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Sample records for ferrihydrite phase transformation

  1. Studies on the controllable transformation of ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Ma, Miaorui; Qin, Mei; Yang, Lijuan; Wei, Yu

    2010-09-15

    Ferrihydrite was prepared by two different procedures. Ferrihydrite-1 was prepared by dropping NaOH solution into Fe(III) solution. Ferrihydrite-2 was prepared by adding Fe(III) and NaOH solutions into a certain volume of water simultaneously. Our earlier results obtained at {approx}100 {sup o}C have shown that the structure of ferrihydrite-2 favors its solid state transformation mechanism. Further research reveals that the structure of ferrihydrite-2 favors its dissolution re-crystallization mechanism at a temperature of {<=}60 {sup o}C. Based on the transformation mechanism of ferrihydrite at different temperatures, the controllable transformation from ferrihydrite to various iron (hydr)oxides such as lepidocrocite, goethite, hematite and magnetite can be achieved by adjusting the pH, transformation temperature, transformation time, the amount of Fe(II) as well as the preparation procedures of ferrihydrite. The results in the present paper give a nice example that the transformation of a precursor can be controlled with the help of mechanism. - Graphical abstract: The transformations from ferrihydrite to lepidocrocite, goethite, hematite or magnetite can be controlled with the help of mechanism.

  2. Irreversible Sorption of Contaminants During Ferrihydrite Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Arthur, S.E.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Westrich, H.R.

    1999-05-19

    A better understanding of the fraction of contaminants irreversibly sorbed by minerals is necessary to effectively quantify bioavailability. Ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, is a natural sink for sorbed contaminants. Contaminants may be sorbed/occluded as ferrihydrite precipitates in natural waters or as it ages and transforms to more crystalline iron oxides such as goethite or hematite. Laboratory studies indicate that Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Np, Pb, Sr, U, and Zn are irreversibly sorbed to some extent during the aging and transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite. Barium, Ra and Sr are known to sorb on ferrihydrite in the pH range of 6 to 10 and sorb more strongly at pH values above its zero point of charge (pH> 8). We will review recent literature on metal retardation, including our laboratory and modeling investigation of Ba (as an analogue for Ra) and Sr adsorption/resorption, during ferrihydrite transformation to more crystalline iron oxides. Four ferrihydrite suspensions were aged at pH 12 and 50 °C with or without Ba in 0.01 M KN03 for 68 h or in 0.17 M KN03 for 3424 h. Two ferrihydrite suspensions were aged with and without Sr at pH 8 in 0.1 M KN03 at 70°C. Barium or Sr sorption, or resorption, was measured by periodically centrifuging suspension subsamples, filtering, and analyzing the filtrate for Ba or Sr. Solid subsamples were extracted with 0.2 M ammonium oxalate (pH 3 in the dark) and with 6 M HCl to determine the Fe and Ba or Sr attributed to ferrihydrite (or adsorbed on the goethite/hematite stiace) and the total Fe and Ba or Sr content, respectively. Barium or Sr occluded in goethite/hematite was determined by the difference between the total Ba or Sr and the oxalate extractable Ba or Sr. The percent transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite/hematite was estimated from the ratio of oxalate and HC1 extractable Fe. All Ba was retained in the precipitates for at least 20 h. Resorption of Ba reached a maximum of 7 to 8% of the Ba2+ added

  3. Arsenic Repartitioning during Biogenic Sulfidization and Transformation of Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, B.; Borch, T; Fendorf, S

    2010-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II){sub (aq)} concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III){sub (s)} depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  4. Arsenic repartitioning during biogenic sulfidization and transformation of ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-04-30

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II)(aq) concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III)(s) depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  5. Arsenic repartitioning during biogenic sulfidization and transformation of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-02-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II) (aq) concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III) (s) depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  6. Sulfidogenesis Controls on Ferrihydrite Transformation and Repartitioning of Sorbed Arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here, we examine diverging pathways of solid phase iron (Fe) transformation during sulfate reduction in the presence of varying As loadings. Columns initially containing As(V)- ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Additionally, abiotic batch reaction experiments were conducted to examine Fe secondary products rapidly formed during sulfidization of As-loaded ferrihydrite. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed within column solids possessing low As(V) surface coverage (10% of the adsorption maximum). Column experiments illustrated that at high As(V) surface coverage (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. The dominant Fe solid-phase transformation products at low As coverage include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II)aq concentrations exceed 1 mM. Arsenic(V) is reduced to As(III) and displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III)s depletion. At higher As coverage, green rust carbonate, as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Abiotic batch reactor experiments illustrate that As is readily released from ferrihydrite during sulfidization, and that low As loadings yield initial Fe secondary products of lepidocrocite and FeS, while high loadings inhibit rapid secondary Fe mineral formation. Our observations illustrate that

  7. Thiocyanate adsorption on ferrihydrite and its fate during ferrihydrite transformation to hematite and goethite.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hong Phuc; Moreau, John W

    2015-01-01

    Thiocyanate (SCN(-)) is a toxic contaminant produced by industrial processes such as gold ore cyanidation and coal coking. The potential for remediation by adsorption of SCN(-) on ferrihydrite, the influence of sulfate (SO4(2-)) on SCN(-) adsorption, and the fate of adsorbed SCN(-) during ferrihydrite aging were studied using macroscopic techniques complemented with attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared analysis (ATR-FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that adsorption of SCN(-) was strongly affected by the concentration of electrolyte (NaNO3) and pH, with decreases in concentration of NaNO3 and pH leading to increased SCN(-) adsorption. The adsorption isotherms can be described by the Langmuir model. While at lower concentrations (0.52-1.04 mM), the presence of SO4(2-) had little impact on SCN(-) adsorption, at a higher concentration (2.08 mM), SCN(-) adsorption was significantly inhibited. ATR-FTIR data confirmed that SCN(-) was bound as an outer-sphere complex on ferrihydrite, and this mechanism was not influenced by changes in pH or electrolyte concentration. XRD data showed that ferrihydrite transformed to a mixture of hematite and goethite at 75 °C and pH 5 in the presence and absence of SCN(-). Partitioning data revealed that during ferrihydrite transformation, all adsorbed SCN(-) was released into solution. PMID:25303658

  8. Effect of solution and solid-phase conditions on the Fe(II)-accelerated transformation of ferrihydrite to lepidocrocite and goethite.

    PubMed

    Boland, Daniel D; Collins, Richard N; Miller, Christopher J; Glover, Chris J; Waite, T David

    2014-05-20

    Aqueous ferrous iron (Fe(II)) accelerates the transformation of ferrihydrite into secondary, more crystalline minerals however the factors controlling the rate and, indeed, the underlying mechanism of this transformation process remain unclear. Here, we present the first detailed study of the kinetics of the Fe(II)-accelerated transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite, via lepidocrocite, for a range of pH and Fe(II) concentrations and, from the results obtained, provide insight into the factors controlling the transformation rate and the processes responsible for transformation. A reaction scheme for the Fe(II)-accelerated secondary mineralization of ferrihydrite is developed in which an Fe(II) atom attaches to the ferrihydrite surface where it is immediately oxidized to Fe(III) with the resultant electron transferred, sequentially, to other iron oxyhydroxide Fe(III) atoms before release to solution as Fe(II). This freshly precipitated Fe(III) forms the nuclei for the formation of secondary minerals and also facilitates the ongoing uptake of Fe(II) from solution by creation of fresh surface sites. The concentration of solid-associated Fe(II) and the rate of transport of Fe(II) to the oxyhydroxide surface appear to determine which particular secondary minerals form and their rates of formation. Lepidocrocite growth is enhanced at lower solid-associated Fe(II) concentrations while conditions leading to more rapid uptake of Fe(II) from solution lead to higher goethite growth rates. PMID:24724707

  9. Transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence or absence of trace Fe(II): The effect of preparation procedures of ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Li Ping; Lu Bin; Wei Yu; Sun Yuhan

    2009-07-15

    Two-line ferrihydrite was prepared by two different procedures. In procedure 1, which is widely used, ferrihydrite (named as ferrihydrite-1) was prepared by droping NaOH solution into Fe(III) solution. In procedure 2, which is rarely reported, ferrihydrite (named as ferrihydrite-2) was prepared by adding Fe(III) and NaOH solutions into a certain volume of water simultaneously. The results showed that mixing procedures of Fe(III) and alkaline were critical in the sub-microstructures and the conversion mechanisms of ferrihydrites in the presence or absence of trace Fe(II). The sub-microstructure of ferrihydrite-1 favored the mechanism of its dissolution re-crystallization and hematite nanoparticles with rough surface were obtained. The sub-microstructure of ferrihydrite-2 favored the solid state transformation from ferrihydrite to hematite and hematite nanoparticles with smooth surface were formed. These research results will be helpful for us to control the synthesis of hematite nanoparticles with different surface state. - Graphical abstract: Ferrihydrites prepared by mixing Fe{sup 3+} and NaOH solutions according to different procedures can rapidly transform into hematite particles with different surface structures in the presence of trace Fe(II).

  10. Influence of Coprecipitated Organic Matter on Fe2+(aq) -Catalyzed Transformation of Ferrihydrite: Implications for Carbon Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunmei; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2015-08-10

    The poorly crystalline Fe(III) hydroxide ferrihydrite is an important sink for organic matter (OM), nutrients and contaminants in soils and sediments. Aqueous Fe(II) is known to catalyze the transformation of ferrihydrite to more crystalline and thus less reactive phases. While coprecipitation of OM with ferrihydrite could be a common process in many environments due to changes in pH, redox potential or ionic strength, little is known about the impacts of coprecipitated OM on Fe(II)-catalyzed ferrihydrite transformation and its consequences for C dynamics. Accordingly, we explored the extent and pathways of Fe(II)-induced transformation of OM-ferrihydrite coprecipitates and subsequent C mobility. Mössbauer spectroscopic results indicated that the coprecipitated OM within ferrihydrite weakened the inter-particle magnetic interactions and decreased average particle size. The coprecipitated OM resulted in diminished Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation and thus preservation of ferrihydrite. The secondary mineral profiles upon Fe(II) reaction with ferrihydrite were a function of OM content and Fe(II) concentration. At low Fe(II) levels, OM completely inhibited goethite formation and stimulated lepidocrocite formation. At high Fe(II) levels, whereas goethite was formed in the presence of OM, OM reduced the amount of goethite and magnetite formation and increased the formation of lepidocrcocite. The solid-phase C content remained unchanged after reaction, while OM desorpability by H2PO4- was enhanced following reaction of OM-ferrihydrites with aqueous Fe(II). These findings provide insights into the reactivity of natural ferrihydrite containing OM in soils and sediments and the subsequent impact on mineral evolution and C dynamics.

  11. Detailed magnetic monitoring of the enhanced magnetism of ferrihydrite along its progressive transformation into hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Barrón, V.; Andrés-Vergés, M.; Serna, C. J.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Morales, M. P.; Lázaro, F. J.

    2016-06-01

    Under certain aging conditions, ferrihydrite evolves into hematite through intermediate products of enhanced magnetism. Although the magnetic properties of the end product, hematite, are to date satisfactorily known, those of ferrihydrite (and especially the products of its progressive aging) are not sufficiently explored. To this end, magnetic experiments, conducted mostly by using alternating magnetic fields, have been performed. The results reveal that two-line ferrihydrite exhibits conspicuous low-temperature spin glass behavior, a new finding that, on the other hand, could be expected given the previous microstructural observations that described this mineral as a very disordered gel. Upon aging, a progressive increase of the effective magnetic moment per iron ion is detected, in agreement with previous observations that ascribed ferrimagnetic character to an intermediate crystalline phase (sometime called ferriferrihydrite) that disappears just before the full transformation into hematite. Transmission electron microscopy observations suggest that this intermediate crystalline phase nucleates at the expense of the primordial gel, remaining physically attached to it until complete transformation into hematite. This microstructural picture appears well supported as, upon aging, the glassy magnetic dynamics found in ferrihydrite persists for the aged products even when dispersed in a nonmagnetic matrix, very likely because part of the so grown ferrimagnetic nanoparticles form aggregates within remains of the nontransformed gel. We propose a coherent model of ferrihydrite aging, based on integrated microstructural and magnetic observations, which is useful for the identification of aging products in geological and biological environments.

  12. Coprecipitated arsenate inhibits thermal transformation of 2-line ferrihydrite: implications for long-term stability of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Xiao, Dongxue; Bush, Richard T; Liu, Jianshe

    2015-03-01

    2-line ferrihydrite, a ubiquitous iron oxy-hydroxide found in natural and engineered systems, is an efficient sink for the toxic metalloids such as arsenic. While much is known of the excellent capacity of ferrihydrite to coprecipitate arsenate, there is little information concerning the long-term stability of arsenate-accumulated ferrihydrite. By thermal treatment methodology, the expedited transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of coprecipitated arsenate was studied at varying As/Fe ratios (0-0.5) and different heating temperature (40, 300, 450, 600°C). Pure and transformed minerals were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Arsenate was found to retard the thermal transformation of ferrihydrite. The extents of ferrihydrite transformation to hematite decreased with increasing As/Fe ratios, but increased at a higher heating temperature. It is predicted that the coprecipitated arsenate can stabilize the amorphous iron oxides against the transformation to more crystalline solids. Arsenate concentration appears to play an important role in this predicted long-term stability. PMID:25433978

  13. Transformation of two-line ferrihydrite to goethite and hematite as a function of pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Das, Soumya; Hendry, M Jim; Essilfie-Dughan, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Under oxic aqueous conditions, two-line ferrihydrite gradually transforms to more thermodynamically stable and more crystalline phases, such as goethite and hematite. This temperature- and pH-dependent transformation can play an important role in the sequestration of metals and metalloids adsorbed onto ferrihydrite. A comprehensive assessment of the crystallization of two-line ferrihydrite with respect to temperature (25, 50, 75, and 100 °C) and pH (2, 7, and 10) as a function of reaction time (minutes to months) was conducted via batch experiments. Pure and transformed phases were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The rate of transformation of two-line ferrihydrite to hematite increased with increasing temperature at all pHs studied and followed first-order reaction kinetics. XRD and XANES showed simultaneous formation of goethite and hematite at 50 and 75 °C at pH 10, with hematite being the dominant product at all pHs and temperatures. With extended reaction time, hematite increased while goethite decreased, and goethite reaches a minimum after 7 days. Observations suggest two-line ferrihydrite transforms to hematite via a two-stage crystallization process, with goethite being intermediary. The findings of this study can be used to estimate rates of crystallization of pure two-line ferrihydrite over the broad range of temperatures and pH found in nature. PMID:21128633

  14. Kinetics of Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of 6-line ferrihydrite under anaerobic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Marcus, M.A.; Bargar, J.R.

    2010-04-01

    The readsorption of ferrous ions produced by the abiotic and microbially-mediated reductive dissolution of iron oxy-hydroxides drives a series of transformations of the host minerals. To further understand the mechanisms by which these transformations occur and their kinetics within a microporous flow environment, flow-through experiments were conducted in which capillary tubes packed with ferrihydrite-coated glass spheres were injected with inorganic Fe(II) solutions under circumneutral pH conditions at 25 C. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to identify the secondary phase(s) formed and to provide data for quantitative kinetic analysis. At concentrations at and above 1.8 mM Fe(II) in the injection solution, magnetite was the only secondary phase formed (no intermediates were detected), with complete transformation following a nonlinear rate law requiring 28 hours and 150 hours of reaction at 18 and 1.8 mM Fe(II), respectively. However, when the injection solution consisted of 0.36 mM Fe(II), goethite was the predominant reaction product and formed much more slowly according to a linear rate law, while only minor magnetite was formed. When the rates are normalized based on the time to react half of the ferrihydrite on a reduced time plot, it is apparent that the 1.8 mM and 18 mM input Fe(II) experiments can be described by the same reaction mechanism, while the 0.36 input Fe(II) experiment is distinct. The analysis of the transformation kinetics suggest that the transformations involved an electron transfer reaction between the aqueous as well as sorbed Fe(II) and ferrihydrite acting as a semiconductor, rather than a simple dissolution and recrystallization mechanism. A transformation mechanism involving sorbed inner sphere Fe(II) alone is not supported, since the essentially equal coverage of sorption sites in the 18 mM and 1.8 mM Fe(II) injections cannot explain the difference in the transformation rates observed.

  15. Investigation of solid phase upon γ-irradiation of ferrihydrite-ethanol suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkin, Tanja; Zadro, Krešo; Gotić, Marijan; Musić, Svetozar

    2011-07-01

    Ferrihydrite (FH) nanoparticles were synthesised and subjected to γ-irradiation in the form of FH-ethanol suspension. The dose rate of γ-radiation was ˜16 kGy/h and the samples were irradiated to doses of up to 2590 kGy. γ-irradiation of FH-ethanol suspensions did not cause the transformation of FH to any of the other iron oxide phases. Likewise, neither the Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopy nor the quantitative analysis using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy gave any evidence of structural changes of FH upon γ-irradiation. C, H analysis showed that the C concentration in FH gradually increased with dose and was higher in γ-irradiated FH samples than in non-irradiated FH sample. This finding suggested that carbon in FH originated from ethanol degradation. The H concentration in FH gradually increased to the dose of up to 340 kGy and then slightly decreased. Magnetic measurements showed a progressive decrease in magnetisation with an increase in γ-irradiation. The results of magnetic measurements and C, H analysis suggested the carbonisation of FH surface. It was supposed that γ-irradiation of FH-ethanol suspension reductively decomposed ethanol thus generating unsaturated hydrocarbons and acetylides, which in turn formed a conjugate iron complex, thus carbonating the FH surface. The carbonisation of the FH surface prevented FH transformation to other iron oxide phases.

  16. Effect of Humic Substances on the Trapping and Transformations of U(VI) by Ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublet, G.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.; Janot, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Old Rifle DOE site in Colorado was a major site for milling uranium ore. U concentrations up to 1.8 uM persist in the Rifle aquifer, even after 'cleaning' the waste source of contaminations [1]. Understanding the behavior of U(VI) in this anthropogenically perturbed system is crucial for controlling the level of U contamination. Direct investigations of U speciation at this site have shown that U is associated with a wide variety of minerals as well as with natural organic matter (NOM) [2]. NOM has multiple functional groups which can be highly reactive with respect to aqueous metal ions, including actinides. Such interactions result in the formation of organo-mineral-metal (ternary) complexes and catalyze redox transformations; in addition, they can enhance mineral dissolution and metal transport [3,4,5]. In the complex soil/sediment system, aqueous, mineral, and organic phases are intimately mixed and their interactions are difficult to characterize by direct investigation [1]. The nanoparticulate iron hydroxide ferrihydrite (Fh), which is ubiquitous in many natural soils and highly reactive toward metal ions, is expected to significantly influence the fate of U in natural soils and is abundant in the subsurface at the Rifle site. NOM is also abundant at this site; however, little is known about the effect of NOM associated with ferrihydrite on the fate of U in such subsurface environments. To date, simple model systems composed mainly of two components (Fh and NOM) [6], (U and NOM or simple organic molecules) [7], or (Fh and U) [8,9], and more rarely composed of three components [10,11] have been studied in an effort to understand interactions among these components. In order to extend this earlier work to ternary systems, we have carried out batch reactions of U, a humic acid standard - Eliott soil humic acid (ESHA), and Fh under conditions that mimic those in the subsurface at Rifle. We have used U L3- and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy coupled

  17. Transformation of goethite/ferrihydrite to hematite and maghemite under temperate humid conditions in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, P.; Finster, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Jensen, S. K.; Merrison, J. P.; Vendelboe, A. L.

    2012-04-01

    At a number of sandy soil sites in Mid Jutland, Denmark, with iron content of 1-2%, very red spots (Munsell colour: dusky red 10R 3/4) of a few square meters are found. These spots are most likely due to burning events. After the fire ashes raised pH. This dispersed silt and clay size soil particles which were then transported with seepage water down into lower soil horizons. These particles contain hematite and maghemite due to influence of the fire. However, a long-standing unresolved question is how hematite and maghemite can also be present along with goethite and ferrihydrite, in the same geographical region, and in extended areas with high iron content (8-40 %) in the topsoil. Hematite and particularly maghemite would normally not be expected to form under the temperate humid Danish climate, but be interpreted as the result of high temperature as found in tropical regions or as seen in soils exposed to fire. The high iron content most likely has its origin in pyrite dissolution in top of the groundwater zone in deeper Miocene deposits. From there Fe2+ is brought to the surface by the groundwater, and in wells oxidized by meeting the atmosphere and precipitated as two line ferrihydrite. This is later transformed into goethite. However, along with these two minerals hematite and maghemite are present in the topsoil around the well area. Forest fires would be a likely explanation to the hematite and maghemite. But a body of evidence argues against these sites having been exposed to fire. 1) The pH in the topsoil is 3.6 - 4.8 and thus not raised by ashes. 2) No charcoal is present. 3) There is no indication of fire outside the high iron content areas. 4) Goethite is present along with hematite and maghemite in microparticles, and the mineralogical zonation produced in a forest fire is not seen. The natural sites contain a uniform mixture of goethite/ferrihydrite, hematite and maghemite down to 20 cm depth. An experimental forest fire left charcoal and ashes at

  18. The transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of trace Fe(II): The effect of the ammonia, amine and the coordination ions of Fe(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Lijuan; Ma, Miaorui; Li, Ping; Wei, Yu

    2010-03-01

    This work examined Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of ammonia, amine and the coordination ions of Fe(III). Our earlier results showed that ferrihydrite transformed into the mixture of lepidocrocite, goethite and/or hematite in the presence of trace Fe(II) and absence of ammonia and similar species. However, the formation of lepidocrocite was restrained when using ammonia as precipitants. When introducing some amines (e.g. ethanolamine and diethanolamine) and some coordination ions (e.g. F - and CO42- ions) into the reaction system, a similar effect on the transformation of ferrihydrite was found. Probably, the complexes formed between Fe(III) and those additives favor the formation of goethite. At the same time, the introduction of these additives hinders Fe(II) from interacting with ferrihydrite, which makes the catalytic dissolution of ferrihydrite be limited, thus, the formation of lepidocrocite be restrained.

  19. Controlled Growth of Ferrihydrite Branched Nanosheet Arrays and Their Transformation to Hematite Nanosheet Arrays for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mei; Cai, Jinguang; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2016-02-17

    The morphology engineering represents an alternative route toward efficient hematite photoanodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting without changing the chemical composition. In this work, a facile and mild solvothermal synthesis of unique ferrihydrite branched nanosheet arrays vertically aligned on FTO substrate was achieved at around 100 °C. The hierarchical branched ferrihydrite nanosheet arrays consisted of tiny branches up to 40 nm in length grown almost vertically on stem nanosheets ∼10 nm in thickness. Moreover, the variation of the morphology of the ferrihydrite nanostructures from bare nanosheet arrays through branched nanosheet arrays to dense branched structures can be readily achieved through the regulation of the reaction time and temperature. The obtained ferrihydrite branched nanosheet arrays can be in situ transformed into α-Fe2O3 nanosheet arrays with small surface protrusions upon annealing at 550 °C. After a simple postgrowth Ti-doping process, the resulting Ti-doped α-Fe2O3 nanosheet arrays showed a good PEC performance for water splitting with a photocurrent density of 1.79 mA/cm(2) at 1.6 V vs RHE under AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW/cm(2)). In contrast, the Ti-doped irregular aggregates of the α-Fe2O3 nanograins transformed from dense ferrihydrite branched structures exhibited a much lower photocurrent density (0.41 mA/cm(2) at 1.6 V vs RHE), demonstrating the important influence of the morphology of α-Fe2O3 photoanodes on the PEC performance. PMID:26517010

  20. Characterization of the Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases onto Ferrihydrite via Fourier Transform Infrared and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Canhisares-Filho, José E; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Santana, Henrique; Urbano, Alexandre; da Costa, Antonio C S; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    Minerals could have played an important role in concentration, protection, and polymerization of biomolecules. Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust, there are few works in the literature that describe the use of iron oxide-hydroxide in prebiotic chemistry experiments. In the present work, the interaction of adenine, thymine, and uracil with ferrihydrite was studied under conditions that resemble those of prebiotic Earth. At acidic pH, anions in artificial seawater decreased the pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc) of ferrihydrite; and at basic pH, cations increased the pHpzc. The adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite followed the order adenine > uracil > thymine. Adenine adsorption peaked at neutral pH; however, for thymine and uracil, adsorption increased with increasing pH. Electrostatic interactions did not appear to play an important role on the adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite. Adenine adsorption onto ferrihydrite was higher in distilled water compared to artificial seawater. After ferrihydrite was mixed with artificial seawaters or nucleic acid bases, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectra did not show any change. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy showed that the interaction of adenine with ferrihydrite was not pH-dependent. In contrast, the interactions of thymine and uracil with ferrihydrite were pH-dependent such that, at basic pH, thymine and uracil lay flat on the surface of ferrihydrite, and at acidic pH, thymine and uracil were perpendicular to the surface. Ferrihydrite adsorbed much more adenine than thymine; thus adenine would have been better protected against degradation by hydrolysis or UV radiation on prebiotic Earth. PMID:26393397

  1. The transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of trace Fe(II): The effect of the ammonia, amine and the coordination ions of Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Yang Lijuan; Ma Miaorui; Li Ping; Wei Yu

    2010-03-15

    This work examined Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of ammonia, amine and the coordination ions of Fe(III). Our earlier results showed that ferrihydrite transformed into the mixture of lepidocrocite, goethite and/or hematite in the presence of trace Fe(II) and absence of ammonia and similar species. However, the formation of lepidocrocite was restrained when using ammonia as precipitants. When introducing some amines (e.g. ethanolamine and diethanolamine) and some coordination ions (e.g. F{sup -} and C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions) into the reaction system, a similar effect on the transformation of ferrihydrite was found. Probably, the complexes formed between Fe(III) and those additives favor the formation of goethite. At the same time, the introduction of these additives hinders Fe(II) from interacting with ferrihydrite, which makes the catalytic dissolution of ferrihydrite be limited, thus, the formation of lepidocrocite be restrained. - Graphical Abstract: Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of ammonia, amine and coordination ions of Fe(III) was studied. The introduction of the additives favors the formation of goethite.

  2. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities <~60 μT. Higher fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism. PMID:27458091

  3. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities <~60 μT. Higher fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism. PMID:27458091

  4. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2016-07-01

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities <~60 μT. Higher fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism.

  5. Effect of adsorbed and substituted Al on Fe(II)-induced mineralization pathways of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Learman, D. R.; Lentini, C. J.; Ekstrom, E. B.

    2011-08-01

    The poorly crystalline Fe(III) hydroxide ferrihydrite is considered one of the most important sinks for (in)organic contaminants and nutrients within soils, sediments, and waters. The ripening of ferrihydrite to more stable and hence less reactive phases such as goethite is catalyzed by surface reaction with aqueous Fe(II). While ferrihydrite within most natural environments contains high concentrations of adsorbed or co-precipitated cations (particularly Al), little is known regarding the impact of these cations on Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite to secondary phases. Accordingly, we explored the extent, rates, and pathways of Fe(II)-induced secondary mineralization of Al-ferrihydrites by reacting aqueous Fe(II) (0.2 and 2.0 mM) with 2-line ferrihydrite containing a range of Al levels substituted within (6-24 mol% Al) or adsorbed on the surface (0.1-27% Γmax). Here, we show that regardless of the Fe(II) concentration, Al substituted within or adsorbed on ferrihydrite results in diminished secondary mineralization and preservation of ferrihydrite. In contrast to pure ferrihydrite, the concentration of Fe(II) may not in fact influence the mineralization products of Al-compromised ferrihydrites. Furthermore, the secondary mineral profiles upon Fe(II) reaction with ferrihydrite are not only a function of Al concentration but also the mode of Al incorporation. While Al substitution impedes lepidocrocite formation and magnetite nucleation, Al adsorption completely inhibits goethite formation and appears to have a lesser impact on magnetite nucleation. When normalized to total Al content associated with ferrihydrite, Al adsorption results in greater degree of ferrihydrite preservation relative to Al substitution. These findings provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for ferrihydrite preservation and low levels of secondary magnetite typically found in sedimentary environments. Considering the preponderance of cation substitution within and

  6. The Mineralogic Transformation of Ferrihydrite Induced by Heterogeneous Reaction with Bioreduced Anthraquinone Disulfonate (AQDS) and the Role of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chong M.; Kennedy, David W.; Moore, Dean A.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2011-10-12

    Anthraquinone-2-6-disulfonate (AQDS) enhances electron donor utilization and mineral product crystallization in studies of Fe(III) oxide reductive mineralization by metal reducing bacteria (MRB) through heterogeneous redox reaction. In spite of the strong effect of AQDS in these systems, little information exits on its direct role in reductive mineralization. To provide such insights, bioreduced AQDS (AH2DS; dihydro-anthraquinone) was reacted with a 2-line, Si-substituted ferrihydrite under anoxic conditions at neutral pH in PIPES buffer. Phosphate (P) and bicarbonate (C); common adsorptive oxyanions and media/buffer components known to effect ferrihydrite mineralization; and Fe(II)aq (as a catalytic mineralization agent) were used in comparative experiments. Heterogeneous AH2DS oxidation coupled with Fe(III) reduction occurred within 0.13-1 day, with mineralogic transformation occurring thereafter. The product suite included lepidocrocite, goethite, and/or magnetite, with proportions varing with reductant:oxidant ratio (r:o) and the presence of P or C. Lepidocrocite was the primary product at low r:o in the absence of P or C, with evidence for multiple formation pathways. P inhibited reductive recrystallization, while C promoted goethite formation. Stoichiometric magnetite was the sole product at higher r:o in the absence and presence of P. Lepidocrocite was the primary mineralization product in the Fe(II)aq system, with magnetite observed at near equal amounts when Fe(II) was high [Fe(II)/Fe(III)]=0.5 and P was absent. P had a greater effect on reductive mineralization in the Fe(II)aq system, while AQDS was more effective than Fe(II)aq in promoting magnetite formation. The direct AH2DS-driven reductive reaction pathway produced mineral products that were different from AH2DS-ferrihydite-MRB systems, particularly in presence of P.

  7. The mineralogic transformation of ferrihydrite induced by heterogeneous reaction with bioreduced anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS) and the role of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peretyazhko, Tanya; Bowden, Mark; Wang, Chongmin; Kennedy, Dave W.; Moore, Dean; Arey, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Bioreduced anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH 2DS; dihydro-anthraquinone) was reacted with a 2-line, Si-substituted ferrihydrite under anoxic conditions at neutral pH in PIPES buffer. Phosphate (P) and bicarbonate (C); common adsorptive oxyanions and media/buffer components known to effect ferrihydrite mineralization; and Fe(II) aq (as a catalytic mineralization agent) were used in comparative experiments. Heterogeneous AH 2DS oxidation coupled with Fe(III) reduction occurred within 0.13-1 day, with mineralogic transformation occurring thereafter. The product suite included lepidocrocite, goethite, and/or magnetite, with proportions varing with reductant:oxidant ratio (r:o) and the presence of P or C. Lepidocrocite was the primary product at low r:o in the absence of P or C, with evidence for multiple formation pathways. Phosphate inhibited reductive recrystallization, while C promoted goethite formation. Stoichiometric magnetite was the sole product at higher r:o in the absence and presence of P. Lepidocrocite was the primary mineralization product in the Fe(II) aq system, with magnetite observed at near equal amounts when Fe(II) was high [Fe(II)/Fe(III)] = 0.5 and P was absent. P had a greater effect on reductive mineralization in the Fe(II) aq system, while AQDS was more effective than Fe(II) aq in promoting magnetite formation. The mineral products of the direct AH 2DS-driven reductive reaction are different from those observed in AH 2DS-ferrihydite systems with metal reducing bacteria, particularly in presence of P.

  8. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Michel, F. Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P.; Serna, Carlos J.; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A. Cristina; Brown, Gordon E.

    2010-01-01

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of “2-line” ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time. PMID:20133643

  9. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P.; Serna, Carlos J.; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A. Cristina; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2010-11-19

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of '2-line' ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time.

  10. Photoinduced Oxidation of Arsenite to Arsenate on Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    N Bhandari; R Reeder; D Strongin

    2011-12-31

    The photochemistry of an aqueous suspension of the iron oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, in the presence of arsenite has been investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and solution phase analysis. Both ATR-FTIR and XANES show that the exposure of ferrihydrite to arsenite in the dark leads to no change in the As oxidation state, but the exposure of this arsenite-bearing surface, which is in contact with pH 5 water, to light leads to the conversion of the majority of the adsorbed arsenite to the As(V) bearing species, arsenate. Analysis of the solution phase shows that ferrous iron is released into solution during the oxidation of arsenite. The photochemical reaction, however, shows the characteristics of a self-terminating reaction in that there is a significant suppression of this redox chemistry before 10% of the total iron making up the ferrihydrite partitions into solution as ferrous iron. The self-terminating behavior exhibited by this photochemical arsenite/ferrihydrite system is likely due to the passivation of the ferrihydrite surface by the strongly bound arsenate product.

  11. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite III. Effects of Si on the structure of 2-line ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Michel, F. Marc; Tcaciuc, A. Patricia; Brown, Gordon E.

    2014-05-01

    Siliceous ferrihydrites are abundant nanoparticles in natural environments. Although it is well known that the physical properties of ferrihydrite are affected when formed in the presence of silicate oxoanions (SiO44-), the structure of siliceous ferrihydrites (SiFh), and the speciation of Si within these nanosolids are not well understood. In this study we evaluate the effects of Si (at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 mol% Si) on synthetic ferrihydrite precipitates using structural data derived from synchrotron-based high energy X-ray scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, in combination with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Silicate oxoanions have a major effect on Fe(O,OH)x polyhedral polymerization and ferrihydrite particle growth, illustrated by the formation of smaller, poorly crystalline, structurally disordered/strained ferrihydrite nanocrystallites. Variation in Fh unit-cell parameters is suggested to arise from substantial particle size-induced structural disorder. As a result of this significant size-dependent structural disorder, it was not possible to identify evidence for Si4+ for Fe3+ substitution in these samples based on unit cell parameter variations or refinement of different structural models. Principal component analyses (PCA) and linear combination fits carried out on the PDFs suggest that iron partitions between several phases (e.g., ferrihydrite and an Fe-bearing amorphous silica phase (Amorph. SiO2 + Fe)) in these co-precipitates. A mechanism of co-precipitation is proposed, in which silicate binds to Fe polymers and Fh particles, thus inhibiting particle growth at low Si content. At higher Si content, SiO44- polymerization traps significant Fe, and we suggest that the occurrence of this second Fe pool limits further the availability of Fe required for ferrihydrite particle development. Such Si-ferrihydrite co-precipitates are expected to be more

  12. Ferrihydrite in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Ferrihydrite—an ephemeral mineral—is the most active Fe-hydroxide in soils. According to modern data, the ferrihydrite structure contains tetrahedral lattice in addition to the main octahedral lattice, with 10-20% of Fe being concentrated in the former. The presence of Fe tetrahedrons influences the surface properties of this mineral. The chemical composition of ferrihydrite samples depends largely on the size of lattice domains ranging from 2 to 6 nm. Chemically pure ferrihydrite rarely occurs in the soil; it usually contains oxyanion (SiO14 4-, PO4 3-) and cation (Al3+) admixtures. Aluminum replace Fe3+ in the structure with a decrease in the mineral particle size. Oxyanions slow down polymerization of Fe3+ aquahydroxomonomers due to the films at the surface of mineral nanoparticles. Si- and Al-ferrihydrites are more resistant to the reductive dissolution than the chemically pure ferrihydrite. In addition, natural ferrihydrite contains organic substance that decreases the grain size of the mineral. External organic ligands favor ferrihydrite dissolution. In the European part of Russia, ferrihydrite is more widespread in the forest soils than in the steppe soils. Poorly crystallized nanoparticles of ferrihydrite adsorb different cations (Zn, Cu) and anions (phosphate, uranyl, arsenate) to immobilize them in soils; therefore, ferrihydrite nanoparticles play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of iron and other elements.

  13. Adsorption of radium and barium on goethite and ferrihydrite: A kinetic and surface complexation modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajih, M.; Bryan, N. D.; Livens, F. R.; Vaughan, D. J.; Descostes, M.; Phrommavanh, V.; Nos, J.; Morris, K.

    2014-12-01

    Radium and barium uptake onto ferrihydrite and goethite have been studied in the concentration range 1 nM to 5 mM and from pH 4 to 10, to develop a model to predict radium behaviour in legacy uranium mining wastes. For ferrihydrite, uptake of Ra2+ at nM concentrations was strong at pH >7. At higher concentrations, Ba2+ sorption to ferrihydrite was slightly weaker than that of Ra2+. Experiments with goethite showed weaker binding for both metal ions in all systems. The interactions of radium with both ferrihydrite and goethite are fully reversible. The behaviour of radium during transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite has been studied, and no evidence for irreversible incorporation within the goethite lattice was found; radium uptake to goethite was the same, whether or not it was present during its formation. Calcium competed with radium for ferrihydrite sorption only at high calcium concentrations (>10 mM). Barium is a more effective competitor, and a concentration of 1 mM reduced radium sorption. Sediment samples from a legacy uranium mining site have been analysed, and the in situ Rd values are consistent with radium uptake by surface coatings of ferrihydrite or goethite like phases. Surface complexation models have been developed for radium sorption to ferrihydrite and goethite which simulate the experimental data successfully. In both cases, approaches based on a single surface functional group and tetradentate binding sites simulated the data successfully. These data could be used in underpinning the safety case for legacy mining sites.

  14. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  15. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  16. Microbial sulfidogenesis in ferrihydrite-rich environments: Effects on iron mineralogy and arsenic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Edward D.; Johnston, Scott G.; Bush, Richard T.

    2011-06-01

    Microbial sulfidogenesis plays a potentially important role in Fe and As biogeochemistry within wetland soils, sediments and aquifers. This study investigates the specific effects of microbial sulfidogenesis on Fe mineralogy and associated As mobility in mildly acidic (pH 6) and mildly basic (pH 8) advective-flow environments. A series of experiments were conducted using advective-flow columns, with an initial solid-phase comprising As(III)-bearing ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand. Columns for each pH treatment were inoculated with the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and were compared to additional abiotic control columns. Over a period of 28 days, microbial sulfidogenesis (as coupled to the incomplete oxidation of lactate) caused major changes in Fe mineralogy, including replacement of ferrihydrite by mackinawite and magnetite at the in-flow end of the inoculated columns. At pH 8, the Fe 2+ produced by electron transfer between sulfide and ferrihydrite was mainly retained near its zone of formation. In contrast, at pH 6, much of the produced Fe 2+ was transported with advecting groundwater, facilitating the downstream Fe 2+-catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite. At both pH 6 and pH 8, the sulfide-driven reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite and its replacement by mackinawite at the in-flow end of the inoculated columns resulted in substantial mobilization of As into the pore-water. At pH 8, this caused the downstream As concentrations within the inoculated columns to be greater than the corresponding abiotic column. However, the opposite occurred under pH 6 conditions, with the Fe 2+-catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite in the inoculated columns causing a decrease in downstream As concentrations compared to the abiotic column. Although thermodynamically favorable at intermediate times and depth intervals within the inoculated columns, solid As sulfide phases were undetectable by As XANES spectroscopy. Our findings

  17. Secondary mineralization pathways induced by dissimilatory iron reduction of ferrihydrite under advective flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Colleen M.; Benner, Shawn G.; Neiss, Jim; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Fendorf, Scott

    2003-08-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides not only serve as potent sorbents and repositories for nutrients and contaminants but also provide a terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. The microbial reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides and the subsequent secondary solid-phase transformations will, therefore, have a profound influence on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe as well as associated metals. Here we elucidate the pathways and mechanisms of secondary mineralization during dissimilatory iron reduction by a common iron-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32), of 2-line ferrihydrite under advective flow conditions. Secondary mineralization of ferrihydrite occurs via a coupled, biotic-abiotic pathway primarily resulting in the production of magnetite and goethite with minor amounts of green rust. Operating mineralization pathways are driven by competing abiotic reactions of bacterially generated ferrous iron with the ferrihydrite surface. Subsequent to the initial sorption of ferrous iron on ferrihydrite, goethite (via dissolution/reprecipitation) and/or magnetite (via solid-state conversion) precipitation ensues resulting in the spatial coupling of both goethite and magnetite with the ferrihydrite surface. The distribution of goethite and magnetite within the column is dictated, in large part, by flow-induced ferrous Fe profiles. While goethite precipitation occurs over a large Fe(II) concentration range, magnetite accumulation is only observed at concentrations exceeding 0.3 mmol/L (equivalent to 0.5 mmol Fe[II]/g ferrihydrite) following 16 d of reaction. Consequently, transport-regulated ferrous Fe profiles result in a progression of magnetite levels downgradient within the column. Declining microbial reduction over time results in lower Fe(II) concentrations and a subsequent shift in magnetite precipitation mechanisms from nucleation to crystal growth. While the initial precipitation rate of goethite exceeds that of magnetite, continued growth is inhibited by

  18. Phase transformations in engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C.; Dunand, D.C.; Priesmeyer, H.G.

    1996-06-01

    Phase transformations in engineering materials are inevitably related to mechanical behavior and are often precursors to residual stress and distortion. Neutron scattering in general is a valuable tool for studying their effects, and pulsed neutrons are of special value, because of the inherently comprehensive crystallographic coverage they provide in each measurement. At the Manuel Lujan neutron scattering center several different research programs have addressed the relationships between phase transformation/mechanical behavior and residual strains. Three disparate examples are presented; (1) stress induced transformation in a NiTi shape memory alloy, (2) cryogenically induced transformation in a quenched 5180 steel, and (3) time resolved evolution of strain induced martensite in 304 stainless steel. In each case a brief description of the principle result will be discussed in the context of using neutrons for the measurement.

  19. Phase Transformations in Confined Nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Shield, Jeffrey E.; Belashchenko, Kirill

    2014-04-29

    This project discovered that non-equilibrium structures, including chemically ordered structures not observed in bulk systems, form in isolated nanoscale systems. Further, a generalized model was developed that effectively explained the suppression of equilibrium phase transformations. This thermodynamic model considered the free energy decrease associated with the phase transformation was less than the increase in energy associated with the formation of an interphase interface, therefore inhibiting the phase transformation. A critical diameter exists where the system transitions to bulk behavior, and a generalized equation was formulated that successfully predicted this transition in the Fe-Au system. This provided and explains a new route to novel structures not possible in bulk systems. The structural characterization was accomplished using transmission electron microscopy in collaboration with Matthew Kramer of Ames Laboratory. The PI and graduate student visited Ames Laboratory several times a year to conduct the experiments.

  20. Ferrous Phosphate Surface Precipitates Resulting from the Reduction of Intragrain 6-line Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3) and phosphate (P) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. In the intragrain ferrihydrite suspensions, 200-300 µmol L-1 dissolved Fe(III) was released during the initial stages of incubation; no Fe(III)aq was detected in the free ferrihydrite suspensions. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Distinctive surface precipitates of Fe(II) phosphates with spherical morphology were observed on porous silica when P was present. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and fragments of extracellular materials at the end of incubation.

  1. Phase transformations coupled to deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, Turab

    2013-06-01

    Phase transformation processes have a substantial impact on the inelastic and damage response of materials. Yet, our understanding of how different loading conditions affect volume fractions of transformed phases, microstructure and transformation pathways is very much in its infancy. With an emphasis on distilling single crystal physics that can, in principle, be incorporated into higher length scale models, I will discuss how recent atomistic simulations on Ti are beginning to provide insights into transformation pathways and the interplay of phase transformations and deformation processes. These simulations are complemented by shock experiments on Zr, Ti together with characterization studies at the Advanced Photon Source.

  2. Reversible nanodiamond-carbon onion phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Ouyang, G; Liu, P; Wang, C X; Yang, G W

    2014-06-11

    Because of their considerable science and technical interest, nanodiamonds (3-5 nm) are often used as a model to study the phase transformation between graphite and diamond. Here we demonstrated that a reversible nanodiamond-carbon onion phase transformation can become true when laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at the ambient temperature and pressure. Nanodiamonds are first transformed to carbon onions driven by the laser-induced high temperature in which an intermediary bucky diamond phase is observed. Sequentially, carbon onions are transformed back to nanodiamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from carbon onions as nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the laser irradiation process in liquid. Similarly, the same bucky diamond phase serving as an intermediate phase is found during the carbon onion-to-nanodiamond transition. To have a clear insight into the unique phase transformation the thermodynamic approaches on the nanoscale were proposed to elucidate the reversible phase transformation of nanodiamond-to-carbon onion-to-nanodiamond via an intermediary bucky diamond phase upon the laser irradiation in liquid. This reversible transition reveals a series of phase transformations between diamond and carbon allotropes, such as carbon onion and bucky diamond, having a general insight into the basic physics involved in these phase transformations. These results give a clue to the root of meteoritic nanodiamonds that are commonly found in primitive meteorites but their origin is puzzling and offers one suitable approach for breaking controllable pathways between diamond and carbon allotropes. PMID:24823241

  3. Magnetic and structural properties of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, N.; Camacho-Aguilar, K. I.; Ramos-González, R.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Herrera-Trejo, M.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2016-05-01

    A rich variety of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites (NCs) with specific size, composition and properties were obtained in transformation reactions of 2-line ferrihydrite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the NCs consist of clusters of strongly aggregated nanoparticles (NPs) similarly to a "plum pudding", where hematite NPs "raisins" are surrounded by ferrihydrite "pudding". Magnetic measurements of the NCs correlate very well with TEM results; i.e., higher coercive fields correspond to greater hematite crystallite size. First order reversal curve (FORC) measurements were used for the characterization of the magnetic components of the NCs. FORC diagrams revealed that the NCs prepared at short times are composed by single domains with low coercivity, and NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min exhibited elongated distribution along the Hc axis. It suggested that these samples consist of mixtures of different kinds of hematite particles, ones with low coercivity and others with coercivity greater than 600 Oe. For NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min, Mossbauer spectroscopy revealed the presence of two sextets, which one was assigned to fine hematite particles and other to hematite particles with hyperfine parameters near to bulk hematite. The correlation of the structural and magnetic properties of the ferrihydrite/hematite NCs revealed important characteristics of these materials which have not been reported elsewhere.

  4. Biotransformation of Two-Line Silica-Ferrihydrite by a Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium: Formation of Carbonate Green Rust in the Presence of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.

    2004-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of two Si-ferrihydrite (0.01 and 0.05 mole% Si) coprecipiates by Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32, was investigated in 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid-buffered media (pH ~7) with lactate as the electron donor. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (electron shuttle) that stimulates respiration was present in the media. Experiments were performed without and with PO43- (ranging from 1 to 20 mmol/L in media containing 50 mmol/L Fe). Our objectives were to define the combined effects of SiO44- and PO43- on the bioreducibility and biomineralization of ferrihydrites under anoxic conditions. Iron reduction was measured as a function of time, solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, and aqueous solutions were analyzed for Si, P, Cl- and inorganic carbon. Both of the ferrihydrites were rapidly reduced regardless of the Si content. Si concentration had no effect on the reduction rate or mineralization products. Magnetite was formed in the absence of PO43- whereas carbonate green rust GR(CO32-) ([FeII(6-x)FeIIIx(OH)12]x+(CO32-)0.5x.yH2O) and vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2.8H2O], were formed when PO43- was present. GR(CO32-) dominated as a mineral product in samples with < 4 mmol/L PO43-. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of GR(CO32-) varied with PO43- concentration; it was 2 in the 1 mmol/L PO43- and approached 1 in the 4- and 10-mmol/L PO43- samples. GR appeared to form by solid-state transformation of ferrihydrite. Medium PO43- concentration dictated the mechanism of transformation. In 1 mmol/L PO43- media, an intermediate Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase with structural Fe(II), which we tentatively assigned to a protomagnetite phase, slowly transformed to GR with time. In contrast, in medium with >4 mmol/L PO43-, a residual ferrihydrite with sorbed Fe2+ phase transformed to GR. Despite similar chemistries, PO43- was shown to have a profound effect on ferrihydrite biotransformations while that of SiO44- was minimal.

  5. Mechanisms of Chromate, Selenate, and Sulfate Adsorption on Al-Substituted Ferrihydrite: Implications for Ferrihydrite Surface Structure and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Chad P; Chrysochoou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Ferrihydrite is a nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxide and important sink for environmental contaminants. Although Fe (hydr)oxides are rarely pure in natural systems, little is known about the effects of structural impurities such as Al on the surface properties and reactivity of ferrihydrite. In this study, we characterized the adsorption mechanisms of chromate, selenate, and sulfate on Al-substituted ferrihydrite (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mol % Al) using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Spectral data sets recorded as a function of pH were processed using a multivariate curve resolution technique to identify which types of surface species form and to generate their concentration profiles as a function of pH and Al content. Results show a significant increase in relative fraction of outer-sphere complexes for all three oxyanions with increasing Al substitution. In addition, the effect of Al substitution is found to be mechanism-specific in the case of chromate, with bidentate complexes disproportionately suppressed over monodentate complexes at higher Al contents. Overall, our findings have important implications for the fate of chromate, selenate, and sulfate in subsurface environments and offer new insight into the surface reactivity of Al-ferrihydrite. PMID:26900715

  6. Coupled dislocation and martensitic phase transformation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Kipton; Acharya, Amit; Lookman, Turab

    2013-03-01

    We present a field theoretic model that couples dislocation dynamics and plasticity with martensitic phase transformation. Dislocations produce long-range stress via incompatibility of the elastic-distortion field. Phase transformations are modeled with a non-convex elastic potential that contains the crystal symmetries of austenite and martensite phases. We discuss the effects of dislocation dynamics on material microstructure produced under extreme conditions.

  7. Composition and reactivity of ferrihydrite-organic matter associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, Karin; Hädrich, Anke; Neidhardt, Julia; Küsel, Kirsten; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organo-mineral associations affects many soil forming processes. On the one hand, it will influence soil organic matter composition and development, because the complex organic matter mixtures usually fractionate during their association with mineral surfaces. Whereas the associated fraction is supposed to be stabilized, the non-associated fraction remains mobile and available to degradation by microorganisms. On the other hand, the organic coating will completely change the interface properties of Fe oxides such as solubility, charge and hydrophobicity. This in turn will strongly influence their reactivity towards nutrients and pollutants, the adsorption of new organic matter, and the availability of ferric Fe towards microorganisms. To better understand such processes we produced ferrihydrite-organic matter associations by adsorption and coprecipitation in laboratory experiments. As a surrogate for dissolved soil organic matter we used the water-extractable fraction of a Podzol forest-floor layer under spruce. Sorptive fractionation of the organic matter was investigated by 13C NMR and FTIR. Relative to the original forest-floor extract, the ferrihydrite-associated OM was enriched in polysaccharides but depleted in aliphatic C and carbonyl C, especially when adsorption took place. Liquid phase incubation experiments were carried out with an inoculum extracted from the podzol forest-floor under oxic conditions at pH 4.8 to quantify the mineralization of the adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter. These experiments showed that the association with ferrihydrite stabilized the associated organic matter, but that differences in the degradability of adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter were small. We therefore conclude that coprecipitation does not lead to a significant formation of microbial inaccessible organic matter domains. Microbial reduction experiments were performed using Geobacter bremensis. We observed that increasing amounts of

  8. Adsorption of Cu(II) to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Importance of the carboxyl group for Cu mobility in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2012-09-01

    :bacteria mass ratio of the composite. EXAFS shows that Cu adsorbs to ferrihydrite as an inner-sphere, (CuO4Hn)n - 6 bidentate edge-sharing complex; and to ferrihydrite composites as an inner-sphere, (CuO5Hn)n - 8 monodentate complex with carboxyl surface functional groups present on the bacterial fraction plus the bidentate edge-sharing complex on the ferrihydrite fraction. Our new results combined with previous work on Cu sorption to bacteria, humic substances and iron (hydr)oxides coated with humics, demonstrate the universal importance of the carboxyl moiety for Cu sorption and mobility in natural environments. Taken together these results show that Cu-carboxyl binding is the predominant mechanism by which Cu interacts with abiotic and biotic organic matter, and provides a ubiquitous control on Cu fate and mobility in natural waters, soils and sediments. Our results indicate that in environments where a significant proportion of iron (hydr)oxides are intimately intermixed with an organic fraction, we must consider Cu sequestration by these composites in addition to pure mineral phases.

  9. Bioaccessibility of lead sequestered to corundum and ferrihydrite in a simulated gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Beak, Douglas G; Basta, Nicholas T; Scheckel, Kirk G; Traina, Samuel J

    2006-01-01

    Lead (Pb) sorption onto oxide surfaces in soils may strongly influence the risk posed from incidental ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. Lead was sorbed to model oxide minerals of corundum (alpha-Al(2)O(3)) and ferrihydrite (Fe(5)HO(8).4H(2)O). The Pb-sorbed minerals were placed in a simulated gastrointestinal tract (in vitro) to simulate ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. The changes in Pb speciation were determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Both corundum (sorption maximum of 2.13 g kg(-1)) and ferrihydrite (sorption maximum of 38.6 g kg(-1)) have been shown to sorb Pb, with ferrihydrite having a very high affinity for Pb. The gastric bioaccessible Pb for corundum was >85% for corundum when the concentration of Pb was >200 mg kg(-1). Bioaccessible Pb was not detectable at ferrihydrite. The bioaccessible Pb was below detection limits for the intestinal phase in the ferrihydrite system. Solid phase speciation identified both inner- (mononuclear bidentate) and outer-sphere species for Pb sorbed to corundum, while only an inner-sphere (mononuclear bidentate) complex was found for ferrihydrite. Although corundum and ferrihydrite can bind Pb, they fail to significantly reduce gastric bioaccessible Pb but do reduce intestinal bioaccessible Pb. Treatment of Pb-contaminated soil with corundum or ferrihydrite may reduce Pb solubility under field soil conditions of pH > 4. However, much of the sorbed Pb will become bioaccessible under gastric conditions (pH 1.5-2.5) if this soil is ingested. Caution should be used before using these materials to remediate a soil where soil ingestion is an important exposure pathway. PMID:17071876

  10. Cadmium(II) speciation in complex aquatic systems: a study with ferrihydrite, bacteria, and an organic ligand.

    PubMed

    Song, Yantao; Swedlund, Peter J; Singhal, Naresh; Swift, Simon

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the chemical interactions that occur in complex natural systems is fundamental to their management In this work the distribution of cadmium in the presence of phthalic acid (H2Lp), ferrihydrite, and bacteria cells (Comamonas spp., heat killed) was measured and modeled for systems with incrementally increasing complexity. In binary systems, cadmium adsorption onto bacteria or ferrihydrite was accurately predicted using the nonelectrostatic four site model (NFSM) and the diffuse layer model (DLM), respectively. Phthalic acid (0.6 mM) enhanced Cd2+ adsorption onto ferrihydrite (due to surface ternary complex formation) butinhibited Cd2 adsorption onto bacteria to the same extent as predicted by Cd-phthalate solution complex formation constants, implying no significant surface ternary interaction occurred in this system. In Cd-ferrihydrite-bacteria systems, Cd2+ adsorption was up to 10% lower than that predicted by additive adsorption onto the pure phases which suggests that an interaction between ferrihydrite and the bacteria is occupying or masking adsorption sites. By adding a generic reaction to the model for the interaction between ferrihydrite and the bacteria, the adsorption of Cd2+ onto Comamonas spp.-ferrihydrite was accurately predicted and Cd2+ distribution and speciation in systems containing ferrihydrite, Comamonas spp., and H2Lp could be predicted. PMID:19848157

  11. The Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Palmer, T

    2002-02-06

    The fundamentals of welding-induced phase transformations in metals and alloys are being investigated using a combination of advanced synchrotron based experimental methods and modem computational science tools. In-situ experimental methods have been developed using a spatially resolved x-ray probe to enable direct observations of phase transformations under the real non- isothermal conditions experienced during welding. These experimental techniques represent a major step forward in the understanding of phase transformations that occur during welding, and are now being used to aid in the development of models to predict microstructural evolution under the severe temperature gradients, high peak temperatures and rapid thermal fluctuations characteristic of welds. Titanium alloys, stainless steels and plain carbon steels are currently under investigation, and the phase transformation data being obtained here cannot be predicted or measured using conventional metallurgical approaches. Two principal synchrotron-based techniques have been developed and refined for in-situ investigations of phase transformation dynamics in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of welds: Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD). Both techniques provide real-time observations of phases that exist during welding, and both have been developed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux wiggler beam line. The SRXRD technique enables direct observations of the phases existing in the HAZ of quasi-stationary moving arc welds, and is used to map the HAZ phases by sequentially jogging the weld with respect to the x-ray beam while taking x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns at each new location. These spatially resolved XRD patterns are collected in linear traverses perpendicular to the direction of weld travel. The XRD data contained in multiple traverses is later compiled to produce an areal map of the phases

  12. Phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilovol, V.; Martínez-García, R.

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite (SrFe12O19) to magnetite (Fe3O4) as main phase and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) as secondary phase is reported here. SrFe12O19 powder was obtained by a heat treatment at 250 °C under controlled oxygen flow. It was observed that the phase transformation occurred when the SrFe12O19 ferrite was heated up to 625 °C in confinement conditions. This transformation took place by a combination of three factors: the presence of stresses in the crystal lattice of SrFe12O19 due to a low synthesis temperature, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ during the heating up to 625 °C, and the similarity of the coordination spheres of the iron atoms present in the S-block of SrFe12O19 and Fe3O4. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the existence of strain and crystal deformation in SrFe12O19 and the absence of them in the material after the phase transformation. Dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy provided evidences of the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ in the SrFe12O19 crystal.

