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Sample records for ferric corrole bonding

  1. Mono- and diboron corroles: factors controlling stoichiometry and hydrolytic reactivity.

    PubMed

    Albrett, Amelia M; Thomas, Kolle E; Maslek, Stefanie; Młodzianowska, Anna; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine M; Ghosh, Abhik; Brothers, Penelope J

    2014-06-01

    The first example of a diboryl corrole complex, [(BF2)2(Br8T(4-F-P)C)](-) (Br8T(4-F-P)C = trianion of 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15-tris(4-fluorophenyl)corrole), has been isolated using the strongly electron-withdrawing and sterically crowded triaryl octabromocorrole ligand. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the hydrolysis reaction producing the partially hydrolyzed complexes [B2OF2(Cor)](-) is more favored for the less sterically crowded triaryl corrole complexes. Monoboryl complexes BF2(H2Cor) (Cor = trianions of 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole (TPC), 5,10,15-tris(4-methylphenyl)corrole (T(4-CH3-P)C), 5,10,15-tris(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)corrole (T(4-CF3-P)C), and 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (TPFPC)) were prepared and characterized. The experimental data are consistent with an out-of-plane dipyrrin coordination mode for these complexes, and DFT optimizations suggest that internal BF···HN hydrogen bonding may be significant in stabilizing these complexes. Further examples of the anionic diboron corrole [B2OF2(Cor)](-) containing the electron-withdrawing 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (TPFPC) and the sterically hindered 10-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5,15-dimesitylcorrole (Mes2(4-MeOP)C) trianions are reported. PMID:24684580

  2. Hangman corroles: efficient synthesis and oxygen reaction chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dogutan, Dilek K; Stoian, Sebastian A; McGuire, Robert; Schwalbe, Matthias; Teets, Thomas S; Nocera, Daniel G

    2011-01-12

    The construction of a new class of compounds--the hangman corroles--is provided efficiently by the modification of macrocyclic forming reactions from bilanes. Hangman cobalt corroles are furnished in good yields from a one-pot condensation of dipyrromethane with the aldehyde of a xanthene spacer followed by metal insertion using microwave irradiation. In high oxidation states, X-band EPR spectra and DFT calculations of cobalt corrole axially ligated by chloride are consistent with the description of a Co(III) center residing in the one-electron oxidized corrole macrocycle. These high oxidation states are likely accessed in the activation of O-O bonds. Along these lines, we show that the proton-donating group of the hangman platform works in concert with the redox properties of the corrole to enhance the catalytic activity of O-O bond activation. The hangman corroles show enhanced activity for the selective reduction of oxygen to water as compared to their unmodified counterparts. The oxygen adduct, prior to oxygen reduction, is characterized by EPR and absorption spectroscopy. PMID:21142043

  3. Corroles cannot ruffle.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kolle E; Conradie, Jeanet; Hansen, Lars Kristian; Ghosh, Abhik

    2011-04-18

    X-ray structures of Co(III)[(CF(3))(3)Cor](PPh(3)) [(CF(3))(3)Cor = meso-tris(trifluoromethyl)corrolato] and Cu[(CF(3))(4)Por] [(CF(3))(4)Por = meso-tetrakis(trifluoromethyl)porphyrinato] revealed planar and highly ruffled macrocycle conformations, respectively, in line with analogous observations for a handful of other meso-perfluoroalkylated porphyrins and corroles reported in the literature. To gain insights into the difference in conformational behavior, we evaluated DFT (BP86-D/TZP) ruffling potentials for a variety of corrole complexes, as well as their porphyrin analogues. The calculations led us to conclude that corrole derivatives, in essence, cannot ruffle. PMID:21366225

  4. meso-Ester Corroles.

    PubMed

    Canard, Gabriel; Gao, Di; D'Aléo, Anthony; Giorgi, Michel; Dang, Florian-Xuan; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2015-05-18

    The introduction of ester groups on the 5- and 15-meso positions of corroles stabilizes them against oxidation and induces a redshift of their absorption and emission spectra. These effects are studied through the photophysical and electrochemical characterization of up to 16 different 5,15-diester corroles, in which the third meso position is free or occupied by an aryl group, a long alkyl chain, or an ester moiety. Single-crystal X-ray structure analysis of five 5,15-diestercorroles and DFT and time-dependent DFT calculations show that the strong electron-withdrawing character of the 5,15 ester substituents is reinforced by their π overlap with the macrocyclic aromatic system. The crystal packing of corroles 2, 4, 6, 9, and 15 features short distances between chromophores that are stacked into columns thanks to the low steric hindrance of meso-ester groups. This close packing is partially due to intermolecular interactions that involve inner hydrogen and nitrogen atoms, and thereby, stabilize a single, identical corrole tautomeric form. PMID:25786789

  5. Fluorescent Bioactive Corrole Grafted-Chitosan Films.

    PubMed

    Barata, Joana F B; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Vaz Serra, Vanda I R C; Silvestre, Armando J D; Trindade, Tito; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cavaleiro, José A S; Daina, Sara; Sadocco, Patrizia; Freire, Carmen S R

    2016-04-11

    Transparent corrole grafted-chitosan films were prepared by chemical modification of chitosan with a corrole macrocycle, namely, 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (TPFC), followed by solvent casting. The obtained films were characterized in terms of absorption spectra (UV-vis), FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy), structure (FTIR, XPS), thermal stability (TGA), thermomechanical properties (DMA), and antibacterial activity. The results showed that the chemical grafting of chitosan with corrole units did not affect its film-forming ability and that the grafting yield increased with the reaction time. The obtained transparent films presented fluorescence which increases with the amount of grafted corrole units. Additionally, all films showed bacteriostatic effect against S. aureus, as well as good thermomechanical properties and thermal stability. Considering these features, promising applications may be envisaged for these corrole-chitosan films, such as biosensors, bioimaging agents, and bioactive optical devices. PMID:26899016

  6. Second sphere control of spin state: Differential tuning of axial ligand bonds in ferric porphyrin complexes by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Kaustuv; Sengupta, Kushal; Singha, Asmita; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Rana, Atanu; Samanta, Subhra; Dey, Abhishek

    2016-02-01

    An iron porphyrin with a pre-organized hydrogen bonding (H-Bonding) distal architecture is utilized to avoid the inherent loss of entropy associated with H-Bonding from solvent (water) and mimic the behavior of metallo-enzyme active sites attributed to H-Bonding interactions of active site with the 2nd sphere residues. Resonance Raman (rR) data on these iron porphyrin complexes indicate that H-Bonding to an axial ligand like hydroxide can result in both stronger or weaker Fe(III)-OH bond relative to iron porphyrin complexes. The 6-coordinate (6C) complexes bearing water derived axial ligands, trans to imidazole or thiolate axial ligand with H-Bonding stabilize a low spin (LS) ground state (GS) when a complex without H-Bonding stabilizes a high spin (HS) ground state. DFT calculations reproduce the trend in the experimental data and provide a mechanism of how H-Bonding can indeed lead to stronger metal ligand bonds when the axial ligand donates an H-Bond and lead to weaker metal ligand bonds when the axial ligand accepts an H-Bond. The experimental and computational results explain how a weak Fe(III)-OH bond (due to H-Bonding) can lead to the stabilization of low spin ground state in synthetic mimics and in enzymes containing iron porphyrin active sites. H-Bonding to a water ligand bound to a reduced ferrous active site can only strengthen the Fe(II)-OH2 bond and thus exclusion of water and hydrophilic residues from distal sites of O2 binding/activating heme proteins is necessary to avoid inhibition of O2 binding by water. These results help demonstrate the predominant role played by H-Bonding and subtle changes in its orientation in determining the geometric and electronic structure of iron porphyrin based active sites in nature. PMID:26638009

  7. Intriguing Physical and Chemical Properties of Phosphorus Corroles.

    PubMed

    Vestfrid, Jenya; Kothari, Rashmi; Kostenko, Arseni; Goldberg, Israel; Tumanskii, Boris; Gross, Zeev

    2016-06-20

    The fluorescence intensity of phosphorus corroles increases upon meso-aryl C-F/C-H and P-OH/P-F substitutions, the latter affects corrole-centered redox processes more than C-H/C-F substitution on the corrole's skeleton, and the presence of F atoms allows for the first experimental insight into the electronic structures of oxidized corroles. Experimental and theoretical methodologies reveal that mono- but not bis-chlorosulfonation of the corrole skeleton is under kinetic control. Selective introduction of heavy atoms leads to complexes that are phosphorescent at room temperature. PMID:27228407

  8. Molecular structures of free-base corroles: nonplanarity, chirality, and enantiomerization.

    PubMed

    Capar, Jan; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine M; Ghosh, Abhik

    2015-04-01

    The molecular structures of free-base corroles are illustrative of a variety of bonded and nonbonded interactions including aromaticity, intra- as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonding, steric interactions among multiple NH hydrogens within a congested central cavity, and the effects of peripheral substituents. Against this backdrop, an X-ray structure of 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, H3[Br8TPFPCor], corresponding to a specific tautomer, has been found to exhibit the strongest nonplanar distortions observed to date for any free-base corrole structure. Two adjacent N-protonated pyrrole rings are tilted with respect to each other by approximately 97.7°, while the remainder of the molecule is comparatively planar. Dispersion-corrected DFT calculations were undertaken to investigate to what extent the strong nonplanar distortions can be attributed to steric effects of the peripheral substituents. For meso-triphenylcorrole, DFT calculations revealed nonplanar distortions that are only marginally less pronounced than those found for H3(Br8TPFPCor). A survey of X-ray structures of sterically unhindered corroles also uncovered additional examples of rather strong nonplanar distortions. Detailed potential energy calculations as a function of different saddling dihedrals also emphasized the softness of the distortions. Because of nonplanar distortions, free-base corrole structures are chiral. For H3[Br8TPFPCor], DFT calculations led to an estimate of 15 kcal/mol (0.67 eV) as the activation barrier for enantiomerization of the free-base structures, which is significantly higher than the barrier for NH tautomerism calculated for this molecule, about 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV). In summary, steric crowding of the internal NH hydrogens appears to provide the main driving force for nonplanar distortions of meso-triarylcorroles; the presence of additional β-substituents adds marginally to this impetus. PMID:25819028

  9. Cryptic noninnocence: FeNO corroles in a new light.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Lima, Hugo; Norheim, Hans-Kristian; Einrem, Rune F; Ghosh, Abhik

    2015-06-14

    Multiple lines of evidence, including electronic absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and broken-symmetry DFT calculations, indicate that the well-known FeNO corroles, long assumed to be {FeNO}(6) complexes, are in fact better described as {FeNO}(7)-(corrole˙(2-)). PMID:25978788

  10. Wolves in Sheep's Clothing: μ-Oxo-Diiron Corroles Revisited.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sumit; Vazquez-Lima, Hugo; Ghosh, Abhik

    2016-07-18

    For well over 20 years, μ-oxo-diiron corroles, first reported by Vogel and co-workers in the form of μ-oxo-bis[(octaethylcorrolato)iron] (Mössbauer δ 0.02 mm s(-1) , ΔEQ 2.35 mm s(-1) ), have been thought of as comprising a pair antiferromagnetically coupled low-spin Fe(IV) centers. The remarkable stability of these complexes, which can be handled at room temperature and crystallographically analyzed, present a sharp contrast to the fleeting nature of enzymatic, iron(IV)-oxo intermediates. An array of experimental and theoretical methods have now shown that the iron centers in these complexes are not Fe(IV) but intermediate-spin Fe(III) coupled to a corrole(.2-) . The intramolecular spin couplings in {Fe[TPC]}2 (μ-O) were analyzed via DFT(B3LYP) calculations in terms of the Heisenberg-Dirac-van Vleck spin Hamiltonian H=JFe-corrole (SFe ⋅Scorrole )+JFe-Fe' (SFe ⋅SFe' )+JFe'-corrole (SFe' ⋅Scorrole' ), which yielded JFe-corrole =JFe'-corrole' =0.355 eV (2860 cm(-1) ) and JFe-Fe' =0.068 eV (548 cm(-1) ). The unexpected stability of μ-oxo-diiron corroles thus appears to be attributable to charge delocalization via ligand noninnocence. PMID:27333259

  11. Reaction mechanism for the highly efficient catalytic decomposition of peroxynitrite by the amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe.

    PubMed

    Avidan-Shlomovich, Shlomit; Gross, Zeev

    2015-07-21

    The amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe is one of the most efficient catalysts for the decomposition of peroxynitrite, the toxin involved in numerous diseases. This research focused on the mechanism of that reaction at physiological pH, where peroxynitrite is in equilibrium with its much more reactive conjugated acid, by focusing on the elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle. Kinetic investigations uncovered the formation of a reaction intermediate in a process that is complete within a few milliseconds (k1 ∼ 3 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 5 °C, about 7 orders of magnitude larger than the first order rate constant for the non-catalyzed process). Multiple evidence points towards iron-catalyzed homolytic O-O bond cleavage to form nitrogen dioxide and hydroxo- or oxo-iron(iv) corrole. The iron(iv) intermediate was found to decay via multiple pathways that proceed at similar rates (k2 about 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)): reaction with nitrogen dioxide to form nitrate, nitration of the corrole macrocyclic, and dimerization to binuclear iron(iv) corrole. Catalysis in the presence of substrates affects the decay of the iron intermediate by either oxidative nitration (phenolic substrates) or reduction (ascorbate). A large enough excess of ascorbate accelerates the catalytic decomposition of PN by 1-Fe by orders of magnitude, prevents other decay routes of the iron intermediate, and eliminates nitration products as well. This suggests that the beneficial effect of the iron corrole under the reducing conditions present in most biological media might be even larger than in the purely chemical system. The acquired mechanistic insight is of prime importance for the design of optimally acting catalysts for the fast and safe decomposition of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. PMID:25747957

  12. Determination of Fe-ligand bond lengths and the Fe-N-O bond angles in soybean ferrous and ferric nitrosylleghemoglobin a using multiple-scattering XAFS analyses.

    PubMed

    Rich, A M; Ellis, P J; Tennant, L; Wright, P E; Armstrong, R S; Lay, P A

    1999-12-14

    The NO adducts of leghemoglobin (Lb) are implicated in biological processes, but only the adduct with ferrous Lb (Lb(II)NO) has been characterized previously. We report the first characterization of ferric nitrosylleghemoglobin (Lb(III)NO) and XAS experiments performed on frozen aqueous solutions of Lb(II)NO and Lb(III)NO at 10 K. The XANES and electronic spectra of the NO adducts are similar in shape and energies to the myoglobin (Mb) analogues. The environment of the Fe atom has been refined using multiple-scattering (MS) analyses of the XAFS data. For Lb(II)NO, the MS analysis resulted in an averaged Fe-N(p)(pyrrole) distance of 2.02 A, an Fe-N(epsilon)(imidazole) distance of 1.98 A, an Fe-N(NO) distance of 1.77 A, and an Fe-N-O angle of 147 degrees. The Fe-N(NO) distance and Fe-N-O angle obtained from the analysis of Lb(II)NO are in good agreement with those determined crystallographically for [Fe(TPP)(NO)] (TPP, tetraphenylporphyrinato), with and without 1-methylimidazole (1-MeIm) as the sixth ligand, and the MS XAFS structures reported previously for the myoglobin (Mb(II)NO) analogue and [Fe(TPP)(NO)]. The MS analysis of Lb(III)NO yielded an average Fe-N(p) distance of 2.00 A, an Fe-N(epsilon) distance of 1.89 A, an Fe-N(NO) distance of 1.68 A, and an Fe-N-O angle of 173 degrees. These bond lengths and angles are consistent with those determined previously for the myoglobin analogue (Mb(III)NO) and the crystal structures of the model complexes, [Fe(III)(TPP)(NO)(OH(2))](+) and [Fe(OEP)(NO)](+) (OEP, octaethylporphyrinato). The final XAFS R values were 16.1 and 18.2% for Lb(II)NO and Lb(III)NO, respectively. PMID:10600110

  13. Corrole and nucleophilic aromatic substitution are not incompatible: a novel route to 2,3-difunctionalized copper corrolates

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, M.; Mandoj, F.; Nardis, S.; Raggio, M.; Fronczek, F.R.; McCandless, G.T.; Smith, K. M.; Paolesse, R.

    2015-01-01

    The insertion of a –NO2 group onto the corrole framework represents a key step for subsequent synthetic manipulation of the macrocycle based on the chemical versatility of such a functionality. Here we report results on the investigation of a copper 3-NO2-triarylcorrolate in nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions with “active” methylene carbanions, namely diethyl malonate and diethyl 2-chloromalonate. Although similar reactions on nitroporphyrins afford chlorin derivatives, nucleophilic attack on carbon-2 of corrole produces 2,3-difunctionalized Cu corrolates in acceptable yields (ca. 30%), evidencing once again the erratic chemistry of this contracted porphyrinoid. PMID:25986693

  14. Elucidating the role of the proximal cysteine hydrogen-bonding network in ferric cytochrome P450cam and corresponding mutants using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Spolitak, Tatyana; Ballou, David P; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2011-02-15

    Although extensive research has been performed on various cytochrome P450s, especially Cyt P450cam, there is much to be learned about the mechanism of how its functional unit, a heme b ligated by an axial cysteine, is finely tuned for catalysis by its second coordination sphere. Here we study how the hydrogen-bonding network affects the proximal cysteine and the Fe-S(Cys) bond in ferric Cyt P450cam. This is accomplished using low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy on wild-type (wt) Cyt P450cam and on the mutants Q360P (pure ferric high-spin at low temperature) and L358P where the "Cys pocket" has been altered (by removing amino acids involved in the hydrogen-bonding network), and Y96W (pure ferric low-spin). The MCD spectrum of Q360P reveals fourteen electronic transitions between 15200 and 31050 cm(-1). Variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) saturation curves were used to determine the polarizations of these electronic transitions with respect to in-plane (xy) and out-of-plane (z) polarization relative to the heme. The polarizations, oscillator strengths, and TD-DFT calculations were then used to assign the observed electronic transitions. In the lower energy region, prominent bands at 15909 and 16919 cm(-1) correspond to porphyrin (P) → Fe charge transfer (CT) transitions. The band at 17881 cm(-1) has distinct sulfur S(π) → Fe CT contributions. The Q band is observed as a pseudo A-term (derivative shape) at 18604 and 19539 cm(-1). In the case of the Soret band, the negative component of the expected pseudo A-term is split into two features due to mixing with another π → π* and potentially a P → Fe CT excited state. The resulting three features are observed at 23731, 24859, and 25618 cm(-1). Most importantly, the broad, prominent band at 28570 cm(-1) is assigned to the S(σ) → Fe CT transition, whose intensity is generated through a multitude of CT transitions with strong iron character. For wt, Q360P, and L358P, this band

  15. Determination of iron-ligand bond lengths in ferric and ferrous horse heart cytochrome c using multiple-scattering analyses of XAFS data

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.C.; Rich, A.M.; Armstrong, R.S.; Ellis, P.J.; Lay, P.A.

    1999-12-13

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a small heme protein (MW 12 384) that functions as a biological electron-transfer agent. It consists of a single polypeptide chain and a prosthetic heme group and provides a pathway for the transfer of electrons from cyt c reductase to cyt c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (oxidative phosphorylation). The protein participates in oxidation-reduction reactions with the heme iron alternating between the oxidized (ferric, Fe{sup III}) state and the reduced (ferrous, Fe{sup II}) state. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) data were obtained from frozen aqueous solutions (10 K) of horse heart ferri- and ferrocyt c. Models of the structure about the Fe center were refined to optimize the fit between the observed XAFS in the range 0 {le} k {le} 16.3 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} and the XAFS calculated using both single-scattering (SS) and multiple-scattering (MS) calculations. The bond lengths obtained are more accurate and precise than those determined previously for cyt c from various species using X-ray crystallography. The Fe-N bond lengths are 1.98--1.99 {angstrom} for both oxidation states of cyt c. The Fe-S bond of derricyt c (2.33 {angstrom}) is significantly longer than that of ferrocyt c (2.29 {angstrom}). The small changes in the bond lengths are consistent with the small reorganizational energy required for the fast electron-transfer reaction of cyt c.

  16. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles.

    PubMed

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H; Gray, Harry B; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-04-19

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax= 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging. PMID:27044076

  17. Corrole and Porphyrin Amino Acid Conjugates: Synthesis and Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Karikis, Kostas; Georgilis, Evangelos; Charalambidis, Georgios; Petrou, Athanasia; Vakuliuk, Olena; Chatziioannou, Theodore; Raptaki, Iliana; Tsovola, Sofia; Papakyriacou, Ioanna; Mitraki, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G

    2016-08-01

    A series of conjugates of amino acids with porphyrins and corroles was synthesized. Their self-assembling ability under defined conditions was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The morphology and photophysical properties of these molecules were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy in solid, liquid, and self-assembled forms. We observed that both corrole and porphyrin conjugated with the l-phenylalanine-l-phenylalanine peptide to form spherical nanostructures with bathochromic shifts in the emission spectra, indicating the formation of aggregates. These aggregates are characterized by the impressive absorption of light over nearly the whole visible range. The broadening of all bands was particularly strong in the case of corroles. The fluorescence lifetimes of self-assembled species were longer as compared to the solid-state form. PMID:27356185

  18. Metal Complexes of meso-meso Linked Corrole Dimers.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Shota; Tanaka, Takayuki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt, gallium, silver, and copper complexes of 5,5'-linked corrole dimer 1 and 10,10'-linked corrole dimer 2 were synthesized by metalations with Co(OAc)2·4H2O, GaCl3, AgOAc, and Cu(OAc)2·H2O, respectively, in good yields. The structures of cobalt(III), gallium(III), and silver(III) complexes have been unambiguously revealed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Their optical and electrochemical properties have been studied, which revealed different electronic interactions between the two corrole units depending upon the positions of meso-meso linkage and axial-ligand coordination modes. PMID:27533780

  19. Fine tuning the reactivity of corrole-based catalytic antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Okun, Zoya; Gross, Zeev

    2012-08-01

    In order to determine the electronic factors that may affect the catalytic antioxidant activity of water-soluble metallocorroles a series of 10-aryl-5,15-pyridinium manganese(III) corroles was prepared. These complexes were examined regarding the effect of the C(10) substituent on the Mn(IV)/Mn(III) redox potentials, catalytic rate constants for decomposition of HOONO, prevention of tyrosine nitration, and superoxide dismutase activity. This structure-activity relationship investigation provides new insight regarding the mechanism by which manganese(III) corroles act as catalytic antioxidants. It also discloses the superiority of the C(10)-anysil-substituted complex in all examined aspects. PMID:22808919

  20. Axial histidyl imidazole non-exchangeable proton resonances as indicators of imidazole hydrogen bonding in ferric cyanide complexes of heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    La Mar, G N; De Ropp, J S; Chacko, V P; Satterlee, J D; Erman, J E

    1982-11-19

    Proton NMR spectra of a model of low-spin cyanide complexes of ferric hemoproteins indicate that two broad single-protein resonances from the axial imidazole can be resolved outside the diamagnetic spectral region. Upon deprotonation of the imidazole in the model, the upfield resonance shifts dramatically to higher field, suggesting that its position may reflect the degree of hydrogen bonding or proton donation of the imidazole. Met-cyano myoglobin reveals a pair of such broad peaks in the regions expected for an essentially neutral axial imidazole. In the cyano complexes of horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, a pair of single-proton resonances are located which are assigned to the same imidazole protons on the basis of their linewidth and shift changes upon altering the heme substituents. The upfiled proton, however, is found at much higher field than in metMbCN. The upfield bias of this resonance is taken as evidence for appreciable imidazolate character for the axial ligand in these heme peroxidases. PMID:6293582

  1. Modulation of the molecular spintronic properties of adsorbed copper corroles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Liu, Jie; Mishra, Puneet; Komeda, Tadahiro; Mack, John; Chang, Yi; Kobayashi, Nagao; Shen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The ability to modulate the spin states of adsorbed molecules is in high demand for molecular spintronics applications. Here, we demonstrate that the spin state of a corrole complex can be tuned by expanding its fused ring as a result of the modification to the d–π interaction between the metal and ligand. A bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene-fused copper corrole can readily be converted into a tetrabenzocorrole radical on an Au(111) substrate during the sublimation process. In the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy spectrum, a sharp Kondo resonance appears near the Fermi level on the corrole ligand of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule. In contrast, a non-fused-ring-expanded copper corrole molecule, copper 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole, shows no such Kondo feature. Mapping of the Kondo resonance demonstrates that the spin distribution of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule can be further modified by the rotation of the meso-aryl groups, in a manner that could lead to applications in molecular spintronics. PMID:26112968

  2. Corroles-Porphyrins: A Teamwork for Gas Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Pomarico, Giuseppe; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrins provide an excellent material for chemical sensors, and they have been used for sensing species both in air and solution. In the gas phase, the broad selectivity of porphyrins is largely dependant on molecular features, such as the metal ion complexed at the core of the aromatic ring and the peripheral substituents. Although these features have been largely exploited to design gas sensor arrays, so far, little attention has been devoted to modify the sensing properties of these macrocycles by variation of the molecular aromatic ring. In this paper, the gas sensing properties of a porphyrin analog, the corrole, are studied in comparison with those of the parent porphyrin. Results show that changes in the aromatic ring have important consequences on the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors and that porphyrins and corroles can positively cooperate to enhance the performance of sensor arrays. PMID:25856324

  3. Stabilization of hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles by axial silyloxy groups.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Lee, Way-Zen; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2016-05-01

    We report the stabilization of the hexa-coordination environment for P(v) corroles by using alkyl/aryl substituted silyloxy groups as axial ligands. The P(v) corroles are highly fluorescent in a hexa-coordination environment compared to in a penta-coordination environment. However, P(v) corroles generally undergo axial ligand dissociation to form a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents such as toluene, CH2Cl2, CHCl3. The usage of moderately bulkier and electron-donating silyloxy groups helps to restrict the axial ligand dissociation of silyloxy substituted hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents. The crystal structure confirmed the hexa-coordination geometry for the P(v) corroles. The P(v) corroles strongly absorb and emit in the visible region, with decent quantum yields and singlet state lifetimes. The hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles are highly stable under electrochemical conditions. PMID:27063706

  4. The corrole and ferrocene marriage: 5,10,15-triferrocenylcorrolato Cu.

    PubMed

    Pomarico, Giuseppe; Vecchi, Andrea; Mandoj, Federica; Bortolini, Olga; Cicero, Daniel O; Galloni, Pierluca; Paolesse, Roberto

    2014-04-21

    Two synthetic routes have been defined for the preparation of a 5,10,15-triferrocenylcorrole Cu derivative. This complex has been characterized and the preliminary electrochemical investigation shows a strong interaction among the corrole and meso ferrocenyl substituents. The results obtained suggest that peculiar properties are gained by combining the eccentric characteristics of ferrocenyl substitution with the corrole macrocycle. PMID:24616907

  5. Synchrotron X-ray-Induced Photoreduction of Ferric Myoglobin Nitrite Crystals Gives the Ferrous Derivative with Retention of the O-bonded Nitrite Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, J.; Orville, A; Skinner, J; Skinner, M; Richter-Addo, G

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of a single crystal of the nitrite adduct of ferric myoglobin (Mb) at 100 K to high-intensity synchrotron X-ray radiation resulted in changes in the UV-vis spectrum that can be attributed to reduction of the ferric compound to the ferrous derivative. We employed correlated single-crystal spectroscopy with crystallography to further characterize this photoproduct. The 1.55 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the photoproduct reveals retention of the O-binding mode for binding of nitrite to the iron center. The data are consistent with cryogenic generation and trapping, at 100 K, of a ferrous d{sup 6} Mb{sup II}(ONO)* complex by photoreduction of the ferric precursor crystals using high-intensity X-ray radiation.

  6. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  7. DNA-Binding, Photocleavage, and Photodynamic Anti-cancer Activities of Pyridyl Corroles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhen-Hua; Liu, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Zao; Ali, Atif; Han, Bing-Jie; Liu, Yun-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The DNA-binding, photocleavage, and antitumor activity of three free base pyridyl corroles 1, 2, and 3 have been investigated. The binding affinity toward CT-DNA decreases with increasing number of pentafluorophenyl, whereas the photocleavage activity toward pBR322 DNA becomes more efficient. Singlet oxygen was demonstrated as active species responsible for DNA cleavage. These corroles exhibited high cytotoxicity against three tested cancer cells (Hela, HapG2, and A549) and the cytotoxicity could be further enhanced under irradiation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species level was also monitored using HeLa Cells upon the combined treatment of corroles and light. These corroles could be absorbed by HeLa cells at low concentration. They can induce the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis of tumor cells under irradiation. PMID:26895317

  8. Metal-Ligand Misfits: Facile Access to Rhenium-Oxo Corroles by Oxidative Metalation.

    PubMed

    Einrem, Rune F; Gagnon, Kevin J; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Ghosh, Abhik

    2016-01-11

    With the exception of a single accidental synthesis, rhenium corroles are unknown, but of great interest as catalysts and potential radiopharmaceuticals. Oxidative metalation of meso-triarylcorroles with [Re2 (CO)10 ] in refluxing decalin has provided a facile and relatively high-yielding route to rhenium(V)-oxo corroles. The complexes synthesized could all be fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analyses. PMID:26639951

  9. β-Pyrrolopyrazino Annulated Corroles via a Pictet-Spengler Approach.

    PubMed

    Berionni Berna, Beatrice; Nardis, Sara; Galloni, Pierluca; Savoldelli, Andrea; Stefanelli, Manuela; Fronczek, Frank R; Smith, Kevin M; Paolesse, Roberto

    2016-07-15

    Reaction of 2-amino-3-(pyrrol-1-yl)-5,10,15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolato copper(II) with arylaldehydes affords novel π-extended β,β'-pyrrolo(1,2-a)pyrazino-fused corroles via a Pictet-Spengler reaction. Corrole shows an unprecedented reaction pathway, leading to a mixture of phenyl-substituted and nonsubstituted pyrrolopyrazino annulated species as reaction products. PMID:27378478

  10. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  11. Effect of ferric sulfate contamination on the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to superficial dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shadman, Niloofar; Abrishami, Arezoo

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the effect of one hemostatic agent on the shear bond strength of self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted third molars were selected. After preparing a flat surface of superficial dentin, they were randomly divided into six groups. Adhesives were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, and AdheSE One F. Before applying adhesives, surfaces were contaminated with ViscoStat for 60 s in three groups and rinsed. Then composite were attached to surfaces and light cured. After thermocycling, the bond strength was calculated and failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: ViscoStat had significantly decreased the shear bond strength of AdheSE (P < 0.0001) to dentin. Modes of failures in all groups were mainly adhesive. Conclusion: Contamination had an adverse effect on the shear bond strength of AdheSE and reduced it. PMID:23716963

  12. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  13. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... on dialysis. Ferric carboxymaltose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... rapid, weak pulse; chest pain; or loss of consciousness. If you experience a severe reaction, your doctor ...

  14. Manipulation resolves non-trivial structure of corrole monolayer on Ag(111).

    PubMed

    Tebi, Stefano; Aldahhak, Hazem; Serrano, Giulia; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Rauls, Eva; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Koch, Reinhold; Müllegger, Stefan

    2016-01-15

    Non-trivial arrangement of molecules within a molecular network complicates structure determination due to interdigitation, partial overlap, or stacking. We demonstrate that combined imaging and lateral manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope resolves the intricate structure of a molecular network in two-dimensions in a straightforward manner. The network, formed by a monolayer of 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)-corrole molecules on Ag(111), is manipulated for the first time with single-molecule precision. Our results reveal a shingle-like packing of partially overlapping corrole molecules. Density functional theory calculations support our findings. PMID:26629708

  15. Manipulation resolves non-trivial structure of corrole monolayer on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebi, Stefano; Aldahhak, Hazem; Serrano, Giulia; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Rauls, Eva; Gero Schmidt, Wolf; Koch, Reinhold; Müllegger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Non-trivial arrangement of molecules within a molecular network complicates structure determination due to interdigitation, partial overlap, or stacking. We demonstrate that combined imaging and lateral manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope resolves the intricate structure of a molecular network in two-dimensions in a straightforward manner. The network, formed by a monolayer of 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)-corrole molecules on Ag(111), is manipulated for the first time with single-molecule precision. Our results reveal a shingle-like packing of partially overlapping corrole molecules. Density functional theory calculations support our findings.

  16. Ferric Tourmaline from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mason, B; Donnay, G; Hardie, L A

    1964-04-01

    Dark brown crystals, up to 10 mm long, occur in rhyolite at Mexquitic, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. They are short prismatic, showing {1120}, {3030}, {1011}, {0221}, with c/a 0.4521, measured with a goniometer, and distinct {1120} cleavage. With an unusual combination of cell dimensions, high density, high refractive indices, and extreme birefringence, this tourmaline falls outside the known elbaite-schorl and schorl-dravite series. A chemical analysis, recalculated on the basis of cell volume and density, gives close to the theoretical 150 atoms per cell, whether the iron is ferrous or ferric, but the physical properties indicate a ferric tourmaline. PMID:17729799

  17. Molecular structures and absorption spectra assignment of corrole NH tautomers.

    PubMed

    Beenken, Wichard; Presselt, Martin; Ngo, Thien H; Dehaen, Wim; Maes, Wouter; Kruk, Mikalai

    2014-02-01

    The individual absorption spectra of the two NH tautomers of 10-(4,6-dichloropyrimidin-5-yl)-5,15-dimesitylcorrole are assigned on the basis of the Gouterman four-orbital model and a quantum chemical TD-DFT study. The assignment indicates that the red-shifted T1 tautomer is the one with protonated pyrrole nitrogen atoms N(21), N(22) and N(23), whereas the blue-shifted T2 tautomer has pyrrole nitrogen atoms N(21), N(22) and N(24) protonated. A wave-like nonplanar distortion of the macrocycle in the ground state is found for both NH tautomers, with the wave axis going through the pyrroles containing N(22) and N(24). The 7C plane determined by the least-squares distances to the carbon atoms C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C16, and C19 is suggested as a mean corrole macrocycle plane for the analysis of out-of-plane distortions. The magnitude of these distortions is distinctly different for the two NH tautomers, leading to substantial perturbations of their acid-base properties, which are rationalized by the interplay of the degree of out-of-plane distortion of the macrocycle as a whole and the tendency of the pyrrole nitrogen atoms toward pyramidalization, with the former leading to a basicity increase whereas the latter enhances the acidity. PMID:24432802

  18. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction on copper-trans-A(2)B corroles with excellent functional group tolerance.

    PubMed

    König, Michael; Reith, Lorenz Michael; Monkowius, Uwe; Knör, Günther; Bretterbauer, Klaus; Schoefberger, Wolfgang

    2011-06-10

    The palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction has been investigated on meso-substituted trans-A(2)B-corrole using tailored Pd-catalyst systems.We present the first examples of Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions on meso-substituted trans-A(2)B-corrole derivatives with neutral, sterically hindered, inactivated and heteroaromatic boronic acids and esters, alkenylboronic acids, as well as quickly deboronating aryl boronic acids and benzo-condensated five membered heterocyclic boronic acids. In addition, we established a high-yield procedure for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction of corroles with neutral boronic acids.Due to the lability of the free-base corrole macrocycles, functionalization of the corrole periphery was performed with the corresponding Cu-metallated species. meso-Substituted trans-A(2)B-corrole can hence be regarded as highly versatile platform towards more sophisticated corrole systems.X-ray structure analysis of a functionalized meso-substituted trans-A(2)B copper corrole exhibited the typical features of such a Cu-complex: short N-Cu distances and a saddled corrole configuration.Moreover, we observed a sensitivity of the formal oxidation state of the coordinated copper ions towards Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction conditions, where the central copper(III) ion approaches the characteristic features of a copper(II) species. This redox behaviour was examined by UV/vis absorption spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and time-dependent density functional theoretical calculations. PMID:21760646

  19. Slow and fast singlet energy transfers in BODIPY-gallium(III)corrole dyads linked by flexible chains.

    PubMed

    Brizet, Bertrand; Desbois, Nicolas; Bonnot, Antoine; Langlois, Adam; Dubois, Adrien; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Gros, Claude P; Goze, Christine; Denat, Franck; Harvey, Pierre D

    2014-04-01

    Red (no styryl), green (monostyryl), and blue (distyryl) BODIPY-gallium(III) (BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene) corrole dyads have been prepared in high yields using click chemistry, and their photophysical properties are reported. An original and efficient control of the direction of the singlet energy transfers is reported, going either from BODIPY to the gallium-corrole units or from gallium-corroles to BODIPY, depending upon the nature of the substitution on BODIPY. In one case (green), both directions are possible. The mechanism for the energy transfers is interpreted by means of through-space Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). PMID:24661249

  20. Thermal stability of meso-substituted metal corroles in inert and oxidative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thao, Vu Thi; Karimov, D. R.; Guseinov, S. S.; Balantseva, E. V.; Berezin, D. B.

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole as the simplest representative of meso-substituted corroles and its complexes with d-metals (Cu3+, Mn3+, Mn4+, Co3+, Co4+, and Zn2+) is studied for the first time via thermogravimetry in oxidizing and inert atmospheres. It is shown that corroles, both as free ligands and in the form of metal complexes, are less thermally stable than porphyrins with a similar structure. It is found that if the free ligands of porphyrins are thermally more stable with respect to thermal oxidation than d-metal complexes, the thermal stability of metal corroles can be both lower and higher than those of free ligands. It is concluded that the order of thermal stability of compounds MnCor < CoCor < H3Cor < ZnCorH < CuCor is reversed upon moving from an oxidizing to an inert medium. It is shown that corroles complexes with many d-metals (Co, Mn, and others) readily participate in extracoordination reactions with electron-donating solvents, e.g., DMF, as is indicated by spectrophotometry and thermogravimetry.

  1. The Silver Complexes of Porphyrins, Corroles, and Carbaporphyrins: Silver in the Oxidation States II and III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckner, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Studies in relation to the silver complexes of porphyrins, corroles and carbaporphyrins are presented especially with relation to silver in the oxidation states II and III. It is seen that the Ag(sub III) complex was electrochemically readily and reversibly reduced to the corresponding Ag(sub II) complex, thus indicating that the complex could be…

  2. Solvent-dependent resonance Raman spectra of high-valent oxomolybdenum(V) tris[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]corrolate.

    PubMed

    Czernuszewicz, Roman S; Mody, Vicky; Zareba, Adelajda A; Zaczek, Marzena B; Gałezowski, Michał; Sashuk, Volodymyr; Grela, Karol; Gryko, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    UV-visible, infrared (IR), and resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured and analyzed for a high-valent molybdenum(V)-oxo complex of 5,10,15-tris[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]corrole (1) at room temperature. The strength of the metal-oxo bond in 1 was found to be strongly solvent-dependent. Solid-state IR and RR spectra of 1 exhibited the MoVO stretching vibration at nu(MoVO)=969 cm(-1). It shifted up by 6 cm(-1) to 975 cm(-1) in n-hexane and then gradually shifted to lower frequencies in more polar solvents, down to 960 cm(-1) in dimethyl sulfoxide. The results imply that stronger acceptor solvents weaken the MoVO bond. The 45-cm(-1) frequency downshifts displayed by 1 containing an 18O label in the molybdenum(V)-oxo unit confirmed the assignments for the observed IR and RR nu(MoVO) bands. The solvent-induced frequency shift for the nu(MoVO) RR band, measured in a series of 25 organic solvents ranging from n-hexane (AN=0.0) to N-methylformamide (AN=32.1), did not decrease in direct proportion to Gutmann's solvent acceptor numbers (ANs). However, a good linear correlation of the nu(MoVO) frequency was found against an empirical "solvent polarity" scale (A+B) of Swain et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1983, 105, 502-513. A molecular association was observed between chloroform and oxomolybdenum(V) corrole 1 through MoO...H/CCl3 hydrogen-bonding interactions. This association manifested itself as a shift of the nu(MoVO) RR band of 1 in CDCl3 to a higher frequency compared to that in CHCl3. PMID:17547394

  3. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate,...

  4. Photoinduced Electron Transfer between Anionic Corrole and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Jun-Teng; Zhu, He; Ying, Xiao; Ji, Liang-Nian; Liu, Hai-Yang

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between a water-soluble anionic Ga(III) corrole [Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2] and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A significant broadening from 570 to 585 nm of positive absorption band of the blend of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 and ct-DNA (Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2-ctDNA) has been observed from 0.15 to 0.50 ps after photoexcitation of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 into the Soret band. The control experiment has been performed on the model DNA ([poly(dG-dC)]2) rich in guanine bases, which exhibits a similar spectral broadening, whereas it is absent for [poly(dA-dT)]2 without guanine bases. The molecular orbital calculation shows that HOMO of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 is lower than that of guanine bases. The results of the electrochemical experiment show the reversible electron transfer (ET) between Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 and guanine bases of ct-DNA is thermodynamically favorable. The dynamical analysis of the transient absorption spectra reveals that an ultrafast forward ET from the guanine bases to Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 occurs within the pulse duration (156 fs), leading to the formation of an intermediate state. The following back ET to the ground state of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 may be accomplished in 520 fs. PMID:26752116

  5. Understanding Arsenate Reaction Kinetics with Ferric Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James; Chaudhary, Binod K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding arsenic reactions with ferric hydroxides is important in understanding arsenic transport in the environment and in designing systems for removing arsenic from potable water. Many experimental studies have shown that the kinetics of arsenic adsorption on ferric hydroxides is biphasic, where a fraction of the arsenic adsorption occurs on a time scale of seconds while full equilibrium may require weeks to attain. This research employed density functional theory modeling in order to understand the mechanisms contributing to biphasic arsenic adsorption kinetics. The reaction energies and activation barriers for three modes of arsenate adsorption to ferric hydroxides were calculated. Gibbs free energies of reaction depended on the net charge of the complexes, which is a function of the system pH value. Physical adsorption of arsenate to ferric hydroxide proceeded with no activation barrier, with Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −21 to −58 kJ/mol. The highest Gibbs free energies of reaction for physical adsorption resulted from negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding between H atoms on the ferric hydroxide and O atoms in arsenate. The conversion of physically adsorbed arsenate into monodentate surface complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 62 to 73 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −23 to −38 kJ/mol. The conversion of monodentate surface complexes to bidentate, binuclear complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 79 to 112 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −11 to −55 kJ/mol. For release of arsenate from uncharged bidentate complexes, energies of activation as high as 167 kJ/mol were encountered. Increasingly negative charges on the complexes lowered the activation barriers for desorption of arsenate, and in complexes with −2 charges, the highest activation barrier was 65 kJ/mol. This study shows that the slow kinetics associated with arsenic

  6. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reaction of sodium phosphate with ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reaction of sodium phosphate with ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate...

  8. Investigating photoexcitation-induced mitochondrial damage by chemotherapeutic corroles using multimode optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Lubow, David J.; Sims, Jessica D.; Gray, Harry B.; Mahammed, Atif; Gross, Zeev; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a targeted, brightly fluorescent gallium corrole (HerGa) is highly effective for breast tumor detection and treatment. Unlike structurally similar porphryins, HerGa exhibits tumor-targeted toxicity without the need for photoexcitation. We have now examined whether photoexcitation further modulates HerGa toxicity, using multimode optical imaging of live cells, including two-photon excited fluorescence, differential interference contrast (DIC), spectral, and lifetime imaging. Using two-photon excited fluorescence imaging, we observed that light at specific wavelengths augments the HerGa-mediated mitochondrial membrane potential disruption of breast cancer cells in situ. In addition, DIC, spectral, and fluorescence lifetime imaging enabled us to both validate cell damage by HerGa photoexcitation and investigate HerGa internalization, thus allowing optimization of light dose and timing. Our demonstration of HerGa phototoxicity opens the way for development of new methods of cancer intervention using tumor-targeted corroles.

  9. Surface enhanced fluorescence from corroles and SERS studies of explosives using copper nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Syed; Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2015-02-01

    We report the deployment of complex copper nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs), fabricated in a single step by ultrafast laser ablation of copper (Cu) in corroles/chloroform solutions, for surface enhanced fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering studies (SERS). The characterization was performed by TEM, SAED, UV-visible absorption, and SEM techniques. Florescence enhancement of five orders in magnitude was obtained from corroles conjugated to Cu complex NPs. Cu NSs were utilized to record the SERS spectra of adsorbed Rhodamine 6G and explosive molecules of 5-amino-3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole and 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene. The estimated enhancement factors were in the range of 106-108.

