from right after transition. Although this oscillation is well taken care of with quadrupole dampers, it is important to understand the source of these oscillations in light of the PIP II requirements that require 6.5 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse at extraction. This paper explores the results from machine studies, computer simulations and solutions to prevent the quadrupole oscillations after transition.

  8. Serving Six Institutions: A History of Administrative Computing at the Associated Colleges of Central Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ray; Doughty, Gavin; McDowell, Valerie

    This paper offers a brief history and description of a voluntary consortium of six church-related private colleges, the Associated Colleges of Central Kansas (ACCK), that is governed by a board of directors made up of the presidents of the member colleges. The schools, all within close geographical proximity, have a combined enrollment of over…

  9. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  10. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators.

  11. Hydro static water level systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; Guerra, J.A.; Hansen, S.U.; Kiper, T.E.; Jostlein, H.; Shiltsev, V.; Chupyra, A.; Kondaurov, M.; Singatulin, S.

    2006-09-01

    Several Hydrostatic Water Leveling systems (HLS) are in use at Fermilab. Three systems are used to monitor quadrupoles in the Tevatron and two systems are used to monitor ground motion for potential sites for the International Linear Collider (ILC). All systems use capacitive sensors to determine the water level of water in a pool. These pools are connected with tubing so that relative vertical shifts between sensors can be determined. There are low beta quadrupoles at the B0 and D0 interaction regions of Tevatron accelerator. These quadrupoles use BINP designed and built sensors and have a resolution of 1 micron. All regular lattice superconducting quadrupoles (a total of 204) in the Tevatron use a Fermilab designed system and have a resolution of 6 microns. Data on quadrupole motion due to quenches, changes in temperature will be presented. In addition data for ground motion for ILC studies caused by natural and cultural factors will be presented.

  12. The Fermilab main injector neutrino program

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, Jorge G.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The NuMI Facility at Fermilab provides an extremely intense beam of neutrinos making it an ideal place for the study of neutrino oscillations as well as high statistics (anti)neutrino-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiments. The MINOS neutrino oscillation {nu}{mu} disappearance experiment is currently taking data and has published first results. The NO{nu}A {nu}e appearance experiment is planning to begin taking data at the start of the next decade. For the study of neutrino scattering, the MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists planning to use a fully active fine-grained solid scintillator detector. The overall goals of the experiment are to measure absolute exclusive cross-sections, nuclear effects in {nu} - A interactions, a systematic study of the resonance-DIS transition region and the high-xBj - low Q2 DIS region.

  13. A Superconducting Linac Proton Driver at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. William

    2004-05-01

    A proton driver has emerged as the leading candidate for Fermilab's next near-term accelerator project. The preferred technical solution is an 8 GeV superconducting linac based on technology developed for TESLA and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Its primary mission is to serve as a single-stage H- injector to prepare 2 MW "Super-Beams" for Neutrino experiments using the Fermilab Main Injector. The linac can also accelerate electrons, protons, and relativistic muons, permitting future applications such as a driver for an FEL, a long-pulse spallation source, the driver for an intense 8 GeV neutrino or kaon program, and potential applications to a neutrino factory or muon collider. The technical design of the 8 GeV linac, as well as the design of an alternative synchrotron based proton driver, will be described along with plans for project proposal and construction.

  14. Collider Detector (CDF) at FERMILAB: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Theriot, D.

    1984-07-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 150 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and Unversity of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies.

  15. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex.

  16. A Roadmap for the Future of Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Oddone, Pier

    2005-12-12

    The principal aim of this roadmap is to place the US and Fermilab in the best position to host the International Linear Collider (ILC). The strategy must be resilient against the many vicissitudes that will attend the development of such a large project. Pier Oddone will explore the tension between the needed concentration of effort to move a project as large as the ILC forward and the need to maintain the breadth of our field.

  17. Upgrade of Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Edwards, H.; Huning, M.; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-05-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector laboratory is a 16 MeV electron accelerator dedicated to beam dynamics and advanced accelerator physics studies. FNPL will soon be capable of operating at {approx} 40 MeV, after the installation of a high gradient TESLA cavity. In this paper we present the foreseen design for the upgraded facility along with its performance. We discuss the possibilities of using of FNPL as an injector for the superconducting module and test facility (SM&TF).

  18. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation.

  19. Future possibilities with Fermilab neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2008-01-01

    We will start with a brief overview of neutrino oscillation physics with emphasis on the remaining unanswered questions. Next, after mentioning near future reactor and accelerator experiments searching for a non zero {theta}{sub 13}, we will introduce the plans for the next generation of long-baseline accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments. We will focus on experiments utilizing powerful (0.7-2.1 MW) Fermilab neutrino beams, either existing or in the design phase.

  20. Fixed-target physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver is now successfully commissioned and fixed-target experimentation at high energy (800 GeV) has begun. In addition, a number of new experiments designed to exploit the unique features of the Tevatron are yet to come on-line. In this talk, we will review recent accomplishments in the fixed-target program and describe experiments in progress and others yet to come.

  1. Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

  2. Fermilab Proton Beam for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Plans to use existing Fermilab facilities to provide beam for the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) are under development. The experiment will follow the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. The proposed Mu2e operating scenario is described as well as the accelerator issues being addressed to meet the experimental goals.

  3. Managing drought risk with a computer model of the Raritan River Basin water-supply system in central New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, Paul; Tasker, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The reservoirs and pumping stations that comprise the Raritan River Basin water-supply system and its interconnections to the Delaware-Raritan Canal water-supply system, operated by the New Jersey Water Supply Authority (NJWSA), provide potable water to central New Jersey communities. The water reserve of this combined system can easily be depleted by an extended period of below-normal precipitation. Efficient operation of the combined system is vital to meeting the water-supply needs of central New Jersey. In an effort to improve the efficiency of the system operation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the NJWSA, has developed a computer model that provides a technical basis for evaluating the effects of alternative patterns of operation of the Raritan River Basin water-supply system. This fact sheet describes the model, its technical basis, and its operation.

  4. Data from Fermilab E-687 (Photoproduction of Heavy Flavours) and Fermilab E-831 (FOCUS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The FERMILAB E687 Collaboration studies production and decay properties of heavy flavours produced in photon-hadron interactions. The experiment recorded approximately 500 million hadronic triggers in the 1990-91 fixed target run at Fermilab from which over 80 thousand charm decays were fully reconstructed. Physics publications include the precision lifetime measurements of the charm hadrons, D meson semileptonic form factors, detailed Dalitz plot analyses, charm meson and baryon decay modes and spectroscopy, searches for rare and forbidden phenomena, and tests of QCD production mechanisms. The follow-on experiment FOCUS Collaboration (Fermilab E831) successfully recorded huge amount of data during the 1996-1997 fixed target run. The FOCUS home page is located at http://www-focus.fnal.gov/. FOCUS is an international collaboration with institutions in Brazil, Italy, South Korea, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the U.S.

  5. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  6. QCD Results from the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, Andreas; CDF, for the; Collaborations, D0

    2010-01-01

    Selected recent quantum chromodynamics (QCD) measurements are reviewed for Fermilab Run II Tevatron proton-antiproton collisions studied by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0 Collaborations at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Tantamount to Rutherford scattering studies at the TeV scale, inclusive jet and dijet production cross-section measurements are used to seek and constrain new particle physics phenomena, test perturbative QCD calculations, inform parton distribution function (PDF) determinations, and extract a precise value of the strong coupling constant, a{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1161{sub -0.0048}{sup +0.0041}. Inclusive photon production cross-section measurements reveal an inability of next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations to describe low-energy photons arising directly in the hard scatter. Events with {gamma} + 3-jet configurations are used to measure the increasingly important double parton scattering (DPS) phenomenon, with an obtained effective interaction cross section of {sigma}{sub eff} = 16.4 {+-} 2.3 mb. Observations of central exclusive particle production demonstrate the viability of observing the Standard Model Higgs boson using similar techniques at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Three areas of inquiry into lower energy QCD, crucial to understanding high-energy collider phenomena, are discussed: the examination of intra-jet track kinematics to infer that jet formation is dominated by pQCD, and not hadronization, effects; detailed studies of the underlying event and its universality; and inclusive minimum-bias charged-particle momentum and multiplicity measurements, which are shown to challenge the Monte Carlo generators.

  7. Proposal for Fermilab remote access via ISDN (Ver. 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Lidinsky, W.P.; Martin, D.E.

    1993-07-02

    Currently, most users at remote sites connect to the Fermilab network via dial-up over analog modems using a dumb terminal or a personal computer emulating a dumb terminal. This level of connectivity is suitable for accessing a single, character-based application. The power of personal computers that are becoming ubiquitous is under-utilized. National HEPnet Management (NHM) has been monitoring and experimenting with remote access via the integrated services digital network (ISDN) for over two years. Members of NHM felt that basic rate ISDN had the potential for providing excellent remote access capability. Initially ISDN was not able to achieve this, but recently the situation has improved. The authors feel that ISDN can now provide, at a remote site such as a user`s home, a computing environment very similar to that which is available at Fermilab. Such an environment can include direct LAN access, windowing systems, graphics, networked file systems, and demanding software applications. This paper proposes using ethernet bridging over ISDN for remote connectivity. With ISDN remote bridging, a remote Macintosh, PC, X-terminal, workstation, or other computer will be transparently connected to the Fermilab LAN. Except for a slight speed difference, the remote machine should function just as if it were on the LAN at Fermilab, with all network services-file sharing, printer sharing, X-windows, etc. - fully available. There are two additional reasons for exploring technologies such as ISDN. First, by mid-decade environmental legislation such as the Federal Clean Air Act of 1990 and Illinois Senate Bill 2177 will likely force increased remote-worker arrangements. Second, recent pilot programs and studies have shown that for many types of work there may be a substantial cost benefits to supporting work away from the site.

  8. Mechanical construction of the 805 MHz side-coupled cavities for the Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.P.; Fritz, J.R; Jurgens, T.G; Miller, H.W.; Olson, J.; Snee, D.

    1990-10-01

    The manufacturing processes for the Side Coupled Structures (SCS) are intimately connected with their tuning requirements. Present Computer Numerical Controlled machining allows very repeatable accuracies of dimensions. This has led to a manufacturing sequence which reduces the need for repeated machining step. Surface tolerances in the high field region of the accelerating cells were assured. Tuning steps were reduced at all stages of construction. This paper will describe the mechanical steps used to fabricate the SCS structure at Fermilab.

  9. FNAL central email systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Pasetes, Ray; Hill, Kevin; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The FNAL Email System is the primary point of entry for email destined for an employee or user at Fermilab. This centrally supported system is designed for reliability and availability. It uses multiple layers of protection to help ensure that: (1) SPAM messages are tagged properly; (2) All mail is inspected for viruses; and (3) Valid mail gets delivered. This system employs numerous redundant subsystems to accomplish these tasks.

  10. Jet production in muon-proton and muon-nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Proton Muon- Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Proton deep-inelastic scattering are compared to perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD) and Monte Carlo model predictions. We observe hadronic (2+1)-jet rates which are a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the partonic level. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a suppression of the jet rates as compared to deuterium. The two- forward jet sample present higher suppression as compared to the one-forward jet sample.

  11. Report of the Fermilab Committee for Site Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Holmes, Vic Kuchler et. al.

    2001-09-10

    Fermilab is the flagship laboratory of the U.S. high-energy physics program. The Fermilab accelerator complex has occupied the energy frontier nearly continuously since its construction in the early 1970s. It will remain at the frontier until the Large Hadron Collider at CERN begins operating in 2006-7. A healthy future for Fermilab will likely require construction of a new accelerator in the post-LHC era. The process of identifying, constructing and operating a future forefront facility will require the support of the world high-energy-physics community, the governments and funding agencies of many nations and the people of surrounding communities. This report explores options for construction of a new facility on or near the existing Fermilab site. We began the study that forms the basis of this report with the idea that Fermilab, and the surrounding area of northeastern Illinois, possesses attributes that make it an attractive candidate for a new accelerator construction project: excellent geology; a Fermilab staff and local contractors who are experienced in subsurface construction; abundant energy supplies; good access to transportation networks; the presence of local universities with strong interest and participation in the Fermilab research program; Fermilab's demonstrated ability to mount large accelerator construction projects and operate complex accelerator facilities; and a surrounding community that is largely supportive of Fermilab's presence. Our report largely confirms these perceptions.

  12. Land Classification of South-Central Iowa from Computer Enhanced Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, J. V.; Lucas, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Billingsley, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two CCT (computer compatible tapes) scenes were digitally enhanced. The IMAGE 100 system was utilized for image processing. The real time ability of this machine allowed large scale viewing of several selected areas on both CCT's.

  13. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Cineangiography in the Demonstration of Central Pulmonary Arteries in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Karuna; Sharma, Sanjiv; Kumar, Krishan; Rajani, Mira

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for central pulmonary artery pathology in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) and right ventricular outflow obstruction. Methods: We compared contrast-enhanced CT and cine pulmonary arteriography in 24 patients with CCHD to assess central pulmonary arteries including the confluence. Both investigations were interpreted by a cardiac radiologist in a double-blinded manner at an interval of 3 weeks. Angiography was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The sensitivity for visualization of main pulmonary artery (MPA), right pulmonary artery (RPA), left pulmonary artery (LPA), and confluence on CT was 94%, 100%, 92.8%, and 92.8%, respectively. Diagnostic specificity for the same entities was 28.5%, 100%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. The positive predictive value for each was 76.2%, 100%, 94.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. The low specificity of CT in the evaluation of the MPA and the confluence is perhaps due to distorted right ventricular outflow anatomy in CCHD. Large aortopulmonary collaterals in this region were mistaken for the MPA in some patients with pulmonary atresia. Conclusion: CT is a useful, relatively noninvasive, imaging technique for the central pulmonary arteries in selected patients. It can supplement diagnostic information from angiography but cannot replace it. LPA demonstration on axial images alone is inadequate.

  14. Central Neural Circuits for Coordination of Swallowing, Breathing, and Coughing: Predictions from Computational Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.; Gestreau, Christian; Morris, Kendall F.; Davenport, Paul W.; Pitts, Teresa E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The purpose of this article is to update the otolaryngologic community on recent developments in the basic understanding of how cough, swallow, and breathing are controlled. These behaviors are coordinated to occur at specific times relative to one another to minimize the risk of aspiration. The control system that generates and coordinates these behaviors is complex and advanced computational modeling methods are useful tools to elucidate its function. PMID:24262953

  15. Land classification of south-central Iowa from computer enhanced images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Taranik, J. V.; Billingsley, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Iowa Geological Survey developed its own capability for producing color products from digitally enhanced LANDSAT data. Research showed that efficient production of enhanced images required full utilization of both computer and photographic enhancement procedures. The 29 August 1972 photo-optically enhanced color composite was more easily interpreted for land classification purposes than standard color composites.

  16. Medium-range objective predictions of thunderstorms on the McIDAS/CSIS interactive computer system. [Computer Interactive Data Access System/Centralized Storm Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Until recently, all operational meteorological data has been made available to forecasters in a variety of different forms. Predictions based upon these different data formats have been complicated by the inability of forecasters to easily assimilate, in real-time, all data to provide an optimum decision regarding future weather occurrences. By March 1980, a joint NASA/NOAA effort had been initiated to develop the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary objectives of this joint project are related to an improvement of the overall severe storm forecast and warning procedure and to a demonstration of the operational utility of techniques developed within the applied research community. CSIS is to utilize the Man Computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS). The present investigation is concerned with one of the first attempts to employ the CSIS system for the evaluation of a new research technique involving the prediction of thunderstorms over a forecast period of 12-48 hours.

  17. Computational Insights into the Central Role of Nonbonding Interactions in Modern Covalent Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Walden, Daniel M; Ogba, O Maduka; Johnston, Ryne C; Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon

    2016-06-21

    The flexibility, complexity, and size of contemporary organocatalytic transformations pose interesting and powerful opportunities to computational and experimental chemists alike. In this Account, we disclose our recent computational investigations of three branches of organocatalysis in which nonbonding interactions, such as C-H···O/N interactions, play a crucial role in the organization of transition states, catalysis, and selectivity. We begin with two examples of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis, both collaborations with the Scheidt laboratory at Northwestern. In the first example, we discuss the discovery of an unusual diverging mechanism in a catalytic kinetic resolution of a dynamic racemate that depends on the stereochemistry of the product being formed. Specifically, the major product is formed through a concerted asynchronous [2 + 2] aldol-lactonization, while the minor products come from a stepwise spiro-lactonization pathway. Stereoselectivity and catalysis are the results of electrophilic activation from C-H···O interactions between the catalyst and the substrate and conjugative stabilization of the electrophile. In the second example, we show how knowledge and understanding of the computed transition states led to the development of a more enantioselective NHC catalyst for the butyrolactonization of acyl phosphonates. The identification of mutually exclusive C-H···O interactions in the computed major and minor TSs directly resulted in structural hypotheses that would lead to targeted destabilization of the minor TS, leading to enhanced stereoinduction. Synthesis and evaluation of the newly designed NHC catalyst validated our hypotheses. Next, we discuss two works related to Lewis base catalysis involving 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and its derivatives. In the first, we discuss our collaboration with the Smith laboratory at St Andrews, in which we discovered the origins of the regioselectivity in carboxyl transfer reactions. We

  18. Measurements of Hbeta Stark central asymmetry and its analysis through standard theory and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Djurović, S; Cirisan, M; Demura, A V; Demchenko, G V; Nikolić, D; Gigosos, M A; González, M A

    2009-04-01

    Experimental measurements of the center of the H_{beta} Stark profile on three different installations have been done to study its asymmetry in wide ranges of electron density, temperature, and plasma conditions. Theoretical calculations for the analysis of experimental results have been performed using the standard theory and computer simulations and included separately quadrupolar and quadratic Stark effects. Earlier experimental results and theoretical calculations of other authors have been reviewed as well. The experimental results are well reproduced by the calculations at high and moderate densities. PMID:19518354

  19. Dijet production in hadron collisions at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied dijet final states produced in hard hadron collisions at Fermilab using the E-609 calorimetric detector. Using dijet events produced in ..pi../sup -/p, ..pi../sup +/p and pp collisions at 200 GeV, we have made a detailed search for the higher-twist process proposed by Berger and Brodsky. In this process, the entire energy at the incident pion goes into dijet production, leaving an event with no forward beam jet and satisfying two-body kinematics.

  20. Numerical Tests of the Improved Fermilab Action

    SciTech Connect

    Detar, C.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Oktay, M.B.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the Fermilab heavy-quark action was extended to include dimension-six and -seven operators in order to reduce the discretization errors. In this talk, we present results of the first numerical simulations with this action (the OK action), where we study the masses of the quarkonium and heavy-light systems. We calculate combinations of masses designed to test improvement and compare results obtained with the OK action to their counterparts obtained with the clover action. Our preliminary results show a clear improvement.

  1. Radiation issues in the Fermilab booster magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The demands of the Fermilab neutrino program will require the lab's 30+ year old 8 GeV Booster to deliver higher intensities than it ever has. Total proton throughput is limited by radiation damage and activation due to beam loss in the Booster tunnel. Of particular concern is the epoxy resin that acts as the insulation in the 96 combined function lattice magnets. This paper describes a simulation study to determine the integrated radiation dose to this epoxy and a discussion of the potential effects.

  2. Slip stacking experiments at Fermilab main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyomi Koba et al.

    2003-06-02

    In order to achieve an increase in proton intensity, Fermilab Main Injector will use a stacking process called ''slip stacking''. The intensity will be doubled by injecting one train of bunches at a slightly lower energy, another at a slightly higher energy, then bringing them together for the final capture. Beam studies have started for this process and we have already verified that, at least for a low beam intensity, the stacking procedure works as expected. For high intensity operation, development work of the feedback and feedforward systems is under way.

  3. The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2009-12-01

    The Mu2e collaboration has proposed an experiment to search for the coherent decay of a muon to an electron in the Coulomb field of a nucleus with an expected sensitivity of Rμe<6.0×10-17, at the 90% confidence level. Mu2e has received strong support from the P5 panel and has received Stage I approval from Fermilab. If all resources are made available as required, the experiment could begin taking data as early as 2016.

  4. Electropolishing on small samples at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Teid, T.; Geng, R.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-07-01

    The electropolishing process (EP) is considered an essential step in the processing of high gradient SRF cavities. Studies on EP of small samples has been started at Fermilab as part of the SRF materials R&D program. A simple bench top setup was developed to understand the basic variables affecting the EP. In addition a setup for vertical EP of half cells, based on the Cornell design, was used and another one for dumbbells was designed and tested. Results and findings are reported.

  5. The VAXONLINE software system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    White, V.; Heinicke, P.; Berman, E.; Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; MacKinnon, B.; Moore, C.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Quigg, L.

    1987-06-01

    The VAXONLINE software system, started in late 1984, is now in use at 12 experiments at Fermilab, with at least one VAX or MicroVax. Data acquisition features now provide for the collection and combination of data from one or more sources, via a list-driven Event Builder program. Supported sources include CAMAC, FASTBUS, Front-end PDP-11's, Disk, Tape, DECnet, and other processors running VAXONLINE. This paper describes the functionality provided by the VAXONLINE system, gives performance figures, and discusses the ongoing program of enhancements.

  6. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  7. The Fermilab short-baseline neutrino program

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, Leslie

    2015-10-15

    The Fermilab short-baseline program is a multi-facetted one. Primarily it searches for evidence of sterile neutrinos as hinted at by the MiniBooNE and LSND results. It will also measure a whole suite of ν-Argon cross sections which will be very useful in future liquid argon long-baseline projects. The program is based on MicroBooNE, already installed in the beam line, the recently approved LAr1-ND and the future addition of the refurbished ICARUS.

  8. Recent ground motion studies at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Volk, J.; Singatulin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    Understanding slow and fast ground motion is important for the successful operation and design for present and future colliders. Since 2000 there have been several studies of ground motion at Fermilab. Several different types of HLS (hydro static level sensors) have been used to study slow ground motion (less than 1 hertz) seismometers have been used for fast (greater than 1 hertz) motions. Data have been taken at the surface and at locations 100 meters below the surface. Data of recent slow ground motion measurements with HLSs, many years of alignment data and results of the ATL-analysis are presented and discussed.

  9. Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close, a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider, Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X also supports development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  10. New corrector system for the Fermilab booster

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, E.J.; Drennan, C.C.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.; Lackey, J.R.; Makarov, A.; Pellico, W.A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We present an ambitious ongoing project to build and install a new corrector system in the Fermilab 8 GeV Booster. The system consists of 48 corrector packages, each containing horizontal and vertical dipoles, normal and skew quadrupoles, and normal and skew sextupoles. Space limitations in the machine have motivated a unique design, which utilizes custom wound coils around a 12 pole laminated core. Each of the 288 discrete multipole elements in the system will have a dedicated power supply, the output current of which is controlled by an individual programmable ramp. This paper describes the physics considerations which drove the design, as well as issues in the control of the system.

  11. Electron cooling rates characterization at Fermilab's Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A 0.1 A, 4.3 MeV DC electron beam is routinely used to cool 8 GeV antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler storage ring [1]. The primary function of the electron cooler is to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the antiprotons for storing and preparing high-density bunches for injection into the Tevatron. The longitudinal cooling rate is found to significantly depend on the transverse emittance of the antiproton beam. The paper presents the measured rates and compares them with calculations based on drag force data.

  12. Magnetic field data on Fermilab Energy-Saver quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.E.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Fisk, H.E.; Gross, D.A.; Hanft, R.; Ohnuma, S.; Turkot, F.T.

    1983-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver/Doubler (Tevatron) accelerator contains 216 superconducting quadrupole magnets. Before installation in the Tevatron ring, these magnets plus an additional number of spares were extensively tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF). Details on the results of the tests are presented here.

  13. Implementation of Stochastic Cooling Hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  14. Implementation of stochastic cooling hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  15. Land classification of south-central Iowa from computer enhanced images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. R.; Taranik, J. V.; Billingsley, F. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Enhanced LANDSAT imagery was most useful for land classification purposes, because these images could be photographically printed at large scales such as 1:63,360. The ability to see individual picture elements was no hindrance as long as general image patterns could be discerned. Low cost photographic processing systems for color printings have proved to be effective in the utilization of computer enhanced LANDSAT products for land classification purposes. The initial investment for this type of system was very low, ranging from $100 to $200 beyond a black and white photo lab. The technical expertise can be acquired from reading a color printing and processing manual.

