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Sample records for fermilab tevatron proton-antiproton

  1. QCD Results from the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, Andreas; CDF, for the; Collaborations, D0

    2010-01-01

    Selected recent quantum chromodynamics (QCD) measurements are reviewed for Fermilab Run II Tevatron proton-antiproton collisions studied by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0 Collaborations at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Tantamount to Rutherford scattering studies at the TeV scale, inclusive jet and dijet production cross-section measurements are used to seek and constrain new particle physics phenomena, test perturbative QCD calculations, inform parton distribution function (PDF) determinations, and extract a precise value of the strong coupling constant, a{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1161{sub -0.0048}{sup +0.0041}. Inclusive photon production cross-section measurements reveal an inability of next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations to describe low-energy photons arising directly in the hard scatter. Events with {gamma} + 3-jet configurations are used to measure the increasingly important double parton scattering (DPS) phenomenon, with an obtained effective interaction cross section of {sigma}{sub eff} = 16.4 {+-} 2.3 mb. Observations of central exclusive particle production demonstrate the viability of observing the Standard Model Higgs boson using similar techniques at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Three areas of inquiry into lower energy QCD, crucial to understanding high-energy collider phenomena, are discussed: the examination of intra-jet track kinematics to infer that jet formation is dominated by pQCD, and not hadronization, effects; detailed studies of the underlying event and its universality; and inclusive minimum-bias charged-particle momentum and multiplicity measurements, which are shown to challenge the Monte Carlo generators.

  2. 132 ns Bunch Spacing in the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.; Holt, J.; Johnstone, J.A.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; McGinnis, D.

    1994-12-01

    Following completion of the Fermilab Main Injector it is expected that the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider will be operating at a luminosity in excess of 5{times}10{sup 3l} cm{sup {minus}2} with 36 proton and antiproton bunches spaced at 396 nsec. At this luminosity, each of the experimental detectors will see approximately 1.3 interactions per crossing. Potential improvements to the collider low beta and rf systems could push the luminosity beyond 10{times}10{sup 3l} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}, resulting in more than three interactions per crossing if the bunch separation is left unchanged. This paper discusses issues related to moving to {approx}100 bunch operation, with bunch spacings of 132 nsec, in the Tevatron. Specific scenarios and associated hardware requirements are described.

  3. Quarkonium production in proton antiproton collisions at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, S.M.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1996-11-01

    Charmonium and bottomonium production is studied using {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} data samples collected by the CDF and D{null} experiments during the 1992-96 {ital p{anti p}} collider run at the Fermilab Tevatron. The inclusive cross sections as a function of the transverse momentum of reconstructed quarkonium states are measured. The results are compared with theoretical predictions, which take into account different quarkonium production mechanisms.

  4. Implementation of Stochastic Cooling Hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  5. Implementation of stochastic cooling hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  6. Tevatron status

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1989-03-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is both the world's highest energy accelerator system and first large-scale superconducting synchrotron. Since Tevatron commissioning in July 1983, the accelerator has operated in 1984, 1985 and 1987 with extracted beams of 800 GeV for three runs of fixed target physics, and in 1987, and 1988, with proton-antiproton colliding beams at 900 /times/ 900 GeV. This paper will focus on the collider operation of the Tevatron: its present status and the outlook for its longer-term future evolution. 18 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex.

  8. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. These efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  9. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in bothmore » software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Furthermore, these efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.« less

  10. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Furthermore, these efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  11. W+ jets production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, J.R.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    1997-05-01

    The production properties of jets in W events have been measured using {radical}s = 1.8 TeV pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Experimental results from several CDF and D0 analyses are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  12. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π, φφ and D. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D.

  13. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π∓, φφ and D*±. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D*±.

  14. Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2015-09-25

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab, has undergone intense studies in the last 20 years. Currently, CDF and D0 converge on their measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections using the full Tevatron data sample. In these proceedings, the latest results on inclusive and differential measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections at the Tevatron are reported.

  15. The W boson transverse momentum spectrum in proton-antiproton collisions at radical s = 1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, B.L.

    1991-02-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) was used to measure the transverse momentum distribution of W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider. The W bosons were identified by the decay W {yields} e{nu}. The results are in good agreement with a next-to-leading order calculation. The cross section for W production with P{sub T} > 50 GeV/c is 423 {plus minus} 58 (stat.) {plus minus} 108 (sys.) pb. 58 refs., 53 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from proton-antiproton collisions at energy = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrandrea, Paolo; /Siena U.

    2008-06-01

    at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 32}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + b{bar b} are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - P{sub T} jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  17. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  18. Sonic Helium Detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  19. The performance of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1991-10-01

    This paper will describe the actual operating performance of the Tevatron, operating as a collider, and will indicate the planned upgrades which will enhance, the physics results coming from the experiments being performed at Fermilab.

  20. Recent results from the CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S. . High Energy Physics Lab.)

    1989-09-01

    Recent results from the CDF experiment are described. The Standard Model gives a good description of jet production, and W/Z production and decay. There is no evidence yet for the top quark, for fourth generation quarks, or for deviations from the Standard Model ascribable to quark substructure, supersymmetric particles, or heavy additional W-like or Z-like bosons. Limits are given where applicable. A search for a light Higgs Boson is also described. 11 refs., 24 figs.

  1. Exclusive e+e-, di-photon and di-jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2007-05-01

    Results from studies on exclusive production of electron-position pair, di-photon, and dijet production at CDF in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. THe first observation and cross section measurements of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and di-jet production in hadron-hadron collisions are emphasized.

  2. Recent Results of Top Quark Physics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R. Y.

    2015-07-09

    Twenty years after its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, the top quark still undergoes intensive studies at the Tevatron and the LHC at CERN. In this article, recent top quark physics results from CDF and D0 are reported. In particular, measurements of single top quark and double top quark production, the $t\\bar{t}$ forward-backward asymmetry and the top quark mass are discussed.

  3. Increasing the energy of the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab has reached its eleventh year of operation since being commissioned in 1983. Last summer, four significant upgrades to the cryogenic system became operational which allow Tevatron operation at higher energy. This came after many years of R&D, power testing in sectors (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation. The improvements include the addition of cold helium vapor compressors, supporting hardware for subatmospheric operation, a new satellite refrigerator control system, and a higher capacity central helium liquefier. A description of each cryogenic upgrade, commissioning experience, and attempts to increase the energy of the Tevatron are presented.

  4. Study of substructure of high transverse momentum jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alon, R.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Duchovni, E.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Perez, G.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.

    2012-05-03

    A study of the substructure of jets with transverse momentum greater than 400 GeV/c produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and recorded by the CDF II detector is presented. The distributions of the jet mass, angularity, and planar flow are measured for the first time in a sample with an integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb⁻¹. The observed substructure for high mass jets is consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  5. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Charge Asymmetry in Top-Quark Pair Production in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at DOe

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Su-Jung

    2008-11-23

    A measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in top-antitop (tt-bar) pair production in proton-antiproton (pp-bar) collisions is presented. The asymmetry is measured for different jet multiplicities in the lepton+jets final state on 0.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the DOe experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The result is sensitive to new physics, which is demonstrated by setting an upper limit on tt-bar production via heavy neutral gauge bosons (Z')

  6. Review of recent Tevatron operations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider continues to improve its luminosity performance at the energy frontier {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The recent Tevatron operation will be reviewed and notable tasks leading to advancements will be highlighted. The topics to be covered include: work performed during the 14-week shutdown in 2006, improved helical orbits, automatic orbit stabilization during high-energy physics (HEP) stores, optics corrections, improvements in the quench protection system, and avenues to maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the CDF and D0 experiments.

  7. Tevatron collider operations and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H. Garbincius

    2004-06-17

    Fermilab's Tevatron is a proton-antiproton collider with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The antiprotons are produced by 125 GeV protons from the Main Injector striking a stainless steel target. The 8 GeV antiprotons are collected and cooled in the Debuncher and Accumulator rings of the Antiproton Source and, just recently, in the Recycler ring before acceleration by the Main Injector and the Tevatron. In addition to energy, a vital parameter for generating physics data is the Luminosity delivered to the experiments given by a formula that is listed in detail in the paper.

  8. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.; Kerns, C.; Kerns, Q.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Tawzer, S.; Wildman, D.

    1987-03-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for the accelration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented.

  9. Channeling collimation studies at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Richard A.; Drozhdin, Alexandr I.; Fliller, Raymond P., III; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Shiltsev, Vladimir D.; Still, Dean A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Bent crystal channeling has promising advantages for accelerator beam collimation at high energy hadron facilities such as the LHC. This significance has been amplified by several surprising developments including multi-pass channeling and the observation of enhanced deflections over the entire arc of a bent crystal. The second effect has been observed both at RHIC and recently at the Tevatron. Results are reported showing channeling collimation of the circulating proton beam halo at the Tevatron. Parenthetically, this study is the highest energy proton channeling experiment ever carried out. The study is continuing.

  10. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  11. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f˜20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  12. Fermilab Tevatron and Pbar source status report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H.

    1986-08-01

    The antiproton production cycle is enumerated, and the commissioning of the antiproton source is described, giving milestones and major obstacles. The Tevatron collider operation is described, including procedure to load the Tevatron with three bunches of protons and three bunches of antiprotons. Commissioning of the Main Ring and Tevatron for collider operation is described. Development and accelerator studies in four areas were necessary: main ring RF manipulations; controls and applications software support; Tevatron storage and low-beta squeeze sequence; and study of various beam transfers, storage steps, and sequences. Final tests are described. A long range upgrade program is presently under evaluation to accomplish these goals: luminosity increase to 5 x 10/sup 31/ cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/, production rates up to 4 x 10/sup 11/ antiprotons/hr, and intensity increase for fixed target operation. Beam quality is to be improved by the injector and main ring upgrades, and the luminosity goal is addressed by the Collider upgrade. (LEW)

  13. A Search for the singlet-P state h(c)(1**1 P(1)) of charmonium in proton-antiproton annihilations at Fermilab experiment E835p

    SciTech Connect

    Joffe, David Noah

    2004-12-01

    The author presents the results of a search for the spin-singlet P-wave state h{sub c}(1{sup 1}P{sub 1}) of charmonium formed through proton-antiproton annihilation at Fermilab experiment E835. The decay channels which were studied were p{bar p} {yields} J/{psi} + X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X, p{bar p} {yields} J/{psi} + {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + {gamma}{gamma}, p{bar p} {yields} J/{psi} + {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + 4{gamma}, and the neutral channel p{bar p} {yields} {eta}{sub c}{gamma} {yields} ({gamma}{gamma}){gamma}. The decay p{bar p} {yields} J/{psi}{gamma} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, into which {sup 1}P{sub 1} decay is forbidden by C-parity conservation, was also examined for comparison. The 90% confidence upper limits for the decay channels studied in the mass range 3525.1-3527.3 MeV for a {sup 1}P{sub 1} resonance with a presumed width of 1.0 MeV were determined to be B(p{bar p} {yields} {sup 1}P{sub 1}) x B({sup 1}P{sub 1} {yields} J/{psi} + X) {le} 1.8 x 10{sup -7}, B(p{bar p} {yields} {sup 1}P{sub 1}) x B({sup 1}P{sub 1} {yields} J/{psi} + {pi}{sup 0}) {le} 1.2 x 10{sup -7}, and B(p{bar p} {yields} {sup 1}P{sub 1}) x B({sup 1}P{sub 1} {yields} J/{psi}{gamma}) {le} 1.0 x 10{sup -7}. No evidence for a {sup 1}P{sub 1} enhancement was observed in either of the two additional reactions studied; p{bar p} {yields} J/{psi} + {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + 4{gamma} and p{bar p} {yields} {eta}{sub c}{gamma} {yields} ({gamma}{gamma}){gamma}.

  14. Fermilab tevatron high level RF accelerating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Tawzer, S.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer. A cavity consists of two quarter-wave resonators placed back to back with a coaxial drift tube separating the two accelerating gaps by ..pi.. radians. The cavities are very similar to the prototype which has been previously described/sup 3/ and is operating as Station 8 in the Tevatron. Only additional water cooling around the high current region of the drift tube supports and a double loop used to monitor the unbalance current through the Hipernom mode damping resistor have been added. Each cavity has a Q of about7100, a shunt impedance of 1.2 M..cap omega.., and is capable of running cw with a peak accelerating voltage of 360

  15. Vacuum control subsystem for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, J.R.; Chapman, L.J.

    1981-06-01

    The CAMAC 170 module and CIA crate provide a convenient, cost effective method of interfacing any system requiring a large number of simple devices to be multiplexed into the Accelerator Control System. The system is ideal for relatively slowly changing systems where ten bit analog to digital conversions are sufficiently accurate. Together with vacuum interface CIA cards and prom-based software resident in the 170, this system is used to provide intelligent local monitoring and control for the Tevatron vacuum subsystems. Although not implemented in the vacuum interface, digital to analog converters could be included on the plug in modules as well, providing a total digital and analog multiplexing scheme. 2 refs.

  16. Fermilab Tevatron high level rf accelerating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Tawser, S.; Reid, J.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-06-01

    Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer.

  17. Mixed pbar source operation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Capista, D.P.; Chase, B.E.; Dey, J.E.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Wu, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Recently we have adopted a scheme, called ''Mixed pbar Source Operation'' in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI). The purpose of this mode of operation is to transfer pbar bunches from the Recycler and the Accumulator to the Tevatron for collider shots. In this scheme, four 2.5 MHz pbar bunches are injected in to the MI, re-bunched in four groups of 53 MHz bunches at 8 GeV, accelerated to 150 GeV, and coalesced in to four 53 MHz bunches before transfer to the Tevatron. A special magnet ramp is needed in the MI to allow for pbar beam of slightly different 8 GeV energies from the Recycler and the Accumulator. Here we will present the status of this scheme.

  18. Double diffraction dissociation at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Borras, K; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van Den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes Da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M

    2001-10-01

    We present results from a measurement of double diffraction dissociation in pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The production cross section for events with a central pseudorapidity gap of width Deltaeta(0)>3 (overlapping eta = 0) is found to be 4.43+/-0.02(stat)+/-1.18(syst) mb [ 3.42+/-0.01(stat)+/-1.09(syst) mb] at square root of (s) = 1800[630] GeV. Our results are compared with previous measurements and with predictions based on Regge theory and factorization. PMID:11580642

  19. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  20. Search for disoriented chiral condensate at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, T. C.; Convery, M. E.; Davis, W. L.; Del Signore, K. W.; Jenkins, T. L.; Kangas, E.; Knepley, M. G.; Kowalski, K. L.; Taylor, C. C.; Oh, S. H.