  10. Ultrafast Photoinduced Charge Separation Leading to High-Energy Radical Ion-Pairs in Directly Linked Corrole-C60 and Triphenylamine-Corrole-C60 Donor-Acceptor Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Kolanu; Gokulnath, Sabapathi; Giribabu, Lingamallu; Lim, Gary N; Trâm, Tạ; D'Souza, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Closely positioned donor-acceptor pairs facilitate electron- and energy-transfer events, relevant to light energy conversion. Here, a triad system TPACor-C60 , possessing a free-base corrole as central unit that linked the energy donor triphenylamine (TPA) at the meso position and an electron acceptor fullerene (C60) at the β-pyrrole position was newly synthesized, as were the component dyads TPA-Cor and Cor-C60. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DFT studies confirmed the molecular integrity and existence of a moderate level of intramolecular interactions between the components. Steady-state fluorescence studies showed efficient energy transfer from (1) TPA* to the corrole and subsequent electron transfer from (1) corrole* to fullerene. Further studies involving femtosecond and nanosecond laser flash photolysis confirmed electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism of corrole emission, in which the electron-transfer products, the corrole radical cation (Cor(⋅+) in Cor-C60 and TPA-Cor(⋅+) in TPACor-C60) and fullerene radical anion (C60(⋅-)), could be spectrally characterized. Owing to the close proximity of the donor and acceptor entities in the dyad and triad, the rate of charge separation, kCS , was found to be about 10(11)  s(-1), suggesting the occurrence of an ultrafast charge-separation process. Interestingly, although an order of magnitude slower than kCS , the rate of charge recombination, kCR , was also found to be rapid (kCR ≈10(10)  s(-1)), and both processes followed the solvent polarity trend DMF>benzonitrile>THF>toluene. The charge-separated species relaxed directly to the ground state in polar solvents while in toluene, formation of (3) corrole* was observed, thus implying that the energy of the charge-separated state in a nonpolar solvent is higher than the energy of (3) corrole* being about 1.52 eV. That is, ultrafast formation of a high-energy charge-separated state in toluene has been achieved in these closely spaced corrole

  11. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  14. 3-NO2-5,10,15-triarylcorrolato-Cu as a versatile platform for synthesis of novel 3-functionalized corrole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, M.; Mancini, M.; Raggio, M.; Fronczeck, F. R.; McCandless, G. T.; Smith, K. M.; Paolesse, R.

    2014-01-01

    β–Nitrocorrole derivatives are potentially valuable platforms for the preparation of a wide range of more elaborated corrole derivatives possessing unique chemical functionalities and electronic properties. Here we report our results on the chemical manipulation of a copper 3-NO2-triarylcorrolate using different organic reactions, all involving the reduction of –NO2 to –NH2 at an early stage, followed by further transformations. By way of a β-acylated copper corrolate, a novel corrole derivative bearing an alkyl azide group on the peripheral positions was obtained and exploited in the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. PMID:25005049

  15. Phosphorus(V) corrole: DNA binding, photonuclease activity and cytotoxicity toward tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Guang; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Hai-Yang

    2016-08-01

    A new phosphorus(V) corrole, 10-(4-hydroxylphenyl)-5,15-bis(pentafluorophenyl)corrolato (trans-dihydroxo)phosphorus(V) 1-P, was synthesized and characterized. The interaction of 1-P with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by multi-spectroscopic methods. The photonuclease activity of this complex was examined by agarose gel electrophoresis. 1-P may bind to CT-DNA via an outside binding mode and display good photonuclease activity. 1-P displayed low dark toxicity but high photocytotoxic activity against H460 and A549 tumor cell lines. PMID:27281437

  16. Macrocyclic Transformations from Norrole to Isonorrole and an N-Confused Corrole with a Fused Hexacyclic Ring System Triggered by a Pyrrole Substituent.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wei, Pingchun; Ishida, Masatoshi; Li, Xin; Savage, Mathew; Guo, Rui; Ou, Zhongping; Yang, Sihai; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Xie, Yongshu

    2016-02-01

    Three kinds of fused porphyrinoids, L2-L4, possessing different types of corrole-based frameworks were synthesized from a pyrrole-substituted corrole isomer (norrole L1). Oxidation of L1 afforded a unique N-Cmeso -fused pyrrolyl isonorrole L2, involving the fusion of an auxiliary pyrrolic NH moiety with a meso-sp(3) -hybridized carbon atom. Subsequently, L2 underwent macrocycle transformations to give singly and doubly N-CAr -fused N-confused corroles, L3 and L4, respectively. L3 and L4 contain fused [5.7.6.5]-tetra- and [5.6.7.7.6.5]-hexacyclic structures, respectively, prepared through lateral annulation. These skeletal transformation reactions from norrole to its isomer isonorrole and finally to N-confused corrole indicate that multiply fused porphyrinoids could be readily synthesized from pyrrole-appended confused porphyrinoids. PMID:26822959

  17. Investigating the photosensitizer-potential of targeted gallium corrole using multimode optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Lubow, Jay; Chu, David; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B.; Farkas, Daniel L.; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.

    2011-02-01

    We recently developed a novel therapeutic particle, HerGa, for breast cancer treatment and detection. HerGa consists of a tumor-targeted cell penetration protein noncovalently assembled with a gallium-metallated corrole. The corrole is structurally similar to porphyrin, emits intense fluorescence, and has proven highly effective for breast tumor treatment preclinically, without light exposure. Here, we tested HerGa as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy and investigated its mechanism of action using multimode optical imaging. Using confocal fluorescence imaging, we observed that HerGa disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential in situ, and this disruption is substantially augmented by light exposure. In addition, spectral and fluorescence lifetime imaging were utilized to both validate the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and investigate HerGa internalization, allowing us to optimize the timing for light dosimetry. We observed, using advanced multimode optical imaging, that light at a specific wavelength promotes HerGa cytotoxicity, which is likely to cause disruption of mitochondrial function. Thus, we can identify for the first time the capacity of HerGa as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy and reveal its mechanism of action, opening possibilities for therapeutic intervention in human breast cancer management.

  18. Low-energy states of manganese-oxo corrole and corrolazine: multiconfiguration reference ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailiang; Pierloot, Kristine; Langner, Ernie H G; Swarts, Jannie C; Conradie, Jeanet; Ghosh, Abhik

    2012-04-01

    Manganese(V)-oxo corrole and corrolazine have been studied with ab initio multiconfiguration reference methods (CASPT2 and RASPT2) and large atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets. The calculations confirm the expected singlet d(δ)(2) ground states for both complexes and rule out excited states within 0.5 eV of the ground states. The lowest excited states are a pair of Mn(V) triplet states with d(δ)(1)d(π)(1) configurations 0.5-0.75 eV above the ground state. Manganese(IV)-oxo macrocycle radical states are much higher in energy, ≥1.0 eV relative to the ground state. The macrocyclic ligands in the ground states of the complexes are thus unambiguously 'innocent'. The approximate similarity of the spin state energetics of the corrole and corrolazine complexes suggests that the latter macrocycle on its own does not afford any special stabilization for the Mn(V)O center. The remarkable stability of an Mn(V)O octaarylcorrolazine thus appears to be ascribable to the steric protection afforded by the β-aryl groups. PMID:22432719

  19. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... color additive ferric ferrocyanide is a ferric hexacyanoferrate pigment characterized by the structual... ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with ferric ferrocyanide may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  2. Adverse Reactions of Ferric Carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  3. Adverse reactions of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Thanusubramanian, Harish; Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-10-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  4. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  5. Improving the photoinduced charge separation parameters in corrole-perylene carboximide dyads by tuning the redox and spectroscopic properties of the components.

    PubMed

    Flamigni, Lucia; Ciuciu, Adina I; Langhals, Heinz; Böck, Bernd; Gryko, Daniel T

    2012-03-01

    A couple of corrole-perylene carboximide dyads (C2-PIa and C2-PIx) have been synthesized and their photoreactivity has been evaluated. We aimed at obtaining better performances for photoinduced charge separation, both in terms of efficiency and in terms of lifetime, with respect to formerly studied systems. The energy level of the charge-separated state was tuned by selecting perylene and corrole components with diverse redox and spectroscopic properties. High spectroscopic energy levels of the perylene carboximide derivatives (PIs) allow a fast charge separation to be maintained in competition with an energy-transfer process from the PI to the corrole unit. Yields and lifetimes of charge separation in toluene are, respectively, 75% and 2.5 μs for C2-PIa and 65% and 24 ns for C2-PIx. The results and the effect of solvent polarity are discussed in the framework of current energy- and electron-transfer theories. PMID:22234895

  6. Gold Tris(carboxyphenyl)corroles as Multifunctional Materials: Room Temperature Near-IR Phosphorescence and Applications to Photodynamic Therapy and Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Abraham B; Day, Nicholas U; Mani, Tomoyasu; Rudine, Alexander B; Thomas, Kolle E; Gederaas, Odrun A; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Wamser, Carl C; Ghosh, Abhik

    2016-07-27

    Two amphiphilic corroles-5,10,15-tris(3-carboxyphenyl)corrole (H3[mTCPC]) and 5,10,15-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)corrole (H3[pTCPC])-and their gold complexes have been synthesized, and their photophysical properties and photovoltaic behavior have been investigated. Like other nonpolar gold corroles, Au[mTCPC] and Au[pTCPC] were both found to exhibit room temperature phosphorescence in deoxygenated solutions with quantum yields of ∼0.3% and triplet lifetimes of ∼75 μs. Both compounds exhibited significant activity as dyes in photodynamic therapy experiments and in dye-sensitized solar cells. Upon irradiation at 435 nm, both Au corroles exhibited significant phototoxicity against AY27 rat bladder cancer cells while the free-base corroles proved inactive. Dye-sensitized solar cells constructed using the free bases H3[mTCPC] and H3[pTCPC] exhibited low efficiencies (≪1%), well under that obtained with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin, H2[pTCPP] (1.9%, cf. N719 9.5%). Likewise, Au[pTCPC] proved inefficient, with an efficiency of ∼0.2%. By contrast, Au[mTCPC] proved remarkably effective, exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.56 V, a short-circuit current of 8.7 mA cm(-2), a fill factor of 0.72, and an efficiency of 3.5%. PMID:27414087

  7. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate....

  9. Synthesis of tyrosine-involved corrole Cu(III), Mn(IV), and Mn(III) complexes as biomimetic models of oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, M.; Gao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Boc-protected tyrosine-attached corrole ligand on the " ortho" position compound 3, its corresponding copper (III) 4a, manganese (IV) 4b, and manganese (III) 4c complexes have been designed and synthesized based on the structures of active-centers of related biological systems. 1H NMR and electronic absorption spectra of these metal complexes are investigated. The crystal structure of 4a displays the relative position of TyrOH unit to the high valent metal center. Electrochemistry investigations display the possibilities of intramolecular electron or energy transfer between TyrOH group and metal corrole group.

  10. Ferric sulfate montmorillonites as Mars soil analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band-strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Ferric - sulfate - montmorillonite samples have been prepared more recently because they are a good compositional match with the surface material on Mars as measured by Viking. Reflectance spectra of montmorillonite doped with ferric sulfate in the interlayer regions include a strong 3 micron band that persists under dry conditions. This is in contrast to spectra of similarly prepared ferric-doped montmorillonites, which exhibit a relatively weaker 3 micron band under comparable dry environmental conditions. Presented here are reflectance spectra of a suite of ferric-sulfate exchanged montmorillonites prepared with variable ferric sulfate concentrations and variable pH conditions.

  11. Manganese(III) corrole-oxidant adduct as the active intermediate in catalytic hydrogen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Michael J; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2008-11-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from dihydroanthracene to ArINTs (Ar = 2- tert-butylsulfonyl)benzene and Ts = p-toluenesulfonyl) is catalyzed by Mn(tpfc) (tpfc = 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole). Kinetics of HAT was monitored by gas chromatography. Conversion to the major products anthracene, TsNH 2, and ArI is too fast to be explained by direct HAT from the terminal imido complex TsN=Mn(tpfc), which forms from the reaction of Mn(tpfc) with ArINTs. Steady-state kinetics, isotope effects, and variation of the initial catalyst form (Mn (III)(tpfc) vs TsN=Mn (V)(tpfc)) support a mechanism in which the active catalytic species is an adduct of manganese(III) with the oxidant, (ArINTs)Mn (III)(tpfc). This species was detected by rapid-scan stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy. Kinetic simulations demonstrated the viability of this mechanism in contrast to other proposals. PMID:18855381

  12. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation.

    PubMed

    Stensitzki, T; Yang, Y; Berg, A; Mahammed, A; Gross, Z; Heyne, K

    2016-07-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump-IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump-supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm(-1) is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm(-1) and at 1508 cm(-1). These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  13. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Stensitzki, T.; Yang, Y.; Berg, A.; Mahammed, A.; Gross, Z.; Heyne, K.

    2016-01-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump–IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump–supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm−1 is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm−1 and at 1508 cm−1. These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  14. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended use. (c) In...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  8. Role of the Imide Axial Ligand in the Spin and Oxidation State of Manganese Corrole and Corrolazine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Alcover-Fortuny, Gerard; Caballol, Rosa; Pierloot, Kristine; de Graaf, Coen

    2016-06-01

    Electronic structure calculations have been performed on four different Mn corrole and corrolazine complexes to clarify the role of the imide axial ligand on the relative stability of the different spin states and the stabilization of the high-valent Mn ion in these complexes. Multiconfigurational perturbation theory energy calculations on the DFT-optimized geometries show that all complexes have a singlet ground state except the complex with the strongest electron-withdrawing substituent on the imide axial ligand, which is found to have a triplet ground state. The analysis of the σ and π interaction between the metal and imide ligand shows that this spin crossover is caused by a subtle interplay of geometrical factors (Mn-N distance and coordination angle) and the electron-withdrawing character of the substituent on the imide, which reduces the electron donation to the metal center. The analysis of the multiconfigurational wave functions reveals that the formally Mn(V) ion is stabilized by an important electron transfer from both the equatorial corrole/corrolazine ligand and the axial imide. The macrocycle donates roughly half an electron, being somewhere between the closed-shell trianionic and the dianionic radical form. The imide ligand transfers 2.5 electrons to the metal center, resulting in an effective d-electron count close to five in all complexes. PMID:27163862

  9. Ferric Iron Reduction by Acidophilic Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. Barrie; McGinness, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Fifty mesophilic and five moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria were tested for the ability to reduce ferric iron in liquid and solid media under aerobic conditions; about 40% of the mesophiles (but none of the moderate thermophiles) displayed at least some capacity to reduce iron. Both rates and extents of ferric iron reduction were highly strain dependent. No acidophilic heterotroph reduced nitrate or sulfate, and (limited) reduction of manganese(IV) was noted in only one strain (Acidiphilium facilis), an acidophile which did not reduce iron. Insoluble forms of ferric iron, both amorphous and crystalline, were reduced, as well as soluble iron. There was evidence that, in at least some acidophilic heterotrophs, iron reduction was enzymically mediated and that ferric iron could act as a terminal electron acceptor. In anaerobically incubated cultures, bacterial biomass increased with increasing concentrations of ferric but not ferrous iron. Mixed cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and an acidophilic heterotroph (SJH) produced sequences of iron cycling in ferrous iron-glucose media. PMID:16348395

  10. Ferric chloride graphite intercalation compounds prepared from graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp3 electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp2 electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2*2H2O, others contain FeF3 in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearing of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol %), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are heated to 800 C in quartz tube, they lost most of its halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber. This iron-oxide-covered fiber may be useful in making carbon-fiber/ceramic-matrix composites with strong bonding at the fiber-ceramic interface.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 120, which is incorporated by... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric pyrophosphate. 184.1304 Section 184.1304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  2. Investigations of Ferric Heme Cyanide Photodissociation in Myoglobin and Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weiqiao; Sun, Yuhan; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Champion, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The photodissociation of cyanide from ferric myoglobin (MbCN) and horseradish peroxidase (HRPCN) has been definitively observed. This has implications for the interpretation of ultrafast IR (Helbing et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 87, 1881–1891) and optical (Gruia et al. Biophys. J. 2008, 94, 2252–2268) studies that had previously suggested the Fe-CN bond was photostable in MbCN. The photolysis of ferric MbCN takes place with a quantum yield of ~75% and the resonance Raman spectrum of the photoproduct observed in steady-state experiments as a function of laser power and sample spinning rate is identical to that of ferric Mb (metMb). The data are quantitatively analyzed using a simple model where cyanide is photodissociated and, although geminate rebinding with a rate kBA ≈ (3.6 ps)−1 is the dominant process, some CN− exits from the distal heme pocket and is replaced by water. Using independently determined values for the CN− association rate, we find that the CN− escape rate from the ferric myoglobin pocket to the solution at 293 K is kout ≈ 1–2 × 107 s−1. This value is very similar to, but slightly larger than, the histidine gated escape rate of CO from Mb (1.1×107 s−1) under the same conditions. The analysis leads to an escape probability kout/(kout+kBA) ~ 10−4, which is unobservable in most time domain kinetic measurements. However, the photolysis is surprisingly easy to detect in Mb using cw resonance Raman measurements. This is due to the anomalously slow CN− bimolecular association rate (170 M−1s−1), which arises from the need for water to exchange at the ferric heme binding site of Mb. In contrast, ferric HRP does not have a heme bound water molecule and its CN− bimolecular association rate is larger by ~103 making the CN− photolysis more difficult to observe. PMID:23472676

  3. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  4. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  5. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  6. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  7. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  8. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferric ammonium...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric sodium pyrophosphate....

  10. Rapid assay for microbially reducible ferric iron in aquatic sediments.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1987-07-01

    The availability of ferric iron for microbial reduction as directly determined by the activity of iron-reducing organisms was compared with its availability as determined by a newly developed chemical assay for microbially reducible iron. The chemical assay was based on the reduction of poorly crystalline ferric iron by hydroxylamine under acidic conditions. There was a strong correlation between the extent to which hydroxylamine could reduce various synthetic ferric iron forms and the susceptibility of the iron to microbial reduction in an enrichment culture of iron-reducing organisms. When sediments that contained hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron were incubated under anaerobic conditions, ferrous iron accumulated as the concentration of hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron declined over time. Ferrous iron production stopped as soon as the hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron was depleted. In anaerobic incubations of reduced sediments that did not contain hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron, there was no microbial iron reduction, even though the sediments contained high concentrations of oxalate-extractable ferric iron. A correspondence between the presence of hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron and the extent of ferric iron reduction in anaerobic incubations was observed in sediments from an aquifer and in fresh- and brackish-water sediments from the Potomac River estuary. The assay is a significant improvement over previously described procedures for the determination of hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron because it provides a correction for the high concentrations of solid ferrous iron which may also be extracted from sediments with acid. This is a rapid, simple technique to determine whether ferric iron is available for microbial reduction. PMID:16347384

  11. Ferric iron reduction by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T D; Gustafson, J

    1976-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of the genera Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus are able to reduce ferric iron when growing on elemental sulfur as an energy source. It has been previously thought that ferric iron serves as a nonbiological oxidant in the formation of acid mine drainage and in the leaching of ores, but these results suggest that bacterial catalysis may play a significant role in the reactivity of ferric iron. PMID:825043

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution. A containment system (cargo tank...

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The... green forms, are deliquescent in air, and are reducible by light. (b) Specifications. Ferric ammonium... from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for the protection of...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The... green forms, are deliquescent in air, and are reducible by light. (b) Specifications. Ferric ammonium... from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for the protection of...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The... green forms, are deliquescent in air, and are reducible by light. (b) Specifications. Ferric ammonium... from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for the protection of...

  1. Energy transduction by anaerobic ferric iron respiration in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Liem, K.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Formate-grown cells of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic acidophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were capable of formate- and elemental sulfur-dependent reduction of ferric iron under anaerovic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, both oxygen and ferric iron could be simultaneously used as electron acceptors. To investigate whether anaerobic ferric iron respiration by T. ferrooxidans is an energy-transducing process, uptake of amino acids was studied. Glycine uptake by starved cells did not occur in the absence of an electron donor, neither under aerobic conditions nor under anaerobic conditions. Uptake of glycine could be driven by formate- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygen uptake. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron respiration with the electron donors formate and elemental sulfur could energize glycine uptake. Glycine uptake was inhibited by the uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. The results indicate that anaerobic ferric iron respiration can contribute to the energy budget of T. ferrooxidans.

  2. Microwave drying of ferric oxide pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, C.A.; Xia, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    The application of microwave energy for the drying of ferric oxide pellets has been investigated and evaluated. It is shown that the microwave drying rates are much higher than those observed in the conventional process. Also there is some potential for improved quality of the product. As a stand-alone technology it is unlikely that microwave drying would be economical for pellets due to the low cost of conventional fuels. However, based on an understanding of the drying mechanisms in the conventional process and in the microwave process, it is shown that microwave-assisted drying offers considerable potential. In this hybrid process, the advantages of the two drying techniques are combined to provide an improved drying process.

  3. Ferric chloride-catalyzed reaction of [60]fullerene with tert-butyl N-substituted carbamates: synthesis of oxazolidino[4,5:1,2][60]fullerenes.

    PubMed

    You, Xun; Wang, Guan-Wu

    2014-01-01

    The rare oxazolidinofullerenes have been prepared by the ferric chloride-catalyzed reaction of [60]fullerene with various tert-butyl N-substituted carbamates via t-Bu-O bond cleavage and heteroannulation under mild conditions. A possible mechanism for the formation of oxazolidinofullerenes is proposed. PMID:24328055

  4. Reduction of Ferric Leghemoglobin in Soybean Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keuk-Ki; Klucas, Robert V.

    1984-01-01

    Reduction of ferric leghemoglobin to ferrous leghemoglobin in soybean nodules (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Woodworth) was studied using a spectrophotometer equipped with an in-cell space diffuse reflectance accessory. Nodule slices prepared and scanned under nitrogen gas showed a ferrous leghemoglobin absorption spectrum. Nodule slices equilibrated with 100% O2 or air exhibited two absorption bands characteristic of oxygenated leghemoglobin. The addition of CO shifted those bands to CO leghemoglobin absorption bands. Potassium ferricyanide was not effective in oxidizing ferrous to ferric leghemoglobin in nodule slices. However, ferric leghemoglobin was formed by treating the nodule slices with hydroxylamine, and this was confirmed by complexing the ferric leghemoglobin to acetate, fluoride, or nicotinic acid. The diminution of ferric leghemoglobin was monitored as a function of time, and in the presence of nicotinic acid, the conversion of ferric to ferrous leghemoglobin was monitored by the appearance of ferrous leghemoglobin nicotinate complex as a function of time. Ferric leghemoglobin reduction was also confirmed by direct transmission spectrophotometry. The evidence presented here suggests that ferrileghemoglobin reduction occurs in nodule slices. PMID:16663546

  5. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency. PMID:25428711

  6. The crystal chemistry of ferric oxyhydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Low, H R; Phonthammachai, N; Maignan, A; Stewart, G A; Bastow, T J; Ma, L L; White, T J

    2008-12-15

    Ferric hydroxyapatites (Fe-HAp) and oxyapatites (Fe-OAp) of nominal composition [Ca(10-x)Fe(x)(3+)][(PO(4))(6)][(OH)(2-x)O(x)] (0 < or = x < or = 0.5) were synthesized from a coprecipitated precursor calcined under flowing nitrogen. The solid solubility of iron was temperature-dependent, varying from x = 0.5 after firing at 600 degrees C to x approximately 0.2 at 1000 degrees C, beyond which Fe-OAp was progressively replaced by tricalcium phosphate (Fe-TCP). Crystal size (13-116 nm) was controlled by iron content and calcination temperature. Ferric iron replaces calcium by two altervalent mechanisms in which carbonate and oxygen are incorporated as counterions. At low iron loadings, carbonate predominantly displaces hydroxyl in the apatite channels (Ca(2+) + OH(-) --> Fe(3+) + CO(3)(2-)), while at higher loadings, "interstitial" oxygen is tenanted in the framework (2Ca(2+) + (vac) --> 2Fe(3+) + O(2+)). Although Fe(3+) is smaller than Ca(2+), the unit cell dilates as iron enters apatite, providing evidence of oxygen injection that converts PO(4) tetrahedra to PO(5) trigonal bipyramids, leading to the crystal chemical formula [Ca(10-x)Fe(x)][(PO(4))(6-x/2)(PO(5))(x/2)][(OH)(2-y)O(2y)] (x < or = 0.5). A discontinuity in unit cell expansion at x approximately 0.2 combined with a substantial reduction of the carbonate FTIR fingerprint shows that oxygen infusion, rather than tunnel hydroxyl displacement, is dominant beyond this loading. This behavior is in contrast to ferrous-fluorapatite where Ca(2+) --> Fe(2+) aliovalent replacement does not require oxygen penetration and the cell volume contracts with iron loading. All of the materials were paramagnetic, but at low iron concentrations, a transition arising from crystallographic modification or a change in spin ordering is observed at 90 K. The excipient behavior of Fe-OAp was superior to that of HAp and may be linked to the crystalline component or mediated by a ubiquitous nondiffracting amorphous phase. Fe-HAp and Fe

  7. Viewing the Valence Electronic Structure of Ferric and Ferrous Hexacyanide in Solution from the Fe and Cyanide Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Zhang, Wenkai; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Miedema, Piter S; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Schröder, Henning; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gaffney, Kelly J; Lundberg, Marcus; Odelius, Michael; Wernet, Philippe

    2016-07-28

    The valence-excited states of ferric and ferrous hexacyanide ions in aqueous solution were mapped by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Fe L2,3 and N K edges. Probing of both the central Fe and the ligand N atoms enabled identification of the metal- and ligand-centered excited states, as well as ligand-to-metal and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states. Ab initio calculations utilizing the RASPT2 method were used to simulate the Fe L2,3-edge RIXS spectra and enabled quantification of the covalencies of both occupied and empty orbitals of π and σ symmetry. We found that π back-donation in the ferric complex is smaller than that in the ferrous complex. This is evidenced by the relative amounts of Fe 3d character in the nominally 2π CN(-) molecular orbital of 7% and 9% in ferric and ferrous hexacyanide, respectively. Utilizing the direct sensitivity of Fe L3-edge RIXS to the Fe 3d character in the occupied molecular orbitals, we also found that the donation interactions are dominated by σ bonding. The latter was found to be stronger in the ferric complex, with an Fe 3d contribution to the nominally 5σ CN(-) molecular orbitals of 29% compared to 20% in the ferrous complex. These results are consistent with the notion that a higher charge at the central metal atom increases donation and decreases back-donation. PMID:27380541

  8. Dentine and enamel bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, R L; Tung, M S; Blosser, R L; Asmussen, E

    1987-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that sequential use of aqueous FO (ferric oxalate containing a small concentration of HNO3), acetone solutions of NPG (N-phenylglycine), and PMDM (the reaction product of pyromellitic dianhydride and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) yields strong adhesive bonding of composite resins to both dentine and enamel. The purpose of this study was to determine if aluminum ions could be substituted for ferric ions and if the procedure could be simplified. Aqueous solutions containing aluminum oxalate and aluminum nitrate, followed in sequence by acetone solutions of NPG and PMDM, gave strong tensile adhesive bond strengths between a composite and extracted human teeth. Comparable values have been obtained with FO, NPG and PMDM. Aluminum oxalate solutions containing no nitrate gave lower bond strengths, as was the case with FO. Aqueous solutions of acidified aluminum oxalate can dissolve NPG, thereby allowing a simplification of the procedure. Tested for comparison, commercially available dentine bonding agents gave lower average bond strengths on dentine than did some of the experimental materials. PMID:3316044

  9. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  10. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  15. Polymeric Optical Sensors for Selective and Sensitive Nitrite Detection Using Cobalt(III) Corrole and Rh(III) Porphyrin as Ionophores

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si; Wo, Yaqi; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt(III) 5, 10, 15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole with a triphenylphosphine axial ligand and rhodium(III) 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-tert-butylphenyl)porphyrin are incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) films to fabricate nitrite-selective bulk optodes via absorbance measurements. The resulting films yield sensitive, fast and fully reversible response toward nitrite with significantly enhanced nitrite selectivity over other anions including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate. The selectivity patterns differ greatly from the Hofmeister series based on anion lipophilicity and are consistent with selectivity obtained with potentiometric sensors based on the same ionophores. The optical nitrite sensors are shown to be useful for detecting rates of emission of nitric oxide (NO) from NO releasing polymers containing S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine. PMID:25150700

  16. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  17. Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Mars Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of oxygen and hydrogen fugacity is of paramount importance in constraining phase equilibria and crystallization processes of melts, as well as understanding the partitioning of elements between the cope and silicate portions of terrestrial planets. H and Fe(3+) must both be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but until now anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many martian phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3+) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Finally, the effects of shock on both Fe(3+) and H in hydrous and anhydrous phases must be quantified. Thus, the overall goal of this research was to understand the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities under which martian samples crystallized. In this research one-year project, we approached this problem by 1) characterizing Fe(3+) and H contents of SNC meteorites using both bulk (Mossbauer spectroscopy and uranium extraction, respectively) and microscale (synchrotron micro-XANES and SIMS) methods; 2) relating Fe(3+) and H contents of martian minerals to their oxygen and hydrogen fugacities through analysis of experimentally equilibrated phases (for pyroxene) and through study of volcanic rocks in which the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities can be independently constrained (for feldspar); and 3) studying the effects of shock processes on Fe(3+) and H contents of the phases of interest. Results have been used to assess quantitatively the distribution of H and Fe(3+) among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars. There were no inventions funded by this research.

  18. Origin of the Individual Basicity of Corrole NH-Tautomers: A Quantum Chemical Study on Molecular Structure and Dynamics, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Beenken, Wichard; Maes, Wouter; Kruk, Mikalai; Martínez, Todd; Presselt, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Free-base corroles exist as individual NH-tautomers that may differ in their spectral and chemical properties. The present paper focuses on the origin of the basicity difference between two AB2-pyrimidinylcorrole NH-tautomers, which has been tentatively attributed to differences in the weak out-of-plane distortions of the pyrrolenic ring between two NH-tautomers. Using DFT-geometry optimizations, we show that the pyrroles involved in the NH-tautomerization process are approximately in-plane, whereas the other two pyrroles are tilted out-of-plane in opposite directions. Alternative out-of-plane distortion patterns play a minor role, as revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Given that the protonated corrole is a unique species, the energy difference between the two NH-tautomers equals the difference in protonation driving force between them. This energy difference increases with improved theoretical level of accounting for intermolecular interactions and dielectric screening of surface charges. The different charge distributions of the two NH-tautomers result in electrostatic potential distributions that effect a larger proton attraction in the case of the T1 tautomer than in the case of the T2 tautomer. In summary, our quantum chemical results show clearly a higher basicity of the T1 tautomer as compared to the T2 tautomer: The previously assumed pronounced out-of-plane tilt of the T1-nonprotonated nitrogen is verified by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Together with analysis of the electrostatic potential distribution we show that the nonprotonated nitrogen is not only tilted stronger but also significantly more accessible for protons in the case of T1 as compared to T2. Additionally, the thermodynamic basicity is higher for T1 than for T2. PMID:26052732

  19. Arsenate precipitation using ferric iron in acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F.; Kirk, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Arsenates (i.e., As(V)) can be removed from aqueous solution by precipitation with ferric iron (i.e., Fe(III)). The chemistry of arsenic acid describes the main properties of arsenates. This triprotic acid resembles the phosphoric acid system. For example, free arsenate ions (i.e., AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}), like free phosphates, are present in significant concentration at pH values above pK{sub a,3}. On the other hand, the concentration of free ferric iron in solution, Fe{sup 3+}, is limited by ferric hydroxide precipitation and hydroxy complexation under neutral or basic conditions. Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant iron form only under very acidic conditions. Therefore, the absence of either ferric ions or arsenate ligands prevents ferric arsenate (FeAsO{sub 4}) precipitation in extreme pH conditions. Precipitation studies using ferric chloride show that the formation of ferric arsenate in water containing 0.667 mM/L (50 mg/L as As) is favored in the pH range between 3 and 4. Ferric iron dose required to remove arsenic from solution increases with pH in the range of 3 to 10. Sludge production also increases with increasing pH conditions. Optimum ferric iron doses at pH 3 and 4 are 4.8 and 10.0 mM/L, respectively, where the arsenate is removed from solution by 98.72 and 99.68 percent. Corresponding iron requirement to arsenate ratios at these two pH conditions are 7.2 and 15.0. Adverse effects on arsenic removal are observed at pH = 3, where the concentration of applied ferric iron exceeds the optimal dose. This effect is probably due to charge reversal on the surface of the precipitates. Overdosing above the optimal iron concentration at pH = 4 does not reduce treatment efficiency significantly. Presence of sodium chloride in solution at a concentration of 171 mM/L (10,000 mg/L as NaCl) does not impair system performance. However, sodium sulfate at a concentration of 104 mM/L (10,000 mg/L) affects adversely treatment performance.

  20. Ferric sulfates on Mars: Surface Explorations and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Ling, Z.; Freeman, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent results from missions to Mars have reinforced the importance of sulfates for Mars science. They are the hosts of water, the sinks of acidity, and maybe the most active species in the past and current surface/near-surface processes on Mars. Fe-sulfate was found frequently by Spirit and Opportunity rovers: jarosite in Meridiani Planum outcrops and a less specific "ferric sulfate" in the salty soils excavated by Spirit at Gusev Crater. Pancam spectral analysis suggests a variety of ferric sulfates in these soils, i.e. ferricopiapite, jarosite, fibroferrite, and rhomboclase. A change in the Pancam spectral features occurred in Tyrone soils after ~ 190 sols of exposure to surface conditions. Dehydration of ferric sulfate is a possible cause. We synthesized eight ferric sulfates and conducted a series of hydration/dehydration experiments. Our goal was to establish the stability fields and phase transition pathways of these ferric sulfates. In our experiments, water activity, temperature, and starting structure are the variables. No redox state change was observed. Acidic, neutral, and basic salts were used. Ferric sulfate sample containers were placed into relative humidity buffer solutions that maintain static relative humidity levels at three temperatures. The five starting phases were ferricopiapite (Fe4.67(SO4)6(OH)2.20H2O), kornelite (Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O), rhomboclase (FeH(SO4)2.4H2O), pentahydrite (Fe2(SO4)3.5H2O), and an amorphous phase (Fe2(SO4)3.5H2O). A total of one hundred fifty experiments have been running for nearly ten months. Thousands of coupled Raman and gravimetric measurements were made at intermediate steps to monitor the phase transitions. The first order discovery from these experiments is the extremely large stability field of ferricopiapite. Ferricopiapite is the major ferric sulfate to precipitate from a Fe3+-S-rich aqueous solution at mid-low temperature, and it has the highest H2O/Fe ratio (~ 4.3). However, unlike the Mg-sulfate with highest

  1. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  2. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  3. Cyanide binding to ferrous and ferric microperoxidase-11.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Microperoxidase-11 (MP11) is an undecapeptide derived from horse heart cytochrome c (cytc). MP11 is characterized by a covalently linked solvent-exposed heme group, the heme-Fe atom being axially coordinated by a histidyl residue. Here, the reactions of ferrous and ferric MP11 (MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III), respectively) with cyanide have been investigated from the kinetic and thermodynamic viewpoints, at pH 7.0 and 20.0 °C. Values of the second-order rate constant for cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 4.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 8.9 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Values of the first-order rate constant for cyanide dissociation from ligated MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 1.8 × 10(-1) s(-1) and 1.5 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively. Values of the dissociation equilibrium constant for cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 3.7 × 10(-2) and 1.7 × 10(-7) M, respectively, matching very well with those calculated from kinetic parameters so that no intermediate species seem to be involved in the ligand-binding process. The pH-dependence of cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(III) indicates that CN(-) is the only binding species. Present results have been analyzed in parallel with those of several heme-proteins, suggesting that (1) the ligand accessibility to the metal center and cyanide ionization may modulate the formation of heme-Fe-cyanide complexes, and (2) the general polarity of the heme pocket and/or hydrogen bonding of the heme-bound ligand may affect cyanide exit from the protein matrix. Microperoxidase-11 (MP11) is an undecapeptide derived from horse heart cytochrome c. Penta-coordinated MP11 displays a very high reactivity towards cyanide, whereas the reactivity of hexa-coordinated horse heart cytochrome c is very low. PMID:27229515

  4. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric

  5. What ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases are present on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.

    1988-01-01

    The weathering history of Mars can be deduced largely from the mineralogy and distribution of ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases. As discussed, some insights can be gained through spectrophotometric remote sensing, but absolute determinations must depend on direct laboratory analysis of returned Martian samples.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  10. Ligand Induced Spin Crossover in Penta-Coordinated Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Iyer, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    On addition of lewis bases to Fe(dtc)2X, ligand exchange takes place through a SN2 mechanism, with a parallel spin crossover in the ferric ion. The two species (S = 3/2 and S = 5/2) formed are in dynamic chemical equilibrium, and a slow decomposition is then initiated.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed...

  15. ESTCP DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  20. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  1. Mechanism of catalytic aziridination with manganese corrole: the often postulated high-valent Mn(V) imido is not the group transfer reagent.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Michael J; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2006-12-27

    The reaction of Arl=NTs (Ar = 2-(tert-butylsulfonyl)benzene and Ts = p-toluenesulfonyl) and (tpfc)Mn (tpfc=5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole), 1, affords the high-valent (tpfc)MnV=NTs, 2, on stopped-flow time scale. The reaction proceeds via the adduct [(tpfc)MnIII(ArINTs)], 3, with formation constant K3 = (10 +/- 2) x 10(3) L mol-1. Subsequently, 3 undergoes unimolecular group transfer to give complex 2 with the rate constant k4 = 0.26 +/- 0.07 s-1 at 24.0 degrees C. The complex (tpfc)Mn catalyzes [NTs] group transfer from ArINTs to styrene substrates with low catalyst loading and without requirement of excess olefin. The catalytic aziridination reaction is most efficient in benzene because solvents such as toluene undergo a competing hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction resulting in H2NTs and lowered aziridine yields. The high-valent manganese imido complex (tpfc)Mn=NTs does not transfer its [NTs] group to styrene. Double-labeling experiments with ArINTs and ArINTstBu (TstBu = (p-tert-butylphenyl)sulfonyl) establish the source of [NR] transfer as a "third oxidant", which is an adduct of Mn(V) imido, [(tpfc)Mn(NTstBu)(ArINTs)](4). Formation of this oxidant is rate limiting in catalysis. PMID:17177448

  2. Evaluation of ferric oxide and ferric citrate for their effects on fermentation, production of sulfide and methane, and abundance of select microbial populations using in vitro rumen cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-07-01

    This study systematically evaluated the effect of ferric iron on sulfate reduction to sulfide, feed digestion and fermentation, methane production, and populations of select ruminal microbes using in vitro rumen cultures. Ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and ferric citrate (C6H5FeO7) at six concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200mg/L as Fe(3+)) were tested. Ferric iron decreased production of both H2S gas in culture headspace (up to 71.9%) and aqueous sulfide (up to 80.8%), without adversely affecting other fermentation parameters, with ferric citrate being more effective than ferric oxide. Total archaeal population was increased by ferric citrate, but methane production was not affected significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was affected differently by ferric oxide than by ferric citrate. The results of this study could guide future in vivo studies to develop effective solutions to abate sulfur-associated polioencephalomalacia in cattle fed high-sulfur diet such as dried distiller's grains with solubles. PMID:27043055

  3. Ferric saponite and serpentine in the nakhlite martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2014-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and Fe-K X-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine structure and ferric content of the secondary phase mineral assemblages in the nakhlite martian meteorites, NWA 998, Lafayette, Nakhla, GV, Y 000593, Y 000749, MIL 03346, NWA 817, and NWA 5790. The secondary phases are a rapidly cooled, metastable assemblage that has preserved Mg# and Ca fractionation related to distance from the fluid source, for most of the nakhlites, though one, NWA 5790, appears not to have experienced a fluid pathway. All nine nakhlite samples have also been analysed with scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro analysis, Bright Field high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction. By measuring the energy position of the Fe-K XANES 1s → 3d pre-edge transition centroid we calculate the ferric content of the minerals within the nakhlite meteorites. The crystalline phyllosilicates and amorphous silicate of the hydrothermal deposits filling the olivine fractures are found to have variable Fe3+/ΣFe values ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. In Lafayette, the central silicate gel parts of the veins are more ferric than the phyllosilicates around it, showing that the fluid became increasingly oxidised. The mesostasis of Lafayette and NWA 817 also have phyllosilicate, which have a higher ferric content than the olivine fracture deposits, with Fe3+/ΣFe values of up to 1.0. Further study, via TEM analyses, reveal the Lafayette and NWA 817 olivine phyllosilicates to have 2:1 T-O-T lattice structure with a the d001-spacing of 0.96 nm, whereas the Lafayette mesostasis phyllosilicates have 1:1 T-O structure with d001-spacings of 0.7 nm. Based on our analyses, the phyllosilicate found within the Lafayette olivine fractures is trioctahedral ferric saponite (Ca0.2K0.1)∑0.3(Mg2.6Fe2+1.3Fe3+1.7Mn0.1)∑5.7[(Si6.7AlIV0.9Fe3+0.4)∑8.0O20](OH)4·nH2O, and that found in the mesostasis fractures is an Fe

  4. Paracoccidioides spp. ferrous and ferric iron assimilation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia L. C.; Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle G.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Kosman, Daniel J.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all organisms, including fungi. Usually, fungi can uptake iron through receptor-mediated internalization of a siderophore or heme, and/or reductive iron assimilation (RIA). Traditionally, the RIA pathway consists of ferric reductases (Fres), ferroxidase (Fet3) and a high-affinity iron permease (Ftr1). Paracoccidioides spp. genomes do not present an Ftr1 homolog. However, this fungus expresses zinc regulated transporter homologs (Zrts), members of the ZIP family of membrane transporters that are able in some organisms to transport zinc and iron. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC)-overlay assay indicates that both Pb01 and Pb18 express a ferric reductase activity; however, 59Fe uptake assays indicate that only in Pb18 is this activity coupled to a reductase-dependent iron uptake pathway. In addition, Zrts are up-regulated in iron deprivation, as indicated by RNAseq and qRT-PCR using Pb01 transcripts. RNAseq strategy also demonstrated that transcripts related to siderophore uptake and biosynthesis are up-regulated in iron-deprived condition. The data suggest that the fungus could use both a non-classical RIA, comprising ferric reductases and Fe/Zn permeases (Zrts), and siderophore uptake pathways under iron-limited conditions. The study of iron metabolism reveals novel surface molecules that could function as accessible targets for drugs to block iron uptake and, consequently, inhibit pathogen's proliferation. PMID:26441843

  5. Application of ferric sludge to immobilize leachable mercury in soils and concrete.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J Ming; Walsh, T; Lam, T; Boulter, D

    2003-11-01

    A Hg-contaminated site in B.C. Province, Canada was caused by the previous operation of Hg-cell in chlor-alkali process for over 25 years. The soils and groundwater at the site are highly contaminated with mercury. An analysis of groundwater at the site has shown that most of the mercury is bonded with humic and fulvic acids (HFA) in colloidal form. The Hg-HFA colloids can be completely removed from the groundwater with ferric chloride treatment under optimized process conditions to form ferric sludge (FS), which is rendered non-leachable by standard TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) test. The effluent discharged from a clarifier has achieved mercury levels of < 0.5 microkg l(-1). The studies of mercury adsorption characteristics of FS show it has low mercury leachability by TCLP, and great mercury adsorption capability. This feature is the basis for the application of FS to immobilization of leachable Hg-contaminants in solid wastes. Full-scale stabilization tests of Hg-contaminated soil have been carried out, and the time-based stability of the treated soil has been monitored by TCLP over a period of 60 days. All the results have shown a small variation in TCLP mercury levels within a range of 10-40 microg l(-1). Based on these results and with the approval of the B.C. Ministry of the Environment, 1850 tons of Hg-contaminated soils and 260 tons of Hg-contaminated concrete fines have been treated, stabilized with FS, and disposed in a non-hazardous waste disposal site. PMID:14733397

  6. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-09-10

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  7. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  8. The secondary coordination sphere controlled reactivity of a ferric-superoxo heme: unexpected conversion to a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate by reaction with a high-spin ferrous heme.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Perumandla; Ohta, Takehiro; Liu, Jin-Gang; Ogura, Takashi; Naruta, Yoshinori

    2016-06-01

    A bio-inspired heme complex involving both a proton donor and an axial imidazole ligand reduces the activation energy for the formation of a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate. A high-spin ferrous heme is shown to be capable of reducing its superoxy species to generate a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate for the first time. PMID:27105471

  9. The crystal structures of the ferric and ferrous forms of the heme complex of HmuO, a heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Shoko; Chu, Grace C; Unno, Masaki; Lee, Dong-Sun; Yoshida, Tadashi; Park, Sam-Yong; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2004-03-19

    Crystal structures of the ferric and ferrous heme complexes of HmuO, a 24-kDa heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, have been refined to 1.4 and 1.5 A resolution, respectively. The HmuO structures show that the heme group is closely sandwiched between the proximal and distal helices. The imidazole group of His-20 is the proximal heme ligand, which closely eclipses the beta- and delta-meso axis of the porphyrin ring. A long range hydrogen bonding network is present, connecting the iron-bound water ligand to the solvent water molecule. This enables proton transfer from the solvent to the catalytic site, where the oxygen activation occurs. In comparison to the ferric complex, the proximal and distal helices move closer to the heme plane in the ferrous complex. Together with the kinked distal helix, this movement leaves only the alpha-meso carbon atom accessible to the iron-bound dioxygen. The heme pocket architecture is responsible for stabilization of the ferric hydroperoxo-active intermediate by preventing premature heterolytic O-O bond cleavage. This allows the enzyme to oxygenate selectively at the alpha-meso carbon in HmuO catalysis. PMID:14645223

  10. Organic Matter Mineralization with Reduction of Ferric Iron in Anaerobic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Phillips, Elizabeth J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can outcompete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition. PMID:16347032

  11. Organic matter mineralization with reduction of ferric iron in anaerobic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1986-04-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can out compete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition.