  16. Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    A new experiment at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with a precision of 140 parts per billion (ppb). This measurement is motivated by the results of the Brookhaven E821 experiment that were first released more than a decade ago, which reached a precision of 540 ppb. As the corresponding Standard Model predictions have been refined, the experimental and theoretical values have persistently differed by about 3 standard deviations. If the Brookhaven result is confirmed at Fermilab with this improved precision, it will constitute definitive evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment observes the muon spin precession frequency in flight in a well-calibrated magnetic fi eld; the improvement in precision will require both 20 times as many recorded muon decay events as in E821 and a reduction by a factor of 3 in the systematic uncertainties. This paper describes the current experimental status as well as the plans for the upgraded magnet, detector and storage ring systems that are being prepared for the start of beam data collection in 2017.

  17. Charm physics at Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, S.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Costa, I.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; de Miranda, J.; Santoro, A.F.S.; Souza, M.H.G.; Blaylock, G.; Burchat, P.R.; Gagnon, P.; Sugano, K.; de Oliveira, A.J.; Santha, A.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Appel, J.A.; Banerjee, S.; Carter, T.; Denisenko, K.; Halling, M.; James, C.; Kwan, S.; Lundberg, B.; Thorne, K.; Burnstein, R.; Kasper, P.A.; Peng, K.C.; Rubin, H.; Summers, D.J.; Aitala, E.M.; Gounder, K.; Rafatian, A.; Reidy, J.J.; Yi, D.; Granite, D.; Nguyen, A.; Reay, N.W.; Reibel, K.; Sidwell, R.; Stanton, N.; Tripathi, A.; Witchey, N.; Purohit, M.V.; Schwartz, A.; Wiener, J.; Almeida, F.M.L.; Ramalho, A.J.; da Silva Carvalho, H.; Ashery, D.; Gerzon, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; May-Tal-Beck, S.; Trumer, D.; Bracker, S.B.; Astorga, J.; Milburn, R.; Napier, A.; Radeztsky, S.; Sheaff, M.; Darling, C.; Slaughter, J.; Takach, S.; Wolin, E.

    1992-05-26

    Experiment 791 at Fermilab`s Tagged Photon Laboratory has just accumulated a high statistics charm sample by recording 20 billion events on 24000 8mm tapes. A 500 GeV/c {pi}{sup {minus}} beam was used with a fixed target and a magnetic spectrometer which now includes 23 silicon microstrip planes for vertex reconstruction. A new data acquisition system read out 9000 events/sec during the part of the Tevatron cycle that delivered beam. Digitization and readout took 50 {mu}S per event. Data was buffered in eight large FIFO memories to allow continuous event building and continuous tape writing to a wall of 42 Exabytes at 9.6 MB/sec. The 50 terabytes of data buffered to tape is now being filtered on RISC CPUs. Preliminary results show D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup +} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{pi}{sup +} decays. Rarer decays will be pursued.

  18. Metropolitan area network support at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    DeMar, Phil; Andrews, Chuck; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; Colon, Orlando; Fry, Steve; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Lamore, Donna; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Advances in wide area network service offerings, coupled with comparable developments in local area network technology have enabled many research sites to keep their offsite network bandwidth ahead of demand. For most sites, the more difficult and costly aspect of increasing wide area network capacity is the local loop, which connects the facility LAN to the wide area service provider(s). Fermilab, in coordination with neighboring Argonne National Laboratory, has chosen to provide its own local loop access through leasing of dark fiber to nearby network exchange points, and procuring dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) equipment to provide data channels across those fibers. Installing and managing such optical network infrastructure has broadened the Laboratory's network support responsibilities to include operating network equipment that is located off-site, and is technically much different than classic LAN network equipment. Effectively, the Laboratory has assumed the role of a local service provider. This paper will cover Fermilab's experiences with deploying and supporting a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) infrastructure to satisfy its offsite networking needs. The benefits and drawbacks of providing and supporting such a service will be discussed.

  19. Computer aided graphics simulation modelling using seismogeologic approach in sequence stratigraphy of Early Cretaceous Punjab platform, Central Indus Basin, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, T.M.; Khan, K.A.

    1996-08-01

    Modelling stratigraphic sequence by using seismo-geologic approach, integrated with cyclic transgressive-regressive deposits, helps to identify a number of non-structural subtle traps. Most of the hydrocarbons found in Early Cretaceous of Central Indus Basin pertain to structural entrapments of upper transgressive sands. A few wells are producing from middle and basal regressive sands, but the massive regressive sands have not been tested so far. The possibility of stratigraphic traps like wedging or pinch-out, a lateral gradation, an uplift, truncation and overlapping of reservoir rocks is quite promising. The natural basin physiography at times has been modified by extensional episodic events into tectono-morphic terrain. Thus, seismo scanning of tectonically controlled sedimentation might delineate some subtle stratigraphic traps. Amplitude maps representing stratigraphic sequences are generated to identify the traps. Seismic expressions indicate the reservoir quality in terms of amplitude increase or decrease. The data is modelled on computer using graphics simulation techniques.

  20. Measuring and computing natural ground-water recharge at sites in south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.A.; Perry, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    To measure the natural groundwater recharge process, two sites in south-central Kansas were instrumented with sensors and data microloggers. The atmospheric-boundary layer and the unsaturated and saturated soil zones were monitored as a single regime. Direct observations also were used to evaluate the measurements. Atmospheric sensors included an anemometer, a tipping-bucket rain gage, an air-temperature thermistor, a relative-humidity probe, a net radiometer, and a barometric-pressure transducer. Sensors in the unsaturated zone consisted of soil-temperature thermocouples, tensiometers coupled with pressure transducers and dial gages, gypsum blocks, and a neutron-moisture probe. The saturated-zone sensors consisted of a water-level pressure transducer, a conventional float gage connected to a variable potentiometer, soil thermocouples, and a number of multiple-depth piezometers. Evaluation of the operation of these sensors and recorders indicates that certain types of equipment, such as pressure transducers, are very sensitive to environmental conditions. A number of suggestions aimed at improving instrumentation of recharge investigations are outlined. Precipitation and evapotranspiration data, taken together with soil moisture profiles and storage changes, water fluxes in the unsaturated zone and hydraulic gradients in the saturated zone at various depths, soil temperature, water table hydrographs, and water level changes in nearby wells, describe the recharge process. Although the two instrumented sites are located in sand-dune environments in area characterized by a shallow water table and a sub-humid continental climate, a significant difference was observed in the estimated total recharge. The estimates ranged from less than 2.5 mm at the Zenith site to approximately 154 mm at the Burrton site from February to June 1983. The principal reasons that the Burrton site had more recharge than the Zenith site were more precipitation, less evapotranspiration, and a

  1. Beam position correction in the Fermilab linac

    SciTech Connect

    Junck, K.L.; McCrory, E.

    1994-08-01

    Orbit correction has long been an essential feature of circular accelerators, storage rings, multipass linacs, and linear colliders. In a drift tube linear accelerator (DTL) such as the H- Linac at Fermilab, beam position monitors (BPMs) and dipole corrector magnets can only be located in between accelerating tanks. Within a tank many drift tubes (from 20 to 60) each house a quadrupole magnet to provide strong transverse focusing of the beam. With good alignment of the drift tubes and quadrupoles and a sufficiently large diameter for the drift tubes, beam position is not typically a major concern. In the Fermilab DTL, 95% of the beam occupies only 35% of the available physical aperture (4.4 cm). The recent upgrade of the Fermilab Linac from a final energy of 200 MeV to 400 MeV has been achieved by replacing four 201.25 MHz drift tube linac tanks with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules (the high energy portion of the linac or HEL). In order to achieve this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, an accelerating gradient is required that is a factor of 3 larger than that found in the DTL. This in turn required that the physical aperture through which the beam must pass be significantly reduced. In addition, the lattice of the side-coupled structure provides significantly less transverse focusing than the DTL. Therefore in the early portion of the HEL the beam occupies over 95% of the available physical aperture (3.0 cm). In order to prevent beam loss and the creation of excess radiation, the ability to correct beam position throughout the HEL is of importance. An orbit smoothing algorithm commonly used in the correction of closed orbits of circular machines has been implemented to achieve a global least-squares minimization of beam position errors. In order to accommodate several features of this accelerator a refinement in the algorithm has been made to increase its robustness and utilize correctors of varying strengths.

  2. Beam position correction in the Fermilab Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junck, K. L.; McCrory, E.

    1994-08-01

    Orbit correction has long been an essential feature of circular accelerators, storage rings, multipass linacs, and linear colliders. In a drift tube linear accelerator (DTL) such as the H- Linac at Fermilab, beam position monitors (BPMs) and dipole corrector magnets can only be located in between accelerating tanks. Within a tank many drift tubes (from 20 to 60) each house a quadrupole magnet to provide strong transverse focusing of the beam. With good alignment of the drift tubes and quadrupoles and a sufficiently large diameter for the drift tubes, beam position is not typically a major concern. In the Fermilab DTL, 95 percent of the beam occupies only 35 percent of the available physical aperture (4.4 cm). The recent upgrade of the Fermilab Linac from a final energy of 200 MeV to 400 MeV has been achieved by replacing four 201.25 MHz drift tube linac tanks with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules (the high energy portion of the linac or HEL). In order to achieve this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, an accelerating gradient is required that is a factor of 3 larger than that found in the DTL. This in turn required that the physical aperture through which the beam must pass be significantly reduced. In addition, the lattice of the side-coupled structure provides significantly less transverse focusing than the DTL. Therefore in the early portion of the HEL the beam occupies over 95 percent of the available physical aperture (3.0 cm). In order to prevent beam loss and the creation of excess radiation, the ability to correct beam position throughout the HEL is of importance. An orbit smoothing algorithm commonly used in the correction of closed orbits of circular machines has been implemented to achieve a global least-squares minimization of beam position errors. In order to accommodate several features of this accelerator a refinement in the algorithm has been made to increase its robustness and utilize correctors of varying strengths.

  3. Registration of central paths and colonic polyps between supine and prone scans in computed tomography colonography: Pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ping; Napel, Sandy; Acar, Burak; Paik, David S.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke Jr.; Beaulieu, Christopher F.

    2004-10-01

    Computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive method that allows the evaluation of the colon wall from CT sections of the abdomen/pelvis. The primary goal of CTC is to detect colonic polyps, precursors to colorectal cancer. Because imperfect cleansing and distension can cause portions of the colon wall to be collapsed, covered with water, and/or covered with retained stool, patients are scanned in both prone and supine positions. We believe that both reading efficiency and computer aided detection (CAD) of CTC images can be improved by accurate registration of data from the supine and prone positions. We developed a two-stage approach that first registers the colonic central paths using a heuristic and automated algorithm and then matches polyps or polyp candidates (CAD hits) by a statistical approach. We evaluated the registration algorithm on 24 patient cases. After path registration, the mean misalignment distance between prone and supine identical anatomic landmarks was reduced from 47.08 to 12.66 mm, a 73% improvement. The polyp registration algorithm was specifically evaluated using eight patient cases for which radiologists identified polyps separately for both supine and prone data sets, and then manually registered corresponding pairs. The algorithm correctly matched 78% of these pairs without user input. The algorithm was also applied to the 30 highest-scoring CAD hits in the prone and supine scans and showed a success rate of 50% in automatically registering corresponding polyp pairs. Finally, we computed the average number of CAD hits that need to be manually compared in order to find the correct matches among the top 30 CAD hits. With polyp registration, the average number of comparisons was 1.78 per polyp, as opposed to 4.28 comparisons without polyp registration.

  4. The calibration system of the new g-2 experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Meo, P.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2016-07-01

    The muon anomaly (g - 2)μ / 2 has been measured to 0.54 parts per million by E821 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at present there is a 3-4 standard-deviation difference between the Standard Model prediction and the experimental value. A new muon g-2 experiment, E989, is being prepared at Fermilab that will improve the experimental error by a factor of four to clarify this difference. A central component to reach this fourfold improvement in accuracy is the high-precision laser calibration system which should monitor the gain fluctuations of the calorimeter photodetectors at 0.04% accuracy.

  5. The calibration system of the new g-2 experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Meo, P.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2016-07-01

    The muon anomaly (g - 2) μ / 2 has been measured to 0.54 parts per million by E821 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at present there is a 3-4 standard-deviation difference between the Standard Model prediction and the experimental value. A new muon g-2 experiment, E989, is being prepared at Fermilab that will improve the experimental error by a factor of four to clarify this difference. A central component to reach this fourfold improvement in accuracy is the high-precision laser calibration system which should monitor the gain fluctuations of the calorimeter photodetectors at 0.04% accuracy.

  6. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  7. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-05-04

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US).

  8. Fermilab Physics Department Fastbus TDC module

    SciTech Connect

    Cancelo, G.; Hansen, S.; Cotta-Ramusino, A.

    1991-07-01

    A prototype 64 channel Fastbus TDC built at Fermilab is described. The module features a full custom CMOS four channel gated integrator chip. One level of analog buffering at the inputs is implemented on chip. A four event deep output queue at the bus interface allows a high event rate with low dead time. Each channel can record up to two hits per event. With an occupation rate of 10%, the module can operate at 40,000 events per second with dead time on the order of 15%. The TDC operates in common stop mode with a full scale of 1 {mu}sec and a resolution of 1 nsec. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  9. The LArIAT Experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutini, Irene; LArIAT Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The LArIAT experiment at Fermilab is part of the International Neutrino program recently approved in the US. LArIAT aims to measure the main features of charged particles interactions in argon in the energy range (0.2 - 2.0 GeV) corresponding to the energy spectrum of the same particles when produced in a neutrino-argon interaction (neutrino energies of few GeV) typical of the short- and long-baseline neutrino beams of the Neutrino Program. Data collected from the 1 st Run are being analyzed for both Physics studies and a technical characterization of the scintillation light collection system. Two analysis topics are reported: the method developed for charged pion cross section measurement, based on the specific features of the LArTPC, and the development and test of the LArIAT custom-designed cold front-end electronics for SiPM devices to collect LAr scintillation light.

  10. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Dhanaraj, N.; Hocker, A.; Orlov, Y.; Peterson, T.; Premo, K.

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  11. Some recent experimental results from Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this talk was to give an impression of the tremendous range and depth of the data being produced by experiments at Fermilab, both fixed target and collider. Despite the generous allotment of time it was not possible to do more than scratch the surface of some subjects. The collider experiments, using the measurements of the W mass and with top search and mass limits, are approaching the situation where a statement about the Higgs mass, or a sensitive test of the consistency of the standard model become a possibility. Subjects discussed were: (1) cross-sections, QCD measurements; (2) decay physics; (3) W/Z physics; (4) searches for new physics; and (5) search for top quark.

  12. Early history of the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, E.; /Fermilab

    1983-10-01

    This note is written in response to a request from Phil Livdahl for corrections, and additions to a TM he is writing on Staffing Levels at Fermilab during Initial Construction Years and to a note that Hank Hinterberger is preparing on milestones. In my spare time over the past few years I have taken the original files of the Main Ring Section, my own notes from that period, and various other collections of relevant paper, and arranged them in a set of 44 large loose leaf binders in chronological order. I call this set of volumes the 'Main Ring Chronological Archives'. In response to Phil's request I have recently skimmed through these records of the period and extracted a small subset of documents which relate to the specific questions that Phil is addressing: staffing. administration, and milestones.

  13. Numerically controlled oscillator for the Fermilab booster

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.L.; Ducar, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    In order to improve the stability of the Fermilab Booster low level rf system, a numerically controlled oscillator system is being constructed. Although the system has not been implemented to date, the design is outlined in this paper. The heart of the new system consists of a numerically synthesized frequency generator manufactured by the Sciteq Company. The 3 Ghz/sec rate and 30 to 53 MHz range of the Booster frequency program required the design of a CAMAC based, fast-cycling (1 MHz), 65K X 32 bit, digital function generator. A 1 MHz digital adder and 12 bit analog to digital converter will be used to correct small program errors by phase locking the oscillator to the beam. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Edwin L. Goldwasser

    2010-01-08

    In the 1960?s the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory) submitted two proposals to build the next high energy physics research laboratory. The first included a 200 GeV accelerator and associated experimental facilities. The cost was $350 million. The Bureau of the Budget rejected that proposal as a ?budget buster?. It ruled that $250 million was the maximum that could be accepted. The second proposal was for a reduced scope laboratory that met the Bureau of the Budget?s cost limitation, but it was for a lower energy accelerator and somewhat smaller and fewer experimental facilities. The powerful Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy rejected the reduced scope proposal as inadequate to provide physics results of sufficient interest to justify the cost. It was then that Bob Wilson came forth with a third proposal, coping with that ?Catch 22? and leading to the creation of Fermilab. How he did it will be the subject of this colloquium.

  15. Full Discharges in Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.; Shemyakin, A.

    2006-03-20

    Fermilab's 4.3 MeV electron cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, which generates a DC electron beam in an energy recovery mode. Effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler requires that the beam remains stable for hours. While short beam interruptions do not deteriorate the performance of the Recycler ring, the beam may provoke full discharges in the accelerator, which significantly affect the duty factor of the machine as well as the reliability of various components. Although cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons has been successfully achieved, full discharges still occur in the current setup. The paper describes factors leading to full discharges and ways to prevent them.

  16. Full discharges in Fermilab's electron cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Fermilab's 4.3 MeV electron cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, which generates a DC electron beam in an energy recovery mode. Effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler requires that the beam remains stable for hours. While short beam interruptions do not deteriorate the performance of the Recycler ring, the beam may provoke full discharges in the accelerator, which significantly affect the duty factor of the machine as well as the reliability of various components. Although cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons has been successfully achieved, full discharges still occur in the current setup. The paper describes factors leading to full discharges and ways to prevent them.

  17. The Fermilab Holometer: Probing the Planck Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamai, Brittany; Chou, A.; Evans, M.; Glass, H.; Gustafson, R.; Hogan, C. J.; Lanza, R.; McCuller, L.; Meyer, S.; Richardson, J.; Sippel, A.; Steffen, J.; Stoughton, C.; Tomlin, R.; Volk, J.; Waldman, S.; Weiss, R.; Wester, W.; Holometer, Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    Experimentally probing the Planck scale can offer insights into understanding a quantum origin of spacetime. The Fermilab Holometer team will look for a new noise source arising from the Planck scale by using the precision of power-recycled Michelson interferometers. The two nested 40 meter interferometers may have a characteristic power spectral density based on the conjectured frequency independent Planckian noise. By cross-correlating the dark port signal of two nearby interferometers, we can rule out conventional noise sources that are not common to both devices. A common source of noise could be from the underlying spacetime itself. A positive result will lead to insights in theories of an emergent quantum spacetime. The Holometer team has finished construction and begun scientific commissioning. First results of the experiment are expected in Spring 2015.

  18. [Multislice computed tomographic angiography in the assessment of central veins for endovascular treatment planning: comparison with phlebography].

    PubMed

    Patanè, Domenico; Morale, Walter; Malfa, Pierantonio; Seminara, Giuseppe; L'Anfusa, Giuseppe; Spanti, Demetrio; Incardona, Concetta; Mandalà, Maria Luisa; Di Landro, Domenico

    2010-01-01

    The dysfunction of a vascular access for hemodialysis and its loss may depend on drainage difficulties of the superficial or deep venation due to hemodynamically significant stenosis or obstruction of a central vein, which generally involve the innominate-subclavian veins or superior vena cava. These alterations are often neglected due to their central and deep location; when there is hemodynamic compensation, they may remain asymptomatic. For these reasons every suspect clinical sign for central vein stenosis (gross arm syndrome or venous hypertension in an arteriovenous fistula) must not be ignored, as timely intervention is essential for functional recovery of the vessel and for the protection of the arteriovenous fistula. The modern imaging techniques ensure thorough diagnostic assessment, while the possibilities of endovascular treatment with interventional radiology allow, in a large proportion of cases, optimal minimally invasive treatment, but above all the recovery of venation in a hemodialyzed patient. We report our experience with multislice computed tomographic angiography (MS-CTA) and reconstruction software for treatment planning of central vein stenosis or obstruction. Forty-nine patients were studied with MS-CTA (GE 16). Images were acquired in the venous phase (120-180 seconds after contrast medium injection) followed by digital vascular reconstruction (AutoBone for bone removal, vessel analysis for caliber and length measurements, thin and curved MIP, MPR). Within a week control phlebography was performed. The venous tree was divided into seven segments and analyzed in a double-blind fashion with a distinction between patent segments, 50-70% stenosis, >70% stenosis, occlusion, and collateral vascular beds. There was excellent correspondence in all the examined segments for patency, >70% stenosis, and occlusion, with high sensitivity (98%), specificity (99.3%), and diagnostic accuracy (99.1%). The binomial test demonstrated a highly significant

  19. The Lilongwe Central Hospital Patient Management Information System: A Success in Computer-Based Order Entry Where One Might Least Expect It

    PubMed Central

    GP, Douglas; RA, Deula; SE, Connor

    2003-01-01

    Computer-based order entry is a powerful tool for enhancing patient care. A pilot project in the pediatric department of the Lilongwe Central Hospital (LCH) in Malawi, Africa has demonstrated that computer-based order entry (COE): 1) can be successfully deployed and adopted in resource-poor settings, 2) can be built, deployed and sustained at relatively low cost and with local resources, and 3) has a greater potential to improve patient care in developing than in developed countries. PMID:14728338

  20. Hyperon polarization, crystal channeling, and E781 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, J.

    1994-01-01

    Early experiments at Fermilab observed significant polarization of inclusively produced hyperons. these and subsequent experiments showed that {Lambda}{degree} were produced polarized while {bar {Lambda}}{degree} had no polarization in the same kinematical region. Other hyperons and antihyperons were also seen to be polarized. Recent Fermilab experiments have showed this to be a rich and complex phenomena. Theoretical understanding is still lacking. Fermilab E761 has shown that bent single crystals can be used to process the polarization of hyperons and from the precession angle measure the hyperon`s magnetic moment. This opens the possibility of measuring the magnetic moments of charmed baryons. Finally, I will briefly discuss Fermilab E781, an experiment designed to study charmed particle production by {Sigma} {sup {minus}} hyperons.

  1. A Radiation shielding study for the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    Radiation shielding calculations are performed for the Fermilab Linac enclosure and gallery. The predicted dose rates around the access labyrinth at normal operation and a comparison to measured dose rates are presented. An accident scenario is considered as well.

  2. The performance of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1991-10-01

    This paper will describe the actual operating performance of the Tevatron, operating as a collider, and will indicate the planned upgrades which will enhance, the physics results coming from the experiments being performed at Fermilab.

  3. Beam Based Measurements for Stochastic Cooling Systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Pasquinelli, R.J.; Werkema, S.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-13

    Improvement of antiproton stacking rates has been pursued for the last twenty years at Fermilab. The last twelve months have been dedicated to improving the computer model of the Stacktail system. The production of antiprotons encompasses the use of the entire accelerator chain with the exception of the Tevatron. In the Antiproton Source two storage rings, the Debuncher and Accumulator are responsible for the accumulation of antiprotons in quantities that can exceed 2 x 10{sup 12}, but more routinely, stacks of 5 x 10{sup 11} antiprotons are accumulated before being transferred to the Recycler ring. Since the beginning of this recent enterprise, peak accumulation rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup 11} to greater than 2.3 x 10{sup 11} antiprotons per hour. A goal of 3 x 10{sup 11} per hour has been established. Improvements to the stochastic cooling systems are but a part of this current effort. This paper will discuss Stacktail system measurements and experienced system limitations.

  4. Fermilab Recycler Ring BPM Upgrade Based on Digital Receiver Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.; Crisp, J.; Prieto, P.; Voy, D.; Briegel, C.; McClure, C.; West, R.; Pordes, S.; Mengel, M.

