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Sample records for ferrite fine particles

  1. Magnetic properties of Sr-La system M-type ferrite fine particles prepared by controlling the chemical coprecipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Seki, Hirota

    1999-09-01

    Single phase Sr-La M-type ferrite fine particles were prepared by the chemical coprecipitation and subsequent heat-treatment methods. Optimum magnetic properties were achieved with materials of composition Sr{sub 0.794}{sup 2+}La{sub 0.172}{sup 3+}Fe{sub 0.335}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 11.74}{sup 3+}O{sub 19}, and heat-treatment of 950 C x 2h in air. The magnetic and physical properties are {sigma}{sub s} = 90.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} Wb {center{underscore}dot} m/kg (72.0emu/g), H{sub cJ} = 505.3 kA/m (6.35 kOe), Tc = 454.4 C, the lattice constants a = 0.5882nm, c = 2.303nm, the activation energy = 230.9kJ/mol(55.2kcal/mol), and the average particle size = 0.3{micro}m.

  2. FINE PARTICLE CHARGING DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the changing of fine particles by unipolar ions in an electric field, and evaluation of a specially designed small pilot-scale (600-1000 acfm) precharging device. Following an extensive review of the lit...

  3. Influence of particle size on the magnetic spectrum of NiCuZn ferrites for electromagnetic shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohan; Yan, Shuoqing; Liu, Weihu; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of ferrite particle size on the magnetic spectra (1 MHz to 1 GHz) of NiCuZn polycrystalline ferrites doped with Co2O3 and Bi2O3 were systematically investigated. The experiments indicate that the ferrite particle size tailored by grinding time and corresponding sintering temperatures is crucial to achieving high permeability, high Q-factor and low magnetic loss, at 13.56 MHz for electromagnetic shielding applications especially in the near field communication (NFC) field. It is evident that high-performance NiZnCu ferrite materials are strongly tailored by morphology and microstructure. It is conclusive that fine ferrite particles and relatively low sintering temperatures are favorable to lowering magnetic loss and enhancing permeability. This work has built a foundation for improvement of the ferrite slurry used for fabrication of large area tape-casting ferrite sheets.

  4. Fine Particle Scrubbing: A Proceedings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, 1974

    1974-01-01

    These articles deal with the proceedings of a 1974 symposium on the use of wet scrubbers for the control of fine particle air pollutants. Various wet scrubbers, their engineering, performance, efficiency, and future are discussed. Tables, formulas, and models are included. (TK)

  5. Deuterium and helium trapping at TiC particles in ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitznagel, J. A.; Brenner, S. S.; Miller, M. K.; Choyke, W. J.

    1984-05-01

    First wall and blanket materials in Tokamak machines must accommodate increasing concentrations of helium and hydrogen isotopes. Alloy design principles point to the efficacy of trapping He and hydrogen at finely dispersed precipitates to minimize their impact on mechanical properties. Titanium carbide particles are known to trap He effectively in austenitic stainless steel. Less is known about TiC as a trap for helium and hydrogen isotopes in ferritic steels. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of directly measuring the trapping of helium and deuterium at TiC-ferrite interfaces using atom probe field ion microscopy.

  6. Influence of Nanocrystalline Ferrite Particles on Properties of Magnetic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Robert; Habisreuther, Tobias; Hiergeist, Robert; Steinmetz, Hanna; Zeisberger, Matthias; Gawalek, Wolfgang

    Nanocrystalline mainly superparamagnetic ferrite particles ≈ 10 nm are used for the preparation of magnetic fluids. Barium hexaferrite BaFe12-2xTixCoxO19 powders with mean particle sizes < 30 nm show the transition to single domain Stoner-Wohlfarth behaviour. Hysteresis parameters, losses and the initial susceptibility versus temperature were obtained by VSM. Ba-ferrite ferrofluids have been prepared using Isopar M or dodecane as carrier liquid. Small Angle Neutron Scattering curves lead to a bimodal size distribution consisting of single magnetic particles and aggregated magnetic particles. Particle size investigations were done by TEM.

  7. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS INFORMATION SYSTEM REFERENCE MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a basic reference manual on the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a computerized database on primary fine particle emissions to the atmosphere from stationary point sources. The FPEIS is a component of the Environmental Assessment Data Systems (EAD...

  8. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe 3O 4 and SrFe 12O 19 ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic.

  9. The effect of calcining temperature on the magnetic properties of the ultra-fine NiCuZn-ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Sik Ham, Chang-Woo

    2009-03-05

    In this study, the ultra-fine NiCuZn-ferrite was prepared by a coprecipitation method. The magnetic properties were investigated in terms of calcining temperature. The ferrite powders, Ni{sub 0.206}Cu{sub 0.206}Zn{sub 0.618}Fe{sub 1.94}O{sub 4-{delta}}, were initially heat treated at various temperatures of 300-750 deg. C, and then sintered at the final temperature of 900 deg. C. The average particle size calculated by a XRD pattern and confirmed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrograph was 7.5 nm. The calcining temperature was an important factor for microstructures and magnetic properties of the sintered ferrite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs showed a uniform grain growth with small pores and high densification at the calcining temperature of 450 deg. C. From the results of magnetic property measurements, the ferrite calcined at 450 deg. C showed higher initial permeability (170) and quality factor (72) than those of other calcining temperatures.

  10. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS INFORMATION SYSTEM: SUMMARY REPORT (SUMMER 1976)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the initial loading of data into the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a computerized database on primary fine particle emissions to the atmosphere from stationary sources, designed to assist engineers and scientists engaged in fine particl...

  11. Shape study of fine coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.C.; Cavallaro, J.A.; Wizzard, J.T.; Rohar, P.C.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational result on a three-dimensional shape model of fine coal particles, and an approach to describe and classify particle shape in terms of the elliptical approximation to their two-dimensional cross-sectional contours. The major semi-axis, minor semi-axis, orientation and tracing phase of each component ellipse, up to four harmonic components, were used as features to classify shapes of coal and pyrite particles. The semi-axes ratio of the fundamental ellipse indicates the elongation of the particle cross-sectional contour, while the harmonic content reflects the angularity of the contour or particle surface. The shape distribution obtained by such an analysis will provide an important physical characteristic of fine coal particles, which is needed in developing the advanced coal beneficiation processes. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  12. The influence of fine ferrite formation on the γ/α interface, fine bainite and retained austenite in a thermomechanically-processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timokhina, Ilana B.; Miller, Michael K.; Beladi, Hossein; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2016-03-03

    We subjected a Fe–0.26C–1.96Si–2Mn with 0.31Mo (wt%) steel to a novel thermomechanical processing route to produce fine ferrite with different volume fractions, bainite, and retained austenite. In two types of fine ferrites were found to be: (i) formed along prior austenite grain boundaries, and (ii) formed intragranularly in the interior of austenite grains. An increase in the volume fraction of fine ferrite led to the preferential formation of blocky retained austenite with low stability, and to a decrease in the volume fraction of bainite with stable layers of retained austenite. Moreover, the difference in the morphology of the bainitic ferritemore » and the retained austenite after different isothermal ferrite times was found to be responsible for the deterioration of the mechanical properties. The segregation of Mn, Mo, and C at distances of 2–2.5 nm from the ferrite and retained austenite/martensite interface on the retained austenite/martensite site was observed after 2700 s of isothermal hold. Finally, it was suggested that the segregation occurred during the austenite-to-ferrite transformation, and that this would decrease the interface mobility, which affects the austenite-to-ferrite transformation and ferrite grain size.« less

  13. Mechanical properties of 15%Mn steel with fine lamellar structure consisting of ferrite and austenite phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueji, R.; Okitsu, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Takagi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.

    2010-07-01

    New steel with fine lamellar structure consisting of austenite and ferrite was developed. 15mass%Mn-3%Al-3%Si steel sheet was used in this study. First of all, the effect of the cooling rate on the microstructure was examined. The cooling at the slower speed of 100 deg/hour created the dual phase structure consisting of both austenite and ferrite. The additional rolling developed the fine lamellar duplex structure. Improvement of both the tensile strength and elongation was achieved by rolling. The strength increases furthermore by the rolling up to larger reduction. The 90% rolled sheet shows high tensile strength around 1000MPa with large elongation (15%-20%). These results indicate that the multi-phased structure with controlled lamellar morphology is beneficial for the management of both high strength and large ductility.

  14. Influence of initial particle size on the magnetostriction of sintered cobalt ferrite derived from nanocrystalline powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaja Mohaideen, K.; Joy, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    The role of initial particle size on the magnetostriction coefficient of sintered cobalt ferrite derived from nanocrystalline powders is studied. Nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite with different sizes in the range 3-80 nm are synthesized by an autocombustion method using metal nitrates and glycine. It has been observed that the initial particle size of the starting powders has a strong influence on the magnetostrictive behavior of sintered cobalt ferrite. Highest magnetostrictive strain and strain derivative are obtained for sintered ferrite derived from nanoparticles of size < 5 nm. The results show that higher magnetostriction coefficient for sintered cobalt ferrite can be achieved by compacting nanocrystalline particles of very small size.

  15. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives highlights of fine particle scrubber research performed by, or under the direction of, EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (IERL-RTP) at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The U.S. EPA has been actively involved in research and development in ...

  16. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  17. Simulation of Indoor Fine Suspension Particle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. Q.; Gong, G. C.; Zou, S. H.

    In this paper, the migration and deposition of particles are simulated using the Moment Dynamic Equation (MDE). Indoor fine suspension particle depositions and particle distribution function are obtained. Gas phase flow is simulated by v 2 - f model. The simulated results of particle concentration profiles show that a uniform concentration exists in the middle region of the room with a low supplying speed. At the same time, the total number of partciels deposited is also obtained using Gradient diffusion model. Through the comparison of velocity predictions among several CFD k-ɛ models and v 2 -f model and experimental data, it is concluded that the results obtained by v 2 -f model more accurately approximate the experimental data. So that the MDE combined v 2 -f model will gain in popularity amongst building engineers and it will gradually be adopted as an attractive alternative tool to predict contaminant particle dispersion and distribution.

  18. Method of drying fine coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ladt, M.A.

    1984-04-24

    A method of drying wet coal fines smaller than 28 mesh in size employs both a vibrating fluidized bed type dryer and a coal fired burner for supplying hot drying gases to the dryer. A regenerative separator is interposed between the coal fired burner and the fluidized bed type dryer to satisfactorily remove particle matter from the gases without unacceptable pressure losses. Hot gases exhausted from the fluidized bed type dryer are also cleansed to remove particulate coal particles which are used as fuel for the coal fired burner.

  19. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  20. FINE PARTICLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: CONVENTIONAL AND NOVEL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the development of technology in fine particle control. Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), scrubbers, fabric filters, and novel devices were assessed to determine their efficiency. ESPs were found to be excellent in controlling fine particles: with an efficien...

  1. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  2. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Physics of compaction of fine cohesive particles.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, A; Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S

    2005-02-25

    Fluidized fractal clusters of fine particles display critical-like dynamics at the jamming transition, characterized by a power law relating consolidation stress with volume fraction increment [sigma--(c) proportional, variant(Deltaphi)(beta)]. At a critical stress clusters are disrupted and there is a crossover to a logarithmic law (Deltaphi = nu logsigma--(c)) resembling the phenomenology of soils. We measure lambda identical with- partial differentialDelta(1/phi)/ partial log(sigma--(c) proportional, variant Bo(0.2)(g), where Bo(g) is the ratio of interparticle attractive force (in the fluidlike regime) to particle weight. This law suggests that compaction is ruled by the internal packing structure of the jammed clusters at nearly zero consolidation. PMID:15783824

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of fine stabilized superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahraei, Maryam; Monshi, Ahmad; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Amirnasr, Mehdi; Behdadfar, Behshid

    2015-11-01

    Superparamagnetic Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.45) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a direct, efficient and environmental friendly hydrothermal method. The synthesized NPs were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The effects of various parameters such as the pH of reaction mixture, time and temperature of hydrothermal treatment and Zn substitution on the spinel phase formation, the magnetization, and the size of resulting NPs are discussed. The Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite NPs obtained from hydrothermal process crystallized mainly in the spinel phase. Nevertheless, without citrate ions, the hematite phase appeared in the product. The monophase Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite NPs hydrothermally prepared in the presence of citric acid had mean particle size of 7 nm and a narrow size distribution. Furthermore, the synthesized NPs can be used to prepare ferrofluids for biomedical applications due to their small size, good stability in aqueous medium (pH 7) and also high magnetization value.

  5. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  6. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  7. Magnetization measurements on fine cobalt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaud, M.; Broto, J. M.; Rakoto, H.; Ousset, J. C.; Osuna, J.; Ould Ely, T.; Amiens, C.; Chaudret, B.; Askenazy, S.

    1998-05-01

    We measure the magnetization of fine cobalt particles by SQUID and pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. These measurements have been made on two samples (C1, C2) with nonagglomerated particles. The analysis of the magnetic meaurements evidences very narrow log-normal size distribution centered around 1.5 nm (≅150 atoms) and 1.9 nm (≅310 atoms) for C1 and C2, respectively. Magnetization at 4.2 K seems to saturate in fields up to 5 T leading to an enhanced mean magnetic moment per atom compared to bulk value (1.72 μB). However, magnetization measurements up to 35 T do not permit to reach saturation, and show a continuous increase of μCo reaching 2.1±0.1 μB (C1) and 1.9±0.1 μB (C2). The effective magnetic anisotropies are found to be larger than those of bulk materials and decrease with increasing particle size. These features are associated with the large influence of the surface atoms.

  8. Harmonic Ratcheting for Ferrite Tuned RF Acceleration of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Brennan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    One of the most persistent difficulties in the design of RF cavities for acceleration of charged particles is the rapid and efficient acceleration of particles over a large range of frequencies. From medical synchrotrons to accelerator driven systems, there is a strong need for fast acceleration of protons and light ions over hundreds of MeV. Conventionally, this is a costly undertaking, requiring specially designed ferrite loaded cavities to be tuned over a large range of frequencies. Ferromagnetic materials allow for the precise adjustment of cavity resonant frequency, but rapid changes in the frequency as well as operation outside material specific frequency ranges result in significant Q-loss to the cavity. This leads to a considerable increase in power required and is thus undesirable for regular operation. We introduce an acceleration scheme known as harmonic ratcheting which can be used to reduce the cavity frequency range needed for accelerating an ion beam in a synchrotron. In particular, this scheme addresses the need for high rep. rate machines for applications such as radiation therapy in which low beam intensity is needed. We demonstrate with simulations the type of ramps achievable using this technique and consider its advantages over h=1 acceleration schemes.

  9. Estuarine fine-particle budget determined from radionuclide tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Cutshall, N.H.; Larsen, I.L.; Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Bopp, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The sedimentary distributions of radiocesium and plutonium have been used to determine patterns of fine-particle accumulation, estimate net sediment fluxes from different sources, and develop a fine-particle budget for the Hudson-Raritan estuary. It is proposed that the rates and patterns of fine-particle accumulation reflect a sediment surface in dynamic equilibrium with the wave and current regimes. Rates of accumulation in most estuarine areas appear to equal the rate of sea-level rise or land subsidence. Localized areas, which have not yet attained or are presently out of equilibrium, serve as fine particle traps. 13 references, 1 table.

  10. Ordering of Fine Particles in a Planar Magnetron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Totsuji, H.; Ishihara, O.; Sato, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Adachi, S.

    2008-09-07

    Fine particles injected in a planar magnetron were pushed upward by diffusible plasma, leading to being suspended by the force balance with the gravity and forming three-dimensional structures on the two-dimensional structure formed by particle strings.

  11. Temperature dependence of magnetic behaviour in very fine grained, spark plasma sintered NiCuZn ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Behzad; Zehani, Karim; LoBue, Martino; Loyau, Vincent; Mazaleyrat, Frederic

    2012-04-01

    Recently, using spark plasma sintering technique, a family of very fine grained, fully dense NiCuZn ferrites have been produced, which show constant permeability up to several 10 MHz. These ferrites can be used for filtering purposes in high frequency applications where a wide frequency band is required. In this paper, we study the magnetization processes taking place in these nano grained materials, in the frequency interval of 100 kHz to 5 MHz. Using a fluxmetric hysteresis graph, permeability, loss, and BH loops are measured at different temperatures, from -5 deg. C to 110 deg. C. Results are compared to the behavior of micrometric grain size ferrites, which are commonly used for power electronic and high frequency applications.

  12. Effect of particle fineness on the finely disseminated iron ore for beneficiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, T. S.; Zhang, W. X.; Fang, X. H.; Gao, G. K.

    2013-06-01

    This paper focused on Oolitic hematite ore which consists of extremely unequal disseminated particles that are fine-grained and easy to become muddy, It presents the effect of particle fineness, roasting temperature and roasting time and other variables on the beneficiation of this ore. The effect of particle fineness on the concentrate quality was also studied after magnetic roasting, the so-called process of "magnetic roasting-stage grinding-low intensity magnetic separation-cationic reverse flotation" was adopted to treat the raw ore under various experimental conditions including particle fineness, roasting temperature and roasting time, etc. it is found the concentrate grade of TFe of raw ore can be increased from 48.32%(original) to 61.30% at a recovery rate of 80.73%. Results show that the effect of particle fineness on mineral processing indexes is significant.

  13. IN SITU FIELD PORTABLE FINE PARTICLE MEASURING DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the design, development, and testing of an in situ fine particle measuring device--the Fine Particle Stack Spectrometer System (FPSSS). It is a laser-fed optical system with detection by near-forward light scattering. Sample volume is established by a high-re...

  14. CHAMBER SIMULATION OF FINE PARTICLE PENETRATION INTO HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    the paper discusses chamber simulation of fine particle penetration into houses. (NOTE: A number of recent studies have shown a correlation of negative health effects with increases in outdoor fine particles. Since people spend up to 90% of their time indoors, the relationship be...

  15. NASAL FILTERING OF FINE PARTICLES IN CHILDREN VS. ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nasal efficiency for removing fine particles may be affected by developmental changes in nasal structure associated with age. In healthy Caucasian children (age 6-13, n=17) and adults (age 18-28, n=11) we measured the fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (1 and 2um MMAD)...