  12. Organic matter mineralization with reduction of ferric iron in anaerobic sediments.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1986-04-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can outcompete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition. PMID:16347032

  13. Ferric citrate controls phosphorus and delivers iron in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia B; Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T; Whittier, Frederick C; Linfert, Douglas R; Galphin, Claude M; Athreya, Balaji P; Nossuli, A Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-02-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  14. Ferric Citrate Controls Phosphorus and Delivers Iron in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J.; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T.; Whittier, Frederick C.; Linfert, Douglas R.; Galphin, Claude M.; Athreya, Balaji P.; Nossuli, A. Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J.; Blumenthal, Samuel S.; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S.; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P.

    2015-01-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of −2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  15. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  16. Can ferric-superoxide act as a potential oxidant in P450(cam)? QM/MM investigation of hydroxylation, epoxidation, and sulfoxidation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wenzhen; Shaik, Sason

    2011-04-13

    In view of recent reports of high reactivity of ferric-superoxide species in heme and nonheme systems (Morokuma et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 11993-12005; Que et al. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 3618-3628; Nam et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 5958-5959; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 10668-10670), we use herein combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods to explore the potential reactivity of P450(cam) ferric-superoxide toward hydroxylation, epoxidation, and sulfoxidation. The calculations demonstrate that P450 ferric-superoxide is a sluggish oxidant compared with the high-valent oxoiron porphyrin cation-radical species. As such, unlike heme enzymes with a histidine axial ligand, the P450 superoxo species does not function as an oxidant in P450(cam). The origin of this different behavior of the superoxo species of P450 vis-à-vis other heme enzymes like tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO) is traced to the ability of the latter superoxo species to make a stronger FeOO-X (X = H,C) bond and to stabilize the corresponding bond-activation transition states by resonance with charge-transfer configurations. By contrast, the negatively charged thiolate ligand in the P450 superoxo species minimizes the mixing of charge transfer configurations in the transition state and raises the reaction barrier. However, as we demonstrate, an external electric field oriented along the Fe-O axis with a direction pointing from Fe toward O will quench Cpd I formation by slowing the reduction of ferric-superoxide and will simultaneously lower the barriers for oxidation by the latter species, thereby enabling observation of superoxo chemistry in P450. Other options for nascent superoxo reactivity in P450 are discussed. PMID:21413763

  17. Reaction mechanism for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Henein, H.; Jin, Zuo-Mei

    1985-12-01

    Reaction mechanisms for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite are proposed based on data obtained in leaching and dual cell experiments presented in this work and in a previous study. The results from the leaching experiments show that at low concentrations the rate is proportional to [Fe3+]T 0.5 and [Cl-]T 0.43 but at higher concentrations the reaction order with respect to both [Fe3+]T and [Cl-]T decreases. Using dual cell experiments which allow the half cell reactions to be separated, increased rates are observed when NaCl is added to the anolyte and to the catholyte. The increase in rate is attributed to a direct, anodic electrochemical reaction of Cl- with the mineral. When NaCl is added only to the catholyte, a decrease in the rate is observed due to a decrease in the E 0 of the cathode which is attributed to the formation of ferric-chloro complexes. Several possible electrochemical mechanisms and mathematical models based on the Butler-Volmer relation are delineated, and of these, one model is selected which accounts for the experimentally observed changes in reaction order for both Fe3+ and Cl-. This analysis incorporates a charge transfer process for each ion and an adsorption step for ferric and chloride ions. The inhibiting effect of Fe2+ noted by previous investigators is also accounted for through a similar model which includes back reaction kinetics for Fe2+. The proposed models successfully provide a theoretical basis for describing the role of Cl-, Fe3+, and Fe2+ as well as their interrelationship in zinc sulfide leaching reactions. Possible applications of these results to chloride leaching systems involving other sulfides or complex sulfides are considered.

  18. Corynebactin and a Serine Trilactone Based Analogue-Chirality and Molecular Modeling of ferric Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Martin E.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Kim, Sangoo S.; Dertz, Emily A.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2002-09-14

    The chirality of ferric siderophore complexes is a determinant for their cellular recognition and transport. Corynebactin (first isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium) contains L-threonine, unlike the closely related enterobactin, which contains L-serine. Also unlike enterobactin, ferric corynebactin is preferentially L at the iron center. Experimental (circular dichroism spectra and synthesis of a corynebactin/enterobactin hybrid) and theoretical (MM3 and density functional theory calculations) results explain ferric corynebactin's properties.

  19. U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-10

    An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

  20. Reaction of ferric heme proteins with nitrite and sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Siegel, L.M.

    1988-04-19

    Optical and EPR spectroscopy of ferric heme proteins of the porphyrin, oxyporphyrin, and isobacteriochlorin classes has indicated that nitrite reacts with these proteins at the heme iron. Sulfite has been conclusively proven to react only with proteins containing the isobacteriochlorin macrocycle. Quantitative EPR spectroscopy of these nitrite and sulfite adducts showed that most contained a substantial quantity of undetectable heme. It is suggested that protein-induced autoreduction of nitrite (but not sulfite) and a strained and/or uniaxial g-tensor are the principal ways by which the silent state is produced.

  1. [Performance and Mechanism of Ferric Tannate in the Removal of Inorganic Nitrogen from Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-na; Li, Lin; Liu, Jun-xin

    2015-11-01

    A novel adsorbent material-ferric tannate was synthesized, and performances and mechanisms of NH4(+) -N, NO2(-) -N and NO3(-) -N were investigated via batch adsorption experiments. The results indicated that ferric tannate exhibited preferential adsorption for NH4(+) -N and NO2(-) -N. When the mass ratios of ferric tannate to NH4(+) -N and ferric tannate to NO2(-) -N were both 200, the removal efficiencies were both higher than 95%. The adsorption behaviors were analyzed with adsorption kinetic models, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm adsorption models, and Weber-Morris equation. The results implied that NH4(+) -N and NO2(-) -N were adsorbed on the surface of ferric tannate in the forms of monolayer and multilayer, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was more suitable to describe the adsorption processes, and the external particle diffusion and surface adsorption played the key roles in the adsorption process. NH: -N could be combined with negative oxygen ions which distributed on the external surface of ferric tannate by the electrostatic interaction, whereas NO2(-) -N could be combined with ferric ions in ferric tannate by the electrostatic interaction and coordination. The present study provided scientific evidence for the application of ferric tannate as a potential adsorbent in the future. PMID:26911001

  2. Ferric chloride leach-electrolysis process for production of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, R.G.; Wong, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, under a cost-sharing, cooperative research agreement with lead producers, is studying a process to eliminate sulfur oxide generation and to minimize lead emission in the production of lead. The new process consists of leaching lead sulfide concentrate with a ferric chloride-sodium chloride solution to produce lead chloride, and fused-salt electrolysis of lead chloride to produce lead metal and chlorine. The chlorine is used to regenerate ferric chloride in the leach solution. The study is being conducted in a process investigation unit which treats 750 lb of concentrate a day. This paper discusses the results of operation of the process investigation unit, data on lead monitoring, and the precautions employed to control lead levels in the workplace atmosphere. The monitoring data for the initial phase of the investigation show lead levels well within OSHA permissible exposure limits. Continued development is necessary before the process can be considered for implementation.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of akaganeite-like ferric oxyhydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.; Chen, X.; Amonette, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Iron-based powders have been used as catalytic and stoichiometric reactants in a variety of organic reactions and are receiving additional attention as ion exchange materials or once-through adsorbents for clean-up of toxic or radioactive waste streams. Recent efforts have been directed toward the design of iron-based products, in particular iron sulfides, capable of performing as hydrocracking catalysts for coal liquefaction and heavy crude or resid cracking. Here the authors present structural studies of new materials having akaganeite-like structures and of their use as hydrocracking catalyst precursors. Akaganeite, {beta}-FeOOH, a natural ferric oxyhydroxide mineral, has a structure containing tunnel-like cavities in which chloride ions reside. Analogs of akaganeite in which carbonate or sulfate groups replace the chloride ions have also been synthesized. Both akaganeite and its substituted analogs are known to be precursors for active hydrocracking catalysts. The authors present powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) data confirming the synthesis of new ferric oxyhydroxides having structures similar to akaganeite, but contain molybdate and tungstate oxy-anions. They also present a new hydrothermal method to prepare this family of materials.

  4. Ion flotation and solvent extraction of ferric thiocyanate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkiewicz, K.

    1987-12-01

    The influence of thiocyanate and accompanying mineral acids concentration on the effectiveness of Fe(III) ion flotation, Fe(III) precipitation in cetyltrimethylammonium ferric-thiocyanate form (as sublate), and Fe(III) extraction using ethyl acetate was studied. The effectiveness of these processes improves with the extent of Fe(III) complexation by thiocyanates. In the presence of acids, flotation and precipitation are increased as follows: HClO/sub 4/ < HCl < HNO/sub 3/ < H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The position of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in this series changes with changing thiocyanate concentration. Extraction effectiveness is increased in the series: H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ < H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ < HNO/sub 3/, HClO/sub 4/, HCl. The following points are discussed: (a) the influence of acid anions competing with thiocyanate anions in Fe(III) complexation; (b) the influence of the competition between acid anions and complex ferric-thiocyanate anions in sublate formation; (c) the influence of hydrogen ion concentration increase in thiocyanate medium on the results of Fe(III) flotation, precipitation, and extraction; and (d) the influence of anion affinity for a collector on the solution surface properties and on Fe(III) flotation.

  5. The leaching of galena in ferric sulfate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrizac, J. E.; Chen, T. T.

    1995-04-01

    The leaching of galena (PbS) in ferric sulfate media was investigated over the temperature range 55 °C to 95 °C and for various Fe(SO4)1.5, H2SO4, FeSO4, and MgSO4 concentrations. Relatively slow kinetics were consistently observed; in most instances, the 1-2/3α-(1-α)2/3 vs time relationship, indicative of a diffusion-controlled reaction, was closely obeyed. The diffusion-controlled kinetics were attributed to the formation of a tenacious layer of PbSO4 and S0 on the surface of the galena. The generation and morphology of the reaction products were systematically determined by scanning electron microscopy, and complex growth mechanisms were illustrated. The leaching rate increased rapidly with increasing temperature, and the apparent activation energy is 61.2 kJ/mol. The rate increases as the 0.5 power of the ferric ion concentration but is nearly independent of the concentration of the FeSO4 reaction product. The rate is insensitive to H2SO4 concentrations <0.1 M but increases at higher acid levels. The presence of neutral sulfates, such as MgSO4, decreases the leaching rate to a modest extent.

  6. The dissolution of galena in ferric chloride media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrizac, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The dissolution of galena (PbS) in ferric chloride-hydrochloric acid media has been investigated over the temperature range 28 to 95 °C and for alkali chloride concentrations from 0 to 4.0 M. Rapid parabolic kinetics were observed under all conditions, together with predominantly (>95 pet) elemental sulfur formation. The leaching rate decreased slightly with increasing FeCl3 concentrations in the range 0.1 to 2.0 M, and was essentially independent of the concentration of the FeCl2 reaction product. The rate was relatively insensitive to HCl concentrations <3.0 M, but increased systematically with increasing concentrations of alkali or alkaline earth chlorides. Most significantly, the leaching rate decreased sharply and linearly with increasing initial concentrations of PbCl2 in the ferric chloride leaching media containing either 0.0 or 3.0 M NaCl. Although the apparent activation energy was in the range 40 to 45 kJ/mol (˜10 kcal/mol), this value was reduced to 16 kJ/mol (3.5 kcal/mol) when the influence of the solubility of lead chloride on the reaction rate was taken into consideration. The experimental results are consistent with rate control by the outward diffusion of the PbCl2 reaction product through the solution trapped in pores in the constantly thickening elemental sulfur layer formed on the surface of the galena.

  7. Particulate and THM precursor removal with ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, A.E.; Vrijenhoek, E.M.; Elimelech, M.; Tanaka, T.S.; Beuhler, M.D.

    1999-11-01

    Pilot-scale experiments were performed to investigate the effectiveness of enhanced coagulation in removing particles and trihalomethane (THM) precursors from two surface source waters: California State Project water and Colorado River water. The removal of suspended particles and natural organic matter at various ferric chloride doses and coagulation pHs was assessed through source water and filter effluent measurements of turbidity, particle count. UV{sub 254}, TOC, and THM formation potential. Overall, it was found that optimal removal of particles and THM precursors by enhanced coagulation with ferric chloride is obtained at high coagulant doses and low pH conditions. Generally, turbidity removal is more efficient and head loss is more moderate at ambient pH compared with pH 5.5. Additionally, filter effluent particle counts were found to be consistent with residual turbidity data. The removal of THM precursors by enhanced coagulation is significantly enhanced at pH 5.5 compared with ambient pH. The reduction in THM formation potential is consistent with the trends observed for the THM precursor removal data. Furthermore, specific UV absorbance was used to estimate the proportion of humic substances in the raw waters. Enhanced coagulation was found to be less effective for the source water with the lower specific UV absorbance.

  8. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  9. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  10. [Stabilization of Cadmium Contaminated Soils by Ferric Ion Modified Attapulgite (Fe/ATP)--Characterizations and Stabilization Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rong, Yang; Li, Rong-bo; Zhou, Yong-li; Chen, Jing; Wang, Lin-ling; Lu, Xiao-hua

    2015-08-01

    Ferric ion modified attapulgite (Fe/ATP) was prepared by impregnation and its structure and morphology were characterized. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effect of Cadmium( Cd) stabilization in soil with the addition of attapulgite (ATP) and Fe/ATP. The stabilization mechanism of Cd was further elucidated by comparing the morphologies and structure of ATP and Fe/ATP before and after Cd adsorption. Fe/ATP exhibited much better adsorption capacity than ATP, suggesting different adsorption mechanisms occurred between ATP and Fe/ATP. The leaching concentrations of Cd in soil decreased by 45% and 91% respectively, with the addition of wt. 20% ATP and Fe/ATP. The former was attributed to the interaction between Cd2 and --OH groups by chemical binding to form inner-sphere complexes in ATP and the attachment between Cd2+ and the defect sites in ATP framework. Whereas Cd stabilization with Fe/ATP was resulted from the fact that the active centers (--OH bonds or O- sites) on ATP could react with Fe3+ giving Fe--O--Cd-- bridges, which helped stabilize Cd in surface soil. What'more, the ferric oxides and metal hydroxides on the surface of ATP could interact with Cd, probably by the formation of cadmium ferrite. In conclusion, Fe/ATP, which can be easily prepared, holds promise as a potential low-cost and environmental friendly stabilizing agent for remediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:26592037

  11. DFT studies of trans and cis influences in the homolysis of the Co-C bond in models of the alkylcobalamins.

    PubMed

    Govender, Penny P; Navizet, Isabelle; Perry, Christopher B; Marques, Helder M

    2013-04-11

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (BP86/6-31+G(d,p)) and an analysis of the electron density using Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) are used to explore factors that influence the bond dissociation energy (BDE) of the Co-C bond in models for the cofactor in the coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes. An increase in the basicity of L in [L-Co(III)(corrin)-CH3](n+), L = NH3, NH2(-), and NH(2-), causes an elongation of the trans Co-C bond, but this does not necessarily cause the BDE to decrease. The bond between the metal and the N-donor of L, Co-Nα, usually becomes shorter after Co-C homolysis as the resulting five-coordinate product permits the metal ion to move toward L. This contraction increases with the basicity of L and stabilizes the five-coordinate product. The BDE is found to correlate well with two variables, the basicity of L and the difference in the Co-Nα bond length between the five-coordinate product and the six-coordinate ground state. When L is a naturally occurring amino acid or a model for its metal-coordinating side chain, the BDE is found to be moderately dependent on L and decrease with an increase in the softness of the donor atom of L. Sulfides produce a BDE < 30 kcal mol(-1), whereas neutral alcohol donors produce a stronger Co-C bond with a BDE of 34-35 kcal mol(-1). All other ligands are associated with a trans Co-C bond that is almost invariant in strength and with a BDE of 31-33 kcal mol(-1). Models of the type [H3N-Co(III)(N4)-CH3](n+), where N4 = bis(dimethylglyoxime), porphyrin, corrin, and corrole, show that the nature of the tetraaza equatorial ligand can change BDE values by over 8 kcal mol(-1); the BDE when N4 = bis(dimethylglyoxime) is significantly larger than for the other three systems, among which differences in BDE are quite small (2.4 kcal mol(-1)). The differential stabilization of the five-coordinate product by the shrinking of the Co-Nα bond (in corrin and in corrole) or its elongation (in

  12. Subsurface injection of dissolved ferric chloride to form a chemical barrier: Laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.; Morris, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A chemical barrier is a permeable zone of reactive materials emplaced in the subsurface to remove ground-water contaminants while allowing clean ground water to pass through. Because dissolved ferric chloride hydrolyzes to amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide when it contacts calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), it may be viable to emplace a zone of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (an absorbent for U, Mo, and other inorganic contaminants) into calcite-bearing geologic units by injecting ferric chloride through wells. For a chemical barrier to be successful, it must remain permeable and must be immobile. This investigation monitored chemical compositions, hydraulic conductivity, and iron mobility in laboratory columns and in a two-dimensional tank to determine the viability of injecting ferric chloride to form an amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide chemical barrier. The authors introduced a ferric chloride solution (1,345 mg/1[0.024 m] Fe) to calcite-bearing alluvial gravel to form a chemical barrier of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide, followed by solutions contaminated with U and Mo. The simulated chemical barriers decreased U and Mo concentrations to less than 0.05 mg/l (2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m) and 0.01 (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m), respectively; however, the breakthrough front is spread out with concentrations increasing to more than regulatory guideline values sooner than predicted. The hydraulic conductivity of calcite-bearing alluvial gravel decreased substantially during ferric chloride introduction because of the formation of carbon dioxide but increased to within factors of 1 to 5 of the original value as synthetic ground water flowed through the system. Amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide that formed in these experiments remained immobile at flow rates exceeding those typical of ground water. These laboratory results, in conjunction with site-specific characterization data, can be used to design chemical barriers emplaced by injection of ferric chloride.

  13. Ultrafast Heme Dynamics of Ferric Cytochrome c in Different Environments: Electronic, Vibrational, and Conformational Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal

    2015-12-21

    The excited-state dynamics of ferric cytochrome c (Cyt c), an important electron-transfer heme protein, in acidic to alkaline medium and in its unfolded form are investigated by using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, exciting the heme and Tryptophan (Trp) to understand the electronic, vibrational, and conformational relaxation of the heme. At 390 nm excitation, the electronic relaxation of heme is found to be ≈150 fs at different pH values, increasing to 480 fs in the unfolded form. Multistep vibrational relaxation dynamics of the heme, including fast and slow processes, are observed at pH 7. However, in the unfolded form and at pH 2 and 11, fast phases of vibrational relaxation dominate, revealing the energy dissipation occurring through the covalent bond interaction between the heme and the nearest amino acids. A significant shortening of the excited-state lifetime of Trp is observed at various pH values at 280 nm excitation due to resonance energy transfer to the heme. The longer time constant (25 ps) observed in the unfolded form is attributed to a complete global conformational relaxation of Cyt c. PMID:26416435

  14. Institutional Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, M. June

    Institutional bonding was examined at a public, urban commuter college with exceptionally high attrition and visibly low morale. Changes in bonding and attrition were measured 6 years after a 2-year effort to develop school identity and student feelings of membership. It was found that a simple index of campus morale is provided by level of…

  15. Ferric iron budget of Kaapvaal cratonic mantle peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, A.

    2012-04-01

    Oxidation fugacity plays an important role in many geochemical processes, such as partial melting and melt-rock interaction. How mantle peridotite responds during such processes is dependent on the amount of Fe2O3 present, since it occurs in much smaller quantities than Fe2+ and affects buffering capacity. This is particularly the case since redox reactions have been directly implicated in the rejuvenation and eventual breakup of cratons (e.g. Foley 2008, 2011). In addition, oxygen fugacity also influences the incorporation of OH in nominally anhydrous minerals, which can affect the mechanical integrity of cratonic blocks (Peslier et al. 2010). These issues are important for understanding the evolution of the upper mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton. Canil and coworkers (1994, 1996) reported bulk ferric iron contents for 11 peridotites (10 garnet-bearing and 1 spinel-bearing) from the Kaapvaal. The purpose of this study is to build on their pioneering work to better assess the ferric iron budget of Kaapvaal cratonic mantle and to improve our understanding of how ferric iron is distributed within the peridotitic assemblage. Our data set includes more than 30 additional samples, predominantly garnet peridoites, from 7 localities in South Africa and Lesotho. Bulk Fe2O3 contents were determined by combining measured Fe3+ contents of individual minerals (by Mössbauer spectroscopy) with their respective modal proportion in each sample. Fe3+ contents of garnet and clinopyroxene reported in Woodland & Koch (2003), Lazarov et al. (2009) and Woodland (2009) were combined with new data for orthopyroxene (opx) and modal mineralogy to make this assessment. Opx has Fe3+/Fetot of 0.04-0.1 and Fe3+ contents are comparable between Opx and coexisting Cpx. Calculated whole rock Fe2O3 contents range from 0.02 to 0.29 wt % with contents systematically decreasing with increasing degrees of depletion (as indicated by increasing MgO and decreasing Al2O3 content). For a given MgO content

  16. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. PMID:24768702

  17. Functional analysis of the ferric uptake requlator gene, fur, in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the f...

  18. Ferric oxide quantum dots in stable phosphate glass system and their magneto-optical study

    SciTech Connect

    Garaje, Sunil N.; Apte, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Ganpathy; Panmand, Rajendra P.; Naik, Sonali D.; Mahajan, Satish M.; Chand, Ramesh; Kale, Bharat B.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: We report synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles (NCs) content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in Verdet constant with concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and there is a threefold enhancement in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite. Highlights: ► We synthesize ferric oxide embedded low melting stable phosphate glass nanocomposite. ► Glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide show particle size in the range of 4–12 nm. ► The host phosphate glass itself shows fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm). ► Glasses doped with 0.25% ferric oxide show high Verdet constant (30.525°/T cm). ► The as synthesis glasses may have potential application in magneto optical devices. -- Abstract: Herein, we report the synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. The optical study clearly showed red shift in optical cut off with increasing ferric oxide concentration. The band gap of the host glass was observed to be 3.48 eV and it shifted to 3.14 eV after doping with ferric oxide. The glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide showed particle size of 4–6 nm and 8–12 nm, respectively. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in the Verdet constant as per increasing concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and threefold enhancement was observed in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite.

  19. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  20. Selective adsorption of phosphoproteins on gel-immobilized ferric chelate

    SciTech Connect

    Muszynska, G.; Andersson, L.; Porath, J.

    1986-11-04

    Ferric ions are very strongly adsorbed to iminodiacetic acid substituted agarose. This firmly immobilized complex acts as a selective immobilized metal affinity adsorbent for phosphoproteins. Chromatography based on this principle is illustrated by the adsorption-desorption behavior of egg yolk phosvitin before and after dephosphorylation as well as by the change in the chromatographic pattern before and after enzymic phosphorylation of selected histones. The strength of binding is dependent on the phosphate content. The difference is binding before and after phosphorylation of a single amino acid residue is demonstrated. Affinity elution can be accomplished by inclusion in the buffer of (1) phosphoserine or (2) a displacing metal ion such as Mg/sup 2 +/.

  1. Haemostatic agents on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Akansha; Sekhar, Anand; Ginjupalli, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin surface contaminated with haemostatic agents can interfere with the bonding of self-adhesive resin cement. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various haemostatic agents such as Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate and Tannic acid on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting agent. Material and Methods The buccal surfaces of extracted premolars were flattened to expose the dentine. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. In Group I Aluminium Chloride was applied on the flattened dentinal surface, in Group II Ferric Sulphate was applied to exposed dentin surface, in Group III tannic acid was applied on to the dentinal surface, and the control group, i.e. Group IV was rinsed with saline. After the surface treatment, all the teeth were air dried. Then a predetermined dimension of RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the pretreated dentin surfaces. The samples were then stored under 370C in distilled water for 24 hours under 100 % humidity. Following this each sample was tested for shear bond strength with an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Results There was significant difference in the shear bond strength of control and tannic acid contaminated group (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant differences between the shear bond strength between control and aluminium chloride and ferric sulphate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The usage of haemostatic agent can negatively affect the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X) on to the dentin surface. As per the study Tannic acid significantly weakened the bond between the self-adhesive resin and dentin. Key words:Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, self-adhesive resin cement, shear bond strength, Tannic acid. PMID:26330930

  2. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  3. Synchrotron Characterization of Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen budget of the Martian interior is distributed among several phases: melts, hydrous minerals, and nominally anhydrous minerals like olivine, pyroxene, and garnet. All these phases are vulnerable to loss of hydrogen during shock, excavation and transport via the mechanism of dehydrogenation, in which the charge on the H protons is left behind as polarons on Fe atoms. Thus, both H and F(3x) must be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many marital phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3x) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Here, we measure and profile H and Fe(3x) abundances in and across individual grains of glass and silicates in Martian meteorites. We use the new technology of synchrotron microFI'lR spectroscopy to measure the hydrogen contents of hydrous and nominally anhydrous minerals in martian meteorites on 30-100 microns thick, doubly polished thin sections on spots down to 3 x 3 microns. Synchrotron microXANES was used to analyze Fe(3x) on the same scale, and complementary SIMS D/H data will be collected where possible, though at a slightly larger scale. Development of this combination of techniques is critical because future sample return missions will generate only microscopic samples for study. Results have been used to quantitatively assess the distribution of hydrogen and ferric iron among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars.

  4. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond. PMID:26910496

  5. Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for the characterization of ferric tannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; Navarro, César

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy are use for the characterization and qualitative analysis of hydrolysable and condensed tannates. The two classes of tannates may be differentiated from the characteristic IR pattern. Mössbauer proof that a mixture of mono- and bis-type ferric tannate complexes, and an iron(II)-tannin complex are obtained from the interaction of hydrolysable tannins (tannic acid and chestnut tannin) and condensed tannins (mimosa and quebracho) with a ferric nitrate solution. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also obtained.

  6. Ferric Leghemoglobin in Plant-Attached Leguminous Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kk.; Shearman, L. L.; Erickson, B. K.; Klucas, R. V.

    1995-01-01

    Leghemoglobin (Lb) is essential for nitrogen fixation by intact leguminous nodules. To determine whether ferric Lb (Lb3+) was detectable in nodules under normal or stressed conditions, we monitored the status of Lb in intact nodules attached to sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis) and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots exposed to various conditions. The effects of N2 and O2 streams and elevated nicotinate levels on root-attached nodules were tested to determine whether the spectrophotometric technique was showing the predicted responses of Lb. The soybean and sweet clover nodules' Lb spectra indicated predominantly ferrous Lb and LbO2 in young (34 d) plants. As the nodule aged beyond 45 d, it was possible to induce Lb3+ with a 100% O2 stream (15 min). At 65 d without inducement, the nodule Lb status indicated the presence of some Lb3+ along with ferrous Lb and oxyferrous Lb. Nicotinate and fluoride were used as ligands to identify Lb3+. Computer-calculated difference spectra were used to demonstrate the changes in Lb spectra under different conditions. Some conditions that increased absorbance in the 626 nm region (indicating Lb3+ accumulation) were root-fed ascorbate and dehydroascorbate, plant exposure to darkness, and nodule water immersion. PMID:12228593

  7. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Lum, B.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner- and outer-container materials of current nuclear waste package design was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 516 carbon steel (UNS K01800), and high-performance UNS N08825, UNS N06985, UNS N06030, UNS N06455, UNS N06625, UNS N06022, and UNS R53400. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel UNS N08825 and N06985 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in UNS N06030 and N06455. UNS N06625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base UNS N06022 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. UNS R53400 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed a significant amount of precipitated particles, especially at higher temperatures.

  8. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-10-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.

  9. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  10. Ferric Phosphate Hydroxide Microstructures Affect Their Magnetic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Youjuan; Run, Zhen; Li, Pengwei; Guo, Qifei; Pang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Uniformly sized and shape-controlled nanoparticles are important due to their applications in catalysis, electrochemistry, ion exchange, molecular adsorption, and electronics. Several ferric phosphate hydroxide (Fe4(OH)3(PO4)3) microstructures were successfully prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Using controlled variations in the reaction conditions, such as reaction time, temperature, and amount of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the crystals can be grown as almost perfect hyperbranched microcrystals at 180 °C (without CTAB) or relatively monodisperse particles at 220 °C (with CTAB). The large hyperbranched structure of Fe4(OH)3(PO4)3 with a size of ∼19 μm forms with the “fractal growth rule” and shows many branches. More importantly, the magnetic properties of these materials are directly correlated to their size and micro/nanostructure morphology. Interestingly, the blocking temperature (TB) shows a dependence on size and shape, and a smaller size resulted in a lower TB. These crystals are good examples that prove that physical and chemical properties of nano/microstructured materials are related to their structures, and the precise control of the morphology of such functional materials could allow for the control of their performance. PMID:26246988

  11. Iron fortification of flour with a complex ferric orthophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Rossander-Hulthen, L.; Gramatkovski, E.

    1989-07-01

    The unexpectedly low bioavailability in humans of elemental iron powder prompted us to search for other Fe compounds suitable for Fe fortification of flour that fulfill the two requirements of insolubility in water (due to high water content of flour) and good bioavailability in humans. Systematic studies of compatibility, solubility, and bioavailability led to this study of a microcrystalline complex ferric orthophosphate (CFOP), Fe/sub 3/H/sub 8/(NH/sub 4/)-(PO/sub 4/)6.6H/sub 2/O, a well-defined compound. This compound was labeled with /sup 59/Fe, and the native Fe in meals was labeled with /sup 55/FeCl3. The ratio of absorbed /sup 59/Fe to absorbed /sup 55/Fe is a direct measure of the fraction of CFOP that joins the nonheme Fe pool and that is made potentially available for absorption. The relative bioavailability of CFOP varied from 30% to 60% when labeled wheat rolls were served with different meals. The CFOP meets practical requirements of an Fe fortificant for flour well, with regard to both compatibility and bioavailability in humans.

  12. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  13. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel. PMID:25647024

  14. Arsenic sequestration by ferric iron plaque on cattail roots.

    PubMed

    Blute, Nicole Keon; Brabander, Daniel J; Hemond, Harold F; Sutton, Stephen R; Newville, Matthew G; Rivers, Mark L

    2004-11-15

    Typha latifolia (cattail) sequesters arsenic within predominantlyferric iron root coatings, thus decreasing mobility of this toxic element in wetland sediments. Element-specific XRF microtomographic imaging illustrated a high spatial correlation between iron and arsenic in root plaques, with little arsenic in the interior of the roots. XANES analyses demonstrated that the plaque was predominantly ferric iron and contained approximately 20% As(III) and 80% As(V), which is significant because the two oxidation states form species that differ in toxicity and mobility. For the first time, spatial distribution maps of As oxidation states were developed, indicating that As(III) and As(V) are both fairly heterogeneous throughoutthe plaque. Chemical extractions showed that As was strongly adsorbed in the plaque rather than coprecipitated. Iron and arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 0.8 g Fe g(-1) wet plaque and 30 to 1200 microg As g(-1) wet plaque, consistent with a mechanism of As adsorption onto Fe(III) oxyhydroxide plaque. Because this mechanism decreases the concentrations of both As(III) and As(V) in groundwater, we propose that disruption of vegetation could increase the concentrations of mobile arsenic. PMID:15573609

  15. Formation of ferric oxides from aqueous solutions: A polyhedral approach by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. I. Hydrolysis and formation of ferric gels

    SciTech Connect

    Combes, J.M.; Manceau, A.; Calas, G. ); Bottero, J.Y. )

    1989-03-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to follow the evolution of local structural environments around ferric ions during the formation of ferric hydrous oxide gels from 1 M chloride and 0.1 M nitrate solutions. Fe K-XANES and EXAFS confirm that ferric ions remain 6-fold coordinated during this evolution. With increasing OH availability in the solution, Cl{sup {minus}} anions tend gradually to be exchanged for (O, OH, OH{sub 2}) ligands. Below OH/Fe = 1, no structural order is detected beyond the first coordination sphere. Above this ratio, two Fe-Fe distances at 3.05 {angstrom} and 3.44 {angstrom} are observed and correspond to the presence of edge- and vertex-sharing Fe-octahedra. XAS results show that ferric gels and highly polymerized aqueous species are short-range ordered. The main contribution to disorder in the gels arises from the small size of coherently scattering domains also responsible for their X-ray amorphous character. From the initial to the final stage of hydrolysis, particles possess a nearly spherical shape with a minimum average diameter ranging from 10-30 {angstrom} for polymers formed from chloride and nitrate solutions. As polymerization proceeds, the local order extends to several tens of angstroms and the particle structures becomes progressively closer to that of akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH) or goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH). This local structure is distinct from that of the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH)-like structure of ferric gels precipitated after oxidation of divalent Fe solutions. The growth of the crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides from gels takes place by the progressive long-range ordering in the ferric polymers without modifying the short-range order around Fe.

  16. Total X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of amorphous ferric arsenate and amorphous ferric phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Schröder, Christian; Marc Michel, F.

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA, FeAsO4·xH2O) is an important As precipitate in a range of oxic As-rich environments, especially acidic sulfide-bearing mine wastes. Its structure has been proposed to consist of small polymers of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra (rFe-Fe ∼3.6 Å) to which arsenate is attached as a monodentate binuclear 2C complex (‘chain model’). Here, we analyzed the structure of AFA and analogously prepared amorphous ferric phosphates (AFP, FePO4·xH2O) by a combination of high-energy total X-ray scattering, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of total X-ray scattering data revealed that the coherently scattering domain size of AFA and AFP is about 8 Å. The PDFs of AFA lacked Fe-Fe pair correlations at r ∼3.6 Å indicative of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra, which strongly supports a local scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) structure. Likewise, the PDFs and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of AFP were consistent with a local strengite (FePO4·2H2O) structure of isolated FeO6 octahedra being corner-linked to PO4 tetrahedra (rFe-P = 3.25(1) Å). Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of AFA and AFP indicated a strong superparamagnetism. While AFA only showed a weak onset of magnetic hyperfine splitting at 5 K, magnetic ordering of AFP was completely absent at this temperature. Mössbauer spectroscopy may thus offer a convenient way to identify and quantify AFA and AFP in mineral mixtures containing poorly crystalline Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides. In summary, our results imply a close structural relationship between AFA and AFP and suggest that these amorphous materials serve as templates for the formation of scorodite and strengite (phosphosiderite) in strongly acidic low-temperature environments.

  17. Nitric oxide binding to the cardiolipin complex of ferric cytochrome C.

    PubMed

    Silkstone, G; Kapetanaki, S M; Husu, I; Vos, M H; Wilson, M T

    2012-08-28

    Cardiolipin, a phospholipid specific to the mitochondrion, interacts with the small electron transfer heme protein cytochrome c through both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Once in a complex with cardiolipin, cytochrome c has been shown to undergo a conformational change that leads to the rupture of the bond between the heme iron and the intrinsic sulfur ligand of a methionine residue and to enhance the peroxidatic properties of the protein considered important to its apoptotic activity. Here we report that the ferric cytochrome c/cardiolipin complex binds nitric oxide tightly through a multistep process in which the first step is the relatively slow displacement (5 s(-1)) from heme coordination of an intrinsic ligand that replaces methionine in the complex. Nanosecond photolysis of the nitrosyl adduct demonstrated that a fraction of the nitric oxide escapes from the heme pocket and subsequently recombines to the heme in second-order processes (k = 1.8 × 10(6) and 5.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) that, under these conditions, were much faster than recombination of the intrinsic ligand with which they compete. Ultrafast (femtosecond) laser photolysis showed that the geminate recombination of nitric oxide to the heme occurred with time constants (τ = 22 and 72 ps) and that ~23% of the photolyzed nitric oxide escaped into the bulk phase. This high value for the escape fraction relative to other heme proteins indicates the open nature of the heme pocket in this complex. These results are summarized in a scheme and are discussed in terms of the possible modulation of the apoptotic activity of cytochrome c by nitric oxide. PMID:22803508

  18. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  19. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-02101 Ford*, R. Rates of Hydrous Ferric Oxide Crystallization and the Influence on Coprecipitated Arsenate. Environmental Science & Technology 36 (11):2459-2463 (2002). EPA/600/J-02/240. Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous fer...

  20. Preparation of ferric-activated sludge-based adsorbent from biological sludge for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Xu, Guoren; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Ferric activation was novelly used to produce sludge-based adsorbent (SBA) from biological sludge through pyrolysis, and the adsorbents were applied to remove tetracycline from aqueous solution. The pyrolysis temperature and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) greatly influenced the surface area and pore characteristics of SBA. Ferric activation could promote the porous structure development of adsorbents, and the optimum preparation conditions were pyrolysis temperature 750°C and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) 0.5. In batch experiments, ferric-activated SBA showed a higher adsorption capacity for tetracycline than non-activated SBA, because the enhanced mesoporous structure favored the diffusion of tetracycline into the pores, the iron oxides and oxygen-containing functional groups in the adsorbents captured tetracycline by surface complexation. The results indicate that ferric activation is an effective approach for preparing adsorbents from biological sludge to remove tetracycline, providing a potential option for waste resource recovery. PMID:27038265

  1. Granulation and ferric oxides loading enable biochar derived from cotton stalk to remove phosphate from water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Li, Nan; Li, Lei; An, Jing-Kun; Zhao, Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2015-02-01

    Granulation of biochar powder followed by immobilization of ferric oxides on the macroporous granular biochar (Bg-FO-1) substantially enhanced phosphate removal from water. BET analysis confirmed that both granulation and ferric oxides loading can increase the surface areas and pore volumes effectively. Bg-FO-1 was proven to be a favorable adsorbent for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption capacity was substantially increased from 0 mg/g of raw biochar powder to 0.963 mg/g (Bg-FO-1). When the ferric oxides loading was prior to granulation, the adsorption capacity was decreased by 59-0.399 mg/g, possibly due to the decrease of micropore and mesopore area as well as the overlaying of binders to the activated sites produced by ferric oxides. PMID:25446788

  2. An investigation of carbonaceous materials reducing ferric ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, A. V.; Chilton, J. P.; Fray, D. J.

    1988-10-01

    By substituting the ferrous to ferric oxidation for anodic oxygen evolution in an electrowinning cell, it is possible to reduce the cell voltage by about 1 V. However, it is then necessary to reduce the ferric back to ferrous and, depending on the circumstances, acid needs to be cogenerated. Various possible reductants are discussed, and experiments are described on the use of lignite and other carbonaceous materials to reduce the ferric ion. It was found that lignite was able to reduce the ferric ion, in situ in the electrowinning cell, but that the rate of reduction was compatible only with a maximum current density of about 40 Am-2. The efficiency was increased by periodically interrupting the current flow.