    2004-11-10

    Electronics for the 237 BPMs in the Fermilab Recycler Ring have been upgraded from a log-amplifier based system to a commercially produced digitizer-digital down converter based system. The hardware consists of a pre-amplifier connected to a split-plate BPM, an analog differential receiver-filter module and an 8-channel 80-MHz digital down converter VME board. The system produces position and intensity with a dynamic range of 30 dB and a resolution of {+-}10 microns. The position measurements are made on 2.5-MHz bunched beam and barrier buckets of the un-bunched beam. The digital receiver system operates in one of six different signal processing modes that include 2.5-MHz average, 2.5-MHz bunch-by-bunch, 2.5-MHz narrow band, unbunched average, un-bunched head/tail and 89-kHz narrow band. Receiver data is acquired on any of up to sixteen clock events related to Recycler beam transfers and other machine activities. Data from the digital receiver board are transferred to the front-end CPU for position and intensity computation on an on-demand basis through the VME bus. Data buffers are maintained for each of the acquisition events and support flash, closed orbit and turn-by-turn measurements. A calibration system provides evaluation of the BPM signal path and application programs.

  5. GammaCHI: A package for the inversion and computation of the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Amparo; Segura, Javier; Temme, Nico M.

    2015-06-01

    A Fortran 90 module GammaCHI for computing and inverting the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral) is presented. The main novelty of this package is the reliable and accurate inversion routines for the noncentral cumulative distribution functions. Additionally, the package also provides routines for computing the gamma function, the error function and other functions related to the gamma function. The module includes the routines cdfgamC, invcdfgamC, cdfgamNC, invcdfgamNC, errorfunction, inverfc, gamma, loggam, gamstar and quotgamm for the computation of the central gamma distribution function (and its complementary function), the inversion of the central gamma distribution function, the computation of the noncentral gamma distribution function (and its complementary function), the inversion of the noncentral gamma distribution function, the computation of the error function and its complementary function, the inversion of the complementary error function, the computation of: the gamma function, the logarithm of the gamma function, the regulated gamma function and the ratio of two gamma functions, respectively.

  6. Recent Fermilab results on hadroproduction of heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1993-08-01

    Recent results from various Fermilab experiments on the hadroproduction of states containing charm, bottom, and top quarks are discussed. These include observation of the spectra, lifetime, and production characteristics of charmonium, open charm states, and bottom particle production with both high energy fixed target and {bar p}-p collider facilities. The status of the search for the top quark by the Fermilab collider experiments is updated.

  7. Jet production in muon scattering at Fermilab E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Nucleon deep-inelastic scattering are compared to Monte Carlo model predictions. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a higher suppression of two-forward jets as compared to one-forward jet production.

  8. High luminosity operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar Mishra

    2003-07-15

    Run-II at Fermilab is progressing steadily. In the Run-II scheme, 36 antiproton bunches collide with 36 proton bunches at the CDF and D0 interaction regions in the Tevatron at 980 GeV per beam. The current status and performance of the Fermilab Accelerator complex is reviewed. The plan for Run-II, accelerator upgrades and integration of the Recycler in the accelerator chain will be presented.

  9. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2011-11-23

    The MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is aimed at precision measurements of neutrino interactions in nuclei for energies up to a few GeV. MINER{nu}A makes use of a fine-grained, fully active detector design and a range of nuclear target materials. The experiment began taking data in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab in late 2009 and will collect data in both the neutrino and antineutrino configurations of the beamline.

  10. SUNBURN: A computer code for evaluating the economic viability of hybrid solar central receiver electric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.J.

    1987-06-01

    The computer program SUNBURN simulates the annual performance of solar-only, solar-hybrid, and fuel-only electric power plants. SUNBURN calculates the levelized value of electricity generated by, and the levelized cost of, these plants. Central receiver solar technology is represented, with molten salt as the receiver coolant and thermal storage medium. For each hour of a year, the thermal energy use, or dispatch, strategy of SUNBURN maximizes the value of electricity by operating the turbine when the demand for electricity is greatest and by minimizing overflow of thermal storage. Fuel is burned to augment solar energy if the value of electricity generated by using fuel is greater than the cost of the fuel consumed. SUNBURN was used to determine the optimal power plant configuration, based on value-to-cost ratio, for dates of initial plant operation from 1990 to 1998. The turbine size for all plants was 80 MWe net. Before 1994, fuel-only was found to be the preferred plant configuration. After 1994, a solar-only plant was found to have the greatest value-to-cost ratio. A hybrid configuration was never found to be better than both fuel-only and solar-only configurations. The value of electricity was calculated as The Southern California Edison Company's avoided generation costs of electricity. These costs vary with time of day. Utility ownership of the power plants was assumed. The simulation was performed using weather data recorded in Barstow, California, in 1984.

  11. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study.

    PubMed

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M

    2013-08-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of experimentally acquired morphological and electrical properties of small CNS axons and oligodendrocytes prompted us to incorporate these data into a computer model, with the aim of simulating the effects of focal axon swelling on action potential conduction. A single swelling on an otherwise intact axon, as occurs in optic nerve axons of Cnp1 null mice caused a small decrease in conduction velocity. The presence of single swellings on multiple contiguous internodal regions (INR), as likely occurs in advanced disease, caused qualitatively similar results, except the dimensions of the swellings required to produce equivalent attenuation of conduction were significantly decreased. Our simulations of the consequences of metabolic insult to axons, namely, the appearance of multiple swollen regions, accompanied by perturbation of overlying myelin and increased axolemmal permeability, contained within a single INR, revealed that conduction block occurred when the dimensions of the simulated swellings were within the limits of those measured experimentally, suggesting that multiple swellings on a single axon could contribute to axonal dysfunction, and that increased axolemmal permeability is the decisive factor that promotes conduction block. PMID:24303138

  12. Serial cranial computed-tomography scans in children with leukemia given two different forms of central nervous system therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, J.J.; Parvey, L.S.; Whitaker, J.N.; Bowman, W.P.; Ch'ien, L.; Campbell, M.; Coburn, T.

    1983-12-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) was used to estimate the frequency and permanence of brain abnormalities in 108 consecutive children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Fifty-five patients received cranial irradiation (1,800 rad) with intrathecal methotrexate (RT group) and 53 patients received intravenous and intrathecal methotrexate without irradiation (IVIT group). Continuation treatment included sequential drug pairs for the RT group and periodic IVIT methotrexate for the other group. After 12 to 24 months of serial evaluation, five (9%) of the 55 patients in the RT group have had CT scan abnormalities, compared to 10 (19%) of 52 in the IVIT group (p . 0.171). Fourteen of the 15 patients with CT scan abnormalities had focal or diffuse white-matter hypodensity; these have reverted to normal in most cases, reflecting a dynamic process. While such CT findings are of concern and may be an early indicator of central nervous system toxicity, this remains to be proven. Therapy should not be altered on the basis of abnormal CT scans alone but in the context of the entire clinical situation.

  13. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M

    2013-01-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of experimentally acquired morphological and electrical properties of small CNS axons and oligodendrocytes prompted us to incorporate these data into a computer model, with the aim of simulating the effects of focal axon swelling on action potential conduction. A single swelling on an otherwise intact axon, as occurs in optic nerve axons of Cnp1 null mice caused a small decrease in conduction velocity. The presence of single swellings on multiple contiguous internodal regions (INR), as likely occurs in advanced disease, caused qualitatively similar results, except the dimensions of the swellings required to produce equivalent attenuation of conduction were significantly decreased. Our simulations of the consequences of metabolic insult to axons, namely, the appearance of multiple swollen regions, accompanied by perturbation of overlying myelin and increased axolemmal permeability, contained within a single INR, revealed that conduction block occurred when the dimensions of the simulated swellings were within the limits of those measured experimentally, suggesting that multiple swellings on a single axon could contribute to axonal dysfunction, and that increased axolemmal permeability is the decisive factor that promotes conduction block. PMID:24303138

  14. The influence of central neuropathic pain in paraplegic patients on performance of a motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface☆

    PubMed Central

    Vuckovic, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Osuagwu, B.; Fraser, M.; Allan, D.B.; Conway, B.A.; Nasseroleslami, B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to test how the presence of central neuropathic pain (CNP) influences the performance of a motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface (BCI). Methods In this electroencephalography (EEG) based study, we tested BCI classification accuracy and analysed event related desynchronisation (ERD) in 3 groups of volunteers during imagined movements of their arms and legs. The groups comprised of nine able-bodied people, ten paraplegic patients with CNP (lower abdomen and legs) and nine paraplegic patients without CNP. We tested two types of classifiers: a 3 channel bipolar montage and classifiers based on common spatial patterns (CSPs), with varying number of channels and CSPs. Results Paraplegic patients with CNP achieved higher classification accuracy and had stronger ERD than paraplegic patients with no pain for all classifier configurations. Highest 2-class classification accuracy was achieved for CSP classifier covering wider cortical area: 82 ± 7% for patients with CNP, 82 ± 4% for able-bodied and 78 ± 5% for patients with no pain. Conclusion Presence of CNP improves BCI classification accuracy due to stronger and more distinct ERD. Significance Results of the study show that CNP is an important confounding factor influencing the performance of motor imagery based BCI based on ERD. PMID:25698307

  15. Computer-Enriched Instruction (CEI) Is Better for Preview Material Instead of Review Material: An Example of a Biostatistics Chapter, the Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, Lai-Chu; Huang, Yu-Hsun; Chang, Yi-Hu; Chiu, Yeo-Ju; Chen, Yi-Fen; Napper, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the timing using computer-enriched instruction (CEI), before or after a traditional lecture to determine cross-over effect, period effect, and learning effect arising from sequencing of instruction. A 2 x 2 cross-over design was used with CEI to teach central limit theorem (CLT). Two sequences of graduate students in nursing…

  16. Plans for a proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, R.D.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    , and will certainly have important implications for our understanding of cosmology and the evolution of the early Universe. The current Fermilab Program is an important part of the world-wide accelerator based effort to explore and understand the physics of neutrino oscillations. By early 2005, with both MINOS and MiniBooNE taking data, Fermilab will be able to answer some of the most pressing first-round questions raised by the discovery that neutrinos have mass. Fermilab's high-intensity neutrino beams are derived from 8- and 120-GeV proton beams. MiniBooNE is currently taking data using 8 GeV Protons from the Booster. The 120 GeV NuMI beam will start to operate in early 2005 using a 0.25 MW proton beam power from the Main Injector. Future neutrino programs will build on these existing facilities. New short and long baseline experiments have been proposed. There are proposals to increase the available number of protons at 8 and 120 GeV with the goal of addressing the full range of questions presented by neutrino oscillations. Key to that vision is a new intense proton source that usually is referred to as the Proton Driver.

  17. Longitudinal bunch monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Bhat, C.; Blokland, W.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Flora, R.; Hahn, A.; Hansen, S.; Kiper, T.; et al

    2011-10-17

    The measurement of the longitudinal behavior of the accelerated particle beams at Fermilab is crucial to the optimization and control of the beam and the maximizing of the integrated luminosity for the particle physics experiments. Longitudinal measurements in the Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons are based on the analysis of signals from resistive wall current monitors. This study describes the signal processing performed by a 2 GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope together with a computer running a LabVIEW program which calculates the longitudinal beam parameters.

  18. Compensation of dogleg effect in Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaobiao Huang; Sho Ohnuma

    2003-10-06

    The edge focusing of dogleg magnets in Fermilab Booster has been causing severe distortion to the horizontal linear optics. The doglegs are vertical rectangular bends, therefore the vertical edge focusing is canceled by body focusing and the overall effect is focusing in the horizontal plane. The maximum horizontal beta function is changed from 33.7m to 46.9m and maximum dispersion from 3.19m to 6.14m. Beam size increases accordingly. This is believed to be one of the major reasons of beam loss. In this technote we demonstrate that this effect can be effectively corrected with Booster's quadrupole correctors in short straight sections (QS). There are 24 QS correctors which can alter horizontal linear optics with negligible perturbation to the vertical plane. The currents of correctors are determined by harmonic compensation, i.e., cancellation of dogleg's harmonics that are responsible for the distortion with that of QS correctors. By considering a few leading harmonics, the ideal lattice can be partly restored. For the current dogleg layout, maximum {beta}{sub x} is reduced to 40.6m and maximum D{sub x} is reduced to 4.19m. This scheme can be useful after the dogleg in section No.3 is repositioned. In this case it can bring {beta}{sub x} from 40.9m down to 37.7m, D{sub x} from 4.57m to 4.01m.

  19. Pixel multichip module development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Turqueti, M A; Cardoso, G; Andresen, J; Appel, J A; Christian, D C; Kwan, S W; Prosser, A; Uplegger, L

    2005-10-01

    At Fermilab, there is an ongoing pixel detector R&D effort for High Energy Physics with the objective of developing high performance vertex detectors suitable for the next generation of HEP experiments. The pixel module presented here is a direct result of work undertaken for the canceled BTeV experiment. It is a very mature piece of hardware, having many characteristics of high performance, low mass and radiation hardness driven by the requirements of the BTeV experiment. The detector presented in this paper consists of three basic devices; the readout integrated circuit (IC) FPIX2A [2][5], the pixel sensor (TESLA p-spray) [6] and the high density interconnect (HDI) flex circuit [1][3] that is capable of supporting eight readout ICs. The characterization of the pixel multichip module prototype as well as the baseline design of the eight chip pixel module and its capabilities are presented. These prototypes were characterized for threshold and noise dispersion. The bump-bonds of the pixel module were examined using an X-ray inspection system. Furthermore, the connectivity of the bump-bonds was tested using a radioactive source ({sup 90}Sr), while the absolute calibration of the modules was achieved using an X-ray source. This paper provides a view of the integration of the three components that together comprise the pixel multichip module.

  20. Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab ASTA

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, D.; Edstrom, D. R.; Piot, P.; Rush, W.; Sen, T.

    2015-06-01

    Electron beams with moderate energy ranging from 4 to 50 MeV can be used to produce x-rays through the Channeling Radiation (CR) mechanism. Typically, the xray spectrum from these sources extends up to 140 keV and this range covers the demand for most practical applications. The parameters of the electron beam determine the spectral brilliance of the x-ray source. The electron beam produced at the Fermilab new facility Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) meets the requirements to assemble an experimental high brilliance CR xray source. In the first stage of the experiment the energy of the beam is 20 MeV and due to the very low emittance ($\\approx 100$ nm ) at low bunch charge (20 pC) the expected average brilliance of the x-ray source is about $10^9$ photons/[s- $(mm-mrad)^2$-0.1% BW]. In the second stage of the experiment the beam energy will be increased to 50 MeV and consequently the average brilliance will increase by a factor of five. Also, the x-ray spectrum will extend from about 30 keV to 140 keV

  1. Charm hadroproduction results from Fermilab E-400

    SciTech Connect

    Coteus, P.; Binkley, M.; Bossi, F.; Butler, J.; Cumalat, J.P.; DiCorato, M.; Diesburg, M.; Enagonio, J.; Filaseta, J.; Frabetti, P.L.

    1987-09-01

    Results are presented from Fermilab E-400 on the production of charmed baryons and mesons at a mean energy of 640 GeV. We show evidence for the charm-strange baryon, ..xi../sub c//sup +/, and present our measurements of its mass, width, lifetime, cross section and relative branching fractions, and the A, x/sub f/, p/sub t/, and particle/antiparticle dependence of the state. We show evidence for both the ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ and ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, and present measurements of three mass differences, ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/, and ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/. Measurements of the A dependence and particle/antiparticle ratios for ..sigma../sub c/ production are also presented. We show preliminary results on the ratio of two decay modes of the D/sup 0/, D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/ and D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sub 0/anti K/sub 0/. The latter mode has not been previously observed. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Tests of cold helium compressors at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.J.; Fuerst, J.D.

    1987-10-01

    Fermilab has tested two cold helium compressors for possible installation in the satellite refrigerator buildings of the Tevatron cryogenic system. Operating conditions required to obtain an overall Tevatron energy upgrade from 900 to 1000 GeV are (for each of 24 machines): 52 g/s mass flow rate, 0.7 atm inlet pressure, 1.4 atm exhaust pressure. Acceptable efficiency is in the 60% range. Both Creare, Inc., and Cryogenic Consultants, Inc. (CCI), have supplied units for evaluation. The Creare machine is a high speed centrifugal pump/compressor which yielded 60% adiabatic efficiency (including an approximately 20 watt heat leak) with a 1.0 atm inlet pressure and 55 g/s flow rate. Certain mechanical difficulties were present, chiefly the device's inability to withstand two-phase flow. CCI supplied a reciprocating unit which, after initial testing and modification, achieved 59% efficiency with an approximate 35 watt heat leak at a 0.7 atm inlet pressure and 48 g/s flow rate. Although the device lacks the smooth, quiet operating characteristics of a turbomachine, it has endured mechanically throughout testing and is entirely insensitive to two-phase flow.

  3. Recycler lattice for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Meiqin; Johnson, David E.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Project X is an intense proton source that provides beam for various physics programs. The source consists of an 8 GeV H- superconducting linac that injects into the Fermilab Recycler where H- are converted to protons. Protons are provided to the Main Injector and accelerated to desired energy (in the range 60-120 GeV) or extracted from the Recycler for the 8 GeV program. A long drift space is needed to accommodate the injection chicane with stripping foils. The Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring using permanent gradient magnets. A phase trombone straight section is used to control the tunes. In this paper, the existing FODO lattice in RR10 straight section being converted into doublet will be described. Due to this change, the phase trombone straight section has to be modified to bring the tunes to the nominal working point. A toy lattice of recycler ring is designed to simulate the end-shim effects of each permanent gradient magnet to add the flexibility to handle the tune shift to the lattice during the operation of 1.6E14 with KV distribution of the proton beam to give {approx}0.05 of space charge tune shift. The comparison or the combinations of the two modification ways for the Recycler ring lattice will be presented also in this paper.

  4. Momentum Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Drennan, C.; Pellico, W.A.; Triplett, K.; Waller, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Booster has an upgrade plan called the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The flux throughput goal is 2E17 protons/hour which, is almost double the present flux, 1.1E17 protons/hour. The beam loss in the machine is going to be an issue. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV and extracts to the Main Injector (MI). The current cogging process synchronizes the extraction kicker gap to the MI by changing radial position of the beam during the cycle. The gap creation occurs at about 700 MeV, which is about 6 ms into the cycle. The cycle-to-cycle variations of the Booster are larger at lower energy. However, changing the radial position at low energy for cogging is limited because of aperture. Momentum cogging is able to move the gap creation to an earlier time by using dipole correctors and radial position feedback, and is able to control the revolution frequency and radial position at the same time. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss and not be limited by aperture. The progress of the momentum cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  5. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  6. Sonic Helium Detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  7. First Data from the Fermilab Drift Scan Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Chris; Annis, Jim; Kent, Steve; Kron, Richard; Loveday, Jonathan; McKay, Tim; Newberg, Heidi

    1994-05-01

    The Fermilab Drift Scan Camera contains a single Tektronix/SITe 2048(2) CCD and serves as a prototype for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The camera is on the 41'' reflector at Yerkes Observatory. We have completed a section of a great circle survey near the celestial equator, 8h long and 20(') wide, using four filters which approximate the colors V, R, I, and z(') . The last color, z(') , is centered at 9250 Angstroms with FWHM of 1450 Angstroms, and will be used in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The effective exposure time of 80 seconds gives a limiting magnitude of 20 in I. By tuning the detection parameters (# connected pixels, and significance above sky) we detect low surface brightness objects (central surface brightness of 21 mag/arcsec(2) in I) and reject noise. We measure isophotal magnitude to a surface brightness of 24.5 mag/arcsec(2) in I, aperture magnitude, radial profiles, and weighted moments in each color. The object finding and measuring software is specific to the Drift Scan Camera, although the ``framework'' software (FITS i/o, storing object parameters, etc.) and commercial object oriented database (Versant) are those used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Thus, tools for data analysis which we develop let us see how to handle the similar, but significantly more volumnious, Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The photometric calibration is from Landolt standard stars, and we then compare to objects in the HST Guide Star Catalog to check the photometry and calibrate the astrometry. Repeated scans on sections of the survey check the calibrations. These data allow us to study the global properties of stars and galaxies in the 40 square degrees of our survey, free from systematic biases inherent in large-angle photographic surveys.

  8. Archiving Scientific Data Outside of the Traditional HEP Domain, Using the Archive Facilities at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A.; Diesbug, M.; Gheith, M.; Illingworth, R.; Mengel, M.

    2015-12-01

    Many experiments in the HEP and Astrophysics communities generate large extremely valuable datasets, which need to be efficiently cataloged and recorded to archival storage. These datasets, both new and legacy, are often structured in a manner that is not conducive to storage and cataloging with modern data handling systems and large file archive facilities. In this paper we discuss in detail how we have created a robust toolset and simple portal into the Fermilab archive facilities, which allows for scientific data to be quickly imported, organized and retrieved from the multi-petabyte facility. In particular we discuss how the data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) for the COUPP dark matter detector was aggregated, cataloged, archived and re-organized to permit it to be retrieved and analyzed using modern distributed computing resources both at Fermilab and on the Open Science Grid. We pay particular attention to the methods that were employed to uniquify the namespaces for the data, derive metadata for the over 460,000 image series taken by the COUP experiment and what was required to map that information into coherent datasets that could be stored and retrieved using the large scale archives systems. We describe the data transfer and cataloging engines that are used for data importation and how these engines have been setup to import data from the data acquisition systems of ongoing experiments at non-Fermilab remote sites including the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and the Ash River Laboratory in Orr, Minnesota. We also describe how large University computing sites around the world are using the system to store and retrieve large volumes of simulation and experiment data for physics analysis.

  9. A multi-purpose computing center: FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Fermilab Computing Center is described with a special emphasis given to the scientific computing systems and the data storage and archiving systems. The scope and focus of this paper is the Fermilab scientific computing facility. It does not cover, or does not cover very well, related issues such as data Grids, cloud computing and storage, commercial storage, data integrity, authorization, access rates, and novel storage technologies. These are all important considerations in discussing data centers and should be kept in mind when one explores issues related to computing centers and long-term data storage.

  10. Physics at an upgraded proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Geer

    2004-07-28

    The accelerator-based particle physics program in the US is entering a period of transition. This is particularly true at Fermilab which for more than two decades has been the home of the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider, the World's highest energy hadron collider. In a few years time the energy frontier will move to the LHC at CERN. Hence, if an accelerator-based program is to survive at Fermilab, it must evolve. Fermilab is fortunate in that, in addition to hosting the Tevatron Collider, the laboratory also hosts the US accelerator-based neutrino program. The recent discovery that neutrino flavors oscillate has opened a new exciting world for us to explore, and has created an opportunity for the Fermilab accelerator complex to continue to address the cutting-edge questions of particle physics beyond the Tevatron Collider era. The presently foreseen neutrino oscillation experiments at Fermilab (MiniBooNE [1] and MINOS [2]) will enable the laboratory to begin contributing to the Global oscillation physics program in the near future, and will help us better understand the basic parameters describing the oscillations. However, this is only a first step. To be able to pin down all of the oscillation parameters, and hopefully make new discoveries along the way, we will need high statistics experiments, which will require a very intense neutrino beam, and one or more very massive detectors. In particular we will require new MW-scale primary proton beams and perhaps ultimately a Neutrino Factory [3]. Plans to upgrade the Fermilab Proton Driver are presently being developed [4]. The upgrade project would replace the Fermilab Booster with a new 8 GeV accelerator with 0.5-2 MW beam power, a factor of 15-60 more than the current Booster. It would also make the modifications needed to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) to upgrade it to simultaneously provide 120 GeV beams of 2 MW. This would enable a factor of 5-10 increase in neutrino beam intensities at the MI, while also

  11. Fermilab: The Ring of the Frontier, 1967-1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Adrienne W.

    2009-05-01

    Fermilab, the home of the highest energy hadron accelerator in the world, has been at the frontier of high energy physics for almost forty years. Between 1967, when the Lab was founded in a suburb of Chicago by Robert R. Wilson, Edwin L. Goldwasser, and Norman F. Ramsey, and 1989, the final year of Leon M. Lederman's administration, Fermilab was the premiere proton facility for experimental particle physics in the US. Wilson's era saw the construction and achievement of the 200-500 billion electron volts (BeV) Main Ring. Lederman led Fermilab into the next frontier with the superconducting Energy Doubler/Saver, renamed the Tevatron for its design energy of one trillion electron volts (TeV). In the 1980s-1990s, as construction of facilities became more complex and experiments grew larger and took a generation to complete, how could the costs be met without even more careful long-term planning and budgeting? Why did Fermilab's accelerator complex advance while others did not? What role, if any, did politics play? What can be learned from Fermilab's experience about maintaining US involvement at the forefront of 21st century particle physics research?