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN EASTERN VISIBILITY FINE PARTICLE NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive assessment of eastern regional haze is being undertaken by EPA's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory. An Eastern Visibility Fine Particle Network (EVFPN) is being set up to study the relationships between fine particles and visibility. A long-term data bas...

  17. AUGMENTATION OF FINE PARTICLE COLLECTION IN THE EPXP SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the A.P.T. electrostatically augmented particle by particle (EPxP) dry scrubber. It is analogous to a venturi scrubber except that it uses relatively large solid particles (instead of water drops) as collection centers for the fine particles...

  18. EDITORIAL: Cluster issue on fine particle magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorani, D.

    2008-07-01

    This Cluster issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics arises from the 6th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) held in Rome during 9-12 October 2007 at the headquarters of the National Research Council (NCR). It contains a collection of papers based on both invited and contributed presentations at the meeting. The ICFPM Conferences have previously been held in Rome, Italy (1991), Bangor, UK (1996), Barcelona, Spain (1999), Pittsburgh, USA (2002) and London, UK (2004). The aim of this series of Conferences is to bring together the experts in the field of nanoparticle magnetism at a single forum to discuss recent developments in both theoretical and experimental aspects, and technological applications. The Conference programme included sessions on: new materials, novel synthesis and processing techniques, with special emphasis on self-organized magnetic arrays; theory and modelling; surface and interface properties; transport properties; spin dynamics; magnetization reversal mechanisms; magnetic recording media and permanent magnets; biomedical applications and advanced investigation techniques. I would like to thank the European Physical Society and the Innovative Magnetic and Superconducting Materials and Devices Project of the Materials and Devices Department and the Institute of Structure of Matter (ISM) of CNR for their support. Thanks are also due to the members of the Programme Committee, to the local Organizing Committee, chaired by Elisabetta Agostinelli and to all the Conference participants. I am also indebted to the many scientists who contributed to assuring the high-quality of this Cluster by donating their time to reviewing the manuscripts contained herein. Finally, I'd like to dedicate this issue to the memories of Jean Louis Dormann, a great expert in nanoparticle magnetism, who was one of the promoters and first organizers of this series of Conferences, and of Grazia Ianni, the Conference secretary, who died before her

  19. Ba-ferrite particles for magnetic liquids with enhanced Neel relaxation time and loss investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, R.; Hiergeist, R.; Gawalek, W.; Hoell, A.

    2003-03-01

    Nanometer-scale particles are interesting because of their unique magnetic properties. Barium ferrite with particle sizes ⪉ 10 nm behave superparamagnetically and show at bigger sizes the transition to single domain behaviour. Beside the particle size, the anisotropy energy K_1\\cdot V, and thus the Neel relaxation time, depends also on the amount of doping. The glass crystallisation method was used for preparation of different Ba-ferrites. Ferrofluids have been prepared using Isopar^{circledR} M or dodecane as a carrier liquid. Magnetic parameters were obtained by VSM, hysteresis losses (specific loss power) of ferrite powders by a hysteresometer at 50 Hz. Magnetic core sizes were calculated from hysteresis loops. SANS curves of a ferrofluid reveal single magnetic particles and aggregated magnetic particles with an incomplete organic shell. Figs 3, Refs 9.

  20. Carbonization behavior of pitches containing fine molybdenum particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Atsushi; Wang, Xiangsheng; Kabe, Toshiaki . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Shono, Hiroaki . Mineral Fiber Research Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    In the carbonization of coal tar pitch and naphthalene pitch containing fine molybdenum particles, it was found by using a tritium tracer method that the fine molybdenum particles added into pitch in advance can selectively catalyze the dehydrogenation and polycondensation of saturated hydrocarbons below 700 C, and thereby the carbonization yield of coal tar pitch containing partially saturated structures or aliphatic side chains in its component molecules increased. Further, it could be inferred that the fine molybdenum particles mainly accelerate the release of the hydrogen which is difficult to isotopically exchange with water in the preparation of tritiated pitch in the presence of Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3].

  1. DAILY MORTALITY AND FINE AND ULTRAFINE PARTICLES IN ERFURT, GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr H-Erich Wichmann and colleagues at the National Research Center for Environment and Health (GSF) in Neuherberg, Germany, prospec-tively studied the association of daily mortality data with the number and mass concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles in Erfurt, Ger...

  2. Surface study of fine MgFe 2O 4 ferrite powder prepared by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Hiromichi; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Naohara, Takashi; Maehara, Tsunehiro

    2008-02-01

    To study surface behaviors, MgFe 2O 4 ferrite materials having different grain sizes were synthesized by two different chemical methods, i.e., a polymerization method and a reverse coprecipitation method. The single phase of the cubic MgFe 2O 4 was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method for both the precursors decomposed at 600-1000 °C except for a very small peak of Fe 2O 3 was detected for the samples calcined at 600 and 700 °C by the polymerization method. The crystal size and particle size increased with an increase in the sintering temperature using both methods. The conductance of the MgFe 2O 4 decreased when the atmosphere was changed from ambient air to air containing 10.0 ppm NO 2. The conductance change, C = G(air)/ G(10 ppm NO 2), was reduced with an increase in the operating temperature. For the polymerization method, the maximum C-value was ca. 40 at 300 °C for the samples sintered at 900 °C. However, the samples sintered at 1000 °C showed a low conductance change in the 10 ppm NO 2 gas, because the ratio of the O 2 gas adsorption sites on the particle surface is smaller than those of the samples having a high C-value. The low Mg content on the surface affects the low ratio of the gas adsorption sites. For the reverse coprecipitation method, the particle size was smaller than that of the polymerization method. Although a stable conductance was obtained for the sample sintered at 900 and 1000 °C, its conductance change was less than that of the polymerization method.

  3. Simple model for fine particle (dust) clouds in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2016-04-01

    In the cloud of fine particles (dusts) in plasmas, the charge neutrality can be much enhanced due to large charge numbers of fine particles. The required condition is not difficult to satisfy even when their charge density is substantially smaller than electrons or ions. Based on this fact, a simple model of fine particle clouds is proposed and the cloud radius is related to the half-width, the radius where the density of surrounding plasmas drops by half, in cylindrically and spherically symmetric cases under microgravity. When fine particles are gradually introduced with parameters of surrounding plasma especially the half-width being fixed, the size of clouds first increases and then saturates at the value determined by the plasma half-width, giving a possibility to control the size and density of clouds independently.

  4. PENETRATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICLES INTO THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several recent studies have indicated significant health risks associated with exposure to fine particles as measured outdoors. However, much of the exposure is believed to have occurred infdoors. consequently, there is considerable interest in the relationship between indoor a...

  5. HUMAN CLINICAL STUDIES OF CONCENTRATED AMBIENT ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confirmation of our hypothesis that exposure to ambient ultrafine and fine particles promotes coagulation and alters cardiac function will have important implications for air pollution regulatory efforts, and will provide new approaches for the prevention of cardiovascular hea...

  6. Dispersion of fine phosphor particles by newly developed beads mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joni, I. Made; Panatarani, C.; Maulana, Dwindra W.

    2016-02-01

    Fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles has advanced properties compare to conventional particles applied for compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) as three band phosphor. However, suspension of fine particles easily agglomerated during preparation of spray coating of the CFL tube. Therefore, it is introduced newly developed beads mill system to disperse fine phosphor. The beads mill consist of glass beads, dispersing chamber (impellers), separator chamber, slurry pump and motors. The first important performance of beads mill is the performance of the designed on separating the beads with the suspended fine particles. We report the development of beads mill and its separation performance vary in flow rate and separator rotation speeds. The 27 kg of glass beads with 30 µm in size was poured into dispersing chamber and then water was pumped continuously through the slurry pump. The samples for the separation test was obtained every 1 hours vary in rotation speed and slurry flow rate. The results shows that the separation performance was 99.99 % obtained for the rotation speed of >1000 rpm and flow rate of 8 L/minute. The performances of the system was verified by dispersing fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles with concentration 1 wt.%. From the observed size distribution of particles after beads mill, it is concluded that the current design of bead mill effectively dispersed fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+.

  7. A facile microwave synthetic route for ferrite nanoparticles with direct impact in magnetic particle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Makridis, A; Chatzitheodorou, I; Topouridou, K; Yavropoulou, M P; Angelakeris, M; Dendrinou-Samara, C

    2016-06-01

    The application of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine finds its rapidly developing emphasis on heating mediators for magnetic hyperthermia, the ever-promising "fourth leg" of cancer treatment. Usage of MNPs depends largely on the preparation processes to select optimal conditions and effective routes to finely tailor MNPs. Microwave heating, instead of conventional heating offers nanocrystals at significantly enhanced rate and yield. In this work, a facile mass-production microwave hydrothermal synthetic approach was used to synthesize stable ferromagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with sizes smaller than 14nm from metal acetylacetonates in the presence of octadecylamine. Prolonging the reaction time from 15 to 60min, led to ferrites with improved crystallinity while the sizes are slight increased. The high crystallinity magnetic nanoparticles showed exceptional magnetic heating parameters. In vitro application was performed using the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 incubated with manganese ferrite nanoparticles. Hyperthermia applied in a two cycle process, while AC magnetic field remained on until the upper limit of 45°C was achieved. The comparative results of the AC hyperthermia efficiency of ferrite nanoparticles in combination with the in vitro study coincide with the magnetic features and their tunability may be further exploited for AC magnetic hyperthermia driven applications. PMID:27040263

  8. Helical-mode magnetostatic resonances in small ferrite particles and singular metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kamenetskii, E O

    2010-12-01

    Small ferrite-disk particles with magnetostatic (magneto-dipole) oscillations are characterized by the topological-phase states-the vortex states. In a recently published paper (Kamenetskii et al 2010 Phys. Rev. A 81 053823), it was shown that such magnetic vortices act as traps, providing purely subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields. The symmetry properties of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite disks allow one to propose new-type subwavelength microwave structures. In this paper it is demonstrated that the unique topological properties of the fields in a ferrite disk are intimately related to the symmetry breaking effects of magnetostatic oscillations. This analysis is based on postulates about a physical meaning of the magnetostatic-potential function ψ(r, t) as a complex scalar wavefunction, which presumes a long-range phase coherence in magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The proper solutions are found based on an analysis of magnetostatic-wave propagation in a helical coordinate system. It is shown that while a composition of two helical waves may acquire a geometrical phase over-running of 2π during a period, every separate helical wave has a dynamical phase over-running of π and so behaves as a double-valued function. This results in the appearance of helical-mode magnetostatic resonances in quasi-2D ferrite disks. The solutions give magnetostatic-wave power-flow-density vortices with cores at the disk center and azimuthally running waves of magnetization. The near fields of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite-disk particles are characterized by space-time symmetry violation. For incident electromagnetic waves, such particles, with sizes much less than the free-space electromagnetic wavelength, appear as local singular regions. From the properties of a composition of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite-disk particles, one may propose novel metamaterials-singular metamaterials. PMID:21406763

  9. Synthesis and properties of hybrid hydroxyapatite-ferrite (Fe3O4) particles for hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid ceramics consisting of hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 and ferrite Fe3O4 were synthesized using a two-stage procedure. The first stage included the synthesis of Fe3O4 ferrite particles by co-precipitation and the synthesis of hydroxyapatite. In the second stage, the magnetic hybrid hydroxyapatite-ferrite bioceramics were synthesized by a thorough mixing of the obtained powders of carbonated hydroxyapatite and Fe3O4 ferrite taken in a certain proportion, pressing into tablets, and annealing in a carbon dioxide atmosphere for 30 min at a temperature of 1200°C. The properties of the components and hybrid particles were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The saturation magnetization of the hybrid ceramic composite containing 20 wt % Fe3O4 was found to be 12 emu/g. The hybrid hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2)-ferrite Fe3O4 ceramics, which are promising for the use in magnetotransport and hyperthermia treatment, were synthesized and investigated for the first time.

  10. Sustainment of Fine Particle Cloud by Means of Time-Averaged Particle Driving Force in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gohda, Takuma; Iizuka, Satoru

    2008-09-07

    We have succeeded in sustaining fine particle cloud by using a time-averaged particle driving (TAPD) method in the RF discharge plasma. The particles feel only time-averaged force when the period of pulses applied to those point-electrodes is shorter than the particle response time. The particles are transported to a middle point between two point-electrodes.

  11. EFFECT OF BODY SIZE ON BREATHING PATTERN AND FINE PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inter-child variability in breathing patterns may contribute to variability in fine particle, lung deposition and morbidity in children associated with those particles. Fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (2um monodisperse, carnauba wax particles) was measured in healthy...

  12. Anticorrosion Properties of Pigments based on Ferrite Coated Zinc Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, P.; Kalendová, A.

    The paper deals with a new anticorrosion pigment, synthesized on a core-shell basis. For its syntheses a starting substance is used that forms the lamellar shaped core; namely lamellar zinc. The cover of the core is represented by zinc oxide, which is in fact partly oxidized lamellar zinc core, and is created during the calcination of the pigment. The compound that forms the top layer of the core, a ferrite, is also formed during calcination. The formula for the prepared pigment is then defined as MexZn1-xFe2O4/Zn and the formula of thin ferrite layer is MexZn1-xFe2O4 (where Me = Ca, Mg). Due to its shape, this anticorrosion pigment includes another anticorrosion effect, the so called "barrier effect". The mechanisms of anticorrosion effect, corrosion efficiency and mechanical properties were investigated for epoxy-ester paint systems with 10%pigment volume concentration (PVC). Mechanical tests were performed to determine the adhesiveness and mechanical resistance of paints and accelerated corrosion tests were carried out to evaluate efficiency against chemical degradation factors.

  13. Synthesis And Characterization Of Ultra-fine Zinc Substituted Lithium Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibam, Ibetombi; Phanjoubam, Sumitra; Sarma, HNK; Prakash, Chandra

    2008-04-01

    Ultrafine substituted lithium ferrite having the compositional formula Li0.5-0.5xZnxFe2.5-0.5xO4 where 0⩽x⩽1.0 in steps of 0.2 were prepared by the citrate Precursor method. A nitrate citrate gel was prepared from metal nitrates and citric acid, which exhibits self-propagating combustion behaviour. Spinel structure of the synthesized ferrite was confirmed by XRD analysis. The variation in lattice parameter and density with zinc concentration is studied.

  14. Autonomous patterning of cells on microstructured fine particles.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Iwori; Kawanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Arata

    2015-05-01

    Regularly patterned cells can clarify cellular function and are required in some biochip applications. This study examines cell patterning along microstructures and the effect of microstructural geometry on selective cellular adhesion. Particles can be autonomously assembled on a soda-lime glass substrate that is chemically patterned by immersion in a suspension of fine particles. By adopting various sizes of fine particles, we can control the geometry of the microstructure. Cells adhere more readily to microstructured fine particles than to flat glass substrate. Silica particles hexagonally packed in 5-40 μm line and space microstructures provide an effective cell scaffold on the glass substrate. Cultured cells tend to attach and proliferate along the microstructured region while avoiding the flat region. The difference in cell adhesion is attributed to their geometries, as both of the silica particles and soda-lime glass are hydrophilic related with cell adhesiveness. After cell seeding, cells adhered to the flat region migrated toward the microstructured region. For most of the cells to assemble on the scaffold, the scaffolding microstructures must be spaced by at most 65 μm. PMID:25746259

  15. Source contributions to atmospheric fine carbon particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Gray, H.; Cass, Glen R.

    A Lagrangian particle-in-cell air quality model has been developed that facilitates the study of source contributions to atmospheric fine elemental carbon and fine primary total carbon particle concentrations. Model performance was tested using spatially and temporally resolved emissions and air quality data gathered for this purpose in the Los Angeles area for the year 1982. It was shown that black elemental carbon (EC) particle concentrations in that city were dominated by emissions from diesel engines including both on-highway and off-highway applications. Fine primary total carbon particle concentrations (TC=EC+organic carbon) resulted from the accumulation of small increments from a great variety of emission source types including both gasoline and diesel powered highway vehicles, stationary source fuel oil and gas combustion, industrial processes, paved road dust, fireplaces, cigarettes and food cooking (e.g. charbroilers). Strategies for black elemental carbon particle concentration control will of necessity need to focus on diesel engines, while controls directed at total carbon particle concentrations will have to be diversified over a great many source types.

  16. FUGITIVE AND FINE PARTICLE CONTROL USING ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED FOG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of fugitive and fine particle control using electrostatically charged fog. Most industrial pollutants acquire an electrostatic charge as they are dispersed into the air. Exposing this charged airborne material to an oppositely charged water fog...

  17. FINE PARTICLE MATTER (PM2.5) DESIGN VALUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particulate matter or PM2.5 (total mass of particles below 2.5 micron is diameter) is known to cause adverse health effects in humans. see the following websites for more information on air quality and data. http://www.epa.gov/airnow/ http://www.epa.gov/air/ http://www.epa....

  18. FINE PARTICLE MATTER (PM2.5) DESIGN VALUE 2020

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particulate matter or PM2.5 (total mass of particles below 2.5 micron is diameter) is known to cause adverse health effects in humans. see the following websites for more information on air quality and data. http://www.epa.gov/airnow/ http://www.epa.gov/air/ http://www.epa....

  19. SOURCES OF FINE PARTICLE ORGANIC MATTER IN BOISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient concentrations of fine particle extracted organic matter (EOM) measured at the Elm Grove Park and Fire Station sites in Boise have been apportioned to their two principal sources, woodsmoke and motor vehicle emissions. A multiple linear regression method using lead and po...

  20. MEASURED FINE PARTICLE COLLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR NOVEL SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of performance tests to determine the fine particle collection of four novel scrubbers: a Lone Star Steel Steam-Hydro Scrubber, an Aronetics (Chemico) Two-Phase Jet Scrubber, an Entoleter Centrifield Scrubber, and a CEA Variable-Throat Venturi Scrubber. T...

  1. Prediction of Coarse Particle Nitrate From Fine Particle Measurements in a Coastal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Evans, M. C.; Poor, N. D.