  3. Method of treating inflammatory diseases using a radiolabeled ferric hydroxide calloid

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  4. Ferric-Pyoverdine Recognition by Fpv Outer Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Hartney, Sierra L.; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K.; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W.; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  5. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2013-02-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  6. Effect of liposome-albumin coatings on ferric ion retention and release from chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1996-01-01

    Ferric chloride was embedded in a chitosan matrix to develop a prolonged-release form. The in vitro release profiles of ferric ions from chitosan beads were monitored in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4, using a UV spectrophotometer. The amount of drug release was much higher initially, followed by a constant slow release profile for a prolonged period. The initial burst release was substantially modified with liposome and albumin coatings. From scanning electron microscope studies, it appears that the ferric ions diffuse out slowly to the dissolution medium through the micropores of the chitosan matrix. Further, the liposome forms a phospholipid membrane layer in the pores of chitosan beads and encapsulates the ferric ions within their vesicles and controls the release profile. The chitosan beads loaded with ferric ions substantially inhibited the polyurethane-associated calcification, in an in vitro model system. The released ferric ions, appeared to alter the protein-surface binding and improved the biocompatibility of the matrix. The results propose the possibility of modifying the polymer matrix to obtain a desired controlled release of the drug for a prolonged period. PMID:8962949

  7. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  8. Concentration of MS2 phage in river water by a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method, with MS2 phage leaching from ferric colloid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takumi; Nishiyama, Masateru; Kono, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The concentration of MS2 phage as a model RNA virus in river water using a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method was examined. The MS2 phage concentrations were determined by the plaque-forming unit (PFU) method and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. When ferric colloid adsorption was performed prior to foam separation, MS2 phage was effectively removed from river water and concentrated in the generated foam within 7 min. The removal efficiency was >99% at the optimum iron and casein concentrations of 5 mg-Fe/L and 10 mg/L, respectively. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the collected ferric colloid dissolved using deferoxamine, the MS2 concentration in the colloid-dissolved solution was 190-fold higher than that found in raw water according to RT-qPCR analysis. This is a novel method for concentrating RNA viruses to facilitate their detection in river water using coagulation and foam separation combined with chelate dissolution of ferric flocs. PMID:26868517

  9. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  10. Quantitative determination of cesium binding to ferric hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Patrick J; Yang, Yongsheng; Progar, Joseph J; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Leutzinger, Eldon; Place, David A; Duffy, Eric P; Houn, Florence; Loewke, Sally A; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Ellison, Christopher D; Khan, Mansoor A; Hussain, Ajaz S; Lyon, Robbe C

    2008-05-12

    Ferric hexacyanoferrate (Fe4III[FeII(CN)6]3), also known as insoluble Prussian blue (PB) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drug product, Radiogardase. Radiogardase is the first FDA approved medical countermeasure for the treatment of internal contamination with radioactive cesium (Cs) or thallium in the event of a major radiological incident such as a "dirty bomb". A number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have evaluated the use of PB as an investigational decorporation agent to enhance the excretion of metal cations. There are few sources of published in vitro data that detail the binding capacity of cesium to insoluble PB under various chemical and physical conditions. The study objective was to determine the in vitro binding capacity of PB APIs and drug products by evaluating certain chemical and physical factors such as medium pH, particle size, and storage conditions (temperature). In vitro experimental conditions ranged from pH 1 to 9, to cover the range of pH levels that PB may encounter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans. Measurements of cesium binding were made between 1 and 24h, to cover gastric and intestinal tract residence time using a validated atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) method. The results indicated that pH, exposure time, storage temperature (affecting moisture content) and particle size play significant roles in the cesium binding to both the PB API and the drug product. The lowest cesium binding was observed at gastric pH of 1 and 2, whereas the highest cesium binding was observed at physiological pH of 7.5. It was observed that dry storage conditions resulted in a loss of moisture from PB, which had a significant negative effect on the PB cesium binding capacity at time intervals consistent with gastric residence. Differences were also observed in the binding capacity of PB with different particle sizes. Significant batch to batch differences were also observed in the binding capacity of some PB API and

  11. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Edwards, J. O.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Froschl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mossbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mossbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water

  12. Modeling ferrous ferric iron chemistry with application to martian surface geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Giles M.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Catling, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Exploration Rover, and Mars Express missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major recent mission findings are the presence of jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt), which requires formation from an acid-sulfate brine, and the occurrence of hematite and goethite on Mars. Recent ferric iron models have largely focused on 25 °C, which is a major limitation for models exploring the geochemical history of cold bodies such as Mars. Until recently, our work on low-temperature iron-bearing brines involved ferrous but not ferric iron, also obviously a limitation. The objectives of this work were to (1) add ferric iron chemistry to an existing ferrous iron model (FREZCHEM), (2) extend this ferrous/ferric iron geochemical model to lower temperatures (<0 °C), and (3) use the reformulated model to explore ferrous/ferric iron chemistries on Mars. The FREZCHEM model is an equilibrium chemical thermodynamic model parameterized for concentrated electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer approach for the temperature range from <-70 to 25 °C and the pressure range from 1 to 1000 bars. Ferric chloride and sulfate mineral parameterizations were based, in part, on experimental data. Ferric oxide/hydroxide mineral parameterizations were based exclusively on Gibbs free energy and enthalpy data. New iron parameterizations added 23 new ferrous/ferric minerals to the model for this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-H-Cl-SO 4-NO 3-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-O 2-CH 4-H 2O system. The model was used to develop paragenetic sequences for Rio Tinto waters on Earth and a hypothetical Martian brine derived from acid weathering of basaltic minerals. In general, model simulations were in agreement with field evidence on Earth and Mars in predicting precipitation of stable iron minerals such as jarosites, goethite, and hematite. In addition, paragenetic simulations for Mars suggest that other iron minerals such as

  13. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  14. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  15. Evaluation of ferric and ferrous iron therapies in women with iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Berber, Ilhami; Diri, Halit; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Aydogdu, Ismet; Kaya, Emin; Kuku, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Different ferric and ferrous iron preparations can be used as oral iron supplements. Our aim was to compare the effects of oral ferric and ferrous iron therapies in women with iron deficiency anaemia. Methods. The present study included 104 women diagnosed with iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation. In the evaluations performed to detect the aetiology underlying the iron deficiency anaemia, it was found and treated. After the detection of the iron deficiency anaemia aetiology and treatment of the underlying aetiology, the ferric group consisted of 30 patients treated with oral ferric protein succinylate tablets (2 × 40 mg elemental iron/day), and the second group consisted of 34 patients treated with oral ferrous glycine sulphate tablets (2 × 40 mg elemental iron/day) for three months. In all patients, the following laboratory evaluations were performed before beginning treatment and after treatment. Results. The mean haemoglobin and haematocrit increases were 0.95 g/dL and 2.62% in the ferric group, while they were 2.25 g/dL and 5.91% in the ferrous group, respectively. A significant difference was found between the groups regarding the increase in haemoglobin and haematocrit values (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Data are submitted on the good tolerability, higher efficacy, and lower cost of the ferrous preparation used in our study. PMID:25006339

  16. Treatment of Iron Deficiency With Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in General Practice: A Retrospective Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Martina; Meli, Damian N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is a frequent problem in general practice. Oral supplementation may in some cases not be well tolerated or not be efficient. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose may be an alternative for iron supplementation in general practice. The aim of the present study was to analyze the indications for and the efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in a primary care center. Methods We retropectively analyzed electronic data from 173 patients given intravenous ferric carboxymaltose between 2011 and 2013 in primary care center with 18 GPs in Bern, Switzerland. Results Of all patients, 34% were treated intravenously due to an inappropriate increase in ferritin levels after oral therapy, 24% had side effects from oral treatment, 10% were treated intravenously due to the patients explicit wish, and in 39% of all cases, no obvious reason of intravenous instead of oral treatment could be found. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose led to a significant increase in hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. Side effects of intravenous treatment were found in 2% of all cases. Conclusion We conclude that treatment with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is an efficient alternative for patients with iron deficiency in general practice, when oral products are not well tolarated or effective. As treatment with iron carboxymaltose is more expensive and potentially dangerous due to side effects, the indication should be placed with (more) care. PMID:25368700

  17. Synthesis and characterization of γ-ferric oxide nanoparticles and their effect on Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Pavani, Tambur; Rao, K Venkateswara; Chakra, Ch Shilpa; Prabhu, Y T

    2016-05-01

    γ-Ferric oxide nanoparticles are synthesized through modern and facile ayurvedic route followed by normal and special purification steps, which are both cost-effective and eco-friendly. These synthesized γ-ferric oxide nanoparticles were applied on Solanum lycopersicum to search the effect on chlorophyll content. This process involves multiple filtration and calcination steps. The synthesized samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and particle size analysis (PSA) to identify the purification step's influence on the structural, optical, morphological, magnetic, and particle size properties of ferric oxide nanoparticles (γ-phase). X-ray diffraction has revealed that ferric oxide nanoparticles have rhombohedral structure of α-phase (hematite) in initial purification process later transformed into cubic structure γ-phase (maghemite). UV-vis spectroscopy analysis has clearly shown that by repetitive purification steps, λmax has increased from 230 to 340 nm. TEM result has an intercorrelation with XRD results. γ-Ferric oxide nanoparticles were tested on Solanum lycopersicum (tomato seeds). The changes in the contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and total carotene were studied using spectral measurements at two different dosages-0.5 and 2 M. As a result, at 0.5-M concentration, magnetic nanoparticles exhibit fruitful results by increasing the crop yield and being more resistant to chlorosis. PMID:26296507

  18. Basics of Fidelity Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Steven P.

    Fidelity bonds are important for an agency to hold to protect itself against any financial loss that can result from dishonest acts by its employees. Three types of fidelity bonds are available to an agency: (1) public official bonds; (2) dishonesty bonds; and (3) faithful performance bonds. Public official bonds are required by state law to be…

  19. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  20. Iron metabolism in aerobes: managing ferric iron hydrolysis and ferrous iron autoxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kosman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron’s aqueous chemistry, occurs as ‘rust’, insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H2O)6]3+. Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting FeII which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the ‘rusting out’ of FeIII and the ROS-generating autoxidation of FeII so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology. PMID:23264695

  1. Juvenile ferric iron prevents microbiota dysbiosis and colitis in adult rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ettreiki, Chourouk; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Mangin, Irène; Coëffier, Moïse; Delayre-Orthez, Carine; Anton, Pauline M

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether juvenile chronic ferric iron ingestion limit colitis and dysbiosis at adulthood in rats and mice. METHODS: Two sets of experiments were designed. In the first set, recently weaned mice were either orally administered ferrous (Fe2+) iron salt or ferric (Fe3+) microencapsulated iron for 6 wk. The last week of experiments trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis was induced. In the second set, juvenile rats received the microencapsulated ferric iron for 6 wk and were also submitted to TNBS colitis during the last week of experiments. In both sets of experiments, animals were sacrificed 7 d after TNBS instillation. Severity of the inflammation was assessed by scoring macroscopic lesions and quantifying colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Alteration of the microflora profile was estimated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) by measuring the evolution of total caecal microflora, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and enterobacteria. RESULTS: Neither ferrous nor ferric iron daily exposures at the juvenile period result in any effect in control animals at adulthood although ferrous iron repeated administration in infancy limited weight gain. Ferrous iron was unable to limit the experimental colitis (1.71 ± 0.27 MPO U/mg protein vs 2.47 ± 0.22 MPO U/mg protein in colitic mice). In contrast, ferric iron significantly prevented the increase of MPO activity (1.64 ± 0.14 MPO U/mg protein) in TNBS-induced colitis. Moreover, this positive effect was observed at both the doses of ferric iron used (75 and 150 mg/kg per day po - 6 wk). In the study we also compared, in both rats and mice, the consequences of chronic repeated low level exposure to ferric iron (75 mg/kg per day po - 6 wk) on TNBS-induced colitis and its related dysbiosis. We confirmed that ferric iron limited the TNBS-induced increase of MPO activity in both the rodent species. Furthermore, we assessed the ferric iron incidence on TNBS-induced intestinal microbiota dysbiosis

  2. Colour and stability assessment of blue ferric anthocyanin chelates in liquid pectin-stabilised model systems.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Brauch, J; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2013-06-01

    The formation of blue coloured ferric anthocyanin chelates and their colour stability during storage and thermal treatment were monitored in a pH range relevant to food (3.6-5.0). Liquid model systems were composed of different types of Citrus pectins, juices (J) and the respective phenolic extracts (E) from elderberry (EB), black currant (BC), red cabbage (RC) and purple carrot (PC) in the presence of ferric ions. For EB, BC and PC, pure blue colours devoid of a violet tint were exclusively observed for the phenolic extracts and at pH values ≥ 4.5 in model systems containing high methoxylated and amidated pectins, respectively. Colour and its stability strongly depended on the amount of ferric ions and the plant source; however, colour decay could generally be described as a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Despite optimal colour hues for RC-E and RC-J, storage and heat stabilities were poor. Highest colour intensities and best stabilities were observed for model systems containing PC-E at a molar anthocyanin:ferric ion ratio of 1:2. Ascorbic and lactic acids interfered with ferric ions, thus significantly affecting blue colour evolution and stability. Colour loss strongly depended on heat exposure with activation energies ranging between 60.5 and 78.4 kJ/mol. The comprehensive evaluation of the interrelationship of pigment source, pH conditions and pectin type on chelate formation and stability demonstrated that ferric anthocyanin chelates are promising natural blue food colourants. PMID:23411339

  3. In vivo NMR study of yeast fermentative metabolism in the presence of ferric irons.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maso; Martini, Silvia; Bonechi, Claudia; Braconi, Daniela; Santucci, Annalisa; Rossi, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Mathematical modelling analysis of experimental data, obtained with in vivo NMR spectroscopy and 13C-labelled substrates, allowed us to describe how the fermentative metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, taken as eukaryotic cell model, is influenced by stress factors. Experiments on cellular cultures subject to increasing concentrations of ferric ions were conducted in order to study the effect of oxidative stress on the dynamics of the fermentative process. The developed mathematical model was able to simulate the cellular activity, the metabolic yield and the main metabolic fluxes occurring during fermentation and to describe how these are modulated by the presence of ferric ions. PMID:21451251

  4. Elasticity of Single-Crystal Phase D across the Spin Transitions of Ferrous and Ferric Iron in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Lin, J. F.; Liu, J.; Mao, Z.; Guo, X.; Yoshino, T.; McCammon, C. A.; Xiao, Y.; Prakapenka, V.

    2014-12-01

    Phase D, the densest hydrous magnesium silicate synthesized at the Earth's mantle P-T conditions thus far, has been proposed to be a potential candidate for transportation of H2O into the lower mantle by subduction of the hydrated oceanic lithosphere. A certain amount of iron, the most abundant transition metal element in the Earth's interior, is expected to be incorporated into the phase D. Here we synthesized high-quality single-crystal Fe,Al-bearing Phase D (Mg0.89Fe0.11Al0.37Si1.55H2.65O6, ~13.3wt% H2O) with grain sizes of ~200 micron using the Kawai multianvil apparatus at 21 GPa and 1200 °C at the Institute for Study of the Earth's Interior, University of Oakayama, Japan. Conventional Mössbauer results indicate that the sample contains both ferrous and ferric iron that occupy the octahedral sites of the hexagonal structure. In situ high-pressure single crystal XRD and NFS experiments were performed up to megabar pressures at 13IDD beamline (GSECARS) and 16IDD beamline (HPCAT) of the Advanced Photon Source, respectively. Both experimental results clearly show that both Fe2+ and Fe3+ undergo a HS-LS transition at high pressures. High-resolution XRD results further indicate an abnormal compression behavior at approximately 37 GPa that can be linked with the previously proposed hydrogen bond symmetrization. Elasticity of phase D has a marked influence by the two-step spin transitions of both Fe2+ and Fe3+ and the hydrogen bond symmetrization, presenting in the seismic wave model, which is of implication for our understanding of the deep-Earth geophysics and geochemistry especially along the subducted slabs.

  5. A Ferric-Peroxo Intermediate in the Oxidation of Heme by IsdI.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Shin-Ichi J; Loutet, Slade A; Mauk, A Grant; Murphy, Michael E P

    2015-04-28

    The canonical heme oxygenases (HOs) catalyze heme oxidation via a heme-bound hydroperoxo intermediate that is stabilized by a water cluster at the active site of the enzyme. In contrast, the hydrophobic active site of IsdI, a heme-degrading enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus, lacks a water cluster and is expected to oxidize heme by an alternative mechanism. Reaction of the IsdI-heme complex with either H2O2 or m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid fails to produce a specific oxidized heme iron intermediate, suggesting that ferric-hydroperoxo or ferryl derivatives of IsdI are not involved in the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. IsdI lacks a proton-donating group in the distal heme pocket, so the possible involvement of a ferric-peroxo intermediate has been evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that heme oxidation involving a ferric-peroxo intermediate is energetically accessible, whereas the energy barrier for a reaction involving a ferric-hydroperoxo intermediate is too great in the absence of a proton donor. We propose that IsdI catalyzes heme oxidation through nucleophilic attack by the heme-bound peroxo species. This proposal is consistent with our previous demonstration by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that heme ruffling increases the susceptibility of the meso-carbon of heme to nucleophilic attack. PMID:25853501

  6. Ferric reductase activity and PsFRO1 sequence variation in pisum sps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological studies in pea (Pisum sativum) suggest that the reduction of iron (Fe) is the rate-limiting physiological process in Fe acquisition by dicotyledonous plants. Previous molecular work suggests that ferric reductase activity is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational ...

  7. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was stabilized against dissolution during transformation of HFO to more crystalline iron (hydr)oxides. The rate of arsenate stabilization approximately coincided with the rate of HFO transformation at pH 6 and 40 ?C. Compa...

  8. ELECTRODE MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ANAEROBIC FERRIC/FERROUS CHLORIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of two inert redox electrodes (Pt and wax-impregnated graphite) was investigated in anaerobic ferrous and ferric chloride solutions in order to establish if these electrodes respond to the FE3/Fe2+ couple in a Nernstian nanner. ew method for determining dissolved fer...

  9. ANALYSIS OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IONS IN SOIL EXTRACTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using ion chromatography (IC) for the analysis of ferrous (Fe 2+) and ferric (Fe 3+) ions in soil extracts has been developed. This method uses an ion exchange column with detection at 520 nm after post-column derivatization. Selectivity is achieved by using an anionic...

  10. ELECTRODE MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ANAEROBIC FERRIC/FERROUS CHLORIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behaviour of two inert redox electrodes (Pt and wax-impregnated graphite) was investigated in anaerobic ferrous and ferric chloride solutions in order to establish if these electrodes respond to the Fe3+/Fe2+ couple in a Nernstian manner. A new method fo...

  11. Complexation of ferric oxide particles with pectins of ordered and random distribution of charged units

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complexation between ferric oxide particles and pectins with degree of methylation 50%, but having blockwise (ordered) or random arrangement of free carboxyl groups, are investigated by electric light scattering and electrophoresis. The influence of charge distribution in pectin chain on the electri...

  12. TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OF ARSENIC ADSORBED ON GRANULAR FERRIC HYDROXIDE UNDER BIO-REDUCTIVE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic reduction of arsenic (V) and iron (III) influences the partioning of arsenic (As) between the solid and aqueous phases in soils, sediments and wastes. In this study, laboratory experiments on arsenic adsorbed on granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was performed to ...

  13. Martian weathering/alteration scenarios from spectral studies of ferric and ferrous minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Adams, John B.; Morris, Richard V.

    1992-01-01

    We review the major aspects of our current knowledge of martian ferric and ferrous mineralogy based on the available ground-based telescopic and spacecraft data. What we know and what we don't know are used to constrain various weathering/alteration models and to identify key future measurements and techniques that can distinguish between these models.

  14. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  15. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  16. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  17. The biostimulation of anaerobic digestion with (semi)conductive ferric oxides: their potential for enhanced biomethanation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Cho, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyokwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-12-01

    The effect of biostimulation with ferric oxides, semiconductive ferric oxyhydroxide, and conductive magnetite on the anaerobic digestion of dairy wastewater was examined in a batch mode. The reactors supplemented with ferric oxyhydroxide (R2) and magnetite (R3) showed significantly enhanced biomethanation performance compared with the control (R1). The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) after 30 days was 31.9, 59.3, and 82.5% in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The consumed COD was almost fully recovered as biogas in R2 and R3, while only 79% was recovered in R1. The total energy production as biogas was accordingly 32.2, 71.0, and 97.7 kJ in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The reactors also differed in the acid formation profile with more propionate and butyrate found in R1 and more acetate found in R3. The enhanced biomethanation seems to be associated with variations in the bacterial community structure supposedly induced by the ferric oxides added. In contrast, no evident variation was observed in the archaeal community structure among the reactors. The potential electric syntrophy formed between Methanosaeta concilii-like methanogens and electroactive iron-reducing bacteria, particularly Trichococcus, was likely responsible for the enhanced performance. The stimulated growth of fermentative iron reducers may also have contributed by altering the metabolic characteristics of the bacterial communities to produce more favorable acidogenic products for methanogenesis. The overall results suggest the potential of biostimulation with (semi)conductive ferric oxides to enhance the rate and efficiency of the biomethanation of organic wastes. This seems to be potentially attractive, as increasing attention is being paid to the energy self-sufficiency of waste/wastewater treatment processes today. PMID:26272096

  18. Visible Wavelength Spectroscopy of Ferric Minerals: A Key Tool for Identification of Ancient Martian Aqueous Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, Richard V.

    2000-01-01

    The mineralogic signatures of past aqueous alteration of a basaltic Martian crust may include iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, zeolites, carbonates, phyllosilicates, and silica. The identities, relative abundances, and crystallinities of the phases formed in a particular environment depend on physicochemical conditions. At one extreme, hot spring environments may be characterized by smectite-chlorite to talc-kaolinite silicate assemblages, plus crystalline ferric oxides dominated by hematite. However, most environments, including cold springs, pedogenic layers, and ponded surface water, are expected to deposit iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and smectite-dominated phyllosilicates. A substantial fraction of the ferric iron is expected to occur in nanophase form, with the exact mineralogy strongly influenced by Eh-pH conditions. Detection of these phases has been an objective of a large body of terrestrial telescopic, Mars orbital, and landed spectral investigations and in situ compositional measurements. However, clear identifications of many of these phases is lacking. Neither carbonate nor silica has been unequivocally detected by any method. Although phyllosilicates may occur near the limit of detection by remote sensing, in general they appear to occur in only poorly crystalline form. In contrast, compelling evidence for ferric iron minerals has been gathered by recent telescopic investigations, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP), and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). These data yield two crucial findings: (1) In the global, high spatial resolution TES data set, highly crystalline ferric iron (as coarse-grained 'gray' hematite) has been recognized but with only very limited spatial occurrence and (2) Low-resolution telescopic reflectance spectroscopy, very limited orbital reflectance spectroscopy, and landed multispectral imaging provide strong indications that at least two broad classes of ferric iron minerals

  19. Use of ferric thiocyanate derivatization for quantification of polysorbate 80 in high concentration protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Savjani, Nimesh; Babcock, Eugene; Khor, Hui Koon; Raghani, Anil

    2014-12-01

    Quantitation of polysorbate 80 in high protein formulation using solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by derivatization with cobalt thiocyanate and UV measurement of the complex at 620 nm resulted in lower recovery of polysorbate 80. Dilution of protein samples with water improved the recovery of polysorbate, however, it compromised the sensitivity of the method when cobalt thiocyanate was used for derivatization. The presented work discusses an evaluation of alternative approaches for increasing the sensitivity of the quantitation method for polysorbate using ferric thiocyanate and molybdenum thiocyanate. Ferric thiocyanate complex of polysorbate 80 exhibited the highest sensitivity among the metals thiocyanate evaluated in the current work. The improvement in the sensitivity through derivatization with ferric thiocyanate allowed 10-fold dilution of a 140 mg mL(-1) protein sample without affecting the recovery or compromising the sensitivity of polysorbate 80 quantitation, indicating that this methodology could be used as an alternate approach for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 in high concentration protein formulations. Stability of ferric thiocynate and cobalt thiocyanate complex was also studied. When these complexes were allowed to equilibrate for 1h between an organic layer containing polysorbate/thiocynate complex and an aqueous layer containing un-reacted metal thiocyanate, it resulted in the most reproducible UV absorbance measurements. The SPE method for quantification of polysorbate 80 using ferric thiocyanate for derivatization provided accuracy (% spike recovery) within 107%, reproducibility (%relative standard deviation) less than 11.7%. The method is linear from 0.0001 to 0.008% polysorbate 80 concentrations in the formulations with protein formulations as high as 140 mg mL(-1). PMID:25159444

  20. Ferric reductase activity in Azotobacter vinelandii and its inhibition by Zn2+.

    PubMed

    Huyer, M; Page, W J

    1989-07-01

    Ferric reductase activity was examined in Azotobacter vinelandii and was found to be located in the cytoplasm. The specific activities of soluble cell extracts were not affected by the iron concentration of the growth medium; however, activity was inhibited by the presence of Zn2+ during cell growth and also by the addition of Zn2+ to the enzyme assays. Intracellular Fe2+ levels were lower and siderophore production was increased in Zn2+-grown cells. The ferric reductase was active under aerobic conditions, had an optimal pH of approximately 7.5, and required flavin mononucleotide and Mg2+ for maximum activity. The enzyme utilized NADH to reduce iron supplied as a variety of iron chelates, including the ferrisiderophores of A. vinelandii. The enzyme was purified by conventional protein purification techniques, and the final preparation consisted of two major proteins with molecular weights of 44,600 and 69,000. The apparent Km values of the ferric reductase for Fe3+ (supplied as ferric citrate) and NADH were 10 and 15.8 microM, respectively, and the data for the enzyme reaction were consistent with Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetics. The approximate Ki values resulting from inhibition of the enzyme by Zn2+, which was a hyperbolic (partial) mixed-type inhibitor, were 25 microM with respect to iron and 1.7 microM with respect to NADH. These results suggested that ferric reductase activity may have a regulatory role in the processes of iron assimilation in A. vinelandii. PMID:2525550

  1. Induction of the Root Cell Plasma Membrane Ferric Reductase (An Exclusive Role for Fe and Cu).

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, C. K.; Norvell, W. A.; Kochian, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    Induction of ferric reductase activity in dicots and nongrass monocots is a well-recognized response to Fe deficiency. Recent evidence has shown that Cu deficiency also induces plasma membrane Fe reduction. In this study we investigated whether other nutrient deficiencies could also induce ferric reductase activity in roots of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle) seedlings. Of the nutrient deficiencies tested (K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Zn, Fe, and Cu), only Cu and Fe deficiencies elicited a response. Cu deficiency induced an activity intermediate between Fe-deficient and control plant activities. To ascertain whether the same reductase is induced by Fe and Cu deficiency, concentration- and pH-dependent kinetics of root ferric reduction were compared in plants grown under control, -Fe, and -Cu conditions. Additionally, rhizosphere acidification, another process induced by Fe deficiency, was quantified in pea seedlings grown under the three regimes. Control, Fe-deficient, and Cu-deficient plants exhibited no major differences in pH optima or Km for the kinetics of ferric reduction. However, the Vmax for ferric reduction was dramatically influenced by plant nutrient status, increasing 16- to 38-fold under Fe deficiency and 1.5- to 4-fold under Cu deficiency, compared with that of control plants. These results are consistent with a model in which varying amounts of the same enzyme are deployed on the plasma membrane in response to plant Fe or Cu status. Rhizosphere acidification rates in the Cu-deficient plants were similarly intermediate between those of the control and Fe-deficient plants. These results suggest that Cu deficiency induces the same responses induced by Fe deficiency in peas. PMID:12223760

  2. Safe administration of iron sucrose in a patient with a previous hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate.

    PubMed

    Sane, Radhika; Baribeault, David; Rosenberg, Carol L

    2007-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman with iron deficiency anemia required parenteral iron therapy and was treated with intravenous ferric gluconate. She tolerated the first dose, but after the second dose, she developed a tingling feeling all over her body, along with swelling in her hands and feet, and a rash with hives over most of her body. It was thought that she had likely experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate. The decision was made to continue therapy; however, two modifications were made. The patient was given dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ibuprofen 1 hour before administering the third dose, and the infusion time was prolonged by 1 hour. Approximately 45 minutes after the infusion was completed, the patient developed hives on her arms and legs. At the patient's next clinic visit, it was decided that continuation of parenteral iron repletion was necessary, and the decision was made to attempt a challenge with iron sucrose. The patient was given dexamethasone 8 mg to be taken the night before and the morning of treatment. She successfully completed the iron repletion therapy with iron sucrose. Three parenteral iron products are available in the United States: iron dextran, sodium ferric gluconate complex, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, the oldest of these products, carries the highest risk for hypersensitivity reactions. Available data suggest that either iron sucrose or ferric gluconate can be safely administered to patients with known hypersensitivity to iron dextran. Our patient's experience implies that it may be possible to safely administer iron sucrose to a patient with hypersensitivity to ferric gluconate. This finding has clinical implications and warrants confirmation in a larger population. PMID:17381390

  3. Reduction of Soluble Iron and Reductive Dissolution of Ferric Iron-Containing Minerals by Moderately Thermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Toni A. M.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    1998-01-01

    Five moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, including representative strains of the three classified species (Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans), were shown to be capable of reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron when they were grown under oxygen limitation conditions. Iron reduction was most readily observed when the isolates were grown as mixotrophs or heterotrophs with glycerol as an electron donor; in addition, some strains were able to couple the oxidation of tetrathionate to the reduction of ferric iron. Cycling of iron between the ferrous and ferric states was observed during batch culture growth in unshaken flasks incubated under aerobic conditions, although the patterns of oxidoreduction of iron varied in different species of iron-oxidizing moderate thermophiles and in strains of a single species (S. acidophilus). All three bacterial species were able to grow anaerobically with ferric iron as a sole electron acceptor; the growth yields correlated with the amount of ferric iron reduced when the isolates were grown in the absence of oxygen. One of the moderate thermophiles (identified as a strain of S. acidophilus) was able to bring about the reductive dissolution of three ferric iron-containing minerals (ferric hydroxide, jarosite, and goethite) when it was grown under restricted aeration conditions with glycerol as a carbon and energy source. The significance of iron reduction by moderately thermophilic iron oxidizers in both environmental and applied contexts is discussed. PMID:9603832

  4. /sup 1/H NMR probe for hydrogen bonding of distal residues to bound ligands in heme proteins: isotope effect on heme electronic structure of myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, J.T.J.; La Mar, G.N.

    1987-11-11

    The authors demonstrate herein an isotope effect on the electronic structure of the heme in the low-spin, ferric cyanide complex of sperm whale myoglobin, metMbCN, which can be uniquely attributed to an H-bond between the distal (E7) histidyl imidazole and the bound ligand. The perturbation of the heme electronic structure arises directly from the isotope effect of the H bond between the distal His number7 and the bound ligand.

  5. Direct observation of the low-spin Fe(III)-NO(radical) intermediate state during rebinding of NO to photodeligated ferric cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Taegon; Lim, Manho

    2013-10-10

    relaxed into the ground state, with the relaxation kinetics described by exp(-(t/2.5 ps)(0.7)). The GR of NO to ferric Cytc was as fast as the thermal relaxation of hot heme, and the relaxation of the rebound Cytc(III)NO in the intermediate LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state was faster than the thermal relaxation of hot heme, generating the rebound Cytc(III)NO in a thermally excited ground electronic state. For both Cytc(III)NO and Mb(III)NO, the relaxation rate of the LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state was similar to the upper rate limit of the domed-to-planar heme transition observed in NO-rebound ferrous-heme proteins, suggesting that the change in the Fe-NO bond length is coupled to the doming motion of the heme Fe. PMID:24041332

  6. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed. PMID:26485903

  7. Synthesis and molecular structure of gold triarylcorroles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kolle E; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine; Ghosh, Abhik

    2011-12-19

    A number of third-row transition-metal corroles have remained elusive as synthetic targets until now, notably osmium, platinum, and gold corroles. Against this backdrop, we present a simple and general synthesis of β-unsubstituted gold(III) triarylcorroles and the first X-ray crystal structure of such a complex. Comparison with analogous copper and silver corrole structures, supplemented by extensive scalar-relativistic, dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations, suggests that "inherent saddling" may occur for of all coinage metal corroles. The degree of saddling, however, varies considerably among the three metals, decreasing conspicuously along the series Cu > Ag > Au. The structural differences reflect significant differences in metal-corrole bonding, which are also reflected in the electrochemistry and electronic absorption spectra of the complexes. From Cu to Au, the electronic structure changes from noninnocent metal(II)-corrole(•2-) to relatively innocent metal(III)-corrole(3-). PMID:22111600

  8. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  9. Method of inhibiting crosslinking of aqueous xanthan gums in the presence of ferric acid ions

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, C.W.

    1982-03-02

    The cross linking of aqueous xanthan gums in the presence of ferric ions is inhibited or prevented by adding a soluble alkanoic and/or alkenoic acid having at least 4 carbon atoms and bearing at least 2 hydroxyl groups per molecule, and/or a soluble salt of ..gamma..-lactone. This combination of ingredients forms gelled acid compositions which are useful in acidizing treatments of wells. The gelled acid compositions are viscous fluids which have increased stability against shear and thermal degradation and other properties which result in retarded reaction rates and reduced fluid leak-off during acidizing treatments of subterranean formations surrounding well bores. The aqueous gelled acids have the further advantage of inhibiting or preventing the formation of insoluble compounds, such as ferric hydroxide, during such acidizing treatments. 13 claims.

  10. Using Crystal Structure Groups to Understand Mössbauer parameters of Ferric Sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Sklute, E. C.; Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    A Mössbauer doublet assigned to ferric sulfate (Fe3D2) was identified in Paso Robles, Mars, spectra by Morris et al. (2006), who noted that its parameters are not diagnostic of any specific mineral because a number of different sulfates with varying parageneses might be responsible for this doublet. Work by Lane et al. (2008) used a multi-instrument approach based on Fe3+ sulfate spectra acquired with VNIR and midinfrared reflectance, mid-infrared emission and Mössbauer spectrometers to narrow down the possible ferric sulfate phases present at Paso Robles to ferricopiapite possibly mixed with other ferric sulfates such as butlerite, parabutlerite, fibroferrite, or metahomanite. Thus, we explore here the crystal-chemical rationale behind these interpretations of the Mössbauer results, using similarities and difference among mineral structures to explore which phases might have similar coordination polyhedra around the Fe atoms in sulfates. Work by Hawthorne et al. (2000) organizes the sulfate minerals into groups with analogous crystal structures. Mössbauer doublets assigned to ferric sulfates ubiquitously have isomer shifts (IS) of 0.40-53 mm/s so that IS is non-diagnostic. However, quadrupole splitting of doublets in these mineral groups has a wide range (0-1.4 mm/s) and the variation can be systematically correlated with different structure types. Members of the hydration series Fe2(SO4)3 · n H2O, which includes quenstedtite, coquimbite, paracoquimbite, kornelite, and lausenite have Mössbauer spectra that closely resemble singlets because of their near-zero QS. These minerals share structures involving finite clusters of sulfate tetrahedral and Fe octahedral or chains of depolymerized clusters, and all mineral species with these structures share similar Mössbauer parameters. At the other extreme, ferric sulfates with structures based on infinite sheets (hydrotalcite, alunite, jarosite), tend to have large electric field gradients at the nucleus of the Fe3

  11. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  12. Repeat radiation synovectomy with dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates in rheumatoid knees unresponsive to initial injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.; Sledge, C.B.

    1988-06-01

    Because of failure to fully respond to an initial intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates, 17 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis underwent repeat radiation synovectomy using this agent. Of the 13 patients who were evaluated 1 year later, 54% (7 knees) had good results, 31% (4 knees) had fair results, and 15% (2 knees) had poor results. The initial lack of significant benefit from radiation synovectomy did not appear to preclude a favorable response to a second injection.

  13. Shock ignition of pyrotechnic heat powders. [Aluminium/ferric oxide mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Hornig, H.C.; Kury, J.W.; Simpson, R.L.; Helm, F.H.; Von Holle, W.G.

    1986-05-14

    Over a dozen pyrotechnic mixtures of alloy forming elements or solid oxidizers and fuels were subjected to shock pressures of from 2 to 35 GPa. More than half of these formulations were ignited by the shock. Visible and ir time resolved radiometry experiments using one of these mixtures, aluminum/ferric oxide, showed that this shock induced ignition occurred in less than 0.1 usec. 9 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Purification of two muscle enzymes by chromatography on immobilized ferric ions.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Andersson, L; Ersson, B; Porath, J

    1989-08-01

    Two enzymes, glycogen phosphorylase and lactate dehydrogenase, were purified simultaneously in a single step. Ferric ions immobilized on a chelating gel were used as the adsorbent. Adsorption and desorption steps were accomplished by changes in buffer composition. The recoveries were better than 80% and the capacities were about 5 mg of protein per milliliter of adsorbent. The procedure worked well both on a small and on a preparative scale. The homogeneity of the purified enzymes was checked by FPLC. PMID:2775499

  15. A novel electrochemical process for the recovery and recycling of ferric chloride from precipitation sludge.

    PubMed

    Mejia Likosova, E; Keller, J; Poussade, Y; Freguia, S

    2014-03-15

    During wastewater treatment and drinking water production, significant amounts of ferric sludge (comprising ferric oxy-hydroxides and FePO4) are generated that require disposal. This practice has a major impact on the overall treatment cost as a result of both chemical addition and the disposal of the generated chemical sludge. Iron sulfide (FeS) precipitation via sulfide addition to ferric phosphate (FePO4) sludge has been proven as an effective process for phosphate recovery. In turn, iron and sulfide could potentially be recovered from the FeS sludge, and recycled back to the process. In this work, a novel process was investigated at lab scale for the recovery of soluble iron and sulfide from FeS sludge. Soluble iron is regenerated electrochemically at a graphite anode, while sulfide is recovered at the cathode of the same electrochemical cell. Up to 60 ± 18% soluble Fe and 46 ± 11% sulfide were recovered on graphite granules for up-stream reuse. Peak current densities of 9.5 ± 4.2 A m(-2) and minimum power requirements of 2.4 ± 0.5 kWh kg Fe(-1) were reached with real full strength FeS suspensions. Multiple consecutive runs of the electrochemical process were performed, leading to the successful demonstration of an integrated process, comprising FeS formation/separation and ferric/sulfide electrochemical regeneration. PMID:24397913

  16. Hydrocarbon microseepage detection based on normalized ferric and ferrous indices of Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M.; Xie, H.; Liu, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-05-01

    Ferric index (TM 3/1) (Fe3), ferrous index (TM 5/4) (Fe2), and clay and/or carbonate index (TM 5/7) have been successfully applied in mapping hydrothermal-alteration minerals, soil types, organics abundance, and mine waste. However, the ferric/ferrous indices do not work well when they are applied to detect relative oxidation/reduction area in hydrocarbon microseepage regions where the total iron and iron ion types are different in background rocks or soils. For example, there is relative high ferrous in organic-rich sediments and basic igneous rock, such as in coal-bearing beds. Clearly, the high ferrous concentration is not resulted from exotic reduction. Usually, under a homogeneous exotic reduced condition, the higher the total iron in rock or soil, the more the transferred ferrous iron produced. In order to remove the effects of total iron difference in rocks and soils on hydrocarbon microseepage detection, a new method, referred to as normalized ferric and ferrous index, is developed in this study, i.e. the normalized ferric index (NFe3) = Fe3 / (Fe3 + Fe2) and the normalized ferrous index (NFe2) = Fe2 / (Fe3 + Fe2). The NFe3 and NFe2 are successfully applied and tested in two sites for hydrocarbon microseepage detection in oil/gas-bearing Ordos Basin and Eren Basin, China. The NFe3 and NFe2 index images can preserve not only the major information of the ratio 3/1 and 5/4 images, but also remove the effects of total iron in background. Comparing to the mineral composite image (TM 3/1, 5/4, and 5/7 in RGB), the normalized indices color composite image (NFe3, NFe2, and TM5/7 in RGB) shows hydrocarbon microseepage areas clearly in green color. In addition, the composite images of normalized index also remove the vegetation effect to some degree in the test sites.

  17. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  18. Bioaccumulation of cadmium bound to ferric hydroxide and particulate organic matter by the bivalve M. meretrix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing; Jia, Yongfeng; Zhu, Huijie

    2012-06-01

    Ferric hydroxide and particulate organic matter are important pools of trace metals in sediments and control their accumulation by benthic animals. We investigated bioaccumulation of cadmium in bivalve Meretrix meretrix by using a simplified system of laboratory synthesized iron oxides and commercially obtained humic acids to represent the inorganic and organic matrix found in nature. The results showed that bioaccumulation characteristics were distinctly different for these two substrates. Bioaccumulation from ferric hydroxide was not observed at 70 and 140 mg/kg, while the clams started to absorb Cd at 140 mg/kg from organic matter and the bioaccumulation rate was faster than that from ferric hydroxide. Within 28 d, accumulation of Cd from organic matter appeared to reach a steady state after rising to a certain level, while absorption from ferric hydroxide appeared to follow a linear profile. The findings have implications about the assimilation of trace metals from sediments by benthic animals. PMID:22445921

  19. Immobilization of arsenite and ferric iron by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and its relevance to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, K; Lebrun, S; Casiot, C; Bruneel, O; Personné, J-C; Leblanc, M; Elbaz-Poulichet, F; Morin, G; Bonnefoy, V

    2003-10-01

    Weathering of the As-rich pyrite-rich tailings of the abandoned mining site of Carnoulès (southeastern France) results in the formation of acid waters heavily loaded with arsenic. Dissolved arsenic present in the seepage waters precipitates within a few meters from the bottom of the tailing dam in the presence of microorganisms. An Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain, referred to as CC1, was isolated from the effluents. This strain was able to remove arsenic from a defined synthetic medium only when grown on ferrous iron. This A. ferrooxidans strain did not oxidize arsenite to arsenate directly or indirectly. Strain CC1 precipitated arsenic unexpectedly as arsenite but not arsenate, with ferric iron produced by its energy metabolism. Furthermore, arsenite was almost not found adsorbed on jarosite but associated with a poorly ordered schwertmannite. Arsenate is known to efficiently precipitate with ferric iron and sulfate in the form of more or less ordered schwertmannite, depending on the sulfur-to-arsenic ratio. Our data demonstrate that the coprecipitation of arsenite with schwertmannite also appears as a potential mechanism of arsenite removal in heavily contaminated acid waters. The removal of arsenite by coprecipitation with ferric iron appears to be a common property of the A. ferrooxidans species, as such a feature was observed with one private and three collection strains, one of which was the type strain. PMID:14532077

  20. Characterization of a water-in-oil microemulsion containing a concentrated ammonium ferric sulfate aqueous phase

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Pfund, D.M.; Fulton, J.L.; Linehan, J.C. ); Capel, M. ); Ma, Y. )

    1994-01-01

    A water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion containing high concentrations of ammonium ferric sulfate in solution was characterized by SAXS, EXAFS, electrical conductivity, and viscosity measurements and by its phase behavior. The nanometer-sized aqueous droplets are microemulsified by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in an isooctane continuous phase. Addition of small amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a cosurfactant greatly aids in the solubilization of the inorganic electrolyte-laden aqueous phase. For this five-component system there is a large region of the composition phase space that exists as a clear, stable w/o microemulsion. A portion of this w/o microemulsion phase space can be characterized as spherically shaped aqueous nanometer-sized droplets. A simple relationship between the total surfactant concentration and the amount of water on the droplet size was established. This relationship has the same form as the well-known relationship for the ternary system, AOT/water/isooctane. True thermodynamic equilibrium was not established in this microemulsion study because the reaction times for the various ferric oxyhydroxide species are prohibitively long. As a result, pseudoequilibria for this ammonium ferric sulfate microemulsion are reported. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Carbonated ferric green rust as a new material for efficient phosphate removal.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, K; Naille, S; Despas, C; Ruby, C; Mallet, M

    2012-10-15

    Phosphate uptake from aqueous solutions by a recently discovered ferric oxyhydroxide is investigated. Carbonated ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))*} is prepared by varying two synthesis parameters, which are (1) the aging period after the ferrous-ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))} synthesis step and (2) the rate of the hydrogen peroxide addition to oxidize GR(CO(3)(2-)) into GR(CO(3)(2-))*. These two parameters permit the control of the size, morphology and cristallinity of the synthesized particles. As prepared GR* samples are then evaluated, in batch experiments, as possible low-cost efficient phosphate removal materials. Firstly, kinetic experiments reveal that a fast sorption step initially occurs and equilibrium is reached at ~500 min. The adsorption kinetics data at pH=7 can be adequately fitted to a pseudo-second order model. Secondly, the Freundlich model provides the best correlation and effectively describes phosphate sorption isotherms for all GR(CO(3)(2-))* samples synthesized. Finally, the phosphate adsorption capacity decreases when pH increases. The highest adsorption capacity is 64.8 mg g(-1) at pH=4 and corresponds to the GR(CO(3)(2-))* sample displaying the smallest and least crystallized particles thus reflecting the importance of the synthesis conditions. Overall, all sorption capacities are higher than the main iron oxide minerals, making GR(CO(3)(2-))* a potentially attractive phosphate adsorbent. PMID:22818797

  2. Enhanced photochemical decomposition of environmentally persistent perfluorooctanoate by coexisting ferric ion and oxalate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Pengyi

    2016-05-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), an environmentally persistent pollutant, was found to be quickly decomposed under 254 nm UV irradiation in the presence of ferric ion and oxalic acid. To understand the PFOA decomposition mechanism by this process, the effects of reaction atmosphere and concentrations of ferric ions and oxalic acids on PFOA decomposition were investigated, as well as decomposition intermediates. PFOA mainly decomposes via two pathways: (i) photochemical oxidation via Fe(III)-PFOA complexes and (ii) one-electron reduction caused by carboxylate anion radical (CO2 (•-)), which was generated by photolysis of ferrioxalate complexes. Under excess oxalic acid, PFOA decomposition was accelerated, and its corresponding half-life was shortened from 114 to 34 min as ferric concentration increased from 7 to 80 μM. Besides fluoride ions, six shorter chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) bearing C2-C7 were identified as main intermediates. The presence of O2 promoted the redox recycling of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and thus avoided the exhaustion of the Fe(III). PMID:26846242

  3. Soluble microbial products decrease pyrite oxidation by ferric iron at pH < 2.

    PubMed

    Yacob, Tesfayohanes; Pandey, Sachin; Silverstein, Joann; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-08-01

    Research on microbial activity in acid mine drainage (AMD) has focused on transformations of iron and sulfur. However, carbon cycling, including formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) from cell growth and decay, is an important biogeochemical component of the AMD environment. Experiments were conducted to study the interaction of SMP with soluble ferric iron in acidic conditions, particularly the formation of complexes that inhibit its effectiveness as the primary oxidant of pyrite during AMD generation. The rate of pyrite oxidation by ferric iron in sterile suspensions at pH 1.8 was reduced by 87% in the presence of SMP produced from autoclaved cells at a ratio of 0.3 mg DOC per mg total soluble ferric iron. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by SMP was shown to be comparable to, but weaker than, the effect of a chelating synthetic siderophore, DFAM. Two computational models incorporating SMP complexation were fitted to experimental results. Results suggest that bacterially produced organic matter can play a role in slowing pyrite oxidation. PMID:23777272

  4. Potential of Alginate Encapsulated Ferric Saccharate Microemulsions to Ameliorate Iron Deficiency in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mukhija, Kimmi; Singhal, Kirti; Angmo, Stanzin; Yadav, Kamalendra; Yadav, Hariom; Sandhir, Rajat; Singhal, Nitin Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most prominent mineral deficiencies around the world, which especially affects large population of women and children. Development of new technologies to combat iron deficiency is on high demand. Therefore, we developed alginate microcapsule with encapsulated iron that had better oral iron bioavailability. Microcapsules containing iron with varying ratios of sodium alginate ferric(III)-saccharide were prepared using emulsification method. In vitro studies with Caco-2 cells suggested that newly synthesized microemulsions had better iron bioavailability as compared to commercially available iron dextran formulations. Ferrozine in vitro assay showed that alginate-encapsulated ferric galactose microemulsion (AFGM) had highest iron bioavailability in comparison to other four ferric saccharate microemulsions, namely AFGlM, AFMM, AFSM, and AFFM synthesized in our laboratory. Mice studies also suggested that AFGM showed higher iron absorption as indicated by increased serum iron, hemoglobin, and other hematopoietic measures with almost no toxicity at tested doses. Development of iron-loaded microemulsions leads to higher bioavailability of iron and can provide alternative strategies to treat iron deficiency. PMID:26637994

  5. Enhanced coagulation of ferric chloride aided by tannic acid for phosphorus removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunan; Xing, Xin-Hui; Liu, Zehua; Cui, Liwen; Yu, Anfeng; Feng, Quan; Yang, Haijun

    2008-05-01

    Phosphorus removal from wastewater is of great importance. In the present study, ferric chloride was selected as the coagulant, and tannic acid (TA), a natural polymer, as the coagulant aid to develop an effective coagulation process with the emphasis of phosphorus recovery from different types of wastewater. The results showed that TA can accelerate the settling speed by forming flocs with large size, reduce the residual Fe(III) to eliminate the yellow color caused by Fe(III), and slightly increase the phosphorus removal efficiency. The precipitate formed by TA-aided coagulation showed the advantage of releasing phosphorus faster than ferric phosphate, indicating the possibility of phosphorus recovery from wastewater as slow release fertilizer. To further understand the structural characteristics of the precipitate, analytical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were employed. The analytical results indicated that TA-Fe-P complex was formed during the coagulation/flocculation processes. Solid phase in the precipitate consisted of TA-Fe-P complex, Fe-TA complex and/or ferric hydroxyphosphate. PMID:18395769

  6. Immobilization of Arsenite and Ferric Iron by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Its Relevance to Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Duquesne, K.; Lebrun, S.; Casiot, C.; Bruneel, O.; Personné, J.-C.; Leblanc, M.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F.; Morin, G.; Bonnefoy, V.