    2000-02-01

    We present results from MiniMax (Fermilab T-864), a small test/experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron designed to search for the production of a disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) in p-p(bar sign) collisions at {radical}(s)=1.8 TeV in the forward direction, {approx}3.4<{eta}<{approx}4.2. Data, consisting of 1.3x10{sup 6} events, are analyzed using the robust observables developed in an earlier paper. The results are consistent with generic, binomial-distribution partition of pions into charged and neutral species. Limits on DCC production in various models are presented. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Search for first generation leptoquarks in proton-antiproton collisions at the center of mass energy = 1.96 TeV in the dielectron + dijet channel using the D0 detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Shaohua

    2004-01-01

    We describe a search for first generation leptoquarks decaying into the eejj final state in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. this search is based on data collected during 2002-2003 with an integrated luminosity of (130.4 =- 8.5) pb -1. Leptoquarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay into an electron and a quark with a branching ration β. We observe no evidence for leptoquarks, and set an upper cross section limit of 0.086 pb at the 95% confidence level corresponding to a lower mass limit of 231 GeV/c2 for scalar leptoquarks when β = 1.

  2. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  3. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  4. Single top quark production and Vtb at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2010-09-01

    Single top quark production via the electroweak interaction was observed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab. Multivariate analysis techniques are employed to extract the small single top quark signal. The combined Tevatron cross section is 2.76{sub -0.47}{sup +0.58} pb. This corresponds to a lower limit on the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}| of 0.77. Also reported are measurements of the t-channel cross section, the top quark polarization in single top quark events, and limits on gluon-quark flavor-changing neutral currents and W{prime} boson production.

  5. Bunch coalescing and bunch rotation in the Fermilab Main Ring: Operational experience and comparison with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.; Wildman, D.W.

    1988-07-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron I proton-antiproton collider project requires that the Fermilab Main Ring produce intense bunches of protons and antiprotons for injection into the Tevatron. The process of coalescing a small number of harmonic number h=1113 bunches into a single bunch by bunch-rotating in a lower harmonic rf system is described.The Main Ring is also required to extract onto the antiproton production target bunches with as narrow a time spread as possible. This operation is also discussed. The operation of the bunch coalescing and bunch rotation are compared with simulations using the computer program ESME. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Search for New Fermions (``Quirks'') at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Calvet, S.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Carrera, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Devaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Evans, H.; Evans, J. A.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Luty, M. A.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Onoprienko, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vint, P.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107, 119, and 133 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale Λ in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV and N=2, 3, and 5, respectively.

  7. Search for New Fermions (''Quirks'') at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Edmunds, D.; Fisher, W.; Kraus, J.

    2010-11-19

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107, 119, and 133 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale {Lambda} in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV and N=2, 3, and 5, respectively.

  8. Search for quirks at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /NIKHEF, Amsterdam

    2010-08-01

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale {Lambda} in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV.

  9. Correlations in bottom quark pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason Edward

    2009-01-01

    I present an analysis of b$\\bar{b}$ pair production correlations, using dimuon-triggered data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV during Run II of the TeVatron. The leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) b quark production processes are discriminated by the angular and momentum correlations between the b{bar b} pair. Track-level jets containing a muon are classified by b quark content and used to estimate the momentum vector of the progenitor b quark. The theoretical distributions given by the MC@NLO event generator are tested against the data.

  10. A disoriented chiral condensate search at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Convery, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    MiniMax (Fermilab T-864) was a small test/experiment at the Tevatron designed to search for disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) in the forward direction. Relativistic quantum field theory treats the vacuum as a medium, with bulk properties characterized by long-range order parameters. This has led to suggestions that regions of {open_quotes}disoriented vacuum{close_quotes} might be formed in high-energy collision processes. In particular, the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD could lead to regions of vacuum which have chiral order parameters disoriented to directions which have non-zero isospin, i.e. disoriented chiral condensates. A signature of DCC is the resulting distribution of the fraction of produced pions which are neutral. The MiniMax detector at the C0 collision region of the Tevatron was a telescope of 24 multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC`s) with a lead converter behind the eighth MWPC, allowing the detection of charged particles and photon conversions in an acceptance approximately a circle of radius 0.6 in pseudorapidity-azimuthal-angle space, centered on pseudorapidity {eta} {approx} 4. An electromagnetic calorimeter was located behind the MWPC telescope, and hadronic calorimeters and scintillator were located in the upstream anti-proton direction to tag diffractive events.

  11. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Standard Model Higgs Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Knoepfel, Kyle J.

    2012-06-01

    We present results from the search for a standard model Higgs boson using data corresponding up to 10 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data produced by the Fermilab Tevatron at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data were recorded by the CDF and D0 detectors between March 2001 and September of 2011. A broad excess is observed between 105 < m{sub H} < 145 GeV/c{sup 2} with a global significance of 2.2 standard deviations relative to the background-only hypothesis.

  13. Searching for SUSY at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bortoletto, Daniela; /Purdue U.

    2004-12-01

    An overview of recent experimental searches for SUSY particles is presented. These searches are based on data collected by the CDF and the D0 experiments operating at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The review focuses on searches for squarks and gluinos in final states with missing transverse energy and jets. Emphasis will be given to the search for the gluino decaying into a sbottom and b quark with each sbottom decaying into a b quark and a neutralino. This scenario yields events containing 4 b-jets and missing transverse energy.

  14. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The 9th {anti p}p Workshop was held in Tsukuba, Japan in October, 1993. A number of important issues remained after that meeting: Does QCD adequately describe the large cross section observed by CDF for {gamma} production below 30 GeV? Do the CDF and D0 b-production cross sections agree? Will the Tevatron live up to its billing as a world-class b-physics facility? How small will the uncertainty in the W mass be? Is there anything beyond the Minimal Standard Model? And finally, where is the top quark? Presentations at this workshop addressed all of these issues. Most of them are now resolved, but new questions have arisen. This summary focuses on the experimental results presented at the meeting by CDF and D0 physicists. Reviews of LEP and HERA results, future plans for hadron colliders and their experiments, as well as important theoretical presentations are summarized elsewhere in this volume. Section 1 reviews physics beyond the Minimal Standard Model. Issues in b and c physics are addressed in section 3. Section 4 focuses on the top quark. Electroweak physics is reviewed in section 5, followed by QCD studies in section 6. Conclusions are drawn in section 7.

  15. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  16. Probing neutrino mass with displaced vertices at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O.J.P.; Magro, M.B.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2005-04-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation can generate naturally the observed neutrino mass spectrum as well as mixings. One interesting feature of these scenarios is that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is unstable, with several of its decay properties predicted in terms of neutrino mixing angles. A smoking gun of this model in colliders is the presence of displaced vertices due to LSP decays in large parts of the parameter space. In this work we focus on the simplest model of this type that comes from minimal supergravity with universal R-parity conserving soft breaking of supersymmetry augmented with bilinear R-parity breaking terms at the electroweak scale (RmSUGRA). We evaluate the potential of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe the RmSUGRA parameters through the analysis of events possessing two displaced vertices stemming from LSP decays. We show that requiring two displaced vertices in the events leads to a reach in m{sub 1/2} twice the one in the usual multilepton signals in a large fraction of the parameter space.

  17. Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul; Stokes, Burnham

    2007-02-27

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} ppp-bar. A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

  18. Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio; Burnham Stokes

    2007-02-01

    Results are reported on the reaction gammap --> ppp-bar . A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

  19. Summary of Single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, R.; CDF, on the

    2014-01-01

    The production of single-top quarks occurs via the weak interaction at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Single top quark events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. Multivariate classifiers separate the s-channel and t-channel single-top signals from the large backgrounds. The combination of CDF and D0 results leads to the first observation of the s-channel mode of single top quark production. The t-channel and single top combined cross sections have also been measured.

  20. Studies of top quark properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shary, Viatcheslav

    2012-05-01

    An overview of the recent measurements of the top quark properties in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. These measurements are based on 5.4-8.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 and CDF experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The top quark mass and width measurements, studies of the spin correlation in top quark pair production, W boson helicity measurement, searches for anomalous top quark couplings and Lorentz invariance violation are discussed.

  1. Longitudinal momentum mining of antiprotons at the Fermilab Recycler: past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Chase, B.E.; Gattuso, C.; Joireman, P.W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technique of longitudinal momentum mining (LMM)[1] in the Fermilab Recycler was adopted in early 2005 to extract thirty-six equal intensity and equal 6D-emittance antiproton bunches for proton-antiproton collider operation in the Tevatron. Since that time, several improvements have been made in the Recycler and the mining technique to handle higher intensity beams. Consequently, the Recycler has become a key contributor to the increased luminosity performance observed during Tevatron Run IIb. In this paper, we present an overview of the improvements and the current status of the momentum mining technique.

  2. Prospects for MSSM Higgs boson searches at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Liu, Tao; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2009-08-01

    We analyze the Tevatron reach for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, using current exclusion limits on the standard model Higgs. We study four common benchmark scenarios for the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, including cases where the Higgs decays differ significantly from the standard model, and provide projections for the improvements in luminosity and efficiency required for the Tevatron to probe sizeable regions of the (m{sub A},tan{beta}) plane.

  3. Prospects for MSSM Higgs searches at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the Tevatron reach for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, using current exclusion limits on the standard model Higgs. We study four common benchmark scenarios for the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, including cases where the Higgs decays differ significantly from the standard model, and provide projections for the improvements in luminosity and efficiency required for the Tevatron to probe sizeable regions of the (m{sub A},tan-{beta}) plane.

  4. Optimization of integrated luminosity in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gattuso, C.; Convery, M.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the strategy which has been used recently to optimize the performance of the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We use a relatively simple heuristic model based on the antiproton production rate, which optimizes the number of antiprotons in a store in order to maximize the integrated luminosity. A store is terminated as soon as the target number of antiprotons is reached and the Tevatron quickly resets to load another store. Since this procedure was implemented, the integrated luminosity has improved by {approx} 35%. Other recent operational improvements include decreasing the shot setup time, and reducing beam-beam effects by making the proton and antiproton brightness more compatible, for example by scraping protons to smaller emittances.

  5. Fully 3D Multiple Beam Dynamics Processes Simulation for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has been, until 2010, the premier high-energy physics collider in the world. The data collected over the last decade by high-energy physics experiments running at the Tevatron have been analyzed to make important measurements in fundamental areas such as B meson masses and flavor oscillation, searches for the Higgs boson, and supersymmetry. Collecting these data at the limits of detectability has required the Tevatron to operate reliably at high beam intensities to maximize the number of collisions to analyze. This impressive achievement has been assisted by the use of HPC resources and software provided through the SciDAC program. This paper describes the enhancements to the BeamBeam3d code to realistically simulate the Tevatron, the validation of these simulations, and the improvement in equipment reliability and personal safety achieved with the aid of simulations.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics studies in the Fermilab tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto,R.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M. J.; Kopp, S. E.

    2009-05-04

    An AC dipole magnet produces a sinusoidally oscillating dipole field with frequency close to betatron frequency and excites large sustained oscillations of beam particles circulating in a synchrotron. Observation of such oscillations with beam position monitors allows direct measurements of a synchrotron's nonlinear parameters. This paper presents experimental studies to measure perturbative effects of sextupole and octupole fields, performed in the Fermilab Tevatron using an ACdipole.

  7. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for B Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The DZero b-Physics Working Group studies all issues related to the b-quark at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Topics we are working on include CP violation, measurements of B hadron properties (masses, lifetimes, decay branching ratios, production mechanisms), and searches for rare decays. The D0 (DZero) Experiment consists of a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter.

  8. Progress with collision optics of the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Alexahin, Y.; Annala, J.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaslaev, V.; Sajaev, V.; /Argonne

    2006-06-01

    Recent advances in the measurement and modeling of the machine parameters and lattice functions at the Tevatron allowed modifications of the collision optics to be performed in order to increase the collider luminosity. As the result, beta functions in the two collision points were decreased from 35cm to 29cm which resulted in {approx}10% increase of the peak luminosity. In this report we describe the results of optics measurements and corrections. We also discuss planned improvements, including the new betatron tune working point and correction of the beta function chromaticity.

  9. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  10. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B.C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  11. Cornering gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with quasistable sleptons at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.P.; Wells, J.D.

    1999-02-01

    There are many theoretical reasons why heavy quasistable charged particles might exist. Pair production of such particles at the Fermilab Tevatron can produce highly ionizing tracks or fake muons. In gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking, sparticle production can lead to events with a pair of quasistable sleptons, a significant fraction of which will have the same electric charge. Depending on the production mechanism and the decay chain, they may also be accompanied by additional energetic leptons. We study the relative importance of the resulting signals for the Tevatron run II. The relative fraction of same-sign tracks to other background-free signals is an important diagnostic tool in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking that may provide information about mass splittings, tanthinsp{beta}, and the number of messengers communicating supersymmetry breaking. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Search for resonant second generation slepton production at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Kooten, R Van; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E Von; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-09-15

    We present a search for supersymmetry in the R-parity violating resonant production and decay of smuons and muon sneutrinos in the channels mu-->chi(1)(0)mu, mu-->chi(2,3,4)(0)mu, and nu(mu)-->chi(1,2)(+/-)mu. We analyzed 0.38 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected between April 2002 and August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of events is in agreement with the standard model expectation, and we calculate 95% C.L. limits on the slepton production cross section times branching fraction to gaugino plus muon, as a function of slepton and gaugino masses. In the framework of minimal supergravity, we set limits on the coupling parameter lambda(211)('), extending significantly previous results obtained in Run I of the Tevatron and at the CERN LEP collider. PMID:17025876

  13. NLO QCD corrections to Zbb production with massive bottom quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Febres Cordero, F.; Reina, L.; Wackeroth, D.

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to Zbb production in hadronic collisions including full bottom-quark mass effects. We present results for the total cross section and the invariant mass distribution of the bottom-quark jet pair at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. We perform a detailed comparison with a calculation that considers massless bottom quarks, as implemented in the Monte Carlo program MCFM. We find that neglecting bottom-quark mass effects overestimates the total NLO QCD cross section for Zbb production at the Tevatron by about 7%, independent of the choice of the renormalization and factorization scales. Moreover, bottom-quark mass effects can impact the shape of the bottom-quark pair invariant mass distribution, in particular, in the low invariant mass region.

  14. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge

    2010-03-25

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70+1.18-0.93 pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 ± 2.3) x 10-8, assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 ± 0.6) x 10-6, corresponding to an expected significance

  15. A Trio of modulators for the Fermilab tevatron electron lens project

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Wildman et al.

    2001-07-25

    Three high voltage modulators used during testing and operation of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) at Fermilab will be described. Short high voltage (0 to {approximately} 20kV) pulses from these modulators vary the anode-cathode voltage of the TEL electron gun to control the magnitude of the electron beam current. The trio of modulators include a low repetition rate MOSFET-based pulser, a fast ionization device, and a high average power tetrode modulator. The characteristics of each device will be discussed and typical outputs from each type of modulator is shown.

  16. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Higgs Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, at Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Higgs Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  17. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

  18. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for QCD Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, at Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons at the highest available energies. It involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the QCD Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

  19. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Top Quark Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Top Quark Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  20. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Electroweak Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Electroweak Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  1. Microwave Schottky diagnostic systems for the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler, and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Jansson, Andreas; /ESS, Lund

    2011-02-01

    A means for non-invasive measurement of transverse and longitudinal characteristics of bunched beams in synchrotrons has been developed based on high sensitivity slotted waveguide pickups. The pickups allow for bandwidths exceeding hundreds of MHz while maintaining good beam sensitivity characteristics. Wide bandwidth is essential to allow bunch-by-bunch measurements by means of a fast gating system. The Schottky detector system is installed and successfully commissioned in the Fermilab Tevatron and Recycler and CERN LHC synchrotrons. Measurement capabilities include tune, chromaticity, and momentum spread of single or multiple beam bunches in any combination. With appropriate calibrations, emittance can also be measured by integrating the area under the incoherent tune sidebands.