    2003-12-01

    Nutrient induced algal growth is one cause of decreased seagrass in the Tampa Bay Estuary. This influx of nutrients arises from the presence of fixed nitrogen in various flows and discharges to the estuary and from atmospheric deposition. One of the goals of BRACE (Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) is to obtain improved estimates of the atmospheric nitrogen deposition to Tampa Bay. Previous estimates of atmospheric dry deposition of nitrogen to Tampa Bay have been based on Annular Denuder System (ADS) measurements of gaseous nitric acid and ammonia and fine particle (PM2.5) nitrate and ammonium, which extend back to 1996. However, recent coarse particle measurements indicate that, while ammonium primarily exists in fine particles, nitrate is preferentially found in the coarse fraction. The goal of this study is to examine whether the historical data for fine particle nitrate can be used to predict the amount of nitrate in the coarse fraction so as to obtain a more accurate estimate of dry particle deposition of nitrate to the Tampa Bay Estuary. Specifically, it is shown that averaged nitrate distributions obtained from recent micro-orifice impactor data can be used to predict the coarse to fine ratios observed for dichotomous samplers and the fine particle concentrations obtained from the Annular Denuder System. This provides some confidence that the impactor results may be used in conjunction with earlier fine particle data to obtain an estimate of coarse particle nitrate concentrations, and therefore an improved estimate of nitrate flux to the estuary.

  2. Inter-particle interactions and magnetism in manganese-zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, P.; Srikanth, H.; Morrison, S. A.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2005-03-01

    Manganese-zinc ferrite (Mn xZn 1-xFe 2O 4) nanoparticles were synthesized by reverse micelle technique using two different surfactant media—(1) bis-(2-ethylhexl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) and (2) mix of nonylphenol poly(oxyethylene) 5 and nonylphenol poly(oxyethylene) 9 (NP) followed by annealing of precursors to remove the surfactant coating and to obtain better crystalline phase. A comparison of the magnetic properties showed distinct differences in blocking temperature, coercivity and saturation magnetization. Radio-frequency (RF) transverse susceptibility (TS) measurements were in agreement with the static magnetization data. Our precise TS measurements further revealed features associated with anisotropy fields that were dependent on the grain size, crystallinity and inter-particle interactions. Overall, we have demonstrated that RF TS is an excellent probe of the dynamic magnetization and influence of effects such as crystallinity and inter-particle interactions in soft ferrite nanoparticles.

  3. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  4. Comparison of the activities of fine-particle size catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of the fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETCs Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The standard procedures use Blind Canyon coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design with temperatures from 350{degrees}C to 400{degrees}C, reaction times from 20 to 60 minutes, and catalyst loadings up to 1 wt%. Catalytic activity is measured in terms of tetrahydrofuran conversion, heptane conversion, the amount of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene in the product, and the gas yield. Several catalysts have been evaluated including a commercially available pyrite, a sulfated iron oxide from the University of Pittsburgh, and several preparations of 6-line ferrihydrites from Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Results have demonstrated that significant differences in activity can be detected among these catalysts.

  5. Ambient fine and coarse particle suppression of alveolar macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, M T; Sioutas, C; Chang, M C; Boere, A J F; Cassee, F R

    2003-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are part of the innate immunological defense system and are among the first cells to respond to the effects of inhaled particles. Study of macrophage responses to particles is, therefore, relevant to understanding the mechanisms by which inhaled particles can adversely affect health. Size-fractionated ambient particles were collected at traffic-dominated sites in The Netherlands using a mobile high volume slit impactor system. AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from adult as well as aged rats and were incubated with for 4 h with collected particles at concentrations of 25-1000 pg per cell. Free radical generation by AM was measured with and without stimulation of AM with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). There were dose-dependent decreases in macrophage production of superoxide radicals as measured by the chemiluminescent method. Coarse particles were more toxic than were fine particles. Suppression of free radical production did not seem to be related to the presence of bioavailable iron or to endotoxin associated with the particles. There were no statistically significant differences related to age or strain of the rats tested. We conclude that in vitro tests using AM is a useful and rapid method for delineating differences in toxicity between environmental samples of size fractionated ambient particles. PMID:12523957

  6. Fine-particle characterization — An important recycling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblom, Bo; Samuelsson, Caisa; Sandström, Åke; Ye, Guozhu

    2002-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results from different research projects on fine-particle characterization of metallurgical residues, such as hydroxide sludge, electric-arc furnace dust, and copper-converter dust. These studies demonstrated that characterization is essential for developing new recycling strategies. The basic knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of the residues obtained by the characterizations also provides necessary information on potential problems that could be encountered during the processing of such materials.

  7. Control of Particle Size and Morphology of Cobalt-Ferrite Nanoparticles by Salt-Matrix during Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.; Mostafavi, M.

    Salt-matrix annealing of mechanically alloyed Co-ferrite nanopowder was used to modify its particle size and morphology. Efficiency improvement due to suppression of sintering and growth resulted in reduction of average particle size from 100nm for salt-less to 40nm for salt-full annealing procedure. Nanosized single-phase cobalt-ferrite particles were observed after 2h annealing at 750°C in the samples milled for 20 hours both with and without NaCl. NaCl:CoFe2O4 ratio of 10:1 resulted in cabbage-like clusters containing particles smaller than 50 nm.

  8. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  9. CHARACTERIZING THE SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC CHEMICALS IN AIRBORNE FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal and ambient exposures to airborne fine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and genotoxic activity has been studied in populations in the US, Japan, China, and the Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors used to collect fine particles were extracted f...

  10. Rotating drum tests of particle suspensions within a fines dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Gollin, Devis; Kaitna, Roland; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Natural flows like mudflows, debris flow, and hyperconcentrated flows are commonly composed by a matrix of particles suspended in a viscous fluid. The nature of the interactions between particles immersed in a fluid is related to its size. While coarse particles (sand, gravel, and boulders) interact with each other or with the surrounding fluid, a dispersion of fine particles interacts with each other through colloidal forces or Brownian motion effects (Coussot and Piau, 1995, and Ancey and Jorrot, 2001). The predominance of one of the previous interactions defines the rheology of the flow. On this sense, experimental insight is required to validate the limits where the rheology of a dispersion of fines is valid. For this purpose, an experimental program in a rotating drum is performed over samples of sand, loess, and kaolin. The solid concentration and angular velocity of the rotating drum are varied. Height and normal loads are measured during flow. High-speed videos are performed to obtain the flow patterns of the mixtures. The experiments provide new laboratory evidence of granular mixture behaviour within an increased viscous fluid phase and its characterization. The results show an apparent threshold in terms of solid concentration, in which the mixtures started to behave as a shear-dependent material.

  11. A novel approach to a fine particle coating using porous spherical silica as core particles.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Makoto; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Isaji, Keiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Ikematsu, Yasuyuki; Aoki, Shigeru

    2014-08-01

    Abstract The applicability of porous spherical silica (PSS) was evaluated as core particles for pharmaceutical products by comparing it with commercial core particles such as mannitol (NP-108), sucrose and microcrystalline cellulose spheres. We investigated the physical properties of core particles, such as particle size distribution, flow properties, crushing strength, plastic limit, drying rate, hygroscopic property and aggregation degree. It was found that PSS was a core particle of small particle size, low friability, high water adsorption capacity, rapid drying rate and lower occurrence of particle aggregation, although wettability is a factor to be carefully considered. The aggregation and taste-masking ability using PSS and NP-108 as core particles were evaluated at a fluidized-bed coating process. The functional coating under the excess spray rate shows different aggregation trends and dissolution profiles between PSS and NP-108; thereby, exhibiting the formation of uniform coating under the excess spray rate in the case of PSS. This expands the range of the acceptable spray feed rates to coat fine particles, and indicates the possibility of decreasing the coating time. The results obtained in this study suggested that the core particle, which has a property like that of PSS, was useful in overcoming such disadvantages as large particle size, which feels gritty in oral cavity; particle aggregation; and the long coating time of the particle coating process. These results will enable the practical fine particle coating method by increasing the range of optimum coating conditions and decreasing the coating time in fluidized bed technology. PMID:23781858

  12. COMPARISON OF SULFUR MEASUREMENTS FROM A REGIONAL FINE PARTICLE NETWORK WITH CONCURRENT ACID MODES NETWORK RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 um) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Environmental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during a two year period in 1988-90. he 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the...

  13. Preparation of cefpodoxime proxetil fine particles using supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Chu, Junho; Li, Guanghua; Row, Kyung Ho; Kim, Hwayong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2009-03-18

    Fine particles of cefpodoxime proxetil (CPD) were prepared using an Aerosol Solvent Extraction System (ASES) with supercritical CO(2). The resulting primary particles were approximately 0.1-0.2microm in size and were almost spherical in shape. The secondary particles were approximately 0.2-0.6microm in size and had irregular shapes. The larger particle size and irregular shapes were due to the agglomeration of the primary particles. The effects of solvent type, CO(2)-to-CPD solution weight ratio, and CPD solution concentration on the extent of agglomeration were investigated. As a result, the use of ethyl acetate and acetone as solvents also reduced the degree of agglomeration. The degree of agglomeration was reduced with the use of a high CO(2)-to-solution weight ratio, and a low solution concentration. In particular, spherical particles, approximately 0.1-0.4microm in size, were obtained when a 10.0wt% CPD solution was used. As a result of dissolution study, almost 90% of the processed CPD had dissolved within 10min. The recovery yield of the CPD powder reached approximately 80% using a membrane filter. PMID:19041383

  14. Optical characterization of clouds of fine liquid-nitrogen particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic drop size, D sub 32, of clouds of fine liquid nitrogen particles was measured with a scattered light scanning instrument developed at NASA-Lewis. Calibration of the instrument was accomplished with suspensions of monosized polystyrene spheres and the scattered light scanner was then used to investigate the mechanism of liquid nitrogen jet disintegration in high velocity gas flow. The Sauter mean diameter, D sub 32, was found to vary inversely with nitrogen gas mass-flux raised to the 1.33 power. Values of D sub 32 varied from 5 to 25 microns and the mass-flux exponent 1.33 agrees well with theory for liquid jet breakup in high velocity gas flow. Loss of fine particles due to the high vaporization rate of liquid nitrogen was avoided by sampling the spray 1.3 cm downstream of the nozzle orifice. The presence of high velocity and thermal gradients in the gas phase also made sampling of the particles quite difficult. As a result, it was necessary to correct the measurements for background noise produced by both highly turbulent gas flow and thermally induced density gradients in the gas phase.

  15. Process for making ultra-fine ceramic particles

    DOEpatents

    Stangle, Gregory C.; Venkatachari, Koththavasal R.; Ostrander, Steven P.; Schulze, Walter A.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing ultra-fine ceramic particles in which droplets are formed from a ceramic precursor mixture containing a metal cation, a nitrogen-containing fuel, a solvent, and an anion capable of participating in an anionic oxidation-reduction reaction with the nitrogen containing fuel. The nitrogen-containing fuel contains at least three nitrogen atoms, at least one oxygen atom, and at least one carbon atom. The ceramic precursor mixture is dried to remove at least 85 weight percent of the solvent, and the dried mixture is then ignited to form a combusted powder.

  16. Magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites consisting of an opal matrix with embedded spinel ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kleshcheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites representing Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn, Co-Zn, La-Co-Zn, and Nd-Co-Zn spinel ferrite particles embedded in the interspherical spaces of opal matrices are studied. Experimental data are obtained in the temperature interval 2-300 K by measuring the magnetization at a static magnetic field strength of up to 50 kOe and the ac magnetic susceptibility at an alternating magnetic field amplitude of 4 kOe and a frequency of 80 Hz.

  17. Deviation from the superparamagnetic behaviour of fine-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mălăescu, I.; Marin, C. N.

    2000-07-01

    Studies concerning superparamagnetic behaviour of fine magnetic particle systems were performed using static and radiofrequency measurements, in the range 1-60 MHz. The samples were: a ferrofluid with magnetite particles dispersed in kerosene (sample A), magnetite powder (sample B) and the same magnetite powder dispersed in a polymer (sample C). Radiofrequency measurements indicated a maximum in the imaginary part of the complex magnetic susceptibility, for each of the samples, at frequencies with the magnitude order of tens of MHz, the origin of which was assigned to Néel-type relaxation processes. The static measurements showed a Langevin-type dependence of magnetisation M and of susceptibility χ, on the magnetic field for sample A. For samples B and C deviations from this type of dependence were found. These deviations were analysed qualitatively and explained in terms of the interparticle interactions, dispersion medium influence and surface effects.

  18. Study of fine and ultrafine particles for coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Birlingmair, D.; Buttermore, W.; Chmielewski, T.; Pollard, J.

    1990-04-01

    During the second quarter of work on this new project, critical review of the literature continued. Several new references related to gravity separation were identified and evaluated. A synopsis was assembled to summarize techniques developed by various researchers for the float/sink separation of ultrafine coal. In the reviewed literature, it was commonly concluded that substantial improvements in washability results for ultrafine coals can be obtained only through the application of dynamic (centrifugal) procedures, and through the use of dispersing aids such as ultrasound and surfactants. These results suggest the presence of physicochemical phenomena, typical of colloidal systems. In theoretical studies this quarter, the effects of Brownian motion on fine particle sedimentation have been identified and theoretically quantitated. The interaction between Brownian and gravitational forces was calculated, and a model was prepared to permit estimation of critical particle size in float/sink separations. In laboratory studies this quarter, aliquots of Upper Freeport coal were prepared and subjected to laboratory float/sink separations to investigate the relative effectiveness of static and centrifugal techniques for fine and ultrafine coal. This series will verify results of earlier work and provide a basis for comparing the effects which may result from further modifications to the separation techniques resulting from insights gained in the basic phenomena governing float/sink processes. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Partition of fine particles in aqueous biphase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xi

    The objective of this research project is to develop an aqueous biphase extraction process for the treatment of fine coals. Aqueous biphase extraction is an advanced separation technology that relies on the ability of an aqueous system consisting of a water-soluble polymer and another component, e.g., another polymer, an inorganic salt, or a nonionic surfactant, to separate into two immiscible aqueous phases. The principle behind the partition of solid particles in aqueous biphase systems is the physicochemical interaction between the solid surface and the surrounding liquid solution. In order to remove sulfur and mineral matter from fine coal with aqueous biphasic extraction, it is necessary to know the partitioning behavior of coal, as well as the inorganic mineral components. Therefore, in this research emphasis was placed on the partitioning behavior of fine coal particles as well as model fine inorganic particles in aqueous biphase systems. In the polyethylene glycol (PEG)/salt/H2O system, it was found that pyrite partition was highly dependent upon pH conditions: at high pH the particles preferred the salt-rich (bottom) phase, while they moved to the polymer-rich (top) phase at low pH. This behavior is attributable to the different surface oxidation products associated with the pH variations: formation of FeOOH in alkaline solution, and a hydrophobic iron-deficient product (Fe 1-xS2) in acidic environment. The partitioning behavior of oxide particles (e.g., Al2O3, Fe2O 3, SiO2, TiO2) in the PEG/Na2SO 4/H2O system indicated that, in the absence of polymer-solid interaction, the surface hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties determined solid partition; otherwise, the specific polymer-solid interaction dominated the distribution of the solid particles. Aside from the polymer/salt aqueous biphase systems, the partitioning behavior of hematite and silica was also investigated in polymer/polymer (PEG/dextran) and polymer/nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100 (TX100

  20. Treatment and recovery of larger particles of fine oxidized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R.E.

    1980-09-16

    This invention relates to a method and treating agent for increasing the yield of larger particles of fine oxidized coal where the particle size is 28 X 100 mesh and preferably 28 X 70 mesh and where said coal particles are concentrated by froth flotation. The method consists of utilizing as a promoter an alkali metal or ammonium polyacrylate. A preferred promoter is about 0.05-1.5 lbs of sodium polyacrylate latex per ton of dry coal (0.017-0.5 lb of dry sodium polyacrylate per ton of dry coal), having an average molecular weight of about 100,000, to 1, 000,000 and more, with a preferred range of 1,000,000 or more. This preferred promoter or frothing aid for oxidized coal is a water-in-oil latex of sodium polyacrylate used with a water-inoil emulsifier and preferably used with an alcohol-type frother. The latex may be utilized neat and self inverts with the assistance of an oil-in-water surfactant and the water in the system upon application to form an oil-in-water emulsion, or it may be used as a two part system with an activator (Aqueous) to promote inversion. Additionally, the latex emulsion recovers larger particles in the size 100 mesh and greater and preferably in the range 28 X 70 mesh.

  1. Fine and ultrafine particle emissions from microwave popcorn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Avalos, J; Zhu, Y

    2014-04-01

    This study characterized fine (PM2.5 ) and ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter < 100 nm) emissions from microwave popcorn and analyzed influential factors. Each pre-packed popcorn bag was cooked in a microwave oven enclosed in a stainless steel chamber for 3 min. The number concentration and size distribution of UFPs and PM2.5 mass concentration were measured inside the chamber repeatedly for five different flavors under four increasing power settings using either the foil-lined original package or a brown paper bag. UFPs and PM2.5 generated by microwaving popcorn were 150-560 and 350-800 times higher than the emissions from microwaving water, respectively. About 90% of the total particles emitted were in the ultrafine size range. The emitted PM concentrations varied significantly with flavor. Replacing the foil-lined original package with a brown paper bag significantly reduced the peak concentration by 24-87% for total particle number and 36-70% for PM2.5 . A positive relationship was observed between both UFP number and PM2.5 mass and power setting. The emission rates of microwave popcorn ranged from 1.9 × 10(10) to 8.0 × 10(10) No./min for total particle number and from 134 to 249 μg/min for PM2.5 . PMID:24106981

  2. Fine and ultrafine particle decay rates in multiple homes.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Kindzierski, Warren; Kearney, Jill; MacNeill, Morgan; Héroux, Marie-Ève; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2013-11-19

    Human exposure to particles depends on particle loss mechanisms such as deposition and filtration. Fine and ultrafine particles (FP and UFP) were measured continuously over seven consecutive days during summer and winter inside 74 homes in Edmonton, Canada. Daily average air exchange rates were also measured. FP were also measured outside each home and both FP and UFP were measured at a central monitoring station. A censoring algorithm was developed to identify indoor-generated concentrations, with the remainder representing particles infiltrating from outdoors. The resulting infiltration factors were employed to determine the continuously changing background of outdoor particles infiltrating the homes. Background-corrected indoor concentrations were then used to determine rates of removal of FP and UFP following peaks due to indoor sources. About 300 FP peaks and 400 UFP peaks had high-quality (median R(2) value >98%) exponential decay rates lasting from 30 min to 10 h. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) decay rates for UFP were 1.26 (0.82-1.83) h(-1); for FP 1.08 (0.62-1.75) h(-1). These total decay rates included, on average, about a 25% contribution from air exchange, suggesting that deposition and filtration accounted for the major portion of particle loss mechanisms in these homes. Models presented here identify and quantify effects of several factors on total decay rates, such as window opening behavior, home age, use of central furnace fans and kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans, use of air cleaners, use of air conditioners, and indoor-outdoor temperature differences. These findings will help identify ways to reduce exposure and risk. PMID:24143863

  3. PREFACE: Fifth International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    In September 2004, the UK Nanomagnetism Network and the London Centre for Nanotechnology hosted the 5th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism. The objective of the meeting, as in Rome (1991), Bangor (1996), Barcelona (1999) and Pittsburgh (2002), was to explore latest developments in the fundamentals and applications of nanoscale magnetic clusters, particles and grains. This particular conference had a very broad remit, and encompassed the interdisciplinary breadth of much of today's innovative work on nanoscale magnetic materials. In recognition of this, symposia were organised around the themes of biomagnetism and Earth and the environment, alongside the familiar themes of fundamental properties, applications, and imaging and characterisation. The aim was that this wide-ranging scope would provide the participants with new insights into how researchers from other disciplines approach similar problems to their own, which would help in their own work. This seemed to be borne out by the lively and good-natured discussion that the talks and posters generated. In keeping with this goal of combining cutting edge research with educating ourselves across traditional disciplinary boundaries, we are very pleased to have received such excellent support from the contributing authors for this proceedings volume. The papers contained herein are an accurate reflection of the topics covered, and include several review style papers. We hope that these proceedings will provide the reader with an understanding of the current vibrancy of research into fine particle magnetism. Furthermore, we hope that this volume sets the scene for the continuing cross-border work between physical scientists, life scientists, social scientists, clinicians and engineers that promises to make this field a very lively one in the years to come.