  13. Spectral Evolution of Bioreduced Ferrihydrite by Hyperthermophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklute, E. C.; Kashyap, S.; Holden, J. F.; Dyar, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The hyperthermophile Pyrodictium sp. Su06 reduces ferrihydrite to a black, magnetic, Fe(II)-bearing mineral. Mossbauer spectra for that mineral freeze dried vs. frozen in the original liquid suspension differ. Both represent potential biosignatures.

  14. Effects of Sediment Iron Mineral Composition on Microbially Mediated Changes in Divalent Metal Speciation: Importance of Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    D. Craig Cooper; Andrew H. Neal; Ravichandran K. Kukkadapu; Dale Brewe; Aaron Coby; Flynn W. Picardal

    2005-04-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) can influence geochemical processes that affect the speciation and mobility of metallic contaminants within natural environments. Most investigations into the effect of DMRB on sediment geochemistry utilize various synthetic oxides as the FeIII source (e.g., ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite). These synthetic materials do not represent the mineralogical composition of natural systems, and do not account for the effect of sediment mineral composition on microbially mediated processes. Our experiments with a DMRB (Shewanella putrefaciens 200) and a divalent metal (ZnII) indicate that, while complexity in sediment mineral composition may not strongly impact the degree of “microbial iron reducibility,” it does alter the geochemical consequences of such microbial activity. The ferrihydrite and clay mineral content are key factors. Microbial reduction of a synthetic blend of goethite and ferrihydrite (VHSA-G) carrying previously adsorbed ZnII increased both [ZnII-aq] and the proportion of adsorbed ZnII that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl. Microbial reduction of FeIII in similarly treated iron-bearing clayey sediment (Fe-K-Q) and hematite sand, which contained minimal amounts of ferrihydrite, had no similar effect. Addition of ferrihydrite increased the effect of microbial FeIII reduction on ZnII association with a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase in all sediment treatments, but the effect was inconsequential in the Fe-K-Q. Zinc k-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data indicate that microbial FeIII reduction altered ZnII bonding in fundamentally different ways for VHSA-G and Fe-K-Q. In VHSA-G, ZnO6 octahedra were present in both sterile and reduced samples; with a slightly increased average Zn-O coordination number and a slightly higher degree of long-range order in the reduced sample. This result may be consistent with enhanced ZnII substitution within goethite in the microbially reduced sample, though these data do not show the

  15. Arsenic strongly associates with ferrihydrite colloids formed in a soil effluent.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Rennert, Thilo; Totsche, Kai U

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic mobility may increase in liquid phase due to association with colloidal Fe oxides. We studied the association of As with Fe oxide colloids in the effluent from water-saturated soil columns run under anoxic conditions. Upon exfiltration, the solutions, which contained Fe2+, were re-aerated and ferrihydrite colloids precipitated. The entire amount of effluent As was associated with the ferrihydrite colloids, although PO4(3-), SiO4(4-), CO3(2-) and dissolved organic matter were present in the effluent during ferrihydrite colloid formation. Furthermore, no subsequent release of As from the ferrihydrite colloids was observed despite the presence of these (in)organic species known to compete with As for adsorption on Fe oxides. Arsenic was bound via inner-sphere complexation on the ferrihydrite surface. FTIR spectroscopy also revealed adsorption of PO4(3-) and polymerized silica. However, these species could not impede the quantitative association of As with colloidal ferrihydrite in the soil effluents. PMID:21310516

  16. Novel Synthesis and Structural Analysis of Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stacey J.; Page, Katharine; Kim, Hyunjeong; Campbell, Branton J.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Woodfield, Brian F.

    2012-07-25

    Naturally occurring ferrihydrite is both impure and difficult to isolate, so the numerous applications and interesting properties of ferrihydrite have spurred the development of various synthetic techniques. Nearly all techniques are based on the hydrolysis of an iron salt and require careful control of temperature, pH, and concentration. In this Article, we report a new synthetic method which does not require such control and is perhaps the fastest and simplest route to synthesizing ferrhydrite. XRD, TEM, BET, and chemical purity characterizations show that the chemically pure, 2-line ferrihydrite product consists of crystallites 2-6 nm in diameter which aggregate to form mesoporous, high surface area agglomerates that are attractive candidates for the many adsorption applications of ferrihydrite. X-ray PDF data were also collected for the ferrihydrite product and refined against the hexagonal structural model recently proposed by Michel et al. These analyses suggest that ferrihydrite has a consistent, repeatable structure independent of variation in the synthetic method, water content of the sample, or particle size of the crystallites, and this structure can be adequately described by the proposed hexagonal model.

  17. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  18. Grain nucleation and growth during phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Offerman, S E; van Dijk, N H; Sietsma, J; Grigull, S; Lauridsen, E M; Margulies, L; Poulsen, H F; Rekveldt, M Th; van der Zwaag, S

    2002-11-01

    The mechanical properties of polycrystalline materials are largely determined by the kinetics of the phase transformations during the production process. Progress in x-ray diffraction instrumentation at synchrotron sources has created an opportunity to study the transformation kinetics at the level of individual grains. Our measurements show that the activation energy for grain nucleation is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by thermodynamic models. The observed growth curves of the newly formed grains confirm the parabolic growth model but also show three fundamentally different types of growth. Insight into the grain nucleation and growth mechanisms during phase transformations contributes to the development of materials with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:12411699

  19. Decoupling of arsenic and iron release from ferrihydrite suspension under reducing conditions: a biogeochemical model

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, André; Garrido, Francis; Baranger, Philippe; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Bodénan, Françoise; Morin, Guillaume; Charlet, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    High levels of arsenic in groundwater and drinking water are a major health problem. Although the processes controlling the release of As are still not well known, the reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxides has so far been a favorite hypothesis. Decoupling between arsenic and iron redox transformations has been experimentally demonstrated, but not quantitatively interpreted. Here, we report on incubation batch experiments run with As(V) sorbed on, or co-precipitated with, 2-line ferrihydrite. The biotic and abiotic processes of As release were investigated by using wet chemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and genomic techniques. The incubation experiments were carried out with a phosphate-rich growth medium and a community of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria under strict anoxic conditions for two months. During the first month, the release of Fe(II) in the aqueous phase amounted to only 3% to 10% of the total initial solid Fe concentration, whilst the total aqueous As remained almost constant after an initial exchange with phosphate ions. During the second month, the aqueous Fe(II) concentration remained constant, or even decreased, whereas the total quantity of As released to the solution accounted for 14% to 45% of the total initial solid As concentration. At the end of the incubation, the aqueous-phase arsenic was present predominately as As(III) whilst X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that more than 70% of the solid-phase arsenic was present as As(V). X-ray diffraction revealed vivianite Fe(II)3(PO4)2.8H2O in some of the experiments. A biogeochemical model was then developed to simulate these aqueous- and solid-phase results. The two main conclusions drawn from the model are that (1) As(V) is not reduced during the first incubation month with high Eh values, but rather re-adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface, and this state remains until arsenic reduction is energetically more favorable than iron reduction, and (2) the release of As

  20. Phase transformations in binary colloidal monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Fu, Lin; Marcoux, Catherine; Socolar, Joshua E S; Charbonneau, Patrick; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2015-03-28

    Phase transformations can be difficult to characterize at the microscopic level due to the inability to directly observe individual atomic motions. Model colloidal systems, by contrast, permit the direct observation of individual particle dynamics and of collective rearrangements, which allows for real-space characterization of phase transitions. Here, we study a quasi-two-dimensional, binary colloidal alloy that exhibits liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions, focusing on the kinetics of a diffusionless transformation between two crystal phases. Experiments are conducted on a monolayer of magnetic and nonmagnetic spheres suspended in a thin layer of ferrofluid and exposed to a tunable magnetic field. A theoretical model of hard spheres with point dipoles at their centers is used to guide the choice of experimental parameters and characterize the underlying materials physics. When the applied field is normal to the fluid layer, a checkerboard crystal forms; when the angle between the field and the normal is sufficiently large, a striped crystal assembles. As the field is slowly tilted away from the normal, we find that the transformation pathway between the two phases depends strongly on crystal orientation, field strength, and degree of confinement of the monolayer. In some cases, the pathway occurs by smooth magnetostrictive shear, while in others it involves the sudden formation of martensitic plates. PMID:25677504

  1. Hydrothermal phase transformation of hematite to magnetite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Different phases of iron oxide were obtained by hydrothermal treatment of ferric solution at 200°C with the addition of either KOH, ethylenediamine (EDA), or KOH and EDA into the reaction system. As usually observed, the α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates and hexagonal bipyramids were obtained for reaction with KOH and EDA, respectively. When both KOH and EDA were added into the reaction system, we observed an interesting phase transformation from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 at low-temperature hydrothermal conditions. The phase transformation involves the formation of α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates, the dissolution of the α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+, and the nucleation and growth of new Fe3O4 polyhedral particles. PMID:24940172

  2. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  3. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  4. Stability of Ferrihydrite and Organic Matter in Ferrihydrite-Organic Matter Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Totsche, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxides can bind particularly large amounts of organic matter (OM) and seem to be an important control on OM storage in many soils. To better understand the interactions between Fe oxides and OM, we produced ferrihydrite-OM associations by adsorption and coprecipitation in laboratory experiments. Because ferrihydrites are often formed in OM-rich solutions, we assume that coprecipitation is a common process in nature. In contrast to adsorption on pre-existing ferrihydrite surfaces, coprecipitation involves adsorption, occlusion (physical entrapment of OM), formation of Fe-OM complexes, and poisoning of ferrihydrite growth. The reactivity of coprecipitates may therefore differ from ferriydrites with adsorbed OM. Incubation experiments with an inoculum extracted from a Podzol forest-floor were carried out to quantify the mineralization of the adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter. These experiments showed that the association with ferrihydrite stabilized the associated organic matter, but that differences in the degradability of adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter were small. We therefore conclude that coprecipitation does not lead to a significant formation of microbial inaccessible organic matter domains. Microbial reduction experiments were performed using Geobacter bremensis. We observed that increasing amounts of associated OM led to decreasing initial reaction rates and a decreasing degree of dissolution. Reduction of coprecipitated ferrihydrites was faster than reduction of ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Our data demonstrate that the association with ferrihydrite can effectively stabilize labile polysaccharides. Vice versa, these polysaccharides may protect ferrihydrite from reduction by Geobacter-like bacteria. However, a challenge for future studies will be to link formation and degradation of mineral-organic associations to natural porous systems, that is, to the complex interplay of mass transport and microbial distribution in the

  5. Thermal effects of phase transformations: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umantsev, A.

    2007-11-01

    All the stages of phase transformations in materials, nucleation, growth, and coarsening, are subject to thermal effects that stem from the redistribution of energy in the system, like release of latent heat, and heat conduction. The thermal effects change the rate and outcome of the transformation and may result in the appearance of unusual states or phases, in particular in nanosystems. This review will cover the attempts of researchers to build a comprehensive theory of thermal effects in different phase transformations. Although the dynamical Ginzburg-Landau (continuum) approach will be used for the analysis of the effects, they are robust and conceivably independent of the theoretical method employed. On general physical grounds a possibility of an oscillatory regime in nucleation is considered and evolution equations for the interfacial motion are derived. The equations show that there are two distinctly different sets of thermal effects of interface motion: one set originates from the existence of the Gibbs-Duhem thermodynamic force on the interface, which has opposite directions compared to the velocity of the interface in the cases of continuous and discontinuous transitions, resulting in a heat trapping effect for the latter and a drag effect for the former. The other set of thermal effects stems from the existence of the surface internal energy and the necessity to carry it over together with the moving interface. As a result, temperature double layers accompany moving domain boundaries after a continuous transition or the surface creation and dissipation effect appear after a discontinuous one. An unusual, novel phase that may appear in isolated nanosystems (adiabatic nanophase) is described. Several experiments are suggested for the verification of the thermal effects in different material systems.

  6. Phase Transformations upon Doping in Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an emerging semiconductor material, with a growing number of applications in Li-ion batteries, photocatalysis, gas sensors and electrochromic devices. As an electrochromic material, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping with monovalent species. Due to it having an empty A-site in the ABO3 perovskite structure, high doping concentrations are possible through intercalation. Tungsten trioxide has been experimentally shown to transform from the ground-state monoclinic symmetry to cubic symmetry with increasing monovalent doping. We use first-principles calculations to understand this transformation. Our calculations show that the addition of electrons to the conduction band is a primary driver of the phase transformation. We quantify the energetics and structural aspects of this transformation using density functional theory, allowing us to elucidate the mechanism. Comparison with experiment, role of the dopant species, and implications of structural changes for device applications will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE and NSF GRFP.

  7. Influence of humic acid imposed changes of ferrihydrite aggregation on microbial Fe(III) reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstaetter, Katja; Borch, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) minerals at neutral pH is faced by the problem of electron transfer from the cells to the solid-phase electron acceptor and is thought to require either direct cell-mineral contact, the presence of Fe(III)-chelators or the presence of electron shuttles, e.g. dissolved or solid-phase humic substances (HS). In this study we investigated to which extent the ratio of Pahokee Peat Humic Acids (HA) to ferrihydrite in the presence and absence of phosphate influences rates of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the identity of the minerals formed. We found that phosphate generally decreased reduction rates by sorption to the ferrihydrite and surface site blocking. In the presence of low ferrihydrite concentrations (5 mM), the addition of HA helped to overcome this inhibiting effect by functioning as electron shuttle between cells and the ferrihydrite. In contrast, at high ferrihydrite concentrations (30 mM), the addition of HA did not lead to an increase but rather to a decrease in reduction rates. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images and ferrihydrite sedimentation behaviour suggest that the extent of ferrihydrite surface coating by HA influences the aggregation of the ferrihydrite particles and thereby their accessibility for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. We further conclude that in presence of dissolved HA, iron reduction is stimulated through electron shuttling while in the presence of only sorbed HA, no stimulation by electron shuttling takes place. In presence of phosphate the stimulation effect did not occur until a minimum concentration of 10 mg/l of dissolved HA was reached followed by increasing Fe(III) reduction rates up to dissolved HA concentrations of approximately 240 mg/l above which the electron shuttling effect ceased. Not only Fe(III) reduction rates but also the mineral products changed in the presence of HA. Sequential extraction, XRD and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that crystallinity and grain

  8. Modelling Cu(II) adsorption to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Deviation from additive adsorption in the composite sorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2013-03-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxides are widespread in natural environments and are potent scavengers of dissolved metal ions. However, it is unclear whether metal sorption on these composites adheres to the additivity principle, and thus whether metal concentrations in environments where these composites comprise a significant proportion of the reactive iron phases can be modelled assuming component additivity. Here we address this issue for Cu adsorption on ferrihydrite-Bacillus subtilis composites. We precipitated pure ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite composites with different ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratios, and measured Cu adsorption as a function of pH, Cu adsorbed concentration and composite mass ratio. We develop a molecular-level surface complexation model for Cu adsorption on pure ferrihydrite. We then combine our end-member models for Cu adsorption on B. subtilis (Moon and Peacock, 2011) and ferrihydrite to model the observed Cu adsorption on the composites, adopting a component linear additivity approach. By comparing observed Cu adsorption to that predicted by our composite model, constrained to the exact best fitting end-member stability constants, we find that Cu adsorption behaviour on ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites deviates from additivity. Specifically, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite is enhanced across the adsorption pH edge (pH ˜3-6), while on our composite composed mainly of bacteria adsorption is enhanced at mid-high pH (pH ˜5-6) but diminished at mid-low pH (pH ˜5-3), compared to additivity. In current surface complexation modelling constructs, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite can be modelled in a component additivity approach, by optimising the stability constants for Cu adsorption on the ferrihydrite and bacteria fractions to values that are within the uncertainty on the end-member stability constant values. The deviation from additivity of these composites, apparent when

  9. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  10. Phase amplitude conformal symmetry in Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, S.

    2015-04-01

    For the Fourier transform ℑ : L2(R) → L2(R) of a complex-valued even or odd function ψ, it is found that the amplitude invariance |ℑψ| = |ψ| leads to a phase invariance or inversion as arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ (θ = constant). The converse holds unless arg ψ = constant. The condition |ψ| = |ℑψ| is required in dealing with, for example, the minimum uncertainty relation between position and momentum. Without the evenness or oddness of ψ, |ℑψ| = |ψ| does not necessarily imply arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ, nor is the converse.

  11. Phase transformations in xerogels of mullite composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1990-01-01

    Monophasic and diphasic xerogels have been prepared as precursors for mullite (3Al203-2Si02). Monophasic xerogel was synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate and aluminum nitrate nanohydrate and the diphasic xerogel from colloidal suspension of silica and boehmite. The chemical and structural evolutions, as a function of thermal treatment, in these two types of sol-gel derived mullite precursor powders have been characterized by DTA, TGA, X-ray diffraction, SEM and infrared spectroscopy. Monophasic xerogel transforms to an Al-Si spinel from an amorphous structure at approximately 980 C. The spinel then changes into mullite on further heating. Diphasic xerogel forms mullite at approximately 1360 C. The components of the diphasic powder react independently up to the point of mullite formation. The transformation in the monophasic powder occurs rapidly and yields strongly crystalline mullite with no other phases present. The diphasic powder, however, transforms rather slowly and contains remnants of the starting materials (alpha-Al203, cristobalite) even after heating at high temperatures for long times (1600 C, 6 hr). The diphasic powder could be sintered to high density but not the monophasic powder in spite of its molecular level homogeneity.

  12. Phase transformations in xerogels of mullite composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    Monophasic and diphasic xerogels have been prepared as precursors for mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2). Monophasic xerogel was synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate and aluminum nitrate nanohydrate and the diphasic xerogel from colloidal suspension of silica and boehmite. The chemical and structural evolutions, as a function of thermal treatment, in these two types of sol-gel derived mullite precursor powders have been characterized by DTA, TGA, X-ray diffraction, SEM and infrared spectroscopy. Monophasic xerogel transforms to an Al-Si spinel from an amorphous structure at approximately 980 C. The spinel then changes into mullite on further heating. Diphasic xerogel forms mullite at approximately 1360 C. The components of the diphasic powder react independently up to the point of mullite formation. The transformation in the monophasic powder occurs rapidly and yields strongly crystalline mullite with no other phases present. The diphasic powder, however, transforms rather slowly and contains remnants of the starting materials (alpha-Al2O3, cristobalite) even after heating at high temperatures for long times (1600 C, 6 hr). The diphasic powder could be sintered to high density but not the monophasic powder in spite of its molecular level homogeneity.

  13. Aerosol phase transformation in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.; Munkelwitz, H.R.

    1992-09-01

    Ambient aerosols are frequently composed of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, sulfates and nitrates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when atmospheric relative humidity reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, a saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. Information on the composition and temperature dependence of these properties is required in mathematical models for describing the dynamic and transport behavior of ambient aerosols. Experiments are carried out in the temperature range 5--35{degrees}C, using single particles individually suspended in an electrodynamic cell that can be evacuated and back filled with water vapor. The phase transformation of the aerosol particle is monitored by laser light scattering and the relative humidity at the transition point is determined by directly measuring the water vapor pressure in the cell. Results are obtained for particles containing either a single salt or a preselected mixture of NaCl, KCl, NaNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which are common constituents of ambient aerosols. A theoretical model on the composition and temperature dependence of the deliquescence properties is developed for single and two-salt aerosol systems.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Phase Transformations in Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, M.; Hoyt, J. J.; Provatas, N.; Rottler, J.; Sinclair, C. W.; Zurob, H. S.

    2014-05-01

    Multiscale modeling tools have great potential to aid the development of new steels and processing routes. Currently, industrial process models are at least in part based on empirical material parameters to describe microstructure evolution and the resulting material properties. Modeling across different length and time scales is a promising approach to develop next-generation process models with enhanced predictive capabilities for the role of alloying elements. The status and challenges of this multiscale modeling approach are discussed for microstructure evolution in advanced low-carbon steels. First-principle simulations of solute segregation to a grain boundary and an austenite-ferrite interface in iron confirm trends of important alloying elements (e.g., Nb, Mo, and Mn) on grain growth, recrystallization, and phase transformation in steels. In particular, the linkage among atomistic simulations, phase-field modeling, and classic diffusion models is illustrated for the effects of solute drag on the austenite-to-ferrite transformation as observed in dedicated experimental studies for iron model alloys and commercial steels.

  15. Ferrous phosphate surface precipitates resulting from the reduction of intragrain 6-line ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3), phosphate (P), and an electron shuttle (AQDS) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Irrespective of buffer and AQDS addition, rosettes of Fe(II) phosphate of approximate 20-30 μm size were observed on porous silica when P was present. The rosettes grew not only on the silica surface but also within it, forming a coherent spherical structure. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and contained extracellular materials at the end of incubation. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances may have adsorbed Fe(II) promoting Fe(II) phosphate nucleation with subsequent crystal growth proceeding in different directions from a common center.

  16. Phase transformations in shock compacted magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher

    Shock compaction experiments were performed on soft magnetic phases Fe 4N and Fe16N2, and hard magnetic phases Nd 2Fe14B and Sm2Fe17N3 in order to determine their thermo-mechanical stability during shock loading and explore the possibility of fabricating a textured nanocomposite magnet. Gas gun experiments performed on powders pressed in a three capsule fixture showed phase transformations occurring in Fe4N, Fe16N 2, and Nd2Fe14B, while Sm2Fe17 N3 was observed to be relatively stable. Shock compaction of FCC Fe4N resulted in a partial transformation to HCP Fe3N, consistent with previous reports of the transition occurring at a static pressure of ~3 GPa. Shock compaction of Fe16N 2 produced decomposition products α-Fe, Fe4N, and FeN due to a combination of thermal effects associated with dynamic void collapse and plastic deformation. Decomposition of Nd-Fe-B, producing α-Fe and amorphous Nd-Fe-B, was observed in several shock consolidated samples and is attributed to deformation associated with shock compaction, similar to decomposition reported in ball milled Nd-Fe-B. No decomposition was observed in shock compacted samples of Sm-Fe-N, which is consistent with literature reports showing decomposition occurring only in samples compacted at a pressure above ~15 GPa. Nd-Fe-B and Sm-Fe-N were shown to accommodate deformation primarily by grain size reduction, especially in large grained materials. Hard/Soft composite magnetic materials were formed by mixing single crystal particles of Nd-Fe-B with iron nanoparticles, and the alignment-by-magnetic-field technique was able to introduce significant texture into green compacts of this mixture. While problems with decomposition of the Nd2Fe14B phase prevented fabricating bulk magnets from the aligned green compacts, retention of the nanoscale morphology of the α-Fe particles and the high alignment of the green compacts shows promise for future development of textured nanocomposite magnets through shock compaction.

  17. Phase transformations in neutron-irradiated Zircaloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1986-04-01

    Microstructural evolution in Zircaloy-2 and -4 spent-fuel cladding specimens after approx.3 years of irradiation in commercial power reactors has been investigated by TEM and HVEM. Two kinds of precipitates induced by the fast-neutron irradiation in the reactors have been identified, i.e., Zr/sub 3/O and cubic-ZrO/sub 2/ particles approximately 2 to 10 nm in size. By means of a weak-beam dark-field ''2-1/2D-microscopy'' technique, the bulk nature of the precipitates and the surficial nature of artifact oxide and hydride phases could be discerned. The Zr(Fe/sub x/,Cr/sub 1-x/)/sub 2/ and Zr/sub 2/(Fe/sub x/,Ni/sub 1-x/) intermetallic precipitates normally present in the as-fabricated material virtually dissolved in the spent-fuel cladding specimens after a fast-neutron fluence of approx.4 x 10/sup 21/ ncm/sup -2/ in the power reactors. The observed radiation-induced phase transformations are compared with predictions based on the currently available understanding of the alloy characteristics. 29 refs.

  18. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore » two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  19. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  20. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  1. Crystal Level Continuum Modeling of Phase Transformations: The (alpha) <--> (epsilon) Transformation in Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, N R; Benson, D J; Becker, R; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2004-10-18

    We present a crystal level model for thermo-mechanical deformation with phase transformation capabilities. The model is formulated to allow for large pressures (on the order of the elastic moduli) and makes use of a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient. Elastic and thermal lattice distortions are combined into a single lattice stretch to allow the model to be used in conjunction with general equation of state relationships. Phase transformations change the mass fractions of the material constituents. The driving force for phase transformations includes terms arising from mechanical work, from the temperature dependent chemical free energy change on transformation, and from interaction energy among the constituents. Deformation results from both these phase transformations and elasto-viscoplastic deformation of the constituents themselves. Simulation results are given for the {alpha} to {epsilon} phase transformation in iron. Results include simulations of shock induced transformation in single crystals and of compression of polycrystals. Results are compared to available experimental data.

  2. Ferrihydrite Formation: The Role of Fe13 Keggin Clusters.

    PubMed

    Weatherill, Joshua S; Morris, Katherine; Bots, Pieter; Stawski, Tomasz M; Janssen, Arne; Abrahamsen, Liam; Blackham, Richard; Shaw, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is the most common iron oxyhydroxide found in soil and is a key sequester of contaminants in the environment. Ferrihydrite formation is also a common component of many treatment processes for cleanup of industrial effluents. Here we characterize ferrihydrite formation during the titration of an acidic ferric nitrate solution with NaOH. In situ SAXS measurements supported by ex situ TEM indicate that initially Fe13 Keggin clusters (radius ∼ 0.45 nm) form in solution at pH 0.12-1.5 and are persistent for at least 18 days. The Fe13 clusters begin to aggregate above ∼ pH 1, initially forming highly linear structures. Above pH ∼ 2 densification of the aggregates occurs in conjunction with precipitation of low molecular weight Fe(III) species (e.g., monomers, dimers) to form mass fractal aggregates of ferrihydrite nanoparticles (∼3 nm) in which the Fe13 Keggin motif is preserved. SAXS analysis indicates the ferrihydrite particles have a core-shell structure consisting of a Keggin center surrounded by a Fe-depleted shell, supporting the surface depleted model of ferrihydrite. Overall, we present the first direct evidence for the role of Fe13 clusters in the pathway of ferrihydrite formation during base hydrolysis, showing clear structural continuity from isolated Fe13 Keggins to the ferrihydrite particle structure. The results have direct relevance to the fundamental understanding of ferrihydrite formation in environmental, engineered, and industrial processes. PMID:27480123

  3. Mössbauer studies of ferrihydrite for Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung; Chun, Dong Hyun; Park, Ji Chan

    2016-01-01

    The 6-line ferrihydrite sample for Ficher-Tropsch catalysts was prepared by using a combination of a co-precipitation technique and a spraydrying method. The crystallographic and magnetic properties of 6-line ferrihydrite sample were investigated by using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Mössbauer spectrometer. The XRD patterns of the ferrihydrite sample, measured at 295 K, showed 6-lines peak and its structure was found to be a single-phased hexagonal with space group of P3m1 according to JCPDS card. The temperaturedependent magnetization curves were measured under 1000 Oe between 4.2 and 300 K, and showed blocking temperature ( T B ) around 110 K. Also, Mössbauer spectra of the 6-line ferrihydrite sample were taken at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 295 K. At temperature below T B , the obtained spectra were analyzed as two-sextets for Fe sites, while At temperature above T B , the obtained spectra showed a doublet due to relaxation, resulting from the spin dynamic effect.

  4. Phase transformations in a model mesenchymal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Stuart A.; Forgacs, Gabor; Hinner, Bernhard; Maier, Christian W.; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-06-01

    Connective tissues, the most abundant tissue type of the mature mammalian body, consist of cells suspended in complex microenvironments known as extracellular matrices (ECMs). In the immature connective tissues (mesenchymes) encountered in developmental biology and tissue engineering applications, the ECMs contain varying amounts of randomly arranged fibers, and the physical state of the ECM changes as the fibers secreted by the cells undergo fibril and fiber assembly and organize into networks. In vitro composites consisting of assembling solutions of type I collagen, containing suspended polystyrene latex beads (~6 µm in diameter) with collagen-binding surface properties, provide a simplified model for certain physical aspects of developing mesenchymes. In particular, assembly-dependent topological (i.e., connectivity) transitions within the ECM could change a tissue from one in which cell-sized particles (e.g., latex beads or cells) are mechanically unlinked to one in which the particles are part of a mechanical continuum. Any particle-induced alterations in fiber organization would imply that cells could similarly establish physically distinct microdomains within tissues. Here we show that the presence of beads above a critical number density accelerates the sol-gel transition that takes place during the assembly of collagen into a globally interconnected network of fibers. The presence of this suprathreshold number of beads also dramatically changes the viscoelastic properties of the collagen matrix, but only when the initial concentration of soluble collagen is itself above a critical value. Our studies provide a starting point for the analysis of phase transformations of more complex biomaterials including developing and healing tissues as well as tissue substitutes containing living cells.

  5. Phase transformations and microstructure development in low alloy steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Microstructure development in low alloy steel welds depends on various phase transformations that are a function of weld heating and cooling. The phase changes include non-metallic oxide inclusion formation in the liquid state, weld pool solidification, and solid state transformations. In this paper the mechanism of inclusion formation during low alloy steel welding is considered and the model predictions are compared with published results. The effect of inclusions on the austenite to ferrite transformation kinetics is measured and the mechanisms of transformation are discussed. The austenite gain development is related to the driving force for transformation of {delta} ferrite to austenite.

  6. XAS and XMCD evidence for species-dependent partitioning of arsenic during microbial reduction of ferrihydrite to magnetite.

    PubMed

    Coker, V S; Gault, A G; Pearce, C I; van der Laan, G; Telling, N D; Charnock, J M; Polya, D A; Lloyd, J R

    2006-12-15

    Poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, ubiquitously distributed as mineral coatings and discrete particles in aquifer sediments, are well-known hosts of sedimentary As. Microbial reduction of these phases is widely thought to be responsible for the genesis of As-rich reducing groundwaters found in many parts of the world, most notably in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. As such, it is important to understand the behavior of As associated with ferric oxyhydroxides during the early stages of Fe(lll) reduction. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) to elucidate the changes in the bonding mechanism of As(III) and As(V) as their host Fe(III) oxyhydroxide undergoes bacterially induced reductive transformation to magnetite. Two-line ferrihydrite, with adsorbed As(III) or As(V), was incubated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of acetate as an electron donor, and Geobacter sulfurreducens, a subsurface bacterium capable of respiring on Fe(lll), but not As(V). In both experiments, no increase in dissolved As was observed during reduction to magnetite (complete upon 5 days incubation), consistent with our earlier observation of As sequestration by the formation of biogenic Fe(III)-bearing minerals. XAS data suggested that the As bonding environment of the As(III)-magnetite product is indistinguishable from that obtained from simple adsorption of As(lll) on the surface of biogenic magnetite. In contrast, reduction of As(V)-sorbed ferrihydrite to magnetite caused incorporation of As5+ within the magnetite structure. XMCD analysis provided further evidence of structural partitioning of As5+ as the small size of the As5+ cation caused a distortion of the spinel structure compared to standard biogenic magnetite. These results may have implications regarding the species-dependent mobility of As undergoing anoxic biogeochemical transformations, e.g., during early sedimentary diagenesis. PMID:17256522

  7. Molecular- and nm-scale Investigation of the Structure and Compositional Heterogeneity of Naturally Occurring Ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismasu, C.; Michel, F. M.; Stebbins, J. F.; Tcaciuc, A. P.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    Ferrihydrite is a hydrated Fe(III) nano-oxide that forms in vast quantities in contaminated acid mine drainage environments. As a result of its high surface area, ferrihydrite is an important environmental sorbent, and plays an essential role in the geochemical cycling of pollutant metal(loid)s in these settings. Despite its environmental relevance, this nanomineral remains one of the least understood environmental solids in terms of its structure (bulk and surface), compositional variations, and the factors affecting its reactivity. Under natural aqueous conditions, ferrihydrite often precipitates in the presence of several inorganic compounds such as aluminum, silica, arsenic, etc., or in the presence of organic matter. These impurities can affect the molecular-level structure of naturally occurring ferrihydrite, thus modifying fundamental properties that are directly correlated with solid-phase stability and surface reactivity. Currently there exists a significant gap in our understanding of the structure of synthetic vs. natural ferrihydrites, due to the inherent difficulties associated to the investigation of these poorly crystalline nanophases. In this study, we combined synchrotron- and laboratory-based techniques to characterize naturally occurring ferrihydrite from an acid mine drainage system situated at the New Idria mercury mine in California. We used high-energy X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis to elucidate quantitative structural details of these samples. We have additionally used scanning transmission X-ray microscopy high resolution imaging (30 nm) to evaluate the spatial relationship of major elements Si, Al, and C within ferrihydrite. Al, Si and C K-edge near- edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to obtain short-range structural information. By combining these techniques we attain the highest level of resolution permitted by current analytical

  8. Phase transformations in ternary monotectic aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, Joachim; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer

    2005-09-01

    Monotectic aluminum alloys are of interest for the development of new alloys for technological applications such as self-lubricating bearings. In contrast to the well-known binary phase diagrams, many of the ternary systems are not well established. Moreover, in a ternary monotectic alloy one may encounter the four-phase equilibrium L‧+L″+solid1+solid2, whereas in a binary system only a three-phase equilibrium L‧+L″+solid1 is possible. This opens a window for generating entirely new monotectic microstructures. The basis for such developments is the knowledge of the ternary phase diagrams and the conditions under which such four-phase reactions or different extensions of the binary monotectic reactions may form. This work presents a systematic classification of monotectic ternary aluminum alloys, illustrated by real systems. The study employs thermodynamic calculations of the ternary phase diagrams.

  9. Non-gauge phase transformations in quantum transition amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    The prescription for introducing a gauge transformation into a quantum transition amplitude, nominally well known, contains an ambiguous feature. It is presumed by some authors that an appropriate transformation of the phase of a wave function will generate the associated gauge transformation. It is shown that this is a necessary but not sufficient step. Examples from the literature are cited to show the consequences of the failure of this procedure. One must distinguish between true gauge transformations and unitary transformations within a fixed gauge.

  10. Effects of phase transformation of steam-water relative permeabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, A.K.

    1986-03-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of steam-water relative permeabilities (RPs) was carried out. First, an experimental study of two-phase concurrent flow of steam and water was conducted and a set of RP curves was obtained. These curves were compared with semi-empirical and experimental results obtained by other investigators for two-phase, two-component flow (oil/gas; gas/water; gas/oil). It was found that while the wetting phase RPs were in good agreement, RPs for the steam phase were considerably higher than the non-wetting phase RPs in two-component systems. This enhancement of steam RP is attributed to phase transformation effects at the pore level in flow channels. The effects of phase transformation were studied theoretically. This study indicates that there are two separate mechanisms by which phase transformation affects RP curves: (1) Phase transformation is converging-diverging flow channels can cause an enhancement of steam phase RP. In a channel dominated by steam a fraction of the flowing steam condenses upstream from the constriction, depositing its latent heat of condensation. This heat is conducted through the solid grains around the pore throat, and evaporation takes place downstream from it. Therefore, for a given bulk flow quality; a smaller fraction of steam actually flows through the throat segments. This pore-level effect manifests itself as relative permeability enhancement on a macroscopic level; and (2) phase transformation along the interface of a stagnant phase and the phase flowing around it controls the irreducible phase saturation. Therefore, the irreducible phase saturation in steam-water flow will depend, among other factors, on the boundary conditions of the flow.

  11. Typical Phases of Transformative Learning: A Practice-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nohl, Arnd-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Empirical models of transformative learning offer important insights into the core characteristics of this concept. Whereas previous analyses were limited to specific social groups or topical terrains, this article empirically typifies the phases of transformative learning on the basis of a comparative analysis of various social groups and topical…

  12. Atomic Structure and Phase Transformations in Pu Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Cynn, H; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Moore, K T; Evans, W J; Farber, D L; Jeffries, J R; Massalski, T B

    2008-04-28

    Plutonium and plutonium-based alloys containing Al or Ga exhibit numerous phases with crystal structures ranging from simple monoclinic to face-centered cubic. Only recently, however, has there been increased convergence in the actinides community on the details of the equilibrium form of the phase diagrams. Practically speaking, while the phase diagrams that represent the stability of the fcc {delta}-phase field at room temperature are generally applicable, it is also recognized that Pu and its alloys are never truly in thermodynamic equilibrium because of self-irradiation effects, primarily from the alpha decay of Pu isotopes. This article covers past and current research on several properties of Pu and Pu-(Al or Ga) alloys and their connections to the crystal structure and the microstructure. We review the consequences of radioactive decay, the recent advances in understanding the electronic structure, the current research on phase transformations and their relations to phase diagrams and phase stability, the nature of the isothermal martensitic {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation, and the pressure-induced transformations in the {delta}-phase alloys. New data are also presented on the structures and phase transformations observed in these materials following the application of pressure, including the formation of transition phases.

  13. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  14. TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON THE SYNTHESIS OF SI-FERRIHYDRITE NANOPARTICLES OF VARIABLE SIZES IDENTIFIED BY MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ferrihydrite is an antiferromagnetic iron oxyhydroxide formed as an ubiquitous product of natural iron diagenesis, and found in iron-containing water, soil, river sediment and oceanic crust. As such, it is a sensitive indicator or proxy of environmental change. This iron phase ha...

  15. Acceleration of the initial phase transformation of mineralization by phosvitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Geng, Fang; Huang, Xi; Ma, Meihu

    2015-01-01

    Phosvitin has a similar structure and similar properties to the phosphorylated proteins that play an important role in biomineralization, suggesting that phosvitin may have similar regulation properties. This study investigated the effect of phosvitin on regulating the phase transformation of the mineral calcium phosphate in a biomimetic mineralization solution; the characterization techniques used were Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results clearly demonstrated that phosvitin significantly promotes the initiation of phase transformation, accelerated the transformation process and shortened the transformation time from 6 to 0.5 h. Phosvitin was involved in the phase transformation and incorporated into or strongly absorbed on the mineral, as evidenced by the protein peaks observed in the FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. The effects of the substrate-addition sequence on the phase transformation demonstrated that the phosvitin-Ca2+ interaction played a key role in the regulation of mineralization. Compared with those for BSA, the results revealed that the role of phosvitin in mineralization is closely associated with its high level of phosphorylation. This study provides useful information about using phosvitin as a potential candidate for biomaterials.

  16. Modeling interface-controlled phase transformation kinetics in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, E. L.; Vo, N. Q.; Philippe, T.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-05-01

    The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation is widely used to describe phase transformation kinetics. This description, however, is not valid in finite size domains, in particular, thin films. A new computational model incorporating the level-set method is employed to study phase evolution in thin film systems. For both homogeneous (bulk) and heterogeneous (surface) nucleation, nucleation density and film thickness were systematically adjusted to study finite-thickness effects on the Avrami exponent during the transformation process. Only site-saturated nucleation with isotropic interface-kinetics controlled growth is considered in this paper. We show that the observed Avrami exponent is not constant throughout the phase transformation process in thin films with a value that is not consistent with the dimensionality of the transformation. Finite-thickness effects are shown to result in reduced time-dependent Avrami exponents when bulk nucleation is present, but not necessarily when surface nucleation is present.

  17. Solid state phase detector replaces bulky transformer circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moberly, C. L.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature solid state phase detector using MOSFETs is used in a phase lock loop with a sun-bit detector in an integrated data-link circuit. This replaces bulky transformer circuits. It uses an inverter amplifier, a modulator switch, and a buffer amplifier.

  18. Phase-filed modelling and synchrotron validation of phase transformations in martensitic dual-phase steel

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, R.G.; Sietsma, J.; Palmer, T.A.; Elmer, J.W.; Richardson, I.M.

    2008-11-12

    A thermodynamically based method to describe the phase transformations during heating and cooling of martensitic dual-phase steel has been developed, and in situ synchrotron measurements of phase transformations have been undertaken to support the model experimentally. Nucleation routines are governed by a novel implementation of the classical nucleation theory in a general phase-field code. Physically-based expressions for the temperature-dependent interface mobility and the driving forces for transformation have also been constructed. Modelling of martensite was accomplished by assuming a carbon supersaturation of the body-centred-cubic ferrite lattice. The simulations predict kinetic aspects of the austenite formation during heating and ferrite formation upon cooling. Simulations of partial austenitising thermal cycles predicted peak and retained austenite percentages of 38.2% and 6.7%, respectively, while measurements yielded peak and retained austenite percentages of 31.0% and 7.2% ({+-}1%). Simulations of a complete austenitisation thermal cycle predicted the measured complete austenitisation and, upon cooling, a retained austenite percentage of 10.3% while 9.8% ({+-}1%) retained austenite was measured.

  19. Kinetics of Propagating Phase Transformation in Compressed Bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Emig, J; Springer, P; Reisman, D

    2004-08-18

    The authors observed dynamically driven phase transitions in isentropically compressed bismuth. By changing the stress loading conditions they explored two distinct cases one in which the experimental signature of the phase transformation corresponds to phase-boundary crossings initiated at both sample interfaces, and another in which the experimental trace is due to a single advancing transformation front in the bulk of the material. They introduce a coupled kinetics-hydrodynamics model that for this second case enables them, under suitable simplifying assumptions, to directly extract characteristic transition times from the experimental measurements.

  20. Phase transformation controlled tetragonality of MnNi-based nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Dai, Qilin; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-03-01

    The phase transformation controlled tetragonality of MnNi nanostructures has attracted wide interest for their shape memory effect. In this study, MnNi nanocrystals were selected to epitaxially grow an FeCo shell, where the antiferromagnetic L10 phase transformation of the MnNi core triggers the tetragonal distortion in the magnetically soft FeCo shell. The tetragonality change of L10 MnNi under thermal annealing enables the control of the tetragonality of the FeCo phase, ultimately increasing magnetocrystalline anisotropy and coercivity. This study opens up a new route to fabricate functional nanostructures with unique magnetic properties.

  1. A model for heterogeneous materials including phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Clements, B.E.; Williams, T.O.

    2005-04-15

    A model is developed for particulate composites, which includes phase transformations in one or all of the constituents. The model is an extension of the method of cells formalism. Representative simulations for a single-phase, brittle particulate (SiC) embedded in a ductile material (Ti), which undergoes a solid-solid phase transformation, are provided. Also, simulations for a tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) are included. In the WHA analyses a particulate composite, composed of tungsten particles embedded in a tungsten-iron-nickel alloy matrix, is modeled. A solid-liquid phase transformation of the matrix material is included in the WHA numerical calculations. The example problems also demonstrate two approaches for generating free energies for the material constituents. Simulations for volumetric compression, uniaxial strain, biaxial strain, and pure shear are used to demonstrate the versatility of the model.

  2. Nanoscale Transforming Mineral Phases in Fresh Nacre.

    PubMed

    DeVol, Ross T; Sun, Chang-Yu; Marcus, Matthew A; Coppersmith, Susan N; Myneni, Satish C B; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2015-10-21

    Nacre, or mother-of-pearl, the iridescent inner layer of many mollusk shells, is a biomineral lamellar composite of aragonite (CaCO3) and organic sheets. Biomineralization frequently occurs via transient amorphous precursor phases, crystallizing into the final stable biomineral. In nacre, despite extensive attempts, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursors have remained elusive. They were inferred from non-nacre-forming larval shells, or from a residue of amorphous material surrounding mature gastropod nacre tablets, and have only once been observed in bivalve nacre. Here we present the first direct observation of ACC precursors to nacre formation, obtained from the growth front of nacre in gastropod shells from red abalone (Haliotis rufescens), using synchrotron spectromicroscopy. Surprisingly, the abalone nacre data show the same ACC phases that are precursors to calcite (CaCO3) formation in sea urchin spicules, and not proto-aragonite or poorly crystalline aragonite (pAra), as expected for aragonitic nacre. In contrast, we find pAra in coral. PMID:26403582

  3. Fracture of Materials Undergoing Solid-Solid Phase Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmecha, Bharat

    A large number of technologically important materials undergo solid-solid phase transformations. Examples range from ferroelectrics (transducers and memory devices), zirconia (Thermal Barrier Coatings) to nickel superalloys and (lithium) iron phosphate (Li-ion batteries). These transformations involve a change in the crystal structure either through diffusion of species or local rearrangement of atoms. This change of crystal structure leads to a macroscopic change of shape or volume or both and results in internal stresses during the transformation. In certain situations this stress field gives rise to cracks (tin, iron phosphate etc.) which continue to propagate as the transformation front traverses the material. In other materials the transformation modifies the stress field around cracks and effects crack growth behavior (zirconia, ferroelectrics). These observations serve as our motivation to study cracks in solids undergoing phase transformations. Understanding these effects will help in improving the mechanical reliability of the devices employing these materials. In this thesis we present work on two problems concerning the interplay between cracks and phase transformations. First, we consider the directional growth of a set of parallel edge cracks due to a solid-solid transformation. We conclude from our analysis that phase transformations can lead to formation of parallel edge cracks when the transformation strain satisfies certain conditions and the resulting cracks grow all the way till their tips cross over the phase boundary. Moreover the cracks continue to grow as the phase boundary traverses into the interior of the body at a uniform spacing without any instabilities. There exists an optimal value for the spacing between the cracks. We ascertain these conclusion by performing numerical simulations using finite elements. Second, we model the effect of the semiconducting nature and dopants on cracks in ferroelectric perovskite materials, particularly

  4. Phase transformation near the classical limit of stability

    SciTech Connect

    Maibaum, Lutz

    2008-11-06

    Successful theories of phase transformation processes include classical nucleation theory (CNT), which envisions a local equilibrium between coexisting phases, and non--equilibrium kinetic cluster theories. Using computer simulations of the magnetization reversal of the Ising model in three different ensembles we make quantitative connections between these physical pictures. We show that the critical nucleus size of CNT is strongly correlated with a dynamical measure of metastability, and that the metastable phase persists to thermodynamic conditions previously thought of as unstable.

  5. Partially transformed relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with distributed phase transformation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John A.

    2015-11-01

    Relaxor ferroelectric single crystals such as PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT undergo field driven phase transformations when electrically or mechanically loaded in crystallographic directions that provide a positive driving force for the transformation. The observed behavior in certain compositions is a phase transformation distributed over a range of fields without a distinct forward or reverse coercive field. This work focuses on the material behavior that is observed when the crystals are loaded sufficiently to drive a partial transformation and then unloaded, as might occur when driving a transducer to achieve high power levels. Distributed transformations have been modeled using a normal distribution of transformation thresholds. A set of experiments was conducted to characterize the hysteresis loops that occur with the partial transformations. In this work the normal distribution model is extended to include the partial transformations that occur when the field is reversed before the transformation is complete. The resulting hysteresis loops produced by the model are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Effect of Phosphate on Surface Properties of Ferrihydrite and its Reactivity towards Aqueous Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D.; Schroeder, C.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    The iron redox cycle plays a prominent role for the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and metals as well as transformation of contaminants in soils, sediments and aquifers. The mineral surface acts as a sorption site for Fe(II), which becomes partially oxidized upon sorption [1]. According to Gorski and Scherer [2], the electron is transferred to the bulk mineral, where it may be stored in a conduction band leading to an increased reductive potential of the system. Iron (hydr)oxides also exhibit a high sorption capacity for phosphate which forms strong surface complexes with iron. Phosphate is a common constituent of pore waters as a result of agricultural fertilizers, and is frequently used by microbiologists as buffer in laboratory experiments. We investigated the effect of phosphate on the oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of ferrihydrite minerals in batch reactors. We synthesized three different ferrihydrites: untreated ferrihydrite (Fh); phosphate-coated ferrihydrite (pc-Fh), where phosphate was added to suspensions of pure ferrihydrite and allowed to sorb to the mineral surface; and phosphate-doped ferrihydrite (pd-Fh), where phosphate co-precipitated with ferrihydrite and was included in the bulk mineral structure. Nitrobenzene was used as model oxidant to study ferrous iron oxidation in anoxic Fh-Fe(II) suspensions. Fe(II) oxidation was much slower in the presence of pc-Fh and pd-Fh compared to untreated Fh. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy, we added dissolved Fe(II) either as pure 57Fe (Mössbauer-active) to analyse for the iron fraction associated with the minerals surface, or as 56Fe (Mössbauer-inactive) to focus on the bulk mineral only. We took Mössbauer spectra for each system before and after Fe(II) oxidation by nitrobenzene. Surface bound Fe(II) was oxidized by two processes: e-transfer to structural Fe(III) in Fh and nitrobenzene reduction. The oxidation product was lepidocrocite which increased with nitrobenzene reduction. Phosphate-doped and

  7. The mathematical modeling of phase transformation of steel during quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanian, S.; Mosleh, M.

    1999-02-01

    In the heat treatment of steel, uneven cooling invariably introduces residual stresses in the workpiece. These residual stresses can combine with the thermomechanical stresses encountered in operation to cause premature fatigue failure of the material. A prediction of the residual and thermoelastoplastic stresses developed during heat treatment would be beneficial for component design. In this article a numerical model is developed to predict the thermoelastoplastic and residual stresses during rapid cooling of a long solid cylinder. The total strains developed during cooling of the cylinder comprise elastic, thermal, and plastic strains and strains due to phase transformation. For plastic deformation an extension of Jiang`s constitutive equations developed by Jahanian is adopted. The properties of the material are assumed to be temperature dependent and characterized by nonlinear strain hardening. For phase transformation two parts are considered: nucleation according to Scheil`s method and phase growth according to Johnson and Mehl`s law. For martensitic transformation, a law established by Koisteinin and Marburger is used. Non-additivity of pearlitic and bainitic nucleation suggested by Manning and Lorig is taken into account by means of a correction factor to Scheil`s summation of the transition from pearlitic to bainitic. The effect of phase transformation and temperature dependence of material properties is investigated. It is shown that by neglecting the temperature dependency and phase transformation in numerical calculations, the results are underestimated. The numerical results are compared with the available experimental data in the literature, and good agreement is observed.

  8. Phase Transformation in Tantalum under Extreme Laser Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C. -H.; Hahn, E. N.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-10-19

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centered cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. Lastly, molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear).

  9. Phase Transformation in Tantalum under Extreme Laser Deformation.

    PubMed

    Lu, C-H; Hahn, E N; Remington, B A; Maddox, B R; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A

    2015-01-01

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centered cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. Molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear). PMID:26478106

  10. Phase transformation in tantalum under extreme laser deformation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, C. -H.; Hahn, E. N.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-10-19

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centeredmore » cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. In conclusion, molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear).« less

  11. Phase transformation in tantalum under extreme laser deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C. -H.; Hahn, E. N.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-10-19

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centered cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. In conclusion, molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear).

  12. Phase Transformation in Tantalum under Extreme Laser Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, C.-H.; Hahn, E. N.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centered cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. Molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear). PMID:26478106

  13. Phase Transformation in Tantalum under Extreme Laser Deformation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, C. -H.; Hahn, E. N.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-10-19

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centeredmore » cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. Lastly, molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear).« less

  14. Bioaccessibility of arsenic(V) bound to ferrihydrite using a simulated gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Beak, Douglas G; Basta, Nicholas T; Scheckel, Kirk G; Traina, Samuel J

    2006-02-15

    The risk posed from incidental ingestion to humans of arsenic-contaminated soil may depend on sorption of arsenate (As(V)) to oxide surfaces in soil. Arsenate sorbed to ferrihydrite, a model soil mineral, was used to simulate possible effects on ingestion of soil contaminated with As-(V) sorbed to Fe oxide surfaces. Arsenate sorbed to ferrihydrite was placed in a simulated gastrointestinal tract (in vitro) to ascertain the bioaccessibility of As(V) and changes in As(V) surface speciation caused by the gastrointestinal system. The speciation of As was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). The As(V) adsorption maximum was found to be 93 mmol kg(-1). The bioaccessible As(V) ranged from 0 to 5%, and surface speciation was determined to be binuclear bidentate with no changes in speciation observed post in vitro. Arsenate concentration in the intestine was not constant and varied from 0.001 to 0.53 mM for the 177 mmol kg(-1) As(V) treated sample. These results suggest that the bioaccessibility of As(V) is related to the As(V) concentration, the As(V) adsorption maximum, and that multiple measurements of dissolved As(V) in the intestinal phase may be needed to calculate the bioaccessibility of As(V) adsorbed to ferrihydrite. PMID:16572798

  15. Coherent phase transformation under nonhydrostatic stress-wave loading

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D E

    1989-12-01

    Coherent phase transformation occurs under conditions of stress wave loading and there are indications that transformation is dependent on the nonhydrostatic state of stress in the body. Studies under static loading show transformation proceeds at lower confining pressure when combined with shearing stress and similar effects appear to occur under stress-wave loading. Nonlinearities in the stress-strain behavior due to the transformation strain lead to complicated wave propagation, including wave separation and rarefaction shock waves. In the present study a thermodynamic theory of the combined elastic and phase transformtion deformation is developed which incorporates the interrelation of pressure and shear effects. The theory is focused on wave propagation in solids and is compared with earlier experimental work on Oakhall limestone. A thermodynamic Gibbs potential is derived for the material and a phase equilibrium relation identified, which constrains the volume and shape change through the transformation. The theory is extended to account for the effect of microstructural heterogeneities on the transformation process which has been observed experimentally.

  16. Phase transformations in superconducting and non-superconducting perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the high {Tc} superconductors and other perovskite-related cuprates exhibit some kind of structural instability. For example, tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transformations occur in the Y-Ba-Cu-O and La-Sr-Cu-O systems while crystal structures in the Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O systems have incommensurate periodicities associated with displacements of the heavy cations. In YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, the transformation is due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies while in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} the transformation is accompanied by tilting of the (CuO{sub 6}) octahedra. Such tilting and distortion of the co-ordination octahedra commonly occur in perovskite-related compounds and transformations between the structures are frequently martensitic. Phase transformations in the superconducting cuprates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy but none of them appear to be martensitic. The phase transformations are accompanied by twinning and the resulting configurations are used to calculate twin boundary energies.

  17. Phase transformations in superconducting and non-superconducting perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Most of the high {Tc} superconductors and other perovskite-related cuprates exhibit some kind of structural instability. For example, tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transformations occur in the Y-Ba-Cu-O and La-Sr-Cu-O systems while crystal structures in the Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O systems have incommensurate periodicities associated with displacements of the heavy cations. In YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, the transformation is due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies while in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} the transformation is accompanied by tilting of the [CuO{sub 6}] octahedra. Such tilting and distortion of the co-ordination octahedra commonly occur in perovskite-related compounds and transformations between the structures are frequently martensitic. Phase transformations in the superconducting cuprates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy but none of them appear to be martensitic. The phase transformations are accompanied by twinning and the resulting configurations are used to calculate twin boundary energies.

  18. Using Neural Networks to Describe Complex Phase Transformation Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1999-05-24

    Final microstructures can often be the end result of a complex sequence of phase transformations. Fundamental analyses may be used to model various stages of the overall behavior but they are often impractical or cumbersome when considering multicomponent systems covering a wide range of compositions. Neural network analysis may be a useful alternative method of identifying and describing phase transformation beavior. A neural network model for ferrite prediction in stainless steel welds is described. It is shown that the neural network analysis provides valuable information that accounts for alloying element interactions. It is suggested that neural network analysis may be extremely useful for analysis when more fundamental approaches are unavailable or overly burdensome.

  19. Phase transformations in steels: Processing, microstructure, and performance

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, Paul J.

    2014-04-03

    In this study, contemporary steel research is revealing new processing avenues to tailor microstructure and properties that, until recently, were only imaginable. Much of the technological versatility facilitating this development is provided by the understanding and utilization of the complex phase transformation sequences available in ferrous alloys. Today we have the opportunity to explore the diverse phenomena displayed by steels with specialized analytical and experimental tools. Advances in multi-scale characterization techniques provide a fresh perspective into microstructural relationships at the macro- and micro-scale, enabling a fundamental understanding of the role of phase transformations during processing and subsequent deformation.