  12. QA (quality assurance) at Fermilab; the hermeneutics of NQA-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-06-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and a historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics.

  13. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  14. Fermilab's multi-petabyte scalable mass storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Oleynik, Gene; Alcorn, Bonnie; Baisley, Wayne; Bakken, Jon; Berg, David; Berman, Eileen; Huang, Chih-Hao; Jones, Terry; Kennedy, Robert D.; Kulyavtsev, Alexander; Moibenko, Alexander; Perelmutov, Timur; Petravick, Don; Podstavkov, Vladimir; Szmuksta, George; Zalokar, Michael; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Fermilab provides a multi-Petabyte scale mass storage system for High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments and other scientific endeavors. We describe the scalability aspects of the hardware and software architecture that were designed into the Mass Storage System to permit us to scale to multiple petabytes of storage capacity, manage tens of terabytes per day in data transfers, support hundreds of users, and maintain data integrity. We discuss in detail how we scale the system over time to meet the ever-increasing needs of the scientific community, and relate our experiences with many of the technical and economic issues related to scaling the system. Since the 2003 MSST conference, the experiments at Fermilab have generated more than 1.9 PB of additional data. We present results on how this system has scaled and performed for the Fermilab CDF and D0 Run II experiments as well as other HEP experiments and scientific endeavors.

  15. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  16. 6 Batch Injection and Slipped Beam Tune Measurements in Fermilab?s Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yan, M.-J.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    During NOVA operations it is planned to run the Fermilab Recycler in a 12 batch slip stacking mode. In preparation for this, measurements of the tune during a six batch injection and then as the beam is decelerated by changing the RF frequency have been carried out in the Main Injector. The coherent tune shifts due to the changing beam intensity were measured and compared well with the theoretically expected tune shift. The tune shifts due to changing RF frequency, required for slip stacking, also compare well with the linear theory, although some nonlinear affects are apparent at large frequency changes. These results give us confidence that the expected tunes shifts during 12 batch slip stacking Recycler operations can be accommodated.

  17. Secondary Electron Yield Measurements of Fermilab?s Main Injector Vacuum Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Duel, K.L.; Zwaska, R.M.; Greenwald, S.; Hartung, W.; Li, Y.; Moore, T.P.; Palmer, M.A.; Kirby, R.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the progress made on a new installation in Fermilab's Main Injector that will help investigate the electron cloud phenomenon by making direct measurements of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of samples irradiated in the accelerator. In the Project X upgrade the Main Injector will have its beam intensity increased by a factor of three compared to current operations. This may result in the beam being subject to instabilities from the electron cloud. Measured SEY values can be used to further constrain simulations and aid our extrapolation to Project X intensities. The SEY test-stand, developed in conjunction with Cornell and SLAC, is capable of measuring the SEY from samples using an incident electron beam when the samples are biased at different voltages. We present the design and manufacture of the test-stand and the results of initial laboratory tests on samples prior to installation.

  18. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  19. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  20. The new (g-2)mu experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Brendan C.K.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We present a proposal to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon to 0.14 ppm precision. This new g-2 experiment will be hosted by Fermilab making use of minor modifications to the existing accelerator complex. The experiment will recycle several components from the previous g-2 experiment E821 hosted at Brookhaven. In particular, the entire storage ring and magnet will be shipped to Fermilab. We cover the motivation for the experiment and review the measurement technique. We then focus on a new in-vacuo straw tracking system planned for the new experiment and its impact on searching for a permanent electric dipole moment of the muon.

  1. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  2. The NuMI Neutrino Beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Sacha E.

    2005-06-08

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab is due to begin operations in late 2004. NuMI will deliver an intense v{mu} beam of variable energy 2-20 GeV directed into the Earth at 58 mrad for short ({approx}1 km) and long ({approx}700-900 km) baseline experiments. Several aspects of the design are reviewed, as are potential upgrade requirements to the facility in the event a Proton Driver is built at Fermilab to enhance the neutrino flux.

  3. Fermilab Recycler Ring: Technical design report. Revision 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the technical design of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. The purpose of the Recycler is to augment the luminosity increase anticipated from the implementation of the Fermi III upgrade project, which has as its main component the Fermilab Main Injector construction project. The Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring. It is located in the Main Injector tunnel directly above the Main Injector beamline, near the ceiling. The construction schedule calls for the installation of the Recycler ring before the installation shutdown of the Main Injector. This aggressive construction schedule is made possible by the exclusive use of permanent magnets in the ring lattice, removing the need for expensive conventional iron/copper magnet construction along with the related power supplies, cooling water system, and electrical safety systems. The location, operating energy, and mode of construction are chosen to minimize operational impacts on both Fermilab`s ongoing High Energy Physics program and the Main Injector construction project.

  4. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.; Kerns, C.; Kerns, Q.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Tawzer, S.; Wildman, D.

    1987-03-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for the accelration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented.

  5. Improvements in bunch coalescing in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.; Meisner, K.G.; Wildman, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    This paper discusses the improvements in the performance of the bunch coalescing operation in the Fermilab Main Ring which have resulted in increased efficiency and the capability to produce bunches containing more than 10/sup 11/ protons. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Beam storage studies in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1982-05-06

    Bunched beams of 100 and 150 GeV have been stored in the Fermilab Main Ring for periods of up to one hour. The observations of beam current and beam profiles are analyzed for the effects of gas scattering, chromaticity and non-linear magnetic field.

  7. Beam-storage studies in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1982-05-06

    Bunched beams of 100 and 150 GeV have been stored in the Fermilab Main Ring for periods of up to one hour. The observations of beam current and beam profiles are analyzed for the effects of gas scattering, chromaticity and non-linear magnetic field.

  8. Fast Transverse Instability and Electron Cloud Measurements in Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Eddy, Nathan; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton; Thangaraj, Jayakar; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zwaska, Robert; Ji, Yichen

    2015-03-01

    A new transverse instability is observed that may limit the proton intensity in the Fermilab Recycler. The instability is fast, leading to a beam-abort loss within two hundred turns. The instability primarily affects the first high-intensity batch from the Fermilab Booster in each Recycler cycle. This paper analyzes the dynamical features of the destabilized beam. The instability excites a horizontal betatron oscillation which couples into the vertical motion and also causes transverse emittance growth. This paper describes the feasibility of electron cloud as the mechanism for this instability and presents the first measurements of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Recycler. Direct measurements of the electron cloud are made using a retarding field analyzer (RFA) newly installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Indirect measurements of the electron cloud are made by propagating a microwave carrier signal through the beampipe and analyzing the phase modulation of the signal. The maximum betatron amplitude growth and the maximum electron cloud signal occur during minimums of the bunch length oscillation.

  9. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed.

  10. Performance and Upgrades of the Fermilab Accumulator Stacktail Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P. F.; Cullerton, Ed; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Sun Ding; Tinsley, David

    2006-03-20

    We report on the performance and planned upgrades to the Fermilab Accumulator Stacktail Stochastic Cooling System. The current system has achieved a maximum flux of 16.5e10/hour, limited by the input flux of antiprotons. The upgrades are designed to handle flux in excess of 40e10/hour.

  11. Performance and upgrades of the Fermilab Accumulator stacktail stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; Cullerton, Ed; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Sun, Ding; Tinsley, David; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We report on the performance and planned upgrades to the Fermilab Accumulator Stacktail Stochastic Cooling System. The current system has achieved a maximum flux of 16.5e10/hour, limited by the input flux of antiprotons. The upgrades are designed to handle flux in excess of 40e10/hour.

  12. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  13. Lattice QCD production on commodity clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D. Holmgren et al.

    2003-09-30

    We describe the construction and results to date of Fermilab's three Myrinet-networked lattice QCD production clusters (an 80-node dual Pentium III cluster, a 48-node dual Xeon cluster, and a 128-node dual Xeon cluster). We examine a number of aspects of performance of the MILC lattice QCD code running on these clusters.

  14. MINERvA Detector ConstructionTimelapse at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-01

    This is a short timelapse of one day of construction of the MINERvA detector located at Fermilab, approximately 375 feet below the ground. This sequence was shot at 5 minute intervals from 6:00 am until 11:00 pm on April 6, 2009.

  15. A search for disoriented chiral condensate at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    A small test/experiment at the Fermilab Collider which measures charged particle and photon multiplicities in the forward direction, {eta} {approx} 4.1, has been carried out, with the primary goal being the search for disoriented chiral condensate (DCC). The author describes the experiment and analysis methods, together with preliminary results.

  16. Using Centrality of Concept Maps as a Measure of Problem Space States in Computer-Supported Collaborative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Engelmann, Tanja; Yu, Wu

    2013-01-01

    Problem solving likely involves at least two broad stages, problem space representation and then problem solution (Newell and Simon, Human problem solving, 1972). The metric centrality that Freeman ("Social Networks" 1:215-239, 1978) implemented in social network analysis is offered here as a potential measure of both. This development research…

  17. Two decades of Mexican particle physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Rubinstein

    2002-12-03

    This report is a view from Fermilab of Mexican particle physics at the Laboratory since about 1980; it is not intended to be a history of Mexican particle physics: that topic is outside the expertise of the writer. The period 1980 to the present coincides with the growth of Mexican experimental particle physics from essentially no activity to its current state where Mexican groups take part in experiments at several of the world's major laboratories. Soon after becoming Fermilab director in 1979, Leon Lederman initiated a program to encourage experimental physics, especially experimental particle physics, in Latin America. At the time, Mexico had significant theoretical particle physics activity, but none in experiment. Following a visit by Lederman to UNAM in 1981, a conference ''Panamerican Symposium on Particle Physics and Technology'' was held in January 1982 at Cocoyoc, Mexico, with about 50 attendees from Europe, North America, and Latin America; these included Lederman, M. Moshinsky, J. Flores, S. Glashow, J. Bjorken, and G. Charpak. Among the conference outcomes were four subsequent similar symposia over the next decade, and a formal Fermilab program to aid Latin American physics (particularly particle physics); it also influenced a decision by Mexican physicist Clicerio Avilez to switch from theoretical to experimental particle physics. The first physics collaboration between Fermilab and Mexico was in particle theory. Post-docs Rodrigo Huerta and Jose Luis Lucio spent 1-2 years at Fermilab starting in 1981, and other theorists (including Augusto Garcia, Arnulfo Zepeda, Matias Moreno and Miguel Angel Perez) also spent time at the Laboratory in the 1980s.

  18. Morphometric differences between central vs. surface acini in A/J mice using high-resolution micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kizhakke Puliyakote, Abhilash S; Vasilescu, Dragoş M; Newell, John D; Wang, Ge; Weibel, Ewald R; Hoffman, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Through interior tomography, high-resolution microcomputed tomography (μCT) systems provide the ability to nondestructively assess the pulmonary acinus at micron and submicron resolutions. With the application of systematic uniform random sampling (SURS) principles applied to in situ fixed, intact, ex vivo lungs, we have sought to characterize morphometric differences in central vs. surface acini to better understand how well surface acini reflect global acinar geometry. Lungs from six mice (A/J strain, 15-20 wk of age) were perfusion fixed in situ and imaged using a multiresolution μCT system (Micro XCT 400, Zeiss). With the use of lower-resolution whole lung images, SURS methods were used for identification of central and surface foci for high-resolution imaging. Acinar morphometric metrics included diameters, lengths, and branching angles for each alveolar duct and total path lengths from entrance of the acinus to the terminal alveolar sacs. In addition, acinar volume, alveolar surface area, and surface area/volume ratios were assessed. A generation-based analysis demonstrated that central acini have significantly smaller branch diameters at each generation with no significant increase in branch lengths. In addition to larger-diameter alveolar ducts, surface acini had significantly increased numbers of branches and terminal alveolar sacs. The total path lengths from the acinar entrance to the terminal nodes were found to be higher in the case of surface acini. Volumes and surface areas of surface acini are greater than central acini, but there were no differences in surface/volume ratios. In conclusion, there are significant structural differences between surface and central acini in the A/J mouse. PMID:27174924

  19. User's manual for DELSOL2: a computer code for calculating the optical performance and optimal system design for solar-thermal central-receiver plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dellin, T.A.; Fish, M.J.; Yang, C.L.

    1981-08-01

    DELSOL2 is a revised and substantially extended version of the DELSOL computer program for calculating collector field performance and layout, and optimal system design for solar thermal central receiver plants. The code consists of a detailed model of the optical performance, a simpler model of the non-optical performance, an algorithm for field layout, and a searching algorithm to find the best system design. The latter two features are coupled to a cost model of central receiver components and an economic model for calculating energy costs. The code can handle flat, focused and/or canted heliostats, and external cylindrical, multi-aperture cavity, and flat plate receivers. The program optimizes the tower height, receiver size, field layout, heliostat spacings, and tower position at user specified power levels subject to flux limits on the receiver and land constraints for field layout. The advantages of speed and accuracy characteristic of Version I are maintained in DELSOL2.

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    , as well as two banquets held at the Grand Hotel and Grand Formosa Regent in Taipei. The next CHEP conference will be held in New York, the United States on 21-25 May 2012. We would like to thank the National Science Council of Taiwan, the EU ACEOLE project, commercial sponsors, and the International Advisory Committee and the Programme Committee members for all their support and help. Special thanks to the Programme Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing about 340 post conference proceedings papers. Simon C Lin CHEP 2010 Conference Chair and Proceedings Editor Taipei, Taiwan November 2011 Track Editors/ Programme Committee Chair Simon C Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Online Computing Track Y H Chang, National Central University, Taiwan Harry Cheung, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Event Processing Track Fabio Cossutti, INFN Trieste, Italy Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, USA Ryosuke Itoh, KEK, Japan Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases Track Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Stefan Roiser, CERN, Switzerland Distributed Processing and Analysis Track Kai-Feng Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Ulrik Egede, Imperial College London, UK Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Fons Rademakers, CERN, Switzerland Torre Wenaus, BNL, USA Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies Track Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Bernd Panzer-Steindel, CERN, Switzerland Antonio Wong, BNL, USA Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Grid and Cloud Middleware Track Alberto Di Meglio, CERN, Switzerland Markus Schulz, CERN, Switzerland Collaborative Tools Track Joao Correia Fernandes, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Galvez, Caltech, USA Milos Lokajicek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic International Advisory Committee Chair: Simon C. Lin , Academia Sinica, Taiwan Members: Mohammad Al-Turany , FAIR, Germany Sunanda Banerjee, Fermilab, USA Dario Barberis, CERN

  1. Recent Results from Fermilab E690

    SciTech Connect

    Berisso, M.C.; Christian, D.C.; Felix, J.; Gara, A.; Gottschalk, E.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartouni, E.P.; Knapp, B.C.; Kreisler, M.N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M.A.; Sosa, M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wehmann, A.; Wesson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Partial wave analysis results of centrally produced mesons in the reaction pp {yields} P{sub slow}(X)P{sub fast}, with 800 GeV/c protons incident on a liquid hydrogen target are presented. In the reactions considered in this paper the (X) system decays into: a) K{sup 0}{sub s}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, b) K{sub s}K{sub s}, and c) {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}.

  2. Computational approaches to the prediction of blood-brain barrier permeability: A comparative analysis of central nervous system drugs versus secretase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rishton, Gilbert M; LaBonte, Kristen; Williams, Antony J; Kassam, Karim; Kolovanov, Eduard

    2006-05-01

    This review summarizes progress made in the development of fully computational approaches to the prediction of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of small molecules, with a focus on rapid computational methods suitable for the analysis of large compound sets and virtual screening. A comparative analysis using the recently developed Advanced Chemistry Development (ACD/Labs) Inc BBB permeability algorithm for the calculation of logBB values for known Alzheimer's disease medicines, selected central nervous system drugs and new secretase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease, is presented. The trends in logBB values and the associated physiochemical properties of these agents as they relate to the potential for BBB permeability are also discussed. PMID:16729726

  3. Unifying model of carpal mechanics based on computationally derived isometric constraints and rules-based motion - the stable central column theory.

    PubMed

    Sandow, M J; Fisher, T J; Howard, C Q; Papas, S

    2014-05-01

    This study was part of a larger project to develop a (kinetic) theory of carpal motion based on computationally derived isometric constraints. Three-dimensional models were created from computed tomography scans of the wrists of ten normal subjects and carpal spatial relationships at physiological motion extremes were assessed. Specific points on the surface of the various carpal bones and the radius that remained isometric through range of movement were identified. Analysis of the isometric constraints and intercarpal motion suggests that the carpus functions as a stable central column (lunate-capitate-hamate-trapezoid-trapezium) with a supporting lateral column (scaphoid), which behaves as a 'two gear four bar linkage'. The triquetrum functions as an ulnar translation restraint, as well as controlling lunate flexion. The 'trapezoid'-shaped trapezoid places the trapezium anterior to the transverse plane of the radius and ulna, and thus rotates the principal axis of the central column to correspond to that used in the 'dart thrower's motion'. This study presents a forward kinematic analysis of the carpus that provides the basis for the development of a unifying kinetic theory of wrist motion based on isometric constraints and rules-based motion. PMID:24072199

  4. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  5. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.; Guo, Y.; Jetton, R.; Kovich, S.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kumar, A.; Litvintsev, D.; Lueking, L.; Stanfield, N.; Trumbo, J.; Vittone-Wiersma, M.; White, S.P.; Wicklund, E.; Yasuda, T.; Maksimovic, P.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-12-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databases used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described.

  6. Test results of LHC interaction regions quadrupoles produced by Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Chichili, D.R.; Feher, S.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, A.; Nicol, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Rabehl, R.; Robotham, W.; Scanlan, R.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Strait, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The US-LHC Accelerator Project is responsible for the production of the Q2 optical elements of the final focus triplets in the LHC interaction regions. As part of this program Fermilab is in the process of manufacturing and testing cryostat assemblies (LQXB) containing two identical quadrupoles (MQXB) with a dipole corrector between them. The 5.5 m long Fermilab designed MQXB have a 70 mm aperture and operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K with a peak field gradient of 215 T/m. This paper summarizes the test results of several production MQXB quadrupoles with emphasis on quench performance and alignment studies. Quench localization studies using quench antenna signals are also presented.

  7. Impedances and beam stability issues of the Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1996-04-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (permanent magnets) will be built on top of the Fermilab Main Injector sharing the same tunnel; its main function is to recycle the anti-protons after a store in the Tevatron and to provide storage for them after after accumulation and cooling in the Accumulator. Estimates of coupling impedances show domination by space charge. Examination of longitudinal instabilities shows that microwave instability will not occur if there are only N = 2.53 x 10{sup 12} anti-protons in the beam. Longitudinal coupling-bunch instability during injection stacking does not appear possible because of long bunch lengths/short bunch gaps and lack of sharp resonances. Transverse instability, on the other hand, cannot be Landau damped by the momentum spread in the beam, but it can be cured by a small spread in the betatron tunes (either from space charge or an octupole).

  8. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  9. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  10. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.

    2014-01-29

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  11. Indo-U.S. Collaborative efforts at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran

    2000-04-01

    The history of collaborative efforts at Fermilab by Indian institutions is reviewed. Beginning in the 1980's there has been a growing participation at Fermilab experiments by Indian Universities and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). These experiments included both fixed target experiments and the Tevatron collider experiment, D0. Following the nuclear tests in 1998 by India and Pakistan, a ban on collaborative efforts with TIFR was instituted by the Department of Energy, which has only recently been rescinded. In January 1999, 8 physicists from DoE funded national laboratories were not granted travel authorization to attend a High Energy Physics conference held at TIFR, which was well attended by U.S. University physicists. The implications of these restrictions are discussed and suggestions are made to help protect scientific freedoms in the future.

  12. Mechanical stability study of capture cavity II at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Problematic resonant conditions at both 18 Hz and 180 Hz were encountered and identified early during the commissioning of Capture Cavity II (CC2) at Fermilab. CC2 consists of an external vacuum vessel and a superconducting high gradient (close to 25 MV/m) 9-cell 1.3 GHz niobium cavity, transported from DESY for use in the A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab. An ANSYS modal finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to isolate the source of the resonance and directed the effort towards stabilization. Using a fast piezoelectric tuner to excite (or shake) the cavity at different frequencies (from 5 Hz to 250 Hz) at a low-range sweep for analysis purposes. Both warm (300 K) and cold (1.8 K) accelerometer measurements at the cavity were taken as the resonant ''fix'' was applied. FEA results, cultural and technical noise investigation, and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  13. Search for disoriented chiral condensate at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, T. C.; Convery, M. E.; Davis, W. L.; Del Signore, K. W.; Jenkins, T. L.; Kangas, E.; Knepley, M. G.; Kowalski, K. L.; Taylor, C. C.; Oh, S. H.

    2000-02-01

    We present results from MiniMax (Fermilab T-864), a small test/experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron designed to search for the production of a disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) in p-p(bar sign) collisions at {radical}(s)=1.8 TeV in the forward direction, {approx}3.4<{eta}<{approx}4.2. Data, consisting of 1.3x10{sup 6} events, are analyzed using the robust observables developed in an earlier paper. The results are consistent with generic, binomial-distribution partition of pions into charged and neutral species. Limits on DCC production in various models are presented. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Activities at Fermilab related to collider present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderre, G. P.; Holt, J.

    1992-11-01

    The long-range Fermilab program requires fully capitalizing on the world's highest energy accelerator, the Tevatron, throughout the decade of the 90's. The program calls for increasing the collider luminosity with each successive run until peak luminosities of ≳5×1031 cm-2 s-1 and integrated luminosities of ≳100 pb-1 per run are achieved, effectively doubling the mass range accessible for discovery. If the quark lies at the upper range of the mass of the Tevatron, then increasing the energy of the collider operation could prove to be a crucial factor in the future program as well. In order to achieve these goals, we present a highly challenging upgrade of the present accelerator complex, called Fermilab III. In order to increase this performance level by a factor of 50, many changes are needed. Such a plan, of necessity, has modifications in almost all areas of the accelerator as the present system is reasonably optimized. (AIP)

  15. Hybrid centralized pre-computing/local distributed optimization of shared disjoint-backup path approach to GMPLS optical mesh network intelligent restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Qian; Xu, Rong; Lin, Jintong

    2004-04-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) networks that route optical connections using intelligent optical cross-connects (OXCs) is firmly established as the core constituent of next generation networks. Rapid failure recovery is fundamental to building reliable transport networks. Mesh restoration promises cost effective failure recovery compared with legacy ring networks, and is now seeing large-scale deployment. Many carriers are migrating away from SONET ring restoration for their core transport networks and replacing it with mesh restoration through "intelligent" O-E-O cross-connects (XC). The mesh restoration is typically provided via two fiber-disjoint paths: a service path and a restoration path. this scheme can restore any single link failure or node failure. And by used shared mesh restoration, although every service route is assigned a restoration route, no dedicated capacity needs to be reserved for the restoration route, resulting in capacity savings. The restoration approach we propose is Centralized Pre-computing, Local Distributed Optimization, and Shared Disjoint-backup Path. This approach combines the merits of centralized and distributed solutions. It avoids the scalability issues of centralized solutions by using a distributed control plane for disjoint service path computation and restoration path provisioning. Moreover, if the service routes of two demands are disjoint, no single failure will affect both demands simultaneously. This means that the restoration routes of these two demands can share link capacities, because these two routes will not be activated at the same time. So we can say, this restoration capacity sharing approach achieves low restoration capacity and fast restoration speed, while requiring few control plane changes.

  16. Fermilab's Booster Correction Element Power Supply Silicon Temperature Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Krafczyk, G.; Jensen, C.; Pfeffer, H.; Warchol, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Fermilab is in the process of upgrading its Booster Correction Element System to include full field correction element magnets to correct position and chromaticity throughout the booster cycle. For good reliability of the switchmode power supplies designed to power the magnets, it is important to limit both the maximum temperature and the repetitive temperature cycling of the silicon junctions of the switching elements. We will describe how we measured these parameters and the results of our measurements.

  17. Ancient Fermilab: The Mier Collection of Native American Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wiant, Michael D.