  4. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Ferrite Nanoparticles: Effect of Reaction Temperature on Particle Size and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, S; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-08-01

    The preparation of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles of different particle sizes by controlling the reaction temperature using microwave assisted synthesis is reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at two different temperatures viz., 45 and 85 °C were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C is found to be 10 and 13.8 nm, respectively, and the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagantic behavior at room temperature. The saturation magnetization values of nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C were found to be 67 and 72 emu/g, respectively. The increase in particle size and saturation magnetization values with increase in incubation temperature is attributed to a decrease in supersaturation at elevated temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be 561 and 566 0C for the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C, respectively. The FTIR spectrum of the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at different temperatures exhibited the characteristic peaks that corresponded to the stretching of bonds between octahedral and tetrahedral metal ions to oxide ions. Our results showed that the ferrite nanoparticle size can be varied by controlling the reaction temperature inside a microwave reactor. PMID:26369150

  5. SOURCE STRENGTHS OF ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES DUE TO COOKING WITH A GAS STOVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cooking, particularly frying, is an important source of particles indoors. Few studies have measured a full range of particle sizes, including ultrafine particles, produced during cooking. In this study, semicontinuous instruments with fine size discriminating ability were us...

  6. Preparation and magnetic properties of nano size nickel ferrite particles using hydrothermal method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nickel ferrite, a kind of soft magnetic materials is one of the most attracting class of materials due to its interesting and important properties and has many technical applications, such as in catalysis, sensors and so on. In this paper the synthesis of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles by the hydrothermal method is reported and the inhibition of surfactant (Glycerol or Sodium dodecyl sulfate) on the particles growth is investigated. Methods For investigation of the inhibition effect of surfactant on NiFe2O4 particles growth, the samples were prepared in presence of Glycerol and Sodium dodecyl sulfate. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) techniques were used to characterize the samples. Results The results of XRD and ICP-AES show that the products were pure NiFe2O4 and also nanoparticles grow with increasing the temperature, while surfactant prevents the particle growth under the same condition. The average particle size was determined from the Scherrer's equation and TEM micrographs and found to be in the range of 50-60 nm that decreased up to 10-15 nm in presence of surfactant. The FT-IR results show two absorption bands near to 603 and 490 cm-1 for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites respectively. Furthermore, the saturated magnetization and coercivity of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles were in the range of 39.60 emu/g and 15.67 Qe that decreased for samples prepared in presence of surfactant. As well as, the nanoparticles exhibited a superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Conclusions Nanosized nickel ferrite particles were synthesized with and without surfactant assisted hydrothermal methods. The results show that with increasing of temperature, the crystallinity of nanoparticles is increased. In the presence of surfactants, the crystallinity of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles

  7. Control Experiment of Positively Charged Fine Particles at the Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Toshiaki; Ando, Ayumi; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    It is already reported that the negatively charged fine particle flow was controlled by application of external electric field. The control of positively charged fine particles was examined in this experiment.The fine particles are able to take charges in the air under the atmospheric pressure by irradiation of UV light. The control of the positively charged fine particles has been attempted by the external electric field applied the negative potential. The fine particles for experiments are volcanic ashes, nylon 16, glass, and ice. Experiment was performed in the T-shaped glass chamber under the atmospheric pressure. The halogen lamp (500 W) was used to exit the electrons from particles by photo-emission. The ring and disk electrodes to control the positively charged particles were set at the bottom of chamber. The parallel electrodes were set at the middle of chamber and horizontal static electric fields (E = 0 {approx} 210 V/cm) were created in order to estimate the charge of fine particles. The charges of particle were estimated by the deflection of particle trajectory in the static electric fields and particle velocity. The estimated charges were 104e {approx} 5x106e and 103e {approx} 105e for volcanic ashes and nylon 16, respectively. When positively charged particles were introduced into collecting electrodes, the fine particles are collected in the electrodes. The result of control of positively charged fine particles is shown in this conference.

  8. Structural, electrical and magnetic characteristics of nickel substituted cobalt ferrite nano particles, synthesized by self combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontu, Uday Bhasker; Yelasani, Vijayakumar; Musugu, Venkata Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Nickel-substituted cobalt ferrite nano-particles are synthesized using a self-combustion method. Aqueous metal nitrates and citric acid form the precursors. No external oxidizing agents are used to change the pH of the precursors; this resulted in a more environment friendly synthesis. Structural, magnetic and electrical characteristics of the nano ferrites are verified using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), VSM and impedance analyzer respectively. Phase formation, particle size, lattice parameter, X-ray density, saturation magnetization, coercivity, dielectric constant and electrical activation energy as function of nickel substitution in cobalt ferrite are studied. It is shown here that the magnetic and electrical properties can be tuned by varying the nickel concentration.

  9. Emissions of fine particle fluoride from biomass burning.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, Thilina; Stockwell, Chelsea E; Yokelson, Robert J; Nakao, Shunsuke; Stone, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-01

    The burning of biomasses releases fluorine to the atmosphere, representing a major and previously uncharacterized flux of this atmospheric pollutant. Emissions of fine particle (PM2.5) water-soluble fluoride (F-) from biomass burning were evaluated during the fourth Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-IV) using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and ion chromatography with conductivity detection. F- was detected in 100% of the PM2.5 emissions from conifers (n=11), 94% of emissions from agricultural residues (n=16), and 36% of the grasses and other perennial plants (n=14). When F- was quantified, it accounted for an average (±standard error) of 0.13±0.02% of PM2.5. F- was not detected in remaining samples (n=15) collected from peat burning, shredded tire combustion, and cook-stove emissions. Emission factors (EF) of F- emitted per kilogram of biomass burned correlated with emissions of PM2.5 and combustion efficiency, and also varied with the type of biomass burned and the geographic location where it was harvested. Based on recent evaluations of global biomass burning, we estimate that biomass burning releases 76 Gg F- yr(-1) to the atmosphere, with upper and lower bounds of 40-150 Gg F- yr(-1). The estimated F- flux from biomass burning is comparable to total fluorine emissions from coal combustion plus other anthropogenic sources. These data demonstrate that biomass burning represents a major source of fluorine to the atmosphere in the form of fine particles, which have potential to undergo long-range transport. PMID:25275955

  10. Saltation threshold reduction due to the electrostatic agglomeration of fine particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Rodman N.; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Particles between 80 and 110 microns in diameter are the most easily moved by the wind. As the particle size decreases below 60 microns, they are increasingly more difficult to move by surface winds, and a number of experiments were performed in an attempt to reduce the required wind velocity. These include: (1) the bombardment of a bed of fine particles by particles near the optimum size, the larger particles kicking the fine particles into the windstream where they are entrained; and (2) the electrostatic agglomeration of fine particles into sizes more easily saltated. The results of these experiments are discussed.

  11. [Synthesis and characteristic of cobalt bearing ferrite particles at room temperature].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Deng, Tong; Feng, Ya-ping; Dai, Yu-jie

    2005-08-01

    Cobalt bearing magnetite particles were synthesized by aerial oxidation of ferrous and cobalt ions at alkaline condition and room temperature. The samples obtained at different time intervals during reaction were subjected to XRD and IR, and it was indicated that the cobalt-bearing ferrites were produced through green-rust intermediate phase. Different compounds were synthesized using 1/20, 1/15, 1/10, 1/7, 1/5 and 1/3 Co2+/Fe2+ starting ratios, and Co-ferrites with Co/Fe of 0.05, 0.06, 0.08, 0.12, 0.17, 0.18 were obtained. The chemical composition, microstructure and micrograph of those precipitates were characterized by chemical analysis, IR, XRD and SEM. The results revealed that Co2+ replaced Fe3+ at octahedral position in spinel structure, and the increase of Co in initial solution showed deleterious effect on the crystallinity of the precipitates. PMID:16329524

  12. Sources of fine particle composition in New York city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Hopke, Philip K.; Husain, Liaquat; Qureshi, Sumizah; Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Schwab, James J.; Drewnick, Frank; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    Fine particle composition data from samples collected at Queens College during July 2001 were studied using positive matrix factorization (PMF). The sampling systems are an integrated filter sampler with a 6-h sampling time interval, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a 10-min sampling time interval and a particle-into-liquid sampler with ion chromatography (PILS-IC) with 15-min sampling time interval. The data from the AMS and the PILS-IC were aggregated to 6-h average values for the PMF calculation. Sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate data were compared among the different instruments. The PMF method uses the estimated errors in the data to provide optimal point-by-point weighting and permits efficient treatment of missing and below detection limit values. Six source categories were resolved from the data. They are: secondary sulfate with high concentration SO 42-; secondary nitrate with the presence of high concentration NO 3-; motor vehicle emissions with high concentration of OC and Zn; road dust represented by Al, Ca, Fe, and K; sea salt with high concentration of Cl and Na; and oil combustion marked by the presence of Ni and V.

  13. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The pure LiCoO 2 cathode particles had high initial discharge capacity of 144 mAh g -1. However, the initial discharge capacities of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased with increasing the contents of the manganese component. The discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased abruptly with increasing the contents of the cobalt component. The pure LiMn 2O 4 cathode particles had the initial discharge capacities of 119 mAh g -1.

  14. A study of nanosized magnesium ferrite particles with high magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumangala, T. P.; Mahender, C.; Venkataramani, N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2015-05-01

    Nano-sized magnesium ferrite particles were prepared by sol gel combustion synthesis and were either furnace cooled or quenched after calcining at various temperatures ranging from 300 to 800 °C. A magnetisation value of 61 emu/g was obtained at 5 K for sample calcined at 800 °C and quenched in liquid nitrogen temperature. This is one of the highest reported values of magnetisation obtained from quenching at such a lower temperature. An estimate of the number of Fe3+ ions on A and B sites was made after applying Néel Model on the magnetisation values measured at 5 K. It was estimated that Fe3+ ions segregates out from both sites disproportionately so as to cause a net decrease in the overall moment. The resultant cation distribution is found to be consistent with the coercivity data.

  15. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization. PMID:26298173

  16. Residential infiltration of fine and ultrafine particles in Edmonton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Jill; Wallace, Lance; MacNeill, Morgan; Héroux, Marie-Eve; Kindzierski, Warren; Wheeler, Amanda

    2014-09-01

    Airborne indoor particles arise from both indoor sources and ambient particles that have infiltrated indoors. The intra-urban variability of infiltration factors (Finf) is a source of measurement error in epidemiological studies estimating exposure from a central site measurement, hence information on the within and between-home variability of Finf is useful to better characterize ambient PM exposure. The objective of this paper was to estimate magnitudes and predictors of daily residential infiltration factors (Finf) and ambient/non-ambient components of indoor ultrafine particle (UFP) and fine particle (FP) concentrations. FPs and UFPs were measured continuously for 7 consecutive days in 74 Edmonton homes in winter and summer 2010 (50 homes in each season). Simultaneous measurements of outdoor (near-home) FP and ambient (at a central site) UFP concentrations were also measured. Daily infiltration factors were estimated for each home; considerable variability was seen within and between homes. For FPs, seasonal-averaged Finf (the average of the 7 daily Finf estimates) ranged from 0.10 to 0.92 in winter (median = 0.30, n = 49) and 0.31 to 0.99 in summer (median = 0.68, n = 48). For UFPs, the seasonal-averaged Finf ranged from 0.08 to 0.47 across homes in winter (median = 0.21, n = 33 houses) and from 0.16 to 0.94 in summer (median = 0.57, n = 48). The higher median Finf in summer was attributed to a high frequency of open windows. Daily infiltration factors were also estimated based on the indoor/outdoor PM1 sulfur ratio. These estimates were poorly correlated with DustTrak-based FP infiltration factor estimates; the difference may be due to losses of volatile components on the PM1 filter samples. Generalized linear mixed models were used to identify variables significantly associated with Finf and the non-ambient component of indoor FP and UFP concentrations. Wind speed was consistently associated with Finf across all seasons for both FPs and UFPs. The use of an

  17. PENETRATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICLES INTO INDOOR ENVIRONMENTS (INDOOR ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because recent studies have indicated significant health risks associated with exposure to fine particles, there is renewed interest in fine particle concentrations indoors and their relationship to particles in the outdoors. Understanding this relationship is especially importa...

  18. Fine particle concentrations in buses and taxis in Florence, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondelli, M. Cristina; Chellini, Elisabetta; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Cenni, Isabella; Gasparrini, Antonio; Nava, Silvia; Garcia-Orellana, Isabel; Lupi, Andrea; Grechi, Daniele; Mallone, Sandra; Jantunen, Matti

    On October 2004, a sampling survey was carried out in Florence to estimate urban fine particle exposure concentrations inside commuting vehicles during workdays characterized by heavy traffic. Portable samplers were positioned inside four regularly scheduled diesel-powered buses and four taxis during eight weekdays. Each sampler consisted of a 2.5 μm size pre-separator cyclone, a direct-reading data logging photometer (pDR-1200), and a 4 L min -1 filter sampler for the determination of PM 2.5 mass concentration. Based on reflectance analysis measurements, a PM 2.5 Black Smoke Index was determined for each filter, and the elemental composition of the PM 2.5 was analyzed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). PM 2.5 mass concentrations inside the vehicles correlated well with the urban ambient air PM 2.5 concentrations measured at the fixed-site monitoring stations. The PM 2.5 excess above the urban ambient level was on average 32 μg m -3 (range: 22-52 μg m -3) and 20 μg m -3 (range: 11-29 μg m -3) in buses and taxis, respectively. The PM 2.5-bound sulfur concentration was also higher in the buses than in the taxis. Based on daily Time-Microenvironment-Activity-Diary (TMAD) data, the Florentines spend on average 9.7% of their day in traffic, and the corresponding average exposure is approximately 12% of their daily PM 2.5 personal exposure. The obtained data could be used to plan interventions to minimize the PM 2.5 citizen exposures in commuting.

  19. Loss of Fine Particle Ammonium from Denuded Nylon Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2006-08-01

    Ammonium is an important constituent of fine particulate mass in the atmosphere, but can be difficult to quantify due to possible sampling artifacts. Losses of semivolatile species such as NH4NO3 can be particularly problematic. In order to evaluate ammonium losses from aerosol particles collected on filters, a series of field experiments was conducted using denuded nylon and Teflon filters at Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio, California (April 2003 and July 2004), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May, 2003), Brigantine, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP), Tennessee (July–August 2004). Samples were collected over 24-hr periods. Losses from denuded nylon filters ranged from 10% (monthly average) in Bondville, Illinois to 28% in San Gorgonio, California in summer. Losses on individual sample days ranged from 1% to 65%. Losses tended to increase with increasing diurnal temperature and relative humidity changes and with the fraction of ambient total N(--III) (particulate NH4+ plus gaseous NH3) present as gaseous NH3. The amount of ammonium lost at most sites could be explained by the amount of NH4NO3 present in the sampled aerosol. Ammonium losses at Great Smoky Mountains NP, however, significantly exceeded the amount of NH4NO3 collected. Ammoniated organic salts are suggested as additional important contributors to observed ammonium loss at this location.

  20. CHAMBER SIMULATION OF FINE PARTICLE PENETRATION INTO HOUSES (EPA/600/A-01/038)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses chamber simulation of fine particle penetration into houses. (NOTE: A number of recent studies have shown a correlation of negative health effects with increases in outdoor fine particles. Since people spend up to 90% of their time indoors, the relationship be...

  1. Influence of fine particles on the stability of a humid granular pile.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xixi; Bec, Sandrine; Colombani, Jean

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated by rotating drum experiments the influence of a small amount of fine particles on the stability of a granular heap. The fine particles are shown to have a strong and ambivalent influence. For low fine particle content, the heap destabilizes by avalanches, and the fine particles tend to fluidize the heap. In contrast, for high fine particle content, they increase the cohesion of the heap, which destabilizes through stick-slip at the drum wall. We interpret and model the fluidification in the avalanching regime, which we show is independent of humidity, by granular lubrication considerations, whereas the stick-slip behavior, highly dependent on humidity, is understood by a solid friction model. PMID:25493785

  2. Effect of particle size on the properties of Mn Zn In ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, P.; Thakur, A.; Singh, M.