  2. Longitudinal bunch monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Bhat, C.; Blokland, W.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Flora, R.; Hahn, A.; Hansen, S.; Kiper, T.; et al

    2011-10-17

    The measurement of the longitudinal behavior of the accelerated particle beams at Fermilab is crucial to the optimization and control of the beam and the maximizing of the integrated luminosity for the particle physics experiments. Longitudinal measurements in the Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons are based on the analysis of signals from resistive wall current monitors. This study describes the signal processing performed by a 2 GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope together with a computer running a LabVIEW program which calculates the longitudinal beam parameters.

  3. Search for Associated Chargino-Neutralino Production in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenschein, Ulla

    2005-08-01

    interacting, carrying away energy and momentum and leading to detector signatures with large missing energy. Supersymmetric particles have been searched for at the electron-positron collider LEP up to the kinematic limit. No evidence for these particles has been observed which results in lower limits on their masses. Additional constraints stem from precision measurements of quantities, which are sensitive to corrections from SUSY particles and from the search for dark matter in cosmological experiments. The search for SUSY particles beyond the reach of LEP is continued at larger energy regimes at present and future hadron colliders. In its second phase of data taking (Run II), the center-of-mass energy of the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron at Fermilab has been raised and the luminosity has been increased considerably. The D0 experiment, one of the two Tevatron experiments, has been upgraded accordingly. The Tevatron collider allows to probe a substantial SUSY mass range beyond the LEP limits. The search will be continued at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is presently being constructed at the European Research laboratory for particle physics CERN in Geneva. At hadron colliders the supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons are copiously produced in strong interactions, provided they are light enough. Within most of the established SUSY models, these particles are too heavy to be produced at a sufficient rate at the Tevatron collider and the production of the lighter super-partners of the Higgs and gauge bosons, the charginos and neutralinos, becomes an important source of SUSY particles. Decays of these particles result in final states with leptons or hadrons and large missing energy. Leptonic final states can be separated more easily from the large background of hadronic Standard Model processes. A search for the associated production of the lightest chargino and the second lightest neutralino has been performed in final states with two electrons, an additional

  4. Search for single top production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2004-11-01

    Searches for the electroweak production of single top quarks have been started at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider using Run II data by both the D0 and CDF collaborations. Using a dataset of approximately 160pb{sup -1}, neither experiment finds evidence for Single Top production and sets 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section. The D0 limits are 19pb on the s-channel production, 25pb on the t-channel production, and 23pb on the combined s+t-channel production. The CDF limits are 8.5pb on the t-channel production and 13.7pb on the combined s+t-channel production.

  5. Remembering the Tevatron: The Machine(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    For 25 years the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the highest energy collider in the world. This presentation will trace the origins of the Tevatron, the challenges that were overcome in creating high luminosity collisions of protons and antiprotons, the technological achievements that drove performance a factor of 400 beyond the initial performance goals, and the legacy of the Tevatron in paving the way for ever more advanced colliders.

  6. A search for z boson pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Chad Ryan; /Maryland U.

    2007-10-01

    This dissertation describes a search for Z/{gamma}* boson pair production decaying into {mu}{mu}{mu}{mu}, {mu}{mu}ee, and eeee final states with approximately 1 fb{sup -1} of data at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The small cross section times branching ratio for each channel mandated a thorough study of the acceptance and efficiencies. After optimization, 1.7 {+-} 0.1 events are expected for Standard Model production with a background of 0.13 {+-} 0.03 events. One event was found in the {mu}{mu}ee channel. A cross section limit of 4.4 pb is determined at a 95% confidence level for Standard Model production. Additionally, one parameter and two parameter 95% C.L. limits are found for the anomalous neutral trilinear gauge couplings ZZZ* and ZZ{gamma}*. The one parameter 95% C.L. coupling limits with a form factor scale of 1.2 TeV are: -0.28 < f{sub 40}{sup Z} < 0.28, -0.31 < f{sub 50}{sup Z} < 0.29, -0.26 < f{sub 40}{gamma} < 0.26, and -0.30 < f{sub 50}{sup {gamma}} < 0.28.

  7. SVX4: A New Deep-Submicron Readout IC for the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, B.; Alfonsi, S.; Bacchetta, N.; Centro, S.; Christofek, L.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Haber, C.; Hanagaki, K.; Hoff, J.; Johnson, M.; vonderLippe, H.; Lujan, P.; Mandelli, E.; Meng, G.; Nomerotski, A.; Pellet, D.; Rapidis, P.; Utes, M.; Walder, J.-P.; Weber, M.; Wester, W.; /LBL, Berkeley /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Kansas U. /Fermilab /UC, Davis

    2003-10-01

    SVX4 is the new silicon strip readout IC designed to meet the increased radiation tolerance requirements for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider. Devices have been fabricated, tested, and approved for production. The SVX4 design is a technology migration of the SVX3D design currently in use by CDF. Whereas SVX3D was fabricated in a 0.8 {micro}m radiation-hard process, SVX4 was fabricated in a standard 0.25 {micro}m mixed-signal CMOS technology using the ''radiation tolerant by design'' transistor topologies devised by the RD-49 collaboration. The specific cell layouts include digital cells developed by the ATLAS Pixel group, and full-custom analog blocks. Unlike its predecessors, the new design also includes the necessary features required for generic use by both the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. Performance of the IC includes >20 MRad total dose tolerance, and {approx}2000 e-rms equivalent input noise charge with 40 pF input capacitance, when sampled at 132 ns period with an 80 ns preamp risetime. At the nominal digitize/readout rate of 106/53 MHz, the 9 mm x 6.3 mm die dissipates {approx}2 mW/channel average at 2.5 V. A review of typical operation, details of the design conversion process, and performance measurements are covered.

  8. A search for Z boson pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Chad

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation describes a search for Z/gamma* boson pair production decaying into mumumumu, mumuee, and eeee final states with approximately 1 fb-1 of data at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at s = 1.96 TeV. The small cross section times branching ratio for each channel mandated a thorough study of the acceptance and efficiencies. After optimization, 1.7 +/- 0.1 events are expected for Standard Model production with a background of 0.13 +/- 0.03 events. One event was found in the mumu ee channel. A cross section limit of 4.4 pb is determined at a 95% confidence level for Standard Model production. Additionally, one parameter and two parameter 95% C.L. limits are found for the anomalous neutral trilinear gauge couplings ZZZ* and ZZgamma*. The one parameter 95% C.L. coupling limits with a form factor scale of 1.2 TeV are: -0.28 < fZ40 < 0.28, -0.31 < fZ50 < 0.29, -0.26 < fg40 < 0.26, and -0.30 < fg50 < 0.28.

  9. Proposed Fermilab fixed target experiment: Kaons at the Tevatron. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0898, evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed fixed target experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Femilab) in Batavia, Illinois, known as Kaons at the Tevatron (KTeV). The proposed KTeV project includes reconfiguration of an existing target station, enhancement of an existing beam transport system connected to existing utility facilities, and construction of a new experimental detector hall area. The study of the K meson, a type of subatomic particle, has been going on at Fermilab for 20 years. The proposed KTEV project advances the search for the origins of a violation of a fundamental symmetry of nature called charge parity (CP) violation. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  10. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; Seryi, Andrei; Solyak, Nikolai; Sytnik, Veniamin; Tiunov, Mikhail; Tkachenko, Leonid; Wildman, David; Wolff, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao-Long; /Fermilab

    2011-09-12

    Fermilab's Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy accelerator in which tightly focused beams of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons collide at two dedicated interaction points (IPs). Both beams share the same beam pipe and magnet aperture and, in order to avoid multiple detrimental head-on collisions, the beams are placed on separated orbits everywhere except the main IPs by using high-voltage (HV) electrostatic separators. The electromagnetic beam-beam interaction at the main IPs together with the long-range interactions between separated beams adversely affect the collider performance, reducing the luminosity integral per store (period of continuous collisions) by 10-30%. Tuning the collider operation for optimal performance becomes more and more cumbersome as the beam intensities and luminosity increase. The long-range effects which (besides being nonlinear) vary from bunch to bunch are particularly hard to mitigate. A comprehensive review of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron Collider Run II can be found in Ref. [1]. The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  11. Exclusive Central $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive $\\pi^{=}\\pi^{-}$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been measured. We select events with two particles with opposite charge in pseudorapidity region -1.3 < $\\eta$ < 1.3 with no other particles detected in -5.9 < $\\eta$ < 5.9. Particles are assumed to be pions. The $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$system is required to have rapidity -1.0 < $y$ < 1.0. The data are expected to be dominated by the double pomeron exchange mechanism. Therefore, the quantum numbers of the central state are constrained. The data extend up to dipion mass M($\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$) = 5000 MeV/$c^2$. Resonance structures consistent with $f_0$ and $f_2$(1270) mesons are visible. The results are valuable for light hadron spectroscopy and for providing information about the nature of the pomeron in a region between non-perturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  12. Exclusive Central π+π- Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Exclusive π+π- production in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been measured. We select events with two particles with opposite charge in pseudorapidity region -1.3 < η < 1.3 with no other particles detected in -5.9 < η < 5.9. Particles are assumed to be pions. The π+π- system is required to have rapidity -1.0 < y < 1.0. The data are expected to be dominated by the double pomeron exchange mechanism. Therefore, the quantum numbers of the central state are constrained. The data extend up to dipion mass M(π+π-) = 5000 MeV/c2. Resonance structures consistent with f0 and f2(1270) mesons are visible. The results are valuable for light hadron spectroscopy and for providing information about the nature of the pomeron in a region between non-perturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  13. Properties of W + jet events in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, R. B.

    1993-11-22

    W boson + QCD Jet events, produced in 1.8 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and measured by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), were used to measure the center-of-mass production angle of the W + jet system, and were also used to place limits on the production of excited quark states. The center-of-mass production angular distribution agrees well with leading order and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. Excited quark states were searched for in the reaction q + g {yields} q* {yields} q + W. Upper limits on the q* cross section, as a function of the q* mass, are shown. Comparison with a theoretical prediction for q* production excludes excited quark states with a mass in the range 150--530 GeV/c{sup 2}, at 95% confidence.

  14. Forward-Backward Asymmetry of Top Quark Pair Productionn at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2015-12-01

    This dissertation presents the final measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) of top quark-antiquark pair events (t t-) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t t- events are produced in proton{anti-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1:96 TeV during the Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed with the full CDF Run II data (9.1 fb-1) in the final state that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons, the dilepton final state), and are designed to con rm or deny the evidence-level excess in the AFB measurements in the final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets (lepton+jets final state) as well as the excess in the preliminary measurements in the dilepton final state with the first half of the CDF Run II data. New measurements include the leptonic AFB (AlFB), the lepton-pair AFB (All FB) and the reconstructed top AFB (At t FB). Each are combined with the previous results from the lepton+jets final state measured at the CDF experiment. The inclusive Al FB, All FB, and At t FB measured in the dilepton final state are 0.072 ± 0.060, 0.076 ± 0.081, and 0.12 ± 0.13, to be compared with the Standard Model (SM) predictions of 0.038 ± 0.003, 0.048 ± 0.004, and 0.010 ± 0.006, respectively. The CDF combination of AlFB and At t FB are 0.090+0:028 -0.026, and 0.160 ± 0.045, respectively. The overall results are consistent with the SM predictions.

  15. Antiproton stacking and un-stacking in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra Bhat

    2003-06-12

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (RR) is intended to be used as a future antiproton storage ring for the Run II proton-antiproton collider operation. It is proposed that about 40mA of antiproton beam from the Accumulator Ring will be transferred to the Recycler once for every two to three hours, stacked and cooled. This operation continues for about 10 to 20 hours depending on the collider needs for antiprotons. Eventually, the cooled antiproton beam will be un-stacked from the Recycler and transferred to the Tevatron via the Main Injector. They have simulated stacking and un-stacking of antiprotons in the Recycler using multi-particle beam dynamics simulation code ESME. In this paper they present results of these simulations.

  16. Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

  17. Phase modulation of the bucket stops bunch oscillations at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-02

    Bunches in the Tevatron are known to exhibit longitudinal oscillations which persist indefinitely. These oscillations are colloquially called 'dancing bunches.' Although the dancing proton bunches do not cause single bunch emittance growth or beam loss at injection, they lead to bunch lengthening at collisions. In Tevatron operations, a longitudinal damper has been built which stops this dance and damps out coupled bunch modes. Recent theoretical work predicts that the dance can also be stopped by an appropriate change in the bunch distribution. This paper describes the Tevatron experiments which support this theory.

  18. Physics at an upgraded proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Geer

    2004-07-28

    The accelerator-based particle physics program in the US is entering a period of transition. This is particularly true at Fermilab which for more than two decades has been the home of the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider, the World's highest energy hadron collider. In a few years time the energy frontier will move to the LHC at CERN. Hence, if an accelerator-based program is to survive at Fermilab, it must evolve. Fermilab is fortunate in that, in addition to hosting the Tevatron Collider, the laboratory also hosts the US accelerator-based neutrino program. The recent discovery that neutrino flavors oscillate has opened a new exciting world for us to explore, and has created an opportunity for the Fermilab accelerator complex to continue to address the cutting-edge questions of particle physics beyond the Tevatron Collider era. The presently foreseen neutrino oscillation experiments at Fermilab (MiniBooNE [1] and MINOS [2]) will enable the laboratory to begin contributing to the Global oscillation physics program in the near future, and will help us better understand the basic parameters describing the oscillations. However, this is only a first step. To be able to pin down all of the oscillation parameters, and hopefully make new discoveries along the way, we will need high statistics experiments, which will require a very intense neutrino beam, and one or more very massive detectors. In particular we will require new MW-scale primary proton beams and perhaps ultimately a Neutrino Factory [3]. Plans to upgrade the Fermilab Proton Driver are presently being developed [4]. The upgrade project would replace the Fermilab Booster with a new 8 GeV accelerator with 0.5-2 MW beam power, a factor of 15-60 more than the current Booster. It would also make the modifications needed to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) to upgrade it to simultaneously provide 120 GeV beams of 2 MW. This would enable a factor of 5-10 increase in neutrino beam intensities at the MI, while also

  19. First measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections from run II of the fermilab tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; Ncnulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; 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Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-11

    We report the first measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections times leptonic branching ratios for pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV, based on their decays to electrons and muons. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 72 pb(-1) recorded with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We test e-mu universality in W decays, and we measure the ratio of leptonic W and Z rates from which the leptonic branching fraction B(W-->lnu) can be extracted as well as an indirect value for the total width of the W and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, |V(cs)|. PMID:15783955

  20. A search for the Higgs boson in the zh channel with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Heinmiller, James Matthew; /Illinois U., Chicago

    2006-11-01

    This analysis describes a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson through the decay mode ZH {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}b{bar b} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample used in this analysis corresponds to 452 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity accumulated with the D{null} detector. Agreement between data and standard model predictions is observed. A 95% confidence level upper exclusion limit for the {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} ZH) x BR(H {yields} b{bar b}) channel is set between 3.2-8.2 pb for Higgs masses of 105 to 145 GeV.