    2002-09-25

    August Mier's collection of artifacts from Fermilab property and elsewhere in the Fox River valley provides perspective on ancient lifeways in this area. This slide-illustrated lecture explores the development of Native American culture in the region and how archaeologists use technology developed in other fields to explore the past. From hunting now-extinct Ice-Age mastodon to the development of agriculture, the history of Native American culture sheds light on the development of humanity in general.

  18. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.

  19. Magnetic performance of new Fermilab high gradient quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Gourlay, S.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Mokhtarani, A.; Riddiford, A.

    1991-05-01

    For the Fermilab Tevatron low beta insertions installed in 1990--1991 as part of a luminosity upgrade there were built approximately 35 superconducting cold iron quadrupoles utilizing a two layer cos 2{theta} coil geometry with 76 mm diameter aperature. The field harmonics and strengths of these magnets obtained by measurement at cryogenic conditions are presented. Evidence for a longitudinal periodic structure in the remnant field is shown. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. A transitionless lattice for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Trbojevic, D. ); Lee, S.Y. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-05-01

    Medium energy (1 to 30 GeV) accelerators are often confronted with transition crossing during acceleration. A lattice without transition is presented, which is a design for the Fermilab Main Injector. The main properties of this lattice are that the {gamma}{sub t} is an imaginary number, the maxima of the dispersion function are small, and two long-straight section with zero dispersion. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Shielding Studies for Superconducting RF Cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-07-20

    A semi-empirical method that allows us to predict intensity of generated field emission in superconducting RF cavities is described. Spatial, angular and energy distributions of the generated radiation are calculated with the FISHPACT code. The Monte Carlo code MARS15 is used for modeling the radiation transport in matter. A comparison with dose rate measurements performed in the Fermilab Vertical Test Facility for ILC-type cavities with accelerating gradients up to 35 MV/m is presented as well.

  2. GammeV: results and future plans at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, William

    2010-05-01

    GammeV is an axion-like particle photo regeneration experiment that employs the light shining through a wall technique. We obtain limits on the coupling of a photon to an axion-like particle that extend previous limits for both scalar and pseudoscalar particles in the milli-eV mass range. We have reconfigured our apparatus to search for chameleon particles. We describe the current results and future plans for similar activities at Fermilab.

  3. Electron beam size measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; Burov, A.V.; Bolshakov, T.B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S.M.; /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  4. Electron Beam Size Measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T. K.; Burov, A. V.; Bolshakov, T. B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S. M.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  5. Long-term stability of Fermilab Energy-Saver magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.E.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.W.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1983-03-01

    The quench and field properties of Energy Saver dipole and quadrupole magnets are measured at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility shortly after the magnets have been produced. It is important that magnet properties remain unchanged with time. This question has been investigated by remeasuring magnets at a later time and comparing the two sets of measurements. The remeasurements agree well with the original measurements. The measurement techniques and magnet properties obtained from the full magnet samples are described elsewhere.

  6. Fermilab Testbeam Facility Annual Report – FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M. G.

    2015-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab Test Beam operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF and are listed in Table TB-1. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  7. TBT optics and impedance measurements at the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fourier analysis of Turn by Turn (TBT) data provides valuable information about the machine linear and non-linear optics. This technique introduced first at Fermilab in 2006 for correcting the Tevatron linear coupling, has been now extended to the Main Injector with the aim of a better understanding of the beam dynamics, in particular in view of a substantial beam intensity increase in the frame of the laboratory neutrino program.

  8. Analysis of emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Huang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2006-05-01

    Multi-particle simulations are performed to study emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster. Analysis shows that the source of vertical emittance growth comes mostly from random errors in skew quadrupoles in the presence of a strong transverse space-charge force. [1] Random errors in dipole rolls and the Montague resonance do contribute but to lesser extent. The effect of random errors in the quadrupoles is small because the betatron envelope tunes are reasonably far away from the half-integer stopband.

  9. The NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab began operations in late 2004. NuMI will deliver an intense {nu}{sub {mu}} beam of variable energy (2-20 GeV) directed into the Earth at 58 mrad for short ({approx}1km) and long ({approx}700-900 km) baseline experiments. Several aspects of the design and results from early commissioning runs are reviewed.

  10. Landau damping of space-charge dominated Fermilab Booster beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space-charge making Landau damping impossible. However, it is shown that the bunching structure of the beam reduces the mean space-charge tune shift. As a result, the beam can be stabilized by suitable octupole-driven tune spread.

  11. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the {pi}{degree} production at high p{sub {perpendicular}} and in the {Lambda} ({Sigma}{degree}), {pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{degree} production at large x{sub F}, and {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(pp, {bar p}p) measurements. 18 refs.

  12. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  13. Fermilab R{ampersand}D program in medium energyelectron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Fermilab began an R & D program in medium energy electron cooling in April 1995 with the object of cooling 8 GeV antiprotons in a new 3.3 km permanent magnet storage ring (Recycler) to be built in the same tunnel as the Main Injector (MI). The MI is to be completed in 1998, and it is planned to install the Recycler by the end of 1997 to reduce interference during the final rush of MI installation. Although the Recycler will employ stochastic cooling initially, its potential for contributing an order of magnitude to Tevatron collider luminosity is tied to electron cooling. The short time scale and Fermilab`s limited familiarity with low energy electron beams has given rise to a two-phase development plan. The first phase is to build a cooling system based on an electron beam of {ge} 200 mA before year 2000. The second phase of about 3 years is planned to reach electron current of 2 A or more. This report describes the general scheme for high luminosity collider operation as well as the R & D plan and progress to date. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Eddy current scanning of niobium for SRF cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Foley, M.; Antoine, C.; Cooper, C.; Brinkmann, A.; /DESY

    2006-08-01

    In the framework of SRF cavity development, Fermilab is creating the infrastructure needed for the characterization of the material used in the cavity fabrication. An important step in the characterization of ''as received'' niobium sheets is eddy current scanning. Eddy current scanning is a non-destructive technique first adopted and further developed by DESY with the purpose of checking the cavity material for subsurface defects and inclusions. Fermilab has received and further upgraded a commercial eddy current scanner previously used for the SNS project. This scanner is now used daily to scan the niobium sheets for the Fermilab third harmonic, the ILC, and the Proton Driver cavities. After optical inspection, more than 400 squares and disks have been scanned and when necessary checked at the optical and electron microscopes, anodized, or measured with profilometers looking for surface imperfections that might limit the performance of the cavities. This paper gives a status report on the scanning results obtained so far, including a discussion of the classification of signals being detected.

  15. Fermilab Muon Campus g-2 Cryogenic Distribution Remote Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.

    2015-11-05

    The Muon Campus (MC) is able to measure Muon g-2 with high precision and comparing its value to the theoretical prediction. The MC has four 300 KW screw compressors and four liquid helium refrigerators. The centerpiece of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is a large, 50-foot-diameter superconducting muon storage ring. This one-of-a-kind ring, made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, was built for the previous g-2 experiment at Brookhaven. Due to each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in the distant location, therefore, Siemens Process Control System PCS7-400, Automation Direct DL205 & DL05 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET HMI are the ideal choices as the MC g-2 cryogenic distribution real-time and on-Line remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time and On-Line remote control systems.

  16. Fermilab Muon Campus g-2 Cryogenic Distribution Remote Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Muon Campus (MC) is able to measure Muon g-2 with high precision and comparing its value to the theoretical prediction. The MC has four 300 KW screw compressors and four liquid helium refrigerators. The centerpiece of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is a large, 50-foot-diameter superconducting muon storage ring. This one-of-a-kind ring, made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, was built for the previous g-2 experiment at Brookhaven. Because each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in the distant location, Siemens Process Control System PCS7-400, Automation Direct DL205 & DL05 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET HMI are the ideal choices as the MC g-2 cryogenic distribution real-time and on-Line remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time and On-Line remote control systems.

  17. Perpendicular Biased Ferrite Tuned Cavities for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Pellico, William; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Terechkine, Iouri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aging Fermilab Booster RF system needs an upgrade to support future experimental program. The important feature of the upgrade is substantial enhancement of the requirements for the accelerating cavities. The new requirements include enlargement of the cavity beam pipe aperture, increase of the cavity voltage and increase in the repetition rate. The modification of the present traditional parallel biased ferrite cavities is rather challenging. An alternative to rebuilding the present Fermilab Booster RF cavities is to design and construct new perpendicular biased RF cavities, which potentially offer a number of advantages. An evaluation and a preliminary design of the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavities for the Fermilab Booster upgrade is described in the paper. Also it is desirable for better Booster performance to improve the capture of beam in the Booster during injection and at the start of the ramp. One possible way to do that is to flatten the bucket by introducing second harmonic cavities into the Booster. This paper also looks into the option of using perpendicularly biased ferrite tuners for the second harmonic cavities.

  18. ARAC: a centralized computer assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of /sup 85/Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF/sub 6/ accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material.

  19. Experience with the Source Evaluation Board method of procuring technical components for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.J.; Collins, J.P.; Kobliska, G.R.; Chester, N.S.; Pewitt, E.G.; Fowler, W.B.

    1993-05-01

    Fermilab has adopted the Source Evaluation Board (SEB) method for procuring certain major technical components of the Fermilab Main Injector. The SEB procedure is designed to ensure the efficient and effective expenditure of Government funds at the same time that it optimizes the opportunity for attainment of project objectives. A qualitative trade-off is allowed between price and technical factors. The process involves a large amount of work and is only justified for a very limited number of procurements. Fermilab has gained experience with the SEB process in awarding subcontracts for major subassemblies of the Fermilab Main Injector dipoles.

  20. Central odontogenic fibroma (simple type) in a four-year-old boy: atypical cone-beam computed tomographic appearance with periosteal reaction

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najme; Sanaei, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. A case of COF (simple type) of the mandible in a four-year-old boy is described in this report. The patient showed asymptomatic swelling in the right inferior border of the lower jaw for one week. A panoramic radiograph showed a poorly-defined destructive unilocular radiolucent area. Cone-beam computed tomography showed expansion and perforation of the adjacent cortical bone plates. A periosteal reaction with the Codman triangle pattern was clearly visible in the buccal cortex. Since the tumor had destroyed a considerable amount of bone, surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. PMID:26125006

  1. Retrospective study of root canal configurations of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone beam computed tomography Part- I

    PubMed Central

    Rawtiya, Manjusha; Somasundaram, Pavithra; Wadhwani, Shefali; Munuga, Swapna; Agarwal, Manish; Sethi, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of 116 maxillary third molars were observed, and data regarding the number of roots, the number of canals, and Vertucci's Classification in each root was statistically evaluated. Results: Majority of Maxillary third molars had three roots (55.2%) and three canals (37.9%). Most MB root (43.8%), DB root (87.5%), and palatal root (100%) of maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I. Mesiobuccal root of three-rooted maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I (43.8%) and Type IV (40.6%) configuration. Overall prevalence of C-shaped canals in maxillary third molars was 3.4%. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of three-rooted maxillary molars with three canals. PMID:27011747

  2. Endodontic and Esthetic Management of a Dilacerated Maxillary Central Incisor Having Two Root Canals Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography as a Diagnostic Aid

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Mittal, Meenu

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the primary dentition are quite common. When primary teeth are subjected to trauma, force transmission and/or invasion of the underlying tooth germs lying in close proximity can result in a variety of disturbances in the permanent successors. Few of these disturbances include hypoplasia, dilaceration, or alteration in the eruption sequence and pattern. Dilaceration is defined as an angulation or sharp bend or curve in the linear relationship of the crown of a tooth to its root. A rare case of maxillary left central incisor having crown dilaceration and Vertucci's type II canal configuration with symptomatic periapical periodontitis is reported. Cone beam computed tomography was used for better understanding of the anomaly and complicated root canal morphology. The tooth was successfully managed by nonsurgical root canal therapy and restoration with resin composite to restore esthetics. PMID:24955260

  3. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

  4. Upgrade and Operation of the DZero Central Track Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, M.P.; Buehler, M.D.; /Virginia U.

    2007-04-01

    The D{O} experiment at the Fermilab p{bar p} Tevatron collider (Batavia, IL, USA) has undergone significant upgrades in anticipation of high luminosity running conditions. As part of the upgrade, the capabilities of the Central Track Trigger (CTT) to make trigger decisions based on hit patterns in the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) have been much improved. We report on the implementation, commissioning and operation of the upgraded CTT system.

  5. Computational and Biochemical Docking of the Irreversible Cocaine Analog RTI 82 Directly Demonstrates Ligand Positioning in the Dopamine Transporter Central Substrate-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D.; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4′-azido-3′-iodophenylethyl ester ([125I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [125I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  6. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  7. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  8. Radiation levels around the Fermilab Main Injector extraction septa

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1997-05-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector extraction system will be capable of delivering a uniform 120 GeV beam of {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons per spill to the fixed target experiments ( with spill time of 1 sec). Up to 2% of the beam is expected to be lost at the extraction septum and the Lambertson magnet. As a result, one expects increased radiation levels around the septa compared to other parts of the Main Injector. Realistic Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the instantaneous and residual radiation levels in the beam extraction region. The results of these studies are presented and implications are discussed.

  9. Fitting the fully coupled ORM for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; Prebys, Eric; Ankenbrandt, Charles; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The orbit response matrix (ORM) method [1] is applied to model the Fermilab Booster with parameters such as the BPM gains and rolls, and parameters in the lattice model, including the gradient errors and magnets rolls. We found that the gradients and rolls of the adjacent combined-function magnets were deeply correlated, preventing full determination of the model parameters. Suitable constraints of the parameters were introduced to guarantee an unique, equivalent solution. Simulations show that such solution preserves proper combinations of the adjacent parameters. The result shows that the gradient errors of combined-function magnets are within design limits.

  10. Survey and alignment of the Fermilab Booster Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; Kyle, John; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The Fermilab Booster is a fast-cycling synchrotron which accelerates protons from 400 MeV to 8 GeV of kinetic energy for injection into the Main Injector and for use by all of the Lab's physics programs. The Booster was originally built in 1970. In 2004, as part of the Booster upgrade, a decision was made to upgrade the Booster survey network by densification with monuments and to survey the main Booster components using modern survey and alignment instruments. This paper discusses the survey and alignment methodology employed for the Booster Accelerator upgrade.

  11. Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

  12. A CP violation and rare kaon decay experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Taku

    1989-02-01

    The E731 collaboration at Fermilab has collected enough K ..-->.. 2..pi.. events to give a statistical error of approx.0.5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/3/ on the CP violation parameter epsilon'/epsilon. Improvements have been made to reduce the systematic error. The experiment is also sensitive to many rare decays, and it set a new limit on the branching ratio of K/sub L/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup /minus//, < 4.2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/8/ (90% CL). 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Development of 325 MHz single spoke resonators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Gonin, I.V.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; Lanfranco, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Ozelis, J.; Ristori, L.; Sergatskov, D.; Wagner, R.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project represents the current effort at Fermilab to produce an 8-GeV proton linac based on 400 independently phased superconducting cavities. Eighteen ?=0.21 single spoke resonators, operating at 325 MHz, comprise the first stage of the linac cold section. In this paper we present the current status of the production and testing of the first two prototype cavities. This includes descriptions of the fabrication, frequency tuning, chemical polishing, high pressure rinse, and high-gradient cold tests.

  14. The New Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Joseph

    2015-01-13

    Precision measurements of fundamental quantities have played a key role in pointing the way forward in developing our understanding of the universe. Though the enormously successful Standard Model (SM) describes the breadth of both historical and modern experimental particle physics data, it is necessarily incomplete. The muon $g-2$ experiment executed at Brookhaven concluded in 2001 and measured a discrepancy of more than three standard deviations compared to the Standard Model calculation. Arguably, this remains the strongest hint of physics beyond the SM. A new initiative at Fermilab is under construction to improve the experimental accuracy four-fold. The current status is presented here.

  15. Overview of the Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SeungCheon

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of muon provides a precision test of the Standard Model. The Brookhaven muon g-2 experiment (E821) measured the muon magnetic moment anomaly with 0.54 ppm precision, a more than 3 deviation from the Standard Model predictions, spurring speculation about the possibility of new physics. The new g-2 experiment at Fermilab (E989) will reduce the combined statistical and systematic error of the BNL experiment by a factor of 4. An overview of the new experiment is described in this article.

  16. Multi-Physics Analysis of the Fermilab Booster RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M.; Reid, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    After about 40 years of operation the RF accelerating cavities in Fermilab Booster need an upgrade to improve their reliability and to increase the repetition rate in order to support a future experimental program. An increase in the repetition rate from 7 to 15 Hz entails increasing the power dissipation in the RF cavities, their ferrite loaded tuners, and HOM dampers. The increased duty factor requires careful modelling for the RF heating effects in the cavity. A multi-physic analysis investigating both the RF and thermal properties of Booster cavity under various operating conditions is presented in this paper.

  17. An overview of plastic optical fiber end finishers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mishina, M.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Korienek, J.

    1993-11-01

    Several years ago the need for equipment to precisely finish the ends of plastic optical fibers was recognized. Many high energy physics experiments use thousands of these fibers which must be polished on one or both ends. A fast, easy-to-operate machine yielding repeatable finishes was needed. Three types of machines were designed and constructed that are in daily use at Fermilab, all finish the fiber ends by flycutting with a diamond tool. Althrough diamond flycutting of plastic is not new, the size and fragility of plastic optical fibers present several challenges.

  18. Survey and Alignment of the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; Leibfritz, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    The goal of achieving the Tevatron luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} requires Electron Cooling in the Recycler Ring to provide an increased flux of antiprotons. The Fermilab Electron Cooling system has been designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. The installation along with the survey and alignment of the Electron Cooling system in the Recycler Ring were completed in November 2004. The Electron Cooling system was fully commissioned in May 2005 and the first cooling of antiprotons was achieved in July 2005. This paper discusses the alignment methodology employed to survey and align the Electron Cooling system.

  19. The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab: Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; Harms, Elvin; Henderson, Stuart; Leibfritz, Jerry; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Valishev, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provide an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.

  20. Summary of Fermilab's Recycler Electron Cooler Operation and Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-15

    Fermilab's Recycler ring was used as a storage ring for accumulation and subsequent manipulations of 8 GeV antiprotons destined for the Tevatron collider. To satisfy these missions, a unique electron cooling system was designed, developed and successfully implemented. The most important features that distinguish the Recycler cooler from other existing electron coolers are its relativistic energy, 4.3 MV combined with 0.1-0.5 A DC beam current, a weak continuous longitudinal magnetic field in the cooling section, 100 G, and lumped focusing elsewhere. With the termination of the Tevatron collider operation, so did the cooler. In this article, we summarize the experience of running this unique machine.

  1. Status of slip stacking at Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Berenc, T.; Dey, J.; Chase, B.; Rivetta, C.; Kourbanis, I.; MacLachlan, J.; Meisner, K.; Pasquinelli, R.; Reid, J.; Steimel, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In order to achieve an increase in proton intensity, the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) will use a stacking process called ''slip stacking'' [1]. The intensity will be doubled by injecting one train of bunches at a slightly lower energy, another at a slightly higher energy, then bringing them together for the final capture. Beam studies have been performed for this process and we have already verified that, at least for low beam intensities, the stacking procedure works as expected [2]. For high intensity operation, development work of the feedback and feedforward systems was done during the last machine shut down, from August to November 2004 [3].

  2. Review of calorimetry in Fermilab fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Crisler, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    The fixed-target program at Fermilab comprises as many as thirteen simultaneous experiments in ten separate beamlines using beams of primary protons, pions, kaons, electrons, neutrinos, and muons. The fixed target beamlines were last in operation in the latter half of 1991, shutting down in 1992. The next fixed target run is scheduled for early 1996. This article describes some of the wide variety of calorimetric devices that were in use in the past run or to be used in the coming run. Special attention is devoted to the new devices currently under construction.

  3. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  4. Forward neutron production at the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmanov, T. S.; Rajaram, D.; Longo, M. J.; Gustafson, H. R.; Park, H. K.; Akgun, U.; Aydin, G.; Duru, F.; Guelmez, E.; Guenaydin, Y. O.; Onel, Y.; Penzo, A.; Baker, W.; Carey, D.; Johnstone, C.; Kostin, M.; Raja, R.; Barnes, P. D. Jr.; Hartouni, E.; Heffner, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have measured cross sections for forward neutron production from a variety of targets using proton beams from the Fermilab Main Injector. Measurements were performed for proton beam momenta of 58, 84, and 120 GeV/c. The cross section dependence on the atomic weight (A) of the targets was found to vary as A{sup {alpha}}, where {alpha} is 0.46{+-}0.06 for a beam momentum of 58 GeV/c and 0.54{+-}0.05 for 120 GeV/c. The cross sections show reasonable agreement with FLUKA and DPMJET Monte Carlos. Comparisons have also been made with the LAQGSM Monte Carlo.

  5. Development of a high density pixel multichip module at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, G.

    2001-03-08

    At Fermilab, both pixel detector multichip module and sensor hybridization are being developed for the BTeV experiment. The BTeV pixel detector is based on a design relying on a hybrid approach. With this approach, the readout chip and the sensor array are developed separately and the detector is constructed by flip-chip mating the two together. This method offers maximum flexibility in the development process, choice of fabrication technologies, and the choice of sensor material. This paper presents strategies to handle the required data rate and performance results of the first prototype and detector hybridization.

  6. Development of a high density pixel multichip module at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Sergio Zimmermann et al.

    2001-09-11

    At Fermilab, a pixel detector multichip module is being developed for the BTeV experiment. The module is composed of three layers. The lowest layer is formed by the readout integrated circuits (ICs). The back of the ICs is in thermal contact with the supporting structure, while the top is flip-chip bump-bonded to the pixel sensor. A low mass flex-circuit interconnect is glued on the top of this assembly, and the readout IC pads are wire-bounded to the circuit. This paper presents recent results on the development of a multichip module prototype and summarizes its performance characteristics.

  7. Fast Bunch Integrators at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas; Briegel, Charles; Fellenz, Brian; Vogel, Greg; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The Fast Bunch Integrator is a bunch intensity monitor designed around the measurements made from Resistive Wall Current Monitors. During the Run II period these were used in both Tevatron and Main Injector for single and multiple bunch intensity measurements. This paper presents an overview of the design and use of these systems during this period. During the Run II era the Fast Bunch integrators have found a multitude of uses. From antiproton transfers to muti-bunch beam coalescing, Main Injector transfers to halo scraping and lifetime measurements, the Fast Bunch Integrators have proved invaluable in the creation and maintenance of Colliding Beams stores at Fermilab.

  8. Hunting for MHz gravitational waves with the Fermilab Holometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamai, Brittany; The Holometer Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The highest frequency end of the gravitational wave spectrum remains poorly constrained. Cosmic strings and primordial black holes are potential gravitational waves candidates that could radiate at MHz frequencies. The existence of nearby sources can be tested using the Fermilab Holometer, two nested 40 meter Michelson interferometers. This instrument can achieve strain sensitivity better than 10- 20 / rt .Hz within the 1-10 MHz frequency band. The Holometer is fully operational and has taken long observational campaigns acquiring 100s of hours of science quality data. I will present results of a search for narrow-lined sources and constraints on the stochastic background in the MHz band.

  9. The muon EDM in the g-2 experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chislett, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    The observation of a muon electric dipole moment would provide an additional source of CP violation which is required to explain the matter anti-matter asymmetry in the universe. The current experimental limit, |dμ| < 1.9 × 10-19e·cm, was set by the BNL E821 experiment. This paper discusses how the new experiment at Fermilab, E989 [3], aims to decrease this by two orders of magnitude down to 10-21e·cm.

  10. Upgrades to the Fermilab NuMI beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Michael A.; Childress, Sam; Grossman, Nancy; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; McCluskey, Elaine; Moore, Craig Damon; Reilly, Robert; Tariq, Salman; Wehmann, Alan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The NuMI beamline at Fermilab has been delivering high-intensity muon neutrino beams to the MINOS experiment since the spring of 2005. A total of 3.4 x 10{sup 20} protons has been delivered to the NuMI target and a maximum beam power of 320 kW has been achieved. An upgrade of the NuMI facility increasing the beam power capability to 700 kW is planned as part of the NOvA experiment. The plans for this upgrade are presented and the possibility of upgrading the NuMI beamline to handle 1.2 MW is considered.