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized Mn0.4Zn0.6In0.5Fe1.5O4 ferrites by the normal ceramic method and the citrate precursor method. The structural studies have been made by using an x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which confirmed the formation of a single-phase spinel structure. In the normal ceramic methods, we cannot control the particle size and porosity, whereas in precursor methods, we can control both. Using the citrate precursor method, we have simultaneously reduced the particle size and sintering temperature as compared to the normal ceramic method. There is an increase in dc resistivity, reduction in dielectric constant, electrical and magnetic losses by the citrate precursor method as compared to the normal ceramic method. The initial permeability is also reduced using the citrate precursor method as compared to the normal ceramic method. However, with sintering temperature, the initial permeability increases. These observations are explained on the basis of various models and mechanisms.

  3. Typical household vacuum cleaners: the collection efficiency and emissions characteristics for fine particles.

    PubMed

    Lioy, P J; Wainman, T; Zhang, J; Goldsmith, S

    1999-02-01

    The issue of fine particle (PM2.5) exposures and their potential health effects is a focus of scientific research because of the recently promulgated National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM2.5. Before final implementation, the health and exposure basis for the standard will be reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency within the next five years. As part of this process, it is necessary to understand total particle exposure issues and to determine the relative importance of the origin of PM2.5 exposure in various micro-environments. The results presented in this study examine emissions of fine particles from a previously uncharacterized indoor source: the residential vacuum cleaner. Eleven standard vacuum cleaners were tested for the emission rate of fine particles by their individual motors and for their efficiency in collecting laboratory-generated fine particles. An aerosol generator was used to introduce fine potassium chloride (KCl) particles into the vacuum cleaner inlet for the collection efficiency tests. Measurements of the motor emissions, which include carbon, and the KCl aerosol were made using a continuous HIAC/Royco 5130 A light-scattering particle detector. All tests were conducted in a metal chamber specifically designed to completely contain the vacuum cleaner and operate it in a stationary position. For the tested vacuum cleaners, fine particle motor emissions ranged from 9.6 x 10(4) to 3.34 x 10(8) particles/min, which were estimated to be 0.028 to 176 micrograms/min for mass emissions, respectively. The vast majority of particles released were in the range of 0.3-0.5 micron in diameter. The lowest particle emission rate was obtained for a vacuum cleaner that had a high efficiency (HEPA) filter placed after the vacuum cleaner bag and the motor within a sealed exhaust system. This vacuum cleaner removed the KCl particles that escaped the vacuum cleaner bag and the particles emitted by the motor. Results obtained for the KCl

  4. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Koo, Hye Young; Hong, Seung Kwon; Jo, Eun Byul; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The initial discharge capacities of the layered LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased from 144 to 136 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Co/Mn components were changed from 1/0 to 0.7/0.3. The mean sizes of the spinel LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 650 to 460 nm when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2. The initial discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 119 to 86 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2.

  5. Stochastic modeling of fine particle deposition, resuspension, and hyporheic exchange in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, Aaron; Drummond, Jennifer; Aubeneau, Antoine

    2013-04-01

    Fine suspended particles are responsible for substantial flux of organic matter and contaminants in rivers. Further, microorganisms delivered from the terrestrial system or resuspended from benthic and hyporheic biofilms also propagate downstream in rivers, providing connectivity in the river microbial community. Because fine particle concentrations are often similar along the length of rivers, there has been a tendency to think that their dynamics are simple. Historically, fine suspended particles have been considered to show little interaction with streambed sediments. This is a fallacy. Recent observations have demonstrated that fine particles show complex dynamics in rivers, including ongoing deposition and resuspension. This provides substantial opportunity for interaction with benthic and hyporheic sediments and biofilms, which can lead to enhanced processing of fine particulate organic carbon, accumulation of pathogens in riverbeds, and mixing of particle-bound contaminants into bed sediments. Here I will briefly review current understanding of fine particle deposition, resuspension, and hyporheic exchange processes, develop a conceptual model for fine particle dynamics in rivers, and present a stochastic modeling framework that can represent most of these processes. I will close by discussing the limits of current modeling capability and prospects for future development of more general models.

  6. Fine particle retention within stream storage areas at baseflow and in response to a storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jen; Harvey, Jud; Larsen, Laurel; González-Pinzón, Ricardo; Packman, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    Fine particles (1-100 μm), including particulate organic carbon (POC) and fine sediment, influence stream ecological functioning because they have a high affinity to sorb nitrogen and phosphorus, which are limited nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. These particles immobilize within in-stream storage areas, especially hyporheic sediments and benthic biofilms. However, fine particles are also known to remobilize at all flow conditions. The combination of immobilization and remobilization events leads to downstream transport and transient retention, which fuels stream ecosystems. The main objective of this study was to quantify immobilization and remobilization rates of fine particles that influence biogeochemical cycling in sand-and-gravel bed streams. During our field injection experiment, a thunderstorm driven spate allowed us to observe fine particle dynamics during both baseflow and in response to increased flow in the fifth-order stream Difficult Run, Virginia, USA. Solute and fine particles were measured within stream surface waters and porewaters at four different in-stream locations and multiple depths. Modeling of in-stream breakthrough curves (leading edge and initial decline before the storm) with a stochastic mobile-immobile model show that fine particles were mainly transported with the solute, but with additional net deposition. Porewater samples showed that flow paths within the stream sediments are complex and heterogeneous, with varying travel times depending on the in-stream location (i.e. channel thalweg, pool or lateral cavity). Higher filtration coefficients of fine particles were observed within the channel thalweg compared to the pool, and the filtration coefficient increased with sediment depth. Furthermore, we observed the accumulation of immobilized fine particles within hyporheic sediment and benthic biofilms on cobbles during baseflow and retention was evident even after the spate. Approximately 64% of fine particles were retained during

  7. Improved electrical properties of cadmium substituted cobalt ferrites nano-particles for microwave application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rabia; Hussain Gul, Iftikhar; Zarrar, Muhammad; Anwar, Humaira; khan Niazi, Muhammad Bilal; Khan, Azim

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium substituted cobalt ferrites with formula CdxCo1-xFe2O4 (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.35, 0.5), have been synthesized by wet chemical co-precipitation technique. Electrical, morphological and Structural properties of the samples have been studied using DC electrical resistivity and Impedance analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. XRD, SEM and AFM have been used to study the structural parameters such as measured density, lattice constant, X-ray density, crystallite size and morphology of the synthesized nano-particles. Debye-Scherrer formula has been used for the estimation of crystallite sizes. The estimated crystallite sizes were to be 15-19±2 nm. Hopping length of octahedral and tetrahedral sites have been calculated using indexed XRD data. The porosity and lattice constant increased as Cd2+concentration increases. DC electrical resistivity was performed using two probe technique. The decrease of resistivity with temperature confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. The dielectric properties variation has been studied at room temperature as a function of frequency. Variation of dielectric properties from 100 Hz to 5 MHz has been explained on the basis of Maxwell and Wagner's model and hoping of electrons on octahedral sites. To separates the grains boundary and grains of the system CdxCo1-xFe2O4 the impedance analysis were performed.

  8. Characterization of fine particles from machining in automotive plants.

    PubMed

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James; Gundrum, Aaron; Sutherland, John; Johnson, John; Carlson, David

    2005-12-01

    Sampling of the full range of particle sizes was carried out on 16 processes in six different General Motors plants over a period of 2.5 years. This article deals with particle characterization from five of the processes that relate to machining, specifically, wet machining with water-based fluids from old and new technology processes, grinding with straight oils from old and new technology processes, and dry machining. The concentrations measured by different instruments were in reasonable agreement, although the light-scattering instrument generally produced higher values than filters. Of the processes studied, the old technology grinding using straight oils generated the highest particle concentrations. The new technology controls (enclosed, vented machines) were highly effective but more so for large particles than small particles. The particle size distribution was shifted to smaller particles with enclosed processes. Dry machining generated the largest particles of all processes studied. PMID:16282165

  9. 76 FR 14812 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Particle National Ambient Air Quality Standards, 110(k)(6) Correction and Technical Correction Related to... the Annual Fine Particles National Ambient Air Quality Standards Correction In rule document...

  10. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes.

  11. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes.

  12. Characterization and mapping of very fine particles in an engine machining and assembly facility.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Peters, Thomas M; Slavin, Thomas J

    2007-05-01

    Very fine particle number and mass concentrations were mapped in an engine machining and assembly facility in the winter and summer. A condensation particle counter (CPC) was used to measure particle number concentrations in the 0.01 microm to 1 microm range, and an optical particle counter (OPC) was used to measure particle number concentrations in 15 channels between 0.3 microm and 20 microm. The OPC measurements were used to estimate the respirable mass concentration. Very fine particle number concentrations were estimated by subtracting the OPC particle number concentrations from 0.3 microm to 1 microm from the CPC number concentrations. At specific locations during the summer visit, an electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure particle size distribution from 0.07 microm to 10 microm in 12 channels. The geometric mean ratio of respirable mass concentration estimated from the OPC to the gravimetrically measured mass concentration was 0.66 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.5. Very fine particle number concentrations in winter were substantially greater where direct-fire natural gas heaters were operated (7.5 x 10(5) particles/cm(3)) than where steam was used for heat (3 x 10(5) particles/cm(3)). During summer when heaters were off, the very fine particle number concentrations were below 10(5) particles/cm(3), regardless of location. Elevated very fine particle number concentrations were associated with machining operations with poor enclosures. Whereas respirable mass concentrations did not vary noticeably with season, they were greater in areas with poorly fitting enclosures (0.12 mg/m(3)) than in areas where state-of-the-art enclosures were used (0.03 mg/m(3)). These differences were attributed to metalworking fluid mist that escaped from poorly fitting enclosures. Particles generated from direct-fire natural gas heater operation were very small, with a number size distribution modal diameter of less than 0.023 microm. Aerosols generated by

  13. FINE PARTICLE EXPOSURE IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALTERED VENTRICULAR REPOLARIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to fine airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) has previously been associated with cardiac events, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease and in diabetics. This study examined the cardiac effects of short-term exposures to ambient PM2.5 in a prospective pane...

  14. Number concentrations of fine and ultrafine particles containing metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolocka, Michael P.; Lake, Derek A.; Johnston, Murray V.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    Typical classification schemes for large data sets of single-particle mass spectra involve statistical or neural network analysis. In this work, a new approach is evaluated in which particle spectra are pre-selected on the basis of an above threshold signal intensity at a specified m/ z (mass to charge ratio). This provides a simple way to identify candidate particles that may contain the specific chemical component associated with that m/ z. Once selected, the candidate particle spectra are then classified by the fast adaptive resonance algorithm, ART 2-a, to confirm the presence of the targeted component in the particle and to study the intra-particle associations with other chemical components. This approach is used to characterize metals in a 75,000 particle data set obtained in Baltimore, Maryland. Particles containing a specific metal are identified and then used to determine the size distribution, number concentration, time/wind dependencies and intra-particle correlations with other metals. Four representative elements are considered in this study: vanadium, iron, arsenic and lead. Number concentrations of ambient particles containing these elements can exceed 10,000 particles cm -3 at the measurement site. Vanadium, a primary marker for fuel oil combustion, is observed from all wind directions during this time period. Iron and lead are observed from the east-northeast. Most particles from this direction that contain iron also contain lead and most particles that contain lead also contain iron, suggesting a common emission source for the two. Arsenic and lead are observed from the south-southeast. Particles from this direction contain either arsenic or lead but rarely both, suggesting different sources for each element.

  15. Retention and Migration of Fine Organic Particles within an Agricultural Stream: Toenepi, Waikato, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, J. D.; Davies-Colley, R.; Stott, R.; Sukias, J.; Nagels, J.; Sharp, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Fine organic particle dynamics are important to stream biogeochemistry, ecology, and transport of contaminant microbes. These particles migrate downstream through a series of deposition and resuspension events, which results in a wide range of residence times. This retention influences biogeochemical processing and in-stream stores of contaminant microbes that may mobilize during flood events and present a hazard to downstream uses such as water supplies and recreation. We are conducting studies to gain insights into organic particle dynamics in streams, with a campaign of experiments and modeling. The results should improve understanding of nutrient (C, N, P) spiraling and fine sediment movement in streams, and have particular application to microbial hazards. We directly measure microbial transport by including the indicator organism, E. coli, as a tracer, which is compared to a fluorescent inert particle tracer and conservative solute to gain insight on both microbial ecology and waterborne disease transmission. We developed a stochastic model to describe the transport and retention of fine suspended particles in rivers, including advective delivery of particles to the streambed, transport through porewaters, and reversible filtration within the streambed. Because fine particles are only episodically transported in streams, with intervening periods at rest in the bed, this transport process violates conventional advection-dispersion assumptions. Instead we adopt a stochastic mobile-immobile model formulation to describe fine particle transport. We apply this model to measurements of particle transport from multiple tracer experiments in an agricultural stream in the Waikato dairy region of New Zealand, and use the model to improve interpretation of baseflow particle dynamics. Our results show the importance of the benthic and hyporheic regions and in-stream vegetation as a reservoir for fine organic particles in streams.

  16. Preparation of porous polymeric membranes from PTFE fine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumada, Ken-ichi; Kitamura, Taketo; Tanigaki, Masataka; Harada, Akira

    1996-12-31

    A porous structure comprised of fibrils and nodes (aggregated domain of particles) is prepared from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) particles through a series of mechanical operations, i.e., extrusion, rolling and uniaxial stretching. The periodic cycle of the structure is controlled by varying the molecular weight of PTFE and conditions of the operations. Connections between the particles which work as the precursor of fibrils are easily formed, and, in particular, promoted by the rolling operation. The molecular-weight-dependency of the tensile stress under the steady stretch is small compared to that applicable in the case of a non-crystalline polymeric system, and the observed activation energy, Ea=7.5 kJ/mol, is only three times as large as the thermal energy ({approximately}3RT). The PTFE particle is so structured that threadlike structure of the connection can easily be pulled out of the crystalline particles.

  17. Growth of In-Sb Fine Particles by Flowing-Gas Evaporation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwama, Saburo; Mihama, Kazuhiro

    Fine particles of the In-Sb system were prepared by the FGE technique (flowing-gas evaporation technique). The characteristic of the technique is that the formation of the vapor zone and particle growth zone along the flow of inert gas can be controlled by the inert-gas species and the flow velocity. From single-source evaporations, In fine islands grown on the amorphous carbon in the metal vapor zone showed a fiber structure with [111] and [001] fiber axes. In the particle growth zone In fine particles were formed, showing very frequently a characteristic contrast in them due to a lattice defect. Sb fine particles showed amorphous structure. These results may be attributed to the enhanced quenching effect of the FGE technique, already observed in the ordinary gas-evaporation technique. By coevaporation of In and Sb, granular film grew in the metal vapor zone, and fine particles were formed in the particle growth zone. The crystal structure was assigned to be the zincblende type including the wurtzite type of intermetallic compound InSb.

  18. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  19. Shock induced magnetic effects in fine particle iron dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic effects associated with shock induced transformation of fcc antiferromagnetic iron precipitates in polycrystalline copper disks at levels up to 5 GPa in weak magnetic fields (H not greater than 0.5 Oe) were investigated. The demagnetization and anisotropy associated with second order transition, the effects of plastic deformation in imparting magnetic anisotropy and magnetic hardening, and the influence of post shock thermal transients on magnetization associated with recovery, recrystallization and grain growth were studied. It was found that on the microsecond time scale of the shock induced first order transformation, the field sense is recorded in the transformed iron particles. For a given particle size the degree of transformation of fcc iron depends on the level of the shock. For a given shock level the resultant magnetic properties depend on the particle size distribution, with maximum effects noted in specimens with 400 to 600 A particles.

  20. NanoFerrite particle based radioimmunonanoparticles: binding affinity and in vivo pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A; Gruettner, C; Ivkov, R; DeNardo, G L; Mirick, G; Yuan, A; Foreman, A; DeNardo, S J

    2008-06-01

    Dextran and PEG-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (NP), when suitably modified to enable conjugation with molecular targeting agents, provide opportunities to target cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, scFv, and peptides conjugated to 20 nm NP have been reported to target cancer for imaging and alternating magnetic field (AMF) therapy. The physical characteristics of NPs can affect their in vivo performance. Surface morphology, surface charge density, and particle size are considered important factors that determine pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and biodistribution. New NanoFerrite (NF) particles having improved specific AMF absorption rates and diameters of 30 and 100 nm were studied to evaluate the variation in their in vitro and in vivo characteristics in comparison to the previously studied 20 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) NP. SPIO NP 20 nm and NF NP 30 and 100 nm were conjugated to (111)In-DOTA-ChL6, a radioimmunoconjugate. Radioimmunoconjugates were conjugated to NPs using 25 microg of RIC/mg of NP by carbodiimide chemistry. The radioimmunonanoparticles (RINP) were purified and characterized by PAGE, cellulose acetate electrophoresis (CAE), live cell binding assays, and pharmacokinetics in athymic mice bearing human breast cancer (HBT 3477) xenografts. RINP (2.2 mg) were injected iv and whole body; blood and tissue data were collected at 4, 24, and 48 h. The preparations used for animal study were >90% monomeric by PAGE and CAE. The immunoreactivity of the RINP was 40-60% compared to (111)In-ChL6. Specific activities of the doses were 20-25 microCi/2.2 mg and 6-11 microg of mAb/2.2 mg of NP. Mean tumor uptakes (% ID/g +/- SD) of each SPIO 20 nm, NF 30 nm, and 100 nm RINP at 48 h were 9.00 +/- 0.8 (20 nm), 3.0 +/- 0.3 (30 nm), and 4.5 +/- 0.8 (100 nm), respectively; the ranges of tissue uptakes were liver (16-32 +/- 1-8), kidney (7.0-15 +/- 1), spleen (8-17 +/- 3-8), lymph nodes 5-6 +/- 1-2), and lung (2.0-4 +/- 0.1-2). In conclusion, this study

  1. A Modelling Approach on Fine Particle Spatial Distribution for Street Canyons in Asian Residential Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Uhrner, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly increasing urban pollution poses severe health risks.Especially fine particles pollution is considered to be closely related to respiratory and cardiovascular disease. In this work, ambient fine particles are studied in street canyons of a typical Asian residential community using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) dispersion modelling approach. The community is characterised by an artery road with a busy traffic flow of about 4000 light vehicles (mainly cars and motorcycles) per hour at rush hours, three streets with hundreds light vehicles per hour at rush hours and several small lanes with less traffic. The objective is to study the spatial distribution of the ambient fine particle concentrations within micro-environments, in order to assess fine particle exposure of the people living in the community. The GRAL modelling system is used to simulate and assess the emission and dispersion of the traffic-related fine particles within the community. Traffic emission factors and traffic situation is assigned using both field observation and local emissions inventory data. High resolution digital elevation data (DEM) and building height data are used to resolve the topographical features. Air quality monitoring and mobile monitoring within the community is used to validate the simulation results. By using this modelling approach, the dispersion of fine particles in street canyons is simulated; the impact of wind condition and street orientation are investigated; the contributions of car and motorcycle emissions are quantified respectively; the residents' exposure level of fine particles is assessed. The study is funded by "Taiwan Megacity Environmental Research (II)-chemistry and environmental impacts of boundary layer aerosols (Year 2-3) (103-2111-M-001-001-); Spatial variability and organic markers of aerosols (Year 3)(104-2111-M-001 -005 -)"

  2. MECHANISMS BY WHICH ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES CAUSE ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small number of recent studies suggest that different size particles may cause different health effects. There are clearly differences in the chemical makeup of coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles, and this different chemistry may well drive different health responses. The ...