  1. Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

  2. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  3. Fermilab's SC Accelerator Magnet Program for Future U.S. HEP Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The invention of SC accelerator magnets in the 1970s opened wide the possibilities for advancing the energy frontier of particle accelerators, while limiting the machine circumference and reducing their energy consumption. The successful development of SC accelerator magnets based on NbTi superconductor have made possible a proton-antiproton collider (Tevatron) at Fermilab, an electron-proton collider (HERA) at DESY, a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL and recently a proton-proton collider (LHC) at CERN. Further technological innovations and inventions are required as the US HEP looks forward towards the post-LHC energy or/and intensity frontiers. A strong, goal oriented national SC accelerator magnet program must take on this challenge to provide a strong base for the future of HEP in the U.S. The results and experience obtained by Fermilab during the past 30 years will allow us to play a leadership role in the SC accelerator magnet development in the U.S., in particular, focusing on magnets for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory [1]-[2]. In this paper, we summarize the required Muon Collider magnet needs and challenges, summarize the technology advances in the Fermilab accelerator magnet development over the past few years, and present and discuss our vision and long-term plans for these Fermilab-supported accelerator initiatives.

  4. Phenomenological study of the atypical heavy flavor production observed at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Barone, M.; Fiori, I.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Ptohos, F.; /Frascati /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Cyprus U.

    2005-11-01

    The authors address known discrepancies between the heavy flavor properties of jets produced at the Tevatron collider and the prediction of conventional-QCD simulations. In this study, they entertain the possibility that these effects are real and due to new physics. They show that all anomalies can be simultaneously fitted by postulating the additional pair production of light bottom squarks with a 100% semileptonic branching fraction.

  5. Measurements of Transverse Beam Diffusion Rates in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The transverse beam diffusion rate vs. particle oscillation amplitude was measured in the Tevatron using collimator scans. All collimator jaws except one were retracted. As the jaw of interest was moved in small steps, the local shower rates were recorded as a function of time. By using a diffusion model, the time evolution of losses could be related to the diffusion rate at the collimator position. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  6. Latest jet results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Darren D.

    2010-05-01

    A brief overview of the latest status of jet physics studies at the Tevatron in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. In particular, measurements of the inclusive jet production cross-section, dijet production and searches for new physics, the ratio of the 3-jet to 2-jet production cross-sections, and the three-jet mass are discussed.

  7. Search for electroweak single top quark production in 1.96-TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd; /Toronto U.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the first search for electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used for this analysis corresponds to 162 pb{sup -1} recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed by doing a classic maximum likelihood fit to the H{sub T} distribution in data. The kinematic variable H{sub T} is the scalar sum of transverse energies of all final state particles in the event. This variable has the advantage that its distribution looks very similar for both contributing (s-channel and t-channel) single top processes, but is different for background processes. The combination of both channels to one signal improves the sensitivity of the search. No significant evidence for electroweak single top quark production is found and we set an upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the combined single top quark production cross section of 17.8 pb.

  8. Combination of electroweak and QCD corrections to single W production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balossini, Giovanni; Montagna, Guido; Carloni Calame, Carlo Michel; Moretti, Mauro; Nicrosini, Oreste; Piccinini, Fulvio; Treccani, Michele; Vicini, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Precision studies of the production of a high-transverse momentum lepton in association with missing energy at hadron colliders require that electroweak and QCD higher-order contributions are simultaneously taken into account in theoretical predictions and data analysis. Here we present a detailed phenomenological study of the impact of electroweak and strong contributions, as well as of their combination, to all the observables relevant for the various facets of the pmathop {p}limits^{left( - right)} to {text{lepton}} + X physics programme at hadron colliders, including luminosity monitoring and Parton Distribution Functions constraint, W precision physics and search for new physics signals. We provide a theoretical recipe to carefully combine electroweak and strong corrections, that are mandatory in view of the challenging experimental accuracy already reached at the Fermilab Tevatron and aimed at the CERN LHC, and discuss the uncertainty inherent the combination. We conclude that the theoretical accuracy of our calculation can be conservatively estimated to be about 2% for standard event selections at the Tevatron and the LHC, and about 5% in the very high W transverse mass/lepton transverse momentum tails. We also provide arguments for a more aggressive error estimate (about 1% and 3%, respectively) and conclude that in order to attain a one per cent accuracy: 1) exact mixed mathcal{O}left( {α {α_s}} right) corrections should be computed in addition to the already available NNLO QCD contributions and two-loop electroweak Sudakov logarithms; 2) QCD and electroweak corrections should be coherently included into a single event generator.

  9. Improvements to Antiproton Accumulator to Recycler Transfers at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.P.; Drendel, B.; Vander Muelen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since 2005, the Recycler has become the sole storage ring for antiprotons used in the Tevatron Collider. The operational role of the Antiproton Source has shifted to exclusively producing antiprotons for periodic transfers to the Recycler. The process of transferring the antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Recycler has been greatly improved, leading to a dramatic reduction in the transfer time. The reduction in time has been accomplished with both an improvement in transfer efficiency and an increase in average stacking rate. This paper will describe the improvements that have streamlined the transfer process and other changes that contributed to a significant increase in the number of antiprotons available to the Collider.

  10. QCD corrections to polarization of J/{psi} and {upsilon} at Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Bin; Wang Jianxiong

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we present more details of the calculation on the next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD corrections to polarization of direct J/{psi} production via color singlet at the Tevatron and LHC, together with the results for {upsilon} for the first time. Our results show that the J/{psi} polarization status drastically changes from transverse polarization dominant at leading order into longitudinal polarization dominant in the whole range of the transverse momentum p{sub t} of J/{psi} when the NLO corrections are counted. For {upsilon} production, the p{sub t} distribution of the polarization status behaves almost the same as that for J/{psi} except that the NLO result is transverse polarization at small p{sub t} range. Although the theoretical evaluation predicts a larger longitudinal polarization than the measured value at the Tevatron, it may provide a solution towards the previous large discrepancy for J/{psi} and {upsilon} polarization between theoretical prediction and experimental measurement, and suggests that the next important step is to calculate the NLO corrections to hadronproduction of color-octet state J/{psi}{sup (8)} and {upsilon}{sup (8)}. Our calculations are performed in two ways: namely, we do and do not analytically sum over the polarizations, and then check them with each other.

  11. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, T.; Bartoszek, L.; Tilles, E.; Petter, J.; McCarthy, J.

    1985-05-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10/sup -10/ torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  13. Measurement of direct CP violation parameters in B± → J/ψK± and B± → J/ψπ± decays with 10.4 fb-1 of Tevatron data.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Beattie, M; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hart, B; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Holzbauer, J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lamont, I; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; Mason, N; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2013-06-14

    We present a measurement of the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry in B(±) mesons decaying to J/ψK(±) and J/ψπ(±) where J/ψ decays to μ(+) μ(-), using the full run II data set of 10.4 fb(-1) of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A difference in the yield of B(-) and B(+) mesons in these decays is found by fitting to the difference between their reconstructed invariant mass distributions resulting in asymmetries of A(J/ψK) = [0.59 ± 0.37]%, which is the most precise measurement to date, and A(J/ψπ) = [-4.2 ± 4.5]%. Both measurements are consistent with standard model predictions. PMID:25165913

  14. Diffractive dijet production at sqrt[s] = 630 and 1800 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Borras, K; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, C; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P

    2002-04-15

    We report a measurement of the diffractive structure function F(D)(jj) of the antiproton obtained from a study of dijet events produced in association with a leading antiproton in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 630 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The ratio of F(D)(jj) at sqrt[s] = 630 GeV to F(D)(jj) obtained from a similar measurement at sqrt[s] = 1800 GeV is compared with expectations from QCD factorization and other theoretical predictions. We also report a measurement of the xi ( x-Pomeron) and beta ( x of parton in Pomeron) dependence of F(D)(jj) at sqrt[s] = 1800 GeV. In the region 0.035

  15. Coherent production of pions and rho mesons in neutrino charged current interactions on neon nuclei at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, S.

    1992-05-01

    The coherent production of single pions and and {rho} mesons in charged current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon nuclei has been studied. The data were obtained using the Fermilab 15-foot Bubble Chamber, filled with a heavy Ne-H{sub 2} mixture and exposed to the Quadrupole Triplet neutrino beam produced by 800 GeV protons from the Tevatron. The average beam energy was 86 GeV. In a sample of 330000 frames, 1032 two-prong {nu}{sub {mu}} + {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions were selected. The goal of this study was to investigate the low Q{sup 2} high {nu} region where the hadron dominance model can be tested. In this model, the vector and axial-vector parts of the weak hadronic current are dominated by the {rho} and a{sub 1} mesons respectively. Moreover, the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC) hypothesis can be tested by studying the coherent production of single pions.

  16. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, A.V.; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  17. Heavy flavor at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, S.

    2016-07-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider have pioneered and established the role of hadron collisions in exploring flavor physics through a broad program that continues to offer competitive results. I report on latest results in the flavor sector obtained using the whole CDF and D0 data sets corresponding to {˜}10{ fb-1} of integrated luminosity; including B-mesons spectroscopy and production asymmetries, flavor specific decay bottom-strange mesons lifetime. I also present measurements of direct and indirect CP violation in bottom and charm meson decays.

  18. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Gonzalez, B.Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in {bar p}p interactions, {bar p}p {yields} {bar p} + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb{sup -1} collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E{sub T}{sup jet} {ge} 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E{sub T}{sup jet}. The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb{sup -1} of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J{sub z} = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at {radical}s = 14 TeV are discussed.

  19. Highlights from Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    In these two lectures I will chose some highlights from the Tevatron experiments (CDF/D0) and the Neutrino experiments and then discuss the future direction of physics at Fermilab after the Tevatron collider era.

  20. Measurement of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Peter Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The top quark is an extremely massive fundamental particle that is predominantly produced in pairs at particle collider experiments. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that top quarks can also be produced singly by the electroweak force; however, this process is more difficult to detect because it occurs at a smaller rate and is more difficult to distinguish from background processes. The cross section of this process is related to the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V tb|, and measurement of the single top quark production cross section is currently the only method to directly measure this quantity without assuming the number of generations of fermions. This thesis describes a measurement of the cross section of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This analysis uses 2.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed using a matrix element method which calculates the differential cross section for each event for several signal and background hypotheses. These numbers are combined into a single discriminant and used to construct templates from Monte Carlo simulation. A maximum likelihood fit to the data distribution gives a measurement of the cross section. This analysis measures a value of 2.2$+0.8\\atop{-0.7}$ pb, which corresponds to a value of |V tb| = 0.88$+0.16\\atop{-0.14}$experimental±0.7(theoretical). The probability that this result originates from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top production (p-value) is 0.0003, which is equivalent to 3.4 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics. The expected (median) p-value as estimated from pseudo-experiments for this analysis is 0.000003, which corresponds to 4.5 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics.

  1. Study on the top quark pair production mechanism in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Naganoma, Junji; /Waseda U.

    2008-03-01

    The study of the top quark pair production mechanism in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is described. The main subjects are the measurements of the top quark pair production cross section, the top quark mass and a search for a new particle decaying to the top quark pair. The analyses are based on 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Run II experiment between March 2002 and May 2007, using the lepton+jets events. The measured top quark pair production cross section is 8.2 {+-} 0.5 (stat.) {+-} 0.8 (syst.) {+-} 0.5 (lum.) pb, which is slightly higher than the standard model prediction at the top mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the standard model, and also in the experimental studies. The measured top quark mass if 171.6 {+-} 2.0 (stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. Finally, they report on a search for a new gauge boson decaying to t{bar t}, which interferes with the standard model gluon in the q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} production process. They call such a hypothetical particle a 'Massive Gluon'. The observed t{bar t} invariant mass distribution is consistent with the standard model expectations, and also the measured massive gluon coupling strength with quarks is consistent within a statistical fluctuation of the standard model expectation in the wide range of the massive gluon masses and widths. They set the upper and lower limits on the coupling strength of the massive gluon.

  2. Overview of the Tevatron Collider Complex: Goals, Operations and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen; Moore, Ronald S.; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    For more than two decades the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for numerous physics discoveries and for many technological breakthroughs. In this article we outline the historical background that led to the construction of the Tevatron Collider, the strategy applied to evolution of performance goals over the Tevatron's operational history, and briefly describe operations of each accelerator in the chain and achieved performance.

  3. Updated calculations of the reach of Fermilab Tevatron upgrades for Higgs Bosons in the MSSM, mSUGRA, and mGMSB models

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Harris, B. W.; Tata, X.

    1999-04-23

    One of the crucial predictions of supersymmetric models that reduce to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) at the weak scale is that the lightest Higgs scalar should have mass m{sub h} {approx_lt} 125-130 GeV[1]. Recent results on the reach of Fermilab Tevatron upgrades for Standard Model (SM) Higgs bosons show that masses of order 120-180 GeV may be probed [2, 3, 4, 5], depending on integrated luminosity, detector performance and signal and background modeling. Thus, the discovery of a Higgs boson (or a new limit of around 120-130 GeV on its mass) will severely constrain supersymmetric models as well. In this report, we update previous calculations made by our group [6] pertaining to the reach of Fermilab Tevatron upgrades for Higgs bosons in supersymmetric models. We present reach results for SUSY Higgs bosons within the MSSM, the minimal Supergravity model (mSUGRA) and in the minimal Gauge Mediated SUSY Breaking model (mGMSB). In this update, 95% CL exclusion contours and 5{sigma} discovery contours are presented for integrated luminosity values of 2, 5 and 20 fb{sup {minus}1}.

  4. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham Stokes

    2006-06-30

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{bar p}p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p{bar p}. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is {sigma} = 33 {+-} 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c{sup 2} is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  5. Double Transverse-Spin Asymmetries in DRELL-YAN and J/Φ Production from PROTON-ANTIPROTON Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, M.; Barone, V.; Cafarella, A.; Corianò, C.; Ratcliffe, P. G.

    We perform a NLO numerical study of the double transverse-spin asymmetries in the J/Φ resonance region for proton-antiproton collisions. We analyze the large x kinematic region, relevant for the proposed PAX experiment at GSI, and discuss the implication of the results for the extraction of the transversity densities.

  6. Measurement of Event Shapes in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    A study of event shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event shape mean values on the leading jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton level predictions that were matched to fixed order results at NLO accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

  7. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2004-03-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-E{sub T} jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 {+-} 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  8. 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider in the SSC Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Two developments over the past decade have made it possible to design a high-luminosity 100 TeV hadron collider in the SSC tunnel in Texas. First, superconducting magnet technology has matured so that it is now feasible to build 16 Tesla Nb3Sn dipoles and 450 T/m quadrupoles for a collider lattice. Second, Fermilab has advanced the state of art of antiproton sources so that it is possible to accumulate the antiprotons needed to sustain a luminosity of ˜10^35cm-2s-1 and techniques to sustain the luminosity during a store. Synchrotron damping of the beams has a time constant of ˜15 minutes, providing stability against mechanisms of slow emittance growth. The proposed single-ring collider would open a new era for high energy physics, after the LHC era that is about to begin, in which weak boson fusion would dominate as a pathway to new particle production. It would extend the reach for discovery beyond LHC by the same factor that LHC will extend beyond Tevatron.