  20. Metallurgical Properties and Phase Transformations of Barium-Strontium Modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, M. A.; Sulimova, I. S.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Dmitrienko, V. I.; Horoshun, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallurgical properties and phase transformations of barium-strontium modifier were tested in laboratory conditions resembling steel processing in furnace and ladle. When heating barium-strontium modifier start of melting, kinetics of decomposition, phase and structure transformation were studied. The concentrate under consideration has been revealed to be a complex mineral compound containing barytocalcite, calcite, calciostrontianite, dolomite and siderite. The reaction kinetics of decomposing mineral components of barium-strontium modifier to oxides does not considerably affect slag formation in conditions of out-of-furnace steel processing.

  1. MUB Entanglement Patterns by Transformations in Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jay

    2011-03-01

    All possible MUB entanglement patterns for systems of N prime-state particles are obtained from standard ones by unitary transformations in the Hilbert space, thus preserving the relationships between the generalized Pauli operators, the phase point operators, and the MUB projectors. The transformations are described geometrically in discrete phase space. Illustrative examples show the invariance of the total entanglement content and the connection of entanglement with Galois fields. Different field representations for the same dimension may produce inequivalent MUB sets. This work provides alternative constructions and generalizes previous work on qubit systems [1,2].

  2. Pressure-induced phase transformation of In2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Anya M.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Mafi, Elham; Gu, Yi; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2013-02-01

    In2Se3 has potential as a phase-change material for memory applications. Understanding its phase diagram is important to achieve controlled switching between phases. Using x-ray diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell, the pressure-dependent structural properties of In2Se3 powder were studied at room temperature. α-In2Se3 transforms into the β phase at 0.7 GPa, an order of magnitude lower than phase-transition critical pressures in typical semiconductors. The β phase persists upon decompression to ambient pressure. Raman spectroscopy experiments confirm this result. The bulk moduli are reported and the c/a ratio for the β phase is shown to have a highly nonlinear dependence on pressure.

  3. Aggregate-scale heterogeneity in iron (hydr)oxide reductive transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tufano, K.J.; Benner, S.G.; Mayer, K.U.; Marcus, M.A.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-06-15

    There is growing awareness of the complexity of potential reaction pathways and the associated solid-phase transformations during the reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides, especially ferrihydrite. An important observation in static and advective-dominated systems is that microbially produced Fe(II) accelerates Ostwald ripening of ferrihydrite, thus promoting the formation of thermodynamically more stable ferric phases (lepidocrocite and goethite) and, at higher Fe(II) surface loadings, the precipitation of magnetite; high Fe(II) levels can also lead to green rust formation, and with high carbonate levels siderite may also be formed. This study expands this emerging conceptual model to a diffusion-dominated system that mimics an idealized micropore of a ferrihydrite-coated soil aggregate undergoing reduction. Using a novel diffusion cell, coupled with micro-x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies, we determined that diffusion-controlled gradients in Fe{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} result in a complex array of spatially distributed secondary mineral phases. At the diffusive pore entrance, where Fe{sup 2+} concentrations are highest, green rust and magnetite are the dominant secondary Fe (hydr)oxides (30 mol% Fe each). At intermediate distances from the inlet, green rust is not observed and the proportion of magnetite decreases from approximately 30 to <10%. Across this same transect, the proportion of goethite increases from undetectable up to >50%. At greater distances from the advective-diffusive boundary, goethite is the dominant phase, comprising between 40 and 95% of the Fe. In the presence of magnetite, lepidocrocite forms as a transient-intermediate phase during ferrihydrite-to-goethite conversion; in the absence of magnetite, conversion to goethite is more limited. These experimental observations, coupled with results of reactive transport modeling, confirm the conceptual model and illustrate the potential importance of diffusion-generated concentration gradients in

  4. Sharp-Interface Nematic-Isotropic Phase Transformations With Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Eliot

    2008-11-01

    We develop a sharp-interface theory for phase transformations between the isotropic and uniaxial nematic phases of a flowing liquid crystal. Aside from conventional evolution equations for the bulk phases and corresponding interface conditions, the theory includes a supplemental interface condition expressing the balance of configurational momentum. As an idealized illustrative application of the theory, we consider the problem of an evolving spherical droplet of the isotropic phase surrounded by the nematic phase in a radially-oriented state. For this problem, the bulk and interfacial equations collapse to a single nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equation for the radius of the droplet—an equation which, in essence, expresses the balance of configurational momentum on the interface. This droplet evolution equation, which closely resembles a previously derived and extensively studied equation for the expansion of contraction of a spherical gas bubble in an incompressible viscous liquid, includes terms accounting for the curvature elasticity and viscosity of the nematic phase, interfacial energy, interfacial viscosity, and the ordering kinetics of the phase transformation. We determine the equilibria of this equation and study their stability. Additionally, we find that motion of the interface generates a backflow, without director reorientation, in the nematic phase. Our analysis indicates that a backflow measurement has the potential to provide an independent means to determine the density difference between the isotropic and uniaxial nematic phases.

  5. In-situ characterization of transformation plasticity during an isothermal austenite-to-bainite phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Holzweissig, M.J.; Canadinc, D.; Maier, H.J.

    2012-03-15

    This paper elucidates the stress-induced variant selection process during the isothermal austenite-to-bainite phase transformation in a tool steel. Specifically, a thorough set of experiments combining electron backscatter diffraction and in-situ digital image correlation (DIC) was carried out to establish the role of superimposed stress level on the evolution of transformation plasticity (TP) strains. The important finding is that TP increases concomitant with the superimposed stress level, and strain localization accompanies phase transformation at all stress levels considered. Furthermore, TP strain distribution within the whole material becomes more homogeneous with increasing stress, such that fewer bainitic variants are selected to grow under higher stresses, yielding a more homogeneous strain distribution. In particular, the bainitic variants oriented along [101] and [201] directions are favored to grow parallel to the loading axis and are associated with large TP strains. Overall, this very first in-situ DIC investigation of the austenite-to-bainite phase transformation in steels evidences the clear relationship between the superimposed stress level, variant selection, and evolution of TP strains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local variations of strain were observed by DIC throughout the phase transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study clearly established the role of the stress-induced variant selection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variant selection is a key parameter that governs distortion.

  6. Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that the vapor-crystal phase transition is actually a superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with variable density and a second-order phase transition with variable ordering. The latter, being a diffuse phase transition, results in the formation of a new, "pretransition," phase irreversibly spent in the course of the transition, which ends in the appearance of orthorhombic crystals. X-ray diffraction data and micrograph are presented.

  7. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xiaozhi; Tan, Dayong; Ren, Xiangting; Yang, Wenge E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; He, Duanwei E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  8. Hydrogen-related phase transformations in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, N.; Altstetter, C. J.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of hydrogen and stress (strain) on the stability of the austenite phase in stainless steels was investigated. Hydrogen was introduced by severe cathodic charging and by elevated temperature equilibration with high pressure H2 gas. Using X-ray diffraction and magnetic techniques, the behavior of two “stable” type AISI310 steels and an “unstable” type AISI304 steel was studied during charging and during the outgassing period following charging. Transformation from the fcc γ phase to an expanded fcc phase, γ*, and to the hcp ɛ phase occurred during cathodic charging. Reversion of the γ* and e phases to the original γ structure and formation of the bcc α structure were examined, and the kinetics of these processes was studied. The γ* phase was shown to be ferromagnetic with a subambient Curie temperature. The γ⇆ɛ phase transition was studied after hydrogen charging in high pressure gas, as was the formation of a during outgassing. These results are interpreted as effects of hydrogen and stress (strain) on the stability of the various phases. A proposed psuedo-binary phase diagram for the metal-hydrogen system was proposed to account for the formation of the γ* phase. The relation of these phase changes to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel is discussed.

  9. Iterative-Transform Phase Retrieval Using Adaptive Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A phase-diverse iterative-transform phase-retrieval algorithm enables high spatial-frequency, high-dynamic-range, image-based wavefront sensing. [The terms phase-diverse, phase retrieval, image-based, and wavefront sensing are defined in the first of the two immediately preceding articles, Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing (GSC-14899-1).] As described below, no prior phase-retrieval algorithm has offered both high dynamic range and the capability to recover high spatial-frequency components. Each of the previously developed image-based phase-retrieval techniques can be classified into one of two categories: iterative transform or parametric. Among the modifications of the original iterative-transform approach has been the introduction of a defocus diversity function (also defined in the cited companion article). Modifications of the original parametric approach have included minimizing alternative objective functions as well as implementing a variety of nonlinear optimization methods. The iterative-transform approach offers the advantage of ability to recover low, middle, and high spatial frequencies, but has disadvantage of having a limited dynamic range to one wavelength or less. In contrast, parametric phase retrieval offers the advantage of high dynamic range, but is poorly suited for recovering higher spatial frequency aberrations. The present phase-diverse iterative transform phase-retrieval algorithm offers both the high-spatial-frequency capability of the iterative-transform approach and the high dynamic range of parametric phase-recovery techniques. In implementation, this is a focus-diverse iterative-transform phaseretrieval algorithm that incorporates an adaptive diversity function, which makes it possible to avoid phase unwrapping while preserving high-spatial-frequency recovery. The algorithm includes an inner and an outer loop (see figure). An initial estimate of phase is used to start the algorithm on the inner loop, wherein

  10. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  11. Reconstructing solute-induced phase transformations within individual nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Tarun C; Baldi, Andrea; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-07-01

    Strain and defects can significantly impact the performance of functional nanomaterials. This effect is well exemplified by energy storage systems, in which structural changes such as volume expansion and defect generation govern the phase transformations associated with charging and discharging. The rational design of next-generation storage materials therefore depends crucially on understanding the correlation between the structure of individual nanoparticles and their solute uptake and release. Here, we experimentally reconstruct the spatial distribution of hydride phases within individual palladium nanocrystals during hydrogen absorption, using a combination of electron spectroscopy, dark-field imaging, and electron diffraction in an environmental transmission electron microscope. We show that single-crystalline cubes and pyramids exhibit a uniform hydrogen distribution at equilibrium, whereas multiply twinned icosahedra exclude hydrogen from regions of high compressive strains. Our technique offers unprecedented insight into nanoscale phase transformations in reactive environments and can be extended to a variety of functional nanomaterials. PMID:27088234

  12. Isomorphic phase transformation in shocked cerium using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C; Chen, Shao - Ping

    2010-08-12

    Cerium (Ce) undergoes a significant ({approx}16%) volume collapse associated with an isomorphic fcc-fcc phase transformation when subject to compressive loading. We present here a new Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential for Cerium that models two minima for the two fcc phases. We show results from its use in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of Ce samples subjected to shocks with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 25 GPa. A split wave structure is observed, with an elastic precursor followed by a plastic wave. The plastic wave causes the expected fcc-fcc phase transformation. Comparisons to experiments and MD simulations on Cesium (Cs) indicate that three waves could be observed. The construction of the EAM potential may be the source of the difference.

  13. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  14. The olivine-wadsleyite phase transformation in mantle peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    One of the most important goals in the study of the olivine (α) - wadsleyite (β) transformation is to understand the seismic discontinuity observed near the depth of 410 km in the Earth’s mantle. Although one school of thought attributes this discontinuity to radical chemical changes from lherzolite to picritic eclogite[1], the α-β transformation in an isochemical peridotitic mantle has widely been accepted as the underlying cause. If the latter interpretation is valid, the composition and temperature can be inferred by the depth and magnitude of the discontinuity, providing useful information for understanding the present state of the Earth’s transition zone. In spite of extensive experimental investigations of this transformation, most studies were conducted in the simple system Mg2SiO4-Fe2SiO4 and/or using the quenching technique[2]. No efforts have been directed to study the kinetic barrier of the α-β transformation under normal mantle conditions. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated increasing needs for the study of the α-β transformation in multi-component systems relevant to the Earth’s mantle[3,4]. We choose the KLB-1 spinel lherzolite, a xenolith from Kilborne Hole Crater in New Mexico USA, as starting material because it represents one of the most undepleted mantle compositions. The high P-T x-ray diffraction experiments were conducted using a two-stage multi-anvil press on beamline 13-BM-D of Advanced Photon source, Argonne National Laboratory. Phase identifications were made by observing the first appearance of a phase that was absent in the starting sample and by closely monitoring complete disappearance of a low-pressure phase from the assembly. In the presence of both α and β phases, transformation direction was identified by observing a significant change in the relative intensity between the two phases. Our results demonstrate the experimental feasibility of studying α-β transformation in complex systems and of resolving

  15. In situ phase transformation of Laves phase from Chi-phase in Mo-containing Fe–Cr–Ni alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, L.; Yang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    For an in situ phase transformation of the Chi (χ) phase to the Laves phase we observed in a Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo model alloy. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure of the χ and Laves phases, and their orientation relationship with the matrix austenite phase were investigated. The resulted Laves phase has larger lattice mismatch with the matrix phase than the χ phase, leading to the increase of local strain fields and the formation of dislocations. Moreover, this finding is helpful to understand the precipitation behavior of the intermetallic phases in the Mo-containing austenitic stainless steels.

  16. Thickness-induced structural phase transformation of layered gallium telluride.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Q; Wang, T; Miao, Y; Ma, F; Xie, Y; Ma, X; Gu, Y; Li, J; He, J; Chen, B; Xi, S; Xu, L; Zhen, H; Yin, Z; Li, J; Ren, J; Jie, W

    2016-07-28

    The thickness-dependent electronic states and physical properties of two-dimensional materials suggest great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the enhanced surface effect in ultra-thin materials might significantly influence the structural stability, as well as the device reliability. Here, we report a spontaneous phase transformation of gallium telluride (GaTe) that occurred when the bulk was exfoliated to a few layers. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicate a structural variation from a monoclinic to a hexagonal structure. Raman spectra suggest a critical thickness for the structural transformation. First-principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis show that the surface energy and the interlayer interaction compete to dominate structural stability in the thinning process. A two-stage transformation process from monoclinic (m) to tetragonal (T) and then from tetragonal to hexagonal (h) is proposed to understand the phase transformation. The results demonstrate the crucial role of interlayer interactions in the structural stability, which provides a phase engineering strategy for device applications. PMID:27198938

  17. Fundamental Mechanisms Driving the Amorphous to Crystalline Phase Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Browning, N D; Santala, M K; LaGrange, T; Gilmer, G H; Masiel, D J; Campbell, G H; Raoux, S; Topuria, T; Meister, S; Cui, Y

    2011-01-04

    Phase transformations are ubiquitous, fundamental phenomena that lie at the heart of many structural, optical and electronic properties in condensed matter physics and materials science. Many transformations, especially those occurring under extreme conditions such as rapid changes in the thermodynamic state, are controlled by poorly understood processes involving the nucleation and quenching of metastable phases. Typically these processes occur on time and length scales invisible to most experimental techniques ({micro}s and faster, nm and smaller), so our understanding of the dynamics tends to be very limited and indirect, often relying on simulations combined with experimental study of the ''time infinity'' end state. Experimental techniques that can directly probe phase transformations on their proper time and length scales are therefore key to providing fundamental insights into the whole area of transformation physics and materials science. LLNL possesses a unique dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) capable of taking images and diffraction patterns of laser-driven material processes with resolution measured in nanometers and nanoseconds. The DTEM has previously used time-resolved diffraction patterns to quantitatively study phase transformations that are orders of magnitude too fast for conventional in situ TEM. More recently the microscope has demonstrated the ability to directly image a reaction front moving at {approx}13 nm/ns and the nucleation of a new phase behind that front. Certain compound semiconductor phase change materials, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST), Sb{sub 2}Te and GeSb, exhibit a technologically important series of transformations on scales that fall neatly into the performance specifications of the DTEM. If a small portion of such material is heated above its melting point and then rapidly cooled, it quenches into an amorphous state. Heating again with a less intense pulse leads to recrystallization into a vacancy

  18. The use of Fourier reverse transforms in crystallographic phase refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ringrose, S.

    1997-10-08

    Often a crystallographer obtains an electron density map which shows only part of the structure. In such cases, the phasing of the trial model is poor enough that the electron density map may show peaks in some of the atomic positions, but other atomic positions are not visible. There may also be extraneous peaks present which are not due to atomic positions. A method for determination of crystal structures that have resisted solution through normal crystallographic methods has been developed. PHASER is a series of FORTRAN programs which aids in the structure solution of poorly phased electron density maps by refining the crystallographic phases. It facilitates the refinement of such poorly phased electron density maps for difficult structures which might otherwise not be solvable. The trial model, which serves as the starting point for the phase refinement, may be acquired by several routes such as direct methods or Patterson methods. Modifications are made to the reverse transform process based on several assumptions. First, the starting electron density map is modified based on the fact that physically the electron density map must be non-negative at all points. In practice a small positive cutoff is used. A reverse Fourier transform is computed based on the modified electron density map. Secondly, the authors assume that a better electron density map will result by using the observed magnitudes of the structure factors combined with the phases calculated in the reverse transform. After convergence has been reached, more atomic positions and less extraneous peaks are observed in the refined electron density map. The starting model need not be very large to achieve success with PHASER; successful phase refinement has been achieved with a starting model that consists of only 5% of the total scattering power of the full molecule. The second part of the thesis discusses three crystal structure determinations.

  19. Magnetostructural phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zou, Junding; Paudyal, Durga; Liu, Jing; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Karl A.

    2015-01-16

    Magnetism and phase transformations in non-stoichiometric Tb1-xMn2 (x = 0.056, 0.039) have been studied as functions of temperature and magnetic field using magnetization, heat capacity, and X-ray powder diffraction measurements. Lowering the temperature, the compounds sequentially order ferrimagnetically and antiferromagnetically, and finally, exhibit spin reorientation transitions. Moreover, these structural distortions from room temperature cubic to low temperature rhombohedral structures occur at TN, and are accompanied by large volume changes reaching ~-1.27% and -1.42%, respectively. First principles electronic structure calculations confirm the phase transformation from the ferrimagnetic cubic structure to the antiferromagnetic rhombohedral structure in TbMn2.

  20. Simplified three-phase transformer model for electromagnetic transient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chimklai, S.; Marti, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents a simplified high-frequency model for three-phase, two- and three-winding transformers. The model is based on the classical 60-Hz equivalent circuit, extended to high frequencies by the addition of the winding capacitances and the synthesis of the frequency-dependent short-circuit branch by an RLC equivalent network. By retaining the T-form of the classical model, it is possible to separate the frequency-dependent series branch from the constant-valued shunt capacitances. Since the short-circuit branch can be synthesized by a minimum-phase-shift rational approximation, the mathematical complications of fitting mutual impedance or admittance functions are avoided and the model is guaranteed to be numerically absolutely stable. Experimental tests were performed on actual power transformers to determine the parameters of the model. EMTP simulation results are also presented.

  1. Application of phase coherent transform to cloud clutter suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L.C.

    1994-11-15

    This paper describes a tracking algorithm using frame-to-frame correlation with frequency domain clutter suppression. Clutter suppression was mechanized via a `Phase Coherent Transform` (PCT) approach. This approach was applied to explore the feasibility of tracking a post-boost rocket from a low earth orbit satellite with real cloud background data. Simulation results show that the PCT/correlation tracking algorithm can perform satisfactorily at signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) as low as 5 or 7 dB.

  2. A multi-scale strength model with phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Nathan; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Rhee, Moono; Marian, Jaime; Bernier, Joel V.; Tang, Meijie; Yang, Lin

    2012-03-01

    We present a multi-scale strength model that includes phase transformation. In each phase, strength depends on pressure, strain rate, temperature, and evolving dislocation density descriptors. A donor cell type of approach is used for the transfer of dislocation density between phases. While the shear modulus can be modeled as smooth through the BCC to rhombohedral transformation in vanadium, the multi-phase strength model predicts abrupt changes in the material strength due to changes in dislocation kinetics. In the rhombohedral phase, the dislocation density is decomposed into populations associated with short and long Burgers vectors. Strength model construction employs an information passing paradigm to span from the atomistic level to the continuum level. Simulation methods in the overall hierarchy include density functional theory, molecular statics, molecular dynamics, dislocation dynamics, and continuum based approaches. We demonstrate the behavior of the model through simulations of Rayleigh Taylor instability growth experiments of the type used to assess material strength at high pressure and strain rate.

  3. A multi-scale strength model with phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, N.; Arsenlis, A.; Rhee, M.; Marian, J.; Bernier, J.; Tang, M.; Yang, L.

    2011-06-01

    We present a multi-scale strength model that includes phase transformation. In each phase, strength depends on pressure, strain rate, temperature, and evolving dislocation density descriptors. A donor cell type of approach is used for the transfer of dislocation density between phases. While the shear modulus can be modeled as smooth through the BCC to rhombohedral transformation in vanadium, the multi-phase strength model predicts abrupt changes in the material strength due to changes in dislocation kinetics. In the rhombohedral phase, the dislocation density is decomposed into populations associated with short and long Burgers vectors. Strength model construction employs an information passing paradigm to span from the atomistic level to the continuum level. Simulation methods in the overall hierarchy include density functional theory, molecular statics, molecular dynamics, dislocation dynamics, and continuum based approaches. We demonstrate the behavior of the model through simulations of Rayleigh Taylor instability growth experiments of the type used to assess material strength at high pressure and strain rate. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-464695).

  4. Phase transformations in some hafnium-tantalum-titanium-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Kapoor, D.

    1997-11-01

    Phase transformations in hafnium alloys are of interest as a means of achieving a material which exhibits flow softening and high localized strains during deformation at high strain rates. Hafnium transforms from a body-centered-cubic beta phase to a hexagonal alpha phase upon cooling below 1749{degrees}C. Hafnium-based alloys containing up to 17.5% Ti, up to 17.5% Ta, and up to 7.3% Zr by weight were button-arc melted and, in some cases, hot extruded to obtain a refined grain size. A number of alloys were shown to have beta solvus temperatures in the range of 1100 to 1300{degrees}C and showed evidence of a shear transformation upon water quenching. The Vickers microhardness of the quenched materials are typically above 350 HV as compared to 300 HV or less for materials with an alpha plus beta structure. Quenching dilatometry indicates a martensite start temperature of about 750{degrees}C for the Hf-7.5 Ta-10 Ti-1 Zr alloy and 800{degrees}C or more for the Hf-7.5 Ta-7.5 Ti-1 Zr alloy. Tensile tests at 1 s{sup {minus}1} strain rate show a constant ultimate tensile strength for temperatures up to 600{degrees}C for the above two alloys and a rapid decrease in strength with a further increase in temperature.

  5. Construction of a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hironobu; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2005-12-01

    We have constructed a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) by which a fluorescence decay waveform can be obtained. In the FT-PMF, the modulation frequency of the excitation light source is swept continuously from a direct current (dc) to a high frequency f max with a time duration T. The resultant fluorescence signal waveform is Fourier-transformed to obtain its amplitude and phase spectra. The ratio of the amplitude spectrum and the difference of the phase spectrum over those of the reference spectra that are obtained from a non-fluorescent material are calculated, respectively, and the pair of both spectral data is inverse-Fourier-transformed again to obtain the fluorescence decay waveform. The light source used was an ultraviolet light emitting- diode (UV LED) whose typical operating condition was f max = 100 MHz and T = 10 μs. To demonstrate the performance of the FT-PMF, we carried out (1) measurement of a fluorescent decay waveform of YAG materials packed in a white LED, and (2) determination of fluorescence lifetime of 10 ppm quinine sulfate in 0.1N H IISO 4.

  6. Construction of a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Shibata, Hironobu; Araki, Tsutomu

    2005-11-01

    We have constructed a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) by which a fluorescence decay waveform can be obtained. In the FT-PMF, the modulation frequency of the excitation light source is swept continuously from a direct current (dc) to a high frequency fmax with a time duration T. The resultant fluorescence signal waveform is Fourier transformed to obtain its amplitude and phase spectra. The ratio of the amplitude spectrum and the difference of the phase spectrum over those of the reference spectra from an excitation waveform are calculated, respectively, and the pair of both spectral data is inverse-Fourier-transformed again to obtain the fluorescence decay waveform. The light source used was an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) whose operating condition was fmax = 50-120 MHz and T = 10 µs. To demonstrate the performance of the FT-PMF, we carried out (1) the measurement of a fluorescent decay waveform of YAG materials enclosed in a white LED and (2) determinations of fluorescence lifetimes of 10 ppm quinine sulfate in 0.1 N H2SO4 and 10 ppm rhodamine 6G in ethanol.

  7. Stress and phase transformation phenomena in oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Hess, N.J.

    1992-04-01

    In situ optical methods are reviewed for characterization of phase transformation processes and evaluation of residual stress in solution- deposited metastable oxide films. Such low density films most often are deposited as disordered phases making them prone to crystallization and attendant densification when subjected to increased temperature and/or applied pressure. Inherent stress imparted during film deposition and its evolution during the transformation are evaluated from phonon frequency shifts seen in Raman spectra (TiO{sub 2}) or from changes in the laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra for films containing rare earth (Sm{sup +3}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) or transition metal (Cr{sup +3}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) dopants. The data in combination with measured increases in line intensities intrinsic to the evolving phase are used to follow crystallization processes in thin films. In general, film deposition parameters are found to influence the crystallite ingrowth kinetics and the magnitude of stress and stress relaxation in the film during the transformation. The utility of these methods to probe crystallization phenomena in oxide films will be addressed.

  8. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite I. Effects of Al content and precipitation rate on the structure of 2-line ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Michel, F. Marc; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Levard, Clément; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2012-10-11

    The association of Al with ferrihydrite (Fh) may have a considerable effect on the composition, structure, and surface properties of Fh nanoparticles, and thus impact its reactivity and interaction with pollutant species. Aluminous Fh is abundant in natural environments, but the mode of association of Al with this nanomineral is not yet fully understood. Al{sup 3+} speciation may vary from true chemical substitution for Fe{sup 3+}, to adsorption or surface precipitation, and/or to formation of a mixture of two (or more) individual nanoscale phases. The conditions of formation (i.e. slow vs. rapid precipitation) may also affect the nature of Fh nanoparticles in terms of their crystallinity, phase purity, and Al speciation. In this study we used a variety of laboratory (TEM, NMR, ICP-AES) and synchrotron-based techniques (X-ray total scattering and PDF analysis, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, Al K-edge XANES spectroscopy) to characterize two synthetic Al-bearing Fh series formed at different precipitation rates in the presence of 5-40 mol% Al. We find that Al is dominantly octahedrally coordinated in the synthetic Fh samples and that up to 20-30 mol% Al substitutes for Fe in the Fh structure, regardless of the synthesis method we used. Formation of separate aluminous phases (e.g., gibbsite) was most significant at Al concentrations above 30 mol% Al in slowly precipitated samples. However, small amounts (<6% of total Al) of Al-hydroxide phases were also detected by NMR spectroscopy in samples with lower Al content (as low as 15 mol% Al), particularly in the Fh series that was precipitated slowly. Furthermore, it appears that the amount of Al incorporated in Fh is not affected by the synthesis methods we used and is more likely controlled by the accumulated strain caused by Al substitution in the Fh lattice. Given the prevalence of naturally occurring aluminous ferrihydrite, assumptions about ferrihydrite reactivity in natural environments should consider the

  9. Phase field modeling of tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamivand, Mahmood

    Zirconia based ceramics are strong, hard, inert, and smooth, with low thermal conductivity and good biocompatibility. Such properties made zirconia ceramics an ideal material for different applications form thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to biomedicine applications like femoral implants and dental bridges. However, this unusual versatility of excellent properties would be mediated by the metastable tetragonal (or cubic) transformation to the stable monoclinic phase after a certain exposure at service temperatures. This transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic, known as LTD (low temperature degradation) in biomedical application, proceeds by propagation of martensite, which corresponds to transformation twinning. As such, tetragonal to monoclinic transformation is highly sensitive to mechanical and chemomechanical stresses. It is known in fact that this transformation is the source of the fracture toughening in stabilized zirconia as it occurs at the stress concentration regions ahead of the crack tip. This dissertation is an attempt to provide a kinetic-based model for tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in zirconia. We used the phase field technique to capture the temporal and spatial evolution of monoclinic phase. In addition to morphological patterns, we were able to calculate the developed internal stresses during tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The model was started form the two dimensional single crystal then was expanded to the two dimensional polycrystalline and finally to the three dimensional single crystal. The model is able to predict the most physical properties associated with tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in zirconia including: morphological patterns, transformation toughening, shape memory effect, pseudoelasticity, surface uplift, and variants impingement. The model was benched marked with several experimental works. The good agreements between simulation results and experimental data, make the model a reliable tool for

  10. Effect of Intercritical Annealing Temperature on Phase Transformations in Medium Carbon Dual Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erişir, Ersoy; Bilir, Oğuz Gürkan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a study concerning phase transformations during quenching of a medium carbon dual phase steel using thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and dilatometry. Medium carbon steel was subjected to the intermediate quenching to produce a fine grained ferrite/martensite dual phase steel. 4 samples quenched after intercritical annealing at 725, 730, 740, and 750 °C. Martensite-start and bainite-start temperatures were calculated from dilatometric curves using plastodilotemeter. Experimental findings are supported by calculated phase diagrams and equilibrium phase compositions using ThermoCalc® and calculations from different empirical formulas. It is concluded that martensite-start temperature depend on chemical composition and grain size of austenite.

  11. Phase transformation diffusion bonding of titanium alloy with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, B. . E-mail: jjj-jenny@163.com; Sheng, G.M.; Huang, J.W.; Zhou, B.; Qiu, S.Y.; Li, C.

    2006-01-15

    Phase transformation diffusion bonding between a titanium alloy (TA17) and an austenitic stainless steel (0Cr18Ni9Ti) has been carried out in vacuum. Relationships between the bonding parameters and the tensile strength of the joints were investigated, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained: maximum cyclic temperature = 890 deg. C, minimum cyclic temperature = 800 deg. C, number of cycles = 10, bonding pressure = 5 MPa and heating rate = 30 deg. C/s. The maximum tensile strength of the joint was 307 MPa. The reaction products and the interface structure of the joints were investigated by light optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The study indicated the existence of {sigma} phase, Fe{sub 2}Ti, Fe-Ti intermetallic and {beta}-Ti in the reaction zone. The presence of the brittle Fe-Ti intermetallic phase lowered both the strength and the ductility of the phase transformation diffusion-bonded joint significantly.

  12. Factors Influencing Ferrihydrite Crystallinity In Natural And Synthetic Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations of the structure of the mineral ferrihydrite indicate that disparities in the number of peaks observed in powder x-ray diffraction patterns can be attributed to differences in crystallite size. This has lead to the conclusion that specimens previously refer...

  13. Fast fringe pattern phase demodulation using FIR Hilbert transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdeisat, Munther; Burton, David; Lilley, Francis; Arevalillo-Herráez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper suggests the use of FIR Hilbert transformers to extract the phase of fringe patterns. This method is computationally faster than any known spatial method that produces wrapped phase maps. Also, the algorithm does not require any parameters to be adjusted which are dependent upon the specific fringe pattern that is being processed, or upon the particular setup of the optical fringe projection system that is being used. It is therefore particularly suitable for full algorithmic automation. The accuracy and validity of the suggested method has been tested using both computer-generated and real fringe patterns. This novel algorithm has been proposed for its advantages in terms of computational processing speed as it is the fastest available method to extract the wrapped phase information from a fringe pattern.

  14. Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Engel, James R.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia

    2013-05-01

    We report on our current status towards the development of a prototype Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer (FTIR-PS-CRDS) system under a U.S. EPA SBIR contract. Our system uses the inherent wavelength-dependent modulation imposed by the FTIR on a broadband thermal source for the phase shift measurement. This spectrally-dependent phase shift is proportional to the spectrally-dependent ring down time, which is proportional to the losses of the cavity including those due to molecular absorption. Our approach is a broadband and spectral range enhancement to conventional CRDS which is typically done in the near IR at a single wavelength; at the same time our approach is a sensitivity enhancement to traditional FTIR owing to the long effective path of the resonant cavity. In this paper we present a summary of the theory including performance projections and the design details of the prototype FTIR-PS-CRDS system.

  15. A study of geometric phase topology using Fourier transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samlan, C. T.; Naik, Dinesh N.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2016-07-01

    Topological aspect of the geometric phase (GP) due to pure polarization projection is studied using the 2D Fourier transform (2D-FT) method. Projection of orthogonal polarization state results in a phase singularity in the 2D parameter space of ellipticity and orientation of polarization ellipse. Projection of its surrounding states results in an accumulation of GP in different amount that form a spiral structure. A half wave plate–quarter wave plate combination is used to generate different polarization states which are projected using a polarizer. The accumulated phase for each orientation of the wave plate is extracted from 2D-FT of the interferogram, obtained by interfering it with a reference beam in a Mach–Zehnder like interferometer.

  16. Effect of silicic acid on arsenate and arsenite retention mechanisms on 6-L ferrihydrite: A spectroscopic and batch adsorption approach

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaodong; Root, Robert A.; Farrell, James; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and arsenite with silicic acid at the ferrihydrite-water interface was investigated over a wide pH range using batch sorption experiments, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) modeling. Batch sorption results indicate that the adsorption of arsenate and arsenite on the 6-L ferrihydrite surface exhibits a strong pH-dependence, and the effect of pH on arsenic sorption differs between arsenate and arsenite. Arsenate adsorption decreases consistently with increasing pH; whereas arsenite adsorption initially increases with pH to a sorption maximum at pH 7–9, where after sorption decreases with further increases in pH. Results indicate that competitive adsorption between silicic acid and arsenate is negligible under the experimental conditions; whereas strong competitive adsorption was observed between silicic acid and arsenite, particularly at low and high pH. In-situ, flow-through ATR-FTIR data reveal that in the absence of silicic acid, arsenate forms inner-sphere, binuclear bidentate, complexes at the ferrihydrite surface across the entire pH range. Silicic acid also forms inner-sphere complexes at ferrihydrite surfaces throughout the entire pH range probed by this study (pH 2.8 – 9.0). The ATR-FTIR data also reveal that silicic acid undergoes polymerization at the ferrihydrite surface under the environmentally-relevant concentrations studied (e.g., 1.0 mM). According to ATR-FTIR data, arsenate complexation mode was not affected by the presence of silicic acid. EXAFS analyses and DFT modeling confirmed that arsenate tetrahedra were bonded to Fe metal centers via binuclear bidentate complexation with average As(V)-Fe bond distance of 3.27 Å. The EXAFS data indicate that arsenite forms both mononuclear bidentate and binuclear bidentate complexes with 6-L ferrihydrite as indicated by

  17. Texture evolution during nitinol martensite detwinning and phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.

    2013-12-09

    Nitinol has been widely used to make medical devices for years due to its unique shape memory and superelastic properties. However, the texture of the nitinol wires has been largely ignored due to inherent complexity. In this study, in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been carried out during uniaxial tensile testing to investigate the texture evolution of the nitinol wires during martensite detwinning, variant reorientation, and phase transformation. It was found that the thermal martensitic nitinol wire comprised primarily an axial (1{sup ¯}20), (120), and (102)-fiber texture. Detwinning initially converted the (120) and (102) fibers to the (1{sup ¯}20) fiber and progressed to a (1{sup ¯}30)-fiber texture by rigid body rotation. At strains above 10%, the (1{sup ¯}30)-fiber was shifted to the (110) fiber by (21{sup ¯}0) deformation twinning. The austenitic wire exhibited an axial (334)-fiber, which transformed to the near-(1{sup ¯}30) martensite texture after the stress-induced phase transformation.

  18. Texture evolution during nitinol martensite detwinning and phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.; Yu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nitinol has been widely used to make medical devices for years due to its unique shape memory and superelastic properties. However, the texture of the nitinol wires has been largely ignored due to inherent complexity. In this study, in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been carried out during uniaxial tensile testing to investigate the texture evolution of the nitinol wires during martensite detwinning, variant reorientation, and phase transformation. It was found that the thermal martensitic nitinol wire comprised primarily an axial (1¯20), (120), and (102)-fiber texture. Detwinning initially converted the (120) and (102) fibers to the (1¯20) fiber and progressed to a (1¯30)-fiber texture by rigid body rotation. At strains above 10%, the (1¯30)-fiber was shifted to the (110) fiber by (21¯0) deformation twinning. The austenitic wire exhibited an axial (334)-fiber, which transformed to the near-(1¯30) martensite texture after the stress-induced phase transformation.

  19. Phase transformations and thermodynamics of aluminum-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changhua (Michael)

    This thesis examines the thermodynamics and associated kinetics and phase transformations of the glass forming Al-Ni-Gd and Al-Fe-Gd systems. In order to fully understand the unique glass forming ability (GFA) of Al-based metallic glasses, the ternary Al-Fe-Gd and Al-Ni-Gd systems in their Al-rich corners were examined experimentally to assist in a thermodynamic assessment. The solid-state phase equilibria are determined using XRD and TEM-EDS techniques. While this work basically confirms the solid-state equilibria in Al-Fe-Gd reported previously, the ternary phase in Al-Ni-Gd system has been identified to be Al15Ni3Gd2 rather than Al16Ni 3Gd reported in the literature. DTA analysis of 24 alloys in the Al-Fe-Gd system and 42 alloys in the Al-Ni-Gd system have yielded critical temperatures pertaining to the solid-liquid transition. Based on these data and information from the literature, a self-consistent thermodynamic database for these systems has been developed using the CALPHAD technique. Parameters describing the Gibbs free energy for various phases of the Al-Gd, Al-Fe-Gd and Al-Ni-Gd systems are manually optimized in this study. Once constructed, the database is used to calculate driving forces for nucleation of crystalline phases which can qualitatively explain the phase formation sequence during crystallization at low temperatures. It was also confirmed that alloy compositions with the lowest Gibbs free energy difference between the equilibrium state and undercooled liquid state exhibit better GFA than other chemistries. Based on 250°C isothermal devitrification phase transformations of 17 Al-Ni-Gd alloys, a phase formation sequence map is constructed. Fcc-Al nanocrystals are formed first in most of the alloys studied, but eutectic crystallization of a metastable phase and fcc-Al is also observed. Addition of Al or Ni promotes fcc-Al phase formation, while increasing Gd suppresses it. The continuous heating DSC scans revealed that crystallization in Al

  20. The effect of calcium on aqueous uranium(VI) speciation and adsorption to ferrihydrite and quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies of uranium(VI) geochemistry have focused on the potentially important role of the aqueous species, CaUO2 (CO3)32- and Ca2 UO2(CO3)30(aq), on inhibition of microbial reduction and uranium(VI) aqueous speciation in contaminated groundwater. However, to our knowledge, there have been no direct studies of the effects of these species on U(VI) adsorption by mineral phases. The sorption of U(VI) on quartz and ferrihydrite was investigated in NaNO3 solutions equilibrated with either ambient air (430 ppm CO2) or 2% CO2 in the presence of 0, 1.8, or 8.9 mM Ca2+. Under conditions where the Ca2UO2(CO3)30 (aq) species predominates U(VI) aqueous speciation, the presence of Ca in solution lowered U(VI) adsorption on quartz from 77% in the absence of Ca to 42% and 10% at Ca concentrations of 1.8 and 8.9 mM, respectively. U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite decreased from 83% in the absence of Ca to 57% in the presence of 1.8 mM Ca. Surface complexation model predictions that included the formation constant for aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) accurately simulated the effect of Ca2+ on U(VI) sorption onto quartz and ferrihydrite within the thermodynamic uncertainty of the stability constant value. This study confirms that Ca2+ can have a significant impact on the aqueous speciation of U(VI), and consequently, on the sorption and mobility of U(VI) in aquifers. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Target tracking using log-polar transform-based shifted phase-encoded joint transform correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed Nazrul; Bitew, Worku T.

    2014-04-01

    Automatic target detection and tracking requires efficient recognition of the target pattern in variable environmental conditions. Optical joint transform correlation (JTC) method has been proven to be efficient in recognizing a target without requiring complex optical set up. However, the classical JTC suffers from poor correlation performance, which can be improved through the use of different and modified designs. A very successful scheme is developed by employing phase-shifted and phase-encoded fringe-adjusted JTC (SPFJTC), which provides with a high discrimination between a target and non-target objects in a given scene and better utilization of the space-bandwidth resource. Further enhancement of the target detection performance can be achieved by incorporating log-polar transform in the SPFJTC technique. We applied the SPFJTC technique to the log-polar transformation of both the reference image and the input scene that makes the pattern recognition invariant to rotation and scale variations. Peak-to-side lobe ratio is measured and a threshold operation is employed to detect and track a target in an unknown input scene.

  2. Two-dimensional phase transformation probed by second harmonic generation: Oscillatory transformation of the K/Al(111) system

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Z.C.; Plummer, E.W. |

    1995-12-31

    The technique of optical second harmonic generation is used to study phase transformations at two-dimensional surfaces and interfaces. Examples are given to illustrate that changes in surface symmetry, adsorption configuration, and electronic structure can be detected by this nonlinear optical technique. An oscillatory phase transformation of potassium adsorbed atoms on Al(111) probed by second harmonic generation is analyzed in detail.

  3. Neutron depolarization study of phase transformations in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, N. H.; Te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Rekveldt, M. Th.; Sietsma, J.; van der Zwaag, S.

    1999-06-01

    Three-dimensional neutron depolarization experiments have been performed in order to study the phase transformations from austenite (γ-Fe) into ferrite (α-Fe) and cementite (Fe 3C) in two medium-carbon steel samples with different carbon concentrations. The rotation of the neutron polarization vector during transmission through the sample is a direct measure for the ferromagnetic ferrite fraction. The degree of depolarization is related to the magnetic correlation length, which gives an indication of the characteristic length scales of the microstructure.

  4. alpha'-SiAlON: Phase stability, phase transformations and microstructural evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenflanz, Anatoly Zhanovich

    1997-11-01

    Silicon nitride is a prominent member of a ceramic family developed for use in structural applications at ambient and elevated temperatures. It exists in two polymorphic forms, alpha and beta. The predominant form in use today is beta-Sisb3Nsb4. The other form of silicon nitride, alpha-Sisb3Nsb4, is not used even though it is much harder. This is because only beta-Sisb3Nsb4 can be made into a tough and strong ceramic by forming a microstructure that resembles a fiber-reinforced composite. alpha-Sisb3Nsb4, which is unstable at high temperature, can be stabilized by forming solid solutions with Al, O, and interstitial cations, but it always appears with a microstructure of fine, equiaxed grains and has low toughness and strength. Microstructural development of silicon nitride is closely related to phase transformations mediated by a liquid. To help guide the development of new silicon nitride alloys, various aspects of these transformations, and some reverse transformations among them, have been studied. This dissertation sheds light on such issues as the determination of equilibrium phase relations at different temperatures for different compositions, the kinetics of forward and reverse transformations, and the connection of these transformations to the microstructure. Among the outstanding issues that have been resolved by this work are the stability of alphasp'-SiAlON at low temperature and the role of starting powders and rare-earth cations in determining the rate of phase transformations. A new class of alphasp'-SiAlON, which combines the toughness of beta-Sisb3Nsb4 and the hardness of alpha-Sisb3Nsb4, with a whisker-like microstructure, has also been discovered by exploiting the nucleation and growth kinetics of phase transformations.

  5. Effect of ferrihydrite crystallite size on phosphate adsorption reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Liu, Fan; Parise, John B; Feng, Xionghan; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-09-17

    The influence of crystallite size on the adsorption reactivity of phosphate on 2-line to 6-line ferrihydrites was investigated by combining adsorption experiments, structure and surface analysis, and spectroscopic analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the ferrihydrite samples possessed a similar fundamental structure with a crystallite size varying from 1.6 to 4.4 nm. N2 adsorption on freeze-dried samples revealed that the specific surface area (SSABET) decreased from 427 to 234 m(2) g(-1) with increasing crystallite size and micropore volume (Vmicro) from 0.137 to 0.079 cm(3) g(-1). Proton adsorption (QH) at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl ranged from 0.73 to 0.55 mmol g(-1). Phosphate adsorption capacity at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl for the ferrihydrites decreased from 1690 to 980 μmol g(-1) as crystallite size increased, while the adsorption density normalized to SSABET was similar. Phosphate adsorption on the ferrihydrites exhibited similar behavior with respect to both kinetics and the adsorption mechanism. The kinetics could be divided into three successive first-order stages: relatively fast adsorption, slow adsorption, and a very slow stage. With decreasing crystallite size, ferrihydrites exhibited increasing rate constants per mass for all stages. Analysis of OH(-) release and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) results indicated that initially phosphate preferentially bound to two Fe-OH2(1/2+) groups to form a binuclear bidentate surface complex without OH(-) release, with smaller size ferrihydrites exchanging more Fe-OH2(1/2+) per mass. Subsequently, phosphate exchanged with both Fe-OH2(1/2+) and Fe-OH(1/2-) with a constant amount of OH(-) released per phosphate adsorbed. Also in this stage binuclear bidentate surface complexes were formed with a P-Fe atomic pair distance of ~3.25 Å. PMID:23992548

  6. Modelling a single phase voltage controlled rectifier using Laplace transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. Alan; Kankam, M. David

    1992-01-01

    The development of a 20 kHz, AC power system by NASA for large space projects has spurred a need to develop models for the equipment which will be used on these single phase systems. To date, models for the AC source (i.e., inverters) have been developed. It is the intent of this paper to develop a method to model the single phase voltage controlled rectifiers which will be attached to the AC power grid as an interface for connected loads. A modified version of EPRI's HARMFLO program is used as the shell for these models. The results obtained from the model developed in this paper are quite adequate for the analysis of problems such as voltage resonance. The unique technique presented in this paper uses the Laplace transforms to determine the harmonic content of the load current of the rectifier rather than a curve fitting technique. Laplace transforms yield the coefficient of the differential equations which model the line current to the rectifier directly.

  7. Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part I: Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Mikutta, Robert; Bonneville, Steeve; Wagner, Friedrich; Voegelin, Andreas; Christl, Iso; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2008-02-01

    Iron(III) (hydr)oxides formed at extracellular biosurfaces or in the presence of exopolymeric substances of microbes and plants may significantly differ in their structural and physical properties from their inorganic counterparts. We synthesized ferrihydrite (Fh) in solutions containing acid polysaccharides [polygalacturonic acid (PGA), alginate, xanthan] and compared its properties with that of an abiotic reference by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, gas adsorption (N 2, CO 2), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. The coprecipitates formed contained up to 37 wt% polymer. Two-line Fh was the dominant mineral phase in all precipitates. The efficacy of polymers to precipitate Fh at neutral pH was higher for polymers with more carboxyl C (PGA ˜ alginate > xanthan). Pure Fh had a specific surface area of 300 m 2/g; coprecipitation of Fh with polymers reduced the detectable mineral surface area by up to 87%. Likewise, mineral micro- (<2 nm) and mesoporosity (2-10 nm) decreased by up to 85% with respect to pure Fh, indicative of a strong aggregation of Fh particles by polymers in freeze-dried state. C-1s STXM images showed the embedding of Fh particles in polymer matrices on the micrometer scale. Iron EXAFS spectroscopy revealed no significant changes in the local coordination of Fe(III) between pure Fh and Fh contained in PGA coprecipitates. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of coprecipitates confirmed Fh as dominant mineral phase with a slightly reduced particle size and crystallinity of coprecipitate-Fh compared to pure Fh and/or a limited magnetic super-exchange between Fh particles in the coprecipitates due to magnetic dilution by the polysaccharides. The pH iep of pure Fh in 0.01 M NaClO 4 was 7.1. In contrast, coprecipitates of PGA and alginate had a pH iep < 2. Considering the differences in specific surface area, porosity, and net charge between the coprecipitates and pure Fh

  8. Synthetic Coprecipitates of Exopolysaccharides and Ferrihydrite. Part I: Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mikutta,C.; Mikutta, R.; Bonneville, S.; Wagner, F.; Voegelin, A.; Christl, I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2008-01-01

    Iron(III) (hydr)oxides formed at extracellular biosurfaces or in the presence of exopolymeric substances of microbes and plants may significantly differ in their structural and physical properties from their inorganic counterparts. We synthesized ferrihydrite (Fh) in solutions containing acid polysaccharides [polygalacturonic acid (PGA), alginate, xanthan] and compared its properties with that of an abiotic reference by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, gas adsorption (N2, CO2), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. The coprecipitates formed contained up to 37 wt% polymer. Two-line Fh was the dominant mineral phase in all precipitates. The efficacy of polymers to precipitate Fh at neutral pH was higher for polymers with more carboxyl C (PGA {approx} alginate > xanthan). Pure Fh had a specific surface area of 300 m2/g; coprecipitation of Fh with polymers reduced the detectable mineral surface area by up to 87%. Likewise, mineral micro- (<2 nm) and mesoporosity (2-10 nm) decreased by up to 85% with respect to pure Fh, indicative of a strong aggregation of Fh particles by polymers in freeze-dried state. C-1s STXM images showed the embedding of Fh particles in polymer matrices on the micrometer scale. Iron EXAFS spectroscopy revealed no significant changes in the local coordination of Fe(III) between pure Fh and Fh contained in PGA coprecipitates. 57Fe Moessbauer spectra of coprecipitates confirmed Fh as dominant mineral phase with a slightly reduced particle size and crystallinity of coprecipitate-Fh compared to pure Fh and/or a limited magnetic super-exchange between Fh particles in the coprecipitates due to magnetic dilution by the polysaccharides. The pHiep of pure Fh in 0.01 M NaClO4 was 7.1. In contrast, coprecipitates of PGA and alginate had a pHiep < 2. Considering the differences in specific surface area, porosity, and net charge between the coprecipitates and pure Fh

  9. Phase-field-crystal methodology for modeling of structural transformations.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael; Rottler, Jörg; Provatas, Nikolas

    2011-03-01

    We introduce and characterize free-energy functionals for modeling of solids with different crystallographic symmetries within the phase-field-crystal methodology. The excess free energy responsible for the emergence of periodic phases is inspired by classical density-functional theory, but uses only a minimal description for the modes of the direct correlation function to preserve computational efficiency. We provide a detailed prescription for controlling the crystal structure and introduce parameters for changing temperature and surface energies, so that phase transformations between body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and simple-cubic (sc) lattices can be studied. To illustrate the versatility of our free-energy functional, we compute the phase diagram for fcc-bcc-liquid coexistence in the temperature-density plane. We also demonstrate that our model can be extended to include hcp symmetry by dynamically simulating hcp-liquid coexistence from a seeded crystal nucleus. We further quantify the dependence of the elastic constants on the model control parameters in two and three dimensions, showing how the degree of elastic anisotropy can be tuned from the shape of the direct correlation functions. PMID:21517507

  10. Local phase transformation in alloys during charged-particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-10-01

    Among the various mechanisms and processes by which energetic irradiation can alter the phase stability of alloys, radiation-induced segregation is one of the most important phenomena. Radiation-induced segregation in alloys occurs as a consequence of preferential coupling between persistent fluxes of excess defects and solute atoms, leading to local enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Thus, this phenomenon tends to drive alloy systems away from thermodynamic equilibrium, on a local scale. During charged-particle irradiations, the spatial nonuniformity in the defect production gives rise to a combination of persistent defect fluxes, near the irradiated surface and in the peak-damage region. This defect-flux combination can modify the alloy composition in a complex fashion, i.e., it can destabilize pre-existing phases, causing spatially- and temporally-dependent precipitation of new metastable phases. The effects of radiation-induced segregation on local phase transformations in Ni-based alloys during proton bombardment and high-voltage electron-microscope irradiation at elevated temperatures are discussed.

  11. The HCP To BCC Phase Transformation in Ti Characterized by Nanosecond Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G; LaGrange, T; King, W; Colvin, J; Ziegler, A; Browning, N; Kleinschmidt, H; Bostanjoglo, O

    2005-06-21

    The general class of martensitic phase transformations occurs by a rapid lattice-distortive mechanism, where kinetics and morphology of the transformation are dominated by the strain energy. Since transformation is diffusionless, phase fronts propagate through a crystal with great speed that can approach the speed of sound. We have observed a particular example of this class of phase transformation, the hexagonal close packed (HCP) to body centered cubic (BCC) transformation in titanium that is driven by a rapid increase in temperature. We have used a novel nanosecond electron microscope (the dynamic transmission electron microscope, DTEM) to acquire diffraction and imaging information on the transformation, which is driven in-situ by nanosecond laser irradiation. Using nanosecond exposure times that are possible in the DTEM, data can be collected about the transient events in these fast transformations. We have identified the phase transformation with diffraction patterns and correlated the time of the phase transformation with calculated conditions in the sample.

  12. Diffusion and Phase Transformations of Transition Metals on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Yi.

    The role of surface diffusion and surface phase reaction kinetics of nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) on Si(111) and Si(100) are investigated under Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) conditions using Auger Spectroscopy (AES), Reflection High Electron Energy Diffraction (RHEED) and surface X-ray diffraction. The surface segregation phenomenon and the formation conditions for Si(111)-sqrt{19 } x sqrt{19}- rm R+/-23.4^circ phase (hereafter called sqrt{19}) for Ni/Si(111) are studied by RHEED and AES. Quench cooling induces surface segregation which restores the total accumulated dose of Ni to two surfaces of the wafer. The coverage dependence of phases thus produced follows: 7 x 7 to 1 x 1-RC(0.05Ml) to sqrt{19} (0.16Ml) then to B-type NiSi_2. It is found that there are 3 Ni atoms in the sqrt{19 } unit cell. A "race" of bulk diffusion versus surface diffusion for Ni in/on Si(111) is studied by depositing a laterally confined dot of metal on one side of the double side polished and UHV cleaned Si wafer and then measuring the lateral Auger profile on the reverse side following annealing and quenching. Ni reaches the far side of the wafer at temperatures as low as 500C via bulk diffusion with no measurable contribution from the surface paths, which are short-circuited by numerous, fast bulk paths. Similar results are found for Ni and Co on Si(111) and Si(100). The diffusivity and solid solubility calculated from the experiments are close to the bulk values known from the literature. In addition, the thermal stability, phase transformation and different dissolution mechanisms of sqrt {19} and 1 x 1-RC surface phases of Ni/Si(111) are carefully examined. The activation energies of these processes are compared on an Arrhenius plot. These are discussed in terms of the migration and formation mechanisms involved in these phase transformations. An energy level diagram is used to summarize the atomistic kinetics.

  13. Phase transformations and residual stresses in environmental barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Bryan J.

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are promising materials for high-temperature structural applications in turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) were developed to protect the underlying substrate. In the case of silicon carbide (SiC), multilayer coating systems consist of a Ba1-xSrxAl2Si 2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite or mullite + SrAl2Si 2O8 (SAS) interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. In this work, biaxial strains were measured on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples to analyze the stress and phase evolution in the coating system as a function of depth and temperature. Models were used to compare the results with an ideal coating system. In the assprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 175 MPa were measured, and cracking was observed. After thermally cycling the samples, stresses were significantly reduced and cracks in the topcoat had closed. The addition of SAS to the interlayer increased the compressive stress in the BSAS topcoat in thermally-cycled samples, which was desirable for EBC applications. The BSAS topcoat transformed from the as-deposited hexacelsian state to the stable celsian above 1200°C. This phase transformation is accompanied by a CTE reduction. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation were quantified for freestanding plasma-sprayed BSAS. Activation energies for bulk bars and crushed powder were determined to be ˜340 kJ/mol and ˜500 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction were used to establish how microstructural constraints reduce the transformation energy. Barrier coating lifetime and stability are also influenced by exposure to reactive, low-melting point calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) deposits formed from dust and sand. Multilayer doped aluminosilicate coatings and bulk BSAS material were

  14. Nanoscale heat transfer and phase transformation surrounding intensely heated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran

    Over the last decade there has been significant ongoing research to use nanoparticles for hyperthermia-based destruction of cancer cells. In this regard, the investigation of highly non-equilibrium thermal systems created by ultrafast laser excitation is a particularly challenging and important aspect of nanoscale heat transfer. It has been observed experimentally that noble metal nanoparticles, illuminated by radiation at the plasmon resonance wavelength, can act as localized heat sources at nanometer-length scales. Achieving biological response by delivering heat via nanoscale heat sources has also been demonstrated. However, an understanding of the thermal transport at these scales and associated phase transformations is lacking. A striking observation made in several laser-heating experiments is that embedded metal nanoparticles heated to extreme temperatures may even melt without an associated boiling of the surrounding fluid. This unusual phase stability is not well understood and designing experiments to understand the physics of this phenomenon is a challenging task. In this thesis, we will resort to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which offer a powerful tool to investigate this phenomenon, without assumptions underlying continuum-level model formulations. We present the results from a series of steady state and transient non-equilibrium MD simulations performed on an intensely heated nanoparticle immersed in a model liquid. For small nanoparticles (1-10 nm in diameter) we observe a stable liquid phase near the nanoparticle surface, which can be at a temperature well above the boiling point. Furthermore, we report the existence of a critical nanoparticle size (4 nm in diameter) below which we do not observe formation of vapor even when local fluid temperatures exceed the critical temperature. Instead, we report the existence of a stable fluid region with a density much larger than that of the vapor phase. We explain this stability in terms of the

  15. Ferritin and ferrihydrite nanoparticles as iron sources for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dehner, Carolyn; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Behera, Rabindra K.; Shrout, Joshua; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism of iron derived from insoluble and/ or scarce sources is essential for pathogenic and environmental microbes. The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to acquire iron from exogenous ferritin was assessed; ferritin is an iron-concentrating and antioxidant protein complex composed of a catalytic protein and caged ferrihydrite nanomineral synthesized from Fe(II) and O2 or H2O2. Ferritin and free ferrihydrite supported growth of P. aeruginosa with indistinguishable kinetics and final culture densities. The P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant (ΔpvdDΔpchEF), which is incapable of siderophore production, grew as well as the wild type when ferritin was the iron source. Such data suggest that P. aeruginosa can acquire iron by siderophore-independent mechanisms, including secretion of small-molecule reductant(s). Protease inhibitors abolished the growth of the siderophore-free strain on ferritins, with only a small effect on growth of the wild type; predictably, protease inhibitors had no effect on growth with free ferrihydrite as the iron source. Proteolytic activity was higher with the siderophore-free strain, suggesting that the role of proteases in the degradation of ferritin is particularly important for iron acquisition in the absence of siderophores. The combined results demonstrate the importance of both free ferrihydrite, a natural environmental form of iron and a model for an insoluble form of partly denatured ferritin called hemosiderin, and caged ferritin iron minerals as bacterial iron sources. Ferritin is also revealed as a growth promoter of opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria such a P. aeruginosa in diseased tissues such as the cystic fibrotic lung, where ferritin concentrations are abnormally high. PMID:23417538

  16. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  17. Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Engel, James R.; Dupuis, Julia Rentz

    2014-05-01

    OPTRA has developed a Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer (FTIR-PS-CRDS) system under a U.S. EPA SBIR contract. This system uses the inherent wavelength-dependent modulation imposed by the FTIR on a broadband thermal source for the phase shift measurement. This spectrally-dependent phase shift is proportional to the spectrally-dependent ring down time. The spectral dependence of both of these values is introduced by the losses of the cavity including those due to the molecular absorption of the sample. OPTRA's approach allows broadband detection of chemicals across the feature-rich fingerprint region of the long-wave infrared. This represents a broadband and spectral range enhancement to conventional CRDS which is typically done at a single wavelength in the near IR; at the same time the approach is a sensitivity enhancement to traditional FTIR, owing to the long effective path of the resonant cavity. In previous papers1,2, OPTRA has presented a breadboard system aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the approach and a prototype design implementing performance enhancements based on the results of breadboard testing. In this final paper in the series, we will present test results illustrating the realized performance of the fully assembled and integrated breadboard, thereby demonstrating the utility of the approach.