  3. DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION BY CHAPEL HILL FINE PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles (PM) induce systemic and lung inflammation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) are one of the lung cells directly exposed to PM that may initiate these responses. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile induced by Chapel Hill fine particles (PM2.5) in ...

  4. PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: OUTDOOR SOURCE TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The most carcinogenic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are the 4-5 ring PAH found preferentially adsorbed to the fine particles (<2.54u in urban ambient air and personal air. Personal exposure to the carcinogenic particle bound PAH is also highly correlated ...

  5. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  6. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions (10-1000 nm aerodynamic diameter), physical and chemical properties of fine particle matter (PM2.5) with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 micrometers, and gas-phase emissions from controlled open burning of assorted taxa were measured. Chemical speciation of ...

  7. Growing Characteristics of Fine Ice Particles in Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kosuke; Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Hiromoto; Okada, Kazuto; Fujisawa, Ryo

    Time variation characteristics of ice particles in a surfactant solution have been investigated. The effect of surfactants on corrosion characteristics was also studied. The results were compared with those treated with poly(vinyl alcohol). From the results, the present surfactant, cetyl dimethyl betaine was not found to be effective on preventing Ostward ripening of ice particles as poly(vinyl alcohol) showed. Then, it was concluded some effective technology has to be installed with surfactants when this surfactant treatment is realized. On the corrosion characteristics, it was found that the present surfactant shows the same level as tap water.

  8. Effect of interparticle forces on the fluidization of fine particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerns, M. G.; Ramaswami, D.

    1969-01-01

    Report studies elucidation and description of effect of interparticle forces on feasibility of gaseous fluidization of particles below 50 microns in diameter. Interparticle forces are determined by inclined-plane method. Study indicated that fluidizability is related to the interparticle adhesive force.

  9. Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Fine Particle Concentrations by Attenuation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores the appropriate frequency and transducer spacing for acoustic measurement of suspended particles in the range of 0.1 – 64 microns. High frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation wa...

  10. Retention and remobilization dynamics of fine particles and microorganisms in pastoral streams.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J D; Davies-Colley, R J; Stott, R; Sukias, J P; Nagels, J W; Sharp, A; Packman, A I

    2014-12-01

    Both microbial metabolism and pathogen retention and remobilization are dependent on downstream transport of fine particles, which migrate in a series of deposition and resuspension events. All fine particles, including clay minerals, particulate organic carbon, nutrients and microbes, are often considered to be transported similarly in the environment because of a lack of specific observations comparing their relative transport. We conducted a tracer injection study to compare the transport and retention of the fecal indicator bacterium Escherichia coli, synthetic inert fluorescent fine particles, and a dissolved conservative tracer. We found that the fluorescent fine particles and bacteria were transported similarly, with both having greater retention than the solute tracer. We used a stochastic model to evaluate in-stream retention and migration of the solute, fluorescent particles, and E. coli. The best-fit model parameters indicate that different stream reaches had varied retention characteristics, but always showed greater retention of fluorescent particles and E. coli compared to the solute tracer. Direct measurements within known retention areas after the injection showed that the majority of the fluorescent particles and E. coli were retained near the sediment-water interface in macrophyte stands or filtered within the top 3 cm of the streambed sediment. Both the tracer particles and E. coli were retained within these regions for multiple months following the injection experiment. The stochastic model properly captured the wide range of storage timescales and processes we observed in the stream. Our results demonstrate the importance of the streambed sediment and in-stream macrophytes as short- and long-term reservoirs for fine organic particles and microbes in streams. PMID:25243658

  11. Superamphiphobic nanofibrous membranes for effective filtration of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zhu, Zhigao; Sheng, Junlu; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2014-08-15

    The worldwide demands are rising for an energy-efficient and cost-effective approach that can provide advanced nanofibrous membranes with high filtration performance and superior antifouling properties. Here we report a novel synthesized fluorinated polyurethane (FPU) modified nanofibrous membrane optimized to achieve oil and non-oil aerosol particle filtration. By employing the FPU incorporation, the polyacrylonitrile/polyurethane (PAN/PU) composite membranes were endowed with superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 154° and superoleophobicity with an oil contact angle of 151°. Morphology, surface wettability, porous structure, and filtration performance could be manipulated by tuning the solution composition as well as the hierarchical structure. Furthermore, the as-prepared membranes can capture, for the first time, a range of different oil aerosol particles in a single-unit operation, with >99.9% filtration efficiency, by using the combined contribution of fiber diameter and surface roughness acting on the objective particles. Exemplified here by the construction of superamphiphobic nanofibrous membrane, numerous applications of this medium includes high efficiency particulate air filters, ultra-low penetration air filters, and respiratory protection equipment. PMID:24910033

  12. Observations of ultra-fine particles above a deciduous forest in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Prip, H.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2005-03-01

    We report physical particle size distribution and chemical composition data over a Beech forest in Denmark during May and June of 2004 with a focus on four days characterized by high concentrations of ultra-fine particles. Highest number concentrations of sub-30 nm particles were observed when net radiation >300 W m-2 and ambient particle surface area <100 μm2 cm-3. The 10-30 nm particles show growth rates of 1.5-4.5 nm hr-1 and are comprised predominantly of ammonium, sulfate and associated water.

  13. Improved synthesis of fine zinc borate particles using seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürhan, Deniz; Çakal, Gaye Ö.; Eroğlu, İnci; Özkar, Saim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc borate is a flame retardant additive used in polymers, wood applications and textile products. There are different types of zinc borate having different chemical compositions and structures. In this study, the production of zinc borate having the molecular formula of 2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O was reexamined by studying the effects of reaction parameters on the properties of product as well as the reaction kinetics. Production of zinc borate from the reaction of boric acid and zinc oxide in the presence of seed crystals was performed in a continuously stirred, temperature-controlled batch reactor having a volume of 1.5 L. Samples taken in regular time intervals during the experiments were analyzed for the concentration of zinc oxide and boron oxide in the solid as well as for the conversion of zinc oxide to zinc borate versus time. The zinc borate production reaction was fit to the logistic model. The reaction rate, reaction completion time, composition and particle size distribution of zinc borate product were determined by varying the following parameters: the boric acid to zinc oxide ratio (H 3BO 3:ZnO=3:1, 3.5:1, 5:1 and 7:1), the particle size of zinc oxide (10 and 25 μm), stirring rate (275, 400, 800 and 1600 rpm), temperature (75, 85 and 95 °C) and the size of seed crystals (10 and 2 μm). The products were also analyzed for particle size distribution. The experimental results showed that the reaction rate increases with the increase in H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, particle size of zinc oxide, stirring rate and temperature. Concomitantly, the reaction completion time is decreased by increasing the H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, stirring rate and temperature. The average particle sizes of the zinc borate products are in the range 4.3-16.6 μm (wet dispersion analysis).

  14. EDITORIAL Invited papers from the 7th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism 2010 Invited papers from the 7th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordblad, Per

    2010-12-01

    This cluster issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains a collection of papers based on invited and contributed talks given at the 7th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) held from 21-24 June, 2010 at the Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University in Sweden. The ICFPM conferences have previously been held in Rome, Italy (1991), Bangor, UK (1996), Barcelona, Spain (1999), Pittsburgh, USA (2002), London, UK (2004) and Rome, Italy (2007); the 8th ICFPM is to be organized in Perpignan, France (2013). The aim of this series of conferences is to bring together experts in the field of fine particle magnetism to discuss recent fundamental experimental and theoretical findings as well as new technological developments and applications. Thus, the conference programme included sessions ranging from basic studies of nanomagnetism to biomedical applications of fine magnetic particles. The local organizers of ICFPM-2010 want to thank the Swedish Research Council (VR), the Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) and LOT-Oriel Group Europe for financial support. We also acknowledge Akademikonferens for effective administration of the conference and Uppsala University for support and for providing the venue. Last but not least, we thank all participants for making the conference scientifically interesting and socially enjoyable.

  15. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  16. Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders

    PubMed Central

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Schmidt, Jochen; Blümel, Christina; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Peukert, Wolfgang; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4–52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size. PMID:25178812

  17. Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Schmidt, Jochen; Blümel, Christina; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Peukert, Wolfgang; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size. PMID:25178812

  18. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.

    1992-05-22

    An investigation aimed at devising a procedure for preparing alkyl-or aryl-capped iron sulfide particles continues. An initial attempt to prepare fine-particle, aryl-capped iron sulfides (S-31) involved the competitive reaction of thiophenol (PhSH) and sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) with Fe(II). However, SEM examination of the particles formed by this procedure indicated that no size control had been attained. It was thought that the phenyl group of thiophenol was not bulky enough to prevent thiolate bridging and consequent particle size growth of the metal sulfide. So the bulkier thiol 1-adamantanethiol was synthesized and used in synthesis S-33 in the next attempt to prepare fine-particle, capped iron sulfides.

  19. Fine particle receptor modeling in the atmosphere of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Vega, Elizabeth; Lowenthal, Douglas; Ruiz, Hugo; Reyes, Elizabeth; Watson, John G; Chow, Judith C; Viana, Mar; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés

    2009-12-01

    Source apportionment analyses were carried out by means of receptor modeling techniques to determine the contribution of major fine particulate matter (PM2.5) sources found at six sites in Mexico City. Thirty-six source profiles were determined within Mexico City to establish the fingerprints of particulate matter sources. Additionally, the profiles under the same source category were averaged using cluster analysis and the fingerprints of 10 sources were included. Before application of the chemical mass balance (CMB), several tests were carried out to determine the best combination of source profiles and species used for the fitting. CMB results showed significant spatial variations in source contributions among the six sites that are influenced by local soil types and land use. On average, 24-hr PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by mobile source emissions (45%), followed by secondary inorganic aerosols (16%) and geological material (17%). Industrial emissions representing oil combustion and incineration contributed less than 5%, and their contribution was higher at the industrial areas of Tlalnepantla (11%) and Xalostoc (8%). Other sources such as cooking, biomass burning, and oil fuel combustion were identified at lower levels. A second receptor model (principal component analysis, [PCA]) was subsequently applied to three of the monitoring sites for comparison purposes. Although differences were obtained between source contributions, results evidence the advantages of the combined use of different receptor modeling techniques for source apportionment, given the complementary nature of their results. Further research is needed in this direction to reach a better agreement between the estimated source contributions to the particulate matter mass. PMID:20066907

  20. Sources and chemical composition of atmospheric fine and coarse particles in the Helsinki area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Tuomo A.; Loukkola, Kati; Korhonen, Christina H.; Aurela, Minna; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto E.; Aarnio, Päivi; Koskentalo, Tarja; Kousa, Anu; Maenhaut, Willy

    During April 1996-June 1997 size-segregated atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at an urban and a rural site in the Helsinki area by utilising virtual impactors (VI) and Berner low-pressure impactors (BLPI). In addition, VI samples were collected at a semi-urban site during October 1996-May 1997. The average PM 2.3 (fine particle) concentrations at the urban and rural sites were 11.8 and 8.4 μg/m 3, and the PM 2.3-15 (coarse particle) concentrations were 12.8 and about 5 μg/m 3, respectively. The difference in fine particle mass concentrations suggests that on average, more than one third of the fine mass at the urban site is of local origin. Evaporation of fine particle nitrate from the VI Teflon filters during sampling varied similarly at the three sites, the average evaporation being about 50-60%. The average fine particle concentrations of the chemical components (25 elements and 13 ions) appeared to be fairly similar at the three sites for most components, which suggests that despite the long-range transport, the local emissions of these components were relatively evenly distributed in the Helsinki area. Exceptions were the average fine particles Ba, Fe, Sb and V concentrations that were clearly highest at the urban site pointing to traffic (Ba, Fe, Sb) and to combustion of heavy fuel oil (V) as the likely local sources. The average coarse particle concentrations for most components were highest at the urban site and lowest at the rural site. Average chemical composition of fine particles was fairly similar at the urban and rural sites: non-analysed fraction (mainly carbonaceous material and water) 43% and 37%, sulphate 21% and 25%, crustal matter 12% and 13%, nitrate 12% and 11%, ammonium 9% and 10% and sea-salt 2.5% and 3.2%, respectively. At the semi-urban site also, the average fine particle composition was similar. At the urban site, the year round average composition of coarse particles was dominated by crustal matter (59%) and the non

  1. The triggering of myocardial infarction by fine particles is enhanced when particles are enriched in secondary species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) associated with acute increases in PM concentration. Recently, we reported that MI/fine particle (PM2.5) associations may be limited to transmural infarctions. We used PM2.5 speci...

  2. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period was devoted to experimental design and fabrication tasks.

  3. The mechanisms of fine particle generation and electrification during Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Microscopical investigation of volcanic ash collected from ground stations during Mount St. Helens eruptions reveal a distinctive bimodel size distribution with high concentrations of particle ranges at (1) 200-100 microns and (2) 20-0.1 microns. Close examination of individual particles shows that most larger ones are solidified magma particles of porous pumice with numerous gas bubbles in the interior and the smaller ones are all glassy fragments without any detectable gas bubbles. Elemental analysis demonstrates that the fine fragments all have a composition similar to that of the larger pumice particles. Laboratory experiments suggest that the formation of the fine fragments is by bursting of glassy bubbles from a partially solidified surface of a crystallizing molten magma particle. The production of gas bubbles is due to the release of absorbed gases in molten magma particles when solubility decreases during phase transition. Diffusion cloud chamber experiments strongly indicate that sub-micron volcanic fragments are highly hygroscopic and extremely active as cloud condensation nuclei. Ice crystals also are evidently formed on those fragments in a supercooled (-20 C) cloud chamber. It has been reported that charge generation from ocean volcanic eruptions is due to contact of molten lava with sea water. This seems to be insufficient to explain the observed rapid and intense lightning activities over Mount St. Helens eruptions. Therefore, a hypothesis is presented here that highly electrically charged fine solid fragments are ejected by bursting of gas bubbles from the surface of a crystallizing molten magma particles.

  4. Nonmodal instability of a stratified plane-channel suspension flow with fine particles.

    PubMed

    Boronin, Sergei A; Osiptsov, Alexander N

    2016-03-01

    We consider the nonmodal instability and transient growth of small disturbances in a plane-channel suspension flow with a nonuniform concentration profile of fine noncolloidal particles accumulated in two localized layers, symmetric about the channel axis. A single-velocity model of an effective Newtonian fluid with a finite particle volume fraction is employed. It is established that fine particles distributed nonuniformly in the main flow significantly modify the growth rate of the first mode in a wide range of governing parameters. The most pronounced destabilizing effect is produced by the particles localized in the vicinity of the walls. A parametric study of the so-called optimal disturbances showed that they are streaks elongated in the flow direction, similar to the optimal disturbances in the flow devoid of particles. The transverse wave number of the optimal disturbances depends strongly on the location of the particle layers. Even when the particle mass concentration (averaged over the channel cross section) is small (of the order of a percent) and the particles are localized in the middle between the walls and the channel axis, the energy of the optimal disturbances is by several orders of magnitude larger than in dusty-gas and pure-fluid flows. When the particle layers are located in the vicinity of the walls or the channel axis, the nonmodal instability mechanism is less pronounced, as compared to the flow devoid of particles. PMID:27078447

  5. Productivity control of fine particle transport to equatorial Pacific sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Turekian, K. K.; Wei, K.-Y.

    2000-09-01

    Accumulation rates of 3He (from cosmic dust), 230Th (produced in the water column), barite (produced in the water column during decay of organic matter), and Fe and Ti (arriving with wind-borne dust) all are positively correlated in an equatorial Pacific core (TT013-PC72; 01.1°N, 139.4°W; water depth 4298 m). These accumulation rates are also positively correlated with the accumulation rates of noncarbonate material. They are not significantly correlated to the mass accumulation rate of carbonate, which makes up the bulk of the sediment. The fluctuations in accumulation rates of these various components from different sources thus must result from variations in some process within the oceans and not from variations in their original sources. Sediment focusing by oceanic bottom currents has been proposed as this process [Marcantonio et al., 1996]. We argue that the variations in the accumulation rates of all these components are dominantly linked to changes in productivity and particle scavenging (3He, 230Th, Fe, Ti) by fresh phytoplankton detritus (which delivers Ba upon its decay) in the equatorial Pacific upwelling region. We speculate that as equatorial Pacific productivity is a major component of global oceanic productivity, its variations over time might be reflected in variations in atmospheric levels of methanesulfonic acid (an atmospheric reaction product of dimethyl sulfide, which is produced by oceanic phytoplankton) and recorded in Antarctic ice cores.

  6. Direct Estimation of Fine and Coarse Mode Particle Parameters from Multiwavelength Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Korenskiy, Mikhail; Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the direct estimation (DE) of particle parameters in the fine and coarse mode from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. Particle size distributions in both modes are approximated by rectangular functions, so the particle density is estimated directly without solving the inverse problem. The numerical simulation demonstrates that the particle volume in both modes can be estimated from 3β+2α lidar measurements with uncertainty of ~25% for a wide range of size distributions. The technique developed was applied to the observations of NASA GSFC Raman lidar. Comparison of the results obtained with DE and regularization approach applied to the same set of data demonstrates agreement between these two techniques.