  11. Project X: A Multi-MW Proton Source at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and he study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a uture facility at the energy frontier.

  12. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  13. Opportunities for high-sensitivity charm physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.; Burnstein, R.A.; Lederman, L.M.; Rubin, H.A.; Brown, C.N.; Christian, D.C.; Gelfand, N.M.; Kwan, S.W.; Chen, T.Y.; He, M.; Koetke, D.D.; Napier, A.; Papavassiliou, V.; Yu, X.Q.

    1996-07-01

    The CO initiative under consideration at Fermilab makes feasible a charm experiment reconstructing >10{sup 9} charm decays, four orders - of magnitude beyond the largest extant sample. The experiment might commence data-taking as early as 1999. In addition to programmatic charm physics such as spectroscopy, lifetimes, and QCD tests, it will have significant new-physics reach in the areas of CP violation, flavor-changing neutral-current and lepton-number-violating decays, and D{sup o} {bar D} {bar {sup o}} mixing, and should observe direct CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed D decays if it occurs at the level predicted by the Standard Model.

  14. Cryogenic System for the Cryomodule Test Stand at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Michael; Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS) at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) located at Fermilab. CMTS is designed for production testing of the 1.3 GHz and 3.9GHz cryomodules to be used in the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLSII), which is an upgrade to an existing accelerator at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). This paper will focus on the cryogenic system that extends from the helium refrigeration plant to the CMTS cave. Topics covered will include component design, installation and commissioning progress, and operational plans. The paper will conclude with a description of the heat load measurement plan.

  15. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V.V.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.

  16. Transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics studies at the Fermilab photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.P.; Barov, N.; Edwards, H.; Fitch, M.; Hartung, W.; Flottmann, K.; Schreiber, S.; Ferrario, M.; /Frascati

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab photoinjector produces electron bunches of 1-12 nC charge with an energy of 16-18 MeV. Detailed measurements and optimization of the transverse emittance have been carried out for a number of beam line optics conditions, and at a number of beam line locations. The length of the bunches has also been measured, first for an uncompressed beam (as a function of the charge) and then for a compressed beam of 8 nC charge (as a function of the 9-cell cavity phase). These measurements are presented and compared with the simulation codes HOMDYN and ASTRA.

  17. Megascience and the Powers and Paradoxes of Pushing Frontiers at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Hoddeson, Lillian [University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois, United States

    2009-09-01

    To help begin the year of celebration of Fermilab's fortieth anniversary (June 15, 1967), this colloquium will characterize the special brand of bigger 'Big Science' that emerged at Fermilab under Robert R. Wilson and Leon M. Lederman, with attention not only to its powers and beauties but to some of its paradoxes, conflicts, and ironies, due in part to funding limitations.

  18. Megascience and the Powers and Paradoxes of Pushing Frontiers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2005-06-14

    To help begin the year of celebration of Fermilab's fortieth anniversary (June 15, 1967), this colloquium will characterize the special brand of bigger 'Big Science' that emerged at Fermilab under Robert R. Wilson and Leon M. Lederman, with attention not only to its powers and beauties but to some of its paradoxes, conflicts, and ironies, due in part to funding limitations.

  19. Megascience and the Powers and Paradoxes of Pushing Frontiers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2006-06-14

    To help begin the year of celebration of Fermilab's fortieth anniversary (June 15, 1967), this colloquium will characterize the special brand of bigger 'Big Science' that emerged at Fermilab under Robert R. Wilson and Leon M. Lederman, with attention not only to its powers and beauties but to some of its paradoxes, conflicts, and ironies, due in part to funding limitations.

  20. Fermilab 200 MeV linac control system hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a description of the present Linac distributed control system that replaces the original Xerox computer and interface electronics with a network of 68000-based stations. In addition to replacing the obsolete Xerox equipment, goals set for the new system were to retain the fast response and interactive nature of the original system, to improve reliability, to ease maintenance, and to provide 15 Hz monitoring of all Linac parameters. Our previous experience with microcomputer installations showed that small, stand-alone control systems are rather straightforward to implement and have been proven to be reliable in operation, even in the severe environment of the 750-keV preaccelerator. The overall design of the Linac system incorporates the concept of many relatively small, stand-alone control systems networked together using an intercomputer communication network. Each station retains its local control system character but takes advantage of the network to allow an operator to interact with the entire Linac from any local console. At the same time, a link to the central computer system allows Host computers to also access parameters in the Linac.

  1. Celebrating 30 Years of K-12 Educational Programming at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, M.; Cooke, M.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    In 1980 Leon Lederman started Saturday Morning Physics with a handful of volunteer physicists, around 300 students and all the physics teachers who tagged along. Today Fermilab offers over 30 programs annually with help from 250 staff volunteers and 50 educators, and serves around 40,000 students and 2,500 teachers. Find out why we bother. Over the years we have learned to take advantage of opportunities and confront challenges to offer effective programs for teachers and students alike. We offer research experiences for secondary school teachers and high school students. We collaborate with educators to design and run programs that meet their needs and interests. Popular school programs include classroom presentations, experience-based field trips, and high school tours. Through our work in QuarkNet and I2U2, we make real particle physics data available to high school students in datadriven activities as well as masterclasses and e-Labs. Our professional development activities include a Teacher Resource Center and workshops where teachers participate in authentic learning experiences as their students would. We offer informal classes for kids and host events where children and adults enjoy the world of science. Our website hosts a wealth of online resources. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation and Fermilab Friends for Science Education, our programs reach out across Illinois, throughout the United States and even around the world. We will review the program portfolio and share comments from the volunteers and participants.

  2. Status report on the survey and alignment activities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The surveying and alignment activities at Fermilab are the responsibility of the Alignment and Metrology Group. The Group supports and interacts with physicists and engineers working on any particular project, from the facility construction phase to the installation and final alignment of components in the beam line. One of the goals of the Alignment and Metrology Group is to upgrade the old survey networks in the tunnel using modern surveying technology, such as the Laser Tracker for tunnel networks and GPS for the surface networks. According to the job needs, all surveys are done with Laser Trackers and/or Videogrammetry (V-STARS) systems for spatial coordinates; optical and electronic levels are used for elevations, Gyro-Theodolite for azimuths, Mekometer for distances and GPS for baseline vectors. The group has recently purchased two new API Laser Trackers, one INCA3 camera for the V-Stars, and one DNA03 digital level. This report presents the projects and major activities of the Alignment and Metrology Group at Fermilab during the period of 2000 to 2004. It focuses on the most important current projects, especially those that have to be completed during the currently scheduled three-month shutdown period. Future projects, in addition to the status of the current projects, are also presented.

  3. Long baseline neutrino physics: From Fermilab to Kamioka

    SciTech Connect

    DeJongh, Fritz

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the physics potential of very long baseline experiments designed to measure nu_mu to nu_e oscillation probabilities. The principles of our design are to tune the beam spectrum to the resonance energy for the matter effect, and to have the spectrum cut off rapidly above this energy. The matter effect amplifies the signal, and the cut-off suppresses backgrounds which feed-down from higher energy. The signal-to-noise ratio is potentially better than for any other conventional nu_mu beam experiment. We find that a beam from Fermilab aimed at the Super-K detector has excellent sensitivity to sin^2(2theta_13) and the sign of Delta M^2. If the mass hierarchy is inverted, the beam can be run in antineutrino mode with a similar signal-to-noise ratio, and event rate 55% as high as for the neutrino mode. Combining the Fermilab beam with the JHF-Kamioka proposal adds very complementary information. We find good sensitivity to maximal CP violation for values of sin^2(2theta_13) ranging from 0.001 to 0.05.

  4. Pattern recognition at the Fermilab collider and Superconducting Supercollider.

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, H J

    1993-01-01

    In a colliding beam accelerator such as Fermilab or the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) protons, or antiprotons, collide at a rate between 10(5) (Fermilab) and 10(8) (SSC) collisions per second. In real time experimentalists have to select those events which are candidates for exploring the limit of known phenomena at a much lower rate, 1-100 per second, for recording on permanent media. The rate of events from new physics sources is expected to be much lower, as low as a few per year. This is a severe problem in pattern recognition: with an input data stream of up to 10(15) potential bits per second in its images, we have to pick out those images that are potentially interesting in real time at a discrimination level of 1 part in 10(6), with a known efficiency. I will describe the overall filtering strategies and the custom hardware to do this event selection (a.k.a. pattern recognition). Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607432

  5. Computed tomography morphometric analysis of the central clival depression and petroclival angle for application of the presigmoid approach in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sohum K.; Baymon, Da’Marcus; Sieloff, Eric; Maynard, Kenneth; Moisi, Marc; Patel, Achal P.; Patterson, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Lateral transtemporal approaches are useful for addressing lesions located ventral to the brainstem, especially when the pathologic diagnosis of the tumor dictates that a gross or near total resection improves outcomes. One approach, the presigmoid approach receives little attention in the pediatric population thus far. We sought to characterize morphometric changes, particularly the clival depth and the petroclival Cobb angle, that occur in the temporal bones of children and draw implications about doing a presigmoid approach in children. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective study performed at John Sealy Hospital, a level-one trauma center that takes care of pediatric injuries as well. Subjects and Methods: We performed a morphometric analysis of noncontrast computed tomography head studies in 96 boys and 67 girls. Central clival depth and petroclival angle were obtained in the axial plane at the level of the internal auditory meatus using the method described by Abdel Aziz et al. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics and Student's t-test to compare groups were calculated using Microsoft Excel. Results: We found no gender difference in mean central clival depth or petroclival angle (P = 0.98 and P = 0.61, respectively). However, when we broke our cohort by age into those younger than 9 years of age and those 10 years or older, we found the petroclival angle decreased by 6.2° which was statistically significant (P < 0.000000006). Conclusions: These findings suggest that a presigmoid retrolabyrinthine approach is useful for children 9 years of age and younger as the petroclival angle appears to decrease resulting in a shallower clival depression in these patients. PMID:27606016

  6. Prediction of Central Nervous System Relapse of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Using Pretherapeutic [18F]2-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoo Sung; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Central nervous system (CNS) relapse of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare complication, but has a poor prognosis with unknown pathophysiology. Recent trials of CNS prophylaxis have shown to be ineffective, despite patient's selection using several known clinical risk factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the value of pretreatment [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in predicting CNS relapse in DLBCL patients. The authors analyzed 180 pathologically confirmed DLBCL patients, retrospectively. Patients underwent [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography before first line rituximab to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone therapy. Clinical characteristics were evaluated and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) with a threshold margin of 50% was calculated. Among age, sex, Ann Arbor stage, International Prognostic Index, revised International Prognostic Index, high serum lactate dehydrogenase level, presence of B symptoms, bulky disease (≥10 cm), extranodal lesion involvement, bone marrow involvement, high metabolic tumor volume ( >450 mL), and high TLG50 (>2000), the high TLG50 was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting CNS relapse in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.04). Kaplan–Meir survival analysis between high TLG50 (>2000) and low TLG50 (≤2000) groups revealed significantly different mean progression free survival (PFS) of 1317.2 ± 134.3 days and 1968.6 ± 18.3 days, respectively (P < 0.001). High TLG50 on [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography is the most significant predictor of CNS relapse in un-treated DLBCL patients. PMID:26554808

  7. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  8. Computer simulation of the steady-state flow system of the Tertiary limestone (Floridan) aquifer system in east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tibbals, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    The predevelopment steady-state ground-water flow system for 13 ,700 square miles of the Tertiary limestone aquifer system (known as the Florida aquifer in Florida) in east-central Florida is simulated by means of a digital computer model. The model results indicate that about 1,900 cubic feet per second recharges the aquifer as downward leakage from the surficial aquifer. The average recharge rate where recharge actually occurs (approximately 6,550 square miles) is about 4 inches per year. The maximum recharge rate is about 14 inches per year. An additional 21 cubic feet per second is recharged to the modeled area of the aquifer by means of lateral boundary inflow along the northeast boundary. The Floridan aquifer system, as simulated, discharges 1,300 cubic feet per second as springflow, 540 cubic feet per second as diffuse upward leakage to the surficial aquifer in an area of approximately 7,150 square miles and 81 cubic feet per second as lateral boundary outflow to the southwest and to the east. The average transmissivity of the upper unit of the aquifer, as simulated, is about 120,000 square feet per day while that for the lower unit is about 60,000 square feet per day. (USGS)

  9. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  10. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  11. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  12. Search for New Fermions (''Quirks'') at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Edmunds, D.; Fisher, W.; Kraus, J.

    2010-11-19

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107, 119, and 133 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale {Lambda} in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV and N=2, 3, and 5, respectively.

  13. Magnetic field properties of Fermilab Energy-Saver dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Gross, D.A.; Michelotti, L.; Schmidt, E.E.; Turkot, F.

    1983-03-01

    At Fermilab we have operated a production line for the fabrication of 901 21 foot long superconducting dipoles for use in the Energy Saver/Doubler. At any one time 772 of these dipoles are installed in the accelerator and 62 in beamlines; the remainder are spares. Magnetic field data are now available for most of these dipoles; in this paper we present some of these data which show that we have been able to maintain the necessary consistency in field quality throughout the production process. Specifically we report harmonic field coefficients, showing that the mechanical design permits substantial reduction of the magnitudes of the normal and skew quadrupole harmonic coefficients; field shape profiles; integral field data; and field angle data.

  14. Application of independent component analysis to Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.B.; Lee, S.Y.; Prebys, E.; Tomlin, R.; /Indiana U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Autocorrelation is applied to analyze sets of finite-sampling data such as the turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data in an accelerator. This method of data analysis, called the independent component analysis (ICA), is shown to be a powerful beam diagnosis tool for being able to decompose sampled signals into its underlying source signals. They find that the ICA has an advantage over the principle component analysis (PCA) used in the model-independent analysis (MIA) in isolating independent modes. The tolerance of the ICA method to noise in the BPM system is systematically studied. The ICA is applied to analyze the complicated beam motion in a rapid-cycling booster synchrotron at the Fermilab. Difficulties and limitations of the ICA method are also discussed.

  15. Design, fabrication and testing of single spoke resonators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ristori, L.; Apollinari, G.; Borissov, E.; Gonin, I.V.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.H.; Ozelis, J.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sergatskov, D.A.; Wagner, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) linac R&D program is building a pulsed 30 MeV superconducting H- linac. The linac incorporates superconducting solenoids, high power RF vector modulators and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linac. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. In this paper we present the RF design, the mechanical design, the fabrication, the chemistry and testing of the first two SSR1 (Single Spoke Resonator type-1) prototype cavities that were built. These cavities operate at 325 MHz with {beta} = 0.21. The design and testing of the input coupler and the tuning mechanism are also discussed.

  16. Survey of the Fermilab D0 detector collision hall

    SciTech Connect

    Babatunde O'Sheg Oshinowo

    2001-07-20

    The Fermilab D0 detector was used for the discovery of the top quark during Run I in 1996. It had been upgraded to exploit the physics potential to be presented by the Main Injector and the Tevatron Collider during Run II. The upgrade of the D0 detector was fully commissioned on March 1, 2001, and thus marked the official start of the Run II experiment. The detector which weighs about 5500 tons, was assembled in the Assembly Hall. Prior to moving the detector into the Collision Hall, the existing survey monuments were densified in the Collision Hall with new monuments. This paper discusses the survey of the Collision Hall using a combination of the Laser Tracker, BETS, V-Stars, and other Optical systems to within the specified accuracy of {+-}0.5mm.

  17. Report on the Fermilab pilot N&S closure process

    SciTech Connect

    Coulson, L.

    1995-08-01

    This document outlines the plans and protocols for conducting a pilot of the Department of Energy`s Necessary & Sufficient Closure Process (Attachment A) at Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois. The result of this pilot will be a set of standards which will serve as the agreed upon basis for providing FNAL with adequate Environment, Safety and Health Protection at the lowest possible cost. This pilot will seek out and emulate compatible industry practices which have been proven successful both in terms of safety performance and cost-effectiveness. This charter has been developed as a partnership effort by the parties to this agreement (see ``Responsibilities`` below), and is considered to be a living document.

  18. Toward a cold electron beam in the Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali S. Tupikov et al.

    2004-05-12

    Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring [1]. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through 20-m long cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 0.1 mrad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of beam quality measurements in the cooler prototype.

  19. Microdosimetric investigations at the fast neutron therapy facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K.M.

    1997-12-01

    Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e., oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 {+-} 0.04 was determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e{sup *} and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e{sup *} and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated.

  20. The Fermilab Upgrade. The Main Injector May 9, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-05-09

    This report is based upon an earli~r document: The Fermilab Upgrade -- An Overview, which was issued in January 1989. The upgrade is designed to maintain and extend the potential for High Energy Physics under the constraints imposed by the US program to build the SSC and in the context of the world's inventory, existing and soon to exist, of particle accelerator facilities. Fundamental to this proposal is the assumption that first rate physics with major discovery potential is an essential ingredient in the pre-SSC era. It is likely that the Upgrade program will also develop unique and important niches in collider and fixed-target physics in the period beyond the SSC operation.

  1. Beam position monitors for the Fermilab recycler ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, E.; Lackey, S.; McClure, C.; Meadowcroft, R.

    1998-12-01

    Fermilab's new Recycler Ring will recover and cool "used" antiprotons at the end of a Tevatron store and also accumulate "new" antiprotons from the antiproton source. A wideband rf system based on barrier buckets will result in unbunched beam, grouped in one to three separate partitions throughout the ring. A new beam position monitor system will measure position of any one partition at a time, using low-frequency signals from beam distribution edges. A signal path including an elliptical split-plate detector, radiation-resistant tunnel preamplifiers, and logarithmic amplifiers, will result in a held output voltage nearly proportional to position. The results will be digitized using Industry Pack technology and a Motorola MVME162 processor board. The data acquisition subsystem, including digitization and timing for 80 position channels, will occupy two VME slots. System design will be described, with some additional emphasis on the use of logamp chips.

  2. Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Sonam; /Panjab U. /Fermilab

    2010-12-09

    The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment at Fermilab uses particle beams of charged pions, kaons, proton and anti-proton with beam momenta of 5 to 90 GeV/c and thin targets spanning the periodic table from (liquid) hydrogen to uranium to measure particle production cross sections in a full acceptance spectrometer with charged particle identification for particles from 0.1 to 120 GeV/c using Time Projection Chamber, Time of Flight, multicell Cherenkov, and Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors and Calorimeter for neutrons. Particle production using 120 GeV/c protons from Main Injector on the MINOS target was also measured. We describe the physics motivation to perform such cross section measurements and highlight the impact of hadronic interaction data on neutrino physics. Recent results on forward neutron cross sections and analysis of MINOS target data are also presented.

  3. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D.; Coulter, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R&D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-{beta} Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  4. 1-GeV Linac Upgrade Study at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, M., Moretti, A., Noble, R., Schmidt, C. W., FNAL

    1998-09-01

    A linac injector for a new proton source complex at Fermilab is assumed to have a kinetic energy of 1 GeV. This linac would be sized to accelerate 100 mA of H{sup -} beam in a 200 microsecond pulse at a 15 Hz repetition rate. This would be adequate to produce {approximately}10{sup 14} protons per pulse allowing for future improvements of the new proton source complex. An alternate proposal is to add 600 MeV of side coupled cavity linac at 805 MHz to the existing 400 MeV Linac. This addition may either be in a new location or use the present Booster tunnel. A discussion of these possibilities will be given.

  5. Mixed pbar source operation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Capista, D.P.; Chase, B.E.; Dey, J.E.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Wu, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Recently we have adopted a scheme, called ''Mixed pbar Source Operation'' in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI). The purpose of this mode of operation is to transfer pbar bunches from the Recycler and the Accumulator to the Tevatron for collider shots. In this scheme, four 2.5 MHz pbar bunches are injected in to the MI, re-bunched in four groups of 53 MHz bunches at 8 GeV, accelerated to 150 GeV, and coalesced in to four 53 MHz bunches before transfer to the Tevatron. A special magnet ramp is needed in the MI to allow for pbar beam of slightly different 8 GeV energies from the Recycler and the Accumulator. Here we will present the status of this scheme.

  6. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Bhat; John P. Marriner

    2003-06-10

    The Recycler Ring (RR) is a new 8Gev antiproton storage ring at Fermilab. Presently, this machine is being commissioned using protons from the Booster. It uses barrier buckets for stacking, un-stacking and storing the beam. At any given time, the RR is capable of storing proton or antiproton beams in multiple segments azimuthally. These segments of the beam may have widely differing longitudinal emittance and beam intensities and bunch lengths. It is highly essential to be able to measure the longitudinal emittance and keep track of the longitudinal dynamics at various stages of the operation of the RR. In this paper, the authors discuss a few methods of longitudinal emittance measurements in barrier buckets and discuss their merits and demerits

  7. Transient beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    A requirement for bunch coalescing and bunch rotation for antiproton production in the Fermilab Main Ring is that the net rf voltages be reduced below about 1 kV. At high beam intensities, the fields generated by the beam in a single pass through the rf cavities will exceed this limit. The new compensation system monitors the component of the beam current at the fundamental rf frequency as a function of time. This information is then delayed by a single turn and fed back into the high level rf system to cancel the beam-induced fields. The system has compensated the beam-induced voltage generated by a single booster batch to 5% of its initial value.

  8. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  9. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J. ); Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D. ); Coulter, K.J. )

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-[beta] Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  10. New pulsed orbit bump magnets for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, J.R.; Carson, J.A.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Makarov, A.; Prebys, E.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The beam from the Fermilab Linac is injected onto a bump in the closed orbit of the Booster Synchrotron where a carbon foil strips the electrons from the Linac's negative ion hydrogen beam. Although the Booster itself runs at 15 Hz, heat dissipation in the orbit bump magnets has been one limitation to the fraction of the cycles that can be used for beam. New 0.28 T pulsed dipole magnets have been constructed that will fit into the same space as the old ones, run at the full repetition rate of the Booster, and provide a larger bump to allow a cleaner injection orbit. The new magnets use a ferrite in the yoke rather than laminated steel.

  11. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  12. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Derwent, P.; Eddy, N.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Pruss, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which {approx} 400 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every {approx}15 hours.

  13. Electron Cloud Measurements in Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey Scott; Backfish, M.; Tan, C. Y.; Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    This conference paper presents a series of electron cloud measurements in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler. A new instability was observed in the Recycler in July 2014 that generates a fast transverse excitation in the first high intensity batch to be injected. Microwave measurements of electron cloud in the Recycler show a corresponding depen- dence on the batch injection pattern. These electron cloud measurements are compared to those made with a retard- ing field analyzer (RFA) installed in a field-free region of the Recycler in November. RFAs are also used in the Main Injector to evaluate the performance of beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. The diamond-like carbon coating, in contrast, reduced the electron cloud signal to 1% of that measured in uncoated stainless steel beampipe.

  14. Search for New Fermions (``Quirks'') at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Calvet, S.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Carrera, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Devaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Evans, H.; Evans, J. A.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Luty, M. A.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Onoprienko, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vint, P.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107, 119, and 133 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale Λ in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV and N=2, 3, and 5, respectively.

  15. Correlations in bottom quark pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason Edward

    2009-01-01

    I present an analysis of b$\\bar{b}$ pair production correlations, using dimuon-triggered data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV during Run II of the TeVatron. The leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) b quark production processes are discriminated by the angular and momentum correlations between the b{bar b} pair. Track-level jets containing a muon are classified by b quark content and used to estimate the momentum vector of the progenitor b quark. The theoretical distributions given by the MC@NLO event generator are tested against the data.

  16. Simulations of the Fermilab Recycler for Losses and Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Eric; Ainsworth, Robert; Amundson, James; Brown, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Fermilab has recently completed an upgrade to the com- plex with the goal of delivering 700 kW of beam power as 120 GeV protons to the NuMI target. A major part of boost- ing beam power is to shorten the beam cycle by accumulating up to 12 bunches of 0.5 × 10 11 protons in the Recycler ring through slip-stacking during the Main Injector ramp. This introduces much higher intensities into the Recycler than it has had before. Meeting radiation safety requirements with high intensity operations requires understanding the ef- fects of space charge induced tune spreads and resulting halo formation, and aperture restrictions in the real machine to de- velop a collimation strategy. We report on initial simulations of slip-stacking in the Recycler performed with Synergia.