  18. Simultaneous lead and antimony immobilization in shooting range soil by a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shouhei; Katoh, Masahiko; Sato, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite could immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil in which the level of lead contamination is markedly higher than that of antimony. In addition, we evaluated the stability of lead and antimony immobilized by the combined application with varying soil pH. The levels of water-soluble lead and antimony for the combined application were lower than those of single applications of hydroxyapatite or ferrihydrite, indicating that the combined application could suppress the levels of water-soluble lead and antimony by 99.9% and 95.5%, respectively, as compared with the levels in shooting range soil without immobilization material. The amounts of residual lead and amorphous Fe/Al oxide-bound antimony fractions in sequential extraction increased with a decrease in the exchangeable and carbonate lead fractions as well as in non-specifically bound and specifically bound antimony fractions. The alteration of lead and antimony phases to chemically more stable ones as a result of the combined application would result in the suppression of their mobility. The stability of immobilized lead and antimony in the combined application was equal to that of lead with a single application of hydroxyapatite and that of antimony with a single application of ferrihydrite within neutral to alkaline pH conditions, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that the combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite can simultaneously immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil with neutral to alkaline pH. PMID:25894550

  19. Role of valence electrons in phase transformation kinetics of thallium and its dilute alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, R.; Ahmed, S.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the phase transformation of thallium and its dilute alloys were investigated using XRD and calorimetry. Pure thallium exhibits a beta(bcc) to alpha(hcp) phase transformation on cooling at 508 K. With alloying additions, the crystal structure for each phase does not change, although the size of the unit cell increases. The enthalpy and the temperature of phase transformation of each alloy have been determined. The chemical free energy change associated with the phase transformation of each alloy was calculated. The valence electrons make an outstanding contribution to the chemical free energy change required for the phase change.

  20. Magnetic properties of heat treated bacterial ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Bayukov, O. A.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, which are products of vital functions of Klebsiella oxitoca bacteria, have been studied. The initial powder containing the nanoparticles in an organic shell was subjected to low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment for up to 240 h. The bacterial ferrihydrite particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior. Their characteristic blocking temperature increases from 26 to 80 K with the heat treatment. Analysis of the magnetization curves with regard to the magnetic moment distribution function and antiferromagnetic contribution shows that the low-temperature heat treatment enhances the average magnetic moment of a particle; i.e., the nanoparticles coarsen, probably due to their partial agglomeration during heat treatment. It was established that the blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. Therefore, a model was proposed that takes into account both the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy. Using this model, the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants KV≈1.7×105 erg/cm3 and KS≈0.055 erg/cm2 have been determined. The effect of the surface magnetic anisotropy of ferrihydrite nanoparticles on the observed magnetic hysteresis loops is discussed.

  1. Atomic structure and pressure-induced phase transformations in a phase-change alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming

    Phase-change materials exist in at least two phases under the ambient condition. One is the amorphous state and another is crystalline phase. These two phases have vastly different physical properties, such as electrical conductivity, optical reflectivity, mass density, thermal conductivity, etc. The distinct physical properties and the fast transformation between amorphous and crystalline phases render these materials the ability to store information. For example, the DVD and the Blue-ray discs take advantage of the optical reflectivity contrast, and the newly developed solid-state memories make use of the large conductivity difference. In addition, both the amorphous and crystalline phases in phase-change memories (PCMs) are very stable at room temperature, and they are easy to be scaled up in the production of devices with large storage density. All these features make phase-change materials the ideal candidates for the next-generation memories. Despite of the fast development of these new memory materials in industry, many fundamental physics problems underlying these interesting materials are still not fully resolved. This thesis is aiming at solving some of the key issues in phase-change materials. Most of phase-change materials are composed of Ge-Sb-Te constituents. Among all these Ge-Sb-Te based materials, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) has the best performance and has been frequently studied as a prototypical phase-change material. The first and foremost issue is the structure of the two functioning phases. In this thesis, we investigate the unique atomic structure and bonding nature of amorphous GST (a-GST) and crystalline GST ( c-GST), using ab initio tools and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Their local structures and bonding scenarios are then analyzed using electronic structure calculations. In order to gain insight into the fast phase transformation mechanism, we also carried out a series of high-pressure experiments on GST. Several new polymorphs and their

  2. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the Finite Element Method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at.% Nb alloy are acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. The variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.

  3. On Inclusion-Matrix Interfacial Stresses in Composites Containing Phase-Transforming Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-C.; Ko, C.-C.

    2010-05-21

    Recent development in composites containing phase-transforming particles, such as vanadium dioxide or barium titanate, reveals the overall stiffness and viscoelastic damping of the composites may be unbounded. Negative stiffness is induced from phase transformation predicted by the Landau phase transformation theory. Although this unbounded phenomenon is theoretically supported with the composite homogenization theory, detailed stress analyses of the composites are still lacking. In this work, we analyze the two-dimensional plane stress elasticity problem of a square plate containing a circular inclusion, under the assumption that the Young's modulus of the inclusion is negative. Assumption of negative stiffness is a priori in the present analysis. A static loading condition is adopted to estimate the effective modulus of the composites by the ratio of applied stress to averaged strain on the loading edges. It is found that the interfacial stresses between the circular inclusion and matrix increase dramatically when the negative stiffness is so tuned that overall stiffness is unbounded. Furthermore, it is found that stress distributions in the inclusion are not uniform, contrary to Eshelby's theorem, which states, for two-phase, infinite composites, the inclusion's stress distribution is uniform when the shape of the inclusion has higher symmetry than an ellipse. The rationale for this nonuniform stress distributions is due to nonlocal effects induced from negative stiffness.

  4. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the Finite Element Method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at.% Nb alloy aremore » acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. The variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.« less

  5. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr-Nb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-03-17

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the finite element method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at% Nb alloy are acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. As a result, the variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.

  6. Zig-zag twins and helical phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Ganor, Yaniv; Dumitrică, Traian; Feng, Fan; James, Richard D

    2016-04-28

    We demonstrate the large bending deformation induced by an array of permanent magnets (applied field ∼0.02 T) designed to minimize poles in the bent state of the crystal. Planar cantilevers of NiMnGa (5M modulated martensite) ferromagnetic shape memory alloy deform into an arched shape according to theory, with a zig-zag microstructure that complies with the kinematic and magnetic compatibility between adjacent twin variants. A general theory of bent and twisted states is given, applicable to both twinning and austenite/martensite transformations. Some of these configurations achieve order-of-magnitude amplification of rotation and axial strain. We investigate also atomistic analogues of these bent and twisted configurations with perfect interfaces between phases. These mechanisms of large deformation, induced by small magnetic fields or temperature changes, have potential application to the development of new actuation technologies for micro-robotic systems. PMID:27002072

  7. Kinetics of phase transformation in glass forming systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to (1) develop computer models for realistic simulations of nucleation and crystal growth in glasses, which would also have the flexibility to accomodate the different variables related to sample characteristics and experimental conditions, and (2) design and perform nucleation and crystallization experiments using calorimetric measurements, such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to verify these models. The variables related to sample characteristics mentioned in (1) above include size of the glass particles, nucleating agents, and the relative concentration of the surface and internal nuclei. A change in any of these variables changes the mode of the transformation (crystallization) kinetics. A variation in experimental conditions includes isothermal and nonisothermal DSC/DTA measurements. This research would lead to develop improved, more realistic methods for analysis of the DSC/DTA peak profiles to determine the kinetic parameters for nucleation and crystal growth as well as to assess the relative merits and demerits of the thermoanalytical models presently used to study the phase transformation in glasses.

  8. Solid-solid phase transformation: Roughening of stylolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, L.; Jettestuen, E.; Mathiesen, J.; Renard, F.; Jamtveit, B.

    2007-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks under uniaxial compression often react by changing the texture during compaction or cementation, which is accompanied by the formation of stylolites spanning the grain contacts or the rocks along surfaces normal to the applied stress. Many field observations corroborate a common feature of stylolites, namely that they are rough interfaces that contain insoluble minerals. Stylolites are outstanding examples of interfacial patterns developed in out-of-equilibrium systems. We study the roughening of stylolites within a model of a moving interface boundary between two stressed solids. The set up of our model consists of two dissimilar elastic bodies that are separated by a sharp interface and subjected to uniform compression in the direction perpendicular to the interface profile. Based on the balance laws of force and energy, we derive the jump conditions for a moving interface driven by a phase transformation process, i.e. the solid phase with higher energy (more porous) is removed and replaced by the same amount of less porous solid phase. An initially flat interface perturbed with small irregularities develops grooves or finger like structures, which align with the principal direction of compaction. The system is dissipative and approaches asymptotically the equilibrium configuration between the two phases. Our numerical investigations reveal several issues: 1) a morphological instability of the solid-solid interface does develop; 2) the instability is driven by the porosity jump across the interface; 3) the energy concentration at the tip of the fingers may influence the development of cracks perpendicular to the stylolites planes, as observed in nature.

  9. Finite element method for conserved phase fields: Stress-mediated diffusional phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeem, Mohsen Asle; Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2010-12-01

    Phase-field models with conserved phase-field variables result in a 4th order evolution partial differential equation (PDE). When coupled with the usual 2nd order thermo-mechanics equations, such problems require special treatment. In the past, the finite element method (FEM) has been successfully applied to non-conserved phase fields, governed by a 2nd order PDE. For higher order equations, the convergence of the standard Galerkin FEM requires that the interpolation functions belong to a higher continuity class. We consider the Cahn-Hilliard phase-field model for diffusion-controlled solid state phase transformation in binary alloys, coupled with elasticity of the solid phases. A Galerkin finite element formulation is developed, with mixed-order interpolation: C 0 interpolation functions for displacements, and C 1 interpolation functions for the phase-field variable. To demonstrate convergence of the mixed interpolation scheme, we first study a one-dimensional problem - nucleation and growth of the intermediate phase in a thin-film diffusion couple with elasticity effects. Then, we study the effects of completeness of C 1 interpolation on parabolic problems in two space dimensions by considering the growth of the intermediate phase in a binary system. Quadratic convergence, expected for conforming elements, is achieved for both one- and two-dimensional systems.

  10. Spectroscopic and Geochemical Analyses of Ferrihydrite from Hydrothermal Springs in Iceland and Applications to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice; Murad, E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ferrihydrite samples were collected from a thermal spring and a cold stream in the Landmannalaugar region of Iceland. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses have been performed on the air-dried and fine-grained fractions of these samples. The ferrihydrite from the cold stream is a pure sample, containing small amounts of Ca, P and Si, which do not form minerals detectable with X-ray diffraction (XRD) or reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy. The ferrihydrite from the thermal pool is a less pure sample, containing larger amounts of amorphous Si and P. The XRD and spectral features for this sample are also consistent with a less crystalline structure. Some of the Si is incorporated in the structure of the ferrihydrite. The Ca, P and possibly some of the Si may be biogenic. The spectral character of these Icelandic ferrihydrites is compared with those of synthetic ferrihydrites and other iron oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals. Ferrihydrite is characterized by a broad Fe3+ excitation band near 0.92 microns (approx. 10900/cm) and a strong Fe-O absorption feature near 475/cm (approx. 21 microns) in transmittance spectra. Multiple bands due to H2O and OH are also present for ferrihydrite. Natural ferrihydrites frequently exhibit a band near 950-1050/cm (approx. 10 microns) that is typically not observed for synthetic ferrihydrites and may be due to some Si in the structure. An additional pair of spectral bands near 1400 and 1500/cm (approx. 7 microns) are characteristic of pure ferrihydrites from natural and synthetic sources. Hydrothermal springs may have been present at one time on Mars in association with volcanic activity. Ferrihydrite formation in such an environment may have contributed to the ferric oxide-rich surface material on Mars.

  11. Low temperature XAFS investigation on the lutetium binding changes during the 2-line ferrihydrite alteration process.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, K; Schäfer, T; Lindqvist-Reis, P; Denecke, M A; Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Kim, J I

    2002-12-01

    The time dependent changes of Lu speciation (used as Am(III) homologue), initially sorbed onto 2-line ferrihydrite at pH 5.9, during tempering (70 degrees C) to stable crystalline transformation products, goethite and hematite, is studied. Microscopies (AFM, SEM), XRD and FTIR spectroscopy confirm transformation to both goethite and hematite, with a predominance of hematite. XRD investigation of another transformation series at pH 8.0 (75 degrees C, [Lu(III)initial] 7 times higher) shows that the cell volume of hematite increases, suggesting the incorporation of Lu in the crystal structure. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) (pH 5.9 series, 70 degrees C) reveals a shortening of the Lu-O bond distance and an increase in asymmetry of the first shell with increasing tempering time in the intermediate temper time samples. The intensity of the second peak in the Fourier transform (FT) of the EXAFS increases and splits into two components. The EXAFS data of the end product can be modeled well using a hematite-like cluster, with an isotropic expansion of distances to account for incorporation of Lu into the hematite structure. These results demonstrate that the Lu is incorporated in the crystal lattice of the transformation product, as opposed to being occluded or remaining a sorbed species on the surface. PMID:12523425

  12. Phase-field modeling of shock-induced α- γ phase transformation of RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, -; de, Suvranu

    2015-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent continuum phase field model has been developed to investigate the role of shock-induced α- γ phase transition in the sensitivity of RDX. Dislocations and phase transformations are distinguished and modeled within a crystal plasticity framework. The Landau potential is derived for the finite elastic deformation analysis. The response of the shock loaded RDX crystal is obtained by solving the continuum momentum equation along with phase evolution equation using a Helmholtz free energy functional, which consists of elastic potential energy and local interfacial energy that follows from the Cahn-Hilliard formalism. We observe that the orientations for which there is a resolved shear stress along the slip direction, the material absorbs large shear strain through plastic deformation, allowing it to be less sensitive as less mechanical work is available for temperature rise. Therefore, plastic slip should be associated with greater shear relaxation and, hence, decreased sensitivity. For elastic orientations, large shear stress arises from steric hindrance that may provides much more mechanical work to increase the temperature and hence more sensitive to detonation. Our simulations suggest that the α- γ phase transformation in RDX may be associated with the increased temperature rise and hence the shock sensitivity. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of this work through Office of Naval Research (ONR) Grants N000140810462 and N000141210527 with Dr. Clifford Bedford as the cognizant Program Manager.

  13. Phase Transformation Hysteresis in a Plutonium Alloy System: Modeling the Resistivity during the Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Johnson, D L; Mayhall, D J; Schwartz, A J

    2001-11-14

    We have induced, measured, and modeled the {delta}-{alpha}' martensitic transformation in a Pu-Ga alloy by a resistivity technique on a 2.8-mm diameter disk sample. Our measurements of the resistance by a 4-probe technique were consistent with the expected resistance obtained from a finite element analysis of the 4-point measurement of resistivity in our round disk configuration. Analysis by finite element methods of the postulated configuration of {alpha}' particles within model {delta} grains suggests that a considerable anisotropy in the resistivity may be obtained depending on the arrangement of the {alpha}' lens shaped particles within the grains. The resistivity of these grains departs from the series resistance model and can lead to significant errors in the predicted amount of the {alpha}' phase present in the microstructure. An underestimation of the amount of {alpha}' in the sample by 15%, or more, appears to be possible.

  14. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM. PMID:25133955

  15. Chemically and temperature-induced phase transformations of metal vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patridge, Christopher James

    different individual beta'-Cu xV2O5 nanowires vary widely. Using scanning transmission X-ray microspectroscopy of individual beta'-CuxV2O 5 nanowires, correlations appear to exist between MIT characteristics and the markedly different orbital hybridization of vanadium and oxygen at the O K and V L absorption edges. These comprehensive nanostructure studies hint at the possibility of approaching the incredibly important realm of single-domain measurements which are needed to understand and exploit the intrinsic physical properties of materials. In addition to the bronze MIT studies, the classical MIT material vanadium dioxide, VO2, also shows new properties when scaling down to nanoscale dimensions as well as incorporation of substitutional dopants such as tungsten. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the dopant local structure suggests an increased symmetry and depairing of V4+-V 4+, which is critical for transition to the lower temperature insulating phase thereby super-cooling the metallic phase to temperatures as low as 254 K. Mechanistic insight and structural changes associated with the intercalation of Li+ are key aspects in understanding and designing useful secondary Li ion batteries. In similarity to the MxV2O 5 studies, another metal vanadate, Ag2VO2PO 4, undergoes phase transformations due to introduction of Li and the vacancy of Ag ions. Employing a comprehensive study on Ag2VO 2PO4 using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, information about chemical state changes and rehybridization of frontier orbitals allows for a more precise understanding of how the material discharges, what, if any, intermediate phases exist during the process, and provides evidence for the posited structural stability at high depths of discharge.

  16. Phase transformation, thermal expansion and electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sapna; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases co-exist at ≥260 °C and cubic above 1000 °C. • Polymorphic changes with temperature in air and Ar–3%H{sub 2} are observed. • Lattice volume change in Ar–3%H{sub 2} atmosphere corresponds to Cr{sup 4+} → Cr{sup 3+} transition. • Change in valence state of Cr{sup 4+} to Cr{sup 3+} results in lower electrical conductivity. • Experimental evidence is provided for poor densification of LaCrO{sub 3} in air. - Abstract: This paper addresses discrepancies pertaining to structural, thermal and electrical properties of lanthanum chromite. Experimental evidence is provided to support the hypothesis for poor densification in air as well as reduction in electrical conductivity in reducing atmosphere. Sintering condition for the synthesis of LaCrO{sub 3} was optimized to 1450 °C and 10 h. Thermo-analytical (differential scanning calorimetry – DSC) and high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies show that orthorhombic lanthanum chromite transforms into rhombohedral structure at ∼260 °C and cubic structure above 1000 °C. Co-existence of the structural phases and the variation in each polymorph with temperature in both air and 3%H{sub 2}–Ar atmosphere is reported. Presence and absence of Cr-rich phase at inter-particle neck are observed in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres respectively. The linear thermal expansion co-efficient was calculated to be 10.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup −6} °C{sup −1} in the temperature range of RT–1400 °C. Electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite was found to be 0.11 S/cm in air. A decrease in electrical conductivity (0.02 S/cm at 800 °C) of LaCrO{sub 3}, as observed in reducing atmosphere (3%H{sub 2}–Ar), corresponds to lattice volume change as indicated by peak shift in HT-XRD results.

  17. The effect of calcium on aqueous uranium(VI) speciation and adsorption to ferrihydrite and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M; Davis, James A; Zachara, John M

    2006-01-30

    Recent studies of uranium(VI) geochemistry have focused on the potentially important role of the aqueous species, CaUO2(CO3)32- and Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq), on inhibition of microbial reduction and uranium(VI) aqueous speciation in contaminated groundwater. However, to our knowledge, there have been no direct studies of the effects of these species on U(VI) adsorption by mineral phases. The sorption of U(VI) on quartz and ferrihydrite was investigated in NaNO3 solutions equilibrated with either ambient air (430 ppm CO2) or 2% CO2 in the presence of 0, 1.8, or 8.9 mM Ca2+. Under conditions where the Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) species predominates U(VI) aqueous speciation, the presence of Ca in solution lowered U(VI) adsorption on quartz from 77% in the absence of Ca to 42% and 10% at Ca concentrations of 1.8 and 8.9 mM, respectively. U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite decreased from 83% in the absence of Ca to 57% in the presence of 1.8 mM Ca. Surface complexation model predictions that included the formation constant for aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) accurately simulated the effect of Ca2+ on U(VI) sorption onto quartz and ferrihydrite within the thermodynamic uncertainty of the stability constant value. This study confirms that Ca2+ can have a significant impact on the aqueous speciation of U(VI), and consequently, on the sorption and mobility of U(VI) in aquifers.

  18. Ferrihydrite dissolution by pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic acid) and hydrolysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Suraj; Anthony, Charles R.; Hersman, Larry E.

    2007-12-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylate) (pdtc), a metabolic product of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri was investigated for its ability of dissolve Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at pH 7.5. Concentration dependent dissolution of ferrihydrite under anaerobic environment showed saturation of the dissolution rate at the higher concentration of pdtc. The surface controlled ferrihydrite dissolution rate was determined to be 1.2 × 10 -6 mol m -2 h -1. Anaerobic dissolution of ferrihydrite by pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid or dipicolinic acid (dpa), a hydrolysis product of pdtc, was investigated to study the mechanism(s) involved in the pdtc facilitated ferrihydrite dissolution. These studies suggest that pdtc dissolved ferrihydrite using a reduction step, where dpa chelates the Fe reduced by a second hydrolysis product, H 2S. Dpa facilitated dissolution of ferrihydrite showed very small increase in the Fe dissolution when the concentration of external reductant, ascorbate, was doubled, suggesting the surface dynamics being dominated by the interactions between dpa and ferrihydrite. Greater than stoichiometric amounts of Fe were mobilized during dpa dissolution of ferrihydrite assisted by ascorbate and cysteine. This is attributed to the catalytic dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by the in situ generated Fe(II) in the presence of a complex former, dpa.

  19. MODELING THE IMPACT OF FERRIHYDRITE ON ADSORPTION-DESORPTION OF SOIL PHOSPHORUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferrihydrite is an Fe-oxide mineral with a high phosphorus (P) sorption capacity. Modeling the P adsorption and desorption mechanisms of soil amended with ferrihydrite is necessary to predict the movement of dissolved and sediment-bound P. The objective of this study was to model the multi-reaction ...

  20. Volumetric and timescale analysis of phase transformation in single-crystal silicon during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-06-01

    Clarifying the phase transformation process and mechanism of single-crystal silicon induced by high pressure is essential for preparation of new silicon phases. Although many previous researches have focused in this area, the volume of high-pressure phases and the duration of phase transformation are still unclear. In this paper, the volume change and the duration of phase transformation from Si-II phase into Si-XII/Si-III phases were investigated quantitatively by introducing a holding process in the unloading stage of a nanoindentation test. Experimental results indicate that the high-pressure phase volume is dependent strongly on the maximum indentation load and independent of the loading/unloading rate and the holding time at the maximum indentation load, while phase transformation duration is independent of the aforementioned experimental parameters. By analyzing the results, a critical volume of Si-XII/Si-III phases was identified which determines the occurrence of sudden phase transformation, and a modified nucleation and growth mechanism of high-pressure phases was proposed. These results provide new insights into high-pressure phase transformations in single-crystal silicon.

  1. Interaction between phase transformations and dislocations at the nanoscale. Part 1. General phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Javanbakht, Mahdi

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamically consistent, three-dimensional (3D) phase field approach (PFA) for coupled multivariant martensitic transformations (PTs), including cyclic PTs, variant-variant transformations (i.e., twinning), and dislocation evolution is developed at large strains. One of our key points is in the justification of the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic, transformational, and plastic parts. The plastic part includes four mechanisms: dislocation motion in martensite along slip systems of martensite and slip systems of austenite inherited during PT and dislocation motion in austenite along slip systems of austenite and slip systems of martensite inherited during reverse PT. The plastic part of the velocity gradient for all these mechanisms is defined in the crystal lattice of the austenite utilizing just slip systems of austenite and inherited slip systems of martensite, and just two corresponding types of order parameters. The explicit expressions for the Helmholtz free energy and the transformation and plastic deformation gradients are presented to satisfy the formulated conditions related to homogeneous thermodynamic equilibrium states of crystal lattice and their instabilities. In particular, they result in a constant (i.e., stress- and temperature-independent) transformation deformation gradient and Burgers vectors. Thermodynamic treatment resulted in the determination of the driving forces for change of the order parameters for PTs and dislocations. It also determined the boundary conditions for the order parameters that include a variation of the surface energy during PT and exit of dislocations. Ginzburg-Landau equations for dislocations include variation of properties during PTs, which in turn produces additional contributions from dislocations to the Ginzburg-Landau equations for PTs. A complete system of coupled PFA and mechanics equations is presented. A similar theory can be developed for PFA to dislocations and other

  2. Phase transformation of calcium phenyl phosphate in calcium hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hidekazu . E-mail: hidekazu@riko.shimane-u.ac.jp; Ibaraki, Koshiro; Uemura, Masao; Hino, Ryozi; Kandori, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    2007-07-03

    Calcium phenyl phosphate (CaPP) was synthesized from a mixture of Ca(OH){sub 2} and phenyl phosphate (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}) in an aqueous media. XRD pattern of CaPP exhibited five diffraction peaks at 2{theta} = 6.6, 13.3, 20.0, 26.8 and 33.7{sup o}. The d-spacing ratio of these peaks was ca. 1:1/2:1/3:1/4:1/5. The molar ratios of Ca/P and phenyl/P of CaPP were 1.0 and 0.92, respectively, and the chemical formula of the material was expressed as (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}PO{sub 4}){sub 0.92}(HPO{sub 4}){sub 0.08}Ca.1.3H{sub 2}O, similar to that of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O: DCPD). These results allowed us to infer that CaPP is composed of a multilayer alternating bilayer of phenyl groups of the phosphates and DCPD-like phase. The structure of the material was essentially not altered after aging at pH 9.0-11.0 and 85 deg. C in an aqueous media. While, after aging at pH {<=}8.0, the diffraction peaks of CaPP were suddenly weakened and disappeared at pH 7.0. Besides, new peaks due to calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}: Hap) appeared and their intensity was strengthened with decreasing the solution pH. TEM observation revealed that the Hap particles formed at pH 6.0 are fibrous with ca. 1.5 {mu}m in length and ca. 0.2 {mu}m in width. From these results, it is presumed that the layered CaPP was dissolved, hydrolyzed and reprecipitated to fibrous Hap particles at pH {<=}8.0 and 85 deg. C in aqueous media. This phase transformation of CaPP in Hap resembled to the formation mechanism of Hap in animal organism.

  3. State estimation of voltage and phase-shift transformer tap settings

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, P.A.; Brammer, S.R.; Rutz, W.L. ); Merritt, W.C.; Salmonsen, J.L. )

    1992-08-01

    Traditionally, state estimation algorithms have treated each transformer tap setting (voltage transformer turns ratio or phase-shift transformer angle) as a fixed parameter of the network, even though the real-time measurement may be in error or non-existent. In this paper, a new transformer tap estimation technique is presented which incorporates the function directly into the state estimation algorithm. The procedure provides for turns ratio and phase angle measurements and treats each transformer tap setting as an independent state variable. Test results for an actual 300-bus network demonstrate the tap estimation capability.

  4. Uranium Adsorption on Ferrihydrite - Effects of Phosphate and Humic Acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium adsorption on ferrihydrite was studied as a function of pH in systems equilibrated with air, in the presence and absence of added phosphate and humic acid (HA). The objective was to determine the influence of PO43- and HA on uranium uptake. Below pH 7, the sorption of UO22+ typically increases with increasing pH (the 'low pH sorption edge'), with a sharp decrease in sorption above this pH value (the 'high pH edge'). The presence of ??PO43- of 10-4 mol/L moved the low pH edge to the left by approximately 0.8 pH units. The PO43- was strongly bound by the ferrihydrite surface, and the increased uptake of U was attributed to the formation of ternary surface complexes involving both UO22+ and PO43-. The addition of HA (9 mg/L) increased U uptake at pH values below 7, with little effect at higher pH values. The positions of the pH edges were also affected by the ionic strength and total U content. These experiments show that sorption interactions involving PO43 and HA must be considered in order to model the behavior of U in natural systems, in which these components are often present.

  5. Adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate onto arsenic-bearing ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Quan, C; Khoe, G; Bagster, D

    2001-02-01

    Ferrihydrite is an excellent adsorbent for binding trace toxic contaminants such as arsenic, and precipitate flotation of the arsenic-bearing ferrihydrite has been studied. Anionic surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium oleate (NaOL) are suitable collectors for the flotation. The adsorption of SLS both alone and after the subsequent addition of NaOL on these precipitates at pH 4-5 was measured. It has been shown that the synergistic effect of the two surfactants on flotation is dependent on their addition order. The presence of NaOL before SLS in the conditioning stage can prevent the adsorption of SLS because of the electrostatic shielding of adsorption sites on the precipitates. The post addition of NaOL to the SLS-bearing precipitates can promote the flocculation of the precipitates and enhance entrainment of SLS for better flotation. The SLS adsorption data fit better with the modified Frumkin isotherm than the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters (-delta Gads0,delta Hads0, and delta Sads0) have been derived from the analysis of the adsorption isotherms. The results suggest that the adsorption of SLS on AFH is physical and exothermic. PMID:11229002

  6. Incorporation of Uranium into Hematite during Crystallization from Ferrihydrite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ferrihydrite was exposed to U(VI)-containing cement leachate (pH 10.5) and aged to induce crystallization of hematite. A combination of chemical extractions, TEM, and XAS techniques provided the first evidence that adsorbed U(VI) (≈3000 ppm) was incorporated into hematite during ferrihydrite aggregation and the early stages of crystallization, with continued uptake occurring during hematite ripening. Analysis of EXAFS and XANES data indicated that the U(VI) was incorporated into a distorted, octahedrally coordinated site replacing Fe(III). Fitting of the EXAFS showed the uranyl bonds lengthened from 1.81 to 1.87 Å, in contrast to previous studies that have suggested that the uranyl bond is lost altogether upon incorporation into hematite. The results of this study both provide a new mechanistic understanding of uranium incorporation into hematite and define the nature of the bonding environment of uranium within the mineral structure. Immobilization of U(VI) by incorporation into hematite has clear and important implications for limiting uranium migration in natural and engineered environments. PMID:24580024

  7. In-situ phase transformation in the field ion microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.

    1991-04-01

    Many materials undergo an athermal martensite transformation when cooled. This transformation has been observed in the Tishomingo meteorite during cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The meteorite is unstable when cooled to the cryogenic temperatures (40 - 85K) suitable for field ion imaging since the martensite start temperature of this material (Fe-32.5 wt%Ni) is approximately 235K.

  8. Interaction between phase transformations and dislocations at the nanoscale. Part 2: Phase field simulation examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanbakht, Mahdi; Levitas, Valery I.

    2015-09-01

    The complete system of phase field equations for coupled martensitic phase transformations (PTs), dislocation evolution, and mechanics at large strains is presented. Finite element method (FEM) is utilized to solve this system for two important problems. The first one is related to the simulation of shear strain-induced PT at the evolving dislocation pile-ups in a nanosized bicrystal. Plasticity plays a dual part in the interaction with PT. Dislocation pile-ups produce strong stress tensor concentrators that lead to barrierless martensite (M) nucleation. On the other hand, plasticity in the transforming grain relaxes these stress concentrators suppressing PT. The final stationary M morphology is governed by the local thermodynamic equilibrium, either at the interfaces or in terms of stresses averaged over the martensitic region or the entire grain. This is very surprising because of strong heterogeneity of stress fields and is in contrast to previous statements that phase equilibrium conditions do not enter the description of strain-induced PTs. The second problem is devoted to martensitic plate propagation through a bicrystal during temperature-induced PT. For elastic growth (without dislocations) and a large thermal driving force, a complex transformation path with plate branching and direct and reverse PTs is observed, which still ends with the same stationary nanostructure as for a smaller driving force and a traditional transformation path. Sharp grain boundary arrests plate growth at a relatively small driving force, exhibiting an athermal friction. For elastoplastic growth, the generation of dislocations produces athermal friction and arrests the plate below some critical driving force, leading to a morphological transition from plate to lath M. The width of the martensitic plate increases in comparison with elastic growth due to internal stress relaxation. Plate growth is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocations within M and remaining in M, the

  9. Near-equilibrium polymorphic phase transformations in Praseodymium under dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Reisman, D

    2007-02-12

    We report the first experimental observation of sequential, multiple polymorphic phase transformations occurring in Praseodymium dynamically compressed using a ramp wave. The experiments also display the signatures of reverse transformations occuring upon pressure release and reveal the presence of small hysteresys loops. The results are in very good agreement with equilibrium hydrodynamic calculations performed using a thermodynamically consistent, multi-phase equation of state for Praseodymium, suggesting a near-equilibrium transformation behavior.

  10. Phase Stability and Stress-Induced Transformations in Beta Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolli, R. Prakash; Joost, William J.; Ankem, Sreeramamurthy

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we provide a brief review of the recent developments related to the relationship between phase stability and stress-induced transformations in metastable body-centered-cubic β-phase titanium alloys. Stress-induced transformations occur during tensile, compressive, and creep loading and influence the mechanical response. These transformations are not fully understood and increased understanding of these mechanisms will permit future development of improved alloys for aerospace, biomedical, and energy applications. In the first part of this article, we review phase stability and discuss a few recent developments. In the second section, we discuss the current status of understanding stress-induced transformations and several areas that require further study. We also provide our perspective on the direction of future research efforts. Additionally, we address the occurrence of the hcp ω-phase and the orthorhombic α″-martensite phase stress-induced transformations.

  11. Low-temperature solid-state phase transformations in 2H silicon carbide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Will, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the phase transformations taking place in 2H SiC single crystals at temperatures as low as 400 C. Some crystals transformed to a structure with one-dimensional disorder along the crystal c axis. Others transformed to a faulted cubic/6H structure. The transformation is time and temperature dependent, and is greatly enhanced by dislocations. The transformation takes place by means of a slip process perpendicular to the c axis. Cubic SiC crystals were observed to undergo a solid-state transformation above 1400 C.

  12. Low-temperature solid-state phase transformations in 2H silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.; Powell, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Single crystals of 2H SiC were observed to undergo phase transformations at temperatures as low as 400 C. Some 2H crystals transformed to a structure with one-dimensional disorder along the crystal c axis. Others transformed to a faulted cubic/6H structure. The transformation is time and temperature dependent and is greatly enhanced by dislocations. Observations indicate that the transformation takes place by means of a slip process perpendicular to the c axis. Cubic SiC crystals were observed to undergo a solid state transformation above 1400 C.

  13. Pressure-induced phase transformation of In2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Anya; Teklemichael, Samuel; Mafi, Elham; Gu, Yi; McCluskey, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Phase-change memory, with fast read-write speeds and small dimensions, will soon replace flash memory in our cell phones and tablets. This type of memory relies on phase change materials like indium selenide, In2Se3, a III-VI semiconductor that exists in multiple crystalline phases. To achieve controlled switching between phases, it is important to understand both the thermal and elastic properties of In2Se3. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell, a pressure-induced phase transition in powder In2Se3 from the α phase to β phase was discovered at 0.7 GPa. This pressure is an order of magnitude lower than phase-transition pressures in most semiconductors. Raman spectroscopy experiments confirm this result. The bulk moduli are reported for both α and β phases, and the c / a ratio for the β phase is shown to have a nonlinear dependence on pressure.

  14. Phase retrieval by using the transport-of-intensity equation with Hilbert transform.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Shuo; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Kuo-Feng; Chen, Hou-Ren; Tsai, Chih-Ya; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Phase recovery by solving the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) is a non-iterative and non-interferometric phase retrieval technique. From solving the TIE with conventional, one partial derivative and Hilbert transform methods for both the periodic and aperiodic samples, we demonstrate that the Hilbert transform method can provide the smoother phase images with edge enhancement and fine structures. Furthermore, compared with the images measured by optical and atomic force microscopy, the Hilbert transform method has the ability to quantitatively map out the phase images for both the periodic and aperiodic structures. PMID:27192301

  15. Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Lu, W.; Sun Dai; He, L.L.; Ye, H.Q.

    2010-11-15

    Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in high Nb containing TiAl alloys was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The dislocations appearing at the tip of deformation-induced {gamma} plate (DI-{gamma}) and the stacking sequence change of the {alpha}{sub 2} matrix were two key evidences for determining the occurrence of the deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation. Compositional analysis revealed that the product phase of the room-temperature transformation was not standard {gamma} phase; on the contrary, the product phase of the high-temperature transformation was standard {gamma} phase.

  16. Three-Dimensional Numerical Model Considering Phase Transformation in Friction Stir Welding of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Kim, Dong-Wan; Hong, Sung-Tae; Jeong, Yong-Ha; Lee, Keunho; Cho, Yi-Gil; Kang, Suk Hoon; Han, Heung Nam

    2015-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-mechanical model is developed considering the phase transformation occurring during the friction stir welding (FSW) of steel, and the simulated result is compared with both the measured temperature distribution during FSW and the microstructural changes after FSW. The austenite grain size (AGS) decreases significantly because of the frictional heat and severe plastic deformation generated during FSW, and the decreased AGS accelerates the diffusional phase transformation during FSW. The ferrite phase, one of the diffusional phases, is developed mainly in mild steel, whereas the bainite phase transformation occurs significantly in high-strength steel with large hardenability. Additionally, transformation-induced heat is observed mainly in the stir zone during FSW. The measured temperature distribution and phase fraction agree fairly well with the predicted data.

  17. Metastable phase transformation and hcp-ω transformation pathways in Ti and Zr under high hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Ding, Xiangdong; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun; Salje, E. K. H.

    2016-07-01

    The energy landscape of Zr at high hydrostatic pressure suggests that its transformation behavior is strongly pressure dependent. This is in contrast to the known transition mechanism in Ti, which is essentially independent of hydrostatic pressure. Generalized solid-state nudged elastic band calculations at constant pressure shows that α-Zr transforms like Ti only at the lowest pressure inside the stability field of ω-phase. Different pathways apply at higher pressures where the energy landscape contains several high barriers so that metastable states are expected, including the appearance of a transient bcc phase at ca. 23 GPa. The global driving force for the hcp-ω transition increases strongly with increasing pressure and reaches 23.7 meV/atom at 23 GPa. Much of this energy relates to the excess volume of the hcp phase compared with its ω phase.

  18. Characterization, Modeling, and Energy Harvesting of Phase Transformations in Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenda

    Solid state phase transformations can be induced through mechanical, electrical, and thermal loading in ferroelectric materials that are compositionally close to morphotropic phase boundaries. Large changes in strain, polarization, compliance, permittivity, and coupling properties are typically observed across the phase transformation regions and are phenomena of interest for energy harvesting and transduction applications where increased coupling behavior is desired. This work characterized and modeled solid state phase transformations in ferroelectric materials and assessed the potential of phase transforming materials for energy harvesting applications. Two types of phase transformations were studied. The first type was ferroelectric rhombohedral to ferroelectric orthorhombic observed in lead indium niobate lead magnesium niobate lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT) and driven by deviatoric stress, temperature, and electric field. The second type of phase transformation is ferroelectric to antiferroelectric observed in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and driven by pressure, temperature, and electric field. Experimental characterizations of the phase transformations were conducted in both PIN-PMN-PT and PZT in order to understand the thermodynamic characteristics of the phase transformations and map out the phase stability of both materials. The ferroelectric materials were characterized under combinations of stress, electric field, and temperature. Material models of phase transforming materials were developed using a thermodynamic based variant switching technique and thermodynamic observations of the phase transformations. These models replicate the phase transformation behavior of PIN-PMN-PT and PZT under mechanical and electrical loading conditions. The switching model worked in conjunction with linear piezoelectric equations as ferroelectric/ferroelastic constitutive equations within a finite element framework that solved the mechanical and electrical field equations

  19. Pressure and Temperature effects on the High Pressure Phase Transformation in Zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Escobedo-Diaz, Juan P.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Brown, Donald W.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Rigg, Paulo A.; Bronkhorst, Curt A.; Addessio, Francis L.; Lookman, Turab

    2012-06-20

    At high pressure zirconium is known to undergo a phase transformation from the hexagonal close packed (HCP) alpha phase ({alpha}) to the simple hexagonal omega phase ({omega}). Under conditions of shock loading, the high-pressure omega phase is retained upon release. However, the hysteresis in this transformation is not well represented by equilibrium phase diagrams. For this reason, the influence of peak shock pressure and temperature on the retention of omega phase in Zr is explored in this study. In situ VISAR measurements along with post-mortem metallographic and neutron diffraction characterization of soft recovered specimens have been utilized to quantify the volume fraction of retained omega phase, morphology of the shocked alpha and omega phases, and qualitatively understand the kinetics of this transformation. This understanding of the role of peak shock stress will be utilized to address physics to be encoded in our present macro-scale models.

  20. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentationmore » studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.« less

  1. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Although abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. Numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, have been applied to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. Here we briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. In the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  2. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  3. Phase diagram of the Y-Y2Se3 system, enthalpies of phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, O. V.; Kharitontsev, V. B.; Polkovnikov, A. A.; Elyshev, A. V.; Andreev, P. O.

    2015-10-01

    A phase diagram for the Y-Y2Se3 system has been constructed in which the YSe and Y2Se3 phases melt congruently. The daltonide type YSe phase (ST Y0,75Se, a=1.1393 nm, melting point=2380 K, H=2200 MPa) forms a double-sided solid solution from 49-50-53 at% Se. In the 50-53 at% Se range, the unit cell parameter increases to 1.1500 nm, the microhardness increases to 4100 MPa and electrical resistivity increases from 0.018 to 0.114 Ω m. These changes are caused by the dominating influx of newly formed structural cationic vacancies arising from the selenium anions that are surplus for the 1:1 Y:Se stoichiometry. The full-valence Y2Se3 composition exists as a low-temperature modification of ε-Y2Se3 (ST Sc2S3, a=1.145 nm, b=0.818 nm, c=2.438 nm, melting point=1780 K, ∆fusion enthalpy=4±0.4 J/g) and transforms into a modification of ξ-Y2Se3 that does not undergo fixing by thermo-hardening. The eutectic melting point between the YSe and Y2Se3 phases is 1625±5 K, with a eutectic composition that is assumed to be 57.5 at% Se and have an enthalpy of fusion of 43±4.3 J/g. The eutectic for the Y and YSe phases appears at a temperature of 1600 K and 5 at% Se.

  4. Nanocrystalline Ferrihydrite-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Part I. Reduction and Carburization Behavior.

    PubMed

    Chun, Dong Hyun; Park, Ji Chan; Rhim, Geun Bae; Lee, Ho-Tae; Yang, Jung-Il; Jung, Heon

    2016-02-01

    Temperature-programmed reduction using H2 (H2-TPR) and CO (CO-TPR) was carried out to investigate the reduction and carburization behavior of nanocrystalline ferrihydrite-based Fe/Cu/K/SiO2 catalysts for use in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). Unlike pure ferrihydrite, the ferrihydrite-based catalysts did not pass through the intermediate decomposition step of ferrihydrite (Fe9O2(OH)23) into hematite (a-Fe2O3) as they were reduced into magnetite (Fe3O4). This is attributed to the enhanced thermal stability induced by SiO2. For the ferrihydrite-based catalysts, the reduction of ferrihydrite into magnetite occurred in two stages because the reduction promoter, Cu, is not homogeneously distributed on the catalyst surfaces. The Cu-rich sites are likely to be reduced in the first stage, and the Cu-lean sites may be reduced in the second stage. After the ferrihydrite is reduced to magnetite, the reduction process of magnetite was similar to that for conventional hematite-based FTS catalysts: 'magnetite --> metallic iron' and 'magnetite --> wüstite (FeO) or fayalite (Fe2SiO4) --> metallic iron' in the H2 atmosphere; 'magnetite --> iron carbides' in the CO atmosphere. PMID:27433641

  5. Ferrihydrite-Dependent Growth of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum through Electron Transfer via Sulfur Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Kristina L.; Schink, Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    Observations in enrichment cultures of ferric iron-reducing bacteria indicated that ferrihydrite was reduced to ferrous iron minerals via sulfur cycling with sulfide as the reductant. Ferric iron reduction via sulfur cycling was investigated in more detail with Sulfurospirillum deleyianum, which can utilize sulfur or thiosulfate as an electron acceptor. In the presence of cysteine (0.5 or 2 mM) as the sole sulfur source, no (microbial) reduction of ferrihydrite or ferric citrate was observed, indicating that S. deleyianum is unable to use ferric iron as an immediate electron acceptor. However, with thiosulfate at a low concentration (0.05 mM), growth with ferrihydrite (6 mM) was possible and sulfur was cycled up to 60 times. Also, spatially distant ferrihydrite in agar cultures was reduced via diffusible sulfur species. Due to the low concentrations of thiosulfate, S. deleyianum produced only small amounts of sulfide. Obviously, sulfide delivered electrons to ferrihydrite with no or only little precipitation of black iron sulfides. Ferrous iron and oxidized sulfur species were produced instead, and the latter served again as the electron acceptor. These oxidized sulfur species have not yet been identified. However, sulfate and sulfite cannot be major products of ferrihydrite-dependent sulfide oxidation, since neither compound can serve as an electron acceptor for S. deleyianum. Instead, sulfur (elemental S or polysulfides) and/or thiosulfate as oxidized products could complete a sulfur cycle-mediated reduction of ferrihydrite. PMID:15466509

  6. Multi-scale modeling of the iron bcc arrow hcp martensitic phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspersen, Kyle; Carter, Emily; Lew, Adrian; Ortiz, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Pressures exceeding 10 GPa induce a martensitic phase transformation in iron, where ferro-magnetic bcc transforms into non-magnetic hcp. The transition pressure is not known precisely, but is thought to depend strongly on shear. To investigate the properties of this transformation and the role of shear, we have developed a multi-scale iron model. This model contains a free energy derived from an ab-initio based non-linear elastic expansion, a kinematically compatible spinodal decomposition of phases, ab-initio based interfacial energies, and a dependence on the bcc rightarrow hcp transformation path(s). The model shows spinodal decomposition behavior (with a slight expected deviation) as well as predicting 10 GPa to be the transformation pressure. Additionally, the model predicted that the inclusion of shear facilitates the transformation, causing transformation pressure to decrease.

  7. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system. PMID:26461439

  8. Comparison between thermochemical and phase stability data for the quartz-coesite-stishovite transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. S.; Chipman, D. W.; Takahashi, T.

    1979-01-01

    Phase stability and elasticity data have been used to calculate the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes at 298 K and 1 bar associated with the quartz-coesite and coesite-stishovite transformations in the system SiO2. For the quartz-coesite transformation, these changes disagree by a factor of two or three with those obtained by calorimetric techniques. The phase boundary for this transformation appears to be well determined by experiment; the discrepancy, therefore, suggests that the calorimetric data for coesite are in error. Although the calorimetric and phase stability data for the coesite-stishovite transformation yield the same transition pressure at 298 K, the phase-boundary slopes disagree by a factor of two. At present, it is not possible to determine which of the data are in error. Thus serious inconsistencies exist in the thermodynamic data for the polymorphic transformations of silica.

  9. In vitro evaluation of ferrihydrite as an enterosorbent for arsenic from contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J F; Robinson, A; Johnson, N; Marroquin-Cardona, A; Brattin, B; Taylor, R; Phillips, T D

    2009-07-15

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic trace element found in groundwater due to natural and industrial processes. Exposure has been linked to cancers of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidneys, nasal passages, liver, and the prostate. Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many countries, notably Bangladesh and Taiwan. The purpose of this research was to utilize binding isotherms, a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) model, and the adult Hydra bioassay to evaluate ferrihydrite's potential to bind As and serve as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. A variety of clay minerals and synthesized iron oxides including ferrihydrite were screened for their ability to bind As(III), as sodium arsenite, and As(V), as sodium arsenate. After ferrihydrite was demonstrated to be the most effective sorbent for both As species, adsorption isotherms were performed. All isotherm data were fit to the Langmuir equation to determine adsorption capacity (Qmax). Ferrihydrite bound 96% of As(III) and 97% of As(V) in the screening studies and had a Qmax of 1.288 mol/kg for As(III) and 0.744 mol/kg for As(V). Using a simulated GI model, ferrihydrite was found to effectively adsorb As(V) and As(III) in the stomach and intestine. Ferrihydrite (0.25% w/w) protected adult Hydra at levels up to 200 times the minimal effective concentration (MEC) for As(III) and up to 2.5 times the MEC for As(V). These experiments confirm that ferrihydrite is a high capacity sorbent of As and that it is effective at removing As in a simulated GI model. These results suggest that ferrihydrite could be used as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. Future work will focus on verifying ferrihydrite's safety and efficacy in vivo. PMID:19708388

  10. Investigation on phase transformation mechanism of zeolite NaY under alkaline hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng Ding, Tian Liu, Liping Xiong, Guang

    2013-12-15

    The phase transformation mechanism of zeolite NaY under alkaline hydrothermal conditions was investigated by UV Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results revealed that the products and transformation rate are dependent on the alkalinities. All of the starting and resulting zeolites are constructed with the 4-ring and 6-ring secondary building units. The products have lower Si/Al ratio, higher framework density and smaller pore size, which are more stable under alkaline hydrothermal condition. During the phase transformation the fragments of faujasite are formed, then the fragments combine to form different zeolites depending on basicity. Zeolite NaY crystals are consumed as the reservoir for the transformation products during the recrystallization process. For the first time, a 4-membered ring intermediate was found at the early stage of the recrystallization process. A cooperative interaction of liquid and solid phases is required for inducing the phase transformation. - Graphical Abstract: Phase transformation of NaY zeolite under alkaline hydrothermal condition is achieved by the cooperative interaction of the liquid and solid phases. A 4-membered ring species is an intermediate for recrystallization process. Highlights: • The products and transformation rate are dependent on the alkalinity. • A 4-membered ring species is an intermediate for recrystallization process. • A cooperative interaction of liquid and solid phases is required.

  11. Fast 3D shape measurement using Fourier transform profilometry without phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kechen; Hu, Shaopeng; Wen, Xin; Yan, Yunhui

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel, simple, yet fast 3D shape measurement method using Fourier transform profilometry. Different from the conventional Fourier transform profilometry, this proposed method introduces the binocular stereo vision and employs two image pairs (i.e., original image pairs and fringe image pairs) to restructure 3D shape. In this proposed method, instead of phase unwrapping algorithm, a coarse disparity map is adopted as a constraint condition to realize phase matching using wrapped phase. Since the local phase matching and sub-pixel disparity refinement are proposed to obtain high measuring accuracy, high-quality phase is not required. The validity of the proposed method is verified by experiments.

  12. Effects of Forming Induced Phase Transformation on Crushing Behavior of TRIP Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, results of finite element crash simulation are presented for a TRIP steel side rail with and without considering the phase transformation during forming operations. A homogeneous phase transformation model is adapted to model the mechanical behavior of the austenite-to-martensite phase. The forming process of TRIP steels is simulated with the implementation of the material model. The distribution and volume fraction of the martensite in TRIP steels may be greatly influenced by various factors during forming process and subsequently contribute to the behavior of the formed TRIP steels during the crushing process. The results indicate that, with the forming induced phase transformation, higher energy absorption of the side rail can be achieved. The phase transformation enhances the strength of the side rail

  13. Visualization of anisotropic-isotropic phase transformation dynamics in battery electrode particles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiajun; Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Eng, Christopher; Shen, Qun; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy, or alternatively, isotropy of phase transformations extensively exist in a number of solid-state materials, with performance depending on the three-dimensional transformation features. Fundamental insights into internal chemical phase evolution allow manipulating materials with desired functionalities, and can be developed via real-time multi-dimensional imaging methods. Here, we report a five-dimensional imaging method to track phase transformation as a function of charging time in individual lithium iron phosphate battery cathode particles during delithiation. The electrochemically driven phase transformation is initially anisotropic with a preferred boundary migration direction, but becomes isotropic as delithiation proceeds further. We also observe the expected two-phase coexistence throughout the entire charging process. We expect this five-dimensional imaging method to be broadly applicable to problems in energy, materials, environmental and life sciences. PMID:27516044

  14. Visualization of anisotropic-isotropic phase transformation dynamics in battery electrode particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajun; Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen; Eng, Christopher; Shen, Qun; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy, or alternatively, isotropy of phase transformations extensively exist in a number of solid-state materials, with performance depending on the three-dimensional transformation features. Fundamental insights into internal chemical phase evolution allow manipulating materials with desired functionalities, and can be developed via real-time multi-dimensional imaging methods. Here, we report a five-dimensional imaging method to track phase transformation as a function of charging time in individual lithium iron phosphate battery cathode particles during delithiation. The electrochemically driven phase transformation is initially anisotropic with a preferred boundary migration direction, but becomes isotropic as delithiation proceeds further. We also observe the expected two-phase coexistence throughout the entire charging process. We expect this five-dimensional imaging method to be broadly applicable to problems in energy, materials, environmental and life sciences. PMID:27516044

  15. Orientation-dependent mechanical behavior and phase transformation of mono-crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiapeng; Ma, Aibin; Jiang, Jinghua; Han, Jing; Han, Ying

    2016-03-01

    We perform a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanoindentation on the (100), (110), and (111) oriented silicon surface to investigate the orientation-dependent mechanical behavior and phase transformation of monocrystalline silicon. The results show both the remarkable anisotropic mechanical behavior and structure phase transformation of monocrystalline silicon. The mechanical behavior of the (110) and (111) oriented surfaces are similar (has a high indentation modulus, low critical indentation depth for the onset of plastic deformation) but quite different from the (100) oriented surface. The mechanical behavior is carefully linked to the phase transformation. The formation of crystalline bct5 phase and β-Si phase is the fundamental phase transformation mechanism for (100) oriented surface. But, a large number of amorphous silicon can be found beneath the indenter for (110) and (111) oriented surface beside the bct5 phase and β-Si phase. The β-Si phase region is relatively small for (110) and (111) oriented surface, even cannot be detected for (111) oriented surface. This result highlights the dominating role of the amorphous transformation in the mechanical behavior of monocrystalline silicon. Additionally, our results indicate that the high pressure phases form a symmetrical, anisotropic pattern on the indented surface for all three oriented surface which is linked to the active {111}<110> slip systems.

  16. Structural and dynamical transformations between neighboring dense microemulsion phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlarchyk, M. ); Sheu, E.Y. ); Capel, M. )

    1992-07-15

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) study of dense AOT-water-decane microemulsions (AOT denotes sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) was undertaken in order to delineate clearly the phase behavior and corresponding structural transitions for AOT-plus-water volume fractions ranging from {phi}=0.60 to 0.95. Spectra were collected for temperatures between {ital T}=3 and 65 {degree}C. The resulting {ital T}-vs-{phi} phase diagram indicates three distinct structural domains when the water-to-AOT molar ratio is fixed at {ital W}=40.8, namely, the previously investigated {ital L}{sub 2} droplet phase, a high-temperature {ital L}{sub {alpha}} lamellar phase, and a low-temperature {ital L}{sub 3} phase consisting of randomly connected lamellar sheets. A significantly wide coexistence region accompanies the droplet-to-lamellar phase transition, which is demonstrated to be first order. For {ital W} between 15 and 40, an analysis of the lamellar structure using a one-dimensional paracrystal model produces a Hosemann {ital g} factor indicative of an approximately constant variation in the lamellar spacing of about 8%. The SAXS study was supplemented by dielectric-relaxation, shear-viscosity, and quasielastic light-scattering measurements in order to substantiate the observed phase transitions and further our understanding of the structural and dynamical properties of the {ital L}{sub 3} phase. It was found that the {ital L}{sub 3} phase exhibits Newtonian behavior up to a shear rate of 790 s{sup {minus}1}, in contradiction to previous theoretical considerations. The phase exhibits two distinct relaxation modes. A relaxation time of {similar to}1 ms characterizes the Brownian motion of a single lamellar sheet, while the motion of the entire interconnected sheet assembly has a relaxation time on the order of 1 s.