  7. Core shell particles consisting of cobalt ferrite and silica as model ferrofluids [CoFe 2O 4-SiO 2 core shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Joachim; Autenrieth, Tina; Hempelmann, Rolf

    2002-11-01

    Nearly monodisperse core shell particles consisting of a magnetic core of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O 4) and a shell of silica (SiO 2) are prepared via a modified Stöber synthesis. The core shell structure is confirmed by TEM, the size distribution of the whole particles was determined by means of photon correlation spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering. Due to charged surface groups of the silica shells and the magnetic moments of the cores, these particles interact both via a screened Coulomb potential and via a magnetic dipole potential. If stray ions are removed in the presence of a mixed bed ion exchanger, the electrostatic repulsion induces colloidal crystallisation. The lattice constant is influenced by the interaction with a magnetic field gradient, indicated by a blue shift of the Laue spots towards increasing field gradient.

  8. Comparison of particle lung doses from the fine and coarse fractions of urban PM-10 aerosols.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, C; Kao, A S

    1999-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently revised the national ambient air quality standards to include a new PM-2.5 particulate standard. We examine the contributions of fine (PM-2.5) and coarse (PM-2.5 to -10) fraction of typical urban aerosols to particle doses in different lung airways resulting from 24-h exposure to the standard concentration of 150 microg m-3. The aerosol is assumed to have a bimodal lognormal mass distribution with mass median diameters of 0.2 and 5 microm, and geometric standard deviation of 1.7 and 57% of the mass in the fine (PM-2.5) mode. The daily mass dose from exposure to 150 microg m-3 of PM-10 in the nasopharyngeal (NPL) region is 20-51 microg day-1 (1.5% of inhaled fines) and 377-687 microg day-1 (30% of inhaled coarse), respectively, of fine and coarse mass filtered in the nose. Similar daily mass doses from fine and coarse fractions, respectively, to the tracheobronchial (TBL) region are 28-38 (1.5%) and 40-52 (4%) microg day-1 and to the pulmonary (PUL) region are 18-194 (6%) and 32-55 microg day-1 (2%). The daily number dose in the NPL region is 5-15 x 10(8) (0.06% of inhaled fines) and 5-10 x 10(6) day-1 (13% of inhaled coarse) respectively, of fine and coarse particles. Similar number doses to the TBL region are 2.2-3.1 x 10(10) (2%) and 7.1-11. 1 x 10(5) (2%) day-1 and to the PUL region are 1.6-16.7 x 10(10) (9%) and 2.9-17.0 x 10(5) (3%) day-1. The daily surface mass dose (microg cm-2 day-1) from coarse fraction particles is large in generations 3-5. The daily number dose (particles day-1) and surface number dose (particles cm-2 day-1) are higher from the fine than the coarse fraction, by about 10(3) to 10(5) times in all lung airways. Fine fraction particles result in 10,000 times greater particle number dose per macrophage than coarse fraction particles. Particle number doses do not follow trends in mass doses, are much larger from fine than coarse fraction, and must be considered in assessing PM health

  9. Spatial variability of fine particle concentrations in three European areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; Cyrys, Josef; Lewné, Marie; Bellander, Tom; Brauer, Mike; Fischer, Paul; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; van Vliet, Patricia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Epidemiological studies of long-term air pollution effects have been hampered by difficulties in characterizing the spatial variation in air pollution. We conducted a study to assess the risk of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution for the development of inhalant allergy and asthma in children in Stockholm county, Munich and the Netherlands. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution was assessed through a 1-year monitoring program and regression modeling using exposure indicators. This paper documents the performance of the exposure monitoring strategy and the spatial variation of ambient particle concentrations. We measured the ambient concentration of PM2.5 and the reflectance of PM2.5 filters ('soot') at 40-42 sites representative of different exposure conditions of the three study populations. Each site was measured during four 14-day average sampling periods spread over one year (spring 1999 to summer 2000). In each study area, a continuous measurement site was operated to remove potential bias due to temporal variation. The selected approach was an efficient method to characterize spatial differences in annual average concentration between a large number of sites in each study area. Adjustment with data from the continuous measurement site improved the precision of the calculated annual averages, especially for PM2.5. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 11 to 20 μg/m 3 in Munich, from 8 to 16 μg/m 3 in Stockholm and from 14 to 26 μg/m 3 in the Netherlands. Larger spatial contrasts were found for the absorption coefficient of PM2.5. PM2.5 concentrations were on average 17-18% higher at traffic sites than at urban background sites, but PM2.5 absorption coefficients at traffic sites were between 31% and 55% increased above background. This suggests that spatial variation of traffic-related air pollution may be underestimated if PM2.5 only is measured.

  10. [Emission characteristics of fine particles from grate firing boilers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Xiao; Zhao, Xiu-Juan; Li, Xing-Hua; Wei, Wei; Hao, Ji-Ming

    2009-04-15

    Grate firing boilers are the main type of Chinese industrial boilers, which accounts for 85% of the industrial boilers and is one of the most important emission sources of primary air pollutants in China. In this study, five boilers in three cities were selected and tested to measure the emission characteristics of PM2.5, and gaseous pollutants were applied by a compact dilution sampling system, which was developed for this field study. Results showed that particles mass size distributions for the five industrial boilers presented single peak or double peak, former peaks near 0.14 microm and the later peaks after 1.0 microm; the cyclone dust remover and wet scrubber dust remover had effective removal efficiencies not only to PM2.5, but also to PM1.0; and under the condition of same control techniques, grate firing boiler with high capacity has less PM2.5 emission than the boiler with low capacity. In the PM2.5 collected from flue gases, SO4(2-) was the most abundant ion, accounted for 20%-40% of the PM2.5; and C was the most abundant element (7.5%-31.8%), followed by S (8.4%-18.7%). Carbon balance method was applied to calculate the emission factors of these pollutants. The emission factors of PM2.5, NO, and SO2 were in the range of 0.046-0.486 g x kg(-1), 1.63-2.47 g x kg(-1), 1.35-9.95 g x kg(-1) respectively. The results are useful for the emission inventory development of industrial boilers and the source analysis of PM2.5 in atmospheric environment. PMID:19544990

  11. Enhancing the linear flow of fine granules through the addition of elongated particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiguo; Chen, Xueli; Xu, Yang; Liu, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Sandglasses have been used to record time for thousands of years because of their constant flow rates; however, they now are drawing attention for their substantial scientific importance and extensive industrial applications. The presence of elongated particles in a binary granular system is believed to result in undesired flow because their shape implies a larger resistance to flow. However, our experiments demonstrate that the addition of elongated particles can substantially reduce the flow fluctuation of fine granules and produce a stable linear flow similar to that in an hourglass. On the basis of experimental data and previous reports of flow dynamics, we observed that the linear flow is driven by the “needle particle effect,” including flow orientation, reduced agglomeration, and local perturbation. This phenomenon is observed in several binary granular systems, including fine granules and secondary elongated particles, which demonstrates that our simple method can be widely applied to the accurate measurement of granular flows in industry. PMID:26551736

  12. Hydrogeomorphology of the hyporheic zone: stream solute and fine particle interactions with a dynamic streambed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Drummond, J.D.; Martin, R.L.; McPhillips, L.E.; Packman, A.I.; Jerolmack, D.J.; Stonedahl, S.H.; Aubeneau, A.F.; Sawyer, A.H.; Larsen, L.G.; Tobias, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyporheic flow in streams has typically been studied separately from geomorphic processes. We investigated interactions between bed mobility and dynamic hyporheic storage of solutes and fine particles in a sand-bed stream before, during, and after a flood. A conservatively transported solute tracer (bromide) and a fine particles tracer (5 μm latex particles), a surrogate for fine particulate organic matter, were co-injected during base flow. The tracers were differentially stored, with fine particles penetrating more shallowly in hyporheic flow and retained more efficiently due to the high rate of particle filtration in bed sediment compared to solute. Tracer injections lasted 3.5 h after which we released a small flood from an upstream dam one hour later. Due to shallower storage in the bed, fine particles were rapidly entrained during the rising limb of the flood hydrograph. Rather than being flushed by the flood, we observed that solutes were stored longer due to expansion of hyporheic flow paths beneath the temporarily enlarged bedforms. Three important timescales determined the fate of solutes and fine particles: (1) flood duration, (2) relaxation time of flood-enlarged bedforms back to base flow dimensions, and (3) resulting adjustments and lag times of hyporheic flow. Recurrent transitions between these timescales explain why we observed a peak accumulation of natural particulate organic matter between 2 and 4 cm deep in the bed, i.e., below the scour layer of mobile bedforms but above the maximum depth of particle filtration in hyporheic flow paths. Thus, physical interactions between bed mobility and hyporheic transport influence how organic matter is stored in the bed and how long it is retained, which affects decomposition rate and metabolism of this southeastern Coastal Plain stream. In summary we found that dynamic interactions between hyporheic flow, bed mobility, and flow variation had strong but differential influences on base flow retention and

  13. Improved blend and tablet properties of fine pharmaceutical powders via dry particle coating.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhonghui; Scicolone, James V; Han, Xi; Davé, Rajesh N

    2015-01-30

    The improvements in the flow and packing of fine pharmaceutical powder blends due to dry coating of micronized acetaminophen (mAPAP, ∼11μm), a model poorly flowing drug, are quantified. Poor flow and packing density of fine excipients (∼20μm) allowed testing the hypothesis that dry coating of cohesive API may counteract poor flow and packing of fine pharmaceutical powder blends. Further, fine excipients could improve compaction and reduce segregation tendency. It was found that flow function coefficient (FFC) and bulk density enhancements for 10%, 30%, and 60% (w/w), API loading blends with dry coated API are significantly higher than those without coated silica. At the highest API loading, for which coarser excipients were also used as reference, the flow and packing of dry coated mAPAP blends were significantly increased regardless of the excipient particle size, exceeding those of a well compacting excipient, Avicel 102. In addition, tensile strength of tablets with fine excipients was significantly higher, indicating improved compactibility. These results show for the first time that dry coating of fine, cohesive API powder leads to significantly improved flow and packing of high API loading blends consisting of fine excipients, while achieving improved tablet compactibility, suggesting suitability for direct compaction. PMID:25475016

  14. Evaluation of an abbreviated impactor for fine particle fraction (FPF) determination of metered dose inhalers (MDI).

    PubMed

    Guo, Changning; Ngo, Diem; Ahadi, Shafiq; Doub, William H

    2013-09-01

    Abbreviated impactors have been developed recently to allow more rapid evaluation of inhalation products as alternates to the eight-stage Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) which has been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for assessing aerodynamic particle size distribution. In this paper, a two-stage abbreviated impactor, Westech Fine Particle Dose Impactor (WFPD), was used to characterize the aerodynamic particle size of metered dose inhaler (MDI) products, and the results were compared with those obtained using the standard eight-stage ACI. Seven commercial MDI products, with different propellants (chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluoroalkane) and formulation types (suspension/solution, dry/normal/wet), were tested in this study by both WFPD and ACI. Substantially equivalent measures of fine particle fraction were obtained for most of the tested MDI products, but larger coarse particle fraction and extra-fine particle fraction values were measured from WFPD relative to those measured using the ACI. Use of the WFPD also produced more wall loss than the ACI. Therefore, it is recommended that the system suitability be evaluated on a product-by-product basis to establish substantial equivalency before implementing an abbreviated impactor measurement methodology for routine use in inhaler product characterization. PMID:23780781

  15. Hydrophobic aggregation of fine particles in high muddied coal slurry water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Min, Fanfei; Liu, Lingyun; Peng, Chenliang; Lu, Fangqin

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic aggregation of fine particles in high muddied coal slurry water in the presence of four quaternary ammonium salts of 1231(dodecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride), 1431(tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride), 1631(cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride) and 1831(octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride) was investigated through the measurement of contact angles, zeta potentials, aggregation observation, adsorption and sedimentation. The results show that quaternary ammonium salts can enhance the hydrophobicity and reduce the electronegativity of particle surface, and thus induce a strong hydrophobic aggregation of slurry fine particles which promotes the settlement of coal slurry water. The adsorption of quaternary ammonium salts on slurry particles increases with the increase of alkyl chain length and reagent dosage, and will reach equilibrium when the dosage reaches a certain value. Weak alkaline conditions also can promote quaternary ammonium salts to be adsorbed on the coal slurry fine particles. In addition, reasonable energy input and a chemical environment of weak alkaline solution are conducive to hydrophobic aggregation settlement of high muddied coal slurry water with quaternary ammonium salts. The main mechanism of hydrophobic aggregation of coal slurry particles with quaternary ammonium salts is 'adsorption charge neutralization' and hydrophobic interaction. PMID:26877031

  16. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-RTP-P- 620 Hays**, M.D., Geron*, C.D., Linna**, K.J., Smith*, N.D., and Schauer, J.J. Speciation of Gas-Phase and Fine Particle Emissions from Burning of Foliar Fuels. Submitted to: Environmental Science & Technology EPA/600/J-02/234, http://pubs.acs.org/journals/esthag/...

  17. Nasal Contribution to Breathing and Fine Particle Deposition in Children Versus Adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both the route of breathing, nasal versus oral, and the effectiveness of the nose to filter inhaled, fine particles may differ between children and adults. This study compared (1) the nasal contribution to breathing at rest and during mild to moderate exercise in children (age 6–...

  18. FINE PARTICLE COLLECTION BY A FLUX-FORCE/CONDENSATION SCRUBBER: PILOT DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale demonstration of flux-force/condensation (FF/C) scrubbing for fine particle control, carried out on a secondary metal recovery furnace. Results were consistent with those of preceding laboratory bench-scale and pilot-plant studies. The sy...

  19. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.

    1992-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the kinetics-assisted design, synthesis and characterization of fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. The goal is to develop a fundamental understanding of coal catalysis and catalysts that will, in turn, allow for the specification of a novel optical catalyst for coal liquefaction.

  20. The path toward clean air: implementing new standards for ozone and fine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lydia Wegman; Erika Sasser

    2005-04-01

    Many areas in the United States have air pollution that exceeds the levels allowed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under its revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone and fine particles. This article provides an overview of the steps EPA and states are taking to implement the new standards. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DATA SYSTEMS USER GUIDE: FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS INFORMATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user guide to the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a computerized data base on particulate emissions from stationary point sources. The FPEIS is one of four waste stream data bases which are components of the Environmental Assessment Data System...

  2. Structure and magnetic properties of Nd2Fe14B fine particles produced by spark erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, H.; Berkowitz, A. E.

    1994-11-01

    At present Nd2Fe14B is the best permanent magnet because of its extremely high coercivity and energy product. Optimum properties of Nd2Fe14B magnets can be attained by producing single domain particles, and then aligning and compacting them. Due to the reactivity of the Nd constitutent, it is challenging to produce and handle a large amount of fine particles of this material. We have prepared fine particles of Nd2Fe14B by spark erosion with various dielectric media. Yield, size, size distribution, structure, and magnetic properties are discussed. The Nd2Fe14B particles were made by the sharker pot spark erosion method. Relaxation oscillators or a pulse generator were used to power the park erosion. Commercial Neomax 35 was employed as the primary material. The dielectric media were liquid Ar, Ar gas, and hydrocarbons, which provided an oxygen free environment. Structure and size were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) with temperatures in range of 4.2-1200 K. The particles produced in these three different dielectric media had different microstructures and crystal structures. The particles made in Ar gas were pure Nd2Fe14B phase. The particles made in liquid Ar were a mixture of amorphous and crystalline Nd2Fe14B, because the liquid Ar provided a much higher quench rate than Ar gas, which produced some amorphous Nd2Fe14B. Upon annealing, the amorphous particles became crystalline. The fine particles produced in hydrocarbons, such as pentane and dodecane, had more complex mixed phases, since the rare earth reacted with the hydrocarbons during the sparking process. The phases were NdC2, alpha-Fe, and amorphous and crystalline Nd2Fe14B. The effects of power parameters, such as voltage and capacitance, on particle size were investigated. Particle sizes from 20 nm to 50 microns were obtained.

  3. Correlation between particle size and magnetic characteristics of Mn-substituted ZnFe2O4 ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawar, Sidra; Atiq, Shahid; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad

    2016-05-01

    We report synthesis of Zn1-xMnxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.4 & 0.5) ferrites using sol-gel auto-combustion route while citric acid is used as a fuel. The study is aimed to explore the influence of Mn contents on structural parameters, morphological characteristics and magnetic properties of ZnFe2O4 ferrite samples while the impact of average grain dimensions on magnetic properties inferred from multi domain and single domain particle's effect is also analyzed. X-ray diffraction confirmed the configuration of single phase pure crystalline structure with low concentration of Mn while some impurity peaks were found for higher Mn contents. Lattice parameter was found to increase with increasing Mn contents while crystallite size was decreased. Average grain size was decreased from 240 to 150 nm with increasing Mn concentration which directly affected the magnetic properties. A decrease in saturation magnetization (from 52.35 to 45.80 emu/g) and an increase in coercivity (from 44 to 262 Oe) was observed with increasing Mn contents. A decrease in initial permeability and increase in hysteresis loss with increasing Mn contents was also evident. Coercive field and hysteresis losses were increased with decreasing average grain size while initial permeability was found to decrease with decrease in average grain size.

  4. The influence of annealing in the ferrite-plus-austenite phase field on the stability of vanadium carbide precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, I. E.; Michal, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of rapid excursions into the ferrite-plus-austenite two-phase field on V4C3 precipitates formed by tempering in the ferrite phases was investigated. Heat treatments were first performed to produce a starting microstructure of fine vanadium carbide particles precipitated in a ferrite matrix, and the microstructure was then subjected to various short-time heat treatment cycles that transformed part of the matrix to austenite. TEM was used to determine the effects of the matrix change on the size, morphology, and distribution of the vanadium carbide particles.