  9. Role of pentaquark components in ϕ meson production proton-antiproton annihilation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srisuphaphon, S.; Kaewsnod, A.; Limphirat, A.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Yan, Y.

    2016-02-01

    The pentaquark component uuds s ¯ is included in the proton wave functions to study ϕ meson production proton-antiproton annihilation reactions. With all possible configurations of the uuds subsystem proposed for describing the strangeness spin and magnetic moment of the proton, we estimate the branching ratios of the annihilation reactions at rest p p ¯→ϕ X (X =π0,η ,ρ0,ω ) from atomic p p ¯ S - and P -wave states by using effective quark line diagrams incorporating the 3P0 model. The best agreement of theoretical prediction with the experimental data is found when the pentaquark configuration of the proton wave function takes the flavor-spin symmetry [4] FS[22] F[22] S .

  10. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a Top-Antitop Quark Pair in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Stanley T.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the first search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a top-antitop quark pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The integrated luminosity for othis search corresponds to 319 pb-1 of data recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We outline the even selection criteria, evaluate the even acceptance and estimate backgrounds from Standard Model sources. These events are observed that satisfy our event selection, while 2.16 ± 0.66 events are expected from background processes. no significant excess of events above background is thus observed, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section for this process as a function of the Higgs mass. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2 we find that σ$t\\bar{t}H$ x BR (Hbb) < 690 fb at 95% C.L. These are the first limits set for $t\\bar{t}H$ production. This search also allows us to anticipate the challenges and necessary strategies needed for future searches of $t\\bar{t}H$ production.

  11. Measurement of the production rate of the charm jet recoiling against the W boson using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.

    2008-05-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate of associated production of the W boson with the charm jet in the proton and anti-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement has direct sensitivity to the strange quark content inside the proton. A direct measurement of the momentum distribution of the strange quark inside the proton is essential for a reliable calculation of new physics signal as well as the background processes at the collider experiments. The identification of events containing a W boson and a charm jet is based on the leptonic decays of the W boson together with a tagging technique for the charm jet identification based on the semileptonic decay of the charm quark into the muon. The charm jet recoiling against the W boson must have a minimum transverse momentum of 20 GeV and an absolute value of pseudorapidity less than 2.5. This measurement utilizes the data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Collider. The measured rate of the charm jet production in association with the W boson in the inclusive jet production with the W boson is 0.074 {+-} 0.023, which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at the leading order in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  12. Measurement of the $W$ Boson Mass in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yacoob, Sahal

    2010-06-01

    I present the measurement of the mass of the W Boson in the electron channel using 4.4 fb-1 of p $\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1:96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  13. Top and higgs physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Savard

    2002-12-23

    We present a summary of our experimental understanding of the top quark and discuss the significant improvements expected in Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We also discuss prospects for a Higgs boson discovery at the Tevatron.

  14. Observation of Central Exclusive Diphoton Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brucken, Jens Erik

    2013-01-01

    We have observed exclusive γγ production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron at √ s = 1.96 TeV. We use data corresponding to 1.11 ± 0.07 fb-1 integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, with a trigger requiring two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2 GeV, and vetoing on hits in the forward beam shower counters. We select events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < η < +7.4. The two showers have similar ET and an azimuthal angle separation Δφ ~ π; we find 34 events with exactly two matching charged particle tracks, agreeing with expectations for the QED process p¯p → p+e+e- + ¯p by two photon exchange; and we find 43 events with no tracks. The latter are candidates for the exclusive process p¯p → p + γγ + ¯p by double pomeron exchange. We use the strip and wire chambers at the longitudinal shower maximum position within the calorimeter to measure a possible exclusive background from IP + IP → π0π0, and conclude that it is consistent with zero and is < 15 events at 95% C.L. The measured cross section is σγγ,excl(|η| < 1, ET (γ) > 2.5 GeV) = 2.48 +0.40 -0.35(stat) +0.40 -0.51(syst) pb and in agreement with the theoretical predictions. This process is closely related to exclusive Higgs boson production pp → p + H + p at the Large Hadron Collider. The observation of the exclusive production of diphotons shows that exclusive Higgs production can happen and could be observed with a proper experimental setup.

  15. Achievements and Lessons from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - beginning operation in December of 1985 until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of the this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. Tevatron will be shut off September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. Below we briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, and technology implemented during the long quest for better and better performance. We also discuss some lessons learned from our experience.

  16. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beammore » remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.« less

  17. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beam remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  18. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  19. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  20. A next-to-leading-order QCD analysis of charged current event rates from (nu)N deep inelastic scattering at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Jesse Matthew

    This dissertation details the results of a NLO QCD analysis of overlinenoverline Fe and overlinenoverline Fe scattering at the Fermilab Tevatron. Recently an increasing number of measurements by a variety of experiments have led to a good understanding of the partonic contents of the nucleon. Accurate parameterisations of these contents and the fact that neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering is an ideal probe of the nucleus allow for a unique understanding of QCD and related phenomena in the kinematic region for which Q2 > 5 GeV 2 and 0.1 < x < 0.7. Perturbative QCD and such non-perturbative effects as the EMC correction, the longitudinal structure function, RL, and higher twist corrections are studied and χ2 comparisons are made with the NuTeV charged current data sample. These comparisons indicate that a NLO perturbative QCD) model combined with the EMC correction and higher twist best agrees with the NuTeV data. Using this resultant model and altering the cuts to include all data for which 0.003 < x < 0.7 leads to a NLO measurement of the strange sea level, κ. Combining this result with the measurement of κ from the NuTeV dimuon analysis leads to limits on the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Masakawa matrix element, Vcs, which are consistent with currently accepted values.

  1. CP Violation Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark .R.J.; /Lancaster U.

    2010-07-09

    The two colliding beam experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, CDF and D0, continue to publish world-leading measurements of CP Violation parameters in the B meson sector. I will present several recent results from both experiments, including measurements of direct CP violating parameters in decays of B{sup +}{sub u}, B{sup 0}{sub d} and B{sup 0}{sub s} mesons; a new D0 measurement of a{sup s}{sub sl} using time-dependent analysis of B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}D{sup -}{sub s}X decays; and the latest Tevatron combination of the CP violating phase {beta}{sub s}, measured in the 'golden mode' B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  2. Introduction to colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1994-10-01

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is currently the site of the world`s highest center-of-mass energy proton-antiproton colliding beam accelerator, the Tevatron. The CDF and D{O} detectors each envelop one of two luminous regions in the collider, and are thus wholly dependent on the accelerator for their success. The Tevatron`s high operating energy, reliability, and record setting integrated luminosity have allowed both experiments to make world-class measurements and defined the region of physics that each can explore. The following sections are an overview of the highlights of the accelerator operation and are compiled from many sources. The major sources for each section are listed at the beginning of that section.

  3. Measurement of Z+ γ production and search for anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The author presents a measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → Zγ + X → e+e-γ + X production using proton-antiproton collisions data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Zγ production provides a direct test of the triple neutral gauge couplings. A measurement of Zγ production cross section and search for anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are presented. The data presented are from 1.1 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ integrated luminosity collected at the CDF Detector. Electrons from Z decays are selected with Et > 20 Gev. Photons (Et > 7 GeV) are required to be well-separated from the electrons. There are 390 eeγ candidate events found with 1.1 fb-1 of data, compared to the SM prediction of 375.3 ± 25.2 events. The Standard Model prediction for the cross section for p$\\bar{p}$ → e+e-γ + X production at √s = 1.96 TeV is 4.5 ± 0.4 pb. The measured cross section is 4.7 ± 0.6 pb. The cross section and kinematic distributions of the eeγ events are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Limits on the ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are extracted using the photon Et distribution of eeγ events with meeγ > 100 GeV/c2. These are the first limits measured using CDF Run II data. These limits provide important test of the interaction of the photon and the Z boson.

  4. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  5. Tevatron constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quark pairs.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gogota, O; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S

    2015-04-17

    Combined constraints from the CDF and D0 Collaborations on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P are presented and compared with results obtained assuming the standard model value JP=0+. Both collaborations analyzed approximately 10  fb(-) of proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected at the Fermilab Tevatron. Two models predicting exotic Higgs bosons with JP=0- and JP=2+ are tested. The kinematic properties of exotic Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson differ from those predicted for the standard model Higgs boson. Upper limits at the 95% credibility level on the production rates of the exotic Higgs bosons, expressed as fractions of the standard model Higgs boson production rate, are set at 0.36 for both the JP=0- hypothesis and the JP=2+ hypothesis. If the production rate times the branching ratio to a bottom-antibottom pair is the same as that predicted for the standard model Higgs boson, then the exotic bosons are excluded with significances of 5.0 standard deviations and 4.9 standard deviations for the JP=0- and JP=2+ hypotheses, respectively. PMID:25933309

  6. Tevatron Constraints on Models of the Higgs Boson with Exotic Spin and Parity Using Decays to Bottom-Antibottom Quark Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Borysova, M.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gogota, O.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savitskyi, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Combined constraints from the CDF and D0 Collaborations on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P are presented and compared with results obtained assuming the standard model value JP=0+. Both collaborations analyzed approximately 10 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected at the Fermilab Tevatron. Two models predicting exotic Higgs bosons with JP=0- and JP=2+ are tested. The kinematic properties of exotic Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson differ from those predicted for the standard model Higgs boson. Upper limits at the 95% credibility level on the production rates of the exotic Higgs bosons, expressed as fractions of the standard model Higgs boson production rate, are set at 0.36 for both the JP=0- hypothesis and the JP=2+ hypothesis. If the production rate times the branching ratio to a bottom-antibottom pair is the same as that predicted for the standard model Higgs boson, then the exotic bosons are excluded with significances of 5.0 standard deviations and 4.9 standard deviations for the JP=0- and JP=2+ hypotheses, respectively.

  7. Coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-{beta} quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note.

  8. Measurement of the radiation field at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kordas et al.

    2003-01-12

    We present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of both ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Using data from multiple exposures we are able to separate the contributions from beam losses and proton-antiproton collisions. Initial measurements of leakage currents in the CDF silicon detectors show patterns consistent with predictions based on our measurements.

  9. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method using the Lepton + Jets Events with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Taichi

    2008-02-01

    We have measured the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method. The data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7fb-1 was collected in proton antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV with the CDF detector at Fermilab Tevatron during the period March 2002-March 2007. We select t$\\bar{t}$ pair production candidates by requiring one high energy lepton and four jets, in which at least one of jets must be tagged as a b-jet. In order to reconstruct the top quark mass, we use the dynamical likelihood method based on maximum likelihood method where a likelihood is defined as the differential cross section multiplied by the transfer function from observed quantities to parton quantities, as a function of the top quark mass and the jet energy scale(JES). With this method, we measure the top quark mass to be 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.+ JES) ± 1.3(syst.) = 171.6 ± 2.4 GeV/c2.

  10. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum pT in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet pT resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet pT resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The

  11. Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

  12. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B(s) Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Giurgiu, Gavril A

    2005-09-01

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons using semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} > 7.7 ps{sup -1} at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B {yields} {mu}X decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B{sub s}{sup 0} flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B{sup 0} and B{sup +} semileptonic B{sup 0/+} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays. The oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d} in semileptonic B{sup 0} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays is measured to be {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.501 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.)) ps{sup -1}.

  13. Observation and study of bottom-meson decays to a charm meson, a proton-antiproton pair, and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tae Min

    2010-04-27

    Bottom-meson decays with baryons show two unusual features—the branching fractions are enhanced for multibody decays and the baryon-antibaryon subsystem recoils against the other decay products—and their reasons are not yet well understood. Moreover, measurements using explicit reconstruction techniques constitute only about 1% out of about 8% of such decays. This Dissertation reports the study of ten bottom-meson decays (labeled 0– 9) to a proton-antiproton pair, a charm meson, and a system of up to two pions, using the BABAR Experiment’s 455×106 BB pairs produced with the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  14. Transverse Velocity Dependence of the Proton-Antiproton Ratio as a Signature of the QCD Critical Point

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, M.; Bass, S. A.; Mueller, B.; Nonaka, C.

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the {mu}{sub B}-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity ({beta}{sub T}) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual {beta}{sub T} dependence of the p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  15. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jun-jie

    2004-10-01

    This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, {Lambda}{sub W}, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb{sup -1} data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, M{sub T}, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < M{sub T} < 200 GeV. The result if {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.011 {+-} 0.093(stat) {+-} 0.107(syst) GeV.

  16. A measurement of forward-backward charge asymmetry of electron-positron pairs in proton-antiproton collision at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Veramendi, Gregory Francisco

    2003-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry for e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs resulting from {gamma}*/Z decays with mass M{sub ee} > 40 GeV/c{sup 2}. The Run II data sample consists of 72 pb{sup -1} of data, which was collected by the CDF detector in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is compared with predictions from the Standard Model.

  17. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  18. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilacker, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  19. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Theilacker, J.C.

    2004-06-23

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  20. Collider Detector (CDF) at FERMILAB: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Theriot, D.

    1984-07-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 150 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and Unversity of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies.

  1. Diffractive Z/gamma* --> mu+mu- boson production in proton - antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza Navas, Luis Miguel; /Andes U., Bogota

    2007-07-01

    Measurements of the inclusive diffractive Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section with gap requirement for M{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}} > 40 GeV at {radical} s = 1.96 TeV and fraction of Z bosons produced diffractively with gap requirement from Z inclusive production are presented. The measurements are performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 820 pb{sup -1}, collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron, between 2002 to 2005. A total of 39945 di-muons events are selected and final results of: {sigma}{sub Diff}{sup gap} x Br(Z/{gamma}* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 4.09 {+-} 0.64(stat.) {+-} 0.88(syst.) {+-} 0.27(lumi.) pb and, R{sub Diff}{sup gap} = 1.92 {+-} 0.30(stat.) {+-} 0.41(syst.) {+-} 0.12(lumi) % are obtained. In addition, d{sigma}/d{zeta} and d{sigma}/dy distributions are presented and they are compared with diffractive montecarlo (POMWIG). A reasonable agreement is obtained in this comparation. Finally, comparison of fraction of Z bosons produced diffractively with gap requirement (gap fraction) as measured with D0 during Run I of the Tevatron is compared. A good agreement is found for gap fraction results.

  2. Measurement of the branching fraction Bs->Ds(*)Ds(*) using the D0 detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Walder, James William; /Lancaster U.