    2003-01-01

    Weathering of the As-rich pyrite-rich tailings of the abandoned mining site of Carnoulès (southeastern France) results in the formation of acid waters heavily loaded with arsenic. Dissolved arsenic present in the seepage waters precipitates within a few meters from the bottom of the tailing dam in the presence of microorganisms. An Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain, referred to as CC1, was isolated from the effluents. This strain was able to remove arsenic from a defined synthetic medium only when grown on ferrous iron. This A. ferrooxidans strain did not oxidize arsenite to arsenate directly or indirectly. Strain CC1 precipitated arsenic unexpectedly as arsenite but not arsenate, with ferric iron produced by its energy metabolism. Furthermore, arsenite was almost not found adsorbed on jarosite but associated with a poorly ordered schwertmannite. Arsenate is known to efficiently precipitate with ferric iron and sulfate in the form of more or less ordered schwertmannite, depending on the sulfur-to-arsenic ratio. Our data demonstrate that the coprecipitation of arsenite with schwertmannite also appears as a potential mechanism of arsenite removal in heavily contaminated acid waters. The removal of arsenite by coprecipitation with ferric iron appears to be a common property of the A. ferrooxidans species, as such a feature was observed with one private and three collection strains, one of which was the type strain. PMID:14532077

  7. Corrosion characteristics of ferric and austenitic stainless steels for dental magnetic attachment.

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Suzuki, M; Ohno, H

    2000-03-01

    The corrosion behaviors of four ferric stainless steels and two austenitic stainless steels were examined in a simulated physiological environment (0.9% NaCl solution) to obtain basic data for evaluating the appropriate composition of stainless steels for dental magnetic attachments. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical techniques and the analysis of released metal ions by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The surface of the stainless steels was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The breakdown potential of ferric stainless steels increased and the total amount of released metal ions decreased linearly with increases in the sum of the Cr and Mo contents. The corrosion rate of the ferric stainless steels increased 2 to 6 times when they were galvanically coupled with noble metal alloys but decreased when coupled with commercially pure Ti. For austenitic stainless steels, the breakdown potential of high N-bearing stainless steel was approximately 500 mV higher than that of SUS316L, which is currently used as a component in dental magnetic attachments. The enriched nitrogen at the alloy/passive film interface may be effective in improving the localized corrosion resistance. PMID:11219089

  8. Orthophosphate removal from a synthetic wastewater using lime, alum, and ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sisk, L.; Benefield, L.; Reed, B.

    1987-01-01

    Lime, alum, and ferric chloride were evaluated using a series of jar tests to determine their effectiveness in orthophosphate precipitation from synthetic wastewaters. Calcium phosphate precipitation was most efficient at pH 11.0 and a total carbonate to phosphorus, C/sub T/:P, molar ratio of 15.0. For these conditions, a residual total orthophosphate concentration of 0.12 mg/L-P was observed. The Mg:P molar ratio had little effect on orthophosphate removal from the synthetic wastewater. When alum was used, the minimum residual total orthophosphate concentration observed was 0.21 mg/L-P for an Al:P molar ratio of 3.0 and a pH of 6.0 when pH was adjusted before and during alum addition. When ferric chloride was used, it was found that an Fe:P molar ratio of 3.0 and a pH of 6.0 resulted in the lowest residual total orthophosphate concentration. This value was 0.19 mg/L-P when pH was adjusted before and during iron addition. A multiple regression analysis produced mathematical relationships which can be used to predict residual soluble and residual total orthophosphate concentration for lime, alum, and ferric chloride treatment.

  9. Evolution of the Ferric Reductase Domain (FRD) Superfamily: Modularity, Functional Diversification, and Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria. PMID:23505460

  10. 29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional..., separate bonds and additional bonding. (a) Additional bonding. Section 13 neither prevents additional... or separate bond. (b) Use of existing bonds. Insofar as a bond currently in use is adequate to...

  11. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  12. Anticooperative ligand binding properties of recombinant ferric Vitreoscilla homodimeric hemoglobin: a thermodynamic, kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, M; Boffi, A; Coletta, M; Mozzarelli, A; Pesce, A; Tarricone, C; Ascenzi, P

    1999-08-20

    Thermodynamics and kinetics for cyanide, azide, thiocyanate and imidazole binding to recombinant ferric Vitreoscilla sp. homodimeric hemoglobin (Vitreoscilla Hb) have been determined at pH 6.4 and 7.0, and 20.0 degrees C, in solution and in the crystalline state. Moreover, the three-dimensional structures of the diligated thiocyanate and imidazole derivatives of recombinant ferric Vitreoscilla Hb have been determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.8 A (Rfactor=19.9%) and 2.1 A (Rfactor=23.8%) resolution, respectively. Ferric Vitreoscilla Hb displays an anticooperative ligand binding behaviour in solution. This very unusual feature can only be accounted for by assuming ligand-linked conformational changes in the monoligated species, which lead to the observed 300-fold decrease in the affinity of cyanide, azide, thiocyanate and imidazole for the monoligated ferric Vitreoscilla Hb with respect to that of the fully unligated homodimer. In the crystalline state, thermodynamics for azide and imidazole binding to ferric Vitreoscilla Hb may be described as a simple process with an overall ligand affinity for the homodimer corresponding to that for diligation in solution. These data suggest that the ligand-free homodimer, observed in the crystalline state, is constrained in a low affinity conformation whose ligand binding properties closely resemble those of the monoligated species in solution. From the kinetic viewpoint, anticooperativity is reflected by the 300-fold decrease of the second-order rate constant for cyanide and imidazole binding to the monoligated ferric Vitreoscilla Hb with respect to that for ligand association to the ligand-free homodimer in solution. On the other hand, values of the first-order rate constant for cyanide and imidazole dissociation from the diligated and monoligated derivatives of ferric Vitreoscilla Hb in solution are closely similar. As a whole, ligand binding and structural properties of ferric Vitreoscilla Hb appear to be unique among

  13. The Formation, Structure, and Ageing of As-Rich Hydrous Ferric Oxide at the Abandoned Sb Deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    SciTech Connect

    Majzlan,J.; Lalinska, B.; Chovan, M.; Jurkovic, L.; Milovska, S.; Gottlicher, J.

    2007-01-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold {approx}380,000 m{sup 3} of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 {+-} 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS{sub 2}; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb{sub 2}S{sub 4}) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ {mu}-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As{sup 5+}). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As{sup 5+}. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3

  14. The formation, structure, and ageing of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide at the abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Lalinská, Bronislava; Chovan, Martin; Jurkovič, L.'ubomír; Milovská, Stanislava; Göttlicher, Jörg

    2007-09-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold ˜380,000 m 3 of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 ± 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS 2; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb 2S 4) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ μ-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As 5+). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As 2O 5 and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As 5+. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3.3-3.5 Å, that is, increasing polymerization of the iron

  15. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  16. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  17. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  18. Prospective bonding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancenay, H.; Benazet, D.

    1981-07-01

    Adhesive bonding in industry and in the laboratory is surveyed and prospects for its wider utilization are assessed. The economic impact of bonding technology on industry is discussed. Research is reviewed, centering on the development of nondestructive testing and inspection techniques. Traditional (wood) as well as new materials susceptible to bonding are considered. Applications in construction and civil engineering, in aeronautics, and in the automobile industry are covered. The use of glues in mechanical constructions, in assembling cylindrical parts, and in metal-metal bonding are examined. Hybrid assembling and bonding of composite materials are included.

  19. Ferric Citrate

    PubMed Central

    Cada, Dennis J.; Cong, Jasen; Baker, Danial E.

    2015-01-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The February 2015 monograph topics are netupitant/palonosetron, naltrxone SR/bupropion SR, nintedanib, pirfenidone, and ivabradine. The Safety MUE is on netupitant/palonosetron. PMID:25717210

  20. Ferric citrate.

    PubMed

    Cada, Dennis J; Cong, Jasen; Baker, Danial E

    2015-02-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The February 2015 monograph topics are netupitant/palonosetron, naltrxone SR/bupropion SR, nintedanib, pirfenidone, and ivabradine. The Safety MUE is on netupitant/palonosetron. PMID:25717210

  1. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  2. Understanding Regeneration of Arsenate-Loaded Ferric Hydroxide-Based Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Binod Kumar; Farrell, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adsorbents comprising ferric hydroxide loaded on a variety of support materials are commonly used to remove arsenic from potable water. Although several studies have investigated the effects of support properties on arsenic adsorption, there have been no investigations of their effects on adsorbent regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of regenerant solution composition and the kinetics of regeneration have not been investigated. This research investigated the effects of adsorbent and regenerant solution properties on the kinetics and efficiency of regeneration of arsenate-loaded ferric hydroxide-based adsorbents. Solutions containing only 0.10–5.0 M NaOH or 0.10–1.0 M NaCl, as well as solutions containing both compounds, were used as regenerants. On all media, >99% of arsenate was adsorbed through complexation with ferric hydroxide. Arsenate recovery was controlled by both equilibrium and kinetic limitations. Adsorbents containing support material with weak base anion-exchange functionality or no anion-exchange functionality could be regenerated with NaOH solutions alone. Regeneration of media containing strong base anion (SBA)-exchange functionality was greatly enhanced by addition of 0.10 M NaCl to the NaOH regenerant solutions. Adsorbed silica had a significant effect on NaOH regeneration of media containing type I SBA-exchange functionality, but on other media, adsorbed silica had little impact on regeneration. On all media, 5–25% of arsenate was resistant to desorption in 1.0 M NaOH solutions. However, the use of 2.5–5.0 M NaOH solutions significantly reduced the desorption-resistant fraction. PMID:25873779

  3. Ferric ammonium citrate decomposition--a taxonomic tool for gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Szentmihályi, A; Lányi, B

    1986-01-01

    The iron uptake test of Szabó and Vandra has been modified and used for the differentiation of Gram-negative bacteria. Nutrient agar containing 20 g per litre of ferric ammonium citrate was distributed into narrow tubes and solidified so as to form butts and slants. Considering the localization of the rusty-brown coloration produced after seeding and incubation, 2367 strains were classified into four groups. (1) Unchanged medium: Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Hafnia alvei and Morganella morganii 100% each, Klebsiella spp., 50%, Enterobacter cloacae 37%, Proteus vulgaris 59%, Acinetobacter spp. 42%, Pseudomonas fluorescens 19%, some other bacteria 2-12%. (2) Rusty-brown slant, unchanged butt: Salmonella subgenera II, III and IV 98%, Citrobacter freundii 65%, E. cloacae 55%, P. vulgaris 41%, Proteus mirabilis 98%, Providencia rettgeri 100%, urease-negative Providencia 96%, Acinetobacter spp. 58%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 100%, P. fluorescens 81%, UFP (unclassified fluorescent pseudomonads) 100%, other Pseudomonas spp. 55%. (3) Unchanged slant, brown butt: S. typhi 88%, Salmonella subgenus I 3%, Klebsiella spp. 31%, some other bacteria 2-3%. (4) Rusty-brown slant, brown butt: Salmonella subgenus I 75%, C. freundii 20%, Klebsiella spp. 12%, some other bacteria 1-5%. Colour reactions in ferric ammonium citrate agar are associated with the accumulation of ferric hydroxide: bacteria giving positive reactions on the slant took up as an average, 63 times more iron than those with negative test. The localization of colour reaction correlated partly with aerobic and anaerobic citrate utilization or decomposition in Simmons' minimal and in Kauffmann's peptone water medium. PMID:3529797

  4. Ferric ion as a scavenging agent in a solvent extraction process

    DOEpatents

    Bruns, Lester E.; Martin, Earl C.

    1976-01-01

    Ferric ions are added into the aqueous feed of a plutonium scrap recovery process that employs a tributyl phosphate extractant. Radiolytic degradation products of tributyl phosphate such as dibutyl phosphate form a solid precipitate with iron and are removed from the extraction stages via the waste stream. Consequently, the solvent extraction characteristics are improved, particularly in respect to minimizing the formation of nonstrippable plutonium complexes in the stripping stages. The method is expected to be also applicable to the partitioning of plutonium and uranium in a scrap recovery process.

  5. Solute-Solvent Interactions and High Spin ⇌ Low Spin Transitions in Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.

    1985-01-01

    The HS ⇌ LS transition in ferric dithiocarbamates in a number of solvents has been investigated using NMR and is interpreted in terms of preferential solvation or second co-ordination sphere reorganisation effects. These studies clearly demonstrate that neglect of pseudo contact shifts can lead to erroneous conclusions about the spin delocalisation mechanisms. The spin derealization in these systems is by direct σ-delocalization along the alkyl chain. The As values of 2T2 and 6A1 states have the same sign.

  6. Point defects in (Mg,Fe)O at high pressures: where does hydrogen dominate over ferric iron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, K.; Karato, S.

    2007-12-01

    The point defects play an important role in transport processes of minerals including diffusion, electrical conduction and plastic deformation. Point defects caused by ferric iron and/or hydrogen (proton) are dominant defects in most of the iron-bearing minerals including olivine and (Mg,Fe)O. In many upper-mantle minerals such as olivine, the concentration of ferric iron is much smaller than that of hydrogen, and therefore the small amount of hydrogen changes their transport properties dramatically. However, the situation is very different for lower- mantle minerals such as (Mg,Fe)O. In this presentation, we will review the available experimental data on point defects in (Mg,Fe)O and discuss the relative importance of ferric iron and hydrogen at high pressures based on atomic models. The existing low-pressure data indicate that the maximum solubility of ferric iron in (Mg,Fe)O is on the order of 0.1 (atomic fraction in the total iron), which is much higher than that of hydrogen. However, experimental studies by Bolfan-Casanova et al (2002, 2006) indicate that the solubility of ferric iron decreases while that of hydrogen increases with pressure. This suggests that the dominant impurity to generate point defects in (Mg,Fe)O may change from ferric iron to hydrogen at high pressure. Therefore it is important to quantify the pressure dependence of the solubility of ferric iron and hydrogen. We have explored two models of ferric iron- related defects and found that the existing experimental data suggest that ferric iron may occur at two lattice sites: the tetrahedral site as interstitial atoms as well as the octahedral site. The pressure dependence of the solubility of hydrogen in (Mg,Fe)O are also estimated based on the experimental data and defect models. The cross-over of defect solubility likely occurs in the lower mantle, but the exact depth is poorly constrained because of large uncertainties in the hydrogen solubility and the mechanisms of hydrogen dissolution

  7. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  8. The fission yeast ferric reductase gene frp1+ is required for ferric iron uptake and encodes a protein that is homologous to the gp91-phox subunit of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, D G; Dancis, A; Anderson, G J; Klausner, R D

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a cell surface ferric reductase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutant strain deficient in this activity was also deficient in ferric iron uptake, while ferrous iron uptake was not impaired. Therefore, reduction is a required step in cellular ferric iron acquisition. We have cloned frp1+, the wild-type allele of the mutant gene. frp1+ mRNA levels were repressed by iron addition to the growth medium. Fusion of 138 nucleotides of frp1+ promoter sequences to a reporter gene, the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, conferred iron-dependent regulation upon the latter when introduced into S. pombe. The predicted amino acid sequence of the frp1+ gene exhibits hydrophobic regions compatible with transmembrane domains. It shows similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FRE1 gene product and the gp91-phox protein, a component of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase that is deficient in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:8321236

  9. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. , Zahler; James M.

    2010-07-13

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  10. Evaluation of polyaluminium ferric chloride (PAFC) as a composite coagulant for water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, B; Yue, Q; Miao, J

    2003-01-01

    Coal gangue is a kind of waste from coal mine processing. Polyaluminium ferric chloride (PAFC), a new type of inorganic composite coagulant, was prepared by using the waste from the Mineral Bureau of Yanzhou, China, hydrochloric acid and calcium carbonate as raw materials. The relationship between the stability of ferric ion and the ionic strength of solution was investigated. The zeta potential of PAFC hydrolysis products of PAFC and the coagulation performances under different pH value were discussed. The turbidity removal properties of PAFC, polyaluminium (PAC) and polyferric sulfate (PFS) were compared, and the color removal effect of PAFC for the wastewater containing suspended dyes was also tested. In addition, the coagulation performance of PAFC for actual wastewaters from petrochemical plant, iron and steel plant, and coal mining processing was evaluated. The experimental results suggest that PAFC took a maximum value of zeta potential at about pH 5.8 on the positive side. Compared with PAC, PAFC gives better turbidity removal performance in the range of pH from 7.0 to 8.4. PAFC gives good color removal performance on suspension dyes. PAFC also gives good wastewater purifying results for the actual wastewater. Therefore, PAFC is a high-effect and stable water treatment agent. PMID:12578184

  11. Synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee using intra-articular injection of dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Venkatesan, P.; Snyder, M.A.; Barrett, W.P.

    1987-09-01

    One hundred and eleven patients who had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injection of 270 millicuries of dysprosium-165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregates. A two-year follow-up was available for fifty-nine of the treated knees. Thirty-nine had a good result; nine, a fair result; and eleven, a poor result. Of the twenty-five knees that had Stage-I radiographic changes, nineteen had a good result. Of the thirty-four knees that had Stage-II radiographic changes, twenty showed a good result. Systemic spread of the radioactivity from the injected joint was minimum. The mean whole-body dose was calculated to be 0.3 rad and that to the liver twenty-four hours after injection, 3.2 rads. The results indicated that dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for performing radiation synovectomy, particularly in knees that have Stage-I radiographic changes. Because of the minimum rate of systemic spread of the dysprosium-165, it offers a definite advantage over agents that previously have been used.

  12. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Atcher, R.W.; Shortkroff, S.; Lionberger, D.R.; Rose, H.A.; Hurson, B.J.; Lankenner, P.A. Jr.; Anderson, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used.

  13. Effect of functional groups on the crystallization of ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides in suspension environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiong; Albert, Olga; Deng, Hua; Yu, Xiao-Long; Cao, Yang; Li, Jian-Bao; Huang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigated the effects of five kinds of Au surfaces terminated with and without functional groups on the crystallization of ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides in the suspension condition. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to create hydroxyl (-OH), carboxyl (-COOH), amine (-NH2) and methyl (-CH3) functionalized surfaces, which proved to be of the same surface density. The immersion time of substrates in the Fe(OH)3 suspension was divided into two time portions. During the first period of 2 h, few ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide was deposited except that ɛ-Fe2O3 was detected on -NH2 surface. Crystallization for 10 h evidenced more kinds of iron compounds on the functional surfaces. Goethite and maghemite were noticed on four functional surfaces, and maghemite also grew on Au surface. Deposition of ɛ-Fe2O3 was found on -OH surface, while the growth of orthorhombic and hexagon FeOOH were indicated on -NH2 surface. Considering the wide existence of iron compounds in nature, our investigation is a precedent work to the study of iron biomineralization in the suspension area.

  14. The precipitation of hematite from ferric chloride media at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrizac, J.E.; Riveros, P.A.

    1999-12-01

    The precipitation of hematite from ferric chloride media at temperatures {lt}100 C and at ambient pressure was studied as part of a program to recover a marketable iron product from metallurgical processing streams or effluents. Hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be formed in preference to ferric oxyhydroxides (e.g., {beta}-FeO{micro}OH) at temperatures as low as 60 C by controlling the precipitation conditions, especially seeding. The hematite product typically contains {gt}66 pct Fe and {lt}1 pct Cl, and its composition does not change appreciably on repeated recycling. The amount of product formed increases significantly with increasing FeCl{sub 3} concentrations to {approximately}0.2 M FeCl{sub 3}, but nearly constant product yields are obtained thereafter; the precipitates consist only of hematite, provided that an adequate amount of seed is present. The contamination with Zn, Ca, and Na is {lt}0.1 pct, even for high concentrations of dissolved ZnCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, or NaCl. The extent of the precipitation reaction depends principally on the temperature and the free-acid concentration; accordingly, the controlled addition of a base allows the nearly complete elimination of the iron from metallurgical processing streams or effluents, as readily filterable Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  15. Kinetics of the ferrous/ferric electrode reaction in the absence of chloride catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.C.; Nagy, Z.

    1987-09-01

    The kinetics of the ferrous ferric redox electrode reaction has been investigated by many workers as a simple, uncomplicated charge transfer reaction which seems ideal for testing experimental techniques and charge transfer theories. However, it has only recently been understood that very small traces of chloride can have a considerable effect on the reaction rate. The relation between the chloride content of the solution and the rate constant of the ferrous/ferric reaction on a gold electrode in perchloric acid solutions is confirmed in this work. The chloride effect free apparent standard rate constant is found to be 2.2 x 10/sup -5/ cm s/sup -1/, which is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the rate constants normally reported for this reaction if the chloride content of the solution is not scrupulously controlled. Measurements were carried out by using two different in situ methods for cleaning the working electrode surface rather than employing extensive solution purification. In the first method the measuring electrode was potentiostated at sufficiently negative potentials to desorb the chloride from the surface followed by a potential step to the equilibrium potential and a pulse measurement of the kinetics. In the second method chloride ions were removed from the surface before and during the kinetic measurement by continuous oxidation of chromous ions added in small concentration to the test solution. Good agreement was found among the rate constants determined by these methods and a reported rate constant determined in ultraclean solution.

  16. Geobacter bremensis sp. nov. and Geobacter pelophilus sp. nov., two dissimilatory ferric-iron-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Straub, K L; Buchholz-Cleven, B E

    2001-09-01

    Two strictly anaerobic, dissimilatory ferric-iron-reducing bacteria, strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T, were isolated from freshwater mud samples with ferrihydrite as electron acceptor. Both strains also grew by reducing Mn(IV), S0 and fumarate. Electron donors used by strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T for growth with ferric iron as electron acceptor included hydrogen, formate, acetate, pyruvate, succinate, fumarate and ethanol. An affiliation with the family Geobacteraceae was revealed by comparative analysis of 165 rRNA gene sequences. Strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T shared 92.5% sequence identity and their closest known relative was Geobacter sulfurreducens, with approximately 93% sequence identity. Cultures and colonies of strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T were intensely red in colour, due to the presence of c-type cytochromes. On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic data, strain Dfr1T (= DSM 12179T = OCM 796T) is described as Geobacter bremensis sp. nov. and strain Dfr2T (= DSM 12255T = OCM 797T) as Geobacter pelophilus sp. nov. PMID:11594612

  17. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation. PMID:26924114

  18. [Mechanism of groundwater As(V) removal with ferric flocculation and direct filtration].

    PubMed

    Kang, Ying; Duan, Jin-Ming; Jing, Chuan-Yong

    2015-02-01

    The As removal process and mechanism from groundwater using ferric flocculation-direct filtration system was investigated using batch, field pilot tests, extended X-ray absorption fine structure ( EXAFS) spectroscopy, and charge-distribution multisite complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The results showed that arsenate [As(V)] was the dominant As species in the groundwater with a concentration of 40 μg x L(-1). The treatment system could supply 64 984 L As-safe drinking water (< 10 μg L(-1)) using Fe 1.5 mg x L(-1). Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) demonstrated that the leachate As was 3.4 μg x L(-1), much lower than the EPA regulatory concentration (5 mg x L(-1)). EXAFS and CD-MUSIC model indicated that As(V) was adsorbed onto ferric hydroxide via bidentate binuclear complexes in the pH range of 3 to 9.5, while formation of precipitate with Ca or Mg dominated the As removal at pH > 9.5. PMID:26031078

  19. A Beverage Containing Fermented Black Soybean Ameliorates Ferric Nitrilotriacetate-Induced Renal Oxidative Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Iqbal, Mohammad; Kawakami, Norito; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Toyokuni, Shinya; Okada, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    It is beneficial to seek scientific basis for the effects of functional foods. Natural pigments derived from plants are widely known as possible antioxidants. Black soybean contains a larger amount of anthocyanins than regular soybean. Here we studied the antioxidative effect of a beverage obtained via citric acid fermentation of black soybean (BBS), using a rat model of renal oxidative injury induced by a renal carcinogen, ferric nitrilotriacetate. BBS (10 ml/kg) was orally administered 30 min before ferric nitrilotriacetate treatment. Renal lipid peroxidation was significantly suppressed in the BBS-pretreated animals concomitant with decrease in 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Maintenance of renal activities of antioxidative enzymes including catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and quinone reductase was significantly better in the BBS-pretreated rats. Elevation of serum creatinine and urea nitrogen was significantly suppressed in the BBS-pretreated rats. These data suggest that dietary intake of BBS is useful for the prevention of renal tubular oxidative damage mediate by iron, and warrant further investigation. PMID:21103028

  20. Novel regeneration method for phosphate loaded granular ferric (hydr)oxide--a contribution to phosphorus recycling.

    PubMed

    Kunaschk, Marco; Schmalz, Viktor; Dietrich, Norman; Dittmar, Thomas; Worch, Eckhard

    2015-03-15

    At a progressive rate, small wastewater treatment plants in rural areas need to be equipped with an additional phosphorus removal stage in order to achieve a good chemical status in the receiving natural water bodies. A conventional regeneration method for ferric (hydr)oxides such as phosphate specific adsorbents, which can be applied to remove and recover phosphorus in fixed bed filters, was investigated and improved. It was shown that a loss of up to 85% of the initial capacity can be observed when regeneration with 1 M NaOH is implemented. The losses are caused by surface blocking with different calcium-containing compounds as revealed by an EDX analysis. These blocking compounds could be removed completely with an additional acidic regeneration step at pH = 2.5. During the alkaline desorption that followed, complete phosphorus removal and a full recovery of the adsorption capacity were achieved for goethite-rich Bayoxide(®) E 33 HC (E33HC) and akaganéite-rich GEH(®) 104 (GEH). The regeneration procedure was repeated up to eight times without any signs of further decline in the phosphate adsorption capacity or any changes in the specific surface area or pore size distribution of the adsorbent. In contrast to GEH and E33HC, ferric hydroxide- and calcite-rich FerroSorp(®) Plus (FSP) was partly dissolved during acid treatment. PMID:25618522

  1. Ferric Citrate Hydrate as a Phosphate Binder and Risk of Aluminum Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ferric citrate hydrate was recently approved in Japan as an oral phosphate binder to be taken with food for the control of hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The daily therapeutic dose is about 3 to 6 g, which comprises about 2 to 4 g of citrate. Oral citrate solubilizes aluminum that is present in food and drinking water, and opens the tight junctions in the intestinal epithelium, thereby increasing aluminum absorption and urinary excretion. In healthy animals drinking tap water, oral citrate administration increased aluminum absorption and, over a 4-week period, increased aluminum deposition in brain and bone by about 2- and 20-fold, respectively. Renal excretion of aluminum is impaired in patients with chronic kidney disease, thereby increasing the risk of toxicity. Based on human and animal studies it can be surmised that patients with CKD who are treated with ferric citrate hydrate to control hyperphosphatemia are likely to experience enhanced absorption of aluminum from food and drinking water, thereby increasing the risk of aluminum overload and toxicity. PMID:25341358

  2. Iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose: no correlation between physicochemical stability and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Praschberger, Monika; Haider, Kathrin; Cornelius, Carolin; Schitegg, Markus; Sturm, Brigitte; Goldenberg, Hans; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous iron preparations, like iron sucrose (IS) and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) differ in their physicochemical stability. Thus differences in storage and utilization can be expected and were investigated in a non-clinical study in liver parenchyma HepG2-cells and THP-1 macrophages as models for toxicological and pharmacological target cells. HepG2-cells incorporated significant amounts of IS, elevated the labile iron pool (LIP) and ferritin and stimulated iron release. HepG2-cells had lower basal cellular iron and ferritin content than THP-1 macrophages, which showed only marginal accumulation of IS and FCM. However, FCM increased the LIP up to twofold and significantly elevated ferritin within 24 h in HepG2-cells. IS and FCM were non-toxic for HepG2-cells and THP-1 macrophages were more sensitive to FCM compared to IS at all concentrations tested. In a cell-free environment redox-active iron was higher with IS than FCM. Biostability testing via assessment of direct transfer to serum transferrin did not reflect the chemical stability of the complexes (i.e., FCM > IS). Effect of vitamin C on mobilisation to transferrin was an increase with IS and interestingly a decrease with FCM. In conclusion, FCM has low bioavailability for liver parenchyma cells, therefore liver iron deposition is unlikely. Ascorbic acid reduces transferrin-chelatable iron from ferric carboxymaltose, thus effects on hepcidin expression should be investigated in clinical studies. PMID:25326244

  3. Combining Ferric Salt and Cactus Mucilage for Arsenic Removal from Water.

    PubMed

    Fox, Dawn I; Stebbins, Daniela M; Alcantar, Norma A

    2016-03-01

    New methods to remediate arsenic-contaminated water continue to be studied, particularly to fill the need for accessible methods that can significantly impact developing communities. A combination of cactus mucilage and ferric (Fe(III)) salt was investigated as a flocculation-coagulation system to remove arsenic (As) from water. As(V) solutions, ferric nitrate, and mucilage suspensions were mixed and left to stand for various periods of time. Visual and SEM observations confirmed the flocculation action of the mucilage as visible flocs formed and settled to the bottom of the tubes within 3 min. The colloidal suspensions without mucilage were stable for up to 1 week. Sample aliquots were tested for dissolved and total arsenic by ICP-MS and HGAFS. Mucilage treatment improved As removal (over Fe(III)-only treatment); the system removed 75-96% As in 30 min. At neutral pH, removal was dependent on Fe(III) and mucilage concentration and the age of the Fe(III) solution. The process is fast, achieving maximum removal in 30 min, with the majority of As removed in 10-15 min. Standard jar tests with 1000 μg/L As(III) showed that arsenic removal and settling rates were pH-dependent; As removal was between 52% (high pH) and 66% (low pH). PMID:26824141

  4. Gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles based disposable magnetic genosensors for the detection of DNA hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Óscar A; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Cabañero, German; Grande, Hans; Rodríguez, Javier

    2011-01-15

    In this article, a disposable magnetic DNA sensor using an enzymatic amplification strategy for the detection of specific hybridization processes, based on the coupling of streptavidin-peroxidase to biotinylated target sequences, has been developed. A thiolated 19-mer capture probe was attached to gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles and hybridization with the biotinylated target was allowed to proceed. Then, a streptavidin-peroxide was attached to the biotinylated target and the resulting modified gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles were captured by a magnetic field on the surface of a home-made carbon screen printed electrode (SPE). Using hydroquinone as a mediator, a square wave voltammetric procedure was chosen to detect the hybridization process after the addition of hydrogen peroxide. Different aspects concerning the assay protocol and nanoparticles fabrication were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity of the developed methodology. A low detection limit (31 pM) with good stability (RSD=7.04%, n=10) was obtained without the need of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. PMID:20951565

  5. Iron Oxidation and Precipitation of Ferric Hydroxysulfates by Resting Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lazaroff, Norman; Sigal, Warren; Wasserman, Andrew

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation of ferrous ions, in acid solution, by resting suspensions of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans produced sediments consisting of crystalline jarosites, amorphous ferric hydroxysulfates, or both. These products differed conspicuously in chemical composition and infrared spectra from precipitates formed by abiotic oxidation under similar conditions. The amorphous sediments, produced by bacterial oxidation, exhibited a distinctive fibroporous microstructure when examined by scanning electron microscopy. Infrared spectra indicated outer-sphere coordination of Fe(III) by sulfate ions, as well as inner-sphere coordination by water molecules and bridging hydroxo groups. In the presence of excess sulfate and appropriate monovalent cations, jarosites, instead of amorphous ferric hydroxysulfates, precipitated from bacterially oxidized iron solutions. It is proposed that the jarositic precipitates result from the conversion of outer-sphere (Td) sulfate, present in a soluble polymeric Fe(III) complex, to inner-sphere (C3v) bridging sulfate. The amorphous precipitates result from the further polymerization of hydroxo-linked iron octahedra and charge stabilized aggregation of the resulting iron complexes in solution. This view was supported by observations that bacterially oxidized iron solutions gave rise to either amorphous or jarositic sediments in response to ionic environments imposed after oxidation had been completed and the bacteria had been removed by filtration. Images PMID:16345996

  6. Energy pulse bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    To eliminate many of the present termination problems a technique called energy pulse bonding (EPB) was developed. The process demonstrated the capability of: (1) joining conductors without prior removal of insulations, (2) joining conductors without danger of brittle intermetallics, (3) increased joint temperature capability, (4) simultaneous formation of several bonds, (5) capability of higher joint density, and (6) a production oriented process. The following metals were successfully bonded in the solid state: copper, beryllium copper, phosphor bronze, aluminum, brass, and Kovar.

  7. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  8. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  9. Two distinctly regulated genes are required for ferric reduction, the first step of iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Georgatsou, E; Alexandraki, D

    1994-01-01

    Iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves at least two steps: reduction of ferric to ferrous ions extracellularly and transport of the reduced ions through the plasma membrane. We have cloned and molecularly characterized FRE2, a gene which is shown to account, together with FRE1, for the total membrane-associated ferric reductase activity of the cell. Although not similar at the nucleotide level, the two genes encode proteins with significantly similar primary structures and very similar hydrophobicity profiles. The FRE1 and FRE2 proteins are functionally related, having comparable properties as ferric reductases. FRE2 expression, like FRE1 expression, is induced by iron deprivation, and at least part of this control takes place at the transcriptional level, since 156 nucleotides upstream of the initiator AUG conferred iron-dependent regulation when fused to a heterologous gene. However, the two gene products have distinct temporal regulation of their activities during cell growth. Images PMID:8164662

  10. Biological regeneration of ferric (Fe3+) solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3+ are reduced to ferrous ions Fe2+. During the industrial regeneration of Fe3+, nutrients and trace minerals usually provided in a laboratory setup are not present and this depletion of nutrients may have a negative impact on the bacteria responsible for ferrous iron oxidation and may probably affect the oxidation rate. In this study, the effect of nutrients and trace minerals on ferrous iron oxidation have been investigated and the results showed that the presence of nutrients and trace minerals affects the efficiency of bacterial Fe2+oxidation. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the geotextile support material was also conducted and the results showed that the iron precipitate deposits appear to play a direct role on the bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26038932

  11. Valence bond entanglement entropy.

    PubMed

    Alet, Fabien; Capponi, Sylvain; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Mambrini, Matthieu

    2007-09-14

    We introduce for SU(2) quantum spin systems the valence bond entanglement entropy as a counting of valence bond spin singlets shared by two subsystems. For a large class of antiferromagnetic systems, it can be calculated in all dimensions with quantum Monte Carlo simulations in the valence bond basis. We show numerically that this quantity displays all features of the von Neumann entanglement entropy for several one-dimensional systems. For two-dimensional Heisenberg models, we find a strict area law for a valence bond solid state and multiplicative logarithmic corrections for the Néel phase. PMID:17930468

  12. Dissociation of a ferric maltol complex and its subsequent metabolism during absorption across the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barrand, M. A.; Callingham, B. A.; Dobbin, P.; Hider, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    1. The fate and disposition of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol after intravenous administration were investigated in anaesthetized rats. Immediate dissociation of ferric iron from maltol took place in the circulation even with high doses of ferric maltol (containing 1 mg elemental iron). In plasma samples withdrawn within 1 min of injection and subjected to gel filtration, 59Fe eluted with the high molecular weight proteins whilst the tritium was associated with low molecular weight material. 2. The rates of elimination of 59Fe and of tritium from the plasma and their ultimate fate were very different. The half life for 59Fe in the plasma was around 70 min and 59Fe appeared mainly in the bone marrow and liver. There was an initial rapid exit of tritium from the plasma with a half life of around 12 min. This was followed either by a plateau or by a rise in tritium levels, involving entry of maltol metabolites into the circulation. These metabolites could be recovered in the urine. 3. Entry of 59Fe and of tritium into the blood plasma after intraduodenal administration of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol was also very different. At low doses of ferric maltol (containing 100 micrograms elemental iron), the tritium appeared in the plasma in highest amounts within seconds and then decreased whilst there was a slow rise in 59Fe levels. At higher doses of ferric maltol (containing 7 mg elemental iron), levels of 59Fe in the plasma were highest at 5 min and then fell whereas tritium levels rose steadily. Mucosal processing of 59Fe prevented further entry of iron at high dose into the circulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1364845

  13. Synthesis of waste cooking oil based biodiesel via ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide / zirconia nanoparticle solid acid catalyst: influence of ferric and manganese dopants.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah H; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide/zirconia (Fe-Mn- MoO3/ZrO2) (FMMZ) solid acid catalyst for production of biodiesel was demonstrated. FMMZ is produced through impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization of FMMZ had been done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement. The effect of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME's) yield on the reactions variables such as reaction temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also assessed. The catalyst was used to convert the waste cooking oil into corresponding methyl esters (95.6%±0.15) within 5 h at 200℃ reaction temperature, 600 rpm stirring speed, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol and 4% w/w catalyst loading. The reported catalyst was successfully recycled in six connective experiments without loss in activity. Moreover, the fuel properties of WCOME's were also reported using ASTM D 6751 methods. PMID:25843280

  14. Relationship between reaction rate constants of organic pollutants and their molecular descriptors during Fenton oxidation and in situ formed ferric-oxyhydroxides.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Shen, Zhemin; Su, Pingru

    2016-05-01

    Fenton oxidation is a promising water treatment method to degrade organic pollutants. In this study, 30 different organic compounds were selected and their reaction rate constants (k) were determined for the Fenton oxidation process. Gaussian09 and Material Studio software sets were used to carry out calculations and obtain values of 10 different molecular descriptors for each studied compound. Ferric-oxyhydroxide coagulation experiments were conducted to determine the coagulation percentage. Based upon the adsorption capacity, all of the investigated organic compounds were divided into two groups (Group A and Group B). The percentage adsorption of organic compounds in Group A was less than 15% (wt./wt.) and that in the Group B was higher than 15% (wt./wt.). For Group A, removal of the compounds by oxidation was the dominant process while for Group B, removal by both oxidation and coagulation (as a synergistic process) took place. Results showed that the relationship between the rate constants (k values) and the molecular descriptors of Group A was more pronounced than for Group B compounds. For the oxidation-dominated process, EHOMO and Fukui indices (f(0)x, f(-)x, f(+)x) were the most significant factors. The influence of bond order was more significant for the synergistic process of oxidation and coagulation than for the oxidation-dominated process. The influences of all other molecular descriptors on the synergistic process were weaker than on the oxidation-dominated process. PMID:27155432

  15. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  16. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  17. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  18. Earth-Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norgaard, Jim

    1988-01-01

    Defines "earth bonding" as dynamic interaction between individual and physical environment. Examines methods and goals of traditional environmental education. Describes development of five-day camping workshop for 11 outdoor education teachers. Describes how workshop facilitated earth bonding for teachers. Calls for further research in "bonding…

  19. Molecular, Antigenic, and Functional Characteristics of Ferric Enterobactin Receptor CfrA in Campylobacter jejuni ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ximin; Xu, Fuzhou; Lin, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The ferric enterobactin receptor CfrA not only is responsible for high-affinity iron acquisition in Campylobacter jejuni but also is essential for C. jejuni colonization in animal intestines. In this study, we determined the feasibility of targeting the iron-regulated outer membrane protein CfrA for immune protection against Campylobacter colonization. Alignment of complete CfrA sequences from 15 Campylobacter isolates showed that the levels of amino acid identity for CfrA range from 89% to 98%. Immunoblotting analysis using CfrA-specific antibodies demonstrated that CfrA was dramatically induced under iron-restricted conditions and was widespread and produced in 32 Campylobacter primary strains from various sources and from geographically diverse areas. The immunoblotting survey results were highly correlated with the results of an enterobactin growth promotion assay and a PCR analysis using cfrA-specific primers. Inactivation of the cfrA gene also impaired norepinephrine-mediated growth promotion, suggesting that CfrA is required for C. jejuni to sense intestinal stress hormones during colonization. Complementation of the cfrA mutant with a wild-type cfrA allele in trans fully restored the production and function of CfrA. A growth assay using purified anti-CfrA immunoglobulin G demonstrated that specific CfrA antibodies could block the function of CfrA, which diminished ferric enterobactin-mediated growth promotion under iron-restricted conditions. The inhibitory effect of CfrA antibodies was dose dependent. Immunoblotting analysis also indicated that CfrA was expressed and immunogenic in chickens experimentally infected with C. jejuni. Amino acid substitution mutagenesis demonstrated that R327, a basic amino acid that is highly conserved in CfrA, plays a critical role in ferric enterobactin acquisition in C. jejuni. Together, these findings strongly suggest that CfrA is a promising vaccine candidate for preventing and controlling Campylobacter infection in

  20. Shape Bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  1. Halogen bonding anion recognition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Asha; Beer, Paul D

    2016-07-01

    A halogen bond is an attractive non-covalent interaction between an electrophilic region in a covalently bonded halogen atom and a Lewis base. While these interactions have long been exploited as a tool in crystal engineering their powerful ability to direct supramolecular self-assembly and molecular recognition processes in solution has, until recently, been overlooked. During the last decade however an ever-increasing number of studies on solution-phase halogen-bond-mediated anion recognition processes has emerged. This Feature Article summarises advancements which have been made thus far in this rapidly developing research area. We survey the use of iodoperfluoroarene, haloimidazolium and halotriazole/triazolium halogen-bond-donor motifs in anion receptor design, before providing an account of our research into the application of mechanically interlocked rotaxane and catenane frameworks as halogen bonding anion host systems. PMID:27273600

  2. Ultrasonically bonded value assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvinski, R. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A valve apparatus capable of maintaining a fluid-tight seal over a relatively long period of time by releasably bonding a valve member to its seat is described. The valve member is bonded or welded to the seat and then released by the application of the same energy to the bond joint. The valve member is held in place during the bonding by a clamping device. An appropriate force device can activate the opening and closing of the valve member. Various combinations of material for the valve member and valve seat can be utilized to provide an adequate sealing bond. Aluminum oxide, stainless steel, inconel, tungsten carbide as hard materials and copper, aluminum, titanium, silver, and gold as soft materials are suggested.

  3. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  4. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    PubMed

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (<20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is a putative organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To elucidate factors influencing the functions of these and related heme proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(ω)-H···¯O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN¯, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O¯) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(ω)-H to ¯O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. PMID:22104301

  5. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, D. M. Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S.; Brash, Alan R.; Dawson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (< 20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is an organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To shed light on the functional differences among these three proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme proteins in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric His93Tyr Mb, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg+-Nω-H … O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN−, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O2 states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O−) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg+-Nω-H to −O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. PMID:22104301

  6. Hydrous ferric oxide precipitation in the presence of nonmetabolizing bacteria: Constraints on the mechanism of a biotic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancourt, Denis G.; Thibault, Pierre-Jean; Mavrocordatos, Denis; Lamarche, Gilles

    2005-02-01

    We have used room temperature and cryogenic 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), mineral magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study the synthetic precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) prepared either in the absence (abiotic, a-HFO) or presence (biotic, b-HFO) of nonmetabolizing bacterial cells ( Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus licheniformis, ˜10 8 cells/mL) and under otherwise identical chemical conditions, starting from Fe(II) (10 -2, 10 -3, or 10 -4 mol/L) under open oxic conditions and at different pH (6-9). We have also performed the first Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements of bacterial cell wall ( Bacillus subtilis) surface complexed Fe, where Fe(III) (10 -3.5-10 -4.5 mol/L) was added to a fixed concentration of cells (˜10 8 cells/mL) under open oxic conditions and at various pH (2.5-4.3). We find that non-metabolic bacterial cell wall surface complexation of Fe is not passive in that it affects Fe speciation in at least two ways: (1) it can reduce Fe(III) to sorbed-Fe 2+ by a proposed steric and charge transfer effect and (2) it stabilizes Fe(II) as sorbed-Fe 2+ against ambient oxidation. The cell wall sorption of Fe occurs in a manner that is not compatible with incorporation into the HFO structure (different coordination environment and stabilization of the ferrous state) and the cell wall-sorbed Fe is not chemically bonded to the HFO particle when they coexist (the sorbed Fe is not magnetically polarized by the HFO particle in its magnetically ordered state). This invalidates the concept that sorption is the first step in a heterogeneous nucleation of HFO onto bacterial cell walls. Both the a-HFOs and the b-HFOs are predominantly varieties of ferrihydrite (Fh), often containing admixtures of nanophase lepidocrocite (nLp), yet they show significant abiotic/biotic differences: Biotic Fh has less intraparticle (including surface region) atomic order (Mössbauer quadrupole splitting), smaller primary

  7. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  8. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens by heated combinations of nitrite, sulfur, and ferrous or ferric ions.