  17. Fermilab Booster Operational Status: Beam Loss and Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Robert C.

    2002-12-01

    Beam loss reduction and control challenges confronting the Fermilab Booster are presented in the context of the current operational status. In Summer 2002 the programmatic demand for 8 GeV protons will increase to 5E20/year. This is an order of magnitude above recent high rates and nearly as many protons as the machine has produced in its entire 30-year lifetime. Catastrophic radiation damage to accelerator components must be avoided, maintenance in an elevated residual radiation environment must be addressed, and operation within a tight safety envelope must be conducted to limit prompt radiation in the buildings and grounds around the Booster. Diagnostic and performance tracking improvements, enhanced orbit control, and a beam loss collimation/localization system are essential elements in the approach to achieving the expected level of performance and are described here.

  18. Two decades of prairie restoration at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, R.F.; Lootens, R.J.; Becker, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Successional Restoration is the method being used to restore the prairie at Fermilab on the former agricultural fields. This involves an initial planting, using aggressive species that have wide ecological tolerances which will grow well on abandoned agricultural fields. Collectively, these species are designated as the prairie matrix. The species used for this prairie matrix compete with and eventually eliminate most weedy species. They also provide an adequate fuel load capable of sustaining a fire within a few years after a site has been initially planted. Associated changes in the biological and physical structure of the soil help prepare the way for the successful introduction of plants of the later successional species. Only after the species of the prairie matrix are well established, is the species diversity increased by introducing species with narrower ecological tolerances. These species are thus characteristic of the later successional stages.

  19. Search for quirks at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /NIKHEF, Amsterdam

    2010-08-01

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale {Lambda} in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV.

  20. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  1. Development of the third harmonic SC cavity at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolay Solyak et al.

    2004-08-05

    The third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity was recently proposed by DESY for a new generation of high brightness photo-injector (TTF photoinjector-2) to compensate nonlinear distortion of the longitudinal phase space due to RF curvature of the 1.3 GHz TESLA cavities [1,2]. Installation of the 3rd harmonic cavity will allow us to generate ultra-short (<50 {micro}m rms) highly charged electron bunches with an extremely small transverse normalized emittance (<1 {micro}m). This is required to support a new generation of linear colliders, free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation sources. In this paper we present the current status of the 3rd harmonic cavity being developed at Fermilab. We discuss the design procedure, the building and testing of the copper and niobium half-cells and components, the design of input and HOM couplers.

  2. Physics Results from the Antiproton Experiment (APEX) at Fermilab

    DOE Data Explorer

    APEX Collaboration

    Is Antimatter stable? The APEX experiment searches for the decay of antiprotons at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. Observation of antiproton decay would indicate a violation of the CPT theorem, which is one of the most fundamental theorems of modern physics. The best laboratory limits on antiproton decay come from the APEX experiment which achieved a sensitivity to antiproton lifetimes up to of order 700,000 years for the most sensitive decay modes. Antiproton lifetimes in this range could arise from CPT violation at the Planck scale.[copied from http://www-apex.fnal.gov/] This website presents published results from the APEX Test Experiment (T861) and from the E868 Experiment. Limits were placed on six antiproton decay modes with a muon in the final state and on seven antiproton decay modes with an electron in the final state. See also the summary table and plot and the APEX picture gallery.

  3. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  4. Measurements and corrections of the Recycler lattice at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Meiqin; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    Obit Response Matrix (ORM) Fit method has been successfully used to calibrate linear optics at Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The linear model of the Recycler optics ring has been significantly improved. Based on the build-up model, lattice measurement of the Recycler ring has been done several times, each after some magnets move and the tunes change. Large beta-wave({approx}20%) has been found in horizontal plane after the working point was moved from (0.424,0.434) to (0.456, 0.467) for the reason of lowering the beam instabilities. The source of the beta-wave, and the correction will be presented in this paper. In addition, we found an easy way to extend the tuning range in the recycler lattice. A new application program for adjusting the tunes operationally was introduced and the measured results will be presented.

  5. Simulations of space charge in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-03-01

    The Fermilab Project X plan for future high intensity operation relies on the Main Injector as the engine for delivering protons in the 60-120 GeV energy range. Project X plans call for increasing the number of protons per Main Injector bunch from the current value of 1.0 x 10{sup 11} to 3.0 x 10{sup 11}. Space charge effects at the injection energy of 8 GeV have the potential to seriously disrupt operations. We report on ongoing simulation efforts with Synergia, MARYLIE/Impact, and IMPACT, which provide comprehensive capabilities for parallel, multi-physics modeling of beam dynamics in the Main Injector including 3D space-charge effects.

  6. A New correction magnet package for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Carson, J.A.; Harding, D.J.; Lackey, J.R.; Makarov, A.; Pellico, W.; Prebys, E.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Since its initial operation over 30 years ago, most correction magnets in the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron have only been able to fully correct the orbit, tunes, coupling, and chromaticity at injection (400MeV). We have designed a new correction package, including horizontal and vertical dipoles, normal and skew quadrupoles, and normal and skew sextupoles, to provide control up to the extraction energy (8GeV). In addition to tracking the 15Hz cycle of the main, combined function magnets, the quadrupoles and sextupoles must swing through their full range in 1 ms during transition crossing. The magnet is made from 12 water-cooled racetrack coils and an iron core with 12 poles, dramatically reducing the effective magnet air gap and increasing the corrector efficiency. Magnetic field analyses of different combinations of multipoles are included.

  7. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vigani, Luigi; Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100×150 μm2 pixel cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.

  8. CDF GlideinWMS usage in Grid computing of high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvada, Marian; Benjamin, Doug; Sfiligoi, Igor

    2010-04-01

    Many members of large science collaborations already have specialized grids available to advance their research in the need of getting more computing resources for data analysis. This has forced the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration to move beyond the usage of dedicated resources and start exploiting Grid resources. Nowadays, CDF experiment is increasingly relying on glidein-based computing pools for data reconstruction. Especially, Monte Carlo production and user data analysis, serving over 400 users by central analysis farm middleware (CAF) on the top of Condor batch system and CDF Grid infrastructure. Condor is designed as distributed architecture and its glidein mechanism of pilot jobs is ideal for abstracting the Grid computing by making a virtual private computing pool. We would like to present the first production use of the generic pilot-based Workload Management System (glideinWMS), which is an implementation of the pilot mechanism based on the Condor distributed infrastructure. CDF Grid computing uses glideinWMS for its data reconstruction on the FNAL campus Grid, user analysis and Monte Carlo production across Open Science Grid (OSG). We review this computing model and setup used including CDF specific configuration within the glideinWMS system which provides powerful scalability and makes Grid computing working like in a local batch environment with ability to handle more than 10000 running jobs at a time.

  9. CDF GlideinWMS usage in grid computing of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zvada, Marian; Benjamin, Doug; Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Many members of large science collaborations already have specialized grids available to advance their research in the need of getting more computing resources for data analysis. This has forced the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration to move beyond the usage of dedicated resources and start exploiting Grid resources. Nowadays, CDF experiment is increasingly relying on glidein-based computing pools for data reconstruction. Especially, Monte Carlo production and user data analysis, serving over 400 users by central analysis farm middleware (CAF) on the top of Condor batch system and CDF Grid infrastructure. Condor is designed as distributed architecture and its glidein mechanism of pilot jobs is ideal for abstracting the Grid computing by making a virtual private computing pool. We would like to present the first production use of the generic pilot-based Workload Management System (glideinWMS), which is an implementation of the pilot mechanism based on the Condor distributed infrastructure. CDF Grid computing uses glideinWMS for its data reconstruction on the FNAL campus Grid, user analysis and Monte Carlo production across Open Science Grid (OSG). We review this computing model and setup used including CDF specific configuration within the glideinWMS system which provides powerful scalability and makes Grid computing working like in a local batch environment with ability to handle more than 10000 running jobs at a time.

  10. Forward Neutron Production at the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmanov, T.S.; Rajaram, D.; Longo, M.J.; Akgun, U.; Aydin, G.; Baker, W.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Bergfeld, T.; Bujak, A.; Carey, D.; Dukes, E.C.; /Virginia U. /Iowa U.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured cross sections for forward neutron production from a variety of targets using proton beams from the Fermilab Main Injector. Measurements were performed for proton beam momenta of 58 GeV/c, 84 GeV/c, and 120 GeV/c. The cross section dependence on the atomic weight (A) of the targets was found to vary as A{sup a} where a is 0.46 {+-} 0.06 for a beam momentum of 58 GeV/c and 0.54 {+-} 0.05 for 120 GeV/c. The cross sections show reasonable agreement with FLUKA and DPMJET Monte Carlos. Comparisons have also been made with the LAQGSM Monte Carlo. The MIPP (Main Injector Particle Production) experiment (FNAL E907) [1] acquired data in the Meson Center beam line at Fermilab. The primary purposes of the experiment were to investigate scaling laws in hadron fragmentation [2], to obtain hadron production data for the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector [3]) target to be used for calculating neutrino fluxes, and to obtain inclusive pion, neutron, and photon production data to facilitate proton radiography [4]. While there is considerable data available on inclusive charged particle production [5], there is little data on neutron production. In this article we present results for forward neutron production using proton beams of 58 GeV/c, 84 GeV/c, and 120 GeV/c on hydrogen, beryllium, carbon, bismuth, and uranium targets, and compare these data with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Opportunities with Drell-Yan Scattering at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Paul E.; Fermilab SeaQuest Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    The proton is a composite object made of fundamental, strongly-interacting quarks. Many of the features of the proton can be described by a simple picture based on three valence quarks bound by the exchange of gluons. However, protons are much more complex objects with the vast majority of their mass dynamically generated by the strong force and manifest in the sea quark and gluon distributions. While deep inelastic scattering cannot differentiate between quark and antiquarks, the Drell-Yan process inherently involves the antiquark distributions of either the beam or target hadron. By measuring Drell-Yan scattering, the Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest experiment will study the sea quarks in the proton and in nuclei. The primary goals of this measurement include elucidating the anti-d to anti-u quark asymmetry in the proton and a study of the EMC effect in sea quarks. With the same data, the angular distribution of Drell-Yan scattering will be studied. Previous measurements of these distributions have been interpreted as evidence for transverse momentum dependent Boer-Mulders h⊥1 distribution; although, pion and proton induced Drell-Yan data disagree. The increased statistical precision of the anticipated data will allow for better extraction of the angular distributions. To accomplish these goals, the experiment will use a 120 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector. While the experiment will be taking advantage of equipment from earlier Drell-Yan experiments, the changes in kinematics of the experiment require several, significant upgrades to the spectrometer. The collaboration expects to begin data collection in late fall of 2010.

  12. Central pseudorapidity gaps in events with a leading antiproton at the fermilab tevatron pp collider.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; De Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; Cecco, S De; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Pedis, D De; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; Denis, R St; Sakumoto, W K

    2003-07-01

    We report a measurement of the fraction of events with a large pseudorapidity gap deltaeta within the pseudorapidity region available to the proton dissociation products X in p+p-->p+X. For a final state p of fractional momentum loss xi(p) and 4-momentum transfer squared t(p) within 0.063 is found to be 0.246+/-0.001 (stat)+/-0.042 (syst) [0.184+/-0.001 (stat)+/-0.043 (syst)]. Our results are compared with gap fractions measured in minimum bias pp collisions and with theoretical expectations. PMID:12906532

  13. The magnetic design and field measurement of Fermilab collider detectors: CDF (the Collider Detector at Fermilab) and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.

    1990-02-01

    General magnetic characteristics of the CDF and D0 hadron collider detectors at Fermilab are described. The method and equipment for the field measurement for both detectors are described, and their field measurement data are presented. The magnetic field distribution inside the CDF solenoid magnet was measured extensively only at the boundaries, and the field values inside the volume were reconstructed. The effects due to the joints and the return conductor were measured and are discussed. The flux distribution inside the yokes and the fringing field of the D0 toroids were calculated and compared with measured data. A proposal to generate dipole magnetic field inside the D0 toroidal magnet is discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Distribution of lithostratigraphic units within the central block of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A three-dimensional computer-based model, Version YMP.R2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.; Drake, R.M. II; San Juan, C.A.; Spengler, R.W.; Geslin, J.K.; Moyer, T.C.

    1996-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underlain by 14.0 to 11.6 Ma volcanic rocks tilted eastward 3{degree} to 20{degree} and cut by faults that were primarily active between 12.7 and 11.6 Ma. A three-dimensional computer-based model of the central block of the mountain consists of seven structural subblocks composed of six formations and the interstratified-bedded tuffaceous deposits. Rocks from the 12.7 Ma Tiva Canyon Tuff, which forms most of the exposed rocks on the mountain, to the 13.1 Ma Prow Pass Tuff are modeled with 13 surfaces. Modeled units represent single formations such as the Pah Canyon Tuff, grouped units such as the combination of the Yucca Mountain Tuff with the superjacent bedded tuff, and divisions of the Topopah Spring Tuff such as the crystal-poor vitrophyre interval. The model is based on data from 75 boreholes from which a structure contour map at the base of the Tiva Canyon Tuff and isochore maps for each unit are constructed to serve as primary input. Modeling consists of an iterative cycle that begins with the primary structure-contour map from which isochore values of the subjacent model unit are subtracted to produce the structure contour map on the base of the unit. This new structure contour map forms the input for another cycle of isochore subtraction to produce the next structure contour map. In this method of solids modeling, the model units are presented by surfaces (structure contour maps), and all surfaces are stored in the model. Surfaces can be converted to form volumes of model units with additional effort. This lithostratigraphic and structural model can be used for (1) storing data from, and planning future, site characterization activities, (2) preliminary geometry of units for design of Exploratory Studies Facility and potential repository, and (3) performance assessment evaluations.

  15. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    , as well as two banquets held at the Grand Hotel and Grand Formosa Regent in Taipei. The next CHEP conference will be held in New York, the United States on 21-25 May 2012. We would like to thank the National Science Council of Taiwan, the EU ACEOLE project, commercial sponsors, and the International Advisory Committee and the Programme Committee members for all their support and help. Special thanks to the Programme Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing about 340 post conference proceedings papers. Simon C Lin CHEP 2010 Conference Chair and Proceedings Editor Taipei, Taiwan November 2011 Track Editors/ Programme Committee Chair Simon C Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Online Computing Track Y H Chang, National Central University, Taiwan Harry Cheung, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Event Processing Track Fabio Cossutti, INFN Trieste, Italy Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, USA Ryosuke Itoh, KEK, Japan Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases Track Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Stefan Roiser, CERN, Switzerland Distributed Processing and Analysis Track Kai-Feng Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Ulrik Egede, Imperial College London, UK Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Fons Rademakers, CERN, Switzerland Torre Wenaus, BNL, USA Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies Track Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Bernd Panzer-Steindel, CERN, Switzerland Antonio Wong, BNL, USA Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Grid and Cloud Middleware Track Alberto Di Meglio, CERN, Switzerland Markus Schulz, CERN, Switzerland Collaborative Tools Track Joao Correia Fernandes, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Galvez, Caltech, USA Milos Lokajicek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic International Advisory Committee Chair: Simon C. Lin , Academia Sinica, Taiwan Members: Mohammad Al-Turany , FAIR, Germany Sunanda Banerjee, Fermilab, USA Dario Barberis, CERN

  16. Radiation shielding issues for superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding study performed with the MARS15 code for the final design of the vertical test cryostat facility to be installed in the Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab are presented and discussed.

  17. Commissioning and early operating experience with the Fermilab horizontal test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; Rowe, A.; Theilacker, J.; Votava, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    Fermilab has constructed a facility for testing dressed superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF. This test stand was designed to test both 9-cell 1.3 GHz TESLA-style cavities and 9-cell 3.9 GHz cavities being built by Fermilab for DESY's TTF-FLASH facility. An overview of the test stand and a description of its initial commissioning is described here.

  18. Magnetic field measurements of full length 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.; Ozelis, J.; Wake, M. ); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. ); Ogitsu, T. (Supe

    1992-09-01

    Thirteen 16 m long, 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets, designed jointly by Fermilab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the SSC Laboratory, have been built at Fermilab. The first nine magnets have been fully tested to date. The allowed harmonics are systematically shifted from zero by amounts larger than the specification. The unallowed harmonics, with the exception of the skew sextupole, are consistent with zero. The magnet-to-magnet RMS variation of all harmonics is much smaller than the specification.

  19. Design and fabrication of a multi-element corrector magnet for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.; Drennan, C.; DiMarco, J.; Harding, David J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lackey, J.R.; Prebys, E.J.; Schlabach, P.; Velev, G.V.; Walbridge, D.G.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    A new package of six corrector elements has been designed to better control the beam position, tune, and chromaticity in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron. It incorporates both normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets. These new corrector magnets will be installed in the Fermilab Booster ring in place of old style corrector elements. A severe space restriction and rapid slew rate have posed special challenges. The magnet design, construction, and performance are presented.

  20. Biomedical user facility at the 400-MeV Linac at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, general requirements are discussed on a biomedical user facility at the Fermilab`s 400-MeV Linac, which meets the needs of biology and biophysics experiments, and a conceptual design and typical operations requirements of the facility is presented. It is assumed that no human patient treatment will take place in this facility. If human patients were treated, much greater attention would have to be paid to safeguarding the patients.

  1. An application for tunes and coupling evaluation from turn-by-turn data at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, W.; Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A console application using the phasing of Turn-by-Turn signals from the different BPMs has been tested at the Fermilab Booster. This technique allows the on-line detection of the beam tunes during the fast Booster ramp in conditions where other algorithms were unsuccessful. The application has been recently expanded to include the computation of the linear coupling coefficients. Algorithm and measurement results are presented. Although improved by the phased sum technique the automatic identification of the tunes is not always successful. This makes the use of the on-line application difficult. Ideas for further improvements are under investigation. Measurements have indicated that the effect of the skew quadrupoles is by a factor 3 weaker than expected from the nominal optics. A calibration of the skew quadrupole circuits using the TBT data is planned.

  2. Exclusive Central pi+pi- production in CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael; Swiech, Artur; Zurek, Maria

    2013-10-14

    Using the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, we have measured exclusive pi+pi- production at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV. The pi+pi- pair is central, |y| < 1.0, and there are no other particles detected in |eta| < 5.9. We discuss the mass spectrum, showing f0(980) and f2(1270) resonances, s-dependence, pT-dependence, and angular distributions.

  3. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an R{Phi} tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against {gamma} {yields} e {sup +} e{sup {minus}} events.

  4. First Megascience Experiment at Fermilab: Through Hardship to Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronskikh, Vitaly; Higgins, Valerie

    The E-36 experiment on the small angle proton-proton scattering that officially started in 1970, making use of the Main Ring beams and giving rise to a chain of similar experiments that continued after 1972, was the first experiment at the newly built NAL. It was also the first US/USSR collaboration in particle physics as well as the first experiment that can be confidently characterized as megascience. The experimental data were interpreted as an indication of the pomeron, a quasiparticle that had been named after the Soviet theorist I. Pomeranchuk. The idea of the experiment can be traced back to the Rochester conference held in 1970 in Kiev where two American and Soviet physicists met to develop it and later acquainted NAL director Robert Wilson with it. Wilson enthusiastically set the stage for the experiment at NAL. Involving a gas-jet target built at the Dubna machine shop of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and brought to Batavia, Illinois, the experiment established cooperation between the US and the Soviets in the spirit of their contemporary Apollo-Soyuz space program, thus breaking the ice of the Cold War from within high-energy physics. In this talk based on the Fermilab Archives and interviews, we discuss the financial and administrative obstacles raised by Soviet officials that the Russian collaborators had to overcome, interinstitutional tensions among the Soviets that accompanied the collaboration, NAL culture as well as the roles of scientists in megascience as ambassadors of peace.

  5. Measurement of nuclear dependence of pT at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suyin; E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The suppression of JPsi and Psi' production in the heavy ion collisions relative to their production in the p+p collisions has been proposed as one of the important signatures of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation. The nuclear dependence of JPsi and Psi' production in the p+A collisions is essential to characterize the important baseline of the cold nuclear matter effect in both the initial and final states of collisions. In addition the final-state effect can be further differentiated in comparison with the nuclear dependence of Drell-Yan process. Fermilab E906/SeaQuest is a fixed-target experiment where the JPsi, Psi' and Drell-Yan productions from 120-GeV proton beam colliding with protons and various nuclear targets are measured simultaneously via the dimuon channel. In this talk we will report the recent progress of nuclear dependence of these productions as a function of the transverse momentum of dimuon from E906/SeaQuest's measurements. The results will be compared to those of E866 experiment obtained at higher beam energies. SuYin Wang is with Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, and Particle Physics Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA. She is also a Ph.D. student from Department of Physics, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Taiwan.

  6. The 400 MeV Linac Upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade in planned to increase the energy of the H{sup {minus}} linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHs drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MRs side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of about 7.5 MV/meter. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a 12 MW klystron-based rf power supply. Three of seven accelerator modules have been fabricated, power tested and installed in their temporary location adjacent to the existing DTL. All seven RF Modulators have been completed and klystron installation has begun. Waveguide runs have completed from the power supply gallery to the accelerator modules. The new linac will be powered in the temporary position without beam in order to verify overall system reliability until the laboratory operating schedule permits final conversion to 400 MeV operation.

  7. Cryogenic controls for Fermilab's SRF cavities and test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B.; Bossert, R.; Klebaner, A.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.; Sirotenko, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    A new superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities test facility is now operational at Fermilab's Meson Detector Building (MDB). The facility is supplied cryogens from the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) located in a separate building 500-m away. The design incorporates ambient temperature pumping for super-fluid helium production, as well as three 0.6-kW at 4.5-K refrigerators, five screw compressors, a helium purifier, helium and nitrogen inventory, cryogenic distribution system, and a variety of test cryostats. To control and monitor the vastly distributed cryogenic system, a flexible scheme has been developed. Both commercial and experimental physics tools are used. APACS+{trademark}, a process automation control system from Siemens-Moore, is at the heart of the design. APACS+{trademark} allows engineers to configure an ever evolving test facility while maintaining control over the plant and distribution system. APACS+{trademark} nodes at CTF and MDB are coupled by a fiber optic network. DirectLogic205 PLC's by KOYO{reg_sign} are used as the field level interface to most I/O. The top layer of this system uses EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) as a SCADA/HMI. Utilities for graphical display, control loop setting, real time/historical plotting and alarming have been implemented by using the world-wide library of applications for EPICS. OPC client/server technology is used to bridge across each different platform. This paper presents this design and its successful implementation.

  8. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; et al

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore » at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  9. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Popp, J.; Pronskikh, V.; Tang, Z.; Tartaglia, M.; Wake, M.; Wands, R.; Yamada, R.

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoid at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.

  10. Status of the Fermilab Muon (g-2) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, B.Lee

    2010-01-01

    The New Muon (g-2) Collaboration at Fermilab has proposed to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}, a factor of four better than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven AGS, which obtained a{sub {mu}} = [116592089(63)] x 10{sup -11} {+-} 0.54 ppm. The last digit of a{sub {mu}} is changed from the published value owing to a new value of the ratio of the muon-to-proton magnetic moment that has become available. At present there appears to be a difference between the Standard-Model value and the measured value, at the {approx}= 3 standard deviation level when electron-positron annihilation data are used to determine the lowest-order hadronic piece of the Standard Model contribution. The improved experiment, along with further advances in the determination of the hadronic contribution, should clarify this difference. Because of its ability to constrain the interpretation of discoveries made at the LHC, the improved measurement will be of significant value, whatever discoveries may come from the LHC.

  11. Fermilab E866 (NuSea) Figures and Data Plots

    DOE Data Explorer

    None

    The NuSea Experiment at Fermilab studied the internal structure of protons, in particular the difference between up quarks and down quarks. This experiment also addressed at least two other physics questions: nuclear effects on the production of charmonia states (bound states of charm and anti-charm quarks) and energy loss of quarks in nuclei from Drell-Yan measurements on nuclei. While much of the NuSea data are available only to the collaboration, figures, data plots, and tables are presented as stand-alone items for viewing or download. They are listed in conjunction with the published papers, theses, or presentations in which they first appeared. The date range is 1998 to 2008. To see these figures and plots, click on E866 publications or go directly to http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/papers.html. Theses are at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866theses/e866theses.html and the presentations are found at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866talks/e866talks.html. Many of the items are postscript files.