    2009-02-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the branching fraction Br(B{sup 0}{sub s} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sub s} D{sup (*)}{sub s}) made using a data sample collected from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, corresponding to approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in 2002--2006 by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. One D{sup (*)}{sub s} meson was partially reconstructed in the decay D{sub s} {yields} {phi}{mu}{nu}, and the other D{sup (*)}{sub s} meson was identified using the decay D{sub s} {yields} {phi}{pi} where no attempt was made to distinguish D{sub s} and D{sup *}{sub s} states. The resulting measurement is Br(B{sup 0}{sub s} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sub s} D{sup (*)}{sub s}) = 0.039{sup +0.019}{sub -0.017}(stat){sup +0.016}{sub -0.015}(syst). This was subsequently used to estimate the width difference {Delta}{Gamma}{sup CP}{sub s} in the B{sup 0}{sub s}-{anti B}{sup 0}{sub s} system: {Delta}{Gamma}{sup CP}{sub s}/{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.079{sup +0.038}{sub -0.035}(stat){sup +0.031}{sub 0.030}(syst), and is currently one of the most precise estimates of this quantity and consistent with the Standard Model.

  3. B Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred Paulini

    2004-02-10

    After a five year upgrade period, the Fermilab experiments CDF and D0 are taking high quality data in Run II of the Tevatron Collider. We report on the start-up of both detectors and present a selection of first B physics results from the Tevatron. We also compare different B hadron producers such as the {Upsilon}(4S) with the hadron collider environment and discuss general features of B physics at a hadron collider.

  4. Diboson Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Iashvili, Ia; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-09-01

    We present the latest results on the production of WW, WZ, Wgamma, Zgamma and ZZ events at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The results are based on the analyses of 0.2 - 2 /fb of data collected in p pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV by CDF and DO experiments during the Tevatron Run II. Analyses of the diboson production processes provide crucial test of the Standard Model, directly probing its predictions on the Trilinear Gauge Couplings.

  5. Recent Electroweak Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-07-01

    W and Z bosons are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Precision measurements with these gauge bosons provide us with high precision tests of the Standard Model (SM) as well as indirect search for possible new physics beyond the SM. I present the recent electroweak measurements related to single W, Z boson and diboson productions from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  6. Tevatron electron lenses: Design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; Seryi, Andrey; Solyak, Nikolai; Sytnik, Veniamin; Tiunov, Mikhail; Tkachenko, Leonid; Wildman, David; Wolff, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao-Long

    2008-10-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [V. Shiltsev , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 101001 (2005)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.101001]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [V. Shiltsev , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 071001 (1999).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.2.071001]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported by Shiltsev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 244801 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.244801; New J. Phys. 10, 043042 (2008)NJOPFM1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/10/4/043042] and by Zhang et al. [X.-L. Zhang , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 051002 (2008)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.11.051002]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation, and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  7. Status of the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The author presents the current operational status of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. Using a mix of stochastic and electron cooling, we prepare antiproton beams for the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program. Included are discussion of stashing and cooling performance, operational scenarios, and collider performance.

  8. Search for Diphoton Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy in 6.3 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ Collisions using the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Mark Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider between 2002 and 2010, and correspond to 6.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the Standard Model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the Standard Model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale Λ is excluded for Λ < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius Rc is excluded for Rc-1 < 477 GeV.

  9. The Charge Asymmetry in $W$ Boson Production in $p\\bar p$ Collisions at the $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV Using the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Khatidze, David

    2009-01-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson charge asymmetry in p $\\bar{p}$ collisions using W →ev decays using 750 pb-1 of data collected with the D detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The electron coverage is extended to |η| < 3.2 and is thus sensitive to Ws generated with low and high x partons. We also measured the charge asymmetry for events with electron ET > 25 GeV, 25 < ET < 35 GeV and ET > 35 GeV. By dividing events into di erent electron ET regions, we can probe di erent W boson rapidity regions, and can provide more constraints on the parton distribution functions (PDFs). Theoretical predictions made using CTEQ6.6 and MRST2004NLO PDFs are compared with the measurement. Our measurement is the most precise W charge asymmetry measurement to date, and this single measurement is superior in precision to the combined world average of all previous W charge asymmetry measurements done at the Tevatron. The measured asymmetry errors are less than the CTEQ6.6 PDF uncertainty for most rapidity bins. The inclusion of our results will further constrain future PDF ts and improve the predictions.

  10. Measurement of the Lambda/b lifetime in Lambda/b to Lambda/c pi decays at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, Jonathan Reid; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2008-10-01

    The lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon (consisting of u, d and b quarks) is the theoretically most interesting of all b-hadron lifetimes. The lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} probes our understanding of how baryons with one heavy quark are put together and how they decay. Experimentally however, measurements of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime have either lacked precision or have been inconsistent with one another. This thesis describes the measurement of {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in proton-antiproton collisions with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Using 1070 {+-} 60pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), a clean sample of about 3,000 fully-reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (with {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} subsequently decaying via {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) is used to extract the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, which is found to be c{tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 422.8 {+-} 13.8(stat) {+-} 8.8(syst){micro}m. This is the most precise measurement of its kind, and is even better than the current world average. It also settles the recent controversy regarding the apparent inconsistency between CDF's other measurement and the rest of the world.

  11. The Charge Asymmetry in W Boson Decays Produced in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Mark Richard

    The charge asymmetry as a function of lepton rapidity, A(y), has been measured at sqrt{s} = 1.8 TeV for mid ymid < 1.8, using the W decays to electrons and muons recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 run of the Tevatron Collider. The large sample of 19,039 W to lv events ({~} 20 pb^{-1} of integrated luminosity) and detector improvements have made discrimination between sets of modern parton distributions possible, for the first time, using p=p collider data. The asymmetry data is sensitive to the ratio of the d/u quark momentum distributions in the proton. The data favor the most recent parton distributions and demonstrate the value of collider data in the measurement of the proton's structure. In particular it is found that of the two current sets, those of Martin, Roberts and Stirling (MRS) are favored over the sets produced by the CTEQ collaboration; this difference is seen even though both sets are found to agree, at the level of the nuclear shadowing corrections, with the recent measurements of F_sp{2} {n}/F_sp{2}{p } performed by NMC. This measurement probes the quark distributions to x < 0.01 at Q^2 = M_sp{W }{2}, where nonperturbative effects are minimal.

  12. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  13. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  14. Search for new physics in electron-tau final states in proton - antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Noeding, Carsten; /Freiburg U.

    2006-04-01

    at large energy regimes. Hence there are strong reasons to believe that the Standard Model is only a low-energy approximation to a more fundamental theory. One of the best studied candidates for an extension of the Standard Model is supersymmetry, which predicts the existence of a supersymmetric partner for each fundamental particle that differs only in spin. To allow different masses for Standard Model particles and their corresponding supersymmetric partners, supersymmetry must be broken. The mechanism behind supersymmetry breaking is currently unknown, however, various hypotheses exist. Supersymmetric models do not only solve the problem of the large quantum corrections to the Higgs boson mass, but they also allow the unification of the coupling constants at a common scale. In addition, certain supersymmetric models provide a suitable candidate for cold dark matter, which represents a large fraction of mass in our universe. Searches for supersymmetric particles have been performed by the four LEP experiments (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) up to the kinematic limit. Since no evidence for supersymmetric particles has been found, lower limits on their masses have been derived. The search for supersymmetry is now continuing at the Tevatron collider, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. Two dedicated detector systems, CDF and D0, are installed at the Tevatron to analyze proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. A particular promising discovery channel for supersymmetry within the Tevatron energy range is the trilepton channel. In this channel, the lighter supersymmetric partners of the Higgs and gauge bosons, the charginos and neutralinos, decay into final states with leptons or hadrons and missing energy. Using the leptonic final states, the signal can be separated from the large Standard Model background. Supersymmetry requires an extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector, leading to more than one neutral

  15. Fermilab recycler stochastic cooling commissioning and performance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Broemmelsiek; Ralph Pasquinelli

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring located in the Fermilab Main Injector tunnel near the ceiling. The Recycler has two roles in Run II. First, to store antiprotons from the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator so that the antiproton production rate is no longer compromised by large numbers of antiprotons stored in the Accumulator. Second, to receive antiprotons from the Fermilab Tevatron at the end of luminosity periods. To perform each of these roles, stochastic cooling in the Recycler is needed to preserve and cool antiprotons in preparation for transfer to the Tevatron. The commissioning and performance of the Recycler stochastic cooling systems will be reviewed.

  16. Magnetic field data on Fermilab Energy-Saver quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.E.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Fisk, H.E.; Gross, D.A.; Hanft, R.; Ohnuma, S.; Turkot, F.T.

    1983-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver/Doubler (Tevatron) accelerator contains 216 superconducting quadrupole magnets. Before installation in the Tevatron ring, these magnets plus an additional number of spares were extensively tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF). Details on the results of the tests are presented here.

  17. Measurements of the Top Quark at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The authors present recent preliminary measurements of the top-antitop pair production cross section and determinations of the top quark pole mass, performed using the data collected by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider. In the lepton plus jets final state, with semileptonic B decay, the pair production cross section has now been measured at CDF using {approx} 760 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. A measurement of the production cross section has also been made with {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data in the all-jets final state by the CDF Collaboration. The mass of the top quark has now been measured using {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of collision data using all decay channels of the top quark pair, yielding the most precise measurements of the top mass to date.

  18. Top quarks at the Tevatron: Measurements of the top quark production and decay with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, Jonas; /Stockholm U.

    2006-04-01

    This thesis presents two measurements of the to pquark using 230 pb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Tevatron accelerator. The first measurement determines the top pair production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. In the standard model of particle physics the top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a b quark. Candidate events are selected by requiring that at least one jet in the event is tagged with the secondary vertex algorithm.

  19. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Tevatron Resistive Wall Current Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    Resistive Wall Current Monitors (RWCM) were designed and built for the Fermilab Tevatron (Tev) project. These devices measure longitudinal beam current from 3 KHz to 6 GHz with 1.34 ohm gap impedance. There are two RWCM's installed a few feet apart in the Tevatron, upstream RWCM is used for general purpose use, downstream RWCM is dedicated for longitudinal parameters of coalesced beam bunches and bunch intensities. The design provides a calibration or test port for injecting test signals. Microwave absorber material is used to reduce interference from spurious electromagnetic waves traveling inside the beam pipe. This paper will do an overview how the RWCM was designed and its test results.

  1. Recent results in light-quark meson spectroscopy from Fermilab experiment E-760

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Church, M.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Hsueh, S.; Marsh, W.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.

    1994-09-01

    Fermilab experiment E-760 light-quark meson spectroscopy data for proton-antiproton annihilation to 3{pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup 0}{eta}, {pi}{sup 0}2{eta}, and 3{eta} in-flight have confirmed the 1500 MeV state at rest seen previously at CERN. Structures above this energy are complex, and preliminary results of amplitude analysis, in progress, for extracting spin quantum numbers show the possibility of nearly degenerate states for some of these structures. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Crystal extraction at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    Luminosity-driven channeling extraction was observed for the first time in a 900 GeV study at the Fermilab Tevatron carried out in the 1995-1996 period. This experiment, Fermilab E853, demonstrated that useful TeV level beams can be extracted from a superconducting accelerator during high luminosity collider operations without unduly affecting the background at the collider detectors. Multipass extraction was found to increase the efficiency of the process significantly. The beam extraction efficiency was in the range of 25%. The history of the experiment is reviewed. Special attention is paid to results related to collimation.

  3. Measurements of Rare B Decays at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Masato

    2009-06-01

    Both CDF and D0 experiments have been searching for evidence of physics beyond the standard model (SM) using the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at Fermilab. We report on recent searches in the B flavor sector, especially decays via flavor changing neutral current processes (FCNC), B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, at the Tevatron.

  4. Searches for supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Mary R. M. Bishai

    2001-05-15

    We review current experimental results of searches for Supersymmetry (SUSY) at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the Run I data collected during 1992-1996. New results from the CDF detector in the jets + missing E{sub t} and lepton-photon channels are presented. Recent results from model independent searches at D0 using the SLEUTH algorithm are reviewed. We discuss the prospects for supersymmetry searches at Run II of the Tevatron, scheduled to start in March, 2001.

  5. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  6. B States at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, Manfred; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2009-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have produced a wealth of heavy flavor physics results since the beginning of RunII of the Fermilab Tevatron. They review recent measurements of B hadron states including excited B states (B**, B{sub s}**) and the B{sub c}{sup +} meson. They also summarize the discoveries of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon states and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon.

  7. Diboson physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Mark S.; /UC, San Diego

    2006-05-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 detectors are being used to study diboson production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The authors summarize recent measurements of the W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, and WW cross-sections and limits on WZ and ZZ production. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings are also presented.

  8. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  9. Results on Charm Baryon Spectroscopy from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-05-01

    Due to an excellent mass resolution and a large amount of available data, the CDF experiment, located at the Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator, allows the precise measurement of spectroscopic properties, like mass and decay width, of a variety of states. This was exploited to examine the first orbital excitations of the {Lambda}{sub c} baryon, the resonances {Lambda}{sub c}(2595) and {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), in the decay channel {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as the {Lambda}{sub c} spin excitations {Sigma}{sub c}(2455) and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) in its decays to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final states in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb{sup -1}. We present measurements of the mass differences with respect to the {Lambda}{sub c} and the decay widths of these states, using significantly higher statistics than previous experiments.

  10. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  11. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John C

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  12. Forward-Backward Asymmetry at High Mass in Top Quark Pair Production in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center of Mass Energy = 1.96 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppig, Andrew Peter

    We present a new measurement of the inclusive forward-backward tt¯ production asymmetry and its mass dependence. The measurements are performed with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L = 5.3 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s = 1.96 TeV, recorded with the CDF II Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Significant inclusive asymmetries are observed in both the laboratory frame and the tt¯ rest frame, and in both cases are found to be consistent with CP conservation under interchange of t and t¯. In the tt¯ rest frame, the asymmetry is observed to increase with the invariant mass, Mtt¯, of the tt¯ system. Fully corrected parton-level asymmetries are derived in two regions of Mtt¯, and the asymmetry is found to be most significant at large Mtt¯ . For Mtt¯ ≥ 450 GeV/ c2, the parton-level asymmetry in the tt¯ rest frame is Att¯ = 0.475 +/- 0.114 compared to a next-to-leading order QCD prediction of 0.088 +/- 0.013.

  13. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Majersky, O.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.