  17. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of NiTi-Nb eutectic joined NiTi wires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Chen, Liangyu; Lu, Weijie; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via eutectic reaction between NiTi and Nb powder deposited at the wire contact region. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of the NiTi-Nb eutectic microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic loading-unloading tests. Results show that R phase and B19′ martensite transformation are induced by plastic deformation. R phase transformation, which significantly contributes to superelasticity, preferentially occurs at the interfaces between NiTi and eutectic region. Round-shaped Nb-rich phase with rod-like and lamellar-type eutectics are observed in eutectic regions. These phases appear to affect the deformation behavior of the brazed NiTi-Nb region via five distinct stages in stress-strain curves: (I) R phase reorientation, (II) R phase transformation from parent phase, (III) elastic deformation of reoriented martensite accompanied by the plastic deformation of Nb-rich phase and lamellar NiTi-Nb eutectic, (IV) B19′ martensitic transformation, and (V) plastic deformation of the specimen. PMID:27049025

  18. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of NiTi-Nb eutectic joined NiTi wires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Chen, Liangyu; Lu, Weijie; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via eutectic reaction between NiTi and Nb powder deposited at the wire contact region. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of the NiTi-Nb eutectic microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic loading-unloading tests. Results show that R phase and B19' martensite transformation are induced by plastic deformation. R phase transformation, which significantly contributes to superelasticity, preferentially occurs at the interfaces between NiTi and eutectic region. Round-shaped Nb-rich phase with rod-like and lamellar-type eutectics are observed in eutectic regions. These phases appear to affect the deformation behavior of the brazed NiTi-Nb region via five distinct stages in stress-strain curves: (I) R phase reorientation, (II) R phase transformation from parent phase, (III) elastic deformation of reoriented martensite accompanied by the plastic deformation of Nb-rich phase and lamellar NiTi-Nb eutectic, (IV) B19' martensitic transformation, and (V) plastic deformation of the specimen. PMID:27049025

  19. α-Phase transformation kinetics of U - 8 wt% Mo established by in situ neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. A.; Calhoun, C. A.; Klein, R. W.; An, K.; Garlea, E.; Agnew, S. R.

    2016-08-01

    The α-phase transformation kinetics of as-cast U - 8 wt% Mo below the eutectoid temperature have been established by in situ neutron diffraction. α-phase weight fraction data acquired through Rietveld refinement at five different isothermal hold temperatures can be modeled accurately utilizing a simple Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov impingement-based theory, and the results are validated by a corresponding evolution in the γ-phase lattice parameter during transformation that follows Vegard's law. Neutron diffraction data is used to produce a detailed Time-Temperature-Transformation diagram that improves upon inconsistencies in the current literature, exhibiting a minimum transformation start time of 40 min at temperatures between 500 °C and 510 °C. The transformation kinetics of U - 8 wt% Mo can vary significantly from as-cast conditions after extensive heat treatments, due to homogenization of the typical dendritic microstructure which possesses non-negligible solute segregation.

  20. Transient analyses using symmetrical component calculus in three-phase resistive and transformer-type SFCLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. S.; Choi, H. S.; Jung, B. I.

    2010-11-01

    A transformer-type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) can control fault current by adjusting a turn’s ratio of the primary and secondary windings. In addition, by inserting a neutral line into the secondary winding, the power burden of the superconducting elements can be evenly distributed. We compared the operating and transient characteristics of the three-phase resistive and transformer-type SFCLs in the balanced and unbalanced faults that occur in power systems. In transformer-type SFCLs, where the primary and secondary windings of each phase were connected to one iron core, flux was induced to each winding of the normal phases by the fault current of the fault phase, thus causing simultaneous quench between superconducting elements. In the three-phase power systems, however, when faults occurred in more than two phases, the flux from fault current of the fault phase affected the other normal phase, thus decreasing the reduction ratio of fault current. We confirmed, however, that the fault current was reduced by 70% relative to cases without SFCLs. The results of the analysis of the transient characteristics of the three-phase transformer-type SFCL through the symmetrical component calculus showed that in the case of triple line-to-ground fault, a difference between positive and negative phase currents was large enough to cause an increase in the phase angle ( δ) between the generator creating the power and the motor acting as a load. Thus, we expect that the transient stability deteriorates.

  1. Power Electronic Transformer based Three-Phase PWM AC Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Kaushik

    A Transformer is used to provide galvanic isolation and to connect systems at different voltage levels. It is one of the largest and most expensive component in most of the high voltage and high power systems. Its size is inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The central idea behind a power electronic transformer (PET) also known as solid state transformer is to reduce the size of the transformer by increasing the frequency. Power electronic converters are used to change the frequency of operation. Steady reduction in the cost of the semiconductor switches and the advent of advanced magnetic materials with very low loss density and high saturation flux density implies economic viability and feasibility of a design with high power density. Application of PET is in generation of power from renewable energy sources, especially wind and solar. Other important application include grid tied inverters, UPS e.t.c. In this thesis non-resonant, single stage, bi-directional PET is considered. The main objective of this converter is to generate adjustable speed and magnitude pulse width modulated (PWM) ac waveforms from an ac or dc grid with a high frequency ac link. The windings of a high frequency transformer contains leakage inductance. Any switching transition of the power electronic converter connecting the inductive load and the transformer requires commutation of leakage energy. Commutation by passive means results in power loss, decrease in the frequency of operation, distortion in the output voltage waveform, reduction in reliability and power density. In this work a source based partially loss-less commutation of leakage energy has been proposed. This technique also results in partial soft-switching. A series of converters with novel PWM strategies have been proposed to minimize the frequency of leakage inductance commutation. These PETs achieve most of the important features of modern PWM ac drives including 1) Input power factor correction, 2) Common

  2. Uncovering the intrinsic size dependence of hydriding phase transformations in nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Hedges, Lester O.; Pint, Cary L.; Javey, Ali; Whitelam, Stephen; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2013-10-01

    A quantitative understanding of nanocrystal phase transformations would enable more efficient energy conversion and catalysis, but has been hindered by difficulties in directly monitoring well-characterized nanoscale systems in reactive environments. We present a new in situ luminescence-based probe enabling direct quantification of nanocrystal phase transformations, applied here to the hydriding transformation of palladium nanocrystals. Our approach reveals the intrinsic kinetics and thermodynamics of nanocrystal phase transformations, eliminating complications of substrate strain, ligand effects and external signal transducers. Clear size-dependent trends emerge in nanocrystals long accepted to be bulk-like in behaviour. Statistical mechanical simulations show these trends to be a consequence of nanoconfinement of a thermally driven, first-order phase transition: near the phase boundary, critical nuclei of the new phase are comparable in size to the nanocrystal itself. Transformation rates are then unavoidably governed by nanocrystal dimensions. Our results provide a general framework for understanding how nanoconfinement fundamentally impacts broad classes of thermally driven solid-state phase transformations relevant to hydrogen storage, catalysis, batteries and fuel cells.

  3. The correlation of local deformation and stress-assisted local phase transformations in MMC foams

    SciTech Connect

    Berek, H.; Ballaschk, U.; Aneziris, C.G.; Losch, K.; Schladitz, K.

    2015-09-15

    Cellular structures are of growing interest for industry, and are of particular importance for lightweight applications. In this paper, a special case of metal matrix composite foams (MMCs) is investigated. The investigated foams are composed of austenitic steel exhibiting transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) and magnesia partially stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ). Both components exhibit martensitic phase transformation during deformation, thus generating the potential for improved mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and energy absorption capability. The aim of these investigations was to show that stress-assisted phase transformations within the ceramic reinforcement correspond to strong local deformation, and to determine whether they can trigger martensitic phase transformations in the steel matrix. To this end, in situ interrupted compression experiments were performed in an X-ray computed tomography device (XCT). By using a recently developed registration algorithm, local deformation could be calculated and regions of interest could be defined. Corresponding cross sections were prepared and used to analyze the local phase composition by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results show a strong correlation between local deformation and phase transformation. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • In situ compressive deformation on MMC foams was performed in an XCT. • Local deformation fields and their gradient amplitudes were estimated. • Cross sections were manufactured containing defined regions of interest. • Local EBSD phase analysis was performed. • Local deformation and local phase transformation are correlated.

  4. Stress-induced phase transformation in nanocrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Desai, Tapan

    2009-01-01

    We report a stress-induced phase transfonnation in stoichiometric UO{sub 2} from fluorite to the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} structure using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. MD simulations, performed on nanocrystalline microstructure under constant-stress tensile loading conditions, reveal a heterogeneous nucleation of the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} phase at the grain boundaries followed by the growth of this phase towards the interior of the grain. The DFT calculations confinn the existence of the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} structure, showing that it is energetically favored under tensile loading conditions.

  5. Transformation of phase transitions driven by an anisotropic random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa-Nita, V.; Kralj, Samo

    2005-04-01

    We carry out a comparative study of the influence of a random anisotropy field on continuous and discontinuous phase transitions. The ordered phase, which is reached via a continuous symmetry breaking phase transition, is characterized by an order parameter and by a corresponding hydrodynamic continuum field. We assume that the response of the hydrodynamic field to the imposed disorder results in a domainlike pattern of the system. For a strong enough disorder both transitions become gradual. For weaker disorder strengths the disorder converts a second order transition into a discontinuous one.

  6. Phase transformations of erythromycin A dihydrate during pelletisation and drying.

    PubMed

    Römer, Meike; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Miroshnyk, Inna; Sandler, Niklas; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2007-08-01

    An at-line process analytical approach was applied to better understand process-induced transformations of erythromycin dihydrate during pellet manufacture (extrusion-spheronisation and drying process). The pellets contained 50% (w/w) erythromycin dihydrate and 50% (w/w) microcrystalline cellulose, with purified water used as a granulating fluid. To characterise changes in solid-state properties during processing, near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were applied. Samples were taken after every processing step (blending, granulation, extrusion, and spheronisation) and at predetermined intervals during drying at 30 or 60 degrees C. During pelletisation and drying at 30 degrees C no changes occurred. Partial transformation to the dehydrated form was observed for the pellets dried at 60 degrees C by NIR and XRPD. The variable temperature XRPD measurements of the wet pellets (from 25 to 200 degrees C) also confirmed the change to erythromycin dehydrate at approximately 60 degrees C. PMID:17270405

  7. Mechanism of the α -ɛ phase transformation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, A.; Denoual, C.; Anzellini, S.; Occelli, F.; Mezouar, M.; Cordier, P.; Merkel, S.; Véron, M.; Rausch, E.

    2015-05-01

    The α -Fe↔ɛ -Fe pressure-induced transformation under pure hydrostatic static compression has been characterized with in situ x-ray diffraction using α -Fe single crystals as starting samples. The forward transition starts at 14.9 GPa, and the reverse at 12 GPa, with a width of α -ɛ coexistence domain of the order of 2 GPa. The elastic stress in the sample increases in this domain, and partially relaxes after completion of the transformation. Orientation relations between parent α -Fe and child ɛ -Fe have been determined, which definitely validates the Burgers path for the direct transition. On the reverse transition, an unexpected variant selection is observed. X-ray diffraction data, complemented with ex situ microstructural observations, suggest that this selection is caused by defects and stresses accumulated during the direct transition.

  8. Origins of asymmetric stress-strain response in phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sehitoglu, H.; Gall, K.

    1997-12-31

    It has been determined that the transformation stress-strain behavior of CuZnAl and NiTi shape memory alloys is dependent on the applied stress state. The uniaxial compressive stress necessary to macroscopically trigger the transformation is approximately 34% (CuZnAl) and 26% (NiTi) larger than the required uniaxial tensile stress. For three dimensional stress states, the response of either alloy system is dependent on the directions of the dominant principal stresses along with the hydrostatic stress component of the stress state. The stress state effects are dominated by the favored growth and nucleation of more martensite plates in tension versus compression. The effect of different hydrostatic pressure levels between stress states on martensite plates volume change is considered small.

  9. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta-phase nickel aluminide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of M sub s temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 at. % Ni, with M sub s = (124 Ni - 7410)K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments for selected alloys indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot-stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  10. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta phase nickel aluminide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of Ms (martensite state) temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 atomic percent nickel, with Ms = 124 Ni - 7410 K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite for selected alloys. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  11. Texture Evolution and Phase Transformation in Titanium Investigated by In-Situ Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke; Yang, Ling; Bei, Hongbin; Mills, Rebecca A; Skorpenske, Harley David; Wang, Xun-Li

    2011-01-01

    We report in-situ neutron diffraction studies of texture evolution and the (hcp) (bcc) phase transformation in commercially pure cold-drawn titanium upon continuous heating and cooling, complemented by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. We show that the recrystallization of the phase at elevated temperature enhanced the preexisting fiber texture, which eventually facilitated the nucleation and growth of the phase favored by the Burgers orientation relationship, i.e., {0001} //{110} . More strikingly, upon completion of the transformation, the {110} texture (or preferred orientation) in was eliminated immediately by the rapid grain growth of intergranular allotriomorphs. This resulted in the loss of the original -texture when Ti was transformed back to from to upon subsequent cooling, distinct from the known texture memory effect for rolling textures in titanium. Our present work provides useful experimental results for understanding the mechanisms of texture evolution and phase transformation in titanium and its alloys and, by and large, low-symmetry alloys such as zirconium.

  12. In-situ phase mapping and direct observations of phase transformations during arc welding of 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.

    2006-07-01

    In-situ spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) experiments were performed during gas tung-sten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. Ferrite (α) and austenite (γ) phases were identified and quantified in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) from the real time SRXRD data. The results were compiled with weld temperatures calculated using a coupled thermal fluids model to create a phase map of the HAZ. Kinetics of the α → γ transformation during weld heating and the reverse γ → α transformation during weld cooling were extracted from the map. Superheating as high as 250 °C above the A3 temperature was observed for the α → γ phase transformation to reach completion at locations near the fusion zone (FZ) boundary. The SRXRD experiments revealed that the newly created γ phase exists with two distinct lattice parameters, resulting from the inhomogeneous distribution of carbon and manganese in the starting pearlitic/ferritic microstructure. During cooling, the reverse γ → α phase transformation was shown to depend on the HAZ location. In the fine-grained region of the HAZ, the γ → α transformation begins near the A3 temperature and ends near the A1 temperature. In this region, where the cooling rates are below 40 °C/s, the transformation occurs by nucleation and growth of pearlite. In the coarse-grained region of the HAZ, the γ → α transformation requires 200 °C of undercooling for completion. This high degree of undercooling is caused by the large grains coupled with cooling rates in excess of 50 °C/s that result in a bainitic transformation mechanism.

  13. In-Situ Phase Mapping and Direct Observations of Phase Transformations During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T

    2005-09-13

    In-situ Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments were performed during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. Ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases were identified and quantified in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) from the real time x-ray diffraction data. The results were compiled along with weld temperatures calculated using a coupled thermal fluids weld model to create a phase map of the HAZ. This map shows the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation taking place during weld heating and the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation taking place during weld cooling. Superheating is required to complete the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation, and the amount of superheat above the A3 temperature was shown to vary with distance from the centerline of the weld. Superheat values as high as 250 C above the A3 temperature were observed at heating rates of 80 C/s. The SRXRD experiments also revealed details about the {gamma} phase not observable by conventional techniques, showing that {gamma} is present with two distinct lattice parameters as a result of inhomogeneous distribution of carbon and manganese in the starting pearlitic/ferritic microstructure. During cooling, the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} phase transformation was shown to depend on the HAZ location. In the fine grained region of the HAZ, at distances greater than 2 mm from the fusion line, the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation begins near the A3 temperature and ends near the A1 temperature. In this region of the HAZ where the cooling rates are below 40 C/s, the transformation occurs by nucleation and growth of pearlite. For HAZ locations closer to the fusion line, undercoolings of 200 C or more below the A1 temperature are required to complete the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation. In this region of the HAZ, grain growth coupled with cooling rates in excess of 50 C/s causes the transformation to occur by a bainitic mechanism.

  14. Ferrihydrite Alteration to Magnetite, Maghemite and Hematite; Implications for Iron Oxides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Bishop, J. L.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Olsen, M.; Wagner, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic ferrihydrites have been altered to form magnetite, maghemite and hematite through low-temperature heating experiments (some with an organic reductant). Maghemite formed in this manner could become an indicator for Astrobiology on Mars.

  15. A concise model for mixed-mode phase transformations in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Sietsma, Jilt; Zwaag, Sybrand van der

    2004-08-16

    Using a Zener-like approach, the character of partitioning mixed-mode phase transformations in the solid state is shown to be governed by a single parameter Z. The parameter is proportional to the diffusivity of the partitioning element and the area-to-volume ratio of the growing grain, and inversely proportional to the interface mobility and to the driving pressure per unit of concentration difference. A value Z=0 implies a diffusion-controlled transformation, for Z{yields}{infinity} the transformation is interface-controlled. The significance of the parameter, both for the character of the transformation and for the transformation kinetics, is shown by the example of the austenite-to-ferrite transformation in iron-carbon alloys. A remarkable outcome is that all phase transformations start as an interface-controlled transformation and with proceeding growth of the newly forming phase gradually shift towards diffusion control. This gradual change in transformation character is accompanied by a gradual decrease of the interface velocity.

  16. Microstructure and Phase Transformation of a Sinter Bearing Low Ti During Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Zhang, Yapeng; Li, Kejiang; Wang, Yaozu; Liu, Zhengjian; Wang, Guangwei

    2016-07-01

    To discuss the reduction behaviors and the transformation mechanism of the Fe containing phases and slag phases of low Ti-bearing sinter (LTS), reduction experiments of the LTS were conducted. The reduction of the LTS was divided into four stages based on the reduction rate, deformation quantity of LTS particle column, phase changes, and microstructural changes. The reduction process could be explained with quasi unreacted core model as three stratifications with different phases and microstructures were observed clearly in the medium-temperature reducing stage. For the reduction of Ti-SFCA, a middle phase of the reduction was found and the phase was surrounded by metallic iron. According to the composites of the reduced Ti-SFCA, the middle phase was a solid solution and difficult to be reduced which consisted mainly of brownmillerite-perovskite and monocalcium silicate. The phase transformation and microstructure changes were mutual coupling in the complicated reduction process of the LTS.

  17. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  18. The Pegg-Barnett phase operator and the discrete Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Leija, Armando; Andrade-Morales, Luis A.; Soto-Eguibar, Francisco; Szameit, Alexander; Moya-Cessa, Héctor M.

    2016-04-01

    In quantum mechanics the position and momentum operators are related to each other via the Fourier transform. In the same way, here we show that the so-called Pegg-Barnett phase operator can be obtained by the application of the discrete Fourier transform to the number operators defined in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. Furthermore, we show that the structure of the London-Susskind-Glogower phase operator, whose natural logarithm gives rise to the Pegg-Barnett phase operator, is contained in the Hamiltonian of circular waveguide arrays. Our results may find applications in the development of new finite-dimensional photonic systems with interesting phase-dependent properties.

  19. X-ray diffraction study of the phase transformations in NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Uchil, J.; Fernandes, F.M. Braz . E-mail: kkmahesh@rediffmail.com

    2007-03-15

    The phase transformations occurring in heat-treated NiTi shape memory alloys have been studied through the analysis of variation in integrated peak area (integrated intensity) with temperature, under the XRD peak profiles in the transformation temperature range. For this purpose, integrated peak area under the prominent peak corresponding to (110) plane of the austenitic phase has been chosen. The results so obtained are compared with those got from the DSC method. The XRD method is found to be more sensitive.

  20. In-situ Monitoring of Dynamic Phenomena during Solidification and Phase Transformation Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Patterson, Brian M.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Lee, Wah Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Tucker, Tim J.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Teter, David F.; Beard, Timothy V.; Hudson, Richard W.; Freibert, Franz J.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.; Farrow, Adam M.; Cross, Carl E.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Lookman, Turab; Hunter, Abigail; Choudhury, Samrat; Karma, Alain; Ott, Thomas J. Jr.; Barker, Martha R.; O'Neill, Finian; Hill, Joshua; Emigh, Megan G.

    2012-07-30

    The purpose of this project is to: (1) Directly observe phase transformations and microstructure evolution using proton (and synchrotron x-ray) radiography and tomography; (2) Constrain phase-field models for microstructure evolution; (3) Experimentally control microstructure evolution during processing to enable co-design; and (4) Advance toward the MaRIE vision. Understand microstructure evolution and chemical segregation during solidification {yields} solid-state transformations in Pu-Ga.

  1. Critical indices for reversible gamma-alpha phase transformation in metallic cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatova, E. D.; Tkachenko, T. B.

    1980-08-01

    Critical indices for cerium have been determined within the framework of the pseudobinary solution theory along the phase equilibrium curve, the critical isotherm, and the critical isobar. The results obtained verify the validity of relationships proposed by Rushbrook (1963), Griffiths (1965), and Coopersmith (1968). It is concluded that reversible gamma-alpha transformation in metallic cerium is a critical-type transformation, and cerium has a critical point on the phase diagram similar to the critical point of the liquid-vapor system.

  2. The investigation of the dynamics of the phase transformation in triolein and oleic acid under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Kos, A.; Kościesza, R.; Wieja, K.

    2008-07-01

    An aim of our work is the understanding of processes happening during phase transformations under the pressure in triglycerides and unsaturated fatty acids. Particles of investigated liquids possess the double bond between carbon atoms, which causes the bended shape of the particle and makes its free rotation impossible. This property causes low temperatures of melting point and high temperatures of boiling and also investigated by us phase transformations. For study of the dynamics of phase transformation in these liquids we measured light transmission and light scattering at 90 degrees angle, temperature, permittivity and internal pressure versus time. We applied pressure using computer controlled pump with a stepping motor, which makes increase of the pressure steady. The phase transformation in oleic acid lasts several seconds, in triolein it lasts several minutes. We think that the elongated time of phase transformation is caused by a hooked shape of particles of triolein and the dynamics of that process is determined by the tangling of particles. We checked the influence of smaller particles of oleic acid on the phase transformation by investigating the mixture of these liquids.

  3. Changes in iron, sulfur, and arsenic speciation associated with bacterial sulfate reduction in ferrihydrite-rich systems.

    PubMed

    Saalfield, Samantha L; Bostick, Benjamin C

    2009-12-01

    Biologically mediated redox processes have been shown to affect the mobility of iron oxide-bound arsenic in reducing aquifers. This work investigates how dissimilatory sulfate reduction and secondary iron reduction affect sulfur, iron, and arsenic speciation. Incubation experiments were conducted with As(III/V)-bearing ferrihydrite in carbonate-buffered artificial groundwater enriched with lactate (10 mM) and sulfate (0.08-10 mM) and inoculated with Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757, formerly D. desulfuricans), which reduces sulfate but not iron or arsenic. Sulfidization of ferrihydrite led to formation of magnetite, elemental sulfur, and trace iron sulfides. Observed reaction rates imply that the majority of sulfide is recycled to sulfate, promoting microbial sulfate reduction in low-sulfate systems. Despite dramatic changes in Fe and S speciation, and minimal formation of Fe or As sulfides, most As remained in the solid phase. Arsenic was not solubilized in As(V)-loaded incubations, which experienced slow As reduction by sulfide, whereas As(III)-loaded incubations showed limited and transient As release associated with iron remineralization. This suggests that As(III) production is critical to As release under reducing conditions, with sulfate reduction alone unlikely to release As. These data also suggest that bacterial reduction of As(V) is necessary for As sequestration in sulfides, even where sulfate reduction is active. PMID:19943647

  4. Changes in Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic Speciation Associated with Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in Ferrihydrite-Rich Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saalfield, S.; Bostick, B

    2009-01-01

    Biologically mediated redox processes have been shown to affect the mobility of iron oxide-bound arsenic in reducing aquifers. This work investigates how dissimilatory sulfate reduction and secondary iron reduction affect sulfur, iron, and arsenic speciation. Incubation experiments were conducted with As(III/V)-bearing ferrihydrite in carbonate-buffered artificial groundwater enriched with lactate (10 mM) and sulfate (0.08-10 mM) and inoculated with Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757, formerly D. desulfuricans), which reduces sulfate but not iron or arsenic. Sulfidization of ferrihydrite led to formation of magnetite, elemental sulfur, and trace iron sulfides. Observed reaction rates imply that the majority of sulfide is recycled to sulfate, promoting microbial sulfate reduction in low-sulfate systems. Despite dramatic changes in Fe and S speciation, and minimal formation of Fe or As sulfides, most As remained in the solid phase. Arsenic was not solubilized in As(V)-loaded incubations, which experienced slow As reduction by sulfide, whereas As(III)-loaded incubations showed limited and transient As release associated with iron remineralization. This suggests that As(III) production is critical to As release under reducing conditions, with sulfate reduction alone unlikely to release As. These data also suggest that bacterial reduction of As(V) is necessary for As sequestration in sulfides, even where sulfate reduction is active.

  5. Elastically driven metamagnetic-like phase transformations of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevich, A. G.; L'vov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model of metamagnetic-like (ferromagnetic-paramagnetic and ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic) phase transitions is developed for the interpretation of experimental results obtained recently for the Ni-Mn-Co-X (X  =  In, Sn, Ga) shape memory alloys. The conditions of elastically driven (caused by the martensitic transformation of alloy) metamagnetic-like phase transitions are determined. These conditions are: high magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic phase; large (but real for some alloys) volume change during the martensitic transformation; and large value of volume magnetostriction caused by the metamagnetic-like phase transition. The magnetoelastic mechanism is proposed for the explanation of magnetic field influence on the martensitic transformation. The elastically driven ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition is considered in more detail and the results of corresponding magnetic measurements are described.

  6. Amphiphilic phase-transforming catalysts for transesterification of triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaratna, Gayan Ivantha

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions that involve immiscible liquid-phase reactants are challenging to conduct due to limitations associated with mass transport. Nevertheless, there are numerous reactions such as esterification, transesterification, etherification, and hydrolysis where two immiscible liquid reactants (such as polar and non-polar liquids) need to be brought into contact with a catalyst. With the intention of alleviating mass transport issues associated with such systems but affording the ability to separate the catalyst once the reaction is complete, the overall goal of this study is geared toward developing a catalyst that has emulsification properties as well as the ability to phase-transfer (from liquid-phase to solid-phase) while the reaction is ongoing and evaluating the effectiveness of such a catalytic process in a practical reaction. To elucidate this concept, the transesterification reaction was selected. Metal-alkoxides that possess acidic and basic properties (to catalyze the reaction), amphiphilic properties (to stabilize the alcohol/oil emulsion) and that can undergo condensation polymerization when heated (to separate as a solid subsequent to the completion of the reaction) were used to test the concept. Studies included elucidating the effect of metal sites and alkoxide sites and their concentration effects on transesterification reaction, effect of various metal alkoxide groups on the phase stability of the reactant system, and kinetic effects of the reaction system. The studies revealed that several transition-metal alkoxides, especially, titanium and yttrium based, responded positively to this reaction system. These alkoxides were able to be added to the reaction medium in liquid phase and were able to stabilize the alcohol/oil system. The alkoxides were selective to the transesterification reaction giving a range of ester yields (depending on the catalyst used). It was also observed that transition-metal alkoxides were able to be

  7. Phase Transformation of VO2 Nanoparticles Assisted by Microwave Heating

    PubMed Central

    Sikong, Lek.

    2014-01-01

    The microwave assisted synthesis nowadays attracts a great deal of attention. Monoclinic phase VO2 (M) was prepared from NH4VO3 and H2C2O4 · 2H2O by a rapid microwave assisted technique. The synthesis parameters, microwave irradiation time, microwave power, and calcinations temperature were systematically varied and their influences on the structure and morphology were evaluated. The microwave power level has been carried out in range 180–600 W. TEM analysis demonstrated nanosized samples. The structural and morphological properties were measured using XRD, TEM, and thermal analyses. The variations of vanadium phase led to thermochromic properties. PMID:24688438

  8. Phase Transformations and Formation of Ultra-Fine Microstructure During Hydrogen Sintering and Phase Transformation (HSPT) Processing of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pei; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Koopman, Mark; Xia, Yang; Paramore, James; Ravi Chandran, K. S.; Ren, Yang; Lu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The hydrogen sintering and phase transformation (HSPT) process is a novel powder metallurgy method for producing Ti alloys, particularly the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, with ultra-fine microstructure in the as-sintered state. The ultra-fine microstructure is obtained as a direct result of the use of H2 gas during sintering. The refinement of the microstructure during HSPT is similar to that of thermal hydrogen processing (THP) of bulk Ti alloys. For both THP and HSPT of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the mechanisms of the grain refinement depend on the phase equilibria and phase transformations in the presence of hydrogen, which are surprisingly still not well established to date and are still subjected to research and debate. In recent work by the present authors, a pseudo-binary phase diagram of (Ti-6Al-4V)-H has been determined by using in situ synchrotron XRD and TGA/DSC techniques. Aided by this phase diagram, the current paper focuses on the series of phase transformations during sintering and cooling of Ti-6Al-4V in a hydrogen atmosphere and the mechanisms for the formation of the ultra-fine microstructures obtained. Using experimental techniques, including in situ synchrotron XRD, SEM, EBSD, and TEM, the microstructural refinement was found to be the result of (1) the precipitation of ultra-fine α/α2 within coarse β grains during an isothermal hold at intermediate temperatures, and (2) the eutectoid transformation of β → α + δ at approximately 473 K (200 °C).

  9. Nonadiabaticity in the iron bcc to hcp phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Carter, Emily A.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is known to undergo a pressure-induced phase transition from the ferromagnetic (FM) body-centered-cubic (bcc) α-phase to the nonmagnetic (NM) hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) ɛ-phase, with a large observed pressure hysteresis whose origin is still a matter of debate. Long ago, Burgers [Physica (Amsterdam) 1, 561 (1934)] proposed an adiabatic pathway for bcc to hcp transitions involving crystal shear followed by atom shuffles. However, a quantum mechanics search in six-dimensional stress-strain space reveals a much lower energy path, where the crystal smoothly shears along the entire path while the atoms shuffle only near the transition state (TS). The energy profile for this phase transition path exhibits a cusp at the TS and closely follows bcc and hcp diabatic energy wells. Both the cusp and the overlap with diabatic energy surfaces are hallmarks of nonadiabaticity, analogous to, e.g., electron transfer (ET) reactions in liquids. Fluctuations in the positions of FM bcc iron atoms near the TS induce magnetic quenching (akin to solvent fluctuations inducing ET), which then promotes NM hcp iron formation (akin to solvent reorganization after ET). We propose that the nonadiabatic nature of this transition at the atomic scale may contribute to the observed pressure hysteresis.

  10. Monoclinic phase transformations of zirconia-based dental prostheses, induced by clinically practised surface manipulations.

    PubMed

    Mochales, C; Maerten, A; Rack, A; Cloetens, P; Mueller, W D; Zaslansky, P; Fleck, C

    2011-07-01

    Full-ceramic zirconia crowns and bridges have become very popular with dentists and patients because of their excellent esthetics and mechanical properties. We studied phase transformations within the outermost surface layer of 3 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) samples of small, clinically relevant thicknesses, manipulated by polishing, grinding and fracture as might be encountered in everyday clinical practice. Stress-induced transformations of the tetragonal phase were studied in three dimensions in order to better understand the organization and extent of the monoclinically transformed phase. By means of laboratory- and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction measurements, coupled with electron microscopy and multimodal tomography, it was possible for the first time to visualize and quantify the phase distributions non-destructively and in three dimensions. Highly variable degrees of local transformation result in ragged transformed zones of very inhomogeneous thickness. The overall thickness of the transformation layers strongly depends on the severity and rate of loading. Gentle diamond cutting resulted in surprisingly low transformation ratios of less than 0.1%. When Y-TZP constructions are manipulated before bonding, toughness of the outer layers is reduced and they may become brittle with important implications for the stability of the bond: dental practitioners thus need to be cautious when altering the surfaces of these materials after sintering. PMID:21515417

  11. Nanoclusters first: a hierarchical phase transformation in a novel Mg alloy

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Michiaki; Kawamura, Yoshihito; Tabuchi, Masao; Kimizuka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The Mg-Y-Zn ternary alloy system contains a series of novel structures known as long-period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures. The formation process and its key concept from a viewpoint of phase transition are not yet clear. The current study reveals that the phase transformation process is not a traditional spinodal decomposition or structural transformation but, rather a novel hierarchical phase transformation. In this transformation, clustering occurs first, and the spatial rearrangement of the clusters induce a secondary phase transformation that eventually lead to two-dimensional ordering of the clusters. The formation process was examined using in situ synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Rapid quenching from liquid alloy into thin ribbons yielded strongly supersaturated amorphous samples. The samples were heated at a constant rate of 10 K/min. and the scattering patterns were acquired. The SAXS analysis indicated that small clusters grew to sizes of 0.2 nm after they crystallized. The clusters distributed randomly in space grew and eventually transformed into a microstructure with two well-defined cluster-cluster distances, one for the segregation periodicity of LPSO and the other for the in-plane ordering in segregated layer. This transformation into the LPSO structure concomitantly introduces the periodical stacking fault required for the 18R structures. PMID:26387813

  12. Understanding metastable phase transformation during crystallization of RDX, HMX and CL-20: experimental and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mrinal; Banerjee, Shaibal; Shafeeuulla Khan, Md Abdul; Sikder, Nirmala; Sikder, Arun Kanti

    2016-09-14

    Multiphase growth during crystallization severely affects deliverable output of explosive materials. Appearance and incomplete transformation of metastable phases are a major source of polymorphic impurities. This article presents a methodical and molecular level understanding of the metastable phase transformation mechanism during crystallization of cyclic nitramine explosives, viz. RDX, HMX and CL-20. Instantaneous reverse precipitation yielded metastable γ-HMX and β-CL-20 which undergo solution mediated transformation to the respective thermodynamic forms, β-HMX and ε-CL-20, following 'Ostwald's rule of stages'. However, no metastable phase, anticipated as β-RDX, was evidenced during precipitation of RDX, which rather directly yielded the thermodynamically stable α-phase. The γ→β-HMX and β→ε-CL-20 transformations took 20 and 60 minutes respectively, whereas formation of α-RDX was instantaneous. Density functional calculations were employed to identify the possible transition state conformations and to obtain activation barriers for transformations at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p)(IEFPCM)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The computed activation barriers and lattice energies responsible for transformation of RDX, HMX and CL-20 metastable phases to thermodynamic ones conspicuously supported the experimentally observed order of phase stability. This precise result facilitated an understanding of the occurrence of a relatively more sensitive and less dense β-CL-20 phase in TNT based melt-cast explosive compositions, a persistent and critical problem unanswered in the literature. The crystalline material recovered from such compositions revealed a mixture of β- and ε-CL-20. However, similar compositions of RDX and HMX never showed any metastable phase. The relatively long stability with the highest activation barrier is believed to restrict complete β→ε-CL-20 transformation during processing. Therefore a method is suggested to overcome this issue. PMID

  13. Modelling of Nb influence on phase transformation behaviours from austenite to ferrite in low carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Parker, S. V.; Rose, A. J.; West, G. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new model has been developed to predict the phase transformation behaviours from austenite to ferrite in Nb-containing low carbon steels. The new model is based on some previous work and incorporates the effects of Nb on phase transformation behaviours, in order to make it applicable for Nb-containing steels. Dissolved Nb atoms segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries increase the critical energy for ferrite nucleation, and thus the ferrite nucleation rate is decreased. Dissolved Nb atoms also apply a solute drag effect to the moving transformation interface, and the ferrite grain growth rate is also decreased. The overall transformation kinetics is then calculated according to the classic Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory. The new model predictions are quite consistent with experimental results for various steels during isothermal transformations or continuous cooling.

  14. Phase transformation in Mg—Sb3Te thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Jian; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Chen, Yi-Min; Shen, Xiang; Nie, Qiu-Hua; Lü, Ye-Gang; Dai, Shi-Xun; Xu, Tie-Feng

    2014-08-01

    Mg-doped Sb3Te films are proposed to improve the performance of phase-change memory (PCM). We prepare Mg-doped Sb3Te films and investigate their crystallization behaviors, structural, optical and electrical properties. We find that Mg-doping can increase the crystallization temperature, enhance the activation energy, and improve the 10-year data retention of Sb3Te. Especially Mg25.19(Sb3Te)74.81 shows higher Tc (~ 190 °C) and larger Ea (~ 3.49 eV), which results in a better data retention maintaining for 10 yr at ~ 112 °C. Moreover Ra/Rc value is also improved. These excellent properties make Mg—Sb—Te material a promising candidate for the phase-change memory (PCM).

  15. Shock-induced phase transformations in gallium single crystals by atomistic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadau, Kai; Cherne, Frank J.; Ravelo, Ramon; Germann, Timothy C.

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing a modified embedded atom method potential, we performed large-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations (with up to 50 million atoms) to investigate the response of Ga single crystals to shock compression along the three major orientations of the orthorhombic A11 ground state, i.e., [001], [010], and [100]. For weak shocks with particle velocity up<300 m/s, these defect-free single crystals respond elastically, but for stronger shocks, they undergo a structural phase transformation and then (for even stronger shocks) melt. For intermediate shock strengths (300m/stransformation wave. The transformed region consists of a mixed phase, with stripes of the product phase embedded into the uniaxially compressed parent phase, with the ratio of product to parent phase increasing with increasing shock strength, much like in martensitic phase transformations. Upon shock release from the free surface at the end of the sample, the transformation is reversed, leaving only some defects behind, which makes it difficult to experimentally investigate the structural transformation in shock-recovered samples. We investigated the structure produced by the shock and found it to be similar to the β phase of Ga which is obtained by supercooling from the liquid state. However, the product phase shows only half the period along [100] in the calculated diffraction pattern. Further investigation showed that this is due to a different stacking sequence in this direction, namely ABCD instead of AB for the β phase.

  16. A Synthetic Quadrature Phase Detector/Demodulator for Fourier Transform Transform Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed to demodulate (velocity correct) Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data that is taken with an analog to digital converter that digitizes equally spaced in time. This method makes it possible to use simple low cost, high resolution audio digitizers to record high quality data without the need for an event timer or quadrature laser hardware, and makes it possible to use a metrology laser of any wavelength. The reduced parts count and simplicity implementation makes it an attractive alternative in space based applications when compared to previous methods such as the Brault algorithm.

  17. Multi phase field model for solid state transformation with elastic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, I.; Apel, M.

    2006-05-01

    A multi phase field model is presented for the investigation of the effect of transformation strain on the transformation kinetics, morphology and thermodynamic stability in multi phase materials. The model conserves homogeneity of stress in the diffuse interface between elastically inhomogeneous phases, in which respect it differs from previous models. The model is formulated consistently with the multi phase field model for diffusional and surface driven phase transitions [I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, B. Nestler, M. Seeßelberg, R. Prieler, G.J. Schmitz, J.L.L. Rezende, A phase field concept for multiphase systems, Physica D 94 (1996) 135-147; J. Tiaden, B. Nestler, H.J. Diepers, I. Steinbach, The multiphase-field model with an integrated concept for modeling solute diffusion, Physica D 115 (1998) 73-86; I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, A generalized field method for multiphase transformations using interface fields, Physica D 134 (1999) 385] and gives a consistent description of interfacial tension, multi phase thermodynamics and elastic stress balance in multiple junctions between an arbitrary number of grains and phases. Some aspects of the model are demonstrated with respect to numerical accuracy and the relation between transformation strain, external stress and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  18. Phase transformation of oxide film in zirconium alloy in high temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-23

    The effect of the variation of the dissolved hydrogen concentration on the oxide phase transformation under high-temperature hydrogenated water conditions was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum in 50 cm(3)/kg of dissolved hydrogen concentration indicated the formation of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconium oxide at the water-substrate interface. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration decreased to 30 cm(3)/kg, the Raman peaks corresponding to the zirconium oxide phase changed, indicating an oxide phase transformation. And, the results of SEM and TEM analyses were compared with those of in situ analyses obtained for the oxide structure formed on the zirconium alloy.

  19. Deep-cryogenic-treatment-induced phase transformation in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-mei; Cheng, Nan-pu; Chen, Zhi-qian; Guo, Ning; Zeng, Su-min

    2015-01-01

    An aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) subjected to deep cryogenic treatment (DCT) was systematically investigated. The results show that a DCT-induced phase transformation varies the microstructures and affects the mechanical properties of the Al alloy. Both Guinier-Preston (GP) zones and a metastable η' phase were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The phenomenon of the second precipitation of the GP zones in samples subjected to DCT after being aged was observed. The viability of this phase transformation was also demonstrated by first-principles calculations.

  20. Detection of indentation induced Fe-to-Afe phase transformation in lead zirconate titanate.

    SciTech Connect

    Baddorf, Arthur P.; Shin, Junsoo; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Watson, Chad Samuel; Kalinin, Sergei; Juliano, Thomas F.

    2005-08-01

    Instrumented indentation was combined with microscopy and spectroscopy analysis to investigate the local mechanically induced ferroelectric to anti-ferroelectric phase transformation of niobium-modified lead zirconate titanate 95/5. Indentation experiments to a depth of 2 {micro}m were performed using a Berkovich pyramidal three-sided diamond tip. Subsequent Raman spectroscopy and piezoelectric force microscopy revealed that indentation locally induced the ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transformation. Piezoelectric force microscopy demonstrated the ability to map the individual phases within and near indented regions on the niobium-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics.

  1. Ultra-fast dynamic compression technique to study kinetics of phase transformations in Bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Kane, J O; Eggert, J H; Saculla, M D; Jankowski, A F; Bastea, M; Hicks, D G; Collins, G W

    2007-12-28

    Pre-heated Bi was ramp compressed within 30 ns to a peak stress of {approx}11 GPa to explore structural phase transformation kinetics under dynamic loading conditions. Under these ultra-fast compression time-scales the equilibrium Bi I-II phase boundary is overpressurized by {Delta}P {approx} 0.8 GPa. {Delta}P is observed to increase logarithmically with strain rate, {var_epsilon}, above 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. Estimates from a kinetics model predict that the Bi I phase is fully transformed within 3 ns.

  2. Crystalline-crystalline phase transformation in two-dimensional In2Se3 thin layers.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xin; Gu, Yi

    2013-08-14

    We report, for the first time, the fabrication of single-crystal In2Se3 thin layers using mechanical exfoliation and studies of crystalline-crystalline (α → β) phase transformations as well as the corresponding changes of the electrical properties in these thin layers. Particularly, using electron microscopy and correlative in situ micro-Raman and electrical measurements, we show that, in contrast to bulk single crystals, the β phase can persist in single-crystal thin layers at room temperature (RT). The single-crystal nature of the layers before and after the phase transition allows for unambiguous determination of changes in the electrical resistivity. Specifically, the β phase has an electrical resistivity about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than the α phase. Furthermore, we find that the temperature of the α → β phase transformation increases by as much as 130 K with the layer thickness decreasing from ~87 nm to ~4 nm. These single-crystal thin layers are ideal for studying the scaling behavior of the phase transformations and associated changes of the electrical properties. For these In2Se3 thin layers, the accessibility of the β phase at RT, with distinct electrical properties than the α phase, provides the basis for multilevel phase-change memories in a single material system. PMID:23841523

  3. Thermally phase-transformed In2Se3 nanowires for highly sensitive photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daegun; Rim, Taiuk; Baek, Chang-Ki; Meyyappan, M; Lee, Jeong-Soo

    2014-09-24

    The photoresponse characteristics of In2Se3 nanowire photodetectors with the κ-phase and α-phase structures are investigated. The as-grown κ-phase In2Se3 nanowires by the vapor-liquid-solid technique are phase-transformed to the α-phase nanowires by thermal annealing. The photoresponse performances of the κ-phase and α-phase In2Se3 nanowire photodetectors are characterized over a wide range of wavelengths (300-900 nm). The phase of the nanowires is analyzed using a high-resolution transmission microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The electrical conductivity and photoresponse characteristics are significantly enhanced in the α-phase due to smaller bandgap structure compared to the κ-phase nanowires. The spectral responsivities of the α-phase devices are 200 times larger than those of the κ-phase devices. The superior performance of the thermally phase-transformed In2Se3 nanowire devices offers an avenue to develop highly sensitive photodetector applications. PMID:24828147

  4. The backward phase flow and FBI-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beams for the Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung Shingyu; Qian Jianliang

    2010-11-20

    We propose the backward phase flow method to implement the Fourier-Bros-Iagolnitzer (FBI)-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beam method for solving the Schroedinger equation in the semi-classical regime. The idea of Eulerian Gaussian beams has been first proposed in . In this paper we aim at two crucial computational issues of the Eulerian Gaussian beam method: how to carry out long-time beam propagation and how to compute beam ingredients rapidly in phase space. By virtue of the FBI transform, we address the first issue by introducing the reinitialization strategy into the Eulerian Gaussian beam framework. Essentially we reinitialize beam propagation by applying the FBI transform to wavefields at intermediate time steps when the beams become too wide. To address the second issue, inspired by the original phase flow method, we propose the backward phase flow method which allows us to compute beam ingredients rapidly. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  5. Raman studies of pressure and temperature induced phase transformations in calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Hess, N.J.

    1990-11-01

    Phase stability in the calcium carbonate system was investigated as a simultaneous function of pressure and temperature up to 40 kbar and several hundred degrees Kelvin using micro-Raman techniques to interrogate samples constrained within a resistively heated diamond anvil cell. Measured spectra allow unequivocal identification of crystalline phases and are used to refine the P,T phase diagram. Calcium carbonate was found to exhibit both reversible and irreversible transformation phenomena among the four known phases which exist under these conditions. Time-dependent Raman intensity variations as the material is perturbed from its equilibrium state allow real-time kinetics measurements to be performed. Evidence suggests that the order of certain observed transformations may be pressure dependent. The utility of Raman spectroscopy to follow transformation phenomena and to estimate fundamental thermophysical properties from the stress dependence of vibrational mode frequencies is demonstrated. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary piezoelectric single crystals near the morphotropic phase boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengtao; Wang, Yaojin; Wang, Zhiguang; Ge, Wenwei; Li, Jiefang; Luo, Haosu; Viehland, D.

    2014-12-01

    Structural phase transformations in (100)-oriented Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 single crystals have been investigated by X-ray diffraction. A cubic (C) → tetragonal (T) → monoclinic-C (MC) transformation sequence was observed in the field-cooled condition. Two phase coexistence regions of C + T and T + MC were found. In addition to an increase in the C → T phase transition temperature and a decrease of the T → MC one, a broadening of the coexistence regions was also found with increasing field. This broadening can be explained by the presence of polar nano regions within the C, T, and MC phase regions.

  7. Fe-Solid Phase Transformations Under Highly Basic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Qafoku, Odeta; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; McKinley, Susan G.

    2007-09-01

    Hyperalkaline and saline radioactive waste fluids with elevated temperatures from S-SX high-level waste tank farm at Hanford, WA accidentally leaked into sediments beneath the tanks, initiating a series of geochemical processes and reactions whose significance and extent was unknown. Among the most important processes was the dissolution of soil minerals and precipitation of stable secondary phases. The objective of this investigation was to study the release of Fe into the aqueous phase upon dissolution of Fe-bearing soil minerals, and the subsequent formation of Fe rich precipitates. Batch reactors were used to conduct experiments at 50 0C using solutions similar in composition to the waste fluids. Results clearly showed that, similarly to Si and Al, Fe was released from the dissolution of soil minerals (most likely phyllosilicates such as biotite, smectite, and chlorite). The extent of Fe release increased with base concentration and decreased with Al concentration in the contacting solution. The maximum apparent rate of Fe release (0.566 × 10-13 mol m-2 s-1) was measured in the treatment with no Al and a concentration of 4.32 mol L-1 NaOH in the contacting solution. Results from electron microscopy indicated that while Si and Al precipitated together to form feldspathoids in the groups of cancrinite and/or sodalite, Fe precipitation followed a different pathway leading to the formation of hematite and goethite. The newly formed Fe oxy-hydroxides may increase the sorption capacity of the sediments, promote surface mediated reactions such as precipitation and heterogeneous redox reactions, and affect the phase distribution of contaminant and radionuclides.

  8. Phase Transformation in Radially Merged Wurtzite GaAs Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    III–V Nanowires (NWs) grown with metal–organic chemical vapor deposition commonly show a polytypic crystal structure, allowing growth of structures not found in the bulk counterpart. In this paper we studied the radial overgrowth of pure wurtzite (WZ) GaAs nanowires and characterized the samples with high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) to reveal the crystal structure of the grown material. In particular, we investigated what happens when adjacent WZ NWs radially merge with each other by analyzing the evolution of XRD peaks for different amounts of radial overgrowth and merging. By preparing cross-sectional lamella samples we also analyzed the local crystal structure of partly merged NWs by transmission electron microscopy. Once individual NWs start to merge, the crystal structure of the merged segments is transformed progressively from initial pure WZ to a mixed WZ/ZB structure. The merging process is then modeled using a simple combinatorial approach, which predicts that merging of two or more WZ NWs will result in a mixed crystal structure containing WZ, ZB, and 4H. The existence large and relaxed segments of 4H structure within the merged NWs was confirmed by XRD, allowing us to accurately determine the lattice parameters of GaAs 4H. We compare the measured WZ and 4H unit cells with an ideal tetrahedron and find that both the polytypes are elongated in the c-axis and compressed in the a-axis compared to the geometrically converted cubic ZB unit cell. PMID:26494983

  9. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, B; Mills, Michael J.; Specht, Eliot D; Santella, Michael L; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  10. Organizational transformation into the operational phase of the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hoeven, Michiel; Rutten, René; Alvarez Martin, Pedro

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we review various organizational issues encountered when GRANTECAN, the Spanish organization responsible for the construction and operation of the GTC telescope, evolved from the construction phase of a large telescope facility into the phase of scientific operation. GRANTECAN now operates and further develops the 10.4m segmented telescope, GTC. The advent of operational pressures to scientifically exploit the telescope enforced a number of organizational changes as priorities shifted towards achieving the best possible level of operational effectiveness. In this paper we will treat the GRANTECAN experience as a case study of the limitations and problems that were encountered throughout this change. We will focus on the processes and strategies applied in order to achieve the necessary changes. We will place our experience in the framework of the McKinsey 7S model, highlight a number of key performance indicators, and will indicate the organizational changes that have taken place, that influenced the way the objectives are achieved. We will present a forward look based on our experience to date.

  11. X-ray diffraction studies of phase transformations in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.; Doremus, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the crystallization properties of five ZrF4-based glass compositions have indicated that the crystalline phase in Zr-Ba-La-Pb fluoride glass is beta-BaZrF6; no such identification of crystal phases was obtainable, however, for the other glasses. Reversible polymorphic phase transformations occur in Zr-Ba-La-Li and Zr-Ba-La-Na fluoride glasses, upon heating to higher temperatures.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nanoindentation-induced Mechanical Deformation and Phase Transformation in Monocrystalline Silicon

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the molecular dynamics approach toward mechanical deformation and phase transformation mechanisms of monocrystalline Si(100) subjected to nanoindentation. We demonstrate phase distributions during loading and unloading stages of both spherical and Berkovich nanoindentations. By searching the presence of the fifth neighboring atom within a non-bonding length, Si-III and Si-XII have been successfully distinguished from Si-I. Crystallinity of this mixed-phase was further identified by radial distribution functions.

  13. Finite element analysis of the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation during oxidation of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, P.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2014-11-01

    Corrosion is a key limiting factor in the degradation of zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process offers a route towards improving safety and efficiency as demand increases for higher burn-up of fuel. Oxides formed on zirconium alloys are composed of both monoclinic and meta-stable tetragonal phases, and are subject to a number of potential mechanical degradation mechanisms. The work presented investigates the link between the tetragonal to monoclinic oxide phase transformation and degradation of the protective character of the oxide layer. To achieve this, Abaqus finite element analysis of the oxide phase transformation has been carried out. Study of the change in transformation strain energy shows how relaxation of oxidation induced stress and fast fracture at the metal-oxide interface could destabilise the tetragonal phase. Central to this is the identification of the transformation variant most likely to form, and understanding why twinning of the transformed grain is likely to occur. Development of transformation strain tensors and analysis of the strain components allows some separation of dilatation and shear effects. Maximum principal stress is used as an indication of fracture in the surrounding oxide layer. Study of the stress distributions shows the way oxide fracture is likely to occur and the differing effects of dilatation and shape change. Comparison with literature provides qualitative validation of the finite element simulations.

  14. Devil's vortex Fresnel lens phase masks on an asymmetric cryptosystem based on phase-truncation in gyrator wavelet transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hukum

    2016-06-01

    An asymmetric scheme has been proposed for optical double images encryption in the gyrator wavelet transform (GWT) domain. Grayscale and binary images are encrypted separately using double random phase encoding (DRPE) in the GWT domain. Phase masks based on devil's vortex Fresnel Lens (DVFLs) and random phase masks (RPMs) are jointly used in spatial as well as in the Fourier plane. The images to be encrypted are first gyrator transformed and then single-level discrete wavelet transformed (DWT) to decompose LL , HL , LH and HH matrices of approximation, horizontal, vertical and diagonal coefficients. The resulting coefficients from the DWT are multiplied by other RPMs and the results are applied to inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT) for obtaining the encrypted images. The images are recovered from their corresponding encrypted images by using the correct parameters of the GWT, DVFL and its digital implementation has been performed using MATLAB 7.6.0 (R2008a). The mother wavelet family, DVFL and gyrator transform orders associated with the GWT are extra keys that cause difficulty to an attacker. Thus, the scheme is more secure as compared to conventional techniques. The efficacy of the proposed scheme is verified by computing mean-squared-error (MSE) between recovered and the original images. The sensitivity of the proposed scheme is verified with encryption parameters and noise attacks.

  15. Phase transformations in Ln2O3 materials irradiated with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Lang, Maik; Zhang, Fuxiang; Trautmann, Christina; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-11-01

    Phase transformations induced in the cubic C-type lanthanide sesquioxides, Ln2O3 (Ln = Sm, Gd, Ho, Tm, and Lu), by dense electronic excitation are investigated. The structural modifications resulting from exposure to beams of 185 MeV Xe and 2246 MeV Au ions are characterized using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The formation of a B-type polymorph, an X-type nonequilibrium phase, and an amorphous phase are observed. The specific phase formed and the transformation rate show dependence on the material composition, as well as the ion beam mass and energy. Atomistic mechanisms for these transformations are determined, indicating that formation of the B-type phase results from the production of anti-Frenkel defects and the aggregation of anion vacancies into planar clusters, whereas formation of the X-type and amorphous phases requires extensive displacement of both anions and cations. The observed variations in phase behavior with changing lanthanide ionic radius and deposited electronic energy density are related to the energetics of these transformation mechanisms.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Ferrihydrite as an Enterosorbent for Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J. F.; Robinson, A.; Johnson, N.; Marroquin-Cardona, A.; Brattin, B.; Taylor, R.; Phillips, T. D.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic trace element found in groundwater due to natural and industrial processes. Exposure has been linked to cancers of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidneys, nasal passages, liver, and the prostate. Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many countries, notably Bangladesh and Taiwan. The purpose of this research was to utilize binding isotherms, a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) model, and the adult Hydra bioassay to evaluate ferrihydrite’s potential to bind As and serve as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. A variety of clay minerals and synthesized iron oxides including ferrihydrite were screened for their ability to bind As(III), as sodium arsenite, and As(V), as sodium arsenate. After ferrihydrite was demonstrated to be the most effective sorbent for both As species, adsorption isotherms were performed. All isotherm data were fit to the Langmuir equation to determine adsorption capacity (Qmax). Ferrihydrite bound 96% of As(III) and 97% of As(V) in the screening studies and had a Qmax of 1.288 mol/kg for As(III) and 0.744 mol/kg for As(V). Using a simulated GI model, ferrihydrite was found to effectively adsorb As(V) and As(III) in the stomach and intestine. Ferrihydrite (0.25% w/w) protected adult hydra at levels up to 200 times the minimal effective concentration (MEC) for As(III) and up to 2.5 times the MEC for As(V). These experiments confirm that ferrihydrite is a high capacity sorbent of As, and that it is effective at removing As in a simulated GI model. These results suggest that ferrihydrite could be used as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. Future work will focus on verifying ferrihydrite’s safety and efficacy in vivo. PMID:19708388

  17. Calorimetric Study of Phase Stability and Phase Transformation in U- xZr ( x = 2, 5, 10 wt pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Arun Kumar; Subramanian, Raju; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Rengachari, Mythili; Saibaba, Saroja

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive calorimetric study of high-temperature phase equilibria and phase transformation characteristics in U- xZr ( x = 2, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys has been undertaken, as a function of heating and cooling rates. It is found that the following sequence of phase transformation takes place upon slow heating in annealed U-2 wt pct Zr alloy: α + α' + δ-UZr2 → α + γ 2 → β + γ 2 → β + γ 1 → γ. For alloys of 5 and 10 wt pct Zr, the additional presence of a miscibility gap ( γ 1 U-rich bcc + γ 2 Zr-rich bcc) in the high-temperature γ(bcc) phase region resulted in the following transformation sequence: α + α' + δ-UZr2 → α + γ 2 → β + γ 2 → γ 1 + γ 2 → γ. Further, it has been demonstrated that depending on the nature of starting microstructure, namely whether it is α eq + δ-UZr2, or a mix of α' + α eq + δ-UZr2 phases, the relative extents of two possible co-occurring modes of the first on-heating phase transformation step differ. In case of starting microstructure having mixture of three phases α' + α eq + δ-UZr2, it is found that α'-martensite relaxation via α' + α eq + δ-UZr2 → α eq + δ-UZr2 constitutes the first on-heating thermal response. The α'-martensitic relaxation is very closely followed by the dissolution of δ-UZr2. The co-occurrence of these two events gives rise to a composite thermal arrest in a normal dynamic calorimetry profile. However, if the starting microstructure is the one having the equilibrium mix of α eq and δ-UZr2, then only the peritectoidal dissolution of δ-UZr2 is found in the calorimetry profile. Unless, a very slow cooling rate of the order of 0.1 K min-1 is adopted from high-temperature γ(bcc) phase, it is not possible to obtain 100 pct of α eq phase along with equilibrium amount of δ-UZr2. At normal and high cooling rates, it is possible to suppress the diffusional decomposition of γ to varying extents. The direct γ → α'-martensite transformation has been observed at

  18. Understanding strain-induced phase transformations in BiFeO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, Hemant; Beekman, Christianne; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Siemons, Wolter; Yang, Yongsoo; Senabulya, Nancy; Clarke, Roy; Chi, Miaofang; Christen, Hans M.; Cooper, Valentino R.