  12. Field measurements in the Fermilab electron cooling solenoid prototype

    SciTech Connect

    A. C. Crawford et al.

    2003-10-02

    To increase the Tevatron luminosity, Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system [1] to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring. The schematic layout of the Recycler Electron Cooling (REC) system is shown in Figure 1. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through a cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 10{sup -4} rad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. As part of the R&D effort, a cooling section prototype consisting of 9 modules (90% of the total length of a future section) was assembled and measured. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of solenoid prototype field measurements. The design of the cooling section solenoid is discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes details of a dedicated measurement system, capable of measuring small transverse field components, while the system's measurement errors are analyzed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains measured field distributions of individual elements of the cooling section as well as an evaluation of the magnetic shielding efficiency. An algorithm of field adjustments for providing lowest possible electron trajectory perturbations is proposed in Chapter 6; also, this chapter shows the results of our first attempts of implementing the algorithm.

  13. Alignment and Aperture Scan at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Lackey, J.; Marsh, W.; Pellico, W.; Still, D.; Triplet, K.; Waller, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Booster is currently in the process of an intensity upgrade referred to as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The goal of PIP is to have the Booster provide a proton beam flux of 2 x 10{sup 17} protons/hour. This is almost double the current operation of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} protons/hour. Beam losses in the machine due to the increased flux will create larger integrated doses on aperture limiting components that will need to be mitigated. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at a rep rate of 15hz and then extracts beam to the Main Injector. Several percent of the beam is lost within 3 msec after injection in the early part of acceleration. The aperture at injection energy was recently measured using corrector scans. Along with magnet survey data and aperture scan data a plan to realign the magnets in the Booster was developed and implemented in May 2012. The beam studies, analysis of the scan and alignment data, and the result of the magnet moves are presented.

  14. Particle Production Measurements using the MIPP Detector at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Sonam

    2013-04-01

    The Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP) experiment at Fermilab is a fixed target hadron production experiment which uses 120 GeV/c primary protons from the Main Injector to produce secondary beams of ^±, K^±, p and p from 5 to 90 GeV/c as projectiles on nuclear targets. It is designed to measure particle production in interactions of projectile p/p/^±/K^± on nuclear targets which include H, Be, C, Bi and U, and a dedicated run with the NuMI target. We present the inelastic cross sections for 58 and 85 GeV/c p-H interactions, and 58 and 120 GeV/c p-C interactions. A new method is described to account for the low multiplicity inefficiencies in the interaction trigger using KNO scaling. Inelastic cross sections as a function of multiplicity are also presented. The MIPP data are compared with the Monte Carlo predictions and previous measurements. We also describe an algorithm to identify charged particles (^±/p/p etc.), and present preliminary e^±, ^±, K^±, p and p particle production cross sections in bins of pT^2 and xF.

  15. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  16. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  17. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  18. Cryogenic Controls for Fermilab's Srf Cavities and Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, B.; Bossert, R.; Klebaner, A.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.; Sirotenko, V.

    2008-03-01

    A new superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities test facility is now operational at Fermilab's Meson Detector Building (MDB). The Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), located in a separate building 500 m away, supplies the facility with cryogens. The design incorporates ambient temperature pumping for superfluid helium production, as well as three 0.6 kW at 4.5 K refrigerators, five screw compressors, a helium purifier, helium and nitrogen inventory, cryogenic distribution system, and a variety of test cryostats. To control and monitor the vastly distributed cryogenic system, a flexible scheme has been developed. Both commercial and experimental physics tools are used. APACS+™, a process automation control system from Siemens-Moore, is at the heart of the design. APACS+™ allows engineers to configure an ever evolving test facility while maintaining control over the plant and distribution system. APACS+™ nodes at CTF and MDB are coupled by a fiber optic network. DirectLogic205 PLCs by KOYO® are used as the field level interface to most I/O. The top layer of this system uses EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) as a SCADA/HMI. Utilities for graphical display, control loop setting, real time/historical plotting and alarming have been implemented by using the world-wide library of applications for EPICS. OPC client/server technology is used to bridge across each different platform. This paper presents this design and its successful implementation.

  19. Particle Production Measurements Using the MIPP Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Sonam; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Choudhary, Brajesh C.; Raja, Rajendran

    2015-05-01

    Inelastic cross sections have been measured for H, Be, C and Bi targets using proton beams at momenta of 58, 85 and 120 GeV/c using the MIPP experiment at Fermilab. The cross section dependence on the atomic weight (A) of the targets has been found to vary as A$^{\\alpha}$, where $\\alpha$ is 0.75 $\\pm$ 0.03 for a beam momentum of 58 GeV/c and 0.66 $\\pm$ 0.03 for 120 GeV/c. The MIPP data have been compared with the Monte Carlo (DPMJET/FLUKA) predictions and previous measurements. Inelastic cross sections have also been measured as a function of multiplicity for H and C targets using proton beams at different momenta. The DPMJET/FLUKA multiplicity shapes disagree with those of data. Inclusive charged pion production cross sections have also been measured in bins of true momentum for C target using 58 and 120 GeV/c proton beams, and compared with the FLUKA Monte Carlo.

  20. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Fermilab's Ilc Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  1. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  2. Microdosimetric investigations at the Fast Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K.M.

    1997-12-31

    Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e. oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 {+-} 0.04 determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e{sup *} and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e{sup *} and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated. In the unmodified beam, a negligible enhancement for a 50 ppm boron loading was measured. To boost the boron dose enhancement to 3% it was necessary to change the primary proton energy from 66 MeV and to filter the beam by 90 mm of tungsten.

  3. Electron cloud experiments at Fermilab: Formation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments at Fermilab to explore the electron cloud phenomenon. The Main Injector will have its beam intensity increased four-fold in the Project X upgrade, and would be subject to instabilities from the electron cloud. We present measurements of the cloud formation in the Main Injector and experiments with materials for the mitigation of the Cloud. An experimental installation of Titanium-Nitride (TiN) coated beam pipes has been under study in the Main Injector since 2009; this material was directly compared to an adjacent stainless chamber through electron cloud measurement with Retarding Field Analyzers (RFAs). Over the long period of running we were able to observe the secondary electron yield (SEY) change and correlate it with electron fluence, establishing a conditioning history. Additionally, the installation has allowed measurement of the electron energy spectrum, comparison of instrumentation techniques, and energydependent behavior of the electron cloud. Finally, a new installation, developed in conjunction with Cornell and SLAC, will allow direct SEY measurement of material samples irradiated in the accelerator.

  4. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  5. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; et al

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100 × 150 μm2 pixelmore » cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.« less

  6. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  7. Near-ideal emittance exchange at the Fermilab Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.S.; Ruan, J.; Edwards, H.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Santucci, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab is presently home to an emittance exchange (EEX) experiment. The emittance exchange beamline consists of a 3.9 GHz normal conducting deflecting mode cavity flanked by two doglegs. Electron bunches with charges of 250 pC and energy of 14.3 MeV are routinely sent through the exchanger. Here we present results of a 1:1 transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange. The advent of synchrotron radiation light sources and free electron lasers (FEL) has been a boon to a wide range of disciplines, resulting in a constantly increasing demand for brighter sources and better resolution. This demand translates to requirements on the properties of the underlying electron beams which produce the light. In particular, one is driven to find ways to precisely manipulate the phase space volume of the beam to optimize it for the desired application. Motivated by the FEL requirement for a small transverse emittance, Cornacchia and Emma developed a transverse/longitudinal emittance exchange concept using a deflecting mode rf cavity located in the dispersive section of a magnetic chicane. This method however, contained residual couplings between the two dimensions, leading Kim to propose a modified version which removed that coupling and resulted in a complete exchange. In this configuration, the deflecting mode cavity is placed between two magnetic doglegs thereby removing the afore-mentioned coupling term. We have used this beamline with upgraded diagnostics to measure a near-ideal 1:1 emittance exchange.

  8. A disoriented chiral condensate search at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Convery, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    MiniMax (Fermilab T-864) was a small test/experiment at the Tevatron designed to search for disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) in the forward direction. Relativistic quantum field theory treats the vacuum as a medium, with bulk properties characterized by long-range order parameters. This has led to suggestions that regions of {open_quotes}disoriented vacuum{close_quotes} might be formed in high-energy collision processes. In particular, the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD could lead to regions of vacuum which have chiral order parameters disoriented to directions which have non-zero isospin, i.e. disoriented chiral condensates. A signature of DCC is the resulting distribution of the fraction of produced pions which are neutral. The MiniMax detector at the C0 collision region of the Tevatron was a telescope of 24 multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC`s) with a lead converter behind the eighth MWPC, allowing the detection of charged particles and photon conversions in an acceptance approximately a circle of radius 0.6 in pseudorapidity-azimuthal-angle space, centered on pseudorapidity {eta} {approx} 4. An electromagnetic calorimeter was located behind the MWPC telescope, and hadronic calorimeters and scintillator were located in the upstream anti-proton direction to tag diffractive events.

  9. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f˜20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  10. Stability of electron energy in the Fermilab electron cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    A powerful electron beam (4.3 MeV, 0.1 A DC) generated by an electrostatic accelerator has been used at Fermilab for three years to cool antiprotons in the Recycler ring. For electron cooling to be effective, the electron energy should not deviate from its optimum value by more than 500V. The main tool for studying the energy stability is the electron beam position in a high-dispersion area. The energy ripple (frequencies above 0.2 Hz) was found to be less than 150 eV rms; the main cause of the ripple is the fluctuations of the chain current. In addition, the energy can drift to up to several keV that is traced to two main sources. One of them is a drift of the charging current, and another is a temperature dependence of generating voltmeter readings. The paper describes the efforts to reach the required level of stability as well as the setup, diagnostics, results of measurements, and operational experience.

  11. Probing neutrino mass with displaced vertices at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O.J.P.; Magro, M.B.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2005-04-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation can generate naturally the observed neutrino mass spectrum as well as mixings. One interesting feature of these scenarios is that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is unstable, with several of its decay properties predicted in terms of neutrino mixing angles. A smoking gun of this model in colliders is the presence of displaced vertices due to LSP decays in large parts of the parameter space. In this work we focus on the simplest model of this type that comes from minimal supergravity with universal R-parity conserving soft breaking of supersymmetry augmented with bilinear R-parity breaking terms at the electroweak scale (RmSUGRA). We evaluate the potential of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe the RmSUGRA parameters through the analysis of events possessing two displaced vertices stemming from LSP decays. We show that requiring two displaced vertices in the events leads to a reach in m{sub 1/2} twice the one in the usual multilepton signals in a large fraction of the parameter space.

  12. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central...

  13. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central...

  14. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central...

  15. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central...

  16. Development of the beam extraction synchronization system at the Fermilab Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiya, K.; Chaurize, S.; Drennan, C. C.; Pellico, W.; Sullivan, T.; Triplett, A. K.; Waller, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    The new beam extraction synchronization control system called "Magnetic Cogging" was developed at the Fermilab Booster and it replaces a system called "RF Cogging" as part of the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).[1] The flux throughput goal for the PIP is 2.2×1017 protons per hour, which is double the present flux. The flux increase will be accomplished by doubling the number of beam cycles which, in turn, will double the beam loss in the Booster accelerator if nothing else is done. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV and extracts it to the Main Injector (MI) or Recycler Ring (RR). Cogging controls the beam extraction gap position which is created early in the Booster cycle and synchronizes the gap to the rising edge of the Booster extraction kicker and the MI/RR injection kicker. The RF Cogging system controls the gap position by changing only the radial position of the beam thus limiting the beam aperture and creating beam loss due to beam scraping. The Magnetic Cogging system controls the gap position with the magnetic field of the dipole correctors while the radial position feedback keeps the beam on a central orbit. Also with Magnetic Cogging the gap creation can occur earlier in the Booster cycle when the removed particles are at a lower energy. Thus Magnetic Cogging reduces the deposited energy of the lost particles (beam energy loss) and results in less beam loss activation. Energy loss was reduced by 40% by moving the gap creation energy from 700 MeV to 400 MeV when the Booster Cogging system was switched from RF Cogging to Magnetic Cogging in March 2015.

  17. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  18. Beam Diagnosis and Lattice Modeling of the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2005-09-01

    A realistic lattice model is a fundamental basis for the operation of a synchrotron. In this study various beam-based measurements, including orbit response matrix (ORM) and BPM turn-by-turn data are used to verify and calibrate the lattice model of the Fermilab Booster. In the ORM study, despite the strong correlation between the gradient parameters of adjacent magnets which prevents a full determination of the model parameters, an equivalent lattice model is obtained by imposing appropriate constraints. The fitted gradient errors of the focusing magnets are within the design tolerance and the results point to the orbit offsets in the sextupole field as the source of gradient errors. A new method, the independent component analysis (ICA) is introduced to analyze multiple BPM turn-by-turn data taken simultaneously around a synchrotron. This method makes use of the redundancy of the data and the time correlation of the source signals to isolate various components, such as betatron motion and synchrotron motion, from raw BPM data. By extracting clean coherent betatron motion from noisy data and separates out the betatron normal modes when there is linear coupling, the ICA method provides a convenient means to measure the beta functions and betatron phase advances. It also separates synchrotron motion from the BPM samples for dispersion function measurement. The ICA method has the capability to separate other perturbation signals and is robust over the contamination of bad BPMs. The application of the ICA method to the Booster has enabled the measurement of the linear lattice functions which are used to verify the existing lattice model. The transverse impedance and chromaticity are measured from turn-by-turn data using high precision tune measurements. Synchrotron motion is also observed in the BPM data. The emittance growth of the Booster is also studied by data taken with ion profile monitor (IPM). Sources of emittance growth are examined and an approach to cure

  19. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Phil S.; /Rochester U.

    2007-08-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  20. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Lammel, S.

    1997-05-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II.

  1. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

    2011-07-26

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

  2. Preliminary report on the utilization of the Fermilab site for a future accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Site Utilization Working Group

    1996-10-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the utility of the Fermilab site for future accelerator projects. It responds to a request from the Director to evaluate how the Fermilab site and infrastructure may be relevant to future accelerator projects in the U.S. The SSC experience suggests that any major new project will have to be based on the existing infrastructure at one of the National Laboratories. This work presents only the technical issues and the benefits of the Fermilab site and infrastructure. The projects treated are: (1) A really large hadron collider based on the ``Pipetron`` vision of low-field (2 Tesla) magnets in a small diameter tunnel. Another option, not treated in detail, is a hadron collider using high field magnets. (2) Muon Colliders with 250 GeV and 2 TeV per beam. (3) A linear electron collider with 250 to 500 GeV per beam. The infrastructure of the state of Illinois - geology, hydrology, power and surface water- seems remarkably well suited to any of these projects. The geology of most of Illinois, including Fermilab, contains a dolomite layer that: has low seismic activity, is at an appropriate depth to provide radiation protection, is essentially impervious to water movement and thus satisfies hydrology requirements. There is adequate electrical power - both locally and statewide. We first give brief overviews of the Fermilab and Illinois infrastructure - geology, hydrology, power, and water - and then a summary of each project. On the basis of what we have learned, we feel that Fermilab must be considered seriously as a site for any of these projects. Beyond this point, however site-specific plans will need to be developed for each of the projects.

  3. Experiment and simulations of sub-ps electron bunch train generation at Fermilab photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Church, M.; Piot, P.; Prokop, C.R.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-10-01

    Recently the generation of electron bunch trains with sub-picosecond time structure has been experimentally demonstrated at the A0 photoinjector of Fermilab using a transverse-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. The temporal profile of the bunch train can be easily tuned to meet the requirements of the applications of modern accelerator beams. In this paper we report the A0 bunch-train experiment and explore numerically the possible extension of this technique to shorter time scales at the Fermilab SRF Accelerator Test Facility, a superconducting linear electron accelerator currently under construction in the NML building.

  4. Performance of 3.9 GHz SRF Cavities at Fermilab's ILCTA_MDB Horizontal Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is building a cryomodule containing four 3.9 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at the Deutsches Elektronen-SYnchrotron (DESY) laboratory. Before assembling the cavities into the cryomodule, each individual cavity is tested at Fermilab's Horizontal Test Stand (HTS). The HTS provides the capability to test fully-dressed SRF cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF in order to verify that the cavities achieve performance requirements under these conditions. The performance at the HTS of the 3.9 GHz cavities built for FLASH is presented here.

  5. Broad-band chopper for a CW proton linac at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Lebedev, V.A.; Solyak, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Sun, D.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The future Fermilab program in the high energy physics is based on a new facility called the Project X [1] to be built in the following decade. It is based on a 3 MW CW linear accelerator delivering the 3 GeV 1 mA H{sup -} beam to a few experiments simultaneously. Small fraction of this beam will be redirected for further acceleration to 8 GeV to be injected to the Recycler/Main Injector for a usage in a neutrino program and other synchrotron based high energy experiments. Requirements and technical limitations to the bunch-by-bunch chopper for the Fermilab Project X are discussed.

  6. Beam manipulation and compression using broadband rf systems in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    G William Foster et al.

    2004-07-09

    A novel method for beam manipulation, compression, and stacking using a broad band RF system in circular accelerators is described. The method uses a series of linear voltage ramps in combination with moving barrier pulses to azimuthally compress, expand, or cog the beam. Beam manipulations can be accomplished rapidly and, in principle, without emittance growth. The general principle of the method is discussed using beam dynamics simulations. Beam experiments in the Fermilab Recycler Ring convincingly validate the concept. Preliminary experiments in the Fermilab Main Injector to investigate its potential for merging two ''booster batches'' to produce high intensity proton beams for neutrino and antiproton production are described.

  7. First high power pulsed tests of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, R.; Branlard, J.; Chase, B.; Darve, C.; Joireman, P.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.; Peoples-Evans, E.; Peterson, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    In the recently commissioned superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab (SCTF), a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke resonator (SSR1) has been tested for the first time with its input power coupler. Previously, this cavity had been tested CW with a low power, high Q{sub ext} test coupler; first as a bare cavity in the Fermilab Vertical Test Stand and then fully dressed in the SCTF. For the tests described here, the design input coupler with Q{sub ext} {approx} 10{sup 6} was used. Pulsed power was provided by a Toshiba E3740A 2.5 MW klystron.

  8. Production and test results of SC 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charlie; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Gonin, Ivan; Mitchell, Donald; Olis, D.; Rowe, Allan; Salman, Tariq; Solyak, Nikolay; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve beam performances for TTF-FEL facility. In the frame of collaboration Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. In this paper we discuss the status of the cavity and coupler production and the first result of cavity tests. It is hoped that this project will be completed during the first half of 2007 and the cryomodule delivered to DESY in this time span.

  9. Automatic steering corrections to minimize injection oscillations in the Fermilab Antiproton Source rings

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.J.; Riddiford, A.W.

    1989-03-01

    Missteering of particle beam at injection into a circular accelerator produces coherent betatron oscillations. The beam position monitor system in the Antiproton Source at Fermilab can measure the beam position on each turn around the ring during these oscillations. From the amplitude and phase of the oscillations, corrections to the beamline steering are calculated to remove the oscillations. The analysis includes the case where the horizontal and vertical tunes are quite strongly coupled. This technique has proved to be valuable both in operation of the Fermilab Collider and as an analytical tool. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Observation of Instabilities of Coherent Transverse Ocillations in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Eddy, N.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Lebedev, V.; Marsh, W.; Pellico, W.; Triplett, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Booster - built more than 40 years ago - operates well above the design proton beam intensity of 4 {center_dot} 10{sup 12} ppp. Still, the Fermilab neutrino experiments call for even higher intensity exceeding 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 12} ppp. A multitude of intensity related effects must be overcome in order to meet this goal including suppression of coherent dipole instabilities of transverse oscillations which manifest themselves as a sudden drop in the beam current. In this report we present the results of observation of these instabilities at different tune, coupling and chromaticity settings and discuss possible cures.

  11. Performance of 3.9 GHz SRF cavities at Fermilab's ILCTA_MDB nhorizontal test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Elvin; Hocker, Andy; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermilab is building a cryomodule containing four 3.9 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at the Deutsches Elektronen-SYnchrotron (DESY) laboratory. Before assembling the cavities into the cryomodule, each individual cavity is tested at Fermilab's Horizontal Test Stand (HTS). The HTS provides the capability to test fully-dressed SRF cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF in order to verify that the cavities achieve performance requirements under these conditions. The performance at the HTS of the 3.9 GHz cavities built for FLASH is presented here.

  12. Development of Rutherford-type cables for high field accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Borissov, E.; Elementi, L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lombardo, V.; Rusy, A.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Fermilab's cabling facility has been upgraded to a maximum capability of 42 strands. This facility is being used to study the effect of cabling on the performance of the various strands, and for the development and fabrication of cables in support of the ongoing magnet R&D programs. Rutherford cables of various geometries, packing factors, with and without a stainless steel core, were fabricated out of Cu alloys, NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Al, and various Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The parameters of the upgraded cabling machine and results of cable R&D efforts at Fermilab are reported.

  13. Installation Status of the Electron Beam Profiler for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Alvarez, M.; Fitzgerald, J.; Lundberg, C.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.; Zagel, J.; Blokland, W.

    2015-11-06

    The planned neutrino program at Fermilab requires large proton beam intensities in excess of 2 MW. Measuring the transverse profiles of these high intensity beams is challenging and often depends on non-invasive techniques. One such technique involves measuring the deflection of a probe beam of electrons with a trajectory perpendicular to the proton beam. A device such as this is already in use at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL and the installation of a similar device is underway in the Main Injector at Fermilab. The present installation status of the electron beam profiler for the Main Injector will be discussed together with some simulations and test stand results.

  14. Design, performance and production of the Fermilab TESLA RF input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, M.

    1996-10-01

    The TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) requires as one of its technical components a radiofrequency (rf) input coupler that transfers 1.3 GHz rf energy from the rf distribution system to a nine-cell superconducting accelerating cavity operating at a temperature of 1.8 K. The input coupler design is driven by numerous design criteria, which result in a rather complicated implementation. The production of twelve input couplers for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is underway at Fermilab, with the first two couplers having been delivered late in 1995. This paper discusses the Fermilab TESLA rf input coupler design, recent test results, and production issues.

  15. A study of Central Exclusive Production

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, James; /Manchester U.

    2008-09-01

    Central exclusive production of a system X in a collision between two hadrons h is defined as hh {yields} h + X + h with no other activity apart from the decay products of X. This thesis presents predictions for the production cross section of a CP violating supersymmetric Higgs boson and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model. The ExHuME Monte Carlo generator was written to simulate central exclusive processes and is described and explored. A comparison to di-jet observations made by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, Fermilab between January and June 2004 is made and the distributions found support the predictions of ExHuME.

  16. Impedance budget and beam stability analysis of the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, M.A.; Ng, K.Y.

    1993-05-01

    The impedance budget of the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) is estimated, which includes the contributions from the resistive walls, bellows, rf cavities, steps, Lambertsons, etc. Beam stability during ramping and bunch coalescence is analyzed. The transverse resistive-wall coupled bunch growth is found to be somewhat worse than the situation in the Main Ring (MR).

  17. The NuMI proton beam at Fermilab successes and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, S.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The NuMI beam at Fermilab has delivered over 5 x 10{sup 20} 120 GeV protons to the neutrino production target since the start for MINOS [1] neutrino oscillation experiment operation in 2005. We report on proton beam commissioning and operation status, including successes and challenges with this beam.

  18. DOE Lab-Wide Review of Fermilab May 19-20, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    1987-05-01

    This book is submitted as a written adjunct to the Annual DOE Lab-Wide Review of Fermilab, scheduled this year for May 19, 20, 1987. In it are described the functions and activities of the various laboratory areas plus statements of plans and goals for the coming year.

  19. Limits on the transverse phase space density in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Holmes, S.D.

    1987-09-01

    Recent results on intensity and transverse density limitations in the Fermilab 8-GeV Booster are presented. The evidence suggests that the limits are set by incoherent space-charge effects at low energy. Data are interpreted in terms of the space-charge tune shift and possible means of improving performance further are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell`Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M.; Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Yao, W.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.R.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Skarha, J.; Snider, F.D.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.F.; Song, T.Y.; Dunn, A.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Azzi, P.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given.