    PubMed Central

    Asan, T; Solberg, M

    1976-01-01

    Heating mixtures of sodium nitrite, cysteine, and either ferrous sulfate or ferric chloride at 121 C for 20 min at pH 6.5 or 6.3 produced a potent inhibitor of Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells and spores when added to previously heat-sterilized fluid thioglycolate medium. When the mixtures containing FeSO4 at pH 5.2 or FeCl3 at pH 2.7 were heated, the inhibitory effect was not produced. These responses seem to eliminate the possibility that cysteine nitrosothiol is the agent responsible for the heated-nitrite inhibition known as the Perigo effect. The variable pH responses also cast doubt upon the role of the black Roussin salt as the agent of the Perigo effect. PMID:8004

  9. Moessbauer search for ferric oxide phases in lunar materials and simulated lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forester, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were carried out on lunar fines and on simulated lunar glasses containing magnetic-like precipitates with the primary objective of determining how much, if any, ferric oxide is present in the lunar soils. Although unambiguous evidence of lunar Fe(3+) phases was not obtained, an upper limit was estimated from different portions of the Moessbauer spectra to be between 0.1 and 0.4 wt.% (as Fe3O4). A smaller than 62 microns fraction of 15021,118 showed 0.5 wt.% ferromagnetic iron at 300 K in as-returned condition. After heating to 650 C in an evacuated, sealed quartz tube for 1400 hours, the same sample exhibited 1 wt.% ferromagnetic iron at room temperature. An accompanying decrease in excess absorption area near zero velocity was noted. Thus, the result of the vacuum heat treatment was to convert fine grained iron to larger particles, apparently without the oxidation effects commonly reported.

  10. Adsorptive bubble separation of zinc and cadmium cations in presence of ferric and aluminum hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Kazimierz

    2005-06-15

    The adsorptive bubble separation of zinc and cadmium cations from solution in the presence of ferric and aluminum hydroxides was carried out by means of Tween 80 (nonionic surfactant), and sodium laurate and stearate (anionic surfactants). The mechanism of metal removal is different depending on the nature of the surfactant used. The removal of zinc cations by adsorbing colloid flotation is higher than that of cadmium cations. It increases with increases in the amount of hydroxide precipitate and the concentration of Tween 80. The removal of zinc cations by ion flotation is lower than that of cadmium cations. It does not change with increases in the hydroxide amount. It increases, however, with increased sodium laurate or stearate concentration. Both separation methods turned out to be helpful for studying both the solution's structure and the interactions at the solution-solid interface. PMID:15897071

  11. Kinetics of the complexation of ferric iron with 8-hydroxyquinoline and KELEX 100

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, K.Y; Lemert, R.M.; Chang, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    The complexation reactions of ferric iron with 8-Hydroxyquinoline and KELEX-100 in both aqueous and methanol solutions were studied by using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. In the aqueous solutions, the observed rate law was found to be first-order with respect to both iron(III) and oxine and inverse-first-order with respect to the hydrogen ion. While in the methanol solution, the rate law was first-order with respect to iron(III) and KELEX-100. Reaction pathes with the formation of the first complex, FeAS , from either FeT or Fe(OH)S were proposed to explain the observed rate law. The activation energies were found to be 5.5 kcal/g-mole and 15 kcal/g-mole for the aqueous and methanol solutions, respectively.

  12. Authigenic vivianite in Potomac River sediments: control by ferric oxy-hydroxides.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, P.P.; Parkhurst, D.L.; Callender, E.

    1983-01-01

    Sand-size aggregates of vivianite crystals occur in the uppermost sediments of the Potomac River estuary immediately downstream from the outfall of a sewage treatment plant at the southernmost boundary of the District of Columbia, USA. They are most abundant in a small area of coarse sand (dredge spoil) which contrasts with the adjacent, much finer sediments. The sewage outfall supplies both reducing conditions and abundant phosphate. Analyses and calculations indicate that the pore waters in all the adjacent sediments are supersaturated with respect to vivianite. Its concentration in the coarse sand is attributed to the absence there of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides, which are present in the finer sediments and preferentially absorb the phosphate ion. -H.R.B.

  13. Treatment of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits with dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, J.D.; Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.

    1989-01-01

    Dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (/sup 165/Dy-FHMA) was used as an agent of radiation synovectomy in an antigen-induced arthritis model in New Zealand white rabbits. Animals were killed up to 6 months after treatment. /sup 165/Dy-FHMA was found to have a potent but temporary antiinflammatory effect on synovium for up to 3 months after treatment. Treated knees also showed significant preservation of articular cartilage architecture and proteoglycan content compared with untreated controls, but only during the first 3 months after treatment. In animals killed 3 and 6 months after treatment there were only minimal differences between the treated and untreated knees, indicating that the antiinflammatory effects on synovial tissue and articular cartilage preservation were not sustained.

  14. Enhanced dark hydrogen fermentation by addition of ferric oxide nanoparticles using Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-05-01

    Ferric oxide nanoparticles (FONPs) were used to facilitate dark hydrogen fermentation using Enterobacter aerogenes. The hydrogen yield of glucose increased from 164.5±2.29 to 192.4±1.14mL/g when FONPs concentration increased from 0 to 200mg/L. SEM images of E. aerogenes demonstrated the existence of bacterial nanowire among cells, suggesting FONPs served as electron conduits to enhance electron transfer. TEM showed cellular internalization of FONPs, indicating hydrogenase synthesis and activity was potentially promoted due to the released iron element. When further increasing FONPs concentration to 400mg/L, the hydrogen yield of glucose decreased to 147.2±2.54mL/g. Soluble metabolic products revealed FONPs enhanced acetate pathway of hydrogen production, but weakened ethanol pathway. This shift of metabolic pathways allowed more nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for reducing proton to hydrogen. PMID:26890796

  15. Arsenic sorption onto titanium dioxide, granular ferric hydroxide and activated alumina: batch and dynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Maia R; Passalía, Claudio; Zalazar, Cristina S; Brandi, Rodolfo J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the efficiencies of three different adsorbents for arsenic (As) removal from water: titanium dioxide (TiO2), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) and activated alumina (AA). Equilibrium experiments for dissolved arsenite and arsenate were carried out through batch tests. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were adopted and their parameters were estimated by non-linear regressions. In addition, dynamic experiments were performed in mini fixed bed columns and breakthrough curves were obtained for each combination of sorbate/adsorbent. Experimental results obtained by column assays were compared with predictions of well-known breakthrough models (Bohart-Adams and Clark). Results indicate that As(V) is more easily adsorbed than As(III) for AA and GFH, while TiO2 has a similar behavior for both species. The titanium-based material is the most efficient adsorbent to carry out the process, followed by the GFH. PMID:25723069

  16. Ferric sulphate catalysed esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ooi, Chun Weng; Motala, Nafisa Osman; Ismail, Mohd Anas Farhan

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) in waste cooking oil catalysed by ferric sulphate was studied as a pre-treatment step for biodiesel production. The effects of reaction time, methanol to oil ratio, catalyst concentration and temperature on the conversion of FFA were investigated on a laboratory scale. The results showed that the conversion of FFA reached equilibrium after an hour, and was positively dependent on the methanol to oil molar ratio and temperature. An optimum catalyst concentration of 2 wt.% gave maximum FFA conversion of 59.2%. For catalyst loadings of 2 wt.% and below, this catalysed esterification was proposed to follow a pseudo-homogeneous pathway akin to mineral acid-catalysed esterification, driven by the H(+) ions produced through the hydrolysis of metal complex [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+) (aq). PMID:20435468

  17. Degradation of ferric chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by bacterium isolated from deep-sea stalked barnacle.

    PubMed

    Imada, Chiaki; Harada, Yohei; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2005-01-01

    Twenty strains of marine bacteria that degrade ferric chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (Fe-EDTA) were isolated from among 117 strains collected from a marine environment. Among them strain 02-N-2, which was isolated from stalked barnacle collected from the deep sea in the Indian Ocean, had the highest Fe-EDTA degradation ability and was selected for further study. The strain showed high Fe-EDTA degradation ability at different seawater concentrations. In addition, the intact cells of this strain had the ability to degrade such metal-EDTAs as Ca, Cu, and Mg. The strain was an aerobic, gram-variable, rod-shaped organism. The results of various taxonomic studies revealed that the strain had significant similarity to Bacillus jeotgali JCM 10885(T), which was isolated from a Korean traditional fermented seafood, Jeotgal. PMID:15747087

  18. Ferric chloride-induced murine carotid arterial injury: A model of redox pathology☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Silverstein, Roy L.

    2013-01-01

    Ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for platelet aggregation to occlude blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular damage that is pathologically relevant to thrombotic disease. We have refined the traditional FeCl3-induced carotid artery model making the data highly reproducible with lower variation. This paper will describe our artifices and report the role of varying the oxidative damage by varying FeCl3 concentrations and exposure. To explore a maximum difference between experimental groups, adjustment of the selected FeCl3 dose and exposure duration may be necessary. PMID:25101237

  19. Concerted loop motion triggers induced fit of FepA to ferric enterobactin

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Chuck R.; Jordan, Lorne; Trinh, Vy; Schuerch, Daniel W.; Gala, Amparo; Hanson, Mathew; Shipelskiy, Yan; Majumdar, Aritri; Newton, Salete M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of fluorophore-labeled Escherichia coli FepA described dynamic actions of its surface loops during binding and transport of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt). When FeEnt bound to fluoresceinated FepA, in living cells or outer membrane fragments, quenching of fluorophore emissions reflected conformational motion of the external vestibular loops. We reacted Cys sulfhydryls in seven surface loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7 L8, and L11) with fluorophore maleimides. The target residues had different accessibilities, and the labeled loops themselves showed variable extents of quenching and rates of motion during ligand binding. The vestibular loops closed around FeEnt in about a second, in the order L3 > L11 > L7 > L2 > L5 > L8 > L4. This sequence suggested that the loops bind the metal complex like the fingers of two hands closing on an object, by individually adsorbing to the iron chelate. Fluorescence from L3 followed a biphasic exponential decay as FeEnt bound, but fluorescence from all the other loops followed single exponential decay processes. After binding, the restoration of fluorescence intensity (from any of the labeled loops) mirrored cellular uptake that depleted FeEnt from solution. Fluorescence microscopic images also showed FeEnt transport, and demonstrated that ferric siderophore uptake uniformly occurs throughout outer membrane, including at the poles of the cells, despite the fact that TonB, its inner membrane transport partner, was not detectable at the poles. PMID:24981231

  20. Proton coupling in the ligand-binding reaction of ferric cytochrome P-450 from Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Totani, K.; Iizuka, T.; Shimada, H.; Makino, R.; Ishimura, Y.

    1983-04-01

    Effects of pH on the ligand-binding reactions of ferric heme in cytochrome P-450 from Pseudomonas putida (camphor 5-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.15.1) were studied by using cyanide, N-methylimidazole, pyridine, and ethylisocyanide as ligands. In all cases, affinity of the ferric heme for the ligand was found to increase as pH of the medium was raised from around 6 to 9. Depending on the ligand, the increase was 10- to 1000-fold and the shapes of their pH-affinity curves were remarkably different. Analyses such pH profiles disclosed the presence of a dissociable group in the enzyme with a pK value of approximately 9.5 and that its ionization greatly enhanced the affinity of the heme for ligands. When a dissociable ligand such as hydrogen cyanide and N-methylimidazole was used, the dissociated form of the ligand had a higher affinity toward the heme than the undissociated form. The shapes of the pH-affinity curves were successfully simulated as overlapping curves of ionization reactions of the ligand and the dissociable group. In addition, size of the ligand molecule was shown to be also important in the binding reaction: relatively large molecules such as pyridine, ethylisocyanide, and N-methylimidazole bound to the enzyme in a competitive manner against d-camphor concentration, whereas the binding of a smaller molecule such as cyanide was inhibited by the substrate in a noncompetitive manner. On the basis of these findings, control mechanisms for the ligand-binding reactions of the cytochrome P-450 from P. putida are discussed.

  1. Ferric carboxymaltose: A revolution in the treatment of postpartum anemia in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Setu; Samal, Sunil K; Mahapatra, Purna C; Samal, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the present study is to compare the safety and efficacy of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), intravenous (IV) iron sucrose and oral iron in the treatment of post = partum anemia (PPA). Materials and Methods: A total of 366 women admitted to SCB Medical College, Cuttack between September 2010 and August 2012 suffering from PPA hemoglobin (Hb) <10 g/dL were randomly assigned to receive either oral iron or IV FCM or iron sucrose. FCM, IV iron sucrose, and oral iron were given as per the protocol. Changes in hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin levels at 2 and 6 weeks after treatment were measured and analyzed using ANOVA. Adverse effects to drug administration were also recorded. Results: A statistically significant increase in Hb and serum ferritin level were observed in all three groups, but the increase in FCM group was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than conventional iron sucrose and oral iron group. The mean increase in Hb after 2 weeks was 0.8, 2.4, and 3.2 g/dL and 2.1, 3.4, and 4.4 g/dL at 6 weeks in oral iron, iron sucrose and FCM groups, respectively. The mean increase in serum ferritin levels after 2 weeks was 2.5, 193.1, and 307.1 and 14.2, 64, and 106.7 ng/mL after 6 weeks in oral iron, iron sucrose and FCM groups, respectively. Adverse drug reactions were significantly less (P < 0.001) in FCM group when compared with other two groups. Conclusion: Ferric carboxymaltose elevates Hb level and restores iron stores faster than IV iron sucrose and oral iron, without any severe adverse reactions. There was better overall satisfaction reported by the patients who received FCM treatment. PMID:25664264

  2. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  3. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  4. Perturbation-response scanning reveals ligand entry-exit mechanisms of ferric binding protein.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Canan; Atilgan, Ali Rana

    2009-10-01

    We study apo and holo forms of the bacterial ferric binding protein (FBP) which exhibits the so-called ferric transport dilemma: it uptakes iron from the host with remarkable affinity, yet releases it with ease in the cytoplasm for subsequent use. The observations fit the "conformational selection" model whereby the existence of a weakly populated, higher energy conformation that is stabilized in the presence of the ligand is proposed. We introduce a new tool that we term perturbation-response scanning (PRS) for the analysis of remote control strategies utilized. The approach relies on the systematic use of computational perturbation/response techniques based on linear response theory, by sequentially applying directed forces on single-residues along the chain and recording the resulting relative changes in the residue coordinates. We further obtain closed-form expressions for the magnitude and the directionality of the response. Using PRS, we study the ligand release mechanisms of FBP and support the findings by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the residue-by-residue displacements between the apo and the holo forms, as determined from the X-ray structures, are faithfully reproduced by perturbations applied on the majority of the residues of the apo form. However, once the stabilizing ligand (Fe) is integrated to the system in holo FBP, perturbing only a few select residues successfully reproduces the experimental displacements. Thus, iron uptake by FBP is a favored process in the fluctuating environment of the protein, whereas iron release is controlled by mechanisms including chelation and allostery. The directional analysis that we implement in the PRS methodology implicates the latter mechanism by leading to a few distant, charged, and exposed loop residues. Upon perturbing these, irrespective of the direction of the operating forces, we find that the cap residues involved in iron release are made to operate coherently, facilitating release of the

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Aluminum Sulfate and Ferric Sulfate-Induced Coagulations as Pretreatment of Microfiltration for Treatment of Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yali; Dong, Bingzhi; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, were tested to reduce natural organic matter (NOM) as a pretreatment prior to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration (MF) membranes for potable water treatment. The results showed that the two coagulants exhibited different treatment performance in NOM removal. Molecular weight (MW) distributions of NOM in the tested surface raw water were concentrated at 3–5 kDa and approximately 0.2 kDa. Regardless of the coagulant species and dosages, the removal of 0.2 kDa NOM molecules was limited. In contrast, NOM at 3–5 kDa were readily removed with increasing coagulant dosages. In particular, aluminum sulfate favorably removed NOM near 5 kDa, whereas ferric chloride tended to reduce 3 kDa organic substances. Although aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride could improve the flux of the ensuing MF treatment, the optimal coagulant dosages to achieve effective pretreatment were different: 2–30 mg/L for aluminum sulfate and >15 mg/L for ferric chloride. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the membrane-filtered coagulated raw water showed that coagulation efficiency dramatically affected membrane flux and that good coagulation properties can reduce membrane fouling. PMID:26075726

  6. Effect of Fe-chelating complexes on a novel M2FC performance with ferric chloride and ferricyanide catholytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungmi; Lee, Ilgyu; Han, Jong-In

    2012-01-01

    As an effort to better utilize the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology, we previously proposed an innovative MFC system named M2FC consisting of ferric-based MFC part and ferrous-based fuel cell (FC) part. In this reactor, ferric ion, the catholyte in the MFC part, was efficiently regenerated by the FC part with the generation of additional electricity. When both units were operated separately, the ferric-based MFC part produced approximately 1360 mW m(-2) of power density with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-citrate as anolyte. The ferrous-based FC part with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-EDTA as anolyte displayed the highest power density (1500 mW m(-2)), while that with ferricyanide as catholyte and Fe-noligand as anolyte had the lowest power density (380 mW m(-2)). The types of catholytes and chelating complexes as anolyte were found to play important roles in the reduction of ferric ions and oxidation of ferrous ion. Linear sweep voltammetry results supported that the cathode electrolytes were electrically active and these agreed well with the M2FC reactor performance. These results clearly showed that ligands played critical role in the efficiency and rate for recycling iron ion and thus the M2FC performance. PMID:22018860

  7. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  8. The reevaluation of the ferric thiocyanate assay for lipid hydroperoxides with special considerations of the mechanistic aspects of the response.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, B; Katusin-Razem, B; Razem, D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanistic aspects of the spectrophotometric method of analysis of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) based on the oxidation of ferrous to ferric ion and subsequent complexation of the latter by thiocyanate are considered. The method of analysis, as revised by us, was carried out in the same solvent that had been used for the extraction of lipids from the sample, a deoxygenated chloroform:methanol or a dichloromethane:methanol (2:1, v/v) mixture, and used a single solution containing both reagents, Fe2+ and SCN-, for developing the response. In that solvent, total lipids up to 5 mg/ml did not interfere, and linear increase of the absorbance of ferric thiocyanate complex was obtained up to 2 x 10(-5) M LOOH. Molar absorptivity of the ferric thiocyanate complex expressed per mol of LOOH was determined as 58,440 M-1 cm-1, based on the average of four ferric ions produced by each LOOH molecule. The estimated lowest detectable limit was about 170 pmol LOOH/ml of analyzed solution, which corresponded to about 50 mumol LOOH/kg lipid in complex natural mixtures. In addition to good sensitivity, and in contrast to some other more popular spectrophotometric assays for LOOH, the method is responsive also to hydroperoxides of mono- and di-unsaturated fatty acids. The method, thus, provides an easy, rapid, sensitive, and complete measure of hydroperoxidation of lipids. PMID:8791093

  9. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Fadem, Stephen Z.; Kant, Kotagal S.; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B.; Negoi, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  10. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Yagil, Yoram; Fadem, Stephen Z; Kant, Kotagal S; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B; Negoi, Dana

    2015-09-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  11. Oxidation of sulphide minerals--I: determination of ferrous and ferric iron in samples of pyrrhotite, pyrite and chalcopyrite.

    PubMed

    Steger, H F

    1977-04-01

    A method has been developed for determining small amounts of both ferrous and ferric iron in oxidized samples of pyrrhotite, pyrite and chalcopyrite. The oxidized iron is selectively dissolved in 10M phosphoric acid under reflux and can be determined with the accuracy generally accepted in chemical phase analysis. PMID:18962075

  12. The Halogen Bond

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  13. The Halogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Milani, Roberto; Pilati, Tullio; Priimagi, Arri; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    2016-02-24

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  14. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Junk-Bond Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Describes how a long-predicted decline in the fortunes of small private colleges is beginning to show up in the bond market, as the number of colleges now rated in the junk category has nearly doubled. (EV)

  16. Detecting Defective Solder Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R.; Barney, J.; Decker, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Method is noncontact and nondestructive. Technique detects solder bonds in solar array of other large circuit board, using thermal-imaging camera. Board placed between heat lamp and camera. Poor joints indiated by "cold" spots on the infrared image.

  17. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operations bond or unit bond. 24.147 Section 24.147 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of Surety § 24.147 Operations bond or unit...

  18. Possible Association of Ferrous Phosphates and Ferric Sulfates in S-rich Soil on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Schroeder, C.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit explored Gusev Crater to look for signs of ancient aqueous activity, assess past environmental conditions and suitability for life. Spirit excavated light-toned, S-rich soils at several locations. These are likely of hydrothermal, possibly fumarolic origin. At a location dubbed Paso Robles the light-toned soil was also rich in P - a signature from surrounding rock. While S is mainly bound in ferric hydrated sulfates [1], the mineralogy of P is ill-constrained [2]. P is a key element for life and its mineralogy constrains its availability. Ferrous phases observed in Paso Robles Mössbauer spectra may represent olivine and pyroxene from surrounding basaltic soil [1] or ferrous phosphate minerals [3]. Phosphate is well-known to complex and stabilize Fe 2+ against oxidation to Fe 3+ . Schröder et al. [3] proposed a formation pathway of ferrous phosphate/ferric sulfate associations: sulfuric acid reacts with basalt containing apatite, forming CaSO4 and phosphoric acid. The phosphoric and/or excess sulfuric acid reacts with olivine, forming Fe2+-phosphate and sulfate. The phosphate is less soluble and precipitates. Ferrous sulfate remains in solution and is oxidized as pH increases. To verify this pathway, we dissolved Fe2+-chloride and Na-phosphate salts in sulfuric acid inside an anoxic glovebox. The solution was titrated to pH 6 by adding NaOH when a first precipitate formed, which was ferrous phosphate according to Mössbauer spectroscopy (MB). At that point the solution was removed from the glovebox and allowed to evaporate in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, leading to the oxidation of Fe2+. The evaporation rate was controlled by keeping the suspensions at different temperatures; pH was monitored during the evaporation process. The final precipitates were analyzed by MB and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), comparable to MER MB and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer instrument datasets, and complementary techniques such as X

  19. The Phosphate Binder Ferric Citrate and Mineral Metabolism and Inflammatory Markers in Maintenance Dialysis Patients: Results From Prespecified Analyses of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Buren, Peter N.; Lewis, Julia B.; Dwyer, Jamie P.; Greene, Tom; Middleton, John; Sika, Mohammed; Umanath, Kausik; Abraham, Josephine D.; Arfeen, Shahabul S.; Bowline, Isai G.; Chernin, Gil; Fadem, Stephen Z.; Goral, Simin; Koury, Mark; Sinsakul, Marvin V.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders are the cornerstone of hyperphosphatemia management in dialysis patients. Ferric citrate is an iron-based oral phosphate binder that effectively lowers serum phosphorus levels. Study Design 52-week, open-label, phase 3, randomized, controlled trial for safety-profile assessment. Setting & Participants Maintenance dialysis patients with serum phosphorus levels ≥6.0 mg/dL after washout of prior phosphate binders. Intervention 2:1 randomization to ferric citrate or active control (sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate). Outcomes Changes in mineral bone disease, protein-energy wasting/inflammation, and occurrence of adverse events after 1 year. Measurements Serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, phosphorus, aluminum, white blood cell count, percentage of lymphocytes, serum urea nitrogen, and bicarbonate. Results There were 292 participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate, and 149, to active control. Groups were well matched. For mean changes from baseline, phosphorus levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−2.04 ± 1.99 [SD] vs −2.18 ± 2.25 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.9); serum calcium levels increased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (0.22 ± 0.90 vs 0.31 ± 0.95 mg/dL; P = 0.2). Hypercalcemia occurred in 4 participants receiving calcium acetate. Parathyroid hormone levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−167.1 ± 399.8 vs −152.7 ± 392.1 pg/mL; P = 0.8). Serum albumin, bicarbonate, serum urea nitrogen, white blood cell count and percentage of lymphocytes, and aluminum values were similar between ferric citrate and active control. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower in participants receiving sevelamer than those receiving ferric citrate and calcium acetate. Fewer participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate had serious adverse events compared with active control. Limitations Open

  20. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  1. Comparative stability of the bioresorbable ferric crosslinked hyaluronic acid adhesion prevention solutions.

    PubMed

    Luu, Hoan-My Do; Chen, Angela; Isayeva, Irada S

    2013-08-01

    The Intergel® ferric crosslinked hyaluronate (FeHA) adhesion prevention solution (APS) (FDA) is associated with serious post-operative complications (Henley, http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/features/gynecare-intergel/intergel-timeline.html, 2007; FDA, 2003; Roman et al., Fertil Steril 2005, 83 Suppl 1:1113-1118; Tang et al., Ann Surg 2006;243(4):449-455; Wiseman, Fertil Steril 2006;86(3):771; Wiseman, Fertil Steril 2006;85(4):e7). This prompted us to examine the in situ stability of crosslinked HA materials to hyaluronidase lyase degradation. Variables such as ferric ionic crosslink density, HA concentration, gel geometry, and molecular weight (MW) of HA polymer were studied. Various formulations of the crosslinked "in house" [Isayeva et al., J Biomed Mater Res: Part B - Appl Biomater 2010, 95B (1):9-18] FeHA (0.5%, w/v; 30, 50, 90% crosslinked), the Intergel® FeHA (0.5%, w/v; 90%), and the non-crosslinked HA (0.05-0.5%, w/v) were degraded at a fixed activity of hyaluronidase lyase from Streptomyces hyalurolyticus (Hyase) at 37°C over time according to the method [Payan et al., J Chrom B: Biomed Sci Appl 1991;566(1):9-18]. Under our conditions, the data show that the crosslink density affects degradation the most, followed by HA concentration and then gel geometry. We found that MW has no effect. Our results are one possible explanation of the observations that the Intergel® FeHA APS (0.5%, w/v; 90%) material persisted an order of magnitude longer than expected [t1/2 = 500 hrs vs. t1/2 = 50 hrs (FDA; Johns et al., Fertil Steril 1997;68(1):37-42)]. These data also demonstrate the sensitivity of the in vitro hyaluronidase assay to predict the in situ stability of crosslinked HA medical products as previously reported [Sall et al., Polym Degrad Stabil 2007;92(5):915-919]. PMID:23559362

  2. How the Ferric Iron Proportion in Basalts Changes Towards the Iceland Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O.; Moussallam, Y.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Murton, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Planetary differentiation has been driven by the Earth's giant convective system, which has been redistributing heat, volatile elements and myriad other chemical species for 4.5 billion years. A key exchange in this transport process is between the mantle and the atmosphere through the volcanic degassing of sulfur, carbon and hydrogen from silicate melts forming in the deep Earth. The speciation and mobility of volatile elements during silicate melting is modulated by the oceanic mantle's oxygen fugacity (fO2), which away from subduction zones has long been considered uniform. However, a recent study has challenged this paradigm with new measurements of ferric iron proportions (Fe3+/Fe) in glasses from mid-ocean ridge basalts (Cottrell & Kelley, 2013). These new results suggest mantle domains containing material recycled from the Earth's surface are more reducing than ambient mantle and contain high concentrations of carbon. The pervasive mantle heterogeneity well documented in other geochemical indices may therefore be systematically associated with changes in oxidation state In this study we have produced a dataset of combined XANES, volatile element (C, S, F, Cl, H, B) and boron isotope analyses of 65 basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland. These samples form a transect from 1000 km south of the Iceland plume to within 300 km of the plume centre, crossing into the zone experiencing the greatest geophysical and geochemical influence from the plume. Accordingly there are major changes in the isotopic and trace element composition of the basalts in this sample set, driven by both an increase in the proportion of recycled oceanic crustal components towards Iceland and a shift to a plume driven flow field. This suite of basalts therefore form an excellent test of the global correlations observed by Cottrell & Kelley (2013), where ferric iron contents anti-correlated with isotopic enrichment, with a high resolution regional dataset. By combining major

  3. Effect of disinfectants containing glutaraldehyde on bonding of a tri-n-butylborane initiated resin to dentine.

    PubMed

    Baba, N; Taira, Y; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of disinfectants on the bond strength of resin to dentine. The surface of bovine dentine was exposed to formaldehyde (FA) aqueous solutions, glutaraldehyde (GA) aqueous solutions, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate aqueous solutions (HEMA), a commercially available dentine primer (Gluma CPS desensitizer, GLUMA), isotonic sodium chloride solution (IS), and distilled water (DW), and placed in a humidor (HU) at 37 degrees C, or non-stored (baseline). All dentine surfaces were conditioned with a 10% citric acid and 3% ferric chloride solution (10-3 liquid), and then bonded to an acrylic rod with a self-curing adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The mean tensile bond strengths determined 24 h after bonding were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's protected LSD test (n=5, P < or = 0.05). The exposure of dentine to IS, DW and HU for both 48 and 168 h resulted in a decrease in bond strength when compared with the baseline. The highest bond strengths after 168 h of exposure were obtained with 5% GA, 10% HEMA, and GLUMA, the values of which were equivalent to baseline and were significantly higher than that of FA. It is concluded that disinfectant pre-treatment with 5% GA or GLUMA stabilizes the bonding of tri-n-butylborane (TBB) initiated luting agent to bovine dentine conditioned with 10-3 liquid. PMID:12028497

  4. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  5. Asymmetric bifurcated halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2015-03-01

    Halogen bonding (XB) is being extensively explored for its potential use in advanced materials and drug design. Despite significant progress in describing this interaction by theoretical and experimental methods, the chemical nature remains somewhat elusive, and it seems to vary with the selected system. In this work we present a detailed DFT analysis of three-center asymmetric halogen bond (XB) formed between dihalogen molecules and variously 4-substituted 1,2-dimethoxybenzene. The energy decomposition, orbital, and electron density analyses suggest that the contribution of electrostatic stabilization is comparable with that of non-electrostatic factors. Both terms increase parallel with increasing negative charge of the electron donor molecule in our model systems. Depending on the orientation of the dihalogen molecules, this bifurcated interaction may be classified as 'σ-hole - lone pair' or 'σ-hole - π' halogen bonds. Arrangement of the XB investigated here deviates significantly from a recent IUPAC definition of XB and, in analogy to the hydrogen bonding, the term bifurcated halogen bond (BXB) seems to be appropriate for this type of interaction. PMID:25656525

  6. Surface analysis in composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The role of the interfacial region in determining the bond strength and durability of composite bonds is discussed. The characterization of a variety of carbon fibers including Celion 6000 using both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is discussed. The emphasis is on composite bonding, that is, the adhesive bonding between composites in contrast to fiber-matrix interaction. The primary objective of the research is the characterization of composite surfaces before adhesive bonding and after fracture of bonded specimens. Work done on the analysis of composite samples pretreated in a number of ways prior to bonding is detailed.

  7. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  8. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  9. The influence of ferrous/ferric ions on the efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of pollutants in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Klauson, D; Preis, S; Portjanskaja, E; Kachina, A; Krichevskaya, M; Kallas, J

    2005-06-01

    The complex influence of ferrous/ferric ions on the efficiency of aqueous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of 2-ethoxyethanol (2-EE), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and humic substances (HS) was established. A drastic efficiency increase at lower concentration of ferrous/ferric ions was observed to change to a sharp decrease at higher concentrations for 2-EE and MTBE, whereas for HS only an inhibitive effect of Fe2+/3+ on the PCO efficiency was noticed. The authors proposed an explanation for the observed phenomena based on the different sensitivities of pollutants towards radical-oxidation reactions and the competitive adsorption of metallic ions and pollutants on the TiO2 surface. PMID:16035658

  10. Spectral study of the interaction between 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde-p-phenyldihydrazone and ferric iron and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quanying; Liu, Weizhou; Chang, Lin; Chen, Fang

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis and spectral characterization of a schiff base, 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde-p-phenylenedihydrazone (short for 2PC-PPH), were described. It was found that ferric ion (Fe3+) could selectively quench the fluorescence of 2PC-PPH, whereas many other metal ions, such as Mn2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, K+, Al3+, Ca2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cr3+ and Fe2+, could not quench its fluorescence. Based on this, a sensitive method for ferric ion selective detection was established. Under the optimum conditions, the decreasing fluorescence intensity of 2PC-PPH is proportional to the concentration of Fe3+ within the range of 6.0 × 10-7-1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1. The detection limit (3σ) for Fe3+ determination is 3.6 × 10-7 mol L-1. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine iron in tea and milk powder.

  11. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  12. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  13. Resolving the multifaceted mechanisms of the ferric chloride thrombosis model using an interdisciplinary microfluidic approach

    PubMed Central

    Ciciliano, Jordan C.; Sakurai, Yumiko; Myers, David R.; Fay, Meredith E.; Hechler, Beatrice; Meeks, Shannon; Li, Renhao; Dixon, J. Brandon; Lyon, L. Andrew; Gachet, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the widely used in vivo ferric chloride (FeCl3) thrombosis model remains poorly understood; although endothelial cell denudation is historically cited, a recent study refutes this and implicates a role for erythrocytes. Given the complexity of the in vivo environment, an in vitro reductionist approach is required to systematically isolate and analyze the biochemical, mass transfer, and biological phenomena that govern the system. To this end, we designed an “endothelial-ized” microfluidic device to introduce controlled FeCl3 concentrations to the molecular and cellular components of blood and vasculature. FeCl3 induces aggregation of all plasma proteins and blood cells, independent of endothelial cells, by colloidal chemistry principles: initial aggregation is due to binding of negatively charged blood components to positively charged iron, independent of biological receptor/ligand interactions. Full occlusion of the microchannel proceeds by conventional pathways, and can be attenuated by antithrombotic agents and loss-of-function proteins (as in IL4-R/Iba mice). As elevated FeCl3 concentrations overcome protective effects, the overlap between charge-based aggregation and clotting is a function of mass transfer. Our physiologically relevant in vitro system allows us to discern the multifaceted mechanism of FeCl3-induced thrombosis, thereby reconciling literature findings and cautioning researchers in using the FeCl3 model. PMID:25931587

  14. Resolving the multifaceted mechanisms of the ferric chloride thrombosis model using an interdisciplinary microfluidic approach.

    PubMed

    Ciciliano, Jordan C; Sakurai, Yumiko; Myers, David R; Fay, Meredith E; Hechler, Beatrice; Meeks, Shannon; Li, Renhao; Dixon, J Brandon; Lyon, L Andrew; Gachet, Christian; Lam, Wilbur A

    2015-08-01

    The mechanism of action of the widely used in vivo ferric chloride (FeCl3) thrombosis model remains poorly understood; although endothelial cell denudation is historically cited, a recent study refutes this and implicates a role for erythrocytes. Given the complexity of the in vivo environment, an in vitro reductionist approach is required to systematically isolate and analyze the biochemical, mass transfer, and biological phenomena that govern the system. To this end, we designed an "endothelial-ized" microfluidic device to introduce controlled FeCl3 concentrations to the molecular and cellular components of blood and vasculature. FeCl3 induces aggregation of all plasma proteins and blood cells, independent of endothelial cells, by colloidal chemistry principles: initial aggregation is due to binding of negatively charged blood components to positively charged iron, independent of biological receptor/ligand interactions. Full occlusion of the microchannel proceeds by conventional pathways, and can be attenuated by antithrombotic agents and loss-of-function proteins (as in IL4-R/Iba mice). As elevated FeCl3 concentrations overcome protective effects, the overlap between charge-based aggregation and clotting is a function of mass transfer. Our physiologically relevant in vitro system allows us to discern the multifaceted mechanism of FeCl3-induced thrombosis, thereby reconciling literature findings and cautioning researchers in using the FeCl3 model. PMID:25931587

  15. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-01-01

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe. PMID:26167713

  16. Passive immunization by recombinant ferric enterobactin protein (FepA) from Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Larrie-Bagha, Seyed Mehdi; Rasooli, Iraj; Mousavi-Gargari, Seyed Latif; Rasooli, Zohreh; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 has been recognized as a major food borne pathogen responsible for frequent hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Cattle are important reservoirs of E. coli O157:H7, in which the organism colonizes the intestinal tract and is shed in the feces. Objective Vaccination of cattle has significant potential as a pre-harvest intervention strategy for E. coli O157:H7. The aim of this study was to evaluate active and passive immunization against E. coli O157:H7 using a recombinant protein. Materials and Methods The recombinant FepA protein induced by IPTG was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Antibody titre was determined by ELISA in FepA immunized rabbits sera. Sera collected from vaccinated animals were used for bacterial challenge in passive immunization studies. Results The results demonstrate that passive immunization with serum raised against FepA protects rabbits from subsequent infection. Conclusion Significant recognition by the antibody of ferric enterobactin binding protein may lead to its application in the restriction of Enterobacteriaceae propagation. PMID:23825727

  17. Mediated electron transfer between Fe(II) adsorbed onto hydrous ferric oxide and a working electrode.

    PubMed

    Klein, Annaleise R; Silvester, Ewen; Hogan, Conor F

    2014-09-16

    The redox properties of Fe(II) adsorbed onto mineral surfaces have been highly studied over recent years due to the wide range of environmental contaminants that react with this species via abiotic processes. In this work the reactivity of Fe(II) adsorbed onto hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) has been studied using ferrocene (bis-cyclopentadienyl iron(II); Fc) derivatives as electron shuttles in cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments. The observed amplification of the ferrocene oxidation peak in CV is attributed to reaction between the electrochemically generated ferrocenium (Fc(+)) ion and adsorbed Fe(II) species in a catalytic process (EC' mechanism). pH dependence studies show that the reaction rate increases with Fe(II) adsorption and is maintained in the absence of aqueous Fe(2+), providing strong evidence that the electron transfer process involves the adsorbed species. The rate of reaction between Fc(+) and adsorbed Fe(II) increases with the redox potential of the ferrocene derivative, as expected, with bimolecular rate constants in the range 10(3)-10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The ferrocene-mediated electrochemical method described has considerable promise in the development of a technique for measuring electron-transfer rates in geochemical and environmental systems. PMID:25157830

  18. A ferric-cyanide-bridged one-dimensional dirhodium complex with (18-crown-6)potassium cations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Kim, S J; Nam, W

    2001-03-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, catena-poly[bis[aqua(18-crown-6)potassium] diaqua(18-crown-6)potassium [[tetra-mu-benzoato-2:3 kappa(8)O:O'-mu-cyano-1:2 kappa(2)C:N-tetracyano-1 kappa C-irondirhodium(Rh-Rh)]-mu-cyano-1 kappa C:3' kappa N] octahydrate], [K(18-crown-6)(H(2)O)](2)[K(18-crown-6)(H(2)O)(2)][FeRh(2)(C(7)H(5)O(2))(4)(CN)(6)] x 8H(2)O, where (18-crown-6) is 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane (C(12)H(24)O(6)), has been determined. Ferric cyanides connect the dirhodium units to form a one-dimensional chain compound. [K(18-crown-6-ether)(H(2)O)(2)] cations (with inversion symmetry) and [K(18-crown-6-ether)(H(2)O)] cations (in general positions) are located between the chains. PMID:11250572

  19. Energy distributions at the high-spin ferric sites in myoglobin crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Fiamingo, F G; Brill, A S; Hampton, D A; Thorkildsen, R

    1989-01-01

    The orientation and temperature dependence (4.2-2.5 K) of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) power saturation and spin-lattice relaxation rate, and the orientation dependence of signal linewidth, were measured in single crystals of the aquo complex of ferric sperm whale skeletal muscle myoglobin. The spin-packet linewidth was found to be temperature independent and to vary by a factor of seven within the heme plane. An analysis is presented which enables one to arrive at (a) hyperfine component line-widths and, from the in-plane angular variation of the latter, at (b) the widths of distributions in energy differences between low-lying electronic levels and (c) the angular spread in the in-plane principal g-directions. The values of the energy level distributions in crystals obtained from the measurements and analysis reported here are compared with those obtained by a different method for the same protein complex in frozen solution. The spread in the rhombic energy splitting is significantly greater in solution than in the crystal. PMID:2539208

  20. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  1. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  2. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  3. Near the Ferric Pseudobrookite Composition (Fe2TiO5).

    PubMed

    Seitz, Guillaume; Penin, Nicolas; Decoux, Léa; Wattiaux, Alain; Duttine, Mathieu; Gaudon, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Because of a very low thermodynamic stability, obtaining a pure monophasic compound of ferric pseudobrookite is quite difficult to achieve. Indeed, the low reticular energy of this phase leads easily to its decomposition and the occurrence of the secondary phases: hematite (Fe2O3) and/or rutile (TiO2). Samples with global composition Fe2-xTi1+xO5 (x = 0, 0.05, and 0.10) have been synthesized by the Pechini route and, thereafter, thermally treated at different temperatures. The concentrations of Fe2O3 and TiO2 secondary phases were accurately determined and correlated with the target compositions and the synthesis parameters, especially the thermal treatment temperature. As revealed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, all iron ions are at the III+ oxidation state. Thus, the formation of hematite or rutile as a secondary phase may be related to the occurrence of cationic vacancies within the pseudobrookite structure, with the amount of vacancies depending on the annealing temperature. In light of the presented results, it appears unreasonable to propose a "fixed" binary phase diagram for such a complex system. Furthermore, the occurrence of cationic vacancies induces a coloration change (darkening), preventing any industrial use of this reddish-brown pseudobrookite as a ceramic pigment. PMID:26866894

  4. Leaching of Arsenic from Granular Ferric Hydroxide Residuals under Mature Landfill Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amlan; Mukiibi, Muhammed; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P.

    2008-01-01

    Most arsenic bearing solid residuals (ABSR) from water treatment will be disposed in non-hazardous landfills. The lack of an appropriate leaching test to predict arsenic mobilization from ABSR creates a need to evaluate the magnitude and mechanisms of arsenic release under landfill conditions. This work studies the leaching of arsenic and iron from a common ABSR, granular ferric hydroxide, in a laboratory-scale column that simulates the biological and physicochemical conditions of a mature, mixed solid waste landfill. The column operated for approximately 900 days and the mode of transport as well as chemical speciation of iron and arsenic changed with column age. Both iron and arsenic were readily mobilized under the anaerobic, reducing conditions. During the early stages of operation, most arsenic and iron leaching (80% and 65%, respectively) was associated with suspended particulate matter and iron was lost proportionately faster than arsenic. In later stages, while the rate of iron leaching declined, the arsenic leaching rate increased greater than 7-fold. The final phase was characterized by dissolved species leaching. Future work on the development of standard batch leaching tests should take into account the dominant mobilization mechanisms identified in this work: solid associated transport, reductive sorbent dissolution, and microbially mediated arsenic reduction. PMID:17051802

  5. Bovine lactoferrin ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced renal oxidative damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Kono, Isato; Kuriki, Takayoshi; Funahashi, Satomi; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iqbal, Mohammad; Okada, Shigeru; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2012-01-01

    Milk provides a well-balanced source of amino acids and other ingredients. One of the functional ingredients in milk is lactoferrin (LF). LF presents a wide variety of bioactivities and functions as a radical scavenger in models using iron-ascorbate complexes and asbestos. Human clinical trials of oral LF administration for the prevention of colon polyps have been successful and demonstrated that dietary compounds exhibit direct interactions. However, antioxidative properties of LF in distant organs require further investigation. To study the antioxidant property of LF, we employed bovine lactoferrin (bLF) using the rat model of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-induced renal tubular oxidative injury. We fed rats with bLF (0.05%, w/w) in basal chow for 4 weeks and sacrificed them after Fe-NTA treatment. After intraperitoneal administration of 9.0 mg iron/kg Fe-NTA for 4 and 24 h, bLF pretreatment suppressed elevation of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. In addition, we observed protective effects against renal oxidative tubular damage and maintenance of antioxidant enzyme activities in the bLF-pretreated group. We thus demonstrated the antioxidative effect of bLF against Fe-NTA-induced renal oxidative injury. These results suggest that LF intake is useful for the prevention of renal tubular oxidative damage mediated by iron. PMID:22962523

  6. Liquid-liquid phase separation on melts and glasses in ferric ferrous oxide-silica system

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumori, A.; Koike, A.; Kameshima, Y.; Okada, K.; Yano, T.; Yamane, M.; Inoue, S.

    1997-12-31

    The existence of liquid-liquid miscibility gap in ferric ferrous oxide-silica system has been reported, however, the phase separation phenomena and the derived morphology of the phase separated glasses are uncertain. In this study, the melt-quenched samples of 5 Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-95 SiO{sub 2} and 15 Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-085 SiO{sub 2} (mol%) were prepared by melting at 2,300 C or 2,200 C (expected to be above miscibility gap), and subsequently at 1,800 C or 1,750 C (in immiscible region) by use of infrared image furnace and quenching at the rate of {approx}10{sup 2} K/sec. The glassy materials exhibited phase separation having discrete spherical particles or interconnected structure due to the composition, melting temperature and time. Also, the segregation of Fe component occurred during melting, which was caused by the difference of specific gravity of components in the melt.