    2015-05-01

    Experiments demonstrate that under large epitaxial strain a coexisting striped phase emerges in BiFeO₃ thin films, which comprises a tetragonal-like (T´) and an intermediate S´ polymorph. It exhibits a relatively large piezoelectric response when switching between the coexisting phase and a uniform T´ phase. This strain-induced phase transformation is investigated through a synergistic combination of first-principles theory and experiments. The results show that the S´ phase is energetically very close to the T´ phase, but is structurally similar to the bulk rhombohedral (R) phase. By fully characterizing the intermediate S´ polymorph, it is demonstrated that the flat energy landscape resulting in the absence of an energy barrier between the T´ and S´ phases fosters the above-mentioned reversible phase transformation. This ability to readily transform between the S´ and T´ polymorphs, which have very different octahedral rotation patterns and c/a ratios, is crucial to the enhanced piezoelectricity in strained BiFeO3 films. Additionally, a blueshift in the band gap when moving from R to S´ to T´ is observed. These results emphasize the importance of strain engineering for tuning electromechanical responses or, creating unique energy harvesting photonic structures, in oxide thin film architectures.

  19. Understanding strain-induced phase transformations in BiFeO3 thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dixit, Hemant; Beekman, Christianne; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Siemons, Wolter; Yang, Yongsoo; Senabulya, Nancy; Clarke, Roy; Chi, Miaofang; Christen, Hans M.; Cooper, Valentino R.

    2015-05-01

    Experiments demonstrate that under large epitaxial strain a coexisting striped phase emerges in BiFeO₃ thin films, which comprises a tetragonal-like (T´) and an intermediate S´ polymorph. It exhibits a relatively large piezoelectric response when switching between the coexisting phase and a uniform T´ phase. This strain-induced phase transformation is investigated through a synergistic combination of first-principles theory and experiments. The results show that the S´ phase is energetically very close to the T´ phase, but is structurally similar to the bulk rhombohedral (R) phase. By fully characterizing the intermediate S´ polymorph, it is demonstrated that the flat energy landscape resultingmore » in the absence of an energy barrier between the T´ and S´ phases fosters the above-mentioned reversible phase transformation. This ability to readily transform between the S´ and T´ polymorphs, which have very different octahedral rotation patterns and c/a ratios, is crucial to the enhanced piezoelectricity in strained BiFeO3 films. Additionally, a blueshift in the band gap when moving from R to S´ to T´ is observed. These results emphasize the importance of strain engineering for tuning electromechanical responses or, creating unique energy harvesting photonic structures, in oxide thin film architectures.« less

  20. Earth physics and phase transformations program: A concept and proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.

    1971-01-01

    A program to study the geophysical characteristics of the earth is presented as an integration of the different disciplines that constitute the earth sciences, through the foundation of a generalized geodynamic theory of earth physics. A program is considered for defining the physical constants of the earth's material which parametrize the hydrodynamic equation in the microscopic solid state behavior of the crystals of the lithosphere. In addition, in order to lay the foundation for a generalized theory in earth physics, specific research areas are considered, such as the nature of the kinetics of the phase transitions in mineral assemblages, the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of crystals which are major constituents of mineral assemblages, and the transport properties of pure crystals which are major constituents of mineral assemblages.

  1. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  2. A new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to new-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Li, J L; Liu, P; Yang, G W

    2014-12-21

    The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called "new diamond" because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond. However, producing n-diamond from raw carbon materials has so far been challenging due to n-diamond's higher formation energy than that of diamond. Here, we, for the first time, demonstrate a new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to n-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion in the unique process of laser ablation in water, and establish that water plays a crucial role in the formation of n-diamond. When a laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at ambient pressure and room temperature, nanodiamonds are first transformed into carbon onions serving as an intermediate phase, and sequentially carbon onions are transformed into n-diamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from the carbon onion as a nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the process of laser irradiation in a liquid. This phase transformation not only provides new insight into the physical mechanism involved, but also offers one suitable opportunity for breaking controllable pathways between n-diamond and carbon allotropes such as diamond and carbon onions. PMID:25369973

  3. Phase transformations and phase relations in Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub (50-x)}TM{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.J.; Sluiter, M.H.; Harmon, B.N.; Tanner, L.E.

    1994-07-15

    The effect of transition metal (TM) substitution for Pd in Ti{sub 5O}Pd{sub (50-x}TM{sub x} alloys with x between 5 and 37.5 at.% and TM = V, Cr, Mn and Fe are being characterized by transmission electron microscopy and First-Principles Alloy Theory modeling. The goal is to obtain detailed structural information related to the ternary phase relations and transformations that are necessary for effective shape-memory alloy development. Thus far, the authors have found that the tend to have pseudobinary eutectoid-like configurations with a terminal TiPd and a non-close-packed long period ordered structure type crystal structure) based on the stoichiometry Ti{sub 2}PdTM. The systems exhibit a conventional martensitic transformation, as well as a new type of displacive transformation that shear-modulates B2 to produce a periodically distorted, but non-close-packed metastable product phase.

  4. Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R.; Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W.; Shen, Yaogen; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-03

    We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d > 1.4 nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0 eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d ≤ 1.4 nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

  5. In Situ Observation of Phase Transformation in Low-Carbon, Boron-Treated Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Shintaku, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Shuichi; Komizo, Yu-Ichi

    2012-02-01

    It is known that adding the appropriate amount of boron to steels dramatically increases their hardness and toughness as a result of the transition of the microstructure from grain boundary nucleation to intragranular nucleation. In this study, precipitation and phase transformation kinetics in heat-affected zones of low-carbon, boron-treated steels are observed directly by high-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy. The effects of boron content and austenite grain size on the phase transformation process are investigated systematically by quantifying the transformation product, the transformation start temperature, the average length of the ferrite plates, and the average number of potent nucleation sites. Finally, detailed methods for controlling and optimizing the microstructure in the heat-affected zones of low-carbon, boron-treated steels are discussed.

  6. Robust two-dimensional weighted and unweighted phase unwrapping that uses fast transforms and iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Romero, L.A. )

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) phase unwrapping continues to find applications in a wide variety of scientific and engineering areas including optical and microwave interferometry, adaptive optics, compensated imaging, and synthetic-aperture-radar phase correction, and image processing. We have developed a robust method (not based on any path-following scheme) for unwrapping 2D phase principal values (in a least-squares sense) by using fast cosine transforms. If the 2D phase values are associated with a 2D weighting, the fast transforms can still be used in iterative methods for solving the weighted unwrapping problem. Weighted unwrapping can be used to isolate inconsistent regions (i.e., phase shear) in an elegant fashion.

  7. Restriction of Phase Transformation in Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Mahato, Neelima; Balani, Kantesh

    2015-07-01

    The present research aims to investigate the effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) reinforcement on the mechanism of transformation toughening in zirconia matrix, and consequently, its fracture toughness. Monoclinic zirconia (un-doped ZrO2), partially stabilized zirconia (3 mol pct yttria-stabilized zirconia (3 mol pct YSZ)), and fully stabilized cubic zirconia (8 mol pct YSZ) with and without 6 vol pct MWNT-reinforced nanocomposites were processed via multi-stage spark plasma sintering. Phase analysis of powders, and sintered and crushed pellets performed using X-ray diffraction reveals the absence of any phase transformation in monoclinic ZrO2, 8 mol pct YSZ and their MWNT-reinforced nanocomposites upon application of stress by means of crushing. However, a significant decrease in the stress-induced phase transformation (81.1 pct metastable tetragonal phase retained with 6 vol pct MWNT reinforcement when compared to that of 68.4 pct tetragonal phase in 3 mol pct YSZ) is observed in the crushed pellet samples of partially stabilized zirconia upon 6 vol pct MWNT reinforcement. Transmission electron microscopy has been utilized for complementary phase analysis. Evaluation of mechanical properties indicates enhancement in fracture toughness (~23.6 to 26.4 pct) with the incorporation of 6 vol pct MWNT. Isolation of the net toughening contribution suggests that MWNT toughening mechanisms are ~3.8 times more effective than transformation toughening in enhancing the fracture toughness of YSZ/MWNT nanocomposites.

  8. A test of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. [for phase transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation is evaluated for the special case of two-dimensional crystallization. The volume fraction transformed is determined directly by computer modeling, and the evaluation of the secondary phase obtained is compared with predictions of the JMA equation. The JMA equation if found to be highly acccurate over virtually the entire range of the transformation process.

  9. Crystal Phase Transformation in Self-Assembled InAs Nanowire Junctions on Patterned Si Substrates.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Torsten; Rosenbach, Daniel; Vakulov, Daniil; Heedt, Sebastian; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the growth and structural characteristics of InAs nanowire junctions evidencing a transformation of the crystalline structure. The junctions are obtained without the use of catalyst particles. Morphological investigations of the junctions reveal three structures having an L-, T-, and X-shape. The formation mechanisms of these structures have been identified. The NW junctions reveal large sections of zinc blende crystal structure free of extended defects, despite the high stacking fault density obtained in individual InAs nanowires. This segment of zinc blende crystal structure in the junction is associated with a crystal phase transformation involving sets of Shockley partial dislocations; the transformation takes place solely in the crystal phase. A model is developed to demonstrate that only the zinc blende phase with the same orientation as the substrate can result in monocrystalline junctions. The suitability of the junctions to be used in nanoelectronic devices is confirmed by room-temperature electrical experiments. PMID:26881450

  10. Martensitic phase transformation in Nb/sub 3/Sn - X-Ray observations

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, R.; Foner, S.; Lehuy, H.

    1985-03-01

    A compilation is presented of room temperature lattice spacing, a /SUB o/ , versus martensitic phase transformation temperature, T /SUB m/ , of Nb/sub 3/Sn for over 50 set of data including data of other investigations. The low temperature tetragonal phase transition occurs with c/a < 1 for a /SUB o/ between 5.289 and 5.2933 A, with c/a > 1 for a /SUB o/ between 5.2865 and 5.2883 A. Nb/sub 3/Sn remains in the cubic phase (no transformation) for a /SUB o/ < 5.2865 A and a /SUB o/ > 5.2933 A, and for a very narrow region between 5.2883 A and 5.289 A. The effect of additives and the effect of matrix strain on the width of T /SUB m/ is also discussed. A detailed tabulation is presented for the various Nb/sub 3/Sn materials and their resultant transformation characteristics.

  11. Influence of Laser Peening on Phase Transformation and Corrosion Resistance of AISI 321 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, D.; Swaroop, S.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of laser peening without coating (LPwC) on austenitic to martensitic (γ → α') phase transformation and corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 in 3.5% NaCl environment. Results indicate that LPwC induces a large compressive residual stresses of nearly -854 MPa and γ → α' phase transformation of about 18% (volume fraction). Microstructures of peened surface confirmed the γ → α' phase transformation and showed no grain refinement. Hardness increased slightly with a case depth of 900 μm. Despite the smaller surface roughness introduced, corrosion resistance improved after peening due to compressive residual stresses.

  12. Neural network calibration of a snapshot birefringent Fourier transform spectrometer with periodic phase errors.

    PubMed

    Luo, David; Kudenov, Michael W

    2016-05-16

    Systematic phase errors in Fourier transform spectroscopy can severely degrade the calculated spectra. Compensation of these errors is typically accomplished using post-processing techniques, such as Fourier deconvolution, linear unmixing, or iterative solvers. This results in increased computational complexity when reconstructing and calibrating many parallel interference patterns. In this paper, we describe a new method of calibrating a Fourier transform spectrometer based on the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs). In this way, it is demonstrated that a simpler and more straightforward reconstruction process can be achieved at the cost of additional calibration equipment. To this end, we provide a theoretical model for general systematic phase errors in a polarization birefringent interferometer. This is followed by a discussion of our experimental setup and a demonstration of our technique, as applied to data with and without phase error. The technique's utility is then supported by comparison to alternative reconstruction techniques using fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and linear unmixing. PMID:27409947

  13. Influence of Laser Peening on Phase Transformation and Corrosion Resistance of AISI 321 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, D.; Swaroop, S.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of laser peening without coating (LPwC) on austenitic to martensitic (γ → α') phase transformation and corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 in 3.5% NaCl environment. Results indicate that LPwC induces a large compressive residual stresses of nearly -854 MPa and γ → α' phase transformation of about 18% (volume fraction). Microstructures of peened surface confirmed the γ → α' phase transformation and showed no grain refinement. Hardness increased slightly with a case depth of 900 μm. Despite the smaller surface roughness introduced, corrosion resistance improved after peening due to compressive residual stresses.

  14. Phase transformations in amorphous fullerite C60 under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, P. A.; Blanter, M. S.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Somenkov, V. A.; Filonenko, V. P.

    2015-08-01

    First phase transformations of amorphous fullerite C60 at high temperatures (up to 1800 K) and high pressures (up to 8 GPa) have been investigated and compared with the previous studies on the crystalline fullerite. The study was conducted using neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The amorphous fullerite was obtained by ball-milling. We have shown that under thermobaric treatment no crystallization of amorphous fullerite into С60 molecular modification is observed, and it transforms into amorphous-like or crystalline graphite. A kinetic diagram of phase transformation of amorphous fullerite in temperature-pressure coordinates was constructed for the first time. Unlike in crystalline fullerite, no crystalline polymerized phases were formed under thermobaric treatment on amorphous fullerite. We found that amorphous fullerite turned out to be less resistant to thermobaric treatment, and amorphous-like or crystalline graphite were formed at lower temperatures than in crystalline fullerite.

  15. On pressure-shear plate impact for studying the kinetics of stress-induced phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Joanne C.; Clifton, Rodney J.

    1992-07-01

    Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are proposed for studying the kinetics of stress-induced phase transformations. The purpose of this paper is to determine loading conditions and specimen orientations which can be expected to activate a single habit plane variant parallel to the impact plane, thereby simplifying the study of the kinetics of the transformation through monitoring the wave profiles associated with the propagating phase boundary. The Wechsler Lieberman-Read phenomenological theory was used to determine habit plane indices and directions of shape deformation for a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy which undergoes a martensitic phase transformation under stress. Elastic waves generated by pressure-shear impact were analyzed for wave propagation in the direction of the normal to a habit plane. A critical resolved shear stress criterion was used to predict variants which are expected to be activated for a range of impact velocities and relative magnitudes of the normal and transverse components of the impact velocity.

  16. Theory of the amplitude-phase retrieval in any linear-transform system and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guozhen; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Dong, Bi-Zhen

    1992-12-01

    This paper is a summary of the theory of the amplitude-phase retrieval problem in any linear transform system and its applications based on our previous works in the past decade. We describe the general statement on the amplitude-phase retrieval problem in an imaging system and derive a set of equations governing the amplitude-phase distribution in terms of the rigorous mathematical derivation. We then show that, by using these equations and an iterative algorithm, a variety of amplitude-phase problems can be successfully handled. We carry out the systematic investigations and comprehensive numerical calculations to demonstrate the utilization of this new algorithm in various transform systems. For instance, we have achieved the phase retrieval from two intensity measurements in an imaging system with diffraction loss (non-unitary transform), both theoretically and experimentally, and the recovery of model real image from its Hartley-transform modulus only in one and two dimensional cases. We discuss the achievement of the phase retrieval problem from a single intensity only based on the sampling theorem and our algorithm. We also apply this algorithm to provide an optimal design of the phase-adjusted plate for a phase-adjustment focusing laser accelerator and a design approach of single phase-only element for implementing optical interconnect. In order to closely simulate the really measured data, we examine the reconstruction of image from its spectral modulus corrupted by a random noise in detail. The results show that the convergent solution can always be obtained and the quality of the recovered image is satisfactory. We also indicated the relationship and distinction between our algorithm and the original Gerchberg- Saxton algorithm. From these studies, we conclude that our algorithm shows great capability to deal with the comprehensive phase-retrieval problems in the imaging system and the inverse problem in solid state physics. It may open a new way to

  17. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  18. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  19. Neutron Scattering Studies of Pre-Transitional Effects in Solid-Solid Phase Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S. M.

    1999-06-30

    Neutron scattering studies have played a fundamental role in understanding solid-solid phase transformations, particularly in studying the lattice dynamical behavior associated with precursor effects. A review of the studies performed on solids exhibiting Martensitic transformations is given below. The mode softening and associated elastic diffuse scattering, previously observed in NiAl alloys, will be discussed as well as more recent work on Ni{sub 2}MnGa, a system exhibiting magnetic order as well as a Martensitic transformation. Also, new results on the precursor effects in ordered and disordered FePt alloys will be presented.

  20. Study of the Effect of Transition Metals on Titanium Dioxide Phase Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellifa, A.; Choukchou-Braham, A.; Kappenstein, C.; Pirault-Roy, L.

    MTiX samples with different atomic metal percentage were synthesised by sol-gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The anatase-rutile transformation in TiO2 in the presence of transition metals (Cr, V and Mn) was investigated. The kinetics of anatase-rutile transformations were determined by XRD over the temperature range 500-800 °C. It was found that the presence of V and Mn accelerate the transformation anatase-to-rutile. However, the anatase phase stability increases as the chromium content increases.

  1. Analysis of transformation plasticity in steel using a finite element method coupled with a phase field model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yi-Gil; Kim, Jin-You; Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Suh, Dong-Woo; Lee, Jae Kon; Han, Heung Nam

    2012-01-01

    An implicit finite element model was developed to analyze the deformation behavior of low carbon steel during phase transformation. The finite element model was coupled hierarchically with a phase field model that could simulate the kinetics and micro-structural evolution during the austenite-to-ferrite transformation of low carbon steel. Thermo-elastic-plastic constitutive equations for each phase were adopted to confirm the transformation plasticity due to the weaker phase yielding that was proposed by Greenwood and Johnson. From the simulations under various possible plastic properties of each phase, a more quantitative understanding of the origin of transformation plasticity was attempted by a comparison with the experimental observation. PMID:22558295

  2. Analysis of Transformation Plasticity in Steel Using a Finite Element Method Coupled with a Phase Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yi-Gil; Kim, Jin-You; Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Suh, Dong-Woo; Lee, Jae Kon; Han, Heung Nam

    2012-01-01

    An implicit finite element model was developed to analyze the deformation behavior of low carbon steel during phase transformation. The finite element model was coupled hierarchically with a phase field model that could simulate the kinetics and micro-structural evolution during the austenite-to-ferrite transformation of low carbon steel. Thermo-elastic-plastic constitutive equations for each phase were adopted to confirm the transformation plasticity due to the weaker phase yielding that was proposed by Greenwood and Johnson. From the simulations under various possible plastic properties of each phase, a more quantitative understanding of the origin of transformation plasticity was attempted by a comparison with the experimental observation. PMID:22558295

  3. Titanium α-ω phase transformation pathway and a predicted metastable structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkevich, Nickolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-01-15

    A titanium is a highly utilized metal for structural lightweighting and its phases, transformation pathways (transition states), and structures have scientific and industrial importance. Using a proper solid-state nudged elastic band method employing two climbing images combined with density functional theory DFT + U methods for accurate energetics, we detail the pressure-induced α (ductile) to ω (brittle) transformation at the coexistence pressure. We also find two transition states along the minimal-enthalpy path and discover a metastable body-centered orthorhombic structure, with stable phonons, a lower density than the end-point phases, and decreasing stability with increasing pressure.

  4. Titanium α -ω phase transformation pathway and a predicted metastable structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkevich, N. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-01-01

    As titanium is a highly utilized metal for structural lightweighting, its phases, transformation pathways (transition states), and structures have scientific and industrial importance. Using a proper solid-state nudged elastic band method employing two climbing images combined with density functional theory DFT + U methods for accurate energetics, we detail the pressure-induced α (ductile) to ω (brittle) transformation at the coexistence pressure. We find two transition states along the minimal-enthalpy path and discover a metastable body-centered orthorhombic structure, with stable phonons, a lower density than the end-point phases, and decreasing stability with increasing pressure.

  5. 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transform for ESPI phase-maps denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, Nivia; Villa, Jesús; de la Rosa, Ismael; de la Rosa, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Efrén; Gutiérrez, Osvaldo; Olvera, Carlos; Araiza, María

    2013-09-01

    In this work we introduce a 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transform (2-D CWT) method for denoising ESPI phase-maps. Multiresolution analysis with 2-D wavelets can provide high directional sensitivity and high anisotropy which are proper characteristics for this task. In particular, the 2-D CWT method using Gabor atoms (Gabor mother wavelets) which can naturally model phase fringes, has a good performance against noise and can preserve phase fringes. We describe the theoretical basis of the proposed technique and show some experimental results with real and simulated ESPI phase-maps. As can be verified the proposal is robust and effective.

  6. Statistical theory of phase transformations in the lithium-nitrogen-hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysina, Z. A.; Zaginaichenko, S. Yu.; Shchur, D. V.

    2011-12-01

    A statistical theory of phase transformations in the course of chemical reactions of hydrogen absorption-desorption in lithium nitride with the formation of lithium amide and hydride has been developed. Free energies of all phases involved in the reactions have been calculated and their dependences on temperature, pressure, hydrogen concentration, and energy parameters have been determined. The solubility of hydrogen in the related phases has been calculated; some features of its temperature dependence have been established. A phase diagram of the system has been constructed. The possibility of the manifestation of a hysteresis effect has been substantiated. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  7. Critical kinetic control of non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transformation for efficient perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yaoguang; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Guo, Rui; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Li, Wenzhi; Fan, Zhiyong; Yao, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3+) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition pathways as a function of annealing conditions. The interdiffusion of MAI and DMSO varies strongly with the annealing temperature and time, thus determining the final film composition and morphology. A surprising finding reveals that the best performing cells contain ~18% of the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase, instead of pure phase OTP. The presence of such an intermediate phase enables smooth surface morphology and enhances the charge carrier lifetime. Our results highlight the importance of the intermediate phase growth kinetics that could lead to large-scale production of efficient solution processed perovskite solar cells.Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3+) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition

  8. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; et al

    2015-12-11

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/ discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surfacemore » layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. In conclusion, our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments.« less

  9. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-12-11

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/ discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. In conclusion, our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments.

  10. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. Our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments. PMID:26655832

  11. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, A; Welland, M J; Collins, S S E; Harder, R; Maxey, E; Wingert, J; Singer, A; Hy, S; Mulvaney, P; Zapol, P; Shpyrko, O G

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. Our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments. PMID:26655832

  12. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-12-01

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. Our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments.

  13. Phase transformation of Ho[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sheng; Liu, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Bai, Ligang; Xiao, Wansheng; Zhang, Yufeng; Lin, Chuanlong; Li, Yanchun; Tang, Lingyun

    2012-01-20

    The structural stability of cubic Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high pressure has been investigated by angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXD) in a diamond anvil cell up to 63.0 GPa at room temperature. The diffraction data reveal two structural transformations on compression. The structural transformation from a cubic to a monoclinic structure starts at 8.9 GPa and is complete at 16.3 GPa with an {approx}8.1% volume collapse. A hexagonal phase begins to appear at {approx}14.8 GPa and becomes dominant at 26.4 GPa. This high-pressure hexagonal phase with a small amount of retained monoclinic phase is stable up to the highest pressure of 63.0 GPa in this study. After release of pressure, the hexagonal phase transforms to a monoclinic structure. A third-order Birch-Murnaghan fit yields zero pressure bulk moduli (B{sub 0}) of 206(3), 200(7) and 204(19) GPa and their pressure derivatives (B'{sub 0}) of 4.8(4), 2.1(4), 3.8(5) for the cubic, monoclinic and hexagonal phases, respectively. Comparing with other rare-earth sesquioxides, it is suggested that the transition pressure from cubic to monoclinic phase, as well as the bulk modulus of the cubic phase, increases with the decreasing of the cation radius of rare-earth sesquioxides.

  14. Avalanching Strain Dynamics During the Hydriding Phase Transformation in Individual Palladium Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-12-01

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/ discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. Our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments.

  15. Crystal-amorphous transformation via defect-templating in phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukala, Pavan

    Phase-change materials (PCM) such as GeTe and Ge-Sb-Te alloys are potential candidates for non-volatile memory applications, because they can reversibly and rapidly transform between a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase with medium-range order. Traditionally, crystal-amorphous transformation in these materials has been carried out via melt-quench pathway, where the crystalline phase is heated beyond its melting point by the rising edge of an electric pulse, and the melt phase is quenched by the falling edge into a glassy phase. Formation of an intermediate melt phase in this transformation pathway requires usage of large switching current densities, resulting in energy wastage, and device degradation issues. Furthermore, melt-quench pathway is a brute force strategy of amorphizing PCM, and does not utilize the peculiar structural properties in crystalline phase. It will be beneficial from a device perspective that crystal-amorphous transformation is carried out via subtler solid-state pathways. Single-crystalline nanowire phase-change memory, owing to its lateral geometry and large volumes of active material, offers a platform to construct a crystal-amorphous transformation pathway via gradually increasing disorder in the crystalline phase, and study it. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy on GeTe and Ge2Sb2Te5 systems, we showed that the application of an electric pulse (heat-shock) creates dislocations in the PCM that migrate with the hole-wind force, and interact with the already existing ferroelectric boundaries in case of GeTe, changing their nature. We adapted novel tools such as optical second harmonic generation polarimety to carefully study these defect interactions. These defects accumulate at a region of local inhomogeneity, and upon addition of defects beyond a critical limit to that region via electrical pulsing, an amorphous phase "nucleates". We also studied the effect of defect dynamics on carrier transport using temperature

  16. Study of phase transformations in CMSX-6 and CMSX-8 superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczotok, Agnieszka; Wierzbicka-Miernik, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are extensively used mainly in the aircraft and aeronautic industry, particularly in the hottest parts of engines or turbo-reactors. The phase reactions occurring in these heat-resistant materials play a crucial role in many aspects of the processing and service of the highly alloyed materials. Cast Ni-based superalloys are obtained in a complex way and their structure is complicated. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique was applied for determination of temperature ranges of the phase transformations occurring in the CMSX-6 and CMSX-8 superalloys during heating/cooling processes. Thermophysical properties, including temperatures of the phase transformation, are the critical input parameters in mathematical models of solidification and casting of metallic materials. The literature data concerning phase transformations and performance of the heat treatment for CMSX-6 and CMSX-8 are incomplete and ambiguous. DSC results accompanied by scanning electron microscopy characterization of microstructure of CMSX-6 and CMSX-8 superalloy was applied. The present study will improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of phase transformations of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  17. Fully phase multiple information encoding based on superposition of two beams and Fresnel-transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuturab, Muhammad Rafiq

    2015-12-01

    A novel asymmetric multiple information encoding using superposition of two beams and Fresnel transform, is proposed. In this scheme, each channel of individual user image is separately phase encoded and then modulated by random phase mask. The three modulated user channels are independently multiplied to produce three complex user channels. They are individually multiplied with three channels of carrier image and Fresnel transformed, and then phase- and amplitude truncated to produce first set of three encrypted channels and three asymmetric keys. Now each channel of secret image is normalized, phase-only masked, and then independently multiplied by corresponding modulated user channels. The three resultant channels are separately multiplied to construct three complex secret channels. Afterward, the three encrypted channels are multiplied with corresponding three complex secret channels and Fresnel transformed, and then phase- and amplitude truncated to obtain second set of three encrypted channels and three asymmetric keys. The wavelengths and propagation distances of two Fresnel transforms, and two asymmetric keys are common keys to all authorized-users, while two individual keys are provided to each authorized-user. The encryption process is implemented digitally while the decryption process can be performed optoelectronically. The proposed method is asymmetric, noniterative and larger multiplexing capacity without any cross-talk noise effects. Owing to the individual user image based method, high robustness against existing attacks can be achieved. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and efficient.

  18. White Layer Formation Due to Phase Transformation to Orthogonal machine of AISI 1045 Annealed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sangil; Melkote, Shreyes N; Haluska, Dr. Michael S; Watkins, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the white layer formed during machining of steels is caused primarily by a thermally induced phase transformation resulting from rapid heating and quenching. As a result, it is often assumed that if the temperature at the tool flank-workpiece interface exceeds the nominal phase transformation temperature for the steel, a white layer forms. However, no attempt has been made to actually measure the temperatures produced at the tool flank-workpiece interface and correlate it with microstructural evidence of phase transformation. This paper aims to address these limitations through suitably designed experiments and analysis. Orthogonal machining tests were performed on AISI 1045 annealed steel at different cutting speeds and tool flank wear. During machining, temperature measurements at the tool flank-workpiece interface were made using an exposed thermocouple technique. Metallographic studies of the machined sub-surface and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were performed to determine the presence and depth of white layer, and the presence of the retained austenite phase in the machined surface layer, respectively. Analysis of the data shows that the white layer can form due to phase transformation at temperatures below the nominal austenitization temperature of the steel. Possible causes of this result are presented.

  19. Slip, twinning and transformation in Laves phases. Technical progress report, August 1, 1990--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1993-01-26

    Research was concentrated on two-phase Ti-TiCr{sub 2} alloys, two- phase Fe-ZrFe{sub 2} alloys, and two-phase ternary Ni-Cu-Mg alloys containing MgNi{sub 2} and MgCu{sub 2} phases. Work demonstrated that a variety of room-temperature deformation processes are possible in Laves phases. A strain-induced phase transformation from C36{r_arrow}C15 structures is one mechanism for plastic deformation in ZrFe{sub 2}. The C15 structure in TiCr{sub 2} deforms by slip and twinning. The microstructure after indentation of specimens containing C36 phases ZrFe{sub 2} and MgNi{sub 2} indicates that a variety of slip systems operate in this form. 8 figs.

  20. [Simulated annealing based phase correction of interferogram in Fourier transform imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng-zhen; Yuan, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-bao; Wang, Qian; Zhou, Zhi-liang

    2011-07-01

    Phase correction is one of the key technologies in the spectrum recovery of the Fourier transform imaging spectrometer. The present paper proposes a correction method based on simulated annealing algorithm to calculate phase error, which overcomes the disadvantage of the existing methods that can not correct the interferogram with noise. The method determines the phase optimum solution by controlling the phase decrease function, attaining objective function value by correcting interferogram data with random phase value generated in the phase range, and determining the objective function increment in accordance with the Metropolis criterion. The simulation result of the algorithm indicates that the optimized phase error is less than 0.5%, and both the error accuracy and stability of the spectrum-recovered relative spectrum is less than 1%, which is a great improvement compared with the existing algorithm. PMID:21942072

  1. Experimental and computational investigation of the effect of phase transformation on fracture parameters of an SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghgouyan, Behrouz; Shafaghi, Nima; Aydıner, C. Can; Anlas, Gunay

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive, multi-method experimental characterization of fracture is conducted on shape memory alloy NiTi that exhibits superelasticity due to austenite-to-martensite stress induced phase transformation. This characterization includes (i) load-based measurement of critical stress intensity factor (K max) using ASTM standard E399, (ii) measurement of crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) per ASTM standard E1290, (iii) the digital image correlation (DIC) characterization of the transformation zone as well as the displacement-field based measurement of K max from the DIC data. Samples have also been tested at T = 100 °C to suppress the martensitic transformation to investigate transformation toughening. The experimental investigation is complemented with finite element (FE) analysis that uses Auricchio–Taylor–Lubliner constitutive model. A direct observation with DIC revealed a small scale transformation (K-dominance). K max of the transforming material is higher than that of the transformation-suppressed material tested at 100 °C, suggesting transformation toughening. At 100 °C, the material becomes quite brittle with a very small crack-tip plastic zone when the transformation mechanism is blocked. By measures of critical CTOD, the gap widens even more between the superelastic and transformation-suppressed cases, particularly because of the side effect that, in this very interesting material, material modulus increases with temperature. Evaluating the transformation zone from the DIC strains with reference to the uniaxial stress–strain curve, an equivalent strain form is proposed in conjunction with the plane stress FE prediction.

  2. Statistical physics concepts for the explanation of effects observed in martensitic phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberaigner, Eduard Roman; Leindl, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Structural solid-to-solid transformations play a key role for the behaviour of several materials, e.g., shape memory alloys, steels, polymers and ceramics. A novel theoretical approach modelling martensitic phase transformation is demonstrated in the present study. The generally formulated model is based on the block-spin approach and on renormalization in statistical mechanics and is applied to a representative volume element (resp. representative mole element) which is assumed to be in a local thermodynamic equilibrium. The neighbouring representative volume elements are in a generally different thermodynamic equilibrium. This leads to fluxes between those elements. Using fundamental physical properties of a shape memory alloy (SMA) single crystal as input data the model predicts the order parameter ‘total strain’, the martensitic phase fraction and the stress-assisted transformation accompanied by pseudo-elasticity without the requirement of evolution equations for internal variables and assumptions on the mathematical structure of the classical free energy. In order to demonstrate the novel approach the first computations are carried out for a simple one-dimensional case, which can be generalized to the two- and three-dimensional case. Results for total strain and martensitic phase fraction are in good qualitative agreement with well known experimental data according to their macroscopic strain rearrangement when phase transformation occurs. Further a material softening effect during phase transformation in SMAs is predicted by the statistical physics approach. Formulas are presented for the relevant quantities such as volume fraction, total strain, transformation strain, rates of the volume fractions and of the strains.

  3. High-speed Single-Phase PLL Control by Quasi dq Transformation Using FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tomoki; Komiyama, Tsuyoshi

    In this paper, we propose a high-speed frequency detection method for a single phase utility interactive inverter. Distributed power systems are considered to be a solution to environmental problems. As the use of distributed power systems spreads, the stability and reliability of utility interactive systems become important. In a utility interactive system, it is necessary to synchronize an internal phase of controller to a utility voltage. In the case of a single phase system, it is difficult to detect the instantaneous phase angle of the utility voltage. In this paper, we describe a new high-speed frequency detection method. In this method, a quasi dq transformation is applied by using an FPGA-based hardware controller. The quasi dq transformation is applied to develop PLL control. In this PLL control method, multiple samples can be processed in parallel by adopting an FPGA implementation. The hardware implementations are demonstrated by performing simulations and experiments.

  4. Evaluation of ferrihydrite as amendment to restore an arsenic-polluted mine soil.

    PubMed

    Abad-Valle, P; Álvarez-Ayuso, E; Murciego, A

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of ferrihydrite as amendment to restore the soil habitat functioning of a soil polluted with As by mining activities was evaluated. Its influence on As mobility and phytoavailability was also assessed. Soil treated with increasing amendment doses (0, 1, 2, and 5 %) were analyzed for soil microbiological parameters such as basal soil respiration and dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease, acid and alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase activities. Batch leaching tests and plant growth experiments using ryegrass and alfalfa plants were performed. The treatment with ferrihydrite was effective to reduce As mobility and plant As uptake, translocation, and accumulation. Likewise, the soil microbiological status was generally improved as derived from basal soil respiration and dehydrogenase and acid and alkaline phosphatase activities, which showed increases up to 85, 45, 11, and 47 %, respectively, at a ferrihydrite addition rate of 5 %. PMID:25430010

  5. Self-generated overvoltages due to open-phasing of ungrounded-wye delta transformer banks

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.A.; Hartana, R.K.; Ros, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Disconnecting one phase of an ungrounded-wye delta transformer bank from the source can result in severe overvoltages due to neutral shift and ferroresonance. Neutral shift overvoltages are quantified and their impact on metal-oxide surge arresters are evaluated. Ferroresonance is shown by test data to occur when low-loss banks, 15 kV and higher, are open phased. Design and operating practices to eliminate or mitigate these self-generated overvoltages are discussed.

  6. Self-generated overvoltages due to open-phasing of ungrounded-wye delta transformer banks

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.A.; Hartana, R.K.; Ros, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Disconnecting one phase of an ungrounded-wye delta transformer bank from the source can result In severe overvoltages due to neutral shirt and ferroresonance. Neutral shirt overvoltages are quantified and their Impact on metal-oxide surge arresters are evaluated. Ferroresonance is shown by test data to occur when low-loss banks, 15 kV and higher, are open phased. Design and operating practices to eliminate or mitigate these self-generated overvoltages are discussed.

  7. Phase transformations of hydrocarbon accumulations in the Upper Cretaceous complex of the Northeast Caucasus

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikov, A.N.; Yaroshenko, A.A.

    1982-10-01

    The geologic structure and development of the Northeast Caucasus has produced a complex distribution of hydrocarbons in different phases throughout Upper Cretaceous deposits. A comprehensive study of the thermobaric conditions in the region are presented so that the patterns of hydrocarbon phase transformations can be identified. In addition the maturation of the geologic formations in the area that led to the oil formation is discussed. (JMT)

  8. Phase-space distributions in quasi-polar coordinates and the fractional Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Alieva, T; Bastiaans, M J

    2000-12-01

    The ambiguity function and Cohen's class of bilinear phase-space distributions are represented in a quasipolar coordinate system instead of in a Cartesian system. Relationships between these distributions and the fractional Fourier transform are derived; in particular, derivatives of the ambiguity function are related to moments of the fractional power spectra. A simplification is achieved for the description of underspread signals, for optical beam characterization, and for the generation of signal-adaptive phase-space distributions. PMID:11140493

  9. HIGH CRYSTALLINITY SI-FERRIHYDRITE: AN INSIGHT INTO ITS NÉEL TEMPERATURE AND SIZE DEPENDENCE OF MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ferrihydrite, an antiferromagnetic iron oxyhydroxide, is of great importance for the cycling of many trace metals in the environment. Four ferrihydrite samples prepared with 1.3 to 3.5 wt% of Si at different synthesis temperatures (7.5 °C, 22 °C, 50 °C and 75 °C) were studied by ...

  10. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand. PMID:26546983

  11. Nondestructive inspection of phase transformation in zirconia-containing hip joints by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenliang; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Environmental metastability of zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic in the human body [represented by a tetragonal-to-monoclinic (t→m) phase transformation] takes place on the surface of the artificial joint and proceeds with time toward its interior. Its quantitative characterization is mandatory for the safety of joint implants and consists of the assessment of the in-depth monoclinic profile fraction as compared to that of the initially untransformed material. We attempt to fully establish a characterization protocol and present two different nondestructive approaches for resolving highly graded phase-transformation profiles along the hip-joint subsurface by confocal Raman microprobe technique. A series of partially transformed tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and zirconia-toughened alumina ceramics are used as screening samples. Probe biases could be eliminated and the real transformation profiles retrieved through a deconvolution procedure of Raman experimental data collected as a function of pinhole aperture and focal depth, respectively. Confirmation of the confocal assessments was made by a destructive cross-sectional inspection by both laser optical microscope and Raman spectral line scans. This study unveils for the first time the real quantitative amount of surface phase-transformation fractions and the related subsurface profiles in zirconia-based retrieved medical samples.

  12. Nondestructive inspection of phase transformation in zirconia-containing hip joints by confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenliang; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Environmental metastability of zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic in the human body [represented by a tetragonal-to-monoclinic (t→m) phase transformation] takes place on the surface of the artificial joint and proceeds with time toward its interior. Its quantitative characterization is mandatory for the safety of joint implants and consists of the assessment of the in-depth monoclinic profile fraction as compared to that of the initially untransformed material. We attempt to fully establish a characterization protocol and present two different nondestructive approaches for resolving highly graded phase-transformation profiles along the hip-joint subsurface by confocal Raman microprobe technique. A series of partially transformed tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and zirconia-toughened alumina ceramics are used as screening samples. Probe biases could be eliminated and the real transformation profiles retrieved through a deconvolution procedure of Raman experimental data collected as a function of pinhole aperture and focal depth, respectively. Confirmation of the confocal assessments was made by a destructive cross-sectional inspection by both laser optical microscope and Raman spectral line scans. This study unveils for the first time the real quantitative amount of surface phase-transformation fractions and the related subsurface profiles in zirconia-based retrieved medical samples. PMID:24297000

  13. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations in the HAZ of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Wong, J

    2001-08-15

    Ferrite ({delta})/austenite ({gamma}) transformations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of a gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld in 2205 duplex stainless steel are observed in real-time using spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) with high intensity synchrotron radiation. A map showing the locations of the {delta} and {gamma} phases with respect to the calculated weld pool dimensions has been constructed from a series of SRXRD scans. Regions of liquid, completely transformed {gamma}, a combination of partially transformed {gamma} with untransformed {delta}, and untransformed {delta}+{gamma} are identified. Analysis of each SRXRD pattern provides a semi-quantitative definition of both the {delta}/{gamma} phase balance and the extent of annealing which are mapped for the first time with respect to the calculated weld pool size and shape. A combination of these analyses provides a unique real-time description of the progression of phase transformations in the HAZ. Using these real-time observations, important kinetic information about the transformations occurring in duplex stainless steels during heating and cooling cycles typical of welding can be determined.

  14. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  15. Natural ferrihydrite as an agent for reducing turbidity caused by suspended clays.

    PubMed

    Rhoton, F E; Bigham, J M

    2009-01-01

    Biologically impaired waters are often caused by the turbidity associated with elevated suspended sediment concentrations. Turbidity can be reduced by the addition of positively charged compounds that coagulate negatively charged particles in suspension, causing them to flocculate. This research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline Fe oxide, as a flocculating agent for suspended clays similar to those found in high-turbidity waters of the Mississippi delta. Clay concentrations of 100 mg L(-1) from a Dubbs silt loam (fine silty, mixed, active, thermic Typic Hapludalfs), a Forestdale silty clay loam (fine, smectitic, thermic Typic Hapludalfs), and a Sharkey clay (very fine, smectitic, thermic Chromic Epiaquerts) were suspended in 0.0005 mol L(-1) CaCl(2) solutions at pH 5, 6, 7, or 8. Natural ferrihydrite with a zero point of charge at pH 5.8 was acquired from a drinking water treatment facility and mixed with the suspension at concentrations of 0, 10, 25, and 50 mg L(-1). After settling periods of 24 and 48 h, percent transmittance was measured at a wavelength of 420 nm using a 3-mL sample collected at a depth of 2 cm. The greatest reductions in turbidity after 24-h equilibration were recorded for the pH 5 suspensions of the Dubbs (31%) and Forestdale (37%) clays at a ferrihydrite concentration of 10 mg L(-1) and for the Sharkey clay at a ferrihydrite concentration of 25 mg L(-1) (relative to the 0 ferrihydrite treatment). Water clarity for all samples further increased after 48 h. These results indicate that the effectiveness of ferrihydrite, as a means of reducing turbidity associated with suspended clays, is greatest at pH values below its zero point of charge. PMID:19643754

  16. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sherman; Haberl, Bianca; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-06-25

    The mixture of the metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that is formed via nanoindentation of diamond cubic (dc) silicon exhibits properties that are of scientifc and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of this mixed phase can be formed in crystalline Si via nanoindentation without signifcant damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated in this way using a spherical tip of ~21.5 μm diameter. The phase transformed region is characterised using both Raman microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that uniform loading using large spherical indenters can favor phase transformation as the sole deformation mechanism as long as the maximum load is below a critical level. We suggest that the sluggish nature of the transformation from the dc-Si phase to the metallic (b-Sn) phase normally results in competing deformation mechanisms such as slip and cracking but these can be suppressed by controlled loading conditions.

  17. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Sherman; Haberl, Bianca; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-06-25

    The mixture of the metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that is formed via nanoindentation of diamond cubic (dc) silicon exhibits properties that are of scientifc and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of this mixed phase can be formed in crystalline Si via nanoindentation without signifcant damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated in this way using a spherical tip of ~21.5 μm diameter. The phase transformed region is characterised using both Ramanmore » microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that uniform loading using large spherical indenters can favor phase transformation as the sole deformation mechanism as long as the maximum load is below a critical level. We suggest that the sluggish nature of the transformation from the dc-Si phase to the metallic (b-Sn) phase normally results in competing deformation mechanisms such as slip and cracking but these can be suppressed by controlled loading conditions.« less

  18. Hilbert versus Concordia transform for three-phase machine stator current time-frequency monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajin, Baptiste; Chabert, Marie; Regnier, Jérémi; Faucher, Jean

    2009-11-01

    This paper deals with mechanical fault diagnosis in three-phase induction machines from stator current measurements. According to machine models, mechanical faults lead to amplitude and/or phase modulations of the measured stator current with possibly time varying carrier frequency. The modulation diagnosis requires a univocal definition of the instantaneous phase and amplitude. This is performed by associating a complex signal to the real measured one. For a convenient separate modulation diagnosis, the complex signal instantaneous phase and amplitude are expected to carry, respectively, information about the phase and amplitude modulations. The complex signal is classically obtained through the Hilbert transform. Under Bedrosian conditions, the so-called analytic signal allows a separate modulation diagnosis. However, mechanical faults may also produce fast modulations violating the Bedrosian conditions. This study proposes an alternative complex signal representation which takes advantage of the three stator current measurements available in a three-phase machine. From two stator current measurements, the Concordia transform builds a complex vector, the so-called space vector, which unconditionally allows separate modulation diagnosis. This paper applies and compares the Hilbert and Concordia transforms, theoretically and in case of simulated and experimental signals with various modulation frequency ranges.

  19. Structural and phase transformation of apatite and quartz in the indentation process single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chaikina, Marina

    2014-11-14

    Using the method of scanning and high-resolution electron microscopy, the zones of indentation by scratching for apatite and quartz single crystals were investigated. The textural, structural and phase transformations revealed have been conventionally ascribed to “deformation” and “diffusion” processes of plastic deformation. In zones of indentation by scratching of single crystals there have been two levels of structural transformations revealed, with a sharp boundary between them, at a stress equal to the theoretical ultimate stress limit (σ{sub TSL}). In the top zone of scratches, within the range of stress from the microhardness value H{sub s} up to the σ{sub TSL} value the substance undergoes profound structural and phase transformations. In the bed of scratches at the stress value lower than σ{sub TSL} values, single crystal fragmentation occurs with the formation of blocks and steps.

  20. Phase transformations in SrAl2Si2O8 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Charles H., III; Bansal, Narottam P.

    Bulk glass of SrAl2Si2O8 composition crystallized at temperatures below 1000 C into hexacelsian, a hexagonal phase which undergoes a reversible, rapid transformation to an orthorhombic phase at 758 C, and at higher temperatures crystallized as celsian, a monoclinic phase. The glass transition temperature and crystallization onset temperature were determined to be 883 C and 1086 C, respectively, from DSC at a heating rate of 20 C/min. Thermal expansion of the various phases and density and bend strengths of cold isostatically pressed glass powder bars, sintered at various temperatures, were measured. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation for SrAl2Si2O8 were studied. Hexacelsian flakes were isothermally heat treated at temperatures from 1025-1200 C for various times. Avrami plots were determined by quantitatively measuring the amount of monoclinic celsian formed at various times using x ray diffraction. The Avrami constant was determined to be 1.1, suggesting a diffusionless, one dimensional transformation mechanism. The activation energy was determined from an Arrhenius plot of 1n k vs. 1/T to be 125 kilocal/mole. This value is consistent with a mechanism which transforms the layered hexacelsian structure to a three dimensional framework celsian structure and involves the breaking of Si-O bonds.

  1. On the thermodynamic criterion for detonability of a phase-transforming substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowles, G. Richard

    1990-05-01

    The thermodynamic criterion for detonability of a phase-transforming substance derived by Kuznetsov [Sov. Phys. JETP 22, 1047 (1966)] is shown to be an approximation to the more general criterion for detonability, namely, (∂P/∂λ)E,V>0, where E is internal energy, V is volume, and λ is the reaction coordinate measured positive as the reaction proceeds toward equilibrium.

  2. Phase transformations in SrAl2Si2O8 glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Charles H., III; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    Bulk glass of SrAl2Si2O8 composition crystallized at temperatures below 1000 C into hexacelsian, a hexagonal phase which undergoes a reversible, rapid transformation to an orthorhombic phase at 758 C, and at higher temperatures crystallized as celsian, a monoclinic phase. The glass transition temperature and crystallization onset temperature were determined to be 883 C and 1086 C, respectively, from DSC at a heating rate of 20 C/min. Thermal expansion of the various phases and density and bend strengths of cold isostatically pressed glass powder bars, sintered at various temperatures, were measured. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation for SrAl2Si2O8 were studied. Hexacelsian flakes were isothermally heat treated at temperatures from 1025-1200 C for various times. Avrami plots were determined by quantitatively measuring the amount of monoclinic celsian formed at various times using x ray diffraction. The Avrami constant was determined to be 1.1, suggesting a diffusionless, one dimensional transformation mechanism. The activation energy was determined from an Arrhenius plot of 1n k vs. 1/T to be 125 kilocal/mole. This value is consistent with a mechanism which transforms the layered hexacelsian structure to a three dimensional framework celsian structure and involves the breaking of Si-O bonds.

  3. fcc-hcp phase transformation in Co nanoparticles induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C. S.; Araujo, L. L.; Kluth, P.; Byrne, A. P.; Foran, G. J.; Johannessen, B.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate a face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonally close-packed (hcp) phase transformation in spherical Co nanoparticles achieved via swift heavy-ion irradiation. Co nanoparticles of mean diameter 13.2 nm and fcc phase were first formed in amorphous SiO2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing and then irradiated at room temperature with 9-185 MeV Au ions. The crystallographic phase was identified with x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron diffraction and quantified, as functions of the irradiation energy and fluence, with the former. The transformation was complete at low fluence prior to any change in nanoparticle shape or size and was governed by electronic stopping. A direct-impact mechanism was identified with the transformation interaction cross-section correlated with that of a molten ion track in amorphous SiO2 . We suggest the shear stress resulting from the rapid thermal expansion about an ion track in amorphous SiO2 was sufficient to initiate the fcc-to-hcp phase transformation in the Co nanoparticles.

  4. Colloidal Nanocrystals: A Model System for the Study of Phase Transformations Since 1950

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Joshua

    2011-06-01

    Shock waves provide a means of rapidly compressing a condensed phase sample and studying the resulting structural changes. However, shock studies to date have focused on bulk materials, in which multiple uncorrelated nucleation events lead to complex transformation kinetics. An individual nanocrystal, by comparison, can transform completely with ~10ps following nucleation of the daughter phase, reducing the likelihood that a second nucleation event will occur during the transformation time. In a diamond anvil cell, the wurtzite to rocksalt phase transformation in CdSe nanocrystals, for example, has been shown to follow simple first-order kinetics. The slow, ensemble kinetics observed in those experiments, however, obscured the dynamics within each nanocrystal. Rapidly compressing a nanocrystalline sample using a laser-driven shock wave, the pressure around each nanocrystal can rise on a timescale comparable to that for a sound wave to traverse the crystal. Shock experiments on nanoscale materials therefore have the potential to elucidate aspects of the transformation mechanism inaccessible to further quasi-static diamond anvil cell measurements behavior of CdSe nanocrystals under shock stresses of 2--3.75 GPa has been studied. Above 3 GPa a near-complete disappearance of the first excitonic feature and broadening of the low-energy absorption edge were observed, consistent with a wurtzite to rocksalt structural transformation. The transformation pressure was reduced relative to hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell, and the rate increased, attributed to shock induced shear stress along the reaction coordinate. The especially rapid rate observed for a 3.75 GPa shock suggests multiple nucleation events occurring in each particle.

  5. Critical kinetic control of non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transformation for efficient perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yaoguang; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Guo, Rui; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Li, Wenzhi; Fan, Zhiyong; Yao, Yan

    2016-07-14

    Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3(+)) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition pathways as a function of annealing conditions. The interdiffusion of MAI and DMSO varies strongly with the annealing temperature and time, thus determining the final film composition and morphology. A surprising finding reveals that the best performing cells contain ∼18% of the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase, instead of pure phase OTP. The presence of such an intermediate phase enables smooth surface morphology and enhances the charge carrier lifetime. Our results highlight the importance of the intermediate phase growth kinetics that could lead to large-scale production of efficient solution processed perovskite solar cells. PMID:26890121

  6. A new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to new-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Li, J. L.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called ``new diamond'' because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond. However, producing n-diamond from raw carbon materials has so far been challenging due to n-diamond's higher formation energy than that of diamond. Here, we, for the first time, demonstrate a new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to n-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion in the unique process of laser ablation in water, and establish that water plays a crucial role in the formation of n-diamond. When a laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at ambient pressure and room temperature, nanodiamonds are first transformed into carbon onions serving as an intermediate phase, and sequentially carbon onions are transformed into n-diamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from the carbon onion as a nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the process of laser irradiation in a liquid. This phase transformation not only provides new insight into the physical mechanism involved, but also offers one suitable opportunity for breaking controllable pathways between n-diamond and carbon allotropes such as diamond and carbon onions.The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called ``new diamond'' because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond

  7. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  8. Integrated frequency comb source based Hilbert transformer for wideband microwave photonic phase analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thach G; Shoeiby, Mehrdad; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Morandotti, Roberto; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrate a photonic RF Hilbert transformer for broadband microwave in-phase and quadrature-phase generation based on an integrated frequency optical comb, generated using a nonlinear microring resonator based on a CMOS compatible, high-index contrast, doped-silica glass platform. The high quality and large frequency spacing of the comb enables filters with up to 20 taps, allowing us to demonstrate a quadrature filter with more than a 5-octave (3 dB) bandwidth and an almost uniform phase response. PMID:26368182

  9. In operando tracking phase transformation evolution of lithium iron phosphate with hard X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiajun; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Wang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The delithiation reaction in lithium ion batteries is often accompanied by an electrochemically driven phase transformation process. Tracking the phase transformation process at nanoscale resolution during battery operation provides invaluable information for tailoring the kinetic barrier to optimize the physical and electrochemical properties of battery materials. Here, using hard X-ray microscopy—which offers nanoscale resolution and deep penetration of the material, and takes advantage of the elemental and chemical sensitivity—we develop an in operando approach to track the dynamic phase transformation process in olivine-type lithium iron phosphate at two size scales: a multiple-particle scale to reveal a rate-dependent intercalation pathway through the entire electrode and a single-particle scale to disclose the intraparticle two-phase coexistence mechanism. These findings uncover the underlying two-phase mechanism on the intraparticle scale and the inhomogeneous charge distribution on the multiple-particle scale. This in operando approach opens up unique opportunities for advancing high-performance energy materials.