    2016-06-01

    We report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, AFB , in b b ¯ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic b -hadron decays. The event sample is collected at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of AFB(b b ¯ ) =(1.2 ±0.7 )% at the particle level for b -quark pairs with invariant mass, mb b ¯ , down to 40 GeV /c2 and measure the dependence of AFB(b b ¯ ) on mb b ¯ . The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  14. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2016-06-02

    Here, we report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, AFB, in bb¯ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic b-hadron decays. The event sample is collected at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb–1 of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of AFB(bb¯)=(1.2±0.7)% at the particle level for b-quark pairs with invariant mass, mbb¯, down to 40 GeV/c2 and measure the dependence of AFB(bb¯) on mbb¯. The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  15. Measurements of Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Elastic Scattering at the European Center for Nuclear Research Intersecting Storage Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Norman Alexander

    1985-12-01

    We have measured proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. Using the optical theorem, we have extracted the total nuclear cross sections for these collisions. By measuring the interference between the Coulomb amplitude and the nuclear amplitude we have found (rho), the ratio of the real part to the imaginary part of the forward nuclear elastic scattering amplitude. Further, we have extracted the nuclear slope parameter in the forward direction. The elastic scattering measurements were made at small scattering angles ((TURN)1 milliradian), demanding that the detectors be placed close to the beams. Access to the interior of the ISR beam pipe was afforded by using reentrant cavities in the beam pipe, called "Roman Pots". The detectors consisted of two conjugate pairs of scintillator hodoscopes placed above and below the beams. Each detector consisted of a front plane of 24 strips of 2 mm scintillator which measured polar scattering angles, seven strips of 4 mm scintillator which measured azimuthal angles, and a trigger counter 48 x 28 mm('2). Normalization of the data was performed by two methods: (1) Van der Meer calibrations were performed on sets of luminosity monitor counters, (2) the known Coulomb differential scattering cross section fixed the normalization scale. For proton-proton interactions, the total nuclear cross sections measured were 39.95 (+OR-) 0.30 mb and 42.19 (+OR-) 0.19 mb for center-of-mass energies SQRT.(s) = 30.6 GeV and 52.8 GeV, respectively. The measured values of (rho) were 0.035 (+OR-) 0.009 and 0.071 (+OR-) 0.010. For proton-antiproton interactions, the cross sections found were 41.10 (+OR-) 0.40 mb and 43.34 (+OR-) 0.43 mb, respectively, and the (rho) values were 0.088 (+OR-) 0.025 and 0.066 (+OR-) 0.022.

  16. Operation and maintenance of Fermilab`s satellite refrigerator expansion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.M.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab`s superconducting Tevatron accelerator is cooled to liquid helium temperatures by 24 satellite refrigerators, each of which uses for normal operations a reciprocating `wet` expansion engine. These expanders are basically Process System (formerly Koch) Model 1400 expanders installed in standalone cryostats designed by Fermilab. This paper will summarize recent experience with operations and maintenance of these expansion engines. Some of the statistics presented will include total engine hours, mean time between major and minor maintenance, and frequent causes of major maintenance.

  17. B PHYSICS AT THE TEVATRON RUN II.

    SciTech Connect

    YIP,K.

    2004-03-27

    We present the B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab and their future prospect. This includes various B mass and lifetime measurements, B mixing, the confirmation of the discovery of the X particle, rare decays, CP violation, and spectroscopy.

  18. Tevatron targets three-year extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-09-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron collider could get a new lease on life following a campaign to keep the facility running beyond the end of 2011, when the rival Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is scheduled to shut down for 15 months of repairs.

  19. WW and WZ production at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Fuess, T.A.

    1995-04-01

    Direct limits are set on WWZ and WW{gamma} three-boson couplings in a search for WW and WZ production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using the D(0) and CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  20. New particle searches at Tevatron (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, T.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1996-05-01

    Various recent results of new particle searches at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. No evidence is found for supersymmetric particles (chargino, gluino), leptoquark bosons and heavy gauge bosons in {ital p{anti P}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Excluded mass regions for each particle are determined.

  1. B(s) properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria U., Santander

    2005-11-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study B{sub s} mesons. In this paper they show a few selected topics from the CDF and D0 collaborations, giving special attention to the B{sub s} Mixing analyses. This note corresponds to the proceedings of the Hadron Collider Physics 2005 conference.

  2. Search for Higgs Boson Production in Association with a W Boson in 1.96-TeV Proton - Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Masubuchi, Tatusya

    2008-02-01

    We have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a W± boson. This search is based on the data collected between February 2002 and May 2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb-1 collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) at the Tevatron which is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider at a center of mass energy 1.96 TeV. W+Higgs channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs search at Tevatron in the low Higgs mass region (mH < 135 GeV/c2), where Higgs boson decays into b$\\bar{b}$ dominantly. The detection of lepton from the W boson decay makes the W+Higgs events much cleaner than the direct Higgs production events which have the largest production cross section. Experimentally we select events with a high pT lepton, high missing transverse energy and two b-quark jets. This signature is same as for the W+jets background which has a huge cross section. To reduce the W+jets background, b-jet identification algorithms are applied to at least one jet. The expected signal events in 1.9fb-1 are 1.82 ± 0.15 and 1.68 ± 0.20 for one b-tagged events and two b-tagged events, respectively. The observed data is 805 for one b-tagged events and 173 for two b-tagged events. They are consistent with the Standard Model background expectation. After selecting the events, Neural Network (NN) discriminant technique is performed to distinguish the signal events from still residual backgrounds. We see no evidence for a Higgs signal in the dijet mass distribution and in the NN output distribution. We set a 95% confidence level upper limit on the W+Higgs production cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs decaying into a b$\\bar{b}$ pair. We obtained σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → W±H) x BR(H → b$\\bar{b}$) < 1.4 to 0.9 pb for Higgs masses from 110 GeV/c2 to 150 GeV/c2 using the NN output distribution. The limits are about 10

  3. Fragmentation properties of jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at radical S = 1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, B. . Dept. of Physics):)

    1989-11-01

    Jet fragmentation properties have been studied in collisions of protons and antiprotons at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV, using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The fractional momentum distribution of charged particles within jets is presented and compared with Monte-Carlo predictions. With increasing di-jet invariant mass from 60 to 200 GeV/c{sup 2} the fragmentation is observed to soften as predicted by scale breaking effects in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The charged multiplicity in the jet core is observed to rise with di-jet invariant mass. 57 refs.

  4. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section in dimuon final states in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Konrath, Jens Peter; /Freiburg U.

    2008-09-01

    Particle physics deals with the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions. The vast number of subatomic particles can be reduced to twelve fundamental fermions, which interact by the exchange of spin-1 particles as described in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM provides the best description of the subatomic world to date, despite the fact it does not include gravitation. Following the relation {lambda} = h/p, where h is Planck's constant, for the examination of physics at subatomic scales with size {lambda} probes with high momenta p are necessary. These high energies are accessible through particle colliders. Here, particles are accelerated and brought to collision at interaction points at which detectors are installed to record these particle collisions. Until the anticipated start-up of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron collider at Fermilab near Chicago is the highest energy collider operating in the world, colliding protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Its two interaction points are covered by the multi purpose particle detectors D0 and CDF. During the first data-taking period, known as Run I, the Tevatron operated at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. This run period lasted from 1992 to 1996. During this period, the long-predicted top quark was discovered. From 1996 and 2001, the accelerator was upgraded to deliver higher instantaneous luminosities at its current center-of-mass energy. At the same time, the experiments were upgraded to take full advantage of the upgraded accelerator complex. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator in the world with a sufficient energy to produce top quarks. Studying top quark production, decay and properties is an important part of the D0 and CDF physics programs. Because of its large mass, the top quark is a unique probe of the Standard Model, and an interesting environment to search for new physics. In this thesis, a

  5. The story of the Tevatron accelerators: Accelerator science and technology breakthroughs, achievements and lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - since it began operation in December of 1985, until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. The Tevatron has been shut off since September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. In this paper, we briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, technology implemented during the long quest for better and better performance, and the lessons learned from our experience.

  6. Charmonium production at the Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider in the Regge limit of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nefedov, M. A. Saleev, V. A. Shipilova, A. V.

    2013-12-15

    Processes involving direct J/ψ-meson production in proton-antiproton and proton-proton collisions are studied under the assumption of gluon Reggeization in t-channel exchanges and with the aid of the formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. The present calculations are performed in the leading approximation in the strong coupling constant α{sub s} and in the relative quark velocity v. The octet nonperturbative matrix elements for the transition of a c c-bar pair to quarkonium are fixed in fitting the transverse-momentumspectra obtained by the CDF Collaboration for J/ψ mesons at the Tevatron collider. The spectra of J/ψ-meson production at the energies of the Large Hadron Collider are predicted, and the resulting predictions agree well with experimental data obtained by the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb Collaborations at √S = 7 TeV.

  7. A search for B_S0 oscillations at the Tevatron collider experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Krop, Dan N.; /Indiana U.

    2007-04-01

    We present a search for B{sub S}{sup 0} oscillations using semileptonic B{sub S} {yields} D{sub s}{mu}X (D{sub S} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K). The data were collected using the D0 detector from events produced in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Tevatron is currently the only place in the world that produces B{sub S}{sup 0} mesons and will be until early 2008 when the Large Hadron Collider begins operating at CERN. One of the vital ingredients for the search for B s oscillations is the determination of the flavor of the B{sub S}{sup 0} candidate (B{sub S}{sup 0} or {bar B}{sub S}{sup 0} ) at the time of its production, called initial state flavor tagging. We develop an likelihood based initial state flavor tagger that uses objects on the side of the event opposite to the reconstructed B meson candidate. To improve the performance of this flavor tagger, we have made it multidimensional so that it takes correlations between discriminants into account. This tagging is then certified by applying it to sample of semimuonic B{sup (0,+)} decays and measuring the well-known oscillation frequency {delta}m{sub d}. We obtain {delta}m{sub d} = 0.486 {+-} 0.021 ps{sup -1}, consistent with the world average. The tagging performance is characterized by the effective efficiency, {epsilon}D{sup 2} = (1.90 {+-} 0.41)%. We then turn to the search for B{sub S}{sup 0} oscillations in the above-named channel. A special two-dimensional mass fitting procedure is developed to separate kinematic reflections from signal events. Using this mass fitting procedure in an unbinned likelihood framework, we obtain a 95% C.L. of {Delta}m{sub s} > 1.10 ps{sup -1} and a sensitivity of 1.92 ps-1. This result is combined with other analyzed B{sub S}{sup 0} decay channels at D0 to obtain a combined 95% C.L. of {Delta}m{sub s} > 14.9 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 16.5 ps-1. The corresponding log likelihood scan has a preferred value of {Delta}m{sub s} = 19 ps-1

  8. SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gris, Philippe; CDF, for the; collaborations, D0

    2011-06-01

    The results of search for Supersymmetry performed at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF and D0 collaborations are summarized in this paper. No significant deviations with respect to the Standard Model expectations were observed and constraints were set on supersymmetric parameters. Supersymmetry (SUSY), a space-time symmetry that predicts for every Standard Model (SM) particle the existence of a superpartner that differs by half a unit of spin, may provide a solution to the hierarchy problem if SUSY particles have masses lower than 1 TeV, strongly motivating the search for such particles at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. If there is supersymmetry in nature, it must be broken and the theorized breaking mechanisms lead to many models (supergravity, gauge mediated, anomaly mediated, ...) with possibly different phenomenologies. Searches performed by the CDF and D0 experiments aim at probing the extensive SUSY parameter space in terms of mass and final state.

  9. Supersymmetry Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.

    2008-11-23

    Supersymmetry predicts a range of new phenomena with a variety of experimental signatures. Searches for supersymmetry at the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator fall into three broad categories: generic sparticle searches; specialized searches for sparticles with unusual properties; and model-independent searches probing for discrepancies between the data and the standard model. Searches performed by the CDF and DOe experiments with up to 2 fb{sup -1} of {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV pp-bar data have yet to turn up any evidence for supersymmetry.

  10. Bs Mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of B{sub s} mesons. B{sub s} Mixing is the most important analysis within the B Physics program of both experiments. In this paper they summarize the most recent results on this topic from both D0 and CDF experiments. There were very important updates in both experiments after his last talk, hence the organizers warmly recommended me to include the latest available results on B{sub s} mixing, instead of what he presents there.

  11. Mesure de la section efficace de production de paires de quarks top dans le canal μ + jets + τ + b-jet(s) + Energie transverse manquante auprès de l'expérience DØ du Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Jerome

    2011-09-09

    The purpose of high energy physics is to improve our knowledge about the fundamental structure of matter, in particular about particles that constitute the world. One of these is the top quark, that was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron protons-antiprotons collider. One of the primary aim of the Tevatron has been then the fine study of the top quark properties, in particular the top-antitop production cross section. Different analysis have been performed in the leptons (μ,e,τ) + jets, dileptons, and all hadronic channels to determine accurately the values of these parameters, and thus to test the validity of the Standard Model. The main goal of this thesis is to verify one of the theoretical predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics, the top-antitop production cross section, at the Tevatron collider.

  12. Some remarks about simulation of cosmic ray phenomena with use of nuclear interaction models based on the current SPS proton-antiproton data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotniak, J. A.; Yodh, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    The x-y controversy is studied by introducing models with as many features (except for x and y distributions) in common, as possible, to avoid an extrapolation problem, only primary energies of 500 TeV are considered. To prove the point, Monte Carlo simulations are performed of EAS generated by 500 TeV vertical primary protons. Four different nuclear interaction models were used. Two of them are described elsewhere. Two are: (1) Model M-Y00 - with inclusive x and y distributions behaving in a scaling way; and (2) Model M-F00 - at and below ISR energies (1 TeV in Lab) exactly equivalent to the above, then gradually changing to provide the distributions in rapidity at 155 TeV as given by SPS proton-antiproton. This was achieved by gradual decrease in the scale unit in x distributions of produced secondaries, as interaction energy increases. Other modifications to the M-Y00 model were made.

  13. Tevatron Run II performance and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D Church

    2002-07-12

    The Fermilab accelerator complex has been operating Run II for approximately one year. In this mode 36 proton bunches collide with 36 antiproton bunches at 2 interaction regions in the Tevatron at 980 GeV beam energy. The long range goal in Run II is to obtain a total integrated luminosity of 15 pb{sup -1}. The current status and performance of the accelerator complex is described, including the Tevatron, Main Injector, Antiproton Source, and Recycler Ring. Future upgrade plans and prospects for reaching the admittedly ambitious long range goal are presented.

  14. Single Z Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Thomas J.

    2012-05-01

    The production of single Z bosons has been studied at Fermilab's Tevatron by the CDF and D0 collaborations. Measurements include the weak mixing angle, vector and axial-vector couplings between Z bosons and light quarks, and angular coefficients in electronic decays which are sensitive to the spin of the gluon. The collaborations have looked for and indication of new physics above the mass scale that can be directly produced at the Tevatron by studying the interference between Z and photon propagators. All measurements are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  15. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  16. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  17. A measurement of R = sigma x B meson (proton antiproton going to W boson going to charged electron neutrino)/sigma x B meson (proton antiproton going to Z boson going to positron electron) using the CDF detector in proton antiproton collisions at 1800 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, John Edward

    We describe the analysis of data from the 1994-1995 collider run (1B) at the Fermi National Laboratory. We measure the ratio R=s×B(pp-->W-->en) s× B(pp-->Z-->e+e-) at a center of mass energy of √s = 1800 GeV. The data sample contains 90.4pb -1 taken with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We find that R is 10.26 +/- 0.15 (stat) +/- 0.18 (syst). Using theoretical calculations and the LEP measurement for the branching ratio of Z bosons decaying to electron-positron pairs ( G(Z-->e+e -)/G( Z) ), we determine the branching ratio of W+/--->e+/- n , G(W+/---> e+/-n)/G (W) . We find that the W+/--->e+/- n branching ratio is 0.1026 +/- 0.0016 +/- 0.0018. Using the Standard Model calculation of the partial width for W+/--->e+/- n , G(W+/---> e+/-n) , we determine the full decay width of the W boson, G(W) = 2.203 +/- 0.035 +/- 0.038.