  7. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  8. Ferric ion-assisted in situ synthesis of silver nanoplates on polydopamine-coated silk.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Huihui; Mao, Cuiping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ling; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a ferric ion (Fe(3+))-assisted in situ synthesis approach was developed to grow silver (Ag) nanoplates on the polydopamine (PDA)-coated silk without the use of additional reductants. The essential role of Fe(3+) in the formation of Ag nanoplates is revealed by comparing the morphologies of Ag nanostructures prepared on the silk-coated PDA film with/without Fe(3+) doping. Scanning electron micrographs show that high-density Ag nanoplates could be synthesized in the reaction system containing 50μg/mL FeCl3 and 50mM AgNO3. The size of the Ag nanoplate could be tuned by adjusting the reaction duration. Based on the data, a mechanism involving the Fe(3+)-selected growth of Ag atoms along the certain crystal faces was proposed to explain the fabrication process. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry indicate that the Ag nanoplates possess good crystalline structures. Raman spectra demonstrate that the nanoplates could strongly enhance the Raman scattering of the PDA molecules. The Ag nanoplate-coated silk could be utilized as a flexible substrate for the development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. PMID:27390855

  9. Multidomain Human Peroxidasin 1 Is a Highly Glycosylated and Stable Homotrimeric High Spin Ferric Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Soudi, Monika; Paumann-Page, Martina; Delporte, Cedric; Pirker, Katharina F.; Bellei, Marzia; Edenhofer, Eva; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Obinger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Human peroxidasin 1 (hsPxd01) is a multidomain heme peroxidase that uses bromide as a cofactor for the formation of sulfilimine cross-links. The latter confers critical structural reinforcement to collagen IV scaffolds. Here, hsPxd01 and various truncated variants lacking nonenzymatic domains were recombinantly expressed in HEK cell lines. The N-glycosylation site occupancy and disulfide pattern, the oligomeric structure, and unfolding pathway are reported. The homotrimeric iron protein contains a covalently bound ferric high spin heme per subunit with a standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of −233 ± 5 mV at pH 7.0. Despite sequence homology at the active site and biophysical properties similar to human peroxidases, the catalytic efficiency of bromide oxidation (kcat/KMapp) of full-length hsPxd01 is rather low but increased upon truncation. This is discussed with respect to its structure and proposed biosynthetic function in collagen IV cross-linking. PMID:25713063

  10. Development of Leptospirillum ferriphilum dominated consortium for ferric iron regeneration and metal bioleaching under extreme stresses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhargav C; Tipre, Devayani R; Dave, Shailesh R

    2012-08-01

    Activated iron oxidizing consortium SR-BH-L enriched from Rajpardi lignite mine soil sample gave iron oxidation rate 1954 mg/L/h. Developed novel polystress resistant consortium oxidized ferrous iron under 11cP viscosity, 7.47 M ionic strength, 2.3 pH and g/L of 0.50 cadmium, 3.75 copper, 0.20 lead, 92.00 zinc, 6.4 sodium, 5.5 chloride, 154 sulphate and 393.8 TDS. The developed consortium showed 78.0% and 70.0% copper and zinc extraction from polymetallic bulk concentrate in monophasic bioleaching process. The bioregenerated ferric by the consortium in leachate showed 80.81% and 54.0% copper and zinc leaching in only 30 and 90 min. The DGGE analysis indicated the presence of 11 OTUs in the consortium. 16S rRNA gene sequence (JN797729) of the dominant band on DGGE shared >99% similarity with Leptospirillum ferriphilum. RE digestion analysis of the total 16S rRNA gene also illustrated the dominance of L. ferriphilum in the consortium. PMID:22717567

  11. Antioxidant property of volatile oils determined by the ferric reducing ability.

    PubMed

    Lado, Cristina; Then, Mária; Varga, Ilona; Szoke, Eva; Szentmihályi, Klára

    2004-01-01

    Some current oils and their main components were studied to determine their antioxidant values. This was done by using the modified method of ferric reducing ability of plasma. It has been established that volatile oils of medicinal plants have on average a reducing capacity of 3.5-220 mmol/kg oil. The reducing capacities of the main constituents of volatile oils are 0.165-65.5 mmol/kg in concentrated oils. The highest reducing capacity was showd for phellandrene (65.438 +/- 0.166 mmol/kg) and anethole (50.087 +/- 0.160 mmol/kg) while the lowest values were obtained for menthol (0.165 +/- 0.023 mmol/kg) and menthone (0.168 +/- 0.010 mmol/kg). It has been stated that the antioxidant values of the main constituents are lower than those of volatile oils. The reducing capacity of the main constituents of medicinal plant drugs at different concentrations was also determined. PMID:18998400

  12. Overproduction in Escherichia coli and Characterization of a Soybean Ferric Leghemoglobin Reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, L.; Becana, M.; Sarath, G.; Shearman, L.; Klucas, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    We previously cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding soybean ferric leghemoglobin reductase (FLbR), an enzyme postulated to play an important role in maintaining leghemoglobin in a functional ferrous state in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. This cDNA was sub-cloned into an expression plasmid, pTrcHis C, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant FLbR protein, which was purified by two steps of column chromatography, was catalytically active and fully functional. The recombinant FLbR cross-reacted with antisera raised against native FLbR purified from soybean root nodules. The recombinant FLbR, the native FLbR purified from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases from pig heart and yeast had similar but not identical ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence spectra, cofactor binding, and kinetic properties. FLbR shared common structural features in the active site and prosthetic group binding sites with other pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductases such as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, but displayed different microenvironments for the prosthetic groups. PMID:12232320

  13. Evaluation of formocresol, calcium hydroxide, ferric sulfate, and MTA primary molar pulpotomies

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Esma; Tosun, Gul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate four different pulpotomy medicaments in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 147 primary molars with deep caries were treated with four different pulpotomy medicaments (FC: formocresol, FS: ferric sulfate, CH: calcium hydroxide, and MTA: mineral trioxide aggregate) in this study. The criteria for tooth selection for inclusion were no clinical and radiographic evidence of pulp pathology. During 30 months of follow-up at 6-month intervals, clinical and radiographic success and failures were recorded. The differences between the groups were statistically analyzed using the Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: At 30 months, clinical success rates were 100%, 95.2%, 96.4%, and 85% in the FC, FS, MTA, and CH groups, respectively. In radiographic analysis, the MTA group had the highest (96.4%), and the CH group had the lowest success rate (85%). There were no clinical and radiographic differences between materials (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although there were no differences between materials, only in the CH group did three teeth require extraction due to further clinical symptoms of radiographic failures during the 30-month follow-up period. None of the failed teeth in the other groups required extraction during the 30-month follow-up period. PMID:24966776

  14. Polyethyleneimine-templated copper nanoclusters via ascorbic acid reduction approach as ferric ion sensor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Ju, Yuyun; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Huige; Chen, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    In this report we reported a facile one-pot method for synthesis of water-soluble and stable fluorescent CuNCs at room temperature, in which branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) served as capping scaffold and ascorbic acid as reducing agent. The prepared BPEI-CuNCs exhibited excellent properties such as good water-solubility, photostability and high stability toward high ionic strength. Based on the electron transfer induced fluorescence quenching mechanism, this fluorescence probe was used for the sensitive and selective determination of ferric ions (Fe(3+)) in aqueous solution. The limit of detection was 340 nM in the linear range of 0.5-1000 μM, which was lower than the maximum level of Fe(3+) permitted in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The method was successfully applied to the detection of Fe(3+) in tap water, Yellow River water and human urine samples with the quantitative spike recoveries ranging from 95.3% to 112.0%. PMID:25479879

  15. Adsorption of phosphonate antiscalant from reverse osmosis membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Boels, Luciaan; Keesman, Karel J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2012-09-01

    Adsorptive removal of antiscalants offers a promising way to improve current reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate treatment processes and enables the reuse of the antiscalant in the RO desalination process. This work investigates the adsorption and desorption of the phosphonate antiscalant nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from RO membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a material that consists predominantly of akaganéite. The kinetics of the adsorption of NTMP onto GFH was predicted fairly well with two models that consider either combined film-pore or combined film-surface diffusion as the main mechanism for mass transport. It is also demonstrated that NTMP is preferentially adsorbed over sulfate by GFH at pH 7.85. The presence of calcium causes a transformation in the equilibrium adsorption isotherm from a Langmuir type to a Freundlich type with much higher adsorption capacities. Furthermore, calcium also increases the rate of adsorption substantially. GFH is reusable after regeneration with sodium hydroxide solution, indicating that NTMP can be potentially recovered from the RO concentrate. This work shows that GFH is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of NTMP antiscalant from RO membrane concentrates. PMID:22873428

  16. Crystallization and preliminary data for the ferric form of Lucina pectinata hemoglobin I.

    PubMed

    Casale, E; Lionetti, C; Coda, A; Merli, A; Ascenzi, P; Wittenberg, J B; Bolognesi, M

    1991-12-01

    Cytoplasmic monomeric hemoglobin I from the bacteria-harboring gill of the bivalve mollusc Lucina pectinata has been crystallized in a form suitable for atomic resolution X-ray structural investigations. The crystals have been grown at pH 4.8, in 0.05 M-acetate buffer, using 2.6 M-ammonium sulfate as precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit cell constants a = 50.0 A, b = 38.6 A, c = 42.1 A, beta = 107.1 degrees, and contain one molecule (14,000 Mr) in the asymmetric unit. By means of single crystal microspectrophotometry it has been shown that the crystals contain the ferric form of L. pectinata "sulfide reactive" hemoglobin I. On the other hand, by careful control of the buffering medium composition, it has been possible to obtain stable crystals of the deoxy, oxy and sulfide forms of the protein. PMID:1748987

  17. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis. PMID:26993237

  18. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, XinMei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur–DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur–feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur–Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs. PMID:26134419

  19. Biodiesel synthesis catalyzed by transition metal oxides: ferric-manganese doped tungstated/molybdena nanoparticle catalyst.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah Hamid; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The solid acid Ferric-manganese doped tungstated/molybdena nananoparticle catalyst was prepared via impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement (BET). Moreover, dependence of biodiesel yield on the reaction variables such as the reaction temperature, catalyst loading, as well as molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also appraised. The catalyst was reused six times without any loss in activity with maximum yield of 92.3% ±1.12 achieved in the optimized conditions of reaction temperature of 200°C; stirring speed of 600 rpm, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol, 6 % w/w catalyst loading as well as 8 h as time of the reaction. The fuel properties of WCOME's were evaluated, including the density, kinematic viscosity, pour point, cloud point and flash point whereas all properties were compared with the limits in the ASTM D6751 standard. PMID:25492234

  20. Evidence of Ball-and-chain Transport of Ferric Enterobactin through FepA*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Kaserer, Wallace; Annamalai, Rajasekeran; Scott, Daniel C.; Jin, Bo; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Qiaobin; Maymani, Hossein; Massis, Liliana Moura; Ferreira, Luiz C. S.; Newton, Salete M. C.; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli iron transporter, FepA, has a globular N terminus that resides within a transmembrane β-barrel formed by its C terminus. We engineered 25 cysteine substitution mutations at different locations in FepA and modified their sulfhydryl side chains with fluorescein maleimide in live cells. The reactivity of the Cys residues changed, sometimes dramatically, during the transport of ferric enterobactin, the natural ligand of FepA. Patterns of Cys susceptibility reflected energy- and TonB-dependent motion in the receptor protein. During transport, a residue on the normally buried surface of the N-domain was labeled by fluorescein maleimide in the periplasm, providing evidence that the transport process involves expulsion of the globular domain from the β-barrel. Porin deficiency much reduced the fluoresceination of this site, confirming the periplasmic labeling route. These data support the previously proposed, but never demonstrated, ball-and-chain theory of membrane transport. Functional complementation between a separately expressed N terminus and C-terminal β-barrel domain confirmed the feasibility of this mechanism. PMID:17056600

  1. Ferric carboxymaltose-mediated attenuation of Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in an iron deficiency rat model.

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Rivas, Carlos; Cao, Gabriel; Giani, Jorge Fernando; Funk, Felix; Mizzen, Lee; Dominici, Fernando Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Since anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC), a complication of anthracycline-based chemotherapies, is thought to involve iron, concerns exist about using iron for anaemia treatment in anthracycline-receiving cancer patients. This study evaluated how intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) modulates the influence of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and doxorubicin (3-5 mg per kg body weight [BW]) on oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation, and cardiorenal function in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHR-SP) rats. FCM was given as repeated small or single total dose (15 mg iron per kg BW), either concurrent with or three days after doxorubicin. IDA (after dietary iron restriction) induced cardiac and renal oxidative stress (markers included malondialdehyde, catalase, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase), nitrosative stress (inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine), inflammation (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6), and functional/morphological abnormalities (left ventricle end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, fractional shortening, density of cardiomyocytes and capillaries, caveolin-1 expression, creatinine clearance, and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) that were aggravated by doxorubicin. Notably, iron treatment with FCM did not exacerbate but attenuated the cardiorenal effects of IDA and doxorubicin independent of the iron dosing regimen. The results of this model suggest that intravenous FCM can be used concomitantly with an anthracycline-based chemotherapy without increasing signs of AIC. PMID:24876963

  2. Success Rates of Ankaferd Blood Stopper and Ferric Sulfate as Pulpotomy Agents in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Gümüş, Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic findings of treatments using a new hemostatic agent (Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS)), as compared to ferric sulfate (FS), when used as a pulpotomy medicament in primary teeth. Materials and Methods. The primary molars (70) were selected from 35 children aged 4 to 6 years. The teeth were randomized into two groups for pulpotomy with the ABS (n = 35) and the FS (n = 35) agents. The patients were recalled for clinical and radiographic evaluation at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month intervals. Results. At the 3- and 6-month clinical and radiographic evaluations, total success rates of 100% were observed in each group. In ABS and FS groups, the clinical success rates, however, reduced to 90.9% and 93.9% at the 9-month examination and 84,8% and 90.9% at the 12-month examination, respectively. Similarly, the teeth in the ABS and FS groups had radiographic success rates of 90.9% and 93.9% at 9 months and 84.8% and 87.8% at 12 moths, respectively. Conclusion. Although the findings indicated that ABS agents may be useful agents for pulpotomy medicament, further long-term and comprehensive histological investigations of ABS treatments are necessary. PMID:27437463

  3. Carvedilol and trimetazidine attenuates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced oxidative renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Chander, Vikas; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2003-09-30

    Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induces acute proximal tubular necrosis as a consequence of lipid peroxidation and oxidative tissue damage, which eventually leads to high incidence of renal adenocarcinoma in rodents. This study was designed to investigate the effect of carvedilol, an antihypertensive and trimetazidine, an antiischemic, both the drugs with additional antioxidative potentials, on Fe-NTA induced nephrotoxicity in rats. One hour after a single i.p. injection of Fe-NTA (8 mg iron per kg), a marked deterioration of renal architecture and renal function as evidenced by a sharp increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine was observed. Fe-NTA induced a significant renal oxidative stress demonstrated by elevated thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) and reduction in activities of renal catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR). Pretreatment of animals with carvedilol (2 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as with trimetazidine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), 30 min before Fe-NTA administration markedly attenuated renal dysfunction, reduced elevated TBARS, restored the depleted renal antioxidant enzymes and normalised the renal morphological alterations. These results clearly demonstrate the role of oxidative stress and its relation to renal dysfunction, and suggest a protective effect of carvedilol and trimetazidine on Fe-NTA-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:12965117

  4. Factors influencing the mechanism of surfactant catalyzed reaction of vitamin C-ferric chloride hexahydrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; Kauser, Robina; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of vitamin C by ferric chloride hexahydrate has been investigated in the aqueous ethanol solution of basic surfactant viz. octadecylamine (ODA) under pseudo-first order conditions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant was determined by surface tension measurement. The effect of pH (2.5-4.5) and temperature (15-35°C) in the presence and absence of surfactant were investigated. Activation parameters, Δ E a, Δ H #, Δ S #, Δ G ≠, for the reaction were calculated by using Arrhenius and Eyring plot. Surface excess concentration (Γmax), minimum area per surfactant molecule ( A min), average area occupied by each molecule of surfactant ( a), surface pressure at the CMC (Πmax), Gibb's energy of micellization (Δ G M°), Gibb's energy of adsorption (Δ G ad°), were calculated. It was found that the reaction in the presence of surfactant showed faster oxidation rate than the aqueous ethanol solution. Reaction mechanism has been deduced in the presence and absence of surfactant.

  5. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic studies of boric acid adsorption on hydrous ferric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peak, Derek; Luther, George W.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2003-07-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient for plants, but high B levels in soils are often responsible for toxicity effects in plants. It is therefore important to understand reactions that may affect B availability in soils. In this study, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to investigate mechanisms of boric acid (B(OH) 3) and borate (B(OH) 4-) adsorption on hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). On the HFO surface, boric acid adsorbs via both physical adsorption (outer-sphere) and ligand exchange (inner-sphere) reactions. Both trigonal (boric acid) and tetrahedral (borate) boron are complexed on the HFO surface, and a mechanism where trigonal boric acid in solution reacts to form either trigonal or tetrahedral surface complexes is proposed based upon the spectroscopic results. The presence of outer-sphere boric acid complexes can be explained based on the Lewis acidity of the B metal center, and this complex has important implications for boron transport and availability. Outer-sphere boric acid is more likely to leach downward in soils in response to water flow. Outer-sphere boron would also be expected to be more available for plant uptake than more strongly bound boron complexes, and may more readily return to the soil solution when solution concentrations decrease.

  6. Radiation exposure from patients treated with 165Dy-ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Havlik, E; Pirich, C; Preitfellner, J; Karanikas, G; Schaffarich, P; Hefner, A; Sinzinger, H

    2001-01-01

    In radiation synovectomy about 10 GBq 165Dy-ferric hydroxide is injected into major joints. Measurements of the dose rates were performed at distances of 5 cm, 0.5 m, 1 m and 2 m from the surface of the treated joints (knees) until 200 min after the application in 16 patients in order to estimate the radiation exposure of persons in the neighbourhood of the patients. The highest doses were estimated for the fingers of the technologist (320 microSv) and for the physician (700 microSv). Special shields for the syringes were constructed for dose reduction. The whole-body doses were 103 microSv for the technologist and 40 microSv for the physician. After the discharge of the patient to a ward or home, other persons at 1 m distance from the patient might receive 88 microSv, which is less than 9% of the annual permissible dose. Our results clearly demonstrate that the calculated radiation exposure to personnel and family members is well below the maximum annual dose limit for non-professionally exposed persons. PMID:11233556

  7. Preparation and Thermal Analysis of Ferric Doped PVA-PVP-PPy Composite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ravikumar V.; Ranganath, M. R.; Lobo, Blaise

    2011-12-01

    The preparation and thermal analysis of flexible blend films of pyrrole (Py) polymerized in aqueous solution of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) is described. In-situ polymerization of pyrrole in aqueous solution of PVA and PVP containing ferric chloride (FeCl3) was achieved through vapor sorption, and the films obtained were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). No melting endotherm is seen in the DSC and DTA scans of the composite films, indicating that the sample is amorphous. Degradation of the sample is found to occur at lower temperatures, with increase in doping level (wt% of FeCl3). DSC study was performed between 40 °C and 400 °C. Below 1.2 wt % DL, degradation of the sample occurs in two stages, the first at 310 °C and the second at 440 °C, as seen from DTA and TGA scans. The broad endotherm between 80 °C and 120 °C is due to volatization of moisture (water) absorbed by the sample. Multiple endotherms are observed in DSC and DTA scans of the composite films, for FeCl3 doping levels above 3.8 wt %, and the sample degrades in many different stages at lower temperature, with increase in doping level, as revealed by weight losses in the TGA curve.

  8. Amelioration of ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats by diallylsulfide.

    PubMed

    Ansar, S; Iqbal, M

    2016-03-01

    Garlic contains diallylsulfide (DAS) and other structurally related compounds that are widely believed to be active agents in preventing cancer. This study shows the effect of DAS (a phenolic antioxidant used in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products) on ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Male albino rats of Wistar strain weighing 125-150 g were given a single dose of Fe-NTA (9 mg kg(-1) body weight, intraperitoneally) after 1 week of treatment with 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) DAS in corn oil respectively administered through the gavage. Fe-NTA administration led to 2.5-fold increase in the values of both alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase, respectively, and 3.2-fold increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, microsomal lipid peroxidation to approximately 2.0-fold compared to saline-treated control. The activities of glutathione (GSH) and other antioxidant enzymes decreased to a range of 2.2-2.5-fold. These changes were reversed significantly (p < 0.001) in animals receiving a pretreatment of DAS. DAS protected against hepatic lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide generation, preserved GSH levels, and GSH metabolizing enzymes to 60-80% as compared to Fe-NTA alone-treated group. Present data suggest that DAS can ameliorate the toxic effects of Fe-NTA and suppress oxidant-induced tissue injury and hepatotoxicity in rats. PMID:25904316

  9. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of arbutin, whitening agent through oxidation by periodate and complexation with ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoom, B. N.; Abdelsamad, A. M. E.; Adib, N. M.

    2006-07-01

    A simple and accurate spectrophotometric method for the determination of arbutin (glycosylated hydroquinone) is described. It is based on the oxidation of arbutin by periodate in presence of iodate. Excess periodate causes liberation of iodine at pH 8.0. The unreacted periodate is determined by measurement of the liberated iodine spectrophotometrically in the wavelength range (300-500 nm). A calibration curve was constructed for more accurate results and the correlation coefficient of linear regression analysis was -0.9778. The precision of this method was better than 6.17% R.S.D. ( n = 3). Regression analysis of Bear-Lambert plot shows good correlation in the concentration range 25-125 ug/ml. The identification limit was determined to be 25 ug/ml a detailed study of the reaction conditions was carried out, including effect of changing pH, time, temperature and volume of periodate. Analyzing pure and authentic samples containing arbutin tested the validity of the proposed method which has an average percent recovery of 100.86%. An alternative method is also proposed which involves a complexation reaction between arbutin and ferric chloride solution. The produced complex which is yellowish-green in color was determined spectophotometrically.

  10. 29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bonding. 2580.412-20 Section 2580.412-20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-20 Use of existing...

  11. The Five-To-Six-Coordination Transition of Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin Is Allosterically-Modulated by Ibuprofen and Warfarin: A Combined XAS and MD Study

    PubMed Central

    Bionducci, Monica; Fanali, Gabriella; Meli, Massimiliano; Colombo, Giorgio; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo; Mobilio, Settimio

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is involved physiologically in heme scavenging; in turn, heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen and warfarin on the local atomic structure around the ferric heme-Fe (heme-Fe(III)) atom of HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been probed by Fe-K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The quantitative analysis of the Fe-K edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) signals and modeling of the near edge (XANES) spectral features demonstrated that warfarin and ibuprofen binding modify the local structure of the heme-Fe(III). Combined XAS data analysis and targeted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provided atomic resolution insights of protein structural rearrangements required to accommodate the heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. In the absence of drugs, the heme-Fe(III) atom is penta-coordinated having distorted 4+1 configuration made by the nitrogen atoms of the porphyrin ring and the oxygen phenoxy atom of the Tyr161 residue. MD simulations show that ibuprofen and warfarin association to the secondary fatty acid (FA) binding site 2 (FA2) induces a reorientation of domain I of HSA-heme-Fe(III), this leads to the redirection of the His146 residue providing an additional bond to the heme-Fe(III) atom, providing the 5+1 configuration. The comparison of Fe-K edge XANES spectra calculated using MD structures with those obtained experimentally confirms the reliability of the proposed structural model. As a whole, combining XAS and MD simulations it has been possible to provide a reliable model of the heme-Fe(III) atom coordination state and to understand the complex allosteric transition occurring in HSA-heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. PMID:25153171

  12. Determination of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) in ferric chloride-hydrochloric acid leaching media by ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.K.; Dutrizac, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    An analytical method has been developed to determine arsenic(V) in ferric chloride-hydrochloric acid leaching media using ion chromatography with conductivity detection. Oxidation of As(III) by aqua regia allows arsenic(III) to be determined by difference. The method involves a preseparation of trace quantities of arsenic from the relatively large concentrations of ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid prior to the ion chromatography measurement. Iron(III) is separated by passing through a hydrogen-form cation exchange column, and arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) are then eluted with water. The effect of the concentration of acid in this separation is discussed. The effluent collected from the cation exchange column is evaporated to remove the hydrochloric acid. The accuracy and precision of the method were determined from the analysis of various synthetic solutions and are discussed; an accuracy of +/-4% was obtained even at arsenic(V) concentrations as low as 10 ppm. The extent of oxidation of arsenic(III) in acidic ferric chloride solution and the reduction of arsenic(V) in acidic ferrous chloride solution were measured. The results obtained by ion chromatography are compared to the values realized using colorimetry after the preseparation step. 13 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Enhancement of Fenton oxidation for removing organic matter from hypersaline solution by accelerating ferric system with hydroxylamine hydrochloride and benzoquinone.

    PubMed

    Peng, Siwei; Zhang, Weijun; He, Jie; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Dongsheng; Zeng, Guisheng

    2016-03-01

    Fenton oxidation is generally inhibited in the presence of a high concentration of chloride ions. This study investigated the feasibility of using benzoquinone (BQ) and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA) as Fenton enhancers for the removal of glycerin from saline water under ambient temperature by accelerating the ferric system. It was found that organics removal was not obviously affected by chloride ions of low concentration (less than 0.1mol/L), while the mineralization rate was strongly inhibited in the presence of a large amount of chloride ions. In addition, ferric hydrolysis-precipitation was significantly alleviated in the presence of HA and BQ, and HA was more effective in reducing ferric ions into ferrous ions than HA, while the H2O2 decomposition rate was higher in the BQ-Fenton system. Electron spin resonance analysis revealed that OH production was reduced in high salinity conditions, while it was enhanced after the addition of HA and BQ (especially HA). This study provided a possible solution to control and alleviate the inhibitory effect of chloride ions on the Fenton process for organics removal. PMID:26969046

  14. Stability of ferric complexes with 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Mark D; Hutcheson, Ryan; Cheng, I Francis

    2005-04-20

    The acid dissociation and ferric stability constants for complexation by the flavonoids 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone in 50:50 (v/v) ethanol/water are determined by pH potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations and the linear least-squares curve-fitting program Hyperquad. Over the entire range of pH and reagent concentrations spanning the titration experiments, the stoichiometry for iron-flavonoid complex formation was 1:1 for all three flavonoids examined. The three flavonoids were chosen for their hydroxy substitution pattern, with each possessing one of the three most commonly suggested sites for metal binding by the flavonoids. On the basis of the calculated stability constants, the intraflavonoid-binding site competition is illustrated as a function of pH via speciation curves. The curves indicate that the binding site comprised of the 3',4'-hydroxy substitutions, the catecholic site, is most influential for ferric complexation at the physiological pH of 7.4. The possibility for antioxidant activity by flavonoid chelation of ferric iron in the presence of other competitive physiological complexing agents is demonstrated through additional speciation calculations. PMID:15826045

  15. The Bacillus subtilis EfeUOB transporter is essential for high-affinity acquisition of ferrous and ferric iron.

    PubMed

    Miethke, Marcus; Monteferrante, Carmine G; Marahiel, Mohamed A; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2013-10-01

    Efficient uptake of iron is of critical importance for growth and viability of microbial cells. Nevertheless, several mechanisms for iron uptake are not yet clearly defined. Here we report that the widely conserved transporter EfeUOB employs an unprecedented dual-mode mechanism for acquisition of ferrous (Fe[II]) and ferric (Fe[III]) iron in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We show that the binding protein EfeO and the permease EfeU form a minimal complex for ferric iron uptake. The third component EfeB is a hemoprotein that oxidizes ferrous iron to ferric iron for uptake by EfeUO. Accordingly, EfeB promotes growth under microaerobic conditions where ferrous iron is more abundant. Notably, EfeB also fulfills a vital role in cell envelope stress protection by eliminating reactive oxygen species that accumulate in the presence of ferrous iron. In conclusion, the EfeUOB system contributes to the high-affinity uptake of iron that is available in two different oxidation states. PMID:23764491

  16. Effects of calcium and ferric ions on struvite precipitation: A new assessment based on quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hanlu; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-05-15

    The precipitation of struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) from waste streams has attracted considerable attention due to its potential for recovering phosphorus for fertilization. As struvite is primarily acquired by means of precipitation and crystallization from aqueous solutions, it is important to evaluate the roles of common metal ions, particularly those that are commonly found in wastewater, in the struvite crystallization process. This study was performed to quantitatively evaluate the effects of calcium and ferric ions on struvite crystallization using the Rietveld refinement method, which is based on the analysis of X-ray diffraction data. The results indicate that both calcium and ferric ions significantly inhibit the formation of struvite crystals, and the effects vary under different pH conditions. There was a negative linear correlation between the struvite weight content in the precipitates and the Ca/Mg molar ratio in the initial solution. However, ferric ions were confirmed to be a more efficient inhibitor of struvite crystallization. Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) further modified the needle-like struvite into irregular shapes. An unambiguous and quantitative understanding of the effects of foreign ions on struvite crystallization will help to reliably improve the quality of struvite products recovered from wastewater and the control of struvite deposits in water and sludge piping systems. PMID:27016641

  17. Bonding without Tears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses merits of using sigma-pi model of ethylene as a teaching aid in introductory organic chemistry. The nonmathematical treatment of sigma-pi bonding is then extended to such phenomena as conjugation, hyperconjugation, Markovnikoff addition, aromaticity, and aromatic substitution. (SK)

  18. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  19. Flax Fiber - Interfacial Bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measured flax fiber physical and chemical properties potentially impact bonding and thus stress transfer between the matrix and fiber within composites. These first attempts at correlating flax fiber quality and biofiber composites contain the initial steps towards identifying key flax fiber charac...

  20. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  1. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  2. Rationale and study design of a three-period, 58-week trial of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder in patients with ESRD on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Umanath, Kausik; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Connelly, Carolyn; Schulman, Gerald; Koury, Mark J; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders arise as a result of aberrant bone mineral metabolism in patients with advancing levels of renal dysfunction and end-stage renal disease. One of the cornerstones of treatment is the use of phosphate-binding agents. We describe the rationale and study design for a clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. This trial is a three-period, international, multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, consisting of a 2-week washout period, a 52-week safety assessment period in which subjects are randomized to ferric citrate or active control, and a 4-week efficacy assessment period in which subjects randomized to ferric citrate in the safety assessment period are randomized to ferric citrate or placebo. Eligible subjects include end-stage renal disease patients who have been treated with thrice-weekly hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for at least 3 months in dialysis clinics in the United States and Israel. Primary outcome measure will be the effect of ferric citrate vs. placebo on the change in serum phosphorus. Safety assessments will be performed by monitoring adverse events, concomitant medication use, and sequential blood chemistries (including iron parameters, phosphorus, and calcium). This three-period trial will assess the efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. If proven safe and efficacious, ferric citrate will likely provide an additional phosphate binder to treat chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders. PMID:22702490

  3. Hydride Attack on a Coordinated Ferric Nitrosyl: Experimental and DFT Evidence for the Formation of a Heme Model-HNO Derivative.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, Erwin G; Khade, Rahul L; Powell, Douglas R; Zhang, Yong; Richter-Addo, George B

    2016-01-13

    Heme-HNO species are crucial intermediates in several biological processes. To date, no well-defined Fe heme-HNO model compounds have been reported. Hydride attack on the cationic ferric [(OEP)Fe(NO)(5-MeIm)]OTf (OEP = octaethylporphyrinato dianion) generates an Fe-HNO product that has been characterized by IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Results of DFT calculations reveal a direct attack of the hydride on the N atom of the coordinated ferric nitrosyl. PMID:26678216

  4. Ferric Maltol Is Effective in Correcting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from a Phase-3 Clinical Trial Program

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Tulassay, Zsolt; Baumgart, Daniel C.; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Büning, Carsten; Howaldt, Stefanie; Stallmach, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is frequently seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Traditionally, oral iron supplementation is linked to extensive gastrointestinal side effects and possible disease exacerbation. This multicenter phase-3 study tested the efficacy and safety of ferric maltol, a complex of ferric (Fe3+) iron with maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyrone), as a novel oral iron therapy for IDA. Methods: Adult patients with quiescent or mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, mild-to-moderate IDA (9.5–12.0 g/dL and 9.5–13.0 g/dL in females and males, respectively), and documented failure on previous oral ferrous products received oral ferric maltol capsules (30 mg twice a day) or identical placebo for 12 weeks according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline to week 12. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Results: Of 329 patients screened, 128 received randomized therapy (64 ferric maltol-treated and 64 placebo-treated patients) and comprised the intent-to-treat efficacy analysis: 55 ferric maltol patients (86%) and 53 placebo patients (83%) completed the trial. Significant improvements in Hb were observed with ferric maltol versus placebo at weeks 4, 8, and 12: mean (SE) 1.04 (0.11) g/dL, 1.76 (0.15) g/dL, and 2.25 (0.19) g/dL, respectively (P < 0.0001 at all time-points; analysis of covariance). Hb was normalized in two-thirds of patients by week 12. The safety profile of ferric maltol was comparable with placebo, with no impact on inflammatory bowel disease severity. Conclusions: Ferric maltol provided rapid clinically meaningful improvements in Hb and showed a favorable safety profile, suggesting its possible use as an alternative to intravenous iron in IDA inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25545376

  5. Athermal fracture of covalent bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1999-08-01

    Most fracture is athermal. Either because it occurs at low temperatures or because it occurs too fast for thermal activation to be effective. Thus it must be directly activated by applied stresses. This can occur via quantum tunneling when the chemical bonding of a solid resides in localized (covalent) bonds. Then applied stresses can cause the bonding electrons to become delocalized (anti-bonded) through quantum tunneling. That is, the bonds become broken. The process is related to the Zener tunneling process that is thought to be responsible for dielectric breakdown in semiconductors. Under a driving force, bonding electrons tunnel at constant energy from their bonding states into anti-bonding states through the forbidden gap in the bonding energy spectrum.

  6. The effect of chloride ion on the ferric chloride leaching of galena concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Kim, Seon-Hyo; Henein, H.

    1987-03-01

    Previous investigations of the ferric chloride brine leaching of galena concentrate have shown that additions of chloride ion result in accelerated dissolution rates. The current study has provided the necessary information to extend and modify these previous results by incorporating the important effect of chloride ion on the dissolution kinetics. As part of this study the solubility of lead chloride in ferric chloride-brine solutions has been determined and results indicate that additions of either FeCl3 or NaCl increase the PbCl2 solubility. This is attributed to the effect of complexing on the level of free chloride ion. In addition, the dissolution kinetics of elemental lead and lead chloride were also determined and compared with the kinetics of PbS dissolution. It is significant that the rate of dissolution of PbCl2 decreases as the concentration of Cl- is decreased and as the concentration of dissolved lead increases. These results along with SEM examination of partially reacted Pb shot show that solid PbCl2 forms on the surface long before the bulk solution is saturated with lead. The PbCl2 is proposed to form by a direct electrochemical reaction between Cl- and PbS prior to the formation of dissolved lead. The reaction was determined to be first order with respect to Cl- and closely obeys the following kinetic model based on a rate limiting charge transfer reaction at the surface:1 - (1 - a)^{1/3} left[ {{5.01x10^{11} }/{r_0 }left[ {Fe^{3 + } } right]_T^{0.21} left[ {Cl^ - } right]_T^{1.0} exp left( {{ - 72100}/{RT}} right)} right]t The model is in excellent agreement with experimental results up to about 95 pct reaction as long as the solubility of PbCl2 is greater than about 0.051 M. Where these conditions are not met, deviation from the surface reaction model occurs due to the extremely slow dissolution rate of PbCl2. Therefore the effect of Cl- on the brine leaching of PbS is attributed to two factors, the direct reaction of Cl- with the pbS surface

  7. Formation of ferric iron crusts in Quaternary sediments of Lake Baikal, Russia, and implications for paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.; Granina, L.; Callender, E.; McGee, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphate-bearing, ferric iron and siliceous crusts ranging in age from Recent to approximately 65,000 yr B.P. are observed in sediments of Lake Baikal. In younger sediments the crusts are at the base of a spectrum of secondary iron and manganese oxides that accumulate near the sediment/water interface in the zone of positive oxidation potential beneath an oxygenated water column. In areas where the average Quaternary sedimentation rates have been slow (e.g. 0.026 mm/yr), the crusts are more common, and span a wider range of ages. No crusts have been found where the Quaternary sedimentation mode has been deltaic and rapid (0.15 mm/yr). Independent core correlation based on magnetic properties of the sediment suggests that crusts can be correlated over most of Academician Ridge, an area that is particularly sensitive to climatic events affecting the concentration of suspended sediment. These crusts may be indicative of periods of low suspended sediment concentration, which occur during sustained transitions from glacial periods of high detrital input, to interglacial periods of high diatom sedimentation. The crusts are dominated by iron-rich and siliceous amorphous mineral phases, with an FeO:SiO2 by weight of 3:1. Regardless of age or location in the lake the Fe phase always includes Ca, P and Mn. Extensive microprobe data for these four elements recast as normalized elemental weight percent reveal linear trends of Ca:P and Fe:P. With increasing P, Ca also increases such that the two elements maintain a linear relationship passing very close to the origin and with a mean molar Ca:P=0.3 (too low for well-characterized apatite). Conversely, with increasing P, Fe decreases (mean molar Fe:P=3.4). There is no correlation between Mn and P. Molar Fe:P ratios for vivianite (an Fe(II) phosphate mineral observed in sediments closely below some crusts) are clustered around a stoichiometric composition. The covariant increase in Ca:P and the corresponding decrease in Fe:P may

  8. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  9. Investigations of the Low Frequency Modes of Ferric Cytochrome c Using Vibrational Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ∼44 cm–1 that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ∼421–435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ∼55 and 30 cm–1. The intensity of the mode near 44 cm–1 appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421–435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm–1 is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d6 configuration. PMID:24823442

  10. Spin-coupling in ferric metalloporphyrin radical cation complexes: Mössbauer and susceptibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, George; Boso, Brian; Erler, Brian S.; Reed, Christopher A.

    1986-03-01

    The ferric metalloporphyrin π-radical cation complexes Fe(III) (OClO3)2 (TPP.) and [Fe(III) Cl (TPP.)] [SbCl6] were examined in microcrystalline form by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptometry over a range of temperatures and applied fields. All measurements on the six-coordinate Fe(OClO3)2 (TPP.) were consistent with isolated molecules having an S=5/2 iron site with zero field splitting (12 cm-1) S2z that is ferromagnetically coupled to the S=1/2 porphyrin radical by an energy term (-110 cm-1) Sṡs. Thus the ground state is overall spin-3. In the five-coordinate [FeCl (TPP.)] [SbCl6] the susceptibility is in reasonable agreement with the results of a calculation based on zero field splitting (12 cm-1) S2z for the S=5/2 iron and antiferromagnetic coupling (200 cm-1) Sṡs with the radical to give an overall spin-2 ground state. However, the Mössbauer measurements require a more complicated model having the same large intramolecular iron-radical coupling, a smaller zero field splitting (3 cm-1) S2z, and weak intermolecular antiferromagnetic coupling between heme pairs given by (32 cm-1) s1ṡs2 or, equivalently, (0.65 cm-1) S1ṡS2. A slightly improved correspondence with the measured susceptibility results. The intermolecular antiferromagnetic coupling probably results from crystallization of the [FeCl (TPP.)]+ cations in face-to-face dimers as observed in other closely related five-coordinate iron (III) porphyrins.

  11. Removal of arsenate with hydrous ferric oxide coprecipitation: effect of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Jingjing; Jing, Chuanyong; Duan, Jinming; Zhang, Yongli; Hu, Shan

    2014-02-01

    Insights from the adverse effect of humic acid (HA) on arsenate removal with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) coprecipitation can further our understanding of the fate of As(V) in water treatment process. The motivation of our study is to explore the competitive adsorption mechanisms of humic acid and As(V) on HFO on the molecular scale. Multiple complementary techniques were used including macroscopic adsorption experiments, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, flow-cell attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurement, and charge distribution multisite complexation (CD-MUSIC) modeling. The As(V) removal efficiency was reduced from over 95% to about 10% with the increasing HA concentration to 25 times of As(V) mass concentration. The SERS analysis excluded the HA-As(V) complex formation. The EXAFS results indicate that As(V) formed bidentate binuclear surface complexes in the presence of HA as evidenced by an As-Fe distance of 3.26-3.31 angstroms. The in situ ATR-FTIR measurements show that As(V) replaces surface hydroxyl groups and forms innersphere complex. High concentrations of HA may physically block the surface sites and inhibit the As(V) access. The adsorption of As(V) and HA decreased the point of zero charge of HFO from 7.8 to 5.8 and 6.3, respectively. The CD-MUSIC model described the zeta potential curves and adsorption edges of As(V) and HA reasonably well. PMID:25076514

  12. Complexation of ferric oxide particles with pectins of ordered and random distribution of charged units.

    PubMed

    Milkova, Viktoria; Kamburova, Kamelia; Cameron, Randall; Radeva, Tsetska

    2012-01-01

    Complexation between ferric oxide particles and pectins with degree of methylation 50% but having ordered or random arrangement of free carboxyl groups is investigated by electric light scattering and electrophoresis. The influence of charge distribution in pectin chain on the electrical properties of oppositely charged oxide particles and stability of their suspensions is examined as a function of pectin concentration. Although the difference in charge density of pectin samples is ~5%, we found small but measurable difference in the behavior of both oxide/pectin complexes. This is attributed to condensation of counterions near the chains of pectin with ordered distribution of charges, leading to a decrease in the effective charge density and to a corresponding decrease in the contour length of the adsorbing pectin chains. Two parameters are sensitive to the conformation of the adsorbed chains in suspensions, stabilized by pectin adsorption (at particle charge reversal). The electro-optical effect is higher for the complex with less charged pectin, which is explained with larger amount of chains, adsorbed in more coiled conformation than the chains of pectin with random distribution of free carboxyl groups. The addition of small amounts of CaCl(2) has no significant influence on the thickness of the layer from the less charged pectin, in agreement with a more compact conformation of the chains in this adsorbed layer. In contrast, the thickness of the layer from pectin with random distribution of charged groups decreases with increasing concentration of CaCl(2), indicating a more loose structure of this layer. PMID:22114903

  13. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  14. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Ren; You, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gaseous transmitter, regulating a multitude of biological processes in the cardiovascular and other systems. However, it remains unclear whether it exerts any effect on arterial thrombosis. In this study, we examined the effect of H2S on ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced thrombosis in the rat common carotid artery (CCA). The results revealed a decrease of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H2S production that persisted until 48 h after FeCl3 application. Intriguingly, administration with NaHS at appropriate regimen reduced the thrombus formation and enhanced the blood flow, accompanied with the alleviation of CSE and CD31 downregulation, and endothelial cell apoptosis in the rat CCA following FeCl3 application. Moreover, the antithrombotic effect of H2S was also observed in Rose Bengal photochemical model in which the development of thrombosis is contributed by oxidative injury to the endothelium. The in vitro study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression of CSE, as well as H2S production, was decreased in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated endothelial cells. Exogenous supplement of NaHS and CSE overexpression consistently alleviated the increase of cleaved caspase-3 and endothelial cell damage caused by H2O2. Taken together, our findings suggest that endogenous H2S generation in the endothelium may be impaired during arterial thrombosis and that modulation of H2S, either exogenous supplement or boost of endogenous production, may become a potential venue for arterial thrombosis therapy. PMID:26982248

  15. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François; Stintzi, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  16. Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose in Anemic Pregnant Women: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pels, Anouk; Ganzevoort, Wessel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia during pregnancy is commonly caused by iron deficiency and can have severe consequences for both the mother and the developing fetus. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in pregnant women. Methods. All women treated with FCM for anemia during pregnancy between 2010 and 2012 at our institution were included. A matched control group was selected, including women who either were nonanemic or had anemia but were not considered for intravenous iron. Main outcome measures were maternal safety and pregnancy outcomes. Results. The study included 128 patients (FCM: 64; control: 64). Median FCM dose was 1000 mg and median gestational age at the time of first treatment was 34 weeks and 6 days. Median Hb increased from 8.4 g/dL (interquartile range 7.7; 8.9 g/dL) at the first FCM administration to 10.7 g/dL (9.8; 11.5 g/dL; n = 46 with available Hb at delivery) at the time of delivery, achieving levels similar to those in the control group (10.8 g/dL [9.8; 11.8 g/dL; n = 48]). No treatment-related adverse events were reported and no statistically significant differences in pregnancy outcomes were observed between groups. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this case control study, FCM was a safe and efficient treatment of anemia during pregnancy. PMID:26688686

  17. Growth, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate: A nonlinear optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Shihabuddeen Syed, A.; Jagannathan, K.; Rajarajan, K.