  10. In operando tracking phase transformation evolution of lithium iron phosphate with hard X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajun; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The delithiation reaction in lithium ion batteries is often accompanied by an electrochemically driven phase transformation process. Tracking the phase transformation process at nanoscale resolution during battery operation provides invaluable information for tailoring the kinetic barrier to optimize the physical and electrochemical properties of battery materials. Here, using hard X-ray microscopy--which offers nanoscale resolution and deep penetration of the material, and takes advantage of the elemental and chemical sensitivity--we develop an in operando approach to track the dynamic phase transformation process in olivine-type lithium iron phosphate at two size scales: a multiple-particle scale to reveal a rate-dependent intercalation pathway through the entire electrode and a single-particle scale to disclose the intraparticle two-phase coexistence mechanism. These findings uncover the underlying two-phase mechanism on the intraparticle scale and the inhomogeneous charge distribution on the multiple-particle scale. This in operando approach opens up unique opportunities for advancing high-performance energy materials. PMID:25087693

  11. Note: An improved calibration system with phase correction for electronic transformers with digital output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Han-miao; Li, Hong-bin

    2015-08-01

    The existing electronic transformer calibration systems employing data acquisition cards cannot satisfy some practical applications, because the calibration systems have phase measurement errors when they work in the mode of receiving external synchronization signals. This paper proposes an improved calibration system scheme with phase correction to improve the phase measurement accuracy. We employ NI PCI-4474 to design a calibration system, and the system has the potential to receive external synchronization signals and reach extremely high accuracy classes. Accuracy verification has been carried out in the China Electric Power Research Institute, and results demonstrate that the system surpasses the accuracy class 0.05. Furthermore, this system has been used to test the harmonics measurement accuracy of all-fiber optical current transformers. In the same process, we have used an existing calibration system, and a comparison of the test results is presented. The system after improvement is suitable for the intended applications.

  12. Note: An improved calibration system with phase correction for electronic transformers with digital output

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Han-miao Li, Hong-bin

    2015-08-15

    The existing electronic transformer calibration systems employing data acquisition cards cannot satisfy some practical applications, because the calibration systems have phase measurement errors when they work in the mode of receiving external synchronization signals. This paper proposes an improved calibration system scheme with phase correction to improve the phase measurement accuracy. We employ NI PCI-4474 to design a calibration system, and the system has the potential to receive external synchronization signals and reach extremely high accuracy classes. Accuracy verification has been carried out in the China Electric Power Research Institute, and results demonstrate that the system surpasses the accuracy class 0.05. Furthermore, this system has been used to test the harmonics measurement accuracy of all-fiber optical current transformers. In the same process, we have used an existing calibration system, and a comparison of the test results is presented. The system after improvement is suitable for the intended applications.

  13. Note: An improved calibration system with phase correction for electronic transformers with digital output.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-miao; Li, Hong-bin

    2015-08-01

    The existing electronic transformer calibration systems employing data acquisition cards cannot satisfy some practical applications, because the calibration systems have phase measurement errors when they work in the mode of receiving external synchronization signals. This paper proposes an improved calibration system scheme with phase correction to improve the phase measurement accuracy. We employ NI PCI-4474 to design a calibration system, and the system has the potential to receive external synchronization signals and reach extremely high accuracy classes. Accuracy verification has been carried out in the China Electric Power Research Institute, and results demonstrate that the system surpasses the accuracy class 0.05. Furthermore, this system has been used to test the harmonics measurement accuracy of all-fiber optical current transformers. In the same process, we have used an existing calibration system, and a comparison of the test results is presented. The system after improvement is suitable for the intended applications. PMID:26329248

  14. ISOTHERMAL PHASE TRANSFORMATION CYCLING IN STEEL BY APPLICATION OF A HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Kisner, Roger A; Wilgen, John B

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation reversal via the application and removal of a large magnetic field was investigated. Because a large magnetic field can alter the phase equilibrium between paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, volume fractions for each phase constituent can be modified at constant temperature by changing the magnetic field strength. In this research elevated temperature isothermal hold experiments were performed for 5160 steel. During the isothermal hold, the magnetic field was cycled between 0 and 30 Tesla. As companion experiments, temperature cycling and isothermal holds were performed without magnetic fields. The resulting microstructures were examined using optical and SEM metallography. These microstructures indicate that a portion of the microstructure experiences isothermal transformation cycling between austenite and ferrite due to the application and removal of the 30T (Tesla) magnetic field.

  15. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in calcite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushana, H.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Lakshminarasappa, B. N.; Singh, Fouran; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    2009-11-01

    Ion irradiation induced phase transformation in calcite single crystals have been studied by means of Raman and infrared spectroscopy using 120 MeV Au 9+ ions. The observed bands have been assigned according to group theory analysis. For higher fluence of 5×10 12 ion/cm 2, an extra peak on either side of the 713 cm -1 peak and an increase in the intensity of 1085 cm -1 peak were observed in Raman studies. FTIR spectra exhibit extra absorption bands at 674, 1589 cm -1 and enhancement in bands at 2340 and 2374 cm -1 was observed. This might be due to the phase transformation from calcite to vaterite. The damage cross section ( σ) for all the Raman and FTIR active modes was determined. The increase of FWHM, shift in peak positions and appearance of new peaks indicated that calcite phase is converted into vaterite.

  16. Status on Iterative Transform Phase Retrieval Applied to the GBT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce; Aronstein, David; Smith, Scott; Shiri, Ron; Hollis, Jan M.; Lyons, Richard; Prestage, Richard; Hunter, Todd; Ghigo, Frank; Nikolic, Bojan

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of iterative transform phase retrieval in the analysis of the Green Bank Radio Telescope (GBT) Data. It reviews the NASA projects that have used phase retrieval, and the testbed for the algorithm to be used for the James Webb Space Telescope. It shows the comparison of phase retrieval with an interferometer, and reviews the two approaches used for phase retrieval, iterative transform (ITA) or parametric (non-linear least squares model fitting). The concept of ITA Phase Retrieval is reviewed, and the application to Radio Antennas is reviewed. The presentation also examines the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) data from the GBT, and the Fourier model that NRAO uses to analyze the data. The challenge for ITA phase retrieval is reviewed, and the coherent approximation for incoherent data is shown. The validity of the approximation is good for a large tilt. There is a review of the proof of concept of the Phase Review simulation using the input wavefront, and the initial sampling parameters estimate from the focused GBT data.

  17. A novel solvethermal method for the preparation of magnetic monodisperse Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles II: High-surface-activity ferrihydrite used as precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Sha; Yang, Caiqin; Yan, Jiawen; Wang, Jing

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The magnetic monodisperse Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by novel solvethemal method at moderate temperature using high surface active ferrihydrit and iron powder as precursors in orgnic solvent. - Highlights: • Facile synthesis of organic ligands-coated monodisperse Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles at low temperature. • Low-cost high surface active ferrihydrit and reductive iron powder were used as precursors. • N{sub 2}-free reaction environment. • Organic ligands act as reductive. - Abstract: Magnetic monodisperse Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from ferrihydrite and iron powder by a novel solvethermal method at moderate temperatures in aqueous and organic solvent media. The effects of temperature and solvent medium on the phase and particle size of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were investigated. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry–thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. At 120 °C in the organic medium, uniform organic-ligand-coated superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were produced; the particle size increased with the temperature, and the calculated mean particle size was 8.9 nm. At 180 °C in the aqueous medium, pure-phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was obtained. Thus, the organic solvent did not only serve as a solvent but also participated in the reaction. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} production in the aqueous and organic solvent media had different mechanisms.

  18. Microstructure and plastic deformation of orthorhombic titanium aluminides Ti2AlNb. IV. Formation of the transformation twins upon the α2 → O phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantseva, N. V.; Demakov, S. L.; Popov, A. A.

    2007-04-01

    X-ray diffraction transmission electron microscopy, and measurements of microhardness and resistivity were used to study the formation of the orthorhombic O phase upon the α2 → O phase transformation. It has been found that the orthorhombic O phase is formed by the diffusion mechanism in the form of thin lamellar precipitates (domains). Upon subsequent growth, these domains form packets of twins with a twinning plane {110}. It is shown that the (130) twinning plane is not realized directly, but it appears as a result of joining of twin packets. No formation of an intermediate metastable phase was observed upon this transformation.

  19. Stability analysis of the martensitic phase transformation in Co2NiGa Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, Anjana; Arróyave, Raymundo; Entel, Peter; Valencia-Jaime, I.; Romero, Aldo H.

    2015-08-01

    Phase competition and the subsequent phase selection are important characteristics of alloy systems exhibiting numerous states of distinct symmetry but comparable energy. The stoichiometric Co2NiGa Heusler alloy exhibits a martensitic transformation with concomitant reduction in symmetry from an austenitic L 21 phase (cubic) to a martensitic L 10 phase (tetragonal). A structural search was carried out for this alloy and it showed the existence of a number of structures with monoclinic and orthorhombic symmetry with ground state energies comparable to and even less than that of the L 10 structure, usually reported as the ground state at low temperatures. We describe these structures and focus in particular on the structural transition path from the L 21 to tetragonal and orthorhombic structures for this material. Calculations were carried out to study the Bain (L 21-L 10 ) and Burgers (L 21-hcp ) transformations. The barrierless Burgers path yielded a stable martensitic phase with orthorhombic symmetry (O ) with energy much lower—beyond the expected uncertainty of the calculation methods—than the known tetragonal L 10 martensitic structure. This low-energy structure (O ) has yet to be observed experimentally and it is thus of scientific interest to discern the cause for the apparent discrepancy between experiments and calculations. It is postulated that the Co2NiGa Heusler system exhibits a classic case of the phase selection problem: although the unexpected O phase may be relatively more stable than the L 10 phase, the energy barrier for the (L 21-O ) transformation may be much higher than the barrier to the (L 21-L 10 ) transformation. To validate this hypothesis, the stability of this structure was investigated by considering the contributions of elastic and vibrational effects, configurational disorder, magnetic disorder, and atomic disorder. The calculations simulating the effect of magnetic disorder/high temperature as well as the atomic disorder

  20. A three-phase cylinder model for residual and transformational stresses in SMA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, J.B.; White, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    SMA composites are a class of smart materials in which shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators are embedded in a polymer matrix composite. The difference in thermal expansion between the SMA and the host material leads to residual stresses during processing. Similarly, the SMA transformations from martensite to austenite, or the reverse, also generate stresses. These stresses acting in combination can lead to SMA/epoxy interfacial debonding. In this study the residual and transformational stresses are investigated for an SMA wire embedded in a graphite/epoxy composite. A three phase micromechanical model is developed. The SMA wire is assumed to behave as a thermoelastic material. Nitinol{trademark} SMA austenitic and martensitic transformations are modeled using linear piecewise interpolation of the experimental data. The interphase is modeled as a thermoelastic polymer. A transversely isotropic thermoelastic composite is used for the outer phase. Stress-free conditions are assumed immediately before cool down from the cure temperature. The effect of SMA and coating properties on residual and transformational stresses are evaluated. A decrease in stresses at the composite/coating interface is predicted through the use of thick, compliant coatings. Reducing the recovery strain and moving the transformation to higher temperatures are also effective in reducing residual stresses.

  1. Influence of processing-induced phase transformations on the dissolution of theophylline tablets.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Smita; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2004-02-12

    The object of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of (1) processing-induced decrease in drug crystallinity and (2) phase transformations during dissolution, on the performance of theophylline tablet formulations. Anhydrous theophylline underwent multiple transformations (anhydrate --> hydrate --> anhydrate) during processing. Although the crystallinity of the anhydrate obtained finally was lower than that of the unprocessed drug, it dissolved at a slower rate. This decrease in dissolution rate was attributed to the accelerated anhydrate to hydrate transformation during the dissolution run. Water vapor sorption studies proved to be a good predictor of powder dissolution behavior. While a decrease in crystallinity was brought about either by milling or by granulation, the effect on tablet dissolution was pronounced only in the latter. Tablet formulations prepared from the granules exhibited higher hardness, longer disintegration time, and slower dissolution than those containing the milled drug. The granules underwent plastic deformation during compression resulting in harder tablets, with delayed disintegration. The high hardness coupled with rapid anhydrate --> hydrate transformation during dissolution resulted in the formation of a hydrate layer on the tablet surface, which further delayed tablet disintegration and, consequently, dissolution. Phase transformations during processing and, more importantly, during dissolution influenced the observed dissolution rates. Product performance was a complex function of the physical state of the active and the processing conditions. PMID:15198529

  2. Phase transformation of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaming

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is used to convert syngas to liquid hydrocarbons using iron-based catalysts. However, the nature of the active phase and phase transformations during F-T synthesis are not well understood. In this work, the phase transformations of Fe catalysts both during F-T synthesis and controlled treatment conditions have been studied using cross-section transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Catalyst samples were obtained from F-T synthesis runs at medium pressure (1.48 MPa) with a H2:CO ratio of 0.7. Samples were analyzed without removal of the wax to preserve the catalyst microstructure intact and prevent oxidation due to air exposure. In all active Fe catalysts, a highly dispersed chi-carbide (Fe5C2) phase with an average particle size <10 nm was seen to be present along with larger sized particles of hexagonal Fe 7C3. On the other hand, the carbide phase whose XRD pattern resembles that obtained by the Barton and Gale was found to be associated with catalysts of low activity. All carbide particles are covered with amorphous carbonaceous layers as seen by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In a series of separate experiments, phase transformations that occur during catalyst activation at atmospheric pressure were studied. During direct CO carburization of iron oxide at 250°C, multiple nucleation sites lead to formation of smaller Fe carbide particles predominantly of the Barton-Gale carbide. However, starting from metallic Fe we obtain a chi-carbide phase without significant change in particle size. Treatment in syngas (H 2:CO = 0.7) results in less complete carburization and larger particle sizes for both the carbide and the magnetite phases. The presence of trace amounts of water vapor during reduction appears to cause formation of large faceted magnetite crystals, which are difficult to further transform to the active carbide phase. The silica support is effective at keeping the Fe phases

  3. THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS OF PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS IN PLUTONIUM ALLOYS - PART I

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Liu, Z; Zhou, S

    2004-08-18

    In this report we investigate order, stability, and phase transformations for a series of actinide-based alloys. The statics and kinetics of precipitation and ordering in this class of alloys are modeled with a scheme that couples fundamental information on the alloy energetics obtained from experimental and assessed thermo-chemical data to the CALPHAD approach commonly used in industry for designing alloys with engineering specificity with the help of the Thermo-Calc software application. The CALPHAD approach is applied to the study of the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of Pu-based alloys, Pu-X, where X=Al, Fe, Ga. The assessment of the equilibrium phase diagrams in the whole range of alloy composition has been performed with the PARROT module of the Thermo-Calc application software. Predictions are made on the low temperature and Pu-rich side of the phase diagrams of Pu-Ga and Pu-Al for which controversy has been noted in the past. The validity of the assessed thermo-chemical database will be discussed by comparing predicted heats of transformation for pure Pu with measured values from differential scanning calorimetry analysis. An overall picture for the stability properties of Pu-Ga and Pu-Al that reconciles the results of past studies carried out on these alloys is proposed. Results on phase stability in the ternary Fe-Ga-Pu and Al-Fe-Pu alloys are discussed. The information collected in this study is then used to model metastability, long-term stability and aging for this class of alloys by coupling Thermo-Calc with DICTRA, a series of modules that allow the analysis of DIffusion Controlled TRAnsformations. Kinetics information is then summarized in so-called TTT (temperature-time-transformations) diagrams for the most relevant phases of actinide alloys. Specifically, results are presented on kinetics of phase transformations associated with the eutectoid-phase decomposition reaction occurring at low temperature, and with the martensitic transformation

  4. Ab-initio phasing using nanocrystal shape transforms with incomplete unit cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers are used in measuring diffraction patterns from nanocrystals in the ‘diffract-before-destroy’ mode by outrunning radiation damage. The finite-sized nanocrystals provide an opportunity to recover intensity between Bragg spots by removing the modulating function that depends on crystal shape, i.e. the transform of the crystal shape. This shape-transform dividing-out scheme for solving the phase problem has been tested using simulated examples with cubic crystals. It provides a phasing method which does not require atomic resolution data, chemical modification to the sample, or modelling based on the protein databases. It is common to find multiple structural units (e.g. molecules, in symmetry-related positions) within a single unit cell, therefore incomplete unit cells (e.g. one additional molecule) can be observed at surface layers of crystals. In this work, the effects of such incomplete unit cells on the ‘dividing-out’ phasing algorithm are investigated using 2D crystals within the projection approximation. It is found that the incomplete unit cells do not hinder the recovery of the scattering pattern from a single unit cell (after dividing out the shape transforms from data merged from many nanocrystals of different sizes), assuming that certain unit-cell types are preferred. The results also suggest that the dynamic range of the data is a critical issue to be resolved in order to apply the shape transform method practically. PMID:25075316

  5. Phase transformation in thiamine hydrochloride tablets: Influence on tablet microstructure, physical properties, and performance.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Paroma; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Govindarajan, Ramprakash

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this article was to monitor phase transformation in thiamine hydrochloride, from a nonstoichiometric hydrate (NSH) to a hemihydrate (HH), in stored tablets, prepared both by direct compression and wet granulation, and to relate the storage-induced phase transformation with changes in tablet microstructure, physical properties, and performance. Raman spectroscopy revealed complete NSH → HH transformation in tablets, within 30 h of storage at 40°C/75% relative humidity. When the tablets were prepared by wet granulation of NSH alone, there was a marked increase in both tablet volume and hardness on storage. However, when microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was included in granulation, the resulting stored tablets also exhibited a pronounced increase in disintegration time. In contrast, tablets prepared by dry processing via compression of a NSH-MCC physical mixture did not exhibit any changes in properties, despite the in situ solid form conversion. Scanning electron microscopy revealed growth of needle-like HH crystals in all stored tablets and mercury porosimetry revealed considerable changes in the pore size distribution during storage. Longer storage led to crystal growth (Ostwald ripening), causing further gradual but less dramatic changes in properties. The phase transformation and the complex interparticulate associations in the tablet influenced the changes in tablet microstructure, compact physical properties, and product behavior. PMID:22213350

  6. Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary piezoelectric single crystals near the morphotropic phase boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chengtao; Wang, Yaojin Wang, Zhiguang; Ge, Wenwei; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, D.; Luo, Haosu

    2014-12-08

    Structural phase transformations in (100)-oriented Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} single crystals have been investigated by X-ray diffraction. A cubic (C) → tetragonal (T) → monoclinic-C (M{sub C}) transformation sequence was observed in the field-cooled condition. Two phase coexistence regions of C + T and T + M{sub C} were found. In addition to an increase in the C → T phase transition temperature and a decrease of the T → M{sub C} one, a broadening of the coexistence regions was also found with increasing field. This broadening can be explained by the presence of polar nano regions within the C, T, and M{sub C} phase regions.

  7. Phase-space analysis for ionization processes in the laser-atom interaction using Gabor transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, X. F.; Liu, S. B.; Song, H. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the ionization processes during laser-atom interaction are investigated in phase-space using Gabor transformation. Based on the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), the depletion of the whole system caused by the mask function is taken into consideration in calculating the plasma density. We obtain the momentum distribution via the Gabor transformation of the escaping portions of the time-dependent wave packet at the detector-like points on the interior boundaries from which the kinetic energies carried by the escaping portions are calculated.

  8. Comments on 'Kinetic Study on the Hexacelsian-Celsian Phase Transformation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Drummond, Charles H., III

    1992-01-01

    A value of 20.1 +/- 4 kcal/mole for the activation energy (E) for the hexacelsian to celsian phase transformation in BaAl2Si2O8 was reported in an earlier work. In the present work, the earlier experimental data were reanalyzed and a much higher value of E was obtained. This revised E value is consistent with the transformation mechanism of a layered hexacelsian structure into a three-dimensional feldspar structure of celsian which would necessitate the breaking of the Si-O and/or the Al-O bonds.

  9. Metastable mantle phase transformations and deep earthquakes in subducting oceanic lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Stein, S.; Okal, E.A.; Rubie, David C.

    1996-01-01

    Earth's deepest earthquakes occur as a population in subducting or previously subducted lithosphere at depths ranging from about 325 to 690 km. This depth interval closely brackets the mantle transition zone, characterized by rapid seismic velocity increases resulting from the transformation of upper mantle minerals to higher-pressure phases. Deep earthquakes thus provide the primary direct evidence for subduction of the lithosphere to these depths and allow us to investigate the deep thermal, thermodynamic, and mechanical ferment inside slabs. Numerical simulations of reaction rates show that the olivine ??? spinel transformation should be kinetically hindered in old, cold slabs descending into the transition zone. Thus wedge-shaped zones of metastable peridotite probably persist to depths of more than 600 km. Laboratory deformation experiments on some metastable minerals display a shear instability called transformational faulting. This instability involves sudden failure by localized superplasticity in thin shear zones where the metastable host mineral transforms to a denser, finer-grained phase. Hence in cold slabs, such faulting is expected for the polymorphic reactions in which olivine transforms to the spinel structure and clinoenstatite transforms to ilmenite. It is thus natural to hypothesize that deep earthquakes result from transformational faulting in metastable peridotite wedges within cold slabs. This consideration of the mineralogical states of slabs augments the traditional largely thermal view of slab processes and explains some previously enigmatic slab features. It explains why deep seismicity occurs only in the approximate depth range of the mantle transition zone, where minerals in downgoing slabs should transform to spinel and ilmenite structures. The onset of deep shocks at about 325 km is consistent with the onset of metastability near the equilibrium phase boundary in the slab. Even if a slab penetrates into the lower mantle, earthquakes

  10. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Su-Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Jia, Shuang; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Batosz; Dil, J Hugo; Shibayev, Pavel P; Basak, Susmita; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Cava, Robert J; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Hasan, M Zahid

    2015-01-01

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from a surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results offer a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality. PMID:25882717

  11. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Su-Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Jia, Shuang; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Batosz; Dil, J. Hugo; Shibayev, Pavel P.; Basak, Susmita; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Cava, Robert J.; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2015-01-01

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from a surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results offer a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality. PMID:25882717

  12. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Su -Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Jia, Shuang; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Batosz; Dil, J. Hugo; et al

    2015-04-17

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from amore » surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results provide a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality.« less

  13. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Su -Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Jia, Shuang; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Batosz; Dil, J. Hugo; Shibayev, Pavel P.; Basak, Susmita; Chang, Tay -Rong; Jeng, Horng -Tay; Cava, Robert J.; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2015-04-17

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from a surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results provide a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality.

  14. Unconventional transformation of spin Dirac phase across a topological quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su-Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Jia, Shuang; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Batosz; Dil, J. Hugo; Shibayev, Pavel P.; Basak, Susmita; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Cava, Robert J.; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2015-04-01

    The topology of a topological material can be encoded in its surface states. These surface states can only be removed by a bulk topological quantum phase transition into a trivial phase. Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to image the formation of protected surface states in a topological insulator as we chemically tune the system through a topological transition. Surprisingly, we discover an exotic spin-momentum locked, gapped surface state in the trivial phase that shares many important properties with the actual topological surface state in anticipation of the change of topology. Using a spin-resolved measurement, we show that apart from a surface bandgap these states develop spin textures similar to the topological surface states well before the transition. Our results offer a general paradigm for understanding how surface states in topological phases arise from a quantum phase transition and are suggestive for the future realization of Weyl arcs, condensed matter supersymmetry and other fascinating phenomena in the vicinity of a quantum criticality.

  15. Transformers: the changing phases of low-dimensional vanadium oxide bronzes.

    PubMed

    Marley, Peter M; Horrocks, Gregory A; Pelcher, Kate E; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-28

    In this feature article, we explore the electronic and structural phase transformations of ternary vanadium oxides with the composition MxV2O5 where M is an intercalated cation. The periodic arrays of intercalated cations ordered along quasi-1D tunnels or layered between 2D sheets of the V2O5 framework induce partial reduction of the framework vanadium atoms giving rise to charge ordering patterns that are specific to the metal M and stoichiometry x. This periodic charge ordering makes these materials remarkably versatile platforms for studying electron correlation and underpins the manifestation of phenomena such as colossal metal-insulator transitions, quantized charge corrals, and superconductivity. We describe current mechanistic understanding of these emergent phenomena with a particular emphasis on the benefits derived from scaling these materials to nanostructured dimensions wherein precise ordering of cations can be obtained and phase relationships can be derived that are entirely inaccessible in the bulk. In particular, structural transformations induced by intercalation are dramatically accelerated due to the shorter diffusion path lengths at nanometer-sized dimensions, which cause a dramatic reduction of kinetic barriers to phase transformations and facilitate interconversion between the different frameworks. We conclude by summarizing numerous technological applications that have become feasible due to recent advances in controlling the structural chemistry and both electronic and structural phase transitions in these versatile frameworks. PMID:25692185

  16. Influence of Dynamic Compression on Phase Transformation of Martensitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ying; Young, Marcus L.; Nie, Xu

    2015-10-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit high damping capacity in both austenitic and martensitic phases, due to either a stress-induced martensite phase transformation or a stress-induced martensite variant reorientation, making them ideal candidates for vibration suppression devices to protect structural components from damage due to external forces. In this study, both quasi-static and dynamic compression was conducted on a martensitic NiTi SMA using a mechanical loading frame and on a Kolsky compression bar, respectively, to examine the relationship between microstructure and phase transformation characteristics of martensitic NiTi SMAs. Both endothermic and exothermic peaks disappear completely after experiencing deformation at a strain rate of 103 s-1 and to a strain of about 10 pct. The phase transformation peaks reappear after the deformed specimens were annealed at 873 K (600 °C) for 30 minutes. As compared to samples from quasi-static loading, where a large amount of twinning is observed with a small amount of grain distortion and fracture, samples from dynamic loading show much less twinning with a larger amount of grain distortion and fracture.

  17. Microstructure of massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl phase studied by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, E.; Kumagai, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1997-12-31

    A microstructure of the massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl ({gamma}{sub m}) phase in a Ti-48at.%Al alloy, which was heat treated in the high-temperature {alpha}-Ti (disordered hcp) single phase field (1,683 K), followed by ice water quenching, has been examined using high-resolution electron microscopy. The characteristic features of the microstructure originated from the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation have been clarified in detail, which are as follows. (1) Extremely thin hcp plates (about 0.8--2nm in thickness), which are considered to be a retained {alpha} phase, are found to exist in the {gamma}{sub m} phase. (2) Twin boundaries are found to be not flat interfaces, that is, twin interfaces are not on the exact (111) mirror plane. This situation is attributed to the existence of a number of partial dislocations at the twin boundaries. (3) Antiphase relationship between the regions either side of the thin rotated domain wall is confirmed. The validity of this situation is explained by assuming that the thin rotated domain wall has been grown from a simple antiphase domain boundary. On the basis of these facts, mechanism of the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation has been discussed.

  18. In-situ measurement of phase transformation kinetics in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Leopold; Hofmann, Michael; Saal, Patrick; Volk, Wolfram; Hoffmann, Hartmut

    2013-11-15

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) alloyed with 0.42% Mn and 0.72% Cu was heat treated in a mirror furnace and the phase transitions were studied in-situ by neutron diffraction. The heat treatment consisted of austenitisation at 920 °C and isothermal austempering at 400 °C, 350 °C and 300 °C, respectively. Due to the growth of ferrite platelets, the austenite content decreases rapidly at all temperatures within the first 15–20 min and reaches a stable plateau after 35 min (400 °C) to 80 min (300 °C). The carbon content of the residual austenite, which was monitored and characterised by the change of the lattice parameter, increases up to 1.6 wt.% caused by redistribution from the newly formed ferrite. While at higher austempering temperatures this takes place almost parallel to the phase transformation, at 300 °C the redistribution of carbon to austenite lags behind considerably. Furthermore the neutron data revealed an austenite peak asymmetry during austempering which is attributed to successive phase transformation. It results temporarily in two fractions of austenite, an initial low-carbon and an enriched high-carbon modification. - Highlights: • The heat treatment of ADI was studied in detail by in-situ neutron diffraction. • The phase fractions were monitored and evaluated quantitatively. • The austenite carbon content increased up to 1.6 wt.% during austempering. • Peak asymmetries indicate two austenite fractions during highest transformation rates.

  19. Solid-gaseous phase transformation of elemental contaminants during the gasification of biomass.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Ameh, Abiba; Lei, Mei; Duan, Lunbo; Longhurst, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Disposal of plant biomass removed from heavy metal contaminated land via gasification achieves significant volume reduction and can recover energy. However, these biomass often contain high concentrations of heavy metals leading to hot-corrosion of gasification facilities and toxic gaseous emissions. Therefore, it is of significant interest to gain a further understanding of the solid-gas phase transition of metal(loid)s during gasification. Detailed elemental analyses (C, H, O, N and key metal/metalloid elements) were performed on five plant species collected from a contaminated site. Using multi-phase equilibria modelling software (MTDATA), the analytical data allows modelling of the solid/gas transformation of metal(loid)s during gasification. Thermodynamic modelling based on chemical equilibrium calculations was carried out in this study to predict the fate of metal(loid) elements during typical gasification conditions and to show how these are influenced by metal(loid) composition in the biomass and operational conditions. As, Cd, Zn and Pb tend to transform to their gaseous forms at relatively low temperatures (<1000°C). Ni, Cu, Mn and Co converts to gaseous forms within the typical gasification temperature range of 1000-1200°C. Whereas Cr, Al, Fe and Mg remain in solid phase at higher temperatures (>1200°C). Simulation of pressurised gasification conditions shows that higher pressures increase the temperature at which solid-to-gaseous phase transformations takes place. PMID:26603198

  20. Target tracking using nonlinear reference phase-encoded joint transform correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed N.; Asari, Vijayan K.; Karim, Mohammad A.; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2012-04-01

    Optical joint transform correlation (JTC) has been proven to be an efficient pattern recognition tool, especially, for real-time applications. However, the classical JTC suffers from a lot of limitations such as broad correlation peaks, large side lobes, duplicate correlation peaks and low discrimination between target and non-target objects. This paper proposes a nonlinear JTC based target detection and tracking technique, where the reference image is phase-shifted and phase-encoded and then fed to two parallel processing channels. Each channel introduces the unknown input scene and performs Fourier transformations to obtain the joint power spectra signals, which are then combined and phase-encoded. Then a nonlinear operation is performed on the modified power spectrum followed by the application of fringe-adjusted filtering operation. A subsequent inverse Fourier transform operation yields the correlation output containing a highly distinct peak corresponding to each target present in the input scene. The reference image phase-encoding process removes any overlapping issue among the input scene objects, which is a drawback of classical JTC technique. An updated decision criterion is developed for the correlation plane so that it can accurately identify the location of the target. The proposed pattern recognition technique offers an excellent alternative for target tracking in an unknown video sequence.

  1. Phase transformation during mechano-synthesis of nanocrystalline/amorphous Fe–32Mn–6Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Rasool; Shamsipoor, Ali; Ghaffari, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Morteza; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2013-10-15

    Mechano-synthesis of Fe–32Mn–6Si alloy by mechanical alloying of the elemental powder mixtures was evaluated by running the ball milling process under an inert argon gas atmosphere. In order to characterize the as-milled powders, powder sampling was performed at predetermined intervals from 0.5 to 192 h. X-ray florescence analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and high resolution transmission electron microscope were utilized to investigate the chemical composition, structural evolution, morphological changes, and microstructure of the as-milled powders, respectively. According to the results, the nanocrystalline Fe–Mn–Si alloys were completely synthesized after 48 h of milling. Moreover, the formation of a considerable amount of amorphous phase during the milling process was indicated by quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis as well as high resolution transmission electron microscopy image and its selected area diffraction pattern. It was found that the α-to-γ and subsequently the amorphous-to-crystalline (especially martensite) phase transformation occurred by milling development. - Graphical abstract: Mechano-synthesis of nanocrystalline/amorphous Fe–32Mn–6Si shape memory alloys in the powder form: amorphous phase formation, α-to-γ phase transformation, mechano-crystallization of the amorphous, and martensite phase formation during the process. Highlights: • During MA, the α-to-γ phase transformation and amorphization occurred. • Mechano-crystallization of the amorphous phase occurred at sufficient milling time. • The formation of high amount of ε-martensite was evidenced at high milling times. • The platelet, spherical, and then irregular particle shapes was extended by MA. • By MA, the particles size was increased, then reduced, and afterward re-increased.

  2. Conductor Formation Through Phase Transformation in Ti-Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Wei, Y. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The resistance and transmittance of Ti-oxide thin films sputtered on quartz substrates were studied. The electrical and optical properties can be changed by varying the percentage of O2 introduced during the sputtering. The lowest resistivity for the sputtered Ti-oxide thin film was 2.30 × 10-2 Ω cm for 12.5% O2, which was obtained after annealing at 400°C in ambient oxygen. The results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) curve-fitting indicate that the Ti-oxide thin film contained both Ti2O3 and TiO2 phases during deposition. The Ti2O3 phase was transformed into the stable TiO2 phase during annealing. The Ti2O3-TiO2 phase transformation initiated the substitution reaction. The substitution of Ti4+ ions in the TiO2 phase for the Ti3+ ions in the Ti2O3 phase created the free electrons. This Ti2O3-TiO2 phase transformation demonstrates the potential mechanism for conduction in the annealed Ti-oxide thin films. The transmittance of the annealed Ti-oxide thin films can be as high as approximately 90% at the 400 nm wavelength with the introduction of 16.5% O2. This result indicates that the annealed Ti-oxide thin films are excellent candidates for use as transparent conducting layers for ultraviolet (UV) or near-UV light-emitting diode (LED) devices.

  3. Bioaccessibility Of Lead Sequestered To Corundum and Ferrihydrite In A Simulated Gastrointestinal System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead (Pb) sorption onto oxide surfaces in soils may strongly influence the risk posed from incidental ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. Lead was sorbed to model oxide minerals of corundum (α-Al2O3) and ferrihydrite (Fe5HO8•4H2

  4. Natural Ferrihydrite as an Agent for Reducing Turbidity Caused by Suspended Clays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The turbidity of water can be reduced by the addition of positively charged compounds which coagulate negatively charged clay particles in suspension causing them to flocculate. This research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Fe oxide mineral ferrihydrite as a flocculating agent fo...

  5. Indirect Phase Transformation of CuO to Cu2O on a Nanowire Surface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Banerjee, Sriya; Li, Huafang; Myung, Yoon; Banerjee, Parag

    2016-05-10

    The reduction of CuO nanowires (NWs) to Cu2O NWs undergoes an indirect phase transformation on the surface: from single crystalline CuO, to a disordered Cu2-δO phase, and then to crystalline Cu2O. A 9-12 nm disordered Cu2-δO is formed on the NW surface by exposing CuO NWs to CO at 1 Torr, 300 °C for 30 min. After 60 min, this layer decreases to 2-3 nm and is eliminated after 180 min. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using a scanning tunneling electron microscope and across a single NW reveals the disordered layer to be O-rich with respect to Cu2O with a maximum at. % Cu:O = 1.8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows adsorbed CO on the surface as evidence of the reduction reaction. Micro-Raman spectroscopy tracks the transformation in NWs as a function of reduction time. A CO enabled surface reduction reaction coupled to diffusion-limited transport of "nonlattice" O to the surface is proposed as a mechanism for Cu2-δO formation. The initial buildup of out-diffusing O to the surface appears to aid the formation of the disordered surface layer. The transformation follows Ostwald-Lussac's law which predicts formation of unstable phases over stable phases, when phase transformation rates are limited by kinetic or diffusional processes. The study provides a generalized approach for facile growth of few nanometer transient layers on multivalent, metal oxide NW surfaces. PMID:27093222

  6. Impact of quasi-dc currents on three-phase distribution transformer installations

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, B.W.; Barnes, P.R. ); Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Schafer, D.A. )

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes a series of tests designed to determine the response of quasi-dc currents on three-phase power distribution transformers for electric power systems. In general, if the dc injection is limited to the primary side of a step-down transformer, significant harmonic distortion is noted and an increase in the reactive power demand results. For dc injection on the secondary (load) side of the step-down transformer the harmonic content at the secondary side is quite high and saturation occurs with a relatively low level of dc injection; however, the reactive power demand is significantly lower. These tests produced no apparent damage to the transformers. Transformer damage is dependent on the duration of the dc excitation, the level of the excitation, and on thermal characteristics of the transfer. The transformer response time is found to be much shorter than seen in power transformer tests at lower dc injection levels. This shorter response time suggests that the response time is strongly dependent on the injected current levels, and that higher levels of dc injection for shorter durations could produce very high reactive power demands and harmonic distortion within a few tenths of a second. The added reactive power load could result in the blowing of fuses on the primary side of the transformer for even moderate dc injection levels, and neutral currents are quite large under even low-level dc injection. This smoking neutral'' results in high-level harmonic injection into equipment via the neutral and in possible equipment failure.

  7. Dependence of microbial magnetite formation on humic substance and ferrihydrite concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Dippon, Urs; Porsch, Katharina; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Iron mineral (trans)formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction is of environmental relevance as it can influence the fate of pollutants such as toxic metal ions or hydrocarbons. Magnetite is an important biomineralization product of microbial iron reduction and influences soil magnetic properties that are used for paleoclimate reconstruction and were suggested to assist in the localization of organic and inorganic pollutants. However, it is not well understood how different concentrations of Fe(III) minerals and humic substances (HS) affect magnetite formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction. We therefore used wet-chemical extractions, magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses to determine systematically how (i) different initial ferrihydrite (FH) concentrations and (ii) different concentrations of HS (i.e. the presence of either only adsorbed HS or adsorbed and dissolved HS) affect magnetite formation during FH reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In our experiments magnetite formation did not occur at FH concentrations lower than 5 mM, even though rapid iron reduction took place. At higher FH concentrations a minimum fraction of Fe(II) of 25-30% of the total iron present was necessary to initiate magnetite formation. The Fe(II) fraction at which magnetite formation started decreased with increasing FH concentration, which might be due to aggregation of the FH particles reducing the FH surface area at higher FH concentrations. HS concentrations of 215-393 mg HS/g FH slowed down (at partial FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) or even completely inhibited (at complete FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) magnetite formation due to blocking of surface sites by adsorbed HS. These results indicate the requirement of Fe(II) adsorption to, and subsequent interaction with, the FH surface for the transformation of FH into magnetite. Additionally, we found that the microbially formed magnetite was further reduced by strain MR-1 leading to

  8. Pressure, temperature, and electric field dependence of phase transformations in niobium modified 95/5 lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Wen D.; Carlos Valadez, J.; Gallagher, John A.; Jo, Hwan R.; Lynch, Christopher S.; Sahul, Raffi; Hackenberger, Wes

    2015-06-28

    Ceramic niobium modified 95/5 lead zirconate-lead titanate (PZT) undergoes a pressure induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transformation accompanied by an elimination of polarization and a volume reduction. Electric field and temperature drive the reverse transformation from the antiferroelectric to ferroelectric phase. The phase transformation was monitored under pressure, temperature, and electric field loading. Pressures and temperatures were varied in discrete steps from 0 MPa to 500 MPa and 25 °C to 125 °C, respectively. Cyclic bipolar electric fields were applied with peak amplitudes of up to 6 MV m{sup −1} at each pressure and temperature combination. The resulting electric displacement–electric field hysteresis loops were open “D” shaped at low pressure, characteristic of soft ferroelectric PZT. Just below the phase transformation pressure, the hysteresis loops took on an “S” shape, which split into a double hysteresis loop just above the phase transformation pressure. Far above the phase transformation pressure, when the applied electric field is insufficient to drive an antiferroelectric to ferroelectric phase transformation, the hysteresis loops collapse to linear dielectric behavior. Phase stability maps were generated from the experimental data at each of the temperature steps and used to form a three dimensional pressure–temperature–electric field phase diagram.

  9. Entanglement under the renormalization-group transformations on quantum states and in quantum phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, T.-C.

    2010-06-15

    We consider quantum states under the renormalization-group (RG) transformations introduced by Verstraete et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 140601 (2005)] and propose a quantification of entanglement under such RGs (via the geometric measure of entanglement). We examine the resulting entanglement under RG transformations for the ground states of ''matrix-product-state'' Hamiltonians constructed by Wolf et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 110403 (2006)] that possess quantum phase transitions. We find that near critical points, the ground-state entanglement exhibits singular behavior. The singular behavior within finite steps of the RG obeys a scaling hypothesis and reveals the correlation length exponent. However, under the infinite steps of RG transformation, the singular behavior is rendered different and is universal only when there is an underlying conformal-field-theory description of the critical point.

  10. Effects of transformed ferrite growth on the tensile fracture characteristics of a dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W. C.; Kim, C. H.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of transformed ferrite growth on the tensile fracture characteristics of a dual-phase steel were investigated by observing crack initiation, propagation, and fracture behaviors. Crack initiation occurred by decohesion between martensite and ferrite. However, cracks propagated along the ferrite-martensite interface in a high temperature quenched specimen, whereas in specimens quenched from lower temperature cracks propagated into the martensite particle. Tensile fracture behaviors were not strongly influenced by the cooling rate. At both cooling rates of 5.6 and 0.1 °C/sec, specimens quenched from high temperature fractured by partially brittle fracture mode, but fracture mode changed to ductile mode as the quenching temperature decreased. The effect of transformed ferrite on the fracture mode was not substantially different from that of retained ferrite. However, the crack initiation and propagation was influenced by the variation in martensite distribution caused by different growth behavior of transformed ferrite.

  11. Entanglement under the renormalization-group transformations on quantum states and in quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2010-06-01

    We consider quantum states under the renormalization-group (RG) transformations introduced by Verstraete [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.140601 94, 140601 (2005)] and propose a quantification of entanglement under such RGs (via the geometric measure of entanglement). We examine the resulting entanglement under RG transformations for the ground states of “matrix-product-state” Hamiltonians constructed by Wolf [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.110403 97, 110403 (2006)] that possess quantum phase transitions. We find that near critical points, the ground-state entanglement exhibits singular behavior. The singular behavior within finite steps of the RG obeys a scaling hypothesis and reveals the correlation length exponent. However, under the infinite steps of RG transformation, the singular behavior is rendered different and is universal only when there is an underlying conformal-field-theory description of the critical point.

  12. Nickel partitioning in biogenic and abiogenic ferrihydrite: The influence of silica and implications for ancient environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickhoff, Merle; Obst, Martin; Schröder, Christian; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Martinez, Raul E.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides are ubiquitous in modern soils and sediments, and their large surface area leads to scavenging of trace elements. Experimental trace element partitioning between Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides and aqueous solutions have been used to elucidate the geochemical composition of the Precambrian oceans based on the trace element concentrations in Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). However, previous partitioning experiments did not consider the potential influence of microbially-derived organic material, even though it is widely believed that bacterial phytoplankton was involved in Fe(II) oxidation and the deposition of BIF primary minerals. Therefore, the present study focuses on sorption of Ni to, and co-precipitation of Ni with, both biogenic ferrihydrite precipitated by the freshwater photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 and the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum, as well as chemically synthesized ferrihydrite. We considered the influence of cellular organic material, medium composition and the availability of dissolved silica. Our results show a preferential association of Ni with ferrihydrite, and not with the microbial cells or extracellular organic substances. We found that the addition of silica (2 mM) did not influence Ni partitioning but led to the encrustation of some cells with ferrihydrite and amorphous silica. The two- to threefold lower Ni/Fe ratio in biogenic as compared to abiogenic ferrihydrite is probably due to a competition between Ni and organic matter for sorption sites on the mineral surface. Additionally, the competition of ions present at high concentrations in marine medium for sorption sites led to decreased Ni sorption or co-precipitation. Based on our data we conclude that, if the Fe(III) minerals deposited in BIFs were - at least to some extent - biological, then the Ni concentrations in the early ocean would have been higher than previously suggested. This study shows the importance of considering the

  13. Effect of grain structure on phase transformation events in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Dahotre, N.B.; McCay, M.H.; McCay, T.D. ); Hubbard, C.R.; Porter, W.D.; Cavin, O.B. )

    1993-06-01

    Nickel base superalloys generally obtain their maximum strength from [gamma][prime][Ni[sub 3](Al,Ti)] and [gamma][double prime][Ni[sub 3](Al,Ti,Nb)] age hardening precipitates. During welding the [gamma][prime] precipitation is very rapid and can lead to strain age cracking, which limits weldability. Thus, the weldable superalloys are limited in their Al and Ti content and hence in their ultimate strength. One method of increasing the ultimate strength of a superalloy, while avoiding strain age cracking, is the addition of Nb. This produces Ni[sub 3]Nb([delta]), and when used in conjunction with a limited amount of [gamma][prime], results in an increase in strength without strain age cracking problems. The [gamma][double prime] does not lead to strain age cracking because its transformation kinetics are too slow for formation during ordinary welding practice. This combination of [gamma][prime] and [gamma][double prime] strengthening is incorporated into the Inconel 718 alloys. The research reported herein was undertaken to determine the time-temperature response of Inconel 718 in the as-cast, wrought and wrought-grain-grown states, using differential thermal analysis (DTA). It is essential to locate the temperature regime of each phase transformation event and to study the transformation sequence in order to tailor sound laser welding techniques for Inconel 718. In the present research, a DTA technique was employed to study both the phase transformation events and the phase transformation sequence as a function of the pre-existing condition of the alloy.

  14. Volume and Mass Estimation of Three-Phase High Power Transformers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimnach, Greg L.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft historically have had sub-1kW(sub e), electrical requirements for GN&C, science, and communications: Galileo at 600W(sub e), and Cassini at 900W(sub e), for example. Because most missions have had the same order of magnitude power requirements, the Power Distribution Systems (PDS) use existing, space-qualified technology and are DC. As science payload and mission duration requirements increase, however, the required electrical power increases. Subsequently, this requires a change from a passive energy conversion (solar arrays and batteries) to dynamic (alternator, solar dynamic, etc.), because dynamic conversion has higher thermal and conversion efficiencies, has higher power densities, and scales more readily to higher power levels. Furthermore, increased power requirements and physical distribution lengths are best served with high-voltage, multi-phase AC to maintain distribution efficiency and minimize voltage drops. The generated AC-voltage must be stepped-up (or down) to interface with various subsystems or electrical hardware. Part of the trade-space design for AC distribution systems is volume and mass estimation of high-power transformers. The volume and mass are functions of the power rating, operating frequency, the ambient and allowable temperature rise, the types and amount of heat transfer available, the core material and shape, the required flux density in a core, the maximum current density, etc. McLyman has tabulated the performance of a number of transformers cores and derived a "cookbook" methodology to determine the volume of transformers, whereas Schawrze had derived an empirical method to estimate the mass of single-phase transformers. Based on the work of McLyman and Schwarze, it is the intent herein to derive an empirical solution to the volume and mass estimation of three-phase, laminated EI-core power transformers, having radiated and conducted heat transfer mechanisms available. Estimation of the mounting hardware, connectors

  15. Effect of calcination temperature on phase transformation of HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S. K.; Kaur, Charanpreet; Kaur, Ramneek; Kaur, Jagdish

    2015-08-28

    Oxides nanomaterials exhibit unique physical, chemical and structural properties and motivated a big research that focus in the integration of these materials for various optoelectronic device applications. In present work, hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized using precipitation method. Hafnium tetrachloride and sodium hydroxide has been used as starting precursors. Prepared oxide material has been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The phase transformation from amorphous to monoclinic is observed with the increase in calcination temperature from 500 °C and 800 °C. In FTIR spectra, the characteristic bands at ν ∼ 758.53 and 509.57 cm{sup −1} reveals the monoclinic phase of prepared HfO{sub 2} NPs. UV-Vis spectroscopy shows an absorption peak at 204 nm and the bandgap calculated is 6.07 eV.

  16. Magnetostructural phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Junding; Paudyal, Durga; Liu, Jing; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Karl A.

    2015-01-16

    Magnetism and phase transformations in non-stoichiometric Tb1-xMn2 (x = 0.056, 0.039) have been studied as functions of temperature and magnetic field using magnetization, heat capacity, and X-ray powder diffraction measurements. Lowering the temperature, the compounds sequentially order ferrimagnetically and antiferromagnetically, and finally, exhibit spin reorientation transitions. Moreover, these structural distortions from room temperature cubic to low temperature rhombohedral structures occur at TN, and are accompanied by large volume changes reaching ~-1.27% and -1.42%, respectively. First principles electronic structure calculations confirm the phase transformation from the ferrimagnetic cubic structure to the antiferromagnetic rhombohedral structure in TbMn2.

  17. Surface-Stress-Induced Phase Transformation of Ultrathin FeCo Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Gong, Maogang; Dai, Qilin; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-01-13

    Ultrathin metal nanowires have attracted wide attention becau se oftheir unique anisotropy and surface-to-volume effects. In this study, we use ultrathin Au nanowires as the templating core to epitaxially grow magnetic iron-cobalt (FeCo) shell through metal-redox with the control on their thickness and stoichiometry. Large surface-stress-induced phase transformation in Au nanowires triggers and stabilizes metastable tetragonal FeCo nanostructure to enhance its magnetic anisotropy and coercivity. Meanwhile, under illumination, plasmon-induced hotspot in ultrathin Au nanowires enables the light-control on magnetic characteristics of FeCo shell. This study demonstrates the feasibility of surface-stress-induced phase transformation to stabilize and control metastable nanostructures for enhanced magnetic anisotropy, which is one of the key properties of functional magnetic materials. PMID:26709528

  18. Optical bandgap widening and phase transformation of nitrogen doped cupric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Radhakrishnan, K.; Kumar, Avishek; Wong, Ten It; Yi, Ren; Dalapati, Goutam Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The structural and optical properties of sputter deposited nitrogen (N) doped CuO (CuO(N)) thin films are systematically investigated. It is found that the incorporation of N into CuO causes an enlargement of optical bandgap and reduction in resistivity of the CuO(N) films. Furthermore, a gradual phase transformation from CuO to Cu2O is observed with the increase in N concentration. The effects of annealing temperature on the structural properties of CuO (N) and its dependence on N concentration are also investigated. It is observed that the phase transformation process from CuO to Cu2O significantly depends on the N concentration and the annealing temperature. Heterojunction solar cells of p-type CuO(N) on n-type silicon (Si) substrate, p-CuO(N)/n-Si, are fabricated to investigate the impact of N doping on its photovoltaic properties.

  19. Phase Transformation Surfaces Analysis for SMA Around a Crack Tip with Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laydi, Mohamed Rachid; Lexcellent, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Under loading, for a shape memory alloy, the stress concentration around the crack tip, inside a plate, is a serious fracture problem. The tip shape constitutes an important data. In a recent paper (Lexcellent et al. in Int J Fract 169:1-13, 2011), the determination of phase transformation surfaces around a crack tip without curvature was investigated. For crack with curvature, the approximate stress field solution proposed by Creager and Paris is used (Int J Fract 3:247-252, 1967). The knowledge of phase transformation surfaces dimensions and shapes can help us to define a fracture criterion. The study is focussed on mode I because this opening mode is the most dangerous for the structure. Also, comparisons between experiments and computing can be made. Qualitative agreement was obtained.

  20. [Radiation transformation mechanism in a photocatalytic reactor of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed].

    PubMed

    You, Hong; Luo, Wei-nan; Yao, Jie; Chen, Ping; Cai, Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    A novel three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor was established and the radiation transformation in which was investigated. The experimental results indicate that with the interaction of gas and solid (gas flux > 0.3m3/h), the radiation transformation in the reactor along radial direction conforms to a definite exponential function, which agrees to formula Rose about the rules of light intensity distribution through evenly suspended particles. The value of radiation energy is affected by the initial light intensity, the concentration of photocatalyst and the thickness of liquid layer. The aerated gas amount only influence the state of the fluidized bed and has little effect on the distribution of light intensity along radical direction. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B indicate that the efficiency of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed is much higher than slurry bed. The optimal catalyst concentration of this system is 10 - 12g/L. PMID:15859420

  1. Effect of calcination temperature on phase transformation of HfO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. K.; Kaur, Charanpreet; Kaur, Ramneek; Kaur, Jagdish

    2015-08-01

    Oxides nanomaterials exhibit unique physical, chemical and structural properties and motivated a big research that focus in the integration of these materials for various optoelectronic device applications. In present work, hafnium oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized using precipitation method. Hafnium tetrachloride and sodium hydroxide has been used as starting precursors. Prepared oxide material has been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The phase transformation from amorphous to monoclinic is observed with the increase in calcination temperature from 500 °C and 800 °C. In FTIR spectra, the characteristic bands at ν ˜ 758.53 and 509.57 cm-1 reveals the monoclinic phase of prepared HfO2 NPs. UV-Vis spectroscopy shows an absorption peak at 204 nm and the bandgap calculated is 6.07 eV.

  2. Transformable optical dipole trap using a phase-modulated standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Jae Jin; Cho, D.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate a new type of a cavity-enhanced optical trap whose standing-wave potential well can be transformed by using phase modulation. When the modulation frequency is matched to the free spectral range of the cavity, the potential well can be changed continuously from a corrugated form of a standing wave to a flattened form of a traveling wave depending on the modulation index. With the phase modulation, more atoms are trapped due to the increase in the trap volume, and there is a pronounced increase by a factor of 1.9 when an optimal modulation is applied. From the increase in number of trapped atoms we also infer that the temperature associated with longitudinal motion is strongly affected by the transformation of the potential well. This technique can be used to study collective behavior of trapped atoms and to manipulate atomic distribution for quantum information processing.

  3. Role of Outer-Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the Biomineralization of Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kennedy, David W.; Saffarini, Daad; Arey, Bruce W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Moyles, Dianne M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer membrane cytochrome genes mtrC, omcA, or both, were characterized for the ability to reduce metal oxides using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemicalr techniques. The results indicate that neither MtrC nor OmcA are essential for the reduction of soluble, complexed Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-NTA; however, at least one of these outer membrane cytochromes is required for the reduction of Fe(III)- and Mn(III/IV)- oxides. In vitro analysis of purified, recombinant protein demonstrated that both cytochromes transfer electrons directly to metal-oxides; however, MtrC transfers electrons at a faster rate than OmcA. Immunolocalization of MtrC and OmcA reveal that both cytochromes are surface-exposed on the cell outer-membrane and co-localize with insoluble iron precipitates when respiring ferrihydrite or cultured aerobically with Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, during prolonged incubation, wild-type cells promoted biotransformation of ferrihydrite to vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O] while the double cytochrome mutant was unable to form any secondary mineral phases. Collectively, our results support a role for direct electron transfer from OMCs to metal oxides by establishing their in vitro electron transfer activities, confirming the requirement of either MtrC or OmcA for in vivo reductive biomineralization of ferrihydrite, and localizing the cytochromes to the cell exterior where they can directly contact mineral substrates.

  4. Optical cryptosystem of color images using random phase masks in the fractional wavelet transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hukum

    2016-05-01

    An optical color image encryption in the Fractional Wavelet Transform (FWT) domain is carried out. The original images are segregated into three colors components: R (red), G (green) and B (blue). After that the components are encrypted separately using double random phase encoding (DRPE) in the FWT domain. Random phase masks (RPMs) are used in the input as well as in Fourier plane. The images to be encrypted are transformed with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the resulting coefficients from the DWT are multiplied each one by masks different form RPM. Masks are independent each other and the results are applied an inverse discrete Wavelet Transform (IDWT), obtaining the encrypted images. The input images are recovered from their corresponding encrypted images by using the correct parameters of the FWT, and its digital implementation has been performed using MATLAB 7.6.0 (R2008a). The mother wavelet family and fractional orders associated with the FWT are extra keys that access difficulty an attacker; thereby the scheme is more secure as compared to conventional techniques. The sensitivity of proposed scheme is verified with encryption parameters, occlusions, and noise attacks.

  5. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S. Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.

    2015-06-22

    The metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that are formed after the nanoindentation of diamond cubic silicon exhibit properties that are of both scientific and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of these phases can be readily formed from crystalline silicon via nanoindentation with minimal damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes of these phases 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated using a symmetrical spherical tip of ∼21.5 μm diameter. This result indicates that the use of large symmetrical spherical tips result in highly hydrostatic conditions that can favor the single phase transformation mode without extensive damage to the surrounding crystalline regions that are observed in previous studies.

  6. Multiscale model for phase transformation in magnetic shape memory alloy single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilov, Vesselin

    2006-03-01

    This paper investigates the nano-macro transition in magnetic shape memory alloy(MSMA) thin films using a recently developed sharp phase front-based three-dimensional (3D) constitutive model outlined by Stoilov (JSMS 2005), and originally proposed in the 1D context by Stoilov and Bhattacharyya (Acta Mat 2002). The key ingredient in the model is the recognition of martensitic variants as separate phases in a MSMA domain. Evolution of the interface between these phases is taken as an indicator of the process of reorientation in progress. A formulation of the Helmholtz free energy potential based on Ising model has been derived. The implications of the external magnetic field on the initiation of phase transformation are studied for various mechanical loading modes.