  18. Prototype electron lens set-up for the Tevatron beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Saewert, G.; Santucci, J.; Sery, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Shiltsev, V.; Wildman, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Arapov, L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Logachov, P.; Sharapa, A.; Skarbo, B.; Sukhina, B.

    1999-05-17

    A prototype "electron lens" for the Tevatron beam-beam compensation project is commissioned at Fermilab. We de-scribe the set-up, report results of the first tests of the elec-tron beam, and discuss future plans.

  19. Probing Neutral Gauge Boson Self-Interactions in ZZ Production at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Rainwater, D.

    We present an analysis of ZZ production at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron for general ZZZ and ZZγ couplings. Achievable limits on these couplings are shown to be a significant improvement over the limits currently obtained by LEP II.

  20. Supporting multiple control systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Fermilab control system, ACNET, is used for controlling the Tevatron and all of its pre-accelerators. However, other smaller experiments at Fermilab have been using different controls systems, in particular DOOCS and EPICS. This paper reports some of the steps taken at Fermilab to integrate support for these outside systems. We will describe specific tools that we have built or adapted to facilitate interaction between the architectures. We also examine some of the difficulties that arise from managing this heterogeneous environment. Incompatibilities as well as common elements will be described.

  1. Searches for gauge mediated supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Pierre; /Saclay

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of searches for new physics in events with two photons and large missing transverse energy collected with both detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Several models of physics beyond the Standard Model motivate searches in this final state, in particular supersymmetry (SUSY) with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. The D0 collaboration interprets also its search in the framework of universal extra dimensions (UED) with gravity-mediated Kaluza-Klein excitation decays. The results presented use 2.6 fb{sup -1} (CDF) and 6.3 fb{sup -1} (D0) of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  2. New Measurements with Photons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, J.R.; /Baylor U.

    2012-05-01

    With the recent completion of Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 experiments are publishing results based on challenging measurements that probe quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and are sensitive to next-to-leading-order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) effects and non-perturbative physics. A superior understanding of parton distribution functions and QCD backgrounds will improve the sensitivity of searches for new phenomena at the LHC and reduce uncertainties in a multitude of future measurements. We present three recent photon analyses from data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron: measurements of the direct photon pair production cross section at CDF and D0, measurements of azimuthal decorrelations and multiple parton interactions in {gamma} + 2 jet and {gamma} + 3 jet events at D0, and an observation of exclusive diphoton production at CDF.

  3. Fermilab Recycler Stochastic Cooling for Luminosity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmelsiek, D.; Gattuso, C.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Recycler began regularly delivering antiprotons for Tevatron luminosity operations in 2005. Methods for tuning the Recycler stochastic cooling system are presented. The unique conditions and resulting procedures for minimizing the longitudinal phase space density of the Recycler antiproton beam are outlined.

  4. Antiproton production for Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Azhgirey, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I. . Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij)

    1991-03-01

    Needs to improve the Fermilab Pbar Source for the Tevatron Upgrade and discrepancies in predictions of the antiproton yields have forced us to develop the production model based on the modern data and to incorporate this model to the current version of MARS10 code. The inclusive scheme of this code with the use of statistical weights allows the production of antiprotons to be enhanced within the phase space region of interest, which is extremely effective for optimization of Pbar Source parameters and for developing of such an idea as a beam sweeping system. Antiproton production model included in the modified version of our Monte Carlo program MARS10M for the inclusive simulation of hadronic cascades, as for other particles throughout the program, is based on a factorization approach for hadron-nucleus differential cross-section. To describe antiproton inclusive spectra in pp-collisions a phenomenological model has been used modified in the low-Pt region. The antiproton production in pion-nucleon interactions is described in the frame of our simple phenomenological model based on the modern data. In describing of the of antiproton production cross-sections ratio in hadron-nucleus and hadron-nucleon collisions the ideas of soft hadronization of color strings and all the present experimental data have been used. Some comparisons of our model with experimental data are presented in the wide intervals of initial momenta, antiproton kinematical variables and nuclei. In all the cases the agreement is pretty good what gives us an assurance in the consequent studies carried out for the Fermilab Pbar Source. The results of such study are presented in this paper.

  5. Rare B Meson Decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Rare B meson decays are an excellent probe for beyond the Standard Model physics. Two very sensitive processes are the b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s,d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays. We report recent results at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from CDF II using 7 fb{sup -1} at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  6. Non SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cortabitarte, R. Vilar

    2004-08-26

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider experiments, CDF and D0, have collected {approx} 200 pb{sup -1} of data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV since March 2002 (RunII). Both experiments have investigated physics beyond the standard model; this paper reviews some of the recent results on the searches for new phenomena, concentrating on Z', extra dimensions, excited electrons and lepto quarks. No signal was observed, therefore stringent limits on the signatures and models were derived.

  7. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  8. Top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich W.; /Arizona U.

    2010-09-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has, until recently, been the only accelerator with sufficient energy to produce top quarks. The CDF and D0 experiments have collected large samples of top quarks. We report on recent top quark production measurements of the single top and t{bar t} production cross sections, as well as studies of the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution and a search for highly boosted top quarks.

  9. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  10. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-10-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held.

  11. Recent QCD Studies at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Robert Craig

    2008-04-01

    Since the beginning of Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron the QCD physics groups of the CDF and D0 experiments have worked to reach unprecedented levels of precision for many QCD observables. Thanks to the large dataset--over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by each experiment--important new measurements have recently been made public and will be summarized in this paper.

  12. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gerdes

    2004-01-28

    Precision studies of the top quark are a prime goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Since the start of Run II in early 2002, the CDF and D0 experiments have analyzed approximately 100 pb{sup -1} of data and have re-established the top quark signal. In this article the author summarizes recent measurements of the top production cross section and mass.

  13. Mixing and CP Violation at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brooijmans, G.; /Columbia U.

    2008-08-01

    Measurements of meson mixing and CP violation parameters obtained by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. These include results on B{sub s} and D meson mixing, and searches for CP violation in the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +}, in mixing through semileptonic B{sub s} meson decays, and in the interference between mixing and decay in the process B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  14. Hydro static water level systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; Guerra, J.A.; Hansen, S.U.; Kiper, T.E.; Jostlein, H.; Shiltsev, V.; Chupyra, A.; Kondaurov, M.; Singatulin, S.

    2006-09-01

    Several Hydrostatic Water Leveling systems (HLS) are in use at Fermilab. Three systems are used to monitor quadrupoles in the Tevatron and two systems are used to monitor ground motion for potential sites for the International Linear Collider (ILC). All systems use capacitive sensors to determine the water level of water in a pool. These pools are connected with tubing so that relative vertical shifts between sensors can be determined. There are low beta quadrupoles at the B0 and D0 interaction regions of Tevatron accelerator. These quadrupoles use BINP designed and built sensors and have a resolution of 1 micron. All regular lattice superconducting quadrupoles (a total of 204) in the Tevatron use a Fermilab designed system and have a resolution of 6 microns. Data on quadrupole motion due to quenches, changes in temperature will be presented. In addition data for ground motion for ILC studies caused by natural and cultural factors will be presented.

  15. Strong Transverse Coupling in the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, Michael

    2004-05-01

    During the 20 years since it was first commissioned, the Fermilab Tevatron has developed strong coupling between the two transverse degrees of freedom. A distributed zeroth harmonic skew quadrupole circuit has traditionally been used to correct for transverse coupling, and the strength required of this circuit has increased since 1983 by more than an order of magnitude. In recent years changes to the Tevatron for colliding beams operation have altered the skew quadrupole corrector distribution and strong local coupling has become evident, often encumbering routine operation. In February 2003 it was discovered that the superconducting coils within the main bending magnets of the Tevatron had become vertically displaced within their iron yokes relative to their measured positions in the early 1980's during construction. The ensuing systematic skew quadrupole field introduced by this displacement accounts for the required corrector settings and observed beam behavior. Beam observations, explanations, and remedial measures are presented.

  16. Roll measurement of Tevatron dipoles and quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; Elementi, L.; Gollwitzer, K.; Jostlein, H.; Nobrega, F.; Shiltsev, V.; Stefanski, R.

    2006-09-01

    In 2003 a simple digital level system was developed to allow for rapid roll measurements of all dipoles and quadrupoles in the Tevatron. The system uses a Mitutoyo digital level and a PC running MS WINDOWS XP and LAB VIEW to acquire data on the upstream and downstream roll of each magnet. The system is sufficiently simple that all 1,000 magnets in the Tevatron can be measured in less than 3 days. The data can be quickly processed allowing for correction of rolled magnets by the Fermilab alignment group. Data will be presented showing the state of the Tevatron in 2003 and the changes in rolls as measured in each shutdown since then.

  17. Commisioning of the second Tevatron electron lens and beam study results

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Fellenz, B.; Hively, R.; Kuznetsov, G.; Olson, M.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In the framework of Fermilab's Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project, the 2nd Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL2) was installed in the Tevatron during Spring 2006 shutdown. It was successfully commissioned and a series of beam studies has been carried out in single bunch and all-bunch modes. The paper describes TEL2 commissioning and beam studies results.

  18. Study of the production of the Σ b with the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Calancha Paredes, Constantino

    2011-02-01

    understanding of the Standard Model and its limitations. In particular, it is very important the measurement of those observables which they are not able to be calculated from theory by perturbation theory. Particle accelerators have played and play nowadays a major role for past and new physics discoverements and has been for many years the source of many precision measurements. Unprecedent discoveries have been made and are yet to come. These measurements allow to select the models that best fit the results and also they can be used as input for those models to get further predictions. Tevatron has been for many years the highest energy particle collider operational in the world. It is located in the high energy physics laboratory Fermilab in Batavia, in the State of Illinois (USA). Tevatron produce proton-antiproton collisions with an energy of 1.96 TeV at the center of the mass. This thesis is based on the data taken by the CDF II detector, one of the two multipurpose detectors located in the two interaction points at Tevatron. In this thesis a precise measurement of the mass and width of four heavy baryon states are performed. These states are described together by the symbol Σ b. They are built by two light quarks and one heavy b quark as it is shown in Fig. 1.2. Baryons containing one bottom quark and two light quarks are described by Heavy Quark Effective Theories (HQET).

  19. Measurement of the front back asymmetry in top-antitop quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Thomas A.; /Michigan U.

    2006-01-01

    Quarks, along with leptons and force carrying particles, are predicted by the Standard Model to be the fundamental constituents of nature. In distinction from the leptons, the quarks interact strongly through the chromodynamic force and are bound together within the hadrons. The familiar proton and neutron are bound states of the light ''up'' and ''down'' quarks. The most massive quark by far, the ''top'' quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments in March, 1995. The new quark was observed in p{bar p} collisions at 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass of the top quark was measured to be 176 {+-} 13 GeV/c{sup 2} and the cross section 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup +3.6} pb. It is the Q = 2/3, T{sub 3} = +1/2 member of the third generation weak-isospin doublet along with the bottom quark. The top quark is the final Standard Model quark to be discovered. Along with whatever is responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, top quark physics is considered one of the least understood sectors of the Standard Model and represents a front line of our understanding of particle physics. Currently, the only direct measurements of top quark properties come from the CDF and D0 experiments observing p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron. Top quark production at the Tevatron is almost exclusively by quark-antiquark annihilation, q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} (85%), and gluon fusion, gg {yields} t{bar t} (15%), mediated by the strong force. The theoretical cross-section for this process is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 6.7 {+-} 0.8 pb for m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. Top quarks can also be produced at the Tevatron via q{bar b}{prime} {yields} tb and qg {yields} q{prime}tb through the weak interaction. The cross section for these processes is lower (3pb) and the signal is much more difficult to isolate as backgrounds are much higher. The top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W-boson and a bottom quark (t {yields} Wb). The total decay width t {yields} Wb is {Lambda} = 1

  20. Measurement of the inclusive bb jet cross section at the Collidor Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gajjar, Anant; /Liverpool U.

    2005-09-01

    Data collected by the Fermilab CDF detector are used to measure the inclusive b{bar b} jet production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Vertices displaced from the primary interaction point (secondary vertices) are a signature for long-lived decay and are used to identify jets originating from b quarks. An event sample containing two jets, each having an identified secondary vertex, is used. The jets are required to be within the pseudo-rapidity region |{eta}| < 1.2. One of the jets is required to have a transverse energy greater than 30 GeV and the other jet is required to have a transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. The results are compared to Leading Order (Pythia and Herwig) and Next to Leading Order (MC{at}NLO) predictions.

  1. Searches for long lived particles at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Tulika; /Brown U.

    2008-04-01

    Several searches have been performed for long lived particles using data collected by the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These include searches for charged massive stable particles, stopped gluinos, neutral long-lived particles decaying to muons, and magnetic monopoles. These proceedings [1] review recent experimental results from Run II analyses.

  2. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: Heavy flavor physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lewis, Jonathan; van Kooten, Rick

    2015-02-28

    In this study, we present a review of heavy flavor physics results from the CDF and DØ Collaborations operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A summary of results from Run 1 is included, but we concentrate on legacy results of charm and b physics from Run 2, including results up to Summer 2014.

  3. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Tompson

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the world�s most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  4. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Tompson.

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the worlds most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  5. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  6. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed.

  7. Future hadron physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  8. Feasibility of searches for a Higgs boson using H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -} + missing p{sub T} and high p{sub T} jets at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, Bruce; Quayle, William; Wu, S.L.

    2007-11-01

    The sensitivity of standard model Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron experiments with a mass 135

  9. High luminosity operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar Mishra

    2003-07-15

    Run-II at Fermilab is progressing steadily. In the Run-II scheme, 36 antiproton bunches collide with 36 proton bunches at the CDF and D0 interaction regions in the Tevatron at 980 GeV per beam. The current status and performance of the Fermilab Accelerator complex is reviewed. The plan for Run-II, accelerator upgrades and integration of the Recycler in the accelerator chain will be presented.

  10. Search for 3rd Generation Vector Leptoquarks in the Di-tau Di-jet Channel in Proton Antiproton Collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, Stanley Scott; /UC, Davis

    2006-12-01

    We search for third generation vector leptoquarks (V LQ3) produced in colliding p{bar p} beams operating at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. We use 322 pb{sup -1} of data to search for the V LQ3 signal in the di-tau plus di-jet channel. For the first time, the full matrix element is used in the Monte Carlo simulation of this signal. With no events observed in the signal region, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the V LQ3 pair production cross section of {sigma} < 344fb, assuming Yang-Mills couplings and Br(V LQ3 {yields} b{tau}) = 1, and a lower limit on the V LQ3 mass of m{sub V LQ3} > 317 GeV=c{sup 2}. If theoretical uncertainties on the cross section are applied in the least favorable manner the results are {sigma} < 360fb and m{sub V LQ3} > 294 GeV=c{sup 2}. The Minimal coupling V LQ3 result is an upper limit on the cross section of {sigma} < 493fb ({sigma} < 610fb) and the lower limit on the mass is m{sub V LQ3} > 251 GeV=c{sup 2} (m{sub V LQ3} > 223 GeV=c{sup 2}) for the nominal (1{sigma} varied) theoretical expectation.