    2013-05-01

    Single crystal of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate [Hg2FeCl3(SCN)4; (MFCTC)] was grown from ethanol-water (3:1) mixed solvent using slow evaporation solvent technique (SEST) for the first time. The cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal XRD. The coordination of transition metal ions with the SCN ligand is well-identified using FT-IR spectral analysis. The chemical composition of MFCTC was confirmed using CHNS elemental test. The ESR spectral profile of MFCTC was recorded from 298 K to 110 K, which strongly suggests the incorporation of Fe3+ ion and its environment with respect to SCN ligand. The HPLC chromatogram of MFCTC highlights the purity of the compound. The UV-Vis-NIR studies revealed the ultra violet cut-off wavelength of MFCTC in ethanol as 338 nm. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the sample were studied as a function of frequency and temperature. The TGA-DTA and DSC thermal analysis show that the sample is thermally stable up to 234.31 °C, which is comparatively far better than the thermal stability of Hg3CdCl2(SCN)6; (171.3 °C) and other metal-organic coordination complex crystals such as CdHg(SCN)4 (198.5 °C), Hg(N2H4CS)4Mn(SCN)4 (199.06 °C) and Hg(N2H4CS)4Zn(SCN)4 (185 °C). The SHG conversion efficiency of MFCTC is found to be higher than KDP.

  18. Ferric Uptake Regulator and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Estevan A.; Szelestey, Blake R.; Newsom, David E.; White, Peter; Mason, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a commensal microorganism of the human nasopharynx, and yet is also an opportunistic pathogen of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Host microenvironments influence gene expression patterns, likely critical for NTHi persistence. The host sequesters iron as a mechanism to control microbial growth, and yet iron limitation influences gene expression and subsequent production of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. Careful regulation of iron uptake, via the ferric uptake regulator Fur, is essential in multiple bacteria, including NTHi. We hypothesized therefore that Fur contributes to iron homeostasis in NTHi, is critical for bacterial persistence, and likely regulates expression of virulence factors. Toward this end, fur was deleted in the prototypic NTHi clinical isolate, 86-028NP, and we assessed gene expression regulated by Fur. As expected, expression of the majority of genes that encode proteins with predicted roles in iron utilization was repressed by Fur. However, 14 Fur-regulated genes encode proteins with no known function, and yet may contribute to iron utilization or other biological functions. In a mammalian model of human otitis media, we determined that Fur was critical for bacterial persistence, indicating an important role for Fur-mediated iron homeostasis in disease progression. These data provide a profile of genes regulated by Fur in NTHi and likely identify additional regulatory pathways involved in iron utilization. Identification of such pathways will increase our understanding of how this pathogen can persist within host microenvironments, as a common commensal and, importantly, as a pathogen with significant clinical impact. PMID:23381990

  19. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  20. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A.; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E.; Humphrey, Daniel M.; Wang, Shirley L.; Kiselyov, Kirill I.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development. PMID:26398942

  1. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  2. Sodium pyrophosphate enhances iron bioavailability from bouillon cubes fortified with ferric pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Cercamondi, Colin I; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Harika, Rajwinder K; van den Berg, Robin; Murray, Peter; Koppenol, Wieneke P; Zeder, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael B; Moretti, Diego

    2016-08-01

    Fe fortification of centrally manufactured and frequently consumed condiments such as bouillon cubes could help prevent Fe deficiency in developing countries. However, Fe compounds that do not cause sensory changes in the fortified product, such as ferric pyrophosphate (FePP), exhibit low absorption in humans. Tetra sodium pyrophosphate (NaPP) can form soluble complexes with Fe, which could increase Fe bioavailability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate Fe bioavailability from bouillon cubes fortified with either FePP only, FePP+NaPP, ferrous sulphate (FeSO4) only, or FeSO4+NaPP. We first conducted in vitro studies using a protocol of simulated digestion to assess the dialysable and ionic Fe, and the cellular ferritin response in a Caco-2 cell model. Second, Fe absorption from bouillon prepared from intrinsically labelled cubes (2·5 mg stable Fe isotopes/cube) was assessed in twenty-four Fe-deficient women, by measuring Fe incorporation into erythrocytes 2 weeks after consumption. Fe bioavailability in humans increased by 46 % (P<0·005) when comparing bouillons fortified with FePP only (4·4 %) and bouillons fortified with FePP+NaPP (6·4 %). Fe absorption from bouillons fortified with FeSO4 only and with FeSO4+NaPP was 33·8 and 27·8 %, respectively (NS). The outcome from the human study is in agreement with the dialysable Fe from the in vitro experiments. Our findings suggest that the addition of NaPP could be a promising strategy to increase Fe absorption from FePP-fortified bouillon cubes, and if confirmed by further research, for other fortified foods with complex food matrices as well. PMID:27267429

  3. Ni(II) complexation to amorphous hydrous ferric oxide: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Axe, Lisa; Boonfueng, Thipnakarin; Tyson, Trevor A; Trivedi, Paras; Pandya, Kaumudi

    2007-10-01

    Ni(II) sorption onto iron oxides and in particular hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) is among the important processes impacting its distribution, mobility, and bioavailability in environment. To develop mechanistic models for Ni, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis has been conducted on Ni(II) sorbed to HFO. Coprecipitation revealed the formation of the metastable alpha-Ni(OH)(2) at a Ni(II) loading of 3.5 x 10(-3) molg(-1). On the other hand, Ni(II) formed inner-sphere mononuclear bidentate complexes along edges of FeO(6) octahedra when sorbed to HFO surfaces with Ni-O distances of 2.05-2.07 A and Ni-Fe distances of 3.07-3.11 A. This surface complex was observed by EXAFS study over 2.8 x 10(-3) to 10(-1) ionic strength, pH from 6 to 7, a Ni(II) loading of 8 x 10(-4) to 8.1 x 10(-3) molg(-1) HFO, and reaction times from 4 hours to 8 months. The short- and long-range structure analyses suggest that the presence of Ni(II) inhibited transformation of the amorphous iron oxide into a more crystalline form. However, Ni(2+) was not observed to substitute for Fe(3+) in the oxide structure. This study systematically addresses Ni(II) adsorption mechanisms to amorphous iron oxide. The experimentally defined surface complexes can be used to constrain surface complexation modeling for improved prediction of metal distribution at the iron oxide/aqueous interface. PMID:17561066

  4. Effect of ferric and ferrous iron addition on phosphorus removal and fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenghua; Wang, Yuan; Leslie, Greg L; Waite, T David

    2015-02-01

    The effect of continuously dosing membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with ferric chloride (Fe(III)) and ferrous sulphate (Fe(II)) on phosphorus (P) removal and membrane fouling is investigated here. Influent phosphorus concentrations of 10 mg/L were consistently reduced to effluent concentrations of less than 0.02 mg/L and 0.03-0.04 mg/L when an Fe(III)/P molar ratio of 4.0 and Fe/P molar ratio (for both Fe(II) and Fe(III)) of 2.0 were used, respectively. In comparison, effluent concentrations did not decrease below 1.35 mg/L in a control reactor to which iron was not added. The concentrations of supernatant organic compounds, particularly polysaccharides, were reduced significantly by iron addition. The sub-critical fouling time (tcrit) after which fouling becomes much more severe was substantially shorter with Fe(III) dosing (672 h) than with Fe(II) dosing (1200-1260 h) at Fe/P molar ratios of 2.0 while the control reactor (no iron dosing) exhibited a tcrit of 960 h. Not surprisingly, membrane fouling was substantially more severe at Fe/P ratios of 4. Fe(II) doses yielding Fe/P molar ratios of 2 or less with dosing to the aerobic chamber were found to be optimal in terms of P removal and fouling mitigation performance. In long term operation, however, the use of iron for maintaining appropriately low effluent P concentrations results in more severe irreversible fouling necessitating the application of an effective membrane cleaning regime. PMID:25482913

  5. Computational methods for intramolecular electron transfer in a ferrous-ferric iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-07-29

    The limitations of common theoretical and molecular computational approaches for predicting electron transfer quantities were assessed, using an archetypal bridged ferrous-ferric electron transfer system in aqueous solution. The basis set effect on the magnitude of the electronic coupling matrix element computed using the quasi-diabatic method was carefully examined, and it was found that the error related to a poor basis set could exceed the thermal energy at room temperature. A range of approaches to determining the external (solvent) reorganization energy were also investigated. Significant improvements from the Marcus continuum model can be obtained by including dipolar Born-Kirkwood-Onsager correction. In this regard we also found that Klamt’s Conductor-Like Screening Model (COSMO) yields estimations of the external reorganization energy similar to those obtained with explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, if the fast-frequency modes are neglected, which makes it an attractive alternative to laborious umbrella sampling simulations. As expected, dielectric saturation observed in the first solvation shell decreases the curvature of the potential energy surface, but it nonetheless remains a quadratic function of the reaction coordinate. The linearity of solvent response to the charge redistribution was assessed by analyzing the energy gap autocorrelation function as well as the solvent density and dipole moment fluctuations. Molecular dynamics was also used to evaluate the sign and magnitude of the solvent reorganization entropy, to determine its effect on the predicted electron transfer rate. Finally, we present a simple way of estimating the vibration frequency along the reaction coordinate, which also enables prediction of the mass dependent isotopic signature of electron-transfer reactions.

  6. The kinetics of the oxidation of pyrite by ferric ions and dissolved oxygen: An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Crundwell, F.K.

    2000-01-01

    The dissolution of pyrite is important in the geochemical cycling of iron and sulphur, in the formation of acid mine drainage, and in the extraction of metals by bacterial leaching. Many researchers have studied the kinetics of dissolution, and the rate of dissolution has often been found to be half-order in ferric ions or oxygen. Previous work has not adequately explained the kinetics of dissolution of pyrite. The dissolution of pyrite is an oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions was studied independently using electrochemical techniques of voltammetry. The kinetics of the overall reaction was studied by the electrochemical technique of potentiometry, which consisted of measuring the mixed potential of a sample of corroding pyrite in solutions of different compositions. The kinetics of the half reactions are related to the kinetics of the overall dissolution reaction by the condition that there is no accumulation of charge. This principle is used to derive expressions for the mixed potential and the rate of dissolution, which successfully describe the mixed potential measurements and the kinetics of dissolution reported in the literature. It is shown that the observations of half-order kinetics and that the oxygen in the sulphate product arises from water are both a direct consequence of the electrochemical mechanism. Thus it is concluded that the electrochemical reaction steps occurring at the mineral-solution interface control the rate of dissolution. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze reaction products formed on the pyrite surface. The results indicated that small amounts of polysulphides form on the surface of the pyrite. However, it was also found that the mixed (corrosion) potential does not change over a 14-day leaching period. This indicates that even though polysulphide material is present on the surface, it does not influence the rate of the reactions occurring at the surface. Measurement of the

  7. Optimizing iron delivery in the management of anemia: patient considerations and the role of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Angerosa, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    With the challenge of optimizing iron delivery, new intravenous (iv) iron-carbohydrate complexes have been developed in the last few years. A good example of these new compounds is ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), which has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in adult patients who are intolerant to oral iron or present an unsatisfactory response to oral iron, and in adult patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD). FCM is a robust and stable complex similar to ferritin, which minimizes the release of labile iron during administration, allowing higher doses to be administered in a single application and with a favorable cost-effective rate. Cumulative information from randomized, controlled, multicenter trials on a diverse range of indications, including patients with chronic heart failure, postpartum anemia/abnormal uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, NDD-CKD, and those undergoing hemodialysis, supports the efficacy of FCM for iron replacement in patients with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia. Furthermore, as FCM is a dextran-free iron-carbohydrate complex (which has a very low risk for hypersensitivity reactions) with a small proportion of the reported adverse effects in a large number of subjects who received FCM, it may be considered a safe drug. Therefore, FCM appears as an interesting option to apply high doses of iron as a single infusion in a few minutes in order to obtain the quick replacement of iron stores. The present review on FCM summarizes diverse aspects such as pharmacology characteristics and analyzes trials on the efficacy/safety of FCM versus oral iron and different iv iron compounds in multiple clinical scenarios. Additionally, the information on cost effectiveness and data on change in quality of life are also discussed. PMID:25525337

  8. Optimizing iron delivery in the management of anemia: patient considerations and the role of ferric carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Angerosa, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    With the challenge of optimizing iron delivery, new intravenous (iv) iron–carbohydrate complexes have been developed in the last few years. A good example of these new compounds is ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), which has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in adult patients who are intolerant to oral iron or present an unsatisfactory response to oral iron, and in adult patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD). FCM is a robust and stable complex similar to ferritin, which minimizes the release of labile iron during administration, allowing higher doses to be administered in a single application and with a favorable cost-effective rate. Cumulative information from randomized, controlled, multicenter trials on a diverse range of indications, including patients with chronic heart failure, postpartum anemia/abnormal uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, NDD-CKD, and those undergoing hemodialysis, supports the efficacy of FCM for iron replacement in patients with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia. Furthermore, as FCM is a dextran-free iron–carbohydrate complex (which has a very low risk for hypersensitivity reactions) with a small proportion of the reported adverse effects in a large number of subjects who received FCM, it may be considered a safe drug. Therefore, FCM appears as an interesting option to apply high doses of iron as a single infusion in a few minutes in order to obtain the quick replacement of iron stores. The present review on FCM summarizes diverse aspects such as pharmacology characteristics and analyzes trials on the efficacy/safety of FCM versus oral iron and different iv iron compounds in multiple clinical scenarios. Additionally, the information on cost effectiveness and data on change in quality of life are also discussed. PMID:25525337

  9. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)–Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension. PMID:23038172

  10. A method for preparing ferric activated carbon composites adsorbents to remove arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao Li; Lin, Y C; Chen, X; Gao, Nai Yun

    2007-09-30

    Iron oxide/activated carbon (FeO/AC) composite adsorbent material, which was used to modify the coal-based activated carbon (AC) 12 x 40, was prepared by the special ferric oxide microcrystal in this study. This composite can be used as the adsorbent to remove arsenic from drinking water, and Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well describes the experimental adsorption isotherms. Then, the arsenic desorption can subsequently be separated from the medium by using a 1% aqueous NaOH solution. The apparent characters and physical chemistry performances of FeO/AC composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch and column adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the arsenic removal capability of the prepared FeO/AC composite material and virgin activated carbon. It can be concluded that: (1) the main phase present in this composite are magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) and goethite (alpha-FeO(OH)); (2) the presence of iron oxides did not significantly affect the surface area or the pore structure of the activated carbon; (3) the comparisons between the adsorption isotherms of arsenic from aqueous solution onto the composite and virgin activated carbon showed that the FeO/AC composite behave an excellent capacity of adsorption arsenic than the virgin activated carbon; (4) column adsorption experiments with FeO/AC composite adsorbent showed that the arsenic could be removed to below 0.01 mg/L within 1250 mL empty bed volume when influent concentration was 0.5mg/L. PMID:17434260

  11. Spectrophotometric techniques to determine tranexamic acid: Kinetic studies using ninhydrin and direct measuring using ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arayne, M. Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed; Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Zuberi, M. Hashim

    2008-11-01

    Two simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods in ultraviolet and visible region are described for the determination of tranexamic acid in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with ninhydrin at boiling temperature and by measuring the increase in absorbance at 575 nm as a function of time. The initial rate, rate constant and fixed time (120 min) procedures were used for constructing the calibration graphs to determine the concentration of the drug, which showed a linear response over the concentration range 16-37 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, 0.996, 0.9999, LOQ 6.968, 7.138, 2.462 μgmL -1 and LOD 2.090, 2.141 and 0.739 μgmL -1, respectively. In second method tranexamic acid was reacted with ferric chloride solution, yellowish orange colored chromogen showed λ max at 375 nm showing linearity in the concentration range of 50-800 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, LOQ 6.227 μgmL -1 and LOD 1.868 μgmL -1. The variables affecting the development of the color were optimized and the developed methods were validated statistically and through recovery studies. These results were also verified by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The proposed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of tranexamic acid in commercial pharmaceutical formulation.

  12. Ferric Citrate Reduces Intravenous Iron and Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Use in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Umanath, Kausik; Jalal, Diana I; Greco, Barbara A; Umeukeje, Ebele M; Reisin, Efrain; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Negoi, Dana G; Hiremath, Anand N; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Koury, Mark J; Ma, Khe-Ni; Greene, Tom; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-10-01

    Ferric citrate (FC) is a phosphate binder with shown efficacy and additional effects on iron stores and use of intravenous (iv) iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). We provide detailed analyses of changes in iron/hematologic parameters and iv iron/ESA use at time points throughout the active control period of a phase 3 international randomized clinical trial. In all, 441 subjects were randomized (292 to FC and 149 to sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate [active control (AC)]) and followed for 52 weeks. Subjects on FC had increased ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) levels compared with subjects on AC by week 12 (change in ferritin, 114.1±29.35 ng/ml; P<0.001; change in TSAT, 8.62%±1.57%; P<0.001). Change in TSAT plateaued at this point, whereas change in ferritin increased through week 24, remaining relatively stable thereafter. Subjects on FC needed less iv iron compared with subjects on AC over 52 weeks (median [interquartile range] dose=12.9 [1.0-28.9] versus 26.8 [13.4-47.6] mg/wk; P<0.001), and the percentage of subjects not requiring iv iron was higher with FC (P<0.001). Cumulative ESA over 52 weeks was lower with FC than AC (median [interquartile range] dose=5303 [2023-9695] versus 6954 [2664-12,375] units/wk; P=0.04). Overall, 90.3% of subjects on FC and 89.3% of subjects on AC experienced adverse events. In conclusion, treatment with FC as a phosphate binder results in increased iron parameters apparent after 12 weeks and reduces iv iron and ESA use while maintaining hemoglobin over 52 weeks, with a safety profile similar to that of available binders. PMID:25736045

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose in Anemic Pregnant Women: A Retrospective Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Pels, Anouk; Ganzevoort, Wessel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia during pregnancy is commonly caused by iron deficiency and can have severe consequences for both the mother and the developing fetus. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in pregnant women. Methods. All women treated with FCM for anemia during pregnancy between 2010 and 2012 at our institution were included. A matched control group was selected, including women who either were nonanemic or had anemia but were not considered for intravenous iron. Main outcome measures were maternal safety and pregnancy outcomes. Results. The study included 128 patients (FCM: 64; control: 64). Median FCM dose was 1000 mg and median gestational age at the time of first treatment was 34 weeks and 6 days. Median Hb increased from 8.4 g/dL (interquartile range 7.7; 8.9 g/dL) at the first FCM administration to 10.7 g/dL (9.8; 11.5 g/dL; n = 46 with available Hb at delivery) at the time of delivery, achieving levels similar to those in the control group (10.8 g/dL [9.8; 11.8 g/dL; n = 48]). No treatment-related adverse events were reported and no statistically significant differences in pregnancy outcomes were observed between groups. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this case control study, FCM was a safe and efficient treatment of anemia during pregnancy. PMID:26688686

  14. Experience with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Bregman, David B; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2014-04-01

    Erythropoiesis may be limited by absolute or functional iron deficiency or when chronic inflammatory conditions lead to iron sequestration. Intravenous iron may be indicated when oral iron cannot address the deficiency. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a nondextran iron preparation recently approved in the United States for intravenous treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in adult patients with intolerance or unsatisfactory response to oral iron or with nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The full dose is two administrations of up to 750 mg separated by at least 7 days (up to 1500 mg total). FCM can be injected in 7-8 min or diluted in saline for slower infusion. The efficacy and safety of this dose was established in two prospective trials that randomized over 3500 subjects, 1775 of whom received FCM. One trial showed similar efficacy of FCM to an approved intravenous iron regimen (1000 mg of iron sucrose) in 2500 subjects with chronic kidney disease and additional cardiovascular risk factors. The other trial showed superior efficacy of FCM to oral iron in subjects with IDA due to various etiologies (e.g. gastrointestinal or uterine bleeding). In these trials, there was no significant difference between FCM and comparator with respect to an independently adjudicated composite safety endpoint, including death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. A database of 5799 subjects exposed to FCM provided a safety profile acceptable for regulatory approval. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the transient, asymptomatic reduction in serum phosphate observed following FCM administration results from induction of fibroblast growth factor 23, which in turn induces renal phosphate excretion. An elevated hepcidin level may identify patients with IDA who will not respond to oral iron but will respond to FCM. The ability to administer FCM in two rapid injections or infusions will likely be viewed favorably by patients and healthcare providers. PMID:24688754

  15. Direct Measurements of the Outer Membrane Stage of Ferric Enterobactin Transport

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Salete M.; Trinh, Vy; Pi, Hualiang; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2010-01-01

    When Gram-negative bacteria acquire iron, the metal crosses both the outer membrane (OM) and the inner membrane, but existing radioisotopic uptake assays only measure its passage through the latter bilayer, as the accumulation of the radionuclide in the cytoplasm. We devised a methodology that exclusively observes OM transport and used it to study the uptake of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) by Escherichia coli FepA. This technique, called postuptake binding, revealed previously unknown aspects of TonB-dependent transport reactions. The experiments showed, for the first time, that despite the discrepancy in cell envelope concentrations of FepA and TonB (∼35:1), all FepA proteins were active and equivalent in FeEnt uptake, with a maximum turnover number of ∼5/min. FepA-mediated transport of FeEnt progressed through three distinct phases with successively decreasing rates, and from its temperature dependence, the activation energy of the OM stage was 33–35 kcal/mol. The accumulation of FeEnt in the periplasm required the binding protein and inner membrane permease components of its overall transport system; postuptake binding assays on strains devoid of FepB, FepD, or FepG did not show uptake of FeEnt through the OM. However, fluorescence labeling data implied that FepA was active in the ΔfepB strain, suggesting that FeEnt entered the periplasm but then leaked out. Further experiments confirmed this futile cycle; cells without FepB transported FeEnt across the OM, but it immediately escaped through TolC. PMID:20335169

  16. [Characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Batch tests have been used to investigate the characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant. ICP, SEM and XRD analyses confirm that the FARs enriched in Fe and Al elements and presented amorphism structure. Orthophosphate sorption by the FARs can be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation. Fine adsorption effects of the FARs were found under lower pH values, particularly a 40.13% drop of the adsorptive capacity from pH 4.6 to pH 7.6. The FARs with grain sizes of 0.6-0.9 mm had the highest adsorption capacity of orthophosphate. Experimental data could be better fitted by the isotherm models of Langmuir (R2 = 0.9736) and Freundlich (R2 = 0.9916). The maximal adsorptive capacity reached 45.45 mg x g(-1) estimated from Langmuir isotherm model. Compared with other natural and industrial materials, FARs has relatively higher adsorption capacity. Under similar testing conditions, it was found that only about 10% orthophosphate could be desorbed from the FARs. Further study demonstrated that the mean energy of orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was 13.36 kJ x mol(-1) and the deltaH0 > 0, deltaS0 > 0 and deltaG0 < 0, which indicated that orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was a spontaneously endothermic chemical reaction. It can be therefore highly valued that the FARs may be applied to phosphate removal from wastewater and surface water. PMID:22619965

  17. Growth, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate: a nonlinear optical crystal.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Shihabuddeen Syed, A; Jagannathan, K; Rajarajan, K

    2013-05-01

    Single crystal of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate [Hg2FeCl3(SCN)4; (MFCTC)] was grown from ethanol-water (3:1) mixed solvent using slow evaporation solvent technique (SEST) for the first time. The cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal XRD. The coordination of transition metal ions with the SCN ligand is well-identified using FT-IR spectral analysis. The chemical composition of MFCTC was confirmed using CHNS elemental test. The ESR spectral profile of MFCTC was recorded from 298 K to 110K, which strongly suggests the incorporation of Fe(3+) ion and its environment with respect to SCN ligand. The HPLC chromatogram of MFCTC highlights the purity of the compound. The UV-Vis-NIR studies revealed the ultra violet cut-off wavelength of MFCTC in ethanol as 338 nm. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the sample were studied as a function of frequency and temperature. The TGA-DTA and DSC thermal analysis show that the sample is thermally stable up to 234.31 °C, which is comparatively far better than the thermal stability of Hg3CdCl2(SCN)6; (171.3 °C) and other metal-organic coordination complex crystals such as CdHg(SCN)4 (198.5 °C), Hg(N2H4CS)4Mn(SCN)4 (199.06 °C) and Hg(N2H4CS)4Zn(SCN)4 (185 °C). The SHG conversion efficiency of MFCTC is found to be higher than KDP. PMID:23501934

  18. Computational methods for intramolecular electron transfer in a ferrous-ferric iron complex.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Kerisit, Sebastien; Rosso, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    The limitations of common theoretical and molecular computational approaches for predicting electron transfer quantities were assessed, using an archetypal bridged ferrous-ferric electron transfer system in aqueous solution. The basis set effect on the magnitude of the electronic coupling matrix element computed using the quasi-diabatic method was carefully examined, and it was found that the error related to a poor basis set could exceed the thermal energy at room temperature. A range of approaches to determining the external (solvent) reorganization energy were also investigated. Significant improvements from the Marcus continuum model can be obtained by including dipolar Born-Kirkwood-Onsager correction. In this regard, we also found that Klamt's Conductor-Like Screening Model (COSMO) yields estimations of the external reorganization energy similar to those obtained with explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations if the fast-frequency modes are neglected, which makes it an attractive alternative to laborious umbrella sampling simulations. By using the COSMO model, we also confirm that a decrease in curvature of the potential energy surface is a manifestation of the dielectric saturation observed in the first solvation layer. The linearity of solvent response to the charge redistribution was assessed by analyzing the energy gap autocorrelation function as well as the solvent density and dipole moment fluctuations. Molecular dynamics was also used to evaluate the sign and magnitude of the solvent reorganization entropy and to determine its effect on the predicted electron transfer rate. Finally, we present a simple way of estimating the vibration frequency along the reaction coordinate, which also enables prediction of the mass-dependent isotopic signature of electron transfer reactions. PMID:21696749

  19. Surface complexation modeling of Cu(II) adsorption on mixtures of hydrous ferric oxide and kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Tracy J; Koretsky, Carla M; Landry, Christopher J; Schaller, Melinda S; Das, Soumya

    2008-01-01

    Background The application of surface complexation models (SCMs) to natural sediments and soils is hindered by a lack of consistent models and data for large suites of metals and minerals of interest. Furthermore, the surface complexation approach has mostly been developed and tested for single solid systems. Few studies have extended the SCM approach to systems containing multiple solids. Results Cu adsorption was measured on pure hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), pure kaolinite (from two sources) and in systems containing mixtures of HFO and kaolinite over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, sorbate/sorbent ratios and, for the mixed solid systems, using a range of kaolinite/HFO ratios. Cu adsorption data measured for the HFO and kaolinite systems was used to derive diffuse layer surface complexation models (DLMs) describing Cu adsorption. Cu adsorption on HFO is reasonably well described using a 1-site or 2-site DLM. Adsorption of Cu on kaolinite could be described using a simple 1-site DLM with formation of a monodentate Cu complex on a variable charge surface site. However, for consistency with models derived for weaker sorbing cations, a 2-site DLM with a variable charge and a permanent charge site was also developed. Conclusion Component additivity predictions of speciation in mixed mineral systems based on DLM parameters derived for the pure mineral systems were in good agreement with measured data. Discrepancies between the model predictions and measured data were similar to those observed for the calibrated pure mineral systems. The results suggest that quantifying specific interactions between HFO and kaolinite in speciation models may not be necessary. However, before the component additivity approach can be applied to natural sediments and soils, the effects of aging must be further studied and methods must be developed to estimate reactive surface areas of solid constituents in natural samples. PMID:18783619

  20. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part... or contiguous distilled spirits plant qualified under 27 CFR part 19 for the production of distilled... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operations bond or...

  1. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 281.33 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... a surety or personal bond to guarantee payment of a deferred portion of the bid. Upon the payment of the full amount of the cash bonus bid, the lessee's bond will be released. (b) All bonds to...

  2. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or contiguous distilled spirits plant qualified under 27 CFR part 19 for the production of distilled... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of...

  3. IMPROVED BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Padgett, E.V. Jr.; Warf, D.H.

    1964-04-28

    An improved process of bonding aluminum to aluminum without fusion by ultrasonic vibrations plus pressure is described. The surfaces to be bonded are coated with an aqueous solution of alkali metal stearate prior to assembling for bonding. (AEC) O H19504 Present information is reviewed on steady state proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of blood cells in mammals. Data are cited from metabolic tracer studies, autoradiographic studies, cytologic studies, studies of hematopoietic response to radiation injuries, and computer analyses of blood cell production. A 3-step model for erythropoiesis and a model for granulocyte kinetics are presented. New approaches to the study of lymphocytopoiesis described include extracorporeal blood irradiation to deplete lymphocytic tissue without direct injury to the formative tissues as a means to study the stressed system, function control, and rates of proliferation. It is pointed out that present knowledge indicates that lymphocytes comprise a mixed family, with diverse life spans, functions, and migration patterns with apparent aimless recycling from modes to lymph to blood to nodes that has not yet been quantitated. Areas of future research are postulated. (70 references.) (C.H.)

  4. Cooperativity in Tetrel Bonds.

    PubMed

    Marín-Luna, Marta; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study of the cooperativity in linear chains of (H3SiCN)n and (H3SiNC)n complexes connected by tetrel bonds has been carried out by means of MP2 and CCSD(T) computational methods. In all cases, a favorable cooperativity is observed, especially in some of the largest linear chains of (H3SiNC)n, where the effect is so large that the SiH3 group is almost equidistant to the two surrounding CN groups and it becomes planar. In addition, the combination of tetrel bonds with other weak interactions (halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, triel, beryllium, lithium, and hydrogen bond) has been explored using ternary complexes, (H3SiCN)2:XY and (H3SiNC)2:XY. In all cases, positive cooperativity is obtained, especially in the (H3SiNC)2:ClF and (H3SiNC)2:SHF ternary complexes, where, respectively, halogen and chalcogen shared complexes are formed. PMID:26756083

  5. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  11. Annual Bond Referenda Survey: 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

    An annual school bond survey for New Jersey reveals that while the state's voters had approved 60 percent of the school bond issues in 1998, the communities clearly could not meet the state's multi- billion dollar construction needs on their own. Further, communities with high property taxes had fewer bond elections and approved less of them than…

  12. The Induction of Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis by a Ferric Carboxymaltose Copy Compared to Iron Sucrose in a Non-Clinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Gabriel; Angerosa, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ferric carboxymaltose is a next-generation polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide carbohydrate complex for intravenous iron therapy belonging to the class of so-called non-biological complex drugs. The product characteristics and therapeutic performance of non-biological complex drugs are largely defined by the manufacturing process. A follow-on product, termed herein as ferric carboxymaltose similar, is available in India. Given that non-biological complex drugs may display differences in diverse product properties not characterisable by physico-chemical methods alone. Aim The aim is to assess the effects of this ferric carboxymaltose similar in our non-clinical model in non-anaemic healthy rats. Materials and Methods Non-anaemic rats were treated with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose similar or iron sucrose both at (40 mg iron/kg body weight), or with saline solution (control) for four weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed. Parameters for tissue iron distribution, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistomorphometry. Results Ferric carboxymaltose similar resulted in deranged iron distribution versus iron sucrose originator as indicated by increased serum iron, transferrin saturation and tissue iron(III) deposits as well as decreased ferritin deposits in the liver, heart and kidneys versus iron sucrose originator. Ferric carboxymaltose similar also increased significantly oxidative/nitrosative stress, pro-inflammatory, and apoptosis markers in the liver, heart and kidneys versus iron sucrose originator. Conclusion In our rat model, ferric carboxymaltose similar had a less favourable safety profile than iron sucrose originator, adversely affecting iron deposition, oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammatory responses, with impaired liver and kidney function. PMID:26816915

  13. Spectroscopic and Crystallographic Evidence for the Role of a Water-Containing H-Bond Network in Oxidase Activity of an Engineered Myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Igor D; Davydov, Roman; Ross, Matthew; Zhao, Xuan; Hoffman, Brian; Lu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Heme-copper oxidases (HCOs) catalyze efficient reduction of oxygen to water in biological respiration. Despite progress in studying native enzymes and their models, the roles of non-covalent interactions in promoting this activity are still not well understood. Here we report EPR spectroscopic studies of cryoreduced oxy-F33Y-CuBMb, a functional model of HCOs engineered in myoglobin (Mb). We find that cryoreduction at 77 K of the O2-bound form, trapped in the conformation of the parent oxyferrous form, displays a ferric-hydroperoxo EPR signal, in contrast to the cryoreduced oxy-wild-type (WT) Mb, which is unable to deliver a proton and shows a signal from the peroxo-ferric state. Crystallography of oxy-F33Y-CuBMb reveals an extensive H-bond network involving H2O molecules, which is absent from oxy-WTMb. This H-bonding proton-delivery network is the key structural feature that transforms the reversible oxygen-binding protein, WTMb, into F33Y-CuBMb, an oxygen-activating enzyme that reduces O2 to H2O. These results provide direct evidence of the importance of H-bond networks involving H2O in conferring enzymatic activity to a designed protein. Incorporating such extended H-bond networks in designing other metalloenzymes may allow us to confer and fine-tune their enzymatic activities. PMID:26716352

  14. Bonding of restorative materials to dentine: the present status in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, N

    1985-06-01

    Monomers which promote adhesion not only to enamel but also to dentine have been prepared. They have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The monomers are 2-hydroxy-3-beta-naphthoxypropyl methacrylate, 2-methacryloxyethyl phenyl hydrogen phosphoric acid and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride. Chemical reaction between monomers and tooth substrates did not lead to adhesion. Cleaning of the ground tooth surface to remove the smeared layer with aqueous 10 per cent citric acid and 3 per cent ferric chloride solution prior to adhesion is recommended. Then, the lipophilic monomers will promote the inter-penetration of monomers into the hard tissues. The infiltrated methacrylates polymerize there and good adhesion takes place. The layer has good resistance against acid and is, in effect, a resin reinforced dentine and enamel as demonstrated by SEM and TEM. The tensile adhesive strength to the cleaned dentine was 18 MN/m2 and to the enamel 14 MN/m2. On the other hand, the value was reduced to 6 MN/m2 when the dentine had been etched by phosphoric acid or citric acid. The ferric chloride added to the citric acid protected dentinal collagen during demineralization. However, the ferric chloride provided ineffective protection against an acid as strong as phosphoric acid. The high bond strength was not dependent upon interlocking at the dentinal tubules as had been considered previously. The resin reinforced dentine and enamel is a hybrid of natural tissue and artificial material and is valuable in the prevention of secondary caries after restoration. PMID:3894241

  15. Comparative evaluation of Ferric Sulfate, Electrosurgical and Diode Laser on human primary molars pulpotomy: an “in-vivo” study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, P; Indushekar, KR; Saraf, BG; Sheoran, N; Sardana, D

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Despite modern advances in the prevention of dental caries and increased understanding of the importance of maintaining the natural primary dentition, many teeth are still lost prematurely. This can lead to malocclusion with aesthetic, phonetic and functional problems that may be transient or permanent. Therefore, maintaining the integrity and health of the oral tissues is the primary objective of pulp treatment. Pulpotomy has remained an acceptable and mainstay treatment in preserving the vitality of primary tooth and prolonging its life till the permanent successor erupts. Various materials and techniques are available for pulpotomy on primary molars; all with some advantages and disadvantages. The present study was carried out on 45 primary molars to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic success of diode laser, electrosurgical and ferric sulfate pulpotomy over a period of 9 months. Materials (Subjects) and Methods: The forty five primary molars were randomly and equally divided into three treatment groups which were as follows: Group A: 15 primary molars treated with 15.5% Ferric sulfate Group B: 15 primary molars treated with electrosurgical unit and Group C: 15 primary molars treated with diode laser. All teeth in three categories were followed up clinically and radiographically at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months post treatment and the findings were recorded on the prepared proforma Results: Clinically, 86.6% success rate was found in ferric sulfate group whereas 100% success rate was found in electrosurgical and diode laser groups. Radiographically, 80% success rate was found in all the three groups at the end of 9 months with internal resorption being the most common cause of failure after pulpotomy. Conclusions: Thus, electrosurgery and diode lasers appear to be acceptable alternative to pharmacotherapeutic pulpotomy agents. PMID:24771970

  16. Fe{sup II} induced mineralogical transformations of ferric oxyhydroxides into magnetite of variable stoichiometry and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Usman, M.; Abdelmoula, M.; Hanna, K.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to monitor the mineralogical transformations of ferrihydrite (F), lepidocrocite (L) and goethite (G) into magnetite as a function of aging time. Ferric oxyhydroxides were reacted with soluble Fe{sup II} and OH{sup -} in stoichiometric amounts to form magnetite at an initial pH of {approx}9.7. Observed transformation extent into magnetite followed the order: F>L>G with almost 30% of untransformed G after 1 month. The departure from stoichiometry, {delta}, of magnetite (Fe{sub 3-{delta}}O{sub 4}) generated from F ({delta}{approx}0.04) and L ({delta}{approx}0.05) was relatively low as compared to that in magnetite from G ({delta}{approx}0.08). The analysis by transmission electron microscopy and BET revealed that generated magnetite was also different in terms of morphology, particle size and surface area depending on the nature of initial ferric oxyhydroxide. This method of preparation is a possible way to form nano-sized magnetite. - Graphical abstract: Moessbauer spectrum of the early stage of magnetite formation formed from the interaction of adsorbed Fe{sup II} species with goethite. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferric oxides were reacted with hydroxylated Fe{sup II} to form magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite formation was quantified as a function of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complete transformation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost 70% of initial goethite was transformed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resulting magnetites have differences in stoichiometry and morphological properties.

  17. Rapid kinetics investigations of peracid oxidation of ferric cytochrome P450cam: nature and possible function of compound ES.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Dawson, John H; Ballou, David P

    2006-12-01

    Previously, we reported spectroscopic properties of cytochrome P450cam compound I, (ferryl iron plus a porphyrin pi-cation radical (Fe(IV)=O/Por(+))), as well as compound ES (Fe(IV)=O/Tyr()) in reactions of substrate-free ferric enzyme with m-chloroperbenzoic acid [T. Spolitak, J.H. Dawson, D.P. Ballou, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 20300-9]. Compound ES arises by intramolecular electron transfer from nearby tyrosines to the porphyrin pi-cation radical of Compound I, and has been characterized by rapid-freeze-quench-Mössbauer/EPR spectroscopy; the tyrosyl radical was assigned to Tyr96 for wild type or to Tyr75 for the Tyr96Phe variant [V. Schünemann, F. Lendzian, C. Jung, J. Contzen, A.L. Barra, S.G. Sligar, A.X. Trautwein, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (2004) 10919-10930]. Here we report rapid-scanning stopped-flow studies of the reactions of peracids with substrate-free ferric Y75F, Y96F, and Y96F/Y75F P450cam variants, showing how these active site changes influence electron transfer from nearby tyrosines and affect formation of intermediates. Curiously, rates of generation of Compounds I and ES for both single mutants were not very different from wild type. Contrasting with the earlier EPR results, the Y96F/Y75F variant was also shown to form an ES-like species, but more slowly. When substrate is not present, or is improperly bound, compound I rapidly converts to compound ES, which can be reduced to form H(2)O and ferric P450, thus avoiding the modification of nearby protein groups or release of reactive oxygen species. PMID:17095096

  18. Kinetic evidence for the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction of ferric hemoproteins with anionic ligands.

    PubMed

    Coletta, M; Angeletti, M; De Sanctis, G; Cerroni, L; Giardina, B; Amiconi, G; Ascenzi, P

    1996-01-15

    The kinetics of azide and fluroide binding to various monomeric and tetrameric ferric hemoproteins (sperm whale Mb, isolated alpha and beta chains of human Hb reacted with p-chloromercuribenzoate, dromeday, ox and human Hb) has been investigated (at pH 6.5 and 20 degrees C over a large range (20 microM to 2 M) of ligand concentration. It has been observed that the pseuo-first-order rate constant for azide binding to the hemoproteins investigated does not increase linearly with ligand concentration, but tends to level off toward an asymptomatic concentration-independent value typical for each hemoprotein. This behavior, which has been detected only by an investigation covering an unusually large range of ligand concentrations appears to be independent of the ionic strength, and it underlies the existence of a rate-limiting step in the dynamic pathway of azide binding to ferric hemoproteins, which is detectable whenever the observed pseudo- first-order rate constant becomes faster than a given value characteristic of the specific hemoprotein. Such a behavior is not observed in the case of fluroide binding probably because the pesudo- first-order rate constant for this ligand is much slower and never attains a value faster than that of the rate-limiting step. In general terms, this feature should involve a conformational equilibrium between at least two forms (possibly related to the interaction of H2O with distal histidine and its exchange with the bulk solvent) which modulates the access of the anionic ligand into the heme pocket and its reaction with the ferric iron. PMID:8631366

  19. Bacterially-mediated precipitation of ferric iron during the leaching of basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittker, K.; Navarrete, J. U.; Cappelle, I. J.; Borrok, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The bacterially-mediated oxidation of ferrous [Fe(II)] iron in environments where its oxidation is otherwise unfavorable (i.e., acidic and/or anaerobic conditions) results in the formation of ferric iron [Fe(III)] precipitates. The mineralogy and morphologies of these precipitates are dictated by solution biochemistry. In this study, we evaluated Fe(III) precipitates that formed during aerobic bioleaching experiments with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and ilmenite (FeTiO3) and Lunar or Martian basaltic stimulant rocks. Growth media was supplied to support the bacteria; however, all the Fe(II) for chemical energy was supplied by the mineral or rock. During the experiments, the bacteria actively oxidized Fe(II) to Fe(III), resulting in the formation of white and yellow-colored precipitates. In our initial experiments with both ilmentite and basalt, High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopic (HRSEM) analysis indicated that the precipitates where small (diameters were less than 5μm and mostly nanometer-scaled), white, and exhibited a platy texture. Networks of mineralized bacterial biofilm were also abundant. In these cases the white precipitates coated the bacteria, forming rod-shaped minerals 5-10μm long by about 1μm in diameter. Many of the rod-shaped minerals formed elongated chains. Energy Dispersive Spectra (EDS) analysis showed that the precipitates were largely composed of Fe and phosphorous (P) with an atomic Fe:P ratio of ˜1. Limited sulfur (S) was also identified as part of the agglomerated precipitates with an atomic Fe:S ratio that ranged from 5 to 10. Phosphorous and S were introduced into the system in considerable amounts as part of the growth media. Additional experiments were performed where we altered the growth media to lower the amount of available P by an order of magnitude. In this case, the experimental behavior remained the same, but the precipitates were more yellow or orange in color relative to those in the experiments using the

  20. Experimental Spinel Standards for Ferric Iron (Fe3+) Determination During Peridotite Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, M. D.; Sorbadere, F.; Rosenthal, A.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of ferric iron (Fe3+) in the mantle plays a significant role in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the Earth's interior. This has a wide range of implications for Earth related processes ranging from the composition of the atmosphere to magmatic phase relations during melting and crystallization processes [1]. A major source of Earth's mantle magmas is spinel peridotite. Despite its low abundance, spinel (Fe3+/ƩFe = 15-34%, [2]) is the main contributor of Fe3+to the melt upon partial melting. Analyses of Fe3+ on small areas of spinel and melt are required to study the Fe3+ behavior during partial melting of spinel peridotite. Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) combines both high precision and small beam size, but requires standards with a wide range of Fe3+ content to obtain good calibration. Glasses with varying Fe3+ content are easily synthesized [3, 4]. Spinel, however, presents a challenge for experimental standards due to the low diffusion of Cr and Al preventing compositional homogeneity. Natural spinel standards are often used, but only cover a narrow Fe3+ range. Thus, there is a need for better experimental spinel standards over a wider range of fO2. Our study involves making experimental mantle spinels with variable Fe3+ content. We used a sol-gel auto-combustion method to synthesize our starting material [5]. FMQ-2, FMQ+0, and air fO2 conditions were established using a gas mixing furnace. Piston cylinder experiments were performed at 1.5GPa, and 1310 -1370°C to obtain solid material for XANES. To maintain distinct oxidizing conditions, three capsules were used: graphite for reduced, Re for intermediate and AuPd for oxidized conditions. The spinels were analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe3+/ƩFe ranged from 0.3 to 0.6. These values are consistent with the Fe edge position obtained using XANES analyses, between 7130 and 7132 eV, respectively. Our spinels are thus suitable standards for Fe3+ measurements in peridotite