  7. Transformation toughened ceramics for the heavy duty diesel engine technology program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musikant, S.; Samanta, S. C.; Architetto, P.; Feingold, E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop an insulating structural ceramic for application in a heavy duty adiabatic diesel engine. The approach is to employ transformation toughening (TT) by additions of zirconia-hafnia solid solution (ZHSS). The feasibility of using ZHSS as a toughening agent in mullite and alumina has been demonstrated in Phase 1 of this work. Based on Phase 1 results, a decision was made to concentrate the Phase 2 effort on process optimization of the TT mullite. A strong factor in that decision was the low thermal conductivity and high thermal shock resistance of the mullite. Results of the Phase 2 effort indicate that optimum toughening of mullite by additions of ZHSS is difficult to achieve due to apparent sensitivity to morphology. The 48 ksi room temperature modulus-of-rupture (MOR) achieved in selected specimens is approximately 50% of the original strength target. The MOR deteriorated to 34 ksi at 800 C.

  8. Color image encryption using iterative phase retrieve process in quaternion Fourier transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Duan, Kuaikuai

    2015-02-01

    A single-channel color image encryption method is proposed based on iterative phase iterative process in quaternion Fourier transform domain. First, three components of the plain color image is confused respectively by using cat map. Second, the confused components are combined into a pure quaternion image, which is encode to the phase only function by using an iterative phase retrieval process. Finally, the phase only function is encrypted into the gray scale ciphertext with stationary white noise distribution based on the chaotic diffusion, which has camouflage property to some extent. The corresponding plain color image can be recovered from the ciphertext only with correct keys in the decryption process. Simulation results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Direct phase extraction of self-mixing displacement measurement using Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei; Zhang, Jiahuan

    2016-01-01

    Signals of a self-mixing interferometer established on a semiconductor laser diode are analyzed. Phase is extracted out for decoding measurement which contained in self-mixing fringes. The semiconductor laser diode works as light source and receiver without modulation. By combining Hilbert transform with phase condition of self-mixing interference, micron- displacement is reconstructed by phase information at week or even moderate feedback level. Theoretical analysis and simulation results are presented before verification of experimental measurement. Practical feedback level is estimated by a data fitting technique with a programmable high-resolution PZT. Consistence of the results promises that direct phase extraction on self-mixing interferometer is available for micron-displacement measurement with a nanometer accuracy.

  10. Improving the efficiency of molecular replacement by utilizing a new iterative transform phasing algorithm.

    PubMed

    He, Hongxing; Fang, Hengrui; Miller, Mitchell D; Phillips, George N; Su, Wu Pei

    2016-09-01

    An iterative transform method proposed previously for direct phasing of high-solvent-content protein crystals is employed for enhancing the molecular-replacement (MR) algorithm in protein crystallography. Target structures that are resistant to conventional MR due to insufficient similarity between the template and target structures might be tractable with this modified phasing method. Trial calculations involving three different structures are described to test and illustrate the methodology. The relationship of the approach to PHENIX Phaser-MR and MR-Rosetta is discussed. PMID:27580202

  11. Modeling the cure kinetics of crosslinking free radical polymerizations using the Avrami theory of phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.R.; Shine, A.D.

    1995-12-01

    A model, based on Avrami`s theory of phase transformation, has been developed to describe the cure kinetics of crosslinking free radical polymerizations. The model assumes the growing polymer can be treated as a distinct phase and the nucleation rate is proportional to the initiation rate of the polymerization. The Avrami time exponent was verified to be 4.0. This physically-based, two-parameter model fits vinyl ester resin heat flow data as well as the empirical, four-parameter autocatalytic model, and is capable of describing both neat and fiber-containing resin.

  12. Improving the efficiency of molecular replacement by utilizing a new iterative transform phasing algorithm

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongxing; Fang, Hengrui; Miller, Mitchell D.; Phillips, George N.; Su, Wu-Pei

    2016-01-01

    An iterative transform method proposed previously for direct phasing of high-solvent-content protein crystals is employed for enhancing the molecular-replacement (MR) algorithm in protein crystallography. Target structures that are resistant to conventional MR due to insufficient similarity between the template and target structures might be tractable with this modified phasing method. Trial calculations involving three different structures are described to test and illustrate the methodology. The relationship of the approach to PHENIX Phaser-MR and MR-Rosetta is discussed. PMID:27580202

  13. Dynamics of Structural Transformations between Lamellar and Inverse Bicontinuous Cubic Lyotropic Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, Charlotte E.; Ces, Oscar; Mulet, Xavier; Seddon, John M.; Templer, Richard H.; Finet, Stephanie; Winter, Roland

    2006-03-17

    The liquid crystalline lamellar (L{sub {alpha}}) to double-diamond inverse bicontinuous cubic (Q{sub II}{sup D}) phase transition for the amphiphile monoelaidin in excess water exhibits a remarkable sequence of structural transformations for pressure or temperature jumps. Our data imply that the transition dynamics depends on a coupling between changes in molecular shape and the geometrical and topological constraints of domain size. We propose a qualitative model for this coupling based on theories of membrane fusion via stalks and existing knowledge of the structure and energetics of bicontinuous cubic phases.

  14. Machining and Phase Transformation Response of Room-Temperature Austenitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    This experimental work reports the results of a study addressing tool wear, surface topography, and x-ray diffraction analysis for the finish cutting process of room-temperature austenitic NiTi alloy. Turning operation of NiTi alloy was conducted under dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. Findings revealed that cryogenic machining substantially reduced tool wear and improved surface topography and quality of the finished parts in comparison with the other two approaches. Phase transformation on the surface of work material was not observed after dry and MQL machining, but B19' martensite phase was found on the surface of cryogenically machined samples.

  15. Transformation of the {beta}-(Ti,V) phase in Ti-V-C alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bursik, J.; Weatherly, G.C.

    1999-05-21

    The importance of Ti and V compounds with C and/or N, e.g. in precipitation strengthened steels, hard coatings, cutting tools, fuel cladding materials and in electronics, has stimulated extensive experimental work resulting in several isothermal sections of the Ti-V-C equilibrium phase diagram. The present paper reports on a study of the transformation of the {beta} phase in Ti-V-C alloys. The microstructure was studied by means of analytical TEM and HREM. Special attention was paid to the {beta} to {omega} transition and to a qualitative description of the influence of carbon on this process.

  16. Phase-recovery improvement using analytic wavelet transform analysis of a noisy interferogram cepstrum.

    PubMed

    Etchepareborda, Pablo; Vadnjal, Ana Laura; Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H

    2012-09-15

    We evaluate the extension of the exact nonlinear reconstruction technique developed for digital holography to the phase-recovery problems presented by other optical interferometric methods, which use carrier modulation. It is shown that the introduction of an analytic wavelet analysis in the ridge of the cepstrum transformation corresponding to the analyzed interferogram can be closely related to the well-known wavelet analysis of the interferometric intensity. Subsequently, the phase-recovery process is improved. The advantages and limitations of this framework are analyzed and discussed using numerical simulations in singular scalar light fields and in temporal speckle pattern interferometry. PMID:23041878

  17. Phase and structural transformations in annealed copper coatings in relation to oxide whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogov, M. V.; Priezzheva, A. N.; Vlassov, S.; Kink, I.; Shulga, E.; Dorogin, L. M.; Lõhmus, R.; Tyurkov, M. N.; Vikarchuk, A. A.; Romanov, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    We describe structural and phase transformation in copper coatings made of microparticles during heating and annealing in air in the temperature range up to 400 °C. Such thermal treatment is accompanied by intensive CuO nanowhisker growth on the coating surface and the formation of the layered oxide phases (Cu2O and CuO) in the coating interior. X-ray diffraction and focused ion beam (FIB) are employed to characterize the multilayer structure of annealed copper coatings. Formation of volumetric defects such as voids and cracks in the coating is demonstrated.

  18. Phase Transformation of BN Nanoparticles Under High Pressure Low Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Lai, Z. F.; Li, K.; Cui, D. L.; Lun, N.; Wang, Q. L.; Jiang, M. H.

    Phase transformation of BN nanoparticles under high pressure (580~860MPa) and low temperature (270~325°C) hot press conditions was investigated. It was found that the contents of orthorhombic boron nitride (oBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) increased with the increase of temperature and the prolonging of hot pressing time under high pressure conditions. At the same time, because of the intergrowth of hBN, oBN and cBN. there are strong interactions among these three phases.

  19. Glass transition, kinetics of crystallization and anomalous phase transformations in tellurite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Soumee; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Sivasubramanian, V.; Kalavathi, S.

    2014-12-01

    A lead-tellurite (0.3PbO:0.7TeO2) eutectic glass was investigated through a combination of thermal, structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies to examine the kinetics of crystallization and phase transformations during the heating of the glass and the cooling of the liquid. A linear relation was found to correlate the glass transition and crystallization temperatures, from which the ideal glass transition was determined. Among the several kinetic models that were analyzed, the primary crystallization was found to agree most to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model, suggesting the microstructural evolution as a two-dimensional crystallization and growth. The complexity of the transformation process was evidenced from the dependence of activation energy (E) on the crystallized fraction (α) using model-free isoconversional methods. The decreasing trend of E(α) was found to be characteristic of a reversible process followed by an irreversible one. Furthermore, nucleation was found to maximize at a temperature much lower than the experimentally observed crystallization onset. The structural evolution of the devitrified phases depicted the coexistence of phases (PbTeO3 and α-TeO2) during the two-stage crystallization. Anomalous crystallization into the Pb2Te3O8 phase was observed when the devitrified melt was cooled. Such an anomaly is explained using amorphous phase separation, which is inherent to the tellurite glass system owing to the presence of unique asymmetric structural units in the corresponding melts.

  20. Precipitation and Phase Transformations in 2101 Lean Duplex Stainless Steel During Isothermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maetz, Jean-Yves; Cazottes, Sophie; Verdu, Catherine; Kleber, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The effect of isothermal aging at 963 K (690 °C) on the microstructure of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel, with the composition Fe-21.5Cr-5Mn-1.6Ni-0.22N-0.3Mo, was investigated using a multi-technique and multi-scale approach. The kinetics of phase transformation and precipitation was followed from a few minutes to thousands of hours using thermoelectric power measurements; based on these results, certain aging states were selected for electron microscopy characterization. Scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to quantitatively describe the microstructural evolution through crystallographic analysis, chemical analysis, and volume fraction measurements from the macroscopic scale down to the nanometric scale. During aging, the precipitation of M23C6 carbides, Cr2N nitrides, and σ phase as well as the transformation of ferrite into austenite and austenite into martensite was observed. These complex microstructural changes are controlled by Cr volume diffusion. The precipitation and phase transformation mechanisms are described.

  1. The Effect of Hardenability Variation on Phase Transformation of Spiral Bevel Gear in Quenching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Shi, Wankai; Yang, Lin; Gu, Zhifei; Li, Zhichao

    2016-05-01

    The hardenability of gear steel is dependent on the composition of alloying elements and is one of important criteria to assess process of phase transformation. The variation of hardenability has to be considered in control of the microstructures and distortion during gear quenching. In this paper, the quantitative effect of hardenability has been investigated on phase transformations of spiral bevel gears in die quenching. The hardenability deviation of 22CrMoH steel was assessed by using Jominy test. The dilatometry experiments were conducted to build phase transformation kinetic models for steels with low and high hardenability, respectively. The complete die quenching process of spiral bevel gear was modeled to reveal the significant difference on microstructures and temperature history with variation of hardenability. The final microstructures of the gear are martensite in surface layer after quenching process. There are bainite inside the gear tooth and the mixture of bainite and ferrite inside gear for the gear with low hardenability. The microstructure is bainite inside the gear with high hardenability.

  2. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  3. Stress-induced phase transformation and optical coupling of silver nanoparticle superlattices into mechanically stable nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Binsong; Wen, Xiaodong; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Zhongwu; Clem, Paul G; Fan, Hongyou

    2014-01-01

    One-dimensional silver materials display unique optical and electrical properties with promise as functional blocks for a new generation of nanoelectronics. To date, synthetic approaches and property engineering of silver nanowires have primarily focused on chemical methods. Here we report a simple physical method of metal nanowire synthesis, based on stress-induced phase transformation and sintering of spherical Ag nanoparticle superlattices. Two phase transformations of nanoparticles under stress have been observed at distinct length scales. First, the lattice dimensions of silver nanoparticle superlattices may be reversibly manipulated between 0-8 GPa compressive stresses to enable systematic and reversible changes in mesoscale optical coupling between silver nanoparticles. Second, stresses greater than 8 GPa induced an atomic lattice phase transformation, which induced sintering of silver nanoparticles into micron-length scale nanowires. The nanowire synthesis mechanism displays a dependence on both nanoparticle crystal surface orientation and presence of particular grain boundaries to enable nanoparticle consolidation into nanowires. PMID:24957078

  4. The Effect of Hardenability Variation on Phase Transformation of Spiral Bevel Gear in Quenching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Shi, Wankai; Yang, Lin; Gu, Zhifei; Li, Zhichao

    2016-07-01

    The hardenability of gear steel is dependent on the composition of alloying elements and is one of important criteria to assess process of phase transformation. The variation of hardenability has to be considered in control of the microstructures and distortion during gear quenching. In this paper, the quantitative effect of hardenability has been investigated on phase transformations of spiral bevel gears in die quenching. The hardenability deviation of 22CrMoH steel was assessed by using Jominy test. The dilatometry experiments were conducted to build phase transformation kinetic models for steels with low and high hardenability, respectively. The complete die quenching process of spiral bevel gear was modeled to reveal the significant difference on microstructures and temperature history with variation of hardenability. The final microstructures of the gear are martensite in surface layer after quenching process. There are bainite inside the gear tooth and the mixture of bainite and ferrite inside gear for the gear with low hardenability. The microstructure is bainite inside the gear with high hardenability.

  5. Residual stress delaying phase transformation in Y-TZP bio-restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud; Hanan, Jay C.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering favorable residual stress for the complex geometry of bi-layer porcelain-zirconia crowns potentially prevents crack initiation and improves the mechanical performance and lifetime of the dental restoration. In addition to external load, the stress field depends on initial residual stress before loading. Residual stress is the result of factors such as the thermal expansion mismatch of layers and compliance anisotropy of zirconia grains in the process of sintering and cooling. Stress induced phase transformation in zirconia extensively relaxes the residual stress and changes the stress state. The objective of this study is to investigate the coupling between tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformations and residual stress. Residual stress, on the surface of the sectioned single load to failure crown, at 23 points starting from the pure tetragonal and ending at a fully monoclinic region were measured using the micro X-ray diffraction sin2 ψ method. An important observation is the significant range in measured residual stress from a compressive stress of -400 MPa up to tensile stress of 400 MPa and up to 100% tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation.

  6. Phase transformation upon cooling path in Ca2SiO4: Possible geological implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yun-Ting; Kung, Jennifer; Hsu, Han

    2016-04-01

    At the contact metamorphism zone two different Ca2SiO4 phases can be found; calcio-olivine (γ phase) and larnite (β phase). In-situ experiments illustrated the existence of five various polymorphs in Ca2SiO4, i.e., α, α'H, α'L, β and γ. The path of phase transformation and the transformation temperatures are shown as follows. γ → α'L(700° C) → α'H(1100° C) → α (1450° C) α'L → β (680° C) → γ (500° C) Experiments showed that the phase transitions at lower temperature is not reversible and seemed to be complicated; β phase is only stable from 500° C to 680° C upon cooling. To understand the possible mechanism of the β phase being metastable at room temperature, atmosphere condition, we were motivated to investigate the route of phase transition in Ca2SiO4 in different thermal process. Powder samples were synthesized by the solid-state reaction. Pure reagent oxides CaCO3 and SiO2 were mixed in 2:1 stoichiometric mole. Two control factors were designated in the experiments; the sintering temperature of starting materials and the cooling path. The sintering temperature was set within the range of stable phase field of α'L phase (˜900° C) and α'H phase (1300° C). The cooling process was designed in three different routes: 1) the quenched procedure from sintering temperature with rate of 900° C/min and 1300° C/min, 2) the furnace cooling procedure, 3) set a slow cooling rate (0.265 ° C/min). The products were examined for the crystal structure by X-ray powder diffraction. First-principle calculation was also applied to investigate the thermodynamic properties of α'H, β and γ phases. A major finding in this study showed that the γ phase presented in the final product when the sintering temperature was set at the stable field of α'H phase; on the other hand, the β phase would present when the sintering temperature was set within the field of α'L phase. It was noted that the existing phase in the product would be modified by the

  7. Arsenic Speciation in Bituminous Coal Fly Ash and Transformations in Response to Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Foster, Andrea L; Doughten, Michael W; Holland, James T; Bailoo, Jeremy D

    2016-06-01

    The risk of the mobilization of coal ash into the environment has highlighted the need for the assessment of the environmental behavior of coal ash, particularly with respect to toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As). Here, we examined As speciation in coal fly ash samples and transformations in response to aquatic redox conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that 92-97% of total As occurred as As(V), with the remainder present as As(III). Major As-bearing hosts in unamended ashes were glass, iron (oxyhydr)oxides, and calcium arsenate. Oxic leaching resulted in immediate As mobilization to the aqueous phase, reprecipitation of As-iron ferrihydrite, and As adsorption to mineral surfaces. Under anoxic conditions, the (reductive) dissolution of As-bearing phases such as iron ferrihydrite resulted in increased dissolved As compared to oxic conditions and reprecipitation of iron arsenate. Overall, As in coal ash is not environmentally stable and can participate in local biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27186791

  8. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Ying Chen

    2005-06-30

    Two-phase flow through fractured media is important in petroleum, geothermal, and environmental applications. However, the actual physics and phenomena that occur inside fractures are poorly understood, and oversimplified relative permeability curves are commonly used in fractured reservoir simulations. In this work, an experimental apparatus equipped with a high-speed data acquisition system, real-time visualization, and automated image processing technology was constructed to study three transparent analog fractures with distinct surface roughnesses: smooth, homogeneously rough, and randomly rough. Air-water relative permeability measurements obtained in this study were compared with models suggested by earlier studies and analyzed by examining the flow structures. A method to evaluate the tortuosities induced by the blocking phase, namely the channel tortuosity, was proposed from observations of the flow structure images. The relationship between the coefficients of channel tortuosity and the relative permeabilities was studied with the aid of laboratory experiments and visualizations. Experimental data from these fractures were used to develop a broad approach for modeling two-phase flow behavior based on the flow structures. Finally, a general model deduced from these data was proposed to describe two-phase relative permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative permeabilities, accounting for phase transformations, the inviscid bubble train models coupled with relative permeability concepts were developed. The phase transformation effects were evaluated by accounting for the molecular transport through liquid-vapor interfaces. For the steam water relative permeabilities, we conducted steam-water flow experiments in the same fractures as used for air-water experiments. We compared the flow behavior and relative permeability differences between two-phase flow with and without phase transformation effects

  9. Transformation between spin-Peierls and incommensurate fluctuating phases of Sc-doped TiOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Wölfel, Alexander; Bykov, Maxim; Schönleber, Andreas; van Smaalen, Sander; Kremer, Reinhard K.; Williamson, Hailey L.

    2014-07-01

    Single crystals of ScxTi1-xOCl(x=0.005) have been grown by the vapor phase transport technique. Specific heat measurements prove the absence of phase transitions for 4-200 K. Instead, an excess entropy is observed over a range of temperatures that encompasses the incommensurate phase transition at 90 K and the spin-Peierls transition at 67 K of pure TiOCl. Temperature-dependent x-ray diffraction on ScxTi1-xOCl gives broadened diffraction maxima at incommensurate positions between Tc1=61.5(3) and ˜90 K, and at commensurate positions below 61.5 K. These results are interpreted as due to the presence of an incommensurate phase without long-range order at intermediate temperatures, and of a highly disturbed commensurate phase without long-range order at low temperatures. The commensurate phase is attributed to a fluctuating spin-Peierls state on an orthorhombic lattice. The monoclinic symmetry and local structure of the fluctuations are equal to the symmetry and structure of the ordered spin-Peierls state of TiOCl. A novel feature of ScxTi1-xOCl(x =0.005) is a transformation from one fluctuating phase (the incommensurate phase at intermediate temperatures) to another fluctuating phase (the spin-Peierls-like phase). This transformation is not a phase transition occurring at a critical temperature, but it proceeds gradually over a temperature range of ˜10 K wide. The destruction of long-range order requires much lower levels of doping in TiOCl than in other low-dimensional electronic crystals, like the canonical spin-Peierls compound CuGeO3. An explanation for the higher sensitivity to doping has not been found, but it is noticed that it may be the result of an increased two-dimensional character of the doped magnetic system. The observed fluctuating states with long correlation lengths are reminiscent of Kosterlitz-Thouless-type phases in two-dimensional systems.

  10. Dynamic Thermo-Mechanical Phase-Field Models for Martensitic Transformations in Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhote, Rakesh

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit complex microstructures and non-linear hysteretic behaviors that arise from a strong interaction between mechanical and thermal phenomena. It is imperative to couple the thermal physics and the mechanical dynamics to study the influence of such coupling on the mechanical properties of SMA systems, including nanostructures. However, the majority of phase-field models in the literature related to SMAs account for structural physics only. With the aim to incorporate thermal physics, in this thesis, first the 2D and 3D dynamic fully coupled thermo-mechanical phase-field models are developed based on the strain-based order parameters. The developed models are highly nonlinear, strongly hysteretic with fourth-order spatial differential terms, which impose several computational challenges. Secondly, to overcome these computational challenges, a numerical formulation based on the isogeometric analysis is developed for a straightforward solution to the fourth-order differential equations using continuously differentiable non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS). Several numerical examples of microstructure evolution in SMA systems, in particular nanostructures of different geometries, under temperature and stress induced loadings illustrated the flexibility, accuracy and robustness of the developed numerical formulation. The numerical simulations revealed a significant impact of the temperature dynamics on mechanical properties of SMAs. The developed models successfully captured experimentally observed mechanical and thermal hysteresis phenomena, local non-uniform phase transformations and corresponding non-uniform temperature and deformations distributions. The predicted microstructure evolution is in qualitative agreement with the results reported in the literature. The material properties of austenite and martensite phases are different, as observed experimentally during phase transformations. However, the majority of macroscale non

  11. Instrumental phase-based method for Fourier transform spectrometer measurements processing

    SciTech Connect

    Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego; Tarabini, Marco

    2011-04-20

    Phase correction is a critical procedure for most space-borne Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) whose accuracy (owing to often poor signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) can be jeopardized from many uncontrollable environmental conditions. This work considers the phase correction in an FTS working under significant temperature change during the measurement and affected by mechanical disturbances. The implemented method is based on the identification of an instrumental phase that is dependent on the interferometer temperature and on the extraction of a linear phase component through a least-squares approach. The use of an instrumental phase parameterized with the interferometer temperature eases the determination of the linear phase that can be extracted using only a narrow spectral region selected to be immune from disturbances. The procedure, in this way, is made robust against phase errors arising from instrumental effects, a key feature to reduce the disturbances through spectra averaging. The method was specifically developed for the Mars IR Mapper spectrometer, that was designed for operation onboard a rover on the Mars surface; the validation was performed using ground and in-flight measurements of the Fourier transform IR spectrometer planetary Fourier spectrometer, onboard the MarsExpress mission. The symmetrization has been exploited also for the spectra calibration, highlighting the issues deriving from the cases of relevant beamsplitter emission. The applicability of this procedure to other instruments is conditional to the presence in the spectra of at least one spectral region with a large SNR along with a negligible (or known) beamsplitter emission. For the PFS instrument, the processing of data with relevant beamsplitter emission has been performed exploiting the absorption carbon dioxide bands present in Martian spectra.

  12. Instrumental phase-based method for Fourier transform spectrometer measurements processing.

    PubMed

    Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego; Tarabini, Marco

    2011-04-20

    Phase correction is a critical procedure for most space-borne Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) whose accuracy (owing to often poor signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) can be jeopardized from many uncontrollable environmental conditions. This work considers the phase correction in an FTS working under significant temperature change during the measurement and affected by mechanical disturbances. The implemented method is based on the identification of an instrumental phase that is dependent on the interferometer temperature and on the extraction of a linear phase component through a least-squares approach. The use of an instrumental phase parameterized with the interferometer temperature eases the determination of the linear phase that can be extracted using only a narrow spectral region selected to be immune from disturbances. The procedure, in this way, is made robust against phase errors arising from instrumental effects, a key feature to reduce the disturbances through spectra averaging. The method was specifically developed for the Mars IR Mapper spectrometer, that was designed for operation onboard a rover on the Mars surface; the validation was performed using ground and in-flight measurements of the Fourier transform IR spectrometer planetary Fourier spectrometer, onboard the MarsExpress mission. The symmetrization has been exploited also for the spectra calibration, highlighting the issues deriving from the cases of relevant beamsplitter emission. The applicability of this procedure to other instruments is conditional to the presence in the spectra of at least one spectral region with a large SNR along with a negligible (or known) beamsplitter emission. For the PFS instrument, the processing of data with relevant beamsplitter emission has been performed exploiting the absorption carbon dioxide bands present in Martian spectra. PMID:21509063

  13. High pressure phase-transformation induced texture evolution and strengthening in zirconium metal: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-07-28

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.

  14. High pressure phase-transformation induced texture evolution and strengthening in zirconium metal: Experiment and modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; et al

    2015-07-28

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can bemore » attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.« less

  15. Determination of phase derivatives from a single fringe pattern using Teager Hilbert Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepan, B.; Quan, C.; Tay, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel sequential algorithm for the estimation of phase derivatives from a single fringe pattern using electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is proposed. The algorithm is based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD), vortex operator (VO) and Teager-Kaiser energy operator (TKEO). The empirical mode decomposition normalizes the fringe pattern; while vortex operator provides a 2D complex image and the phase derivatives are obtained using a novel image demodulation method called discrete higher order image demodulation algorithm (DHODA). Unlike phase shifting and Fourier transform methods, the proposed method does not require complex experimental setup or more than one fringe pattern for each deformation state. The proposed method is also able to provide phase derivatives in both the x and ydirections from a single fringe pattern, which is difficult to achieve using shearography. Since the algorithm provides unwrapped phase derivatives directly, it does not require separate phase unwrapping process. Hence it is suitable for dynamic strain and curvature measurement. The proposed algorithm is validated by both simulation and experiment. The results are found to be accurate and the method requires less computation time than existing phase demodulation techniques.

  16. High Pressure Phase-Transformation Induced Texture Evolution and Strengthening in Zirconium Metal: Experiment and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation. PMID:26218405

  17. High Pressure Phase-Transformation Induced Texture Evolution and Strengthening in Zirconium Metal: Experiment and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-07-01

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5-1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.

  18. Shear-Induced Phase Transformation: From Single-Crystal Silicon to Si-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Krick, Brandon; Tansu, Nelson

    2015-03-01

    Silicon has been recognized as one of the most important semiconductors in modern electronics industry. Investigations in the past decades have led to observation of more than 12 different polymorphs of silicon. Among these polymorphs, the wurtzite silicon (Si-IV) shows promising application potential. It has been widely accepted that Si-IV is a metastable phase of silicon forming from annealing Si-III at temperature range between 200 C and 600 C. Besides the annealing, the shear stress can also lead to the phase transition from Si-I into Si-IV. It has been confirmed that the mechanism of shear-induced phase transition is different from that observed from hydrostatic pressure-induced phase transition. However, this shear-induced phase transition has not been studied systematically, and further investigations are required to clarify this transition on silicon. In this work, we develop a new method to study the formation of Si-IV. Combining nanoscratching and micro-Raman spectroscopy, shear effect on Si-I to Si-IV phase transformation has been studied qualitatively and quantitatively. A clear evolution of phase transition of silicon has been recorded. The stability of Si-IV has been analyzed by applying an in-situ Raman measurement under various temperature.

  19. Geometric phase analysis based on the windowed Fourier transform for the deformation field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xianglu; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-06-01

    The geometric phase analysis (GPA), an important image-based deformation measurement method, has been used at both micro- and nano-scale. However, when a deformed image has apparent distortion, non-ignorable error in the obtained deformation field could occur by using this method. In this paper, the geometric phase analysis based on the windowed Fourier transform (WFT) is proposed to solve the above-mentioned issue, defined as the WFT-GPA method. In WFT-GPA, instead of the Fourier transform (FT), the WFT is utilized to extract the phase field block by block, and therefore more accurate local phase information can be acquired. The simulation tests, which include detailed discussion of influence factors for measurement accuracy such as window size and image noise, are conducted with digital deformed grids. The results verify that the WFT-GPA method not only keeps all advantages of traditional GPA method, but also owns a better accuracy for deformation measurement. Finally, the WFT-GPA method is applied to measure the machining distortion incurred in soft ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) process. The successful measurement shows the feasibility of this method and offers a full-field way for characterizing the replication quality of UV-NIL process.

  20. Evidence for the temperature dependence of phase transformation behavior of silicon at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Mangalampalli S. R. N. Kiran; Tran, Tuan; Smillie, Lachlan; Haberl, Bianca; Subianto, D.; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-05-27

    This study uses the in-situ high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25 to 200 C) of the phase transformation behavior of crystalline silicon (dc-Si) at the nanoscale. Along with in-situ indentation and electrical data, ex-situ characterizations such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) have been used to reveal the dominant mode of deformation under the indenter. In contrast to the previous studies, the dominant mode of deformation under the nanoindenter at elevated temperatures is not the dc-Si to metallic phase ( -Sn) transformation. Instead, XTEM images from 150 C indents reveal that the dominant mode of deformation is twinning along {111} planes. While the in-situ high-temperature electrical measurements show an increase in the current due to metallic phase formation up to 125 C, it is absent 150 C, revealing that the formation of the metallic phase is negligible in this regime. Thus, this work provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale.

  1. Nanoalloying and phase transformations during thermal treatment of physical mixtures of Pd and Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundan, Vineetha; Yin, Jun; Joseph, Pharrah; Luo, Jin; Shan, Shiyao; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Malis, Oana

    2014-04-01

    Nanoscale alloying and phase transformations in physical mixtures of Pd and Cu ultrafine nanoparticles are investigated in real time with in situ synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction complemented by ex situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The combination of metal-support interaction and reactive/non-reactive environment was found to determine the thermal evolution and ultimate structure of this binary system. At 300 °C, the nanoparticles supported on silica and carbon black intermix to form a chemically ordered CsCl-type (B2) alloy phase. The B2 phase transforms into a disordered fcc alloy at higher temperature (> 450 °C). The alloy nanoparticles supported on silica and carbon black are homogeneous in volume, but evidence was found of Pd surface enrichment. In sharp contrast, when supported on alumina, the two metals segregated at 300 °C to produce almost pure fcc Cu and Pd phases. Upon further annealing of the mixture on alumina above 600 °C, the two metals interdiffused, forming two distinct disordered alloys of compositions 30% and 90% Pd. The annealing atmosphere also plays a major role in the structural evolution of these bimetallic nanoparticles. The nanoparticles annealed in forming gas are larger than the nanoparticles annealing in helium due to reduction of the surface oxides that promotes coalescence and sintering.

  2. In-situ characterization of highly reversible phase transformation by synchrotron X-ray Laue microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Tamura, Nobumichi; MacDowell, Alastair; James, Richard D.

    2016-05-01

    The alloy Cu25Au30Zn45 undergoes a huge first-order phase transformation (6% strain) and shows a high reversibility under thermal cycling and an unusual martensitc microstructure in sharp contrast to its nearby compositions. This alloy was discovered by systematically tuning the composition so that its lattice parameters satisfy the cofactor conditions (i.e., the kinematic conditions of compatibility between phases). It was conjectured that satisfaction of these conditions is responsible for the enhanced reversibility as well as the observed unusual fluid-like microstructure during transformation, but so far, there has been no direct evidence confirming that these observed microstructures are those predicted by the cofactor conditions. To verify this hypothesis, we use synchrotron X-ray Laue microdiffraction to measure the orientations and structural parameters of variants and phases near the austenite/martensite interface. The areas consisting of both austenite and multi-variants of martensite are scanned by microLaue diffraction. The cofactor conditions have been examined from the kinematic relation of lattice vectors across the interface. The continuity condition of the interface is precisely verified from the correspondent lattice vectors between two phases.

  3. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo; Li, Zhuguo; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  4. Evidence for the temperature dependence of phase transformation behavior of silicon at nanoscale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mangalampalli S. R. N. Kiran; Tran, Tuan; Smillie, Lachlan; Haberl, Bianca; Subianto, D.; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-05-27

    This study uses the in-situ high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25 to 200 C) of the phase transformation behavior of crystalline silicon (dc-Si) at the nanoscale. Along with in-situ indentation and electrical data, ex-situ characterizations such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) have been used to reveal the dominant mode of deformation under the indenter. In contrast to the previous studies, the dominant mode of deformation under the nanoindenter at elevated temperatures is not the dc-Si to metallic phase ( -Sn) transformation. Instead, XTEM images from 150 C indents reveal that themore » dominant mode of deformation is twinning along {111} planes. While the in-situ high-temperature electrical measurements show an increase in the current due to metallic phase formation up to 125 C, it is absent 150 C, revealing that the formation of the metallic phase is negligible in this regime. Thus, this work provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale.« less

  5. Limited reduction of ferrihydrite encrusted by goethite in freshwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, S; Makita, H; Konno, U; Shiraishi, F; Ijiri, A; Takai, K; Maeda, M; Takahashi, Y

    2016-07-01

    Many physical and chemical processes control the extent of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. The surface precipitation of secondary Fe minerals on Fe(III) oxyhydroxides limits the extent of microbial Fe(III) reduction, but this phenomenon has not yet been observed in nature. This paper reports the observation of secondary Fe-mineral (goethite) encrustation on ferrihydrite surface within freshwater sediment up to 10 cm deep. The sediment surface was characterized by the predominance of ferrihydrites with biogenic stalks and sheaths. An Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium (Gallionellaceae) was detected by 16S rRNA gene analysis at sediment depths of 1 and 2 cm. Fe(2+) concentration in the sediment pore water was relatively higher at 2-4 cm depths. The 16S rRNA genes affiliated with dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were detected at 1, 2, and 4 cm depths. The results of the Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis suggested the presence of goethite and siderite at depths below 3 cm. However, the change in the Fe-mineral composition was restricted to sediment depths between 3 and 4 cm, despite the presence of abundant ferrihydrite at depths below 4 cm. An increase in CH4 concentration was observed at deeper than 6 cm. Stable isotopic analysis of CH4 in the pore water indicated that acetoclastic CH4 occurred at depths below 7 cm. Transmission electron microscope observations suggested the presence of goethite and siderite on stalks and sheaths at depths below 3 cm. Results from conversion electron yield EXAFS analysis suggested that goethite dominated at 10 cm depth, thereby indicating that ferrihydrite was encrusted by goethite at this depth. Moreover, the incomplete reduction of ferrihydrite below depths of 4 cm was not due to the lack of organic carbon, but was possibly due to the surface encrustation of goethite on ferrihydrite. PMID:27027643

  6. Novel copyright information hiding method based on random phase matrix of Fresnel diffraction transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chao; Chen, Ru-jun

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new copyright information hide method for digital images in Moiré fringe formats. The copyright information is embedded into the protected image and the detecting image based on Fresnel phase matrix. Firstly, using Fresnel diffraction transform, the random phase matrix of copyright information is generated. Then, according to Moiré fringe principle, the protected image and the detecting image are modulated respectively based on the random phase matrix, and the copyright information is embedded into them. When the protected image and the detecting image are overlapped, the copyright information can reappear. Experiment results show that our method has good concealment performance, and is a new way for copyright protection.

  7. Controlling magnetoelectric coupling by nanoscale phase transformation instrain engineered bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. Y.; Vasudevan, Rama K; Pan, K.; Xie, S. H.; Liang, W. -I.; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Chen, Y. -C.; Chu, Y.-H.; Nagarajan, Valanoor; Kalinin, Sergei V; Li, J. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials is promising for a wide range of applications, yet manipulating magnetic ordering by electric field proves elusive to obtain and difficult to control. In this paper, we explore the prospect of controlling magnetic ordering in misfit strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3, BFO) films, combining theoretical analysis, numerical simulations, and experimental characterizations. Electric field induced transformation from a tetragonal phase to a distorted rhombohedral one in strain engineered BFO films has been identified by thermodynamic analysis, and realized by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiment. By breaking the rotational symmetry of a tip-induced electric field as suggested by phase field simulation, the morphology of distorted rhombohedral variants has been delicately controlled and regulated. Such capabilities enable nanoscale control of magnetoelectric coupling in strain engineered BFO films that is difficult to achieve otherwise, as demonstrated by phase field simulations.

  8. ISAR Imaging of Maneuvering Targets Based on the Modified Discrete Polynomial-Phase Transform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Abdelkader, Ali Cherif; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of a maneuvering target is a challenging task in the field of radar signal processing. The azimuth echo can be characterized as a multi-component polynomial phase signal (PPS) after the translational compensation, and the high quality ISAR images can be obtained by the parameters estimation of it combined with the Range-Instantaneous-Doppler (RID) technique. In this paper, a novel parameters estimation algorithm of the multi-component PPS with order three (cubic phase signal-CPS) based on the modified discrete polynomial-phase transform (MDPT) is proposed, and the corresponding new ISAR imaging algorithm is presented consequently. This algorithm is efficient and accurate to generate a focused ISAR image, and the results of real data demonstrate the effectiveness of it. PMID:26404299

  9. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-09-15

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  10. ISAR Imaging of Maneuvering Targets Based on the Modified Discrete Polynomial-Phase Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Abdelkader, Ali Cherif; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of a maneuvering target is a challenging task in the field of radar signal processing. The azimuth echo can be characterized as a multi-component polynomial phase signal (PPS) after the translational compensation, and the high quality ISAR images can be obtained by the parameters estimation of it combined with the Range-Instantaneous-Doppler (RID) technique. In this paper, a novel parameters estimation algorithm of the multi-component PPS with order three (cubic phase signal-CPS) based on the modified discrete polynomial-phase transform (MDPT) is proposed, and the corresponding new ISAR imaging algorithm is presented consequently. This algorithm is efficient and accurate to generate a focused ISAR image, and the results of real data demonstrate the effectiveness of it. PMID:26404299

  11. Variant selection in transformation texture from the {beta} to {alpha} phase in Cu-40 mass% Zn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, H.Y.; Sakata, T.; Umakoshi, Y.

    1999-04-23

    The rolling texture and variant selection in texture during the phase transformation from {beta} to {alpha} in Cu-40 mass% Zn were investigated using X-ray back reflection and electron back-scatter diffraction pattern (EBSP) techniques. The rolling texture of the {beta} parent phase, before the phase transformation, was composed of {l_brace}111{r_brace}{l_angle}1{bar 1}0{r_angle}, {l_brace}001{r_brace}{l_angle}110{r_angle} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}{l_angle}{bar 1}{bar 1}2{r_angle}. Variant selection occurred during the {beta} to {alpha} phase transformation from the cold-rolled parent {beta} phase, even when the phase transformation following the Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship was controlled by a diffusion process. The variant selection was related to the Bain distortion for each {alpha} variant during the phase transformation from the {beta} to {alpha} phase. A limited set of {alpha} variants was chosen to minimize the residual stress induced in the deformed {beta} parent phase by the Bain distortion. The type of selected variants changed with the rolling texture of {beta} parent phase. The selectivity of specific variants increased and was stimulated by both annealing temperature and rolling reduction.

  12. Electric field effect on the rhombohedral-rhombohedral phase transformation in tin modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pin; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Burns, George R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Moore, Roger H.

    2004-04-01

    The ferroelectric-to-ferroelectic phase transformation between the high temperature (FERH) and the low temperature (FERL) rhomobohedral phases in lead based perovskite under the dc bias conditions was investigated. Dielectric measurements show that an external electric field stabilizes the FERL phase and moves the phase transformation to a higher temperature. The observation has been further verified by an in situ microfocused x-ray study where an external field can effectively induce the oxygen octahedral tilting in the crystalline lattice and extends the thermal stability region of the FERL phase to a higher temperature. An analysis based on the combination of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship with lattice dynamic principles suggests that the transformation from FERH to FERL is driven by a short-range interaction in the crystalline lattice. The origin of this short-range interaction is proposed, based on the structural evolution during the phase transformation. Experimental evidence suggests that such interaction driving the structural instability can be exploited by an external electric field near the phase transformation temperature and leads to an unusual, transient field-enhanced deformation near the FERH/FERL phase transformation.

  13. The mechansims by which solute nitrogen affects phase transformations and mechanical properties of automotive dual-phase sheet steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tyson W.

    Dual-phase steels have seen increased use in automotive applications in recent years, in order to meet the goals of weight reduction and occupant safety. Variations in nitrogen content that may be encountered in steel sourced from a basic oxygen furnace process compared to an electric arc furnace process require that dual-phase steel producers understand the ways that nitrogen affects processing and properties. In the current work, the distribution of nitrogen was investigated in a dual-phase steel with a base chemistry of 0.1 C, 2.0 Mn, 0.2 Cr, 0.2 Mo (wt pct) across a range of nitrogen contents (30-159 ppm) with Al (0.2 and 0.08 wt pct), and Ti (0.02 wt pct) additions used for precipitation control of nitrogen amounts. The distribution of nitrogen amongst trapping sites, including precipitates, grain boundaries, dislocations, and interstitial sites (away from other types of defects) was determined from a combination of electrolytic dissolution, internal friction, and three-dimensional atom probe tomography experiments. Various mechanisms by which different amounts and locations of nitrogen affect phase transformations and mechanical properties were identified from quantitative metallography, dilatometric measurement of phase transformations, tensile testing, and nanoindentation hardness testing. Results indicate nitrogen that is not precipitated with Ti or Al (free nitrogen) partitions to austenite (and thus martensite) during typical intercritical annealing treatments, and is mostly contained in Cottrell atmospheres in martensite. Due to the austenite stabilizing effect of nitrogen, the presence of free nitrogen during intercritical annealing leads to a higher austenite fraction in certain conditions. Thus, the presence of free nitrogen in a dual-phase microstructure will lead to an increase in tensile and yield strengths from both an increase in martensite fraction, and an increase in martensite hardness due to solid solution strengthening. Despite the presence

  14. Stress dependence of thermally driven pyroelectric charge release during FER-FEO phase transformations in [011] cut relaxor ferroelectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wen D.; Finkel, Peter; Amin, Ahmed; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2012-06-01

    The stress dependence of thermally driven polarization change is reported for a ferroelectric rhombohedral to ferroelectric orthorhombic phase transformation in [011] cut and poled Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT). A jump in polarization and strain is associated with a phase transformation of the ferroelectric material. The phase transformation temperature can be tuned, over a broad temperature range, through the application of bias stress. This phenomenon has applications in the field of energy harvesting and thermal sensing.

  15. Development of a carburizing and quenching simulation tool: A material model for low carbon steels undergoing phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, D.; Prantil, V.; Kumar, A.

    1996-06-24

    An internal state variable formulation for phase transforming alloy steels is presented. We have illustrated how local transformation plasticity can be accommodated by an appropriate choice for the corresponding internal stress field acting between the phases. The state variable framework compares well with a numerical micromechanical calculation providing a discrete dependence of microscopic plasticity on volume fraction and the stress dependence attributable to a softer parent phase. The multiphase model is used to simulate the stress state of a quenched bar and show qualitative trends in the response when the transformation phenomenon is incorporated on the length scale of a global boundary value problem.

  16. Identifying stable phase coupling associated with cerebral autoregulation using the synchrosqueezed cross-wavelet transform and low oscillation morlet wavelets.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    A novel method of identifying stable phase coupling behavior of two signals within the wavelet transform time-frequency plane is presented. The technique employs the cross-wavelet transform to provide a map of phase coupling followed by synchrosqueezing to collect the stable phase regime information. The resulting synchrosqueezed cross-wavelet transform method (Synchro-CrWT) is illustrated using a synthetic signal and then applied to the analysis of the relationship between biosignals used in the analysis of cerebral autoregulation function. PMID:26737649

  17. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  18. Phase transformations in the transition zone of the mantle and possible changes in the earth's radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, V. L.; Urusov, V. S.

    1982-12-01

    A survey of the sequence of phase transitions in the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system under the conditions of the earth's mantle shows that experimentally observed structural state transformations correctly explain the principal discontinuities encountered in the increase in density with depth within the earth. The properties of the ilmenite, corundum, and perovskite modifications of MgSiO3 are evaluated for what is believed to be the first time. It is shown that all the transformations occurring in the upper mantle and in the transition zone proceed with a positive slope of dP/dT, whereas the transition into a mixture of the perovskite modification and periclase (MgO), which explains the boundary between the transition zone and the lower mantle, has a negative slope. An assessment is made of the changes that may have occurred in the density of individual layers deep within the earth in response to the increasing depth of phase transformations. It is believed that this effect may have been responsible for increases in the earth's radius by 3-5% over the last two billion years.

  19. Structural and optical properties of short peptides: nanotubes-to-nanofibers phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Natan, Amir; Rosenman, Gil

    2014-07-01

    Thermally induced phase transformation in bioorganic nanotubes, which self-assembled from two ultrashort dipeptides of different origin, aromatic diphenylalanine (FF) and aliphatic dileucine (LL), is studied. In both FF and LL nanotubes, irreversible phase transformation found at 120-180 °C is governed by linear-to-cyclic dipeptide molecular modification followed by formation of extended β-sheet structure. As a result of this process, native open-end FF and LL nanotubes are transformed into ultrathin nanofibrils. Found deep reconstructions at all levels from macroscopic (morphology) and structural space symmetry to molecular give rise to new optical properties in both aromatic FF and aliphatic LL nanofibrils and generation of blue photoluminescence (PL) emission. It is shown that observed blue PL peak is similar in these supramolecular nanofibrillar structures and is excited by the network of non-covalent hydrogen bonds that link newly thermally induced neighboring cyclic dipeptide strands to final extended β-sheet structure of amyloid-like nanofibrils. The observed blue PL peak in short dipeptide nanofibrils is similar to the blue PL peak that was recently found in amyloid fibrils and can be considered as the optical signature of β-sheet structures. Nanotubular structures were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscope, ToF-secondary ion mass spectroscopy, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24895323

  20. Kinetics of hexacelsian to celsian phase transformation in SrAl2Si2O8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Drummond, Charles H., III

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of hexacelsian to celsian phase transformation in SrAl2Si2O8 have been investigated. Phase pure hexacelsian was prepared by heat treatment of glass flakes at 990 C for 10 h. Bulk hexacelsian was isothermally heat treated at 1026, 1050, 1100, 1152, and 1200 C for various times. The amounts of monoclinic celsian formed were determined using quantitative X-ray diffraction. Values of reaction rate constant, k, at various temperatures were evaluated from the Avrami equation. The Avrami parameter was determined to be 1.1, suggesting a diffusionless, one-dimensional transformation mechanism. From the temperature dependence of k, the activation energy for this reaction was evaluated to be 527 plus or minus 50 kJ/mole (126 plus or minus 12 kcal/mole). This value is consistent with a mechanism involving the transformation of the layered hexacelsian structure to a three-dimensional network celsian structure which necessitates breaking of the strongest bonds, the Si-O bonds.

  1. Large-aperture continuous-phase diffractive optical element for beam transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiaofeng; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Wu, Minxian

    1999-11-01

    Beam transform, such as to obtain uniform focal spot with flat top, steep edge, low side lobes and high light efficiency, can be realized well by diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE has many advantages, such as high light efficiency and strong phase distribution design flexibility. To increase the light efficiency and decrease large-angle scattering, continuous phase DOE should be used. The phase design is competed by a kind of multi-resolution hybrid algorithm based on hill-climbing and simulated annealing, which exploits sufficiently strong convergence ability of the hill climbing and global optimization potential of the simulated annealing. A kind of phase distribution with good geometrical structure and diameter 80 mm is obtained by choosing disturbance function, receipt and refused probability and so on. The simulated results show that the light efficiency is more than 95 percent, and the non-uniformity is less than 5 percent. Because the etching depth is direct proportion to the exposure time, to obtain continuous phase DOE, a kind of hollowed-out mask, namely gray-scale mask is used to control exposure time of each are. The mask is manufactured by linear cutting machine. The continuous phase DOE with diameter 80mm is fabricated by ion-etching with the mask. Finally, the tolerance of manufacturing error including depth error and alignment error are analyzed.

  2. Structural transformation of Sb-based high-speed phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Yamada, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kifune, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    The crystal structure of a phase-change recording material (the compound Ag(3.4)In(3.7)Sb(76.4)Te(16.5)) enclosed in a vacuum capillary tube was investigated at various temperatures in a heating process using a large Debye-Scherrer camera installed in BL02B2 at SPring-8. The amorphous phase of this material turns into a crystalline phase at around 416 K; this crystalline phase has an A7-type structure with atoms of Ag, In, Sb or Te randomly occupying the 6c site in the space group. This structure was maintained up to around 545 K as a single phase, although thermal expansion of the crystal lattice was observed. However, above this temperature, phase separation into AgInTe(2) and Sb-Te transpired. The first fragment, AgInTe(2), reliably maintained its crystal structure up to the melting temperature. On the other hand, the atomic configuration of the Sb-Te gradually varied with increasing temperature. This gradual structural transformation can be described as a continuous growth of the modulation period γ. PMID:23165592

  3. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter in the environment. This mineral-bound organic matter entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated 2-line ferrihydrite, ferrihydrite with adsorbed organic matter, and ferrihydrite coprecipitated with organic matter for microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). Ferrihydrite-organic matter associations with different organic matter loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe-reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound organic matter. At similar organic matter loadings, coprecipitated ferrihydrites were more reactive than ferrihydrites with adsorbed organic matter. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small organic matter loadings the poor crystallinity of coprecipitates led to even faster Fe-reduction rates than found for pure ferrihydrite. The amount of mineral-bound organic matter also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of organic matter-free ferrihydrite and siderite was only detected when ferrihydrites with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound organic matter were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited by attached organic matter. Consequently, mineral-bound organic matter shall be taken into account as a factor in slowing down reductive dissolution.

  4. Effects of Nereis diversicolor on the transformation of 1-methylpyrene and pyrene: transformation efficiency and identification of phase I and II products.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Christensen, Jan H; Selck, Henriette

    2013-05-21

    Transformation of nonsubstituted and alkyl-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the benthic invertebrate Nereis diversicolor was compared in this study. Pyrene and 1-methylpyrene were used as model compounds for nonsubstituted and alkyl-substituted PAHs, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of metabolites and parent compounds in worm tissue, water, and sediment were performed. Transformation of 1-methylpyrene generated the benzylic hydroxylated phase I product, 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid that comprised 90% of the total metabolites of 1-methylpyrene, and was mainly found in water extracts. We tentatively identified 1-methylpyrene glucuronides and 1-carbonylpyrene glycine as phase II metabolites not previously reported in literature. Pyrene was biotransformed to 1-hydroxypyrene, pyrene-1-sulfate, pyrene-1-glucuronide, and pyrene glucoside sulfate, with pyrene-1-glucuronide as the most prominent metabolite. Transformation of 1-methylpyrene (21% transformed) was more than 3 times as efficient as pyrene transformation (5.6% transformed). Because crude oils contain larger amounts of C₁-C₄-substituted PAHs than nonsubstituted PAHs, the rapid and efficient transformation of sediment-associated 1-methylpyrene may result in a high exposure of water-living organisms to metabolites of alkyl-substituted PAHs, whose toxicities are unknown. This study demonstrates the need to consider fate and effects of substituted PAHs and their metabolites in risk assessments. PMID:23611659

  5. Characterization of solid phases and study of transformation kinetics in m-chlorofluorobenzene by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Silvina; Wolfenson, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Polymorphism is of widespread occurrence in the world of molecular crystals. In this work we present experimental results showing the existence of four solid phases in m-chlorofluorobenzene. A glass structure is achieved by quenching the liquid phase at 77 K. This glassy state crystallizes in a disordered phase at T~143 K, which in turn transforms to the high-temperature stable phase (phase I) at T~153 K. Depending on the thermal history of the sample, a different ordered phase (phase III) can be obtained. The disorder is attributed to a molecular orientational disorder. There is no evidence of molecular reorientation in any phase. A study of the disorder-order phase transformation kinetics, using nuclear quadrupole resonance, is presented. The results are analyzed following Cahn's theory. Nucleation seems to take place at grain boundaries. Growth rates for different temperatures have been determined. PMID:22209621

  6. Phase transformation studies in unirradiated and proton beam irradiated Ni-Ti alloy between 25 and 100°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Rana; Afzal, Naveed; Ahmad, R.

    2012-06-01

    The stress-induced phase transformation characteristics of unirradiated and proton beam irradiated NiTi alloy were investigated at different tests temperatures. The wire-shaped NiTi specimens were irradiated by 2 MeV proton beam for 30 min at room temperature to a flux of 1019 protons/m2 s. Engineering stress-strain (S-S) curves of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were obtained using a materials testing machine at 25, 50, 75 and 100°C. The results indicate a single-stage phase transformation from austenite to martensite (B2-B19‧) in unirraidated specimens at all the test temperatures. In contrast, in the case of the irradiated specimens, a two-stage austenite-rhombohedral-martensite (B2-R-B19‧) phase transformation is observed at 25 and 50°C. The B2-R-B19‧ phase transformation, however, is found to change into B2-B19‧ transformation at 75 and 100°C. The stress required to initiate the B19‧ phase transformation (σMS) and the plateau range are found to be lower in irradiated specimens compared with those of the unirradiated specimens. The results obtained are discussed on the basis of the formation of Ni4Ti3 precipitates in irradiated specimens and their consequences on the phase transformations.

  7. 1D linear-phase band-pass multiplierless FIR Hilbert transformers and filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Vlastimir D.; Dončov, Nebojša S.; Ćirić, Dejan G.

    2016-06-01

    An original analytical method, based on modified Christoffel-Darboux formula, is used in the paper in order to synthesise a linear-phase band-pass finite impulse response (FIR) filter function that can have an effect of Hilbert transformer. New structure of the band-pass FIR filter in recursive realisation, together with the corresponding difference equation, is presented providing the efficient filter solution without multipliers. Several examples of filter types for different parity of two real free integer parameters, including a particular solution of Hilbert transformer, are considered in terms of required number of adders and values of cut-off frequencies of the pass and stop bands. A comparison of the proposed band-pass filter characteristics with those of a classical filter solution is provided in the paper.

  8. Time resolved optical methods for investigation of phase transformations in materials exposed to nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, J.; Semmar, N.; Cibulka, O.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared (IR) radiometry and time resolved reflectivity (TRR) methods can be used for investigation of laser pulse effects on materials in nanosecond time scale. The methods in combination are capable to quantify object temperature and detect phase transformations in the solid state, melting and plasma formation from vapour. Measurements with different laser pulse energy densities provide threshold of the transformation. The melt duration can be also determined. The experimental system is described. It contains KrF excimer laser with homogenizer and variable attenuator, fast IR detector for radiometry, continuous probing laser with Si photodiode for reflectivity measurement and UV detector for pump laser pulse reflection measurement. The system was applied to investigation of responses to laser light of silicon and different pure metals and alloys. The range of energy densities used was 1-5500 mJ.cm-2 and measurements were done with temporal resolution of 6 ns for radiometry and 1 ns for reflectivity.

  9. Structural and phase transformations and properties of TiNi-TiCu quasi-binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, N. N.; Pushin, A. V.; Pushin, V. G.; Korolev, A. V.; Kourov, N. I.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of copper doping (25 at. %) upon the structural and phase transformations of triple alloys of the TiNi-TiCu quasi-binary cut is studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy and electron and X-ray diffraction. A generalized complete diagram of B2 ↔ B19', B2 ↔ B19 ↔ B19', and B2 ↔ B19 thermoelastic transformations proceeding upon cooling as the copper content increases in the intervals of 0-8, 8-15, and 15-25 at. %, respectively, is constructed. Specificities of changes in the mechanical properties and microstructure of B19 and B19' martensites in relation to copper doping are studied.

  10. Phase transformations and the spectral reflectance of solid sulfur - Can metastable sulfur allotropes exist on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Nash, Douglas B.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory investigations have been conducted on the effects of variations in sulfur sample histories on their solid-state transformation rate and the corresponding spectral variation of freshly frozen sulfur. The temporal variations in question may be due to differences in the amount and type of metastable allotropes present in the sulfur after solidification, as well as to the physics of the phase-transformation process itself. The results obtained are pertinent to the physical behavior and spectral variation of such freshly solidified sulfur as may exist on the Jupiter moon Io; this would initially solidify into a glassy solid or monoclinic crystalline lattice, then approach ambient dayside temperatures. Laboratory results imply that the monoclinic or polymeric allotropes can in these circumstances be maintained, and will take years to convert to the stable orthorhombic crystalline form.

  11. Cost-Optimal Design of a 3-Phase Core Type Transformer by Gradient Search Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, R.; Das, A.; Sensarma, A. K.; Sanyal, A. N.

    2014-04-01

    3-phase core type transformers are extensively used as power and distribution transformers in power system and their cost is a sizable proportion of the total system cost. Therefore they should be designed cost-optimally. The design methodology for reaching cost-optimality has been discussed in details by authors like Ramamoorty. It has also been discussed in brief in some of the text-books of electri