  5. Ultrasonic agitation-floating classification of nano-sized Ba-Mg ferrites particles formed by using self-propagating high temperature synthesis and fabrication of nickel-ferrites thin sheet by pulse-electroforming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Nickel-nano-sized ferrites composites sheet for electromagnetic shielding was produced by pulse-electroforming in a modified nickel sulfamate solution. The ferrite particles were prepared by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) followed by mechanical milling, and classified with an ultrasonic agitation-floating unit to obtain about 100 nm in size. Average combustion temperature and combustion propagating rate during SHS reaction were 1190 K and 5.8 mm/sec at the oxygen pressure of 1.0 MPa, respectively. The nickel-ferrite composite sheet had preferred orientation which (100) pole clearly concentrated to normal direction, whereas, (110) and (111) poles tended to split to the longitudinal direction, respectively. Maximum magnetization, residual magnetization and coercive force of the nano-sized ferrites were 27.13 A x m2/kg, 6.4 A x m2/kg and 14.58 kA/m, respectively. Complex permeability of the composites decreased with an increase in frequency, and its real value (mu'r) had the maximum at about 0.3 GHz. The dielectric constants of the composites were epsilon'r = 6.7 and epsilon"r = 0. PMID:23646783

  6. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  7. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  8. Characteristics of Fine Particles in an Urban Atmosphere-Relationships with Meteorological Parameters and Trace Gases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianhao; Zhu, Zhongmin; Gong, Wei; Xiang, Hao; Fang, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particles (diameter < 1 μm) attract a growing global health concern and have increased in urban areas that have a strong link to nucleation, traffic emissions, and industrial emissions. To reveal the characteristics of fine particles in an industrial city of a developing country, two-year measurements of particle number size distribution (15.1 nm-661 nm), meteorological parameters, and trace gases were made in the city of Wuhan located in central China from June 2012 to May 2014. The annual average particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode (15.1 nm-30 nm), Aitken mode (30 nm-100 nm), and accumulation mode (100 nm-661 nm) reached 4923 cm(-3), 12193 cm(-3) and 4801 cm(-3), respectively. Based on Pearson coefficients between particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters, precipitation and temperature both had significantly negative relationships with particle number concentrations, whereas atmospheric pressure was positively correlated with the particle number concentrations. The diurnal variation of number concentration in nucleation mode particles correlated closely with photochemical processes in all four seasons. At the same time, distinct growth of particles from nucleation mode to Aitken mode was only found in spring, summer, and autumn. The two peaks of Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles in morning and evening corresponded obviously to traffic exhaust emissions peaks. A phenomenon of "repeated, short-lived" nucleation events have been created to explain the durability of high particle concentrations, which was instigated by exogenous pollutants, during winter in a case analysis of Wuhan. Measurements of hourly trace gases and segmental meteorological factors were applied as proxies for complex chemical reactions and dense industrial activities. The results of this study offer reasonable estimations of particle impacts and provide references for emissions control strategies in industrial cities of developing

  9. Characteristics of Fine Particles in an Urban Atmosphere—Relationships with Meteorological Parameters and Trace Gases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhao; Zhu, Zhongmin; Gong, Wei; Xiang, Hao; Fang, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particles (diameter < 1 μm) attract a growing global health concern and have increased in urban areas that have a strong link to nucleation, traffic emissions, and industrial emissions. To reveal the characteristics of fine particles in an industrial city of a developing country, two-year measurements of particle number size distribution (15.1 nm–661 nm), meteorological parameters, and trace gases were made in the city of Wuhan located in central China from June 2012 to May 2014. The annual average particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode (15.1 nm–30 nm), Aitken mode (30 nm–100 nm), and accumulation mode (100 nm–661 nm) reached 4923 cm−3, 12193 cm−3 and 4801 cm−3, respectively. Based on Pearson coefficients between particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters, precipitation and temperature both had significantly negative relationships with particle number concentrations, whereas atmospheric pressure was positively correlated with the particle number concentrations. The diurnal variation of number concentration in nucleation mode particles correlated closely with photochemical processes in all four seasons. At the same time, distinct growth of particles from nucleation mode to Aitken mode was only found in spring, summer, and autumn. The two peaks of Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles in morning and evening corresponded obviously to traffic exhaust emissions peaks. A phenomenon of “repeated, short-lived” nucleation events have been created to explain the durability of high particle concentrations, which was instigated by exogenous pollutants, during winter in a case analysis of Wuhan. Measurements of hourly trace gases and segmental meteorological factors were applied as proxies for complex chemical reactions and dense industrial activities. The results of this study offer reasonable estimations of particle impacts and provide references for emissions control strategies in industrial cities of

  10. Curie temperature and magnetic properties of aluminum doped barium ferrite particles prepared by ball mill method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daming; Harward, Ian; Baptist, Joshua; Goldman, Sara; Celinski, Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Barium ferrite has attracted considerable interest in the fields of permanent magnets and perpendicular magnetic recording due to its strong uniaxial anisotropy and high Curie temperature (Tc). We prepared aluminum doped barium ferrite ceramics (BaAlxFe12-xO19, 0≤x≤6) by the ball mill method. The powder was milled for 96 h, and after forming pellets, annealed for 48 h in air at 1000 °C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) data show that there are only single hexagonal phases in the samples without any impurity phase. The crystal lattice constants, a and c, were calculated by Cohen's method. Both a and c decrease with increasing x, ranging from 0.588 nm and 2.318 nm to 0.573 nm and 2.294 nm, respectively. A Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) were used to investigate Tc and magnetic properties of BaFe12-xAlxO19. It is found that Tc decreases with increasing x, from 425 °C to 298 °C. It is also found that the saturated magnetization (4πMs) decreases with increasing x, while the coercivity (Hc) increases with the increase in x. The anisotropy field was also determined from the SQUID measurement.

  11. Mineralogical characterization of ambient fine/ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei C1 coal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Hao, Xiaojie; Liu, Dingyu; Wang, Qiangxiang; Zhang, Wenchao; Liu, Pinwei; Zhang, Rongci; Yu, Shang; Pan, Ruiqi; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2016-03-01

    Nano-quartz in Xuanwei coal, the uppermost Permian (C1) coal deposited in the northwest of Yuanan, China, has been regarded as one of factors which caused high lung cancer incidence in the local residents. However, mineralogical characterization of the fine/ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei coal combustion has not previously been studied. In this study, PM1 and ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei coal combustion were sampled. Chemical elements in the ambient particles were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and mineralogical characterization of these ambient particles was investigated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM/EDX) and transmission electronic microscopy, coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM/EDX). Our results showed that the size distribution of mineral particles from the coal combustion emissions ranged from 20 to 200 nm. Si-containing particles and Fe-containing particles accounted for 50.7% of the 150 individual particles measured, suggesting that these two types of particles were major minerals in the ambient particles generally. The nano-mineral particles were identified as quartz (SiO2) and gypsum (CaSO4) based on their crystal parameters and chemical elements. Additionally, there also existed unidentified nano-minerals. Armed with these data, toxicity assessments of the nano-minerals will be carried out in a future study.

  12. Thermomagnetic stability of M-type strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19) particles with different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihoon; Hong, Yang-Ki; Lee, Woncheol; Kim, Chin-Mo; Choi, Kang-Ryong; An, Sung-Yong; Seo, Jung-Wook; Hur, Kang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    M-type strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19: SrM) with two different shapes were synthesized by a simple and benign process. One is peanut-like shape, and the other is hexagonal platelet. These shapes were controlled by the shape and size of precursor Fe3O4 particles. A mixture of submicron- or nanometer-sized Fe3O4 particles and SrCO3 nanoparticles was calcined to transform to SrM, followed by acid-washing to remove secondary phase from SrM particles. Static magnetic properties, magnetic interactions, and thermomagnetic stability of the SrM particles were studied. The measured saturation magnetization and intrinsic coercivity are 74.2 emu/g and 4431 Oe, respectively, for the peanut-like SrM particles and 73.6 emu/g and 5360 Oe for the hexagonal SrM platelets. The saturation magnetization is close to the theoretical value of 76 emu/g. Both types of SrM show dipolar interactions and good thermomagnetic stability, i.e. α = Δ σ s / σ s = -0.16%/K and β = Δ H ci/ H ci = 0.15%/K for the peanut-like SrM particles and α = -0.12%/K and β = 0.12%/K for the hexagonal SrM platelets. The temperature coefficient of intrinsic coercivity ( β) is positive and magnetization still remains high at 400 K; 60 emu/g for the hexagonal SrM platelets and 50 emu/g for the peanut-like SrM particles. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. A novel permanently magnetised high gradient magnetic filter using assisted capture for fine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.H.P.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the structure and properties of a novel permanently magnetised magnetic filter for fine friable radioactive material. Previously a filter was described and tested. This filter was designed so that the holes in the filter are left open as capture proceeds which means the pressure drop builds up only slowly. This filter is not suitable for friable composite particles which can be broken by mechanical forces. The structure of magnetic part of the second filter has been changed so as to strongly capture particles composed of fine particles weakly bound together which tend to break when captured. This uses a principle of assisted-capture in which coarse particles aid the capture of the fine fragments. The technique has the unfortunate consequence that the pressure drop across the filter rises faster as capture capture proceeds than the filter described previously. These filters have the following characteristics: (1) No external magnet is required. (2) No external power is required. (3) Small is size and portable. (4) Easily interchangeable. (5) Can be cleaned without demagnetising.

  14. Electrophoretic deposition of adsorbed arsenic on fine iron oxide particles in tap water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Syahira Mohd; Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu; Naim, M. Nazli; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Talib, Suhaimi Abdul

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been demonstrated to remove arsenic with natural adsorbent (fine iron oxide particles) in tap water samples. Characterizations of metal element particularly arsenic and fine iron oxide particles in tap water from two different locations, i.e. commercial and residential areas, were conducted. Results showed that the concentration of arsenic in tap water from residential area was higher than commercial area samples i.e. 0.022 ± 0.004 and 0.016 ± 0.008 ppm, respectively. The same finding was observed in zeta potential value where it was higher in the residential area than commercial area, i.e. -42.27 ± 0.12 and -34.83 ± 0.23 mV, respectively. During the removal of arsenic using the EPD technique, direct current (DC) voltage was varied from 5 to 25V at a constant electrode distance of 30 mm. Effect of zeta potential, voltage and electrode type were intensively investigated. High percentage removal of arsenic was obtained from carbon plate than carbon fibre electrode. The percentage removal of arsenic from all samples slightly decreased with increasing of the applied voltage. EDX analysis confirmed that arsenic has adsorbed onto deposited iron oxide particles on the anode electrode. Overall, EPD technique was found to be successful in removing arsenic onto fine iron oxide particles in tap water with 26% ± 1.05 of removal.

  15. The cumulative effects of using fine particles and cyanobacteria for rehabilitation of disturbed active sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaady, Eli; Katra, Itzhak; Barkai, Daniel; Knoll, Yaakov; Sarig, Shlomo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems in desertified lands worldwide is active wind-borne sand dunes, which lead to covering of fertile soils and agricultural fields. In regions with more than 100 mm of annual rainfall, sand dunes may be naturally stabilized by biocrusts (biological soil crusts). One of the main restraints of biocrust development is the typical lack of fine particles in sand dunes. Our study investigated the combined application of fine particles [coal fly-ash <100 micrometer] and bio-inoculant of filamentous cyanobacteria, isolated from nearby natural stabilized sand dunes, on the soil surface of active sands for increasing resistance to wind erosion. Boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments were conducted in experimental plots within a greenhouse for examining the effects of adding coal fly-ash and bio-inoculant to active sands. The biocrust development was evaluated via several physical and bio-physiological variables. In all the physical measurements and the bio-physiological variables, the treatment of "sand+inoculum+coal fly-ash" showed significant differences from the "sand-control". The combination led to the best results of surface stabilization in boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments, with the lowest sand fluxes. The filamentous cyanobacteria use the fine particles of the coal fly-ash as bridges for growing toward and adhering to the large sand particles. The cumulative effects of biocrusts and coal fly-ash enhance soil surface stabilization and may allow long-term sustainability.

  16. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period focused on assembling the supercritical particle generation/collection system. Effort was applied to constructing a shakedown testing plan also.

  17. Empirical modeling of the fine particle fraction for carrier-based pulmonary delivery formulations

    PubMed Central

    Pacławski, Adam; Szlęk, Jakub; Lau, Raymond; Jachowicz, Renata; Mendyk, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    In vitro study of the deposition of drug particles is commonly used during development of formulations for pulmonary delivery. The assay is demanding, complex, and depends on: properties of the drug and carrier particles, including size, surface characteristics, and shape; interactions between the drug and carrier particles and assay conditions, including flow rate, type of inhaler, and impactor. The aerodynamic properties of an aerosol are measured in vitro using impactors and in most cases are presented as the fine particle fraction, which is a mass percentage of drug particles with an aerodynamic diameter below 5 μm. In the present study, a model in the form of a mathematical equation was developed for prediction of the fine particle fraction. The feature selection was performed using the R-environment package “fscaret”. The input vector was reduced from a total of 135 independent variables to 28. During the modeling stage, techniques like artificial neural networks, genetic programming, rule-based systems, and fuzzy logic systems were used. The 10-fold cross-validation technique was used to assess the generalization ability of the models created. The model obtained had good predictive ability, which was confirmed by a root-mean-square error and normalized root-mean-square error of 4.9 and 11%, respectively. Moreover, validation of the model using external experimental data was performed, and resulted in a root-mean-square error and normalized root-mean-square error of 3.8 and 8.6%, respectively. PMID:25653522

  18. A comparative study on the varying exposure to atmospheric fine and coarse particles under urban and rural conditions.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Benning, Uta; Schultz, Eckart; Dietze, Volker; Kaminski, Uwe; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2012-11-01

    This paper is based on the results of three air quality studies conducted in Buenos Aires in Berlin, and in German spas between 2003 and 2007. A high comparability of results was ensured by using the same sampling techniques and analytical methods. Total particle sampling was achieved by active sampling of fine (PM2.5) and passive sampling of coarse particles > or = 2.5 microm and giant particles > or = 10 microm. The highly absorbing, black, predominantly carbonaceous particles (BC) of fine particle samples were determined by measuring the total light attenuation of filter samples and interpreting the extinction value as black carbon. The difference between the gravimetric total mass concentration of the PM2.5 samples and the BC is defined as the transparent, mostly mineral fine fraction. In coarse/giant particle samples the mean gray value was determined by means of automated light microscopy with subsequent single-particle analysis. "Opaque" particles were separated from the "transparent" particle fraction by applying a grey value threshold level. Microscopic measurement of individual particles was employed to establish the size distribution of the coarse and giant fraction. Due to different health effects, the separate detection of these components is suggested. Decline functions of particles are given, possibly providing useful information for a more detailed specification of the local particle distribution, and for a better estimate of the individual exposure. Atmospheric dispersal of particles was found effected mainly by source characteristics. An increased, spatially largely constant level of fine transparent particles in Berlin indicates a particle plume originating from photochemical processes. Buenos Aires, in contrast, is characterized by a lower background level of fine transparent particles but is considerably affected by fine black particles from diesel emissions and by a higher resuspension of coarse/giant transparent, mainly soil particles. PMID

  19. Preparation of medical magnetic nanobeads with ferrite particles encapsulated in a polyglycidyl methacrylate (GMA) for bioscreening

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibiraki, H.; Kuroda, C.S.; Maeda, M.; Matsushita, N.; Abe, M.; Handa, H.

    2005-05-15

    Ferrite nanoparticles (an intermediate between Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), {approx}7 nm in diameter, were embedded in beads of a mixed polymer of styrene (St) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization method. The beads were coated with GMA by a seeded polymerization method in order to suppress nonspecific protein binding on the surfaces; GMA exhibits very low nonspecific protein binding, which is required for carriers used for bioscreening. The beads have diameters of 180{+-}50 nm and saturation magnetizations of 28 emu/g, exceeding commercially available polymer-coated beads of micron size having a weaker saturation magnetization ({approx}12 emu/g)

  20. [Using barium fluoride fine particles as stationary phase for TLC/FTIR analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Pan, Qing-hua; Ding, Jie; Zhu, Qing; He, An-qi; Yue, Shi-juan; Li, Xiao-pei; Hu, Li-ping; Xia, Jin-ming; Liu, Cui-ge; Wei, Yong-ju; Yu, Jiang; Yang, Zhan-lan; Zhu, Xi; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Wu, Jin-guang

    2011-07-01

    In situ TLC/FTIR technique has tremendous potential in the analysis of complex mixtures. However, the progress in this technique was quite slow. The reason is that conventional stationary phase such as silica gel etc. has strong absorption in FTIR spectrum and thus brings about severe interference in the detection of samples. To solve the problem, the authors propose to use barium fluoride fine particles as stationary phase of TLC plate. The reasons are as follows: Barium fluoride wafer has been extensively used as infrared window in FTIR experiments and it has no absorbance in an IR region between 4 000 and 800 cm'. As a matter of fact, the atomic mass of barium and fluoride is quite large, thus the normal vibration of BaF2 lattice is limited in far-IR region and low frequency part of mid-IR region. Therefore, the interference caused by IR absorption of stationary phase can be resolved if BaF2 is used as stationary phase of TLC plate. Moreover, BaF2 is quite stable and insolvable in water and most organic solvents and it will not be dissolved by mobile phase or react with samples in TLC separation. Additionally, decreasing the particle size of BaF2 is very important in TLC/FTIR analysis technique. The reason is two-fold: First, decreasing the particle size of stationary phase is helpful to improving the efficiency of separation by TLC plate; second, decreasing the size of BaFz particle can improve the quality of FTIR spectra by alleviating the problem of light scattering. By optimizing the synthetic conditions, fine particles of barium fluoride were obtained. SEM results indicate that the size of the BaF2 particles is around 500 nm. FTIR spectrum of the BaF2 particles shows that no absorption of impurity was observed. Moreover, the elevation of baseline caused by light scattering is insignificant. The authors have developed a new technique named "settlement volatilization method" to prepare TLC plate without polymeric adhesive that may bring about significant

  1. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm. PMID:23796831

  2. Modeled deposition of fine particles in human airway in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoying; Yan, Caiqing; Patterson, Regan F.; Zhu, Yujiao; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhu, Yifang; Ma, Shexia; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhu, Tong; Zheng, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to simulate depositions of size-segregated particles in human airway in Beijing, China during seasons when fine particulate matter concentrations are high (December 2011 and April 2012). Particle size distributions (5.6-560 nm, electrical mobility diameter) near a major road in Beijing were measured by the TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The information of size distributions provided by FMPS was applied in the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model (MPPD) to quantify number and mass depositions of particles in human airway including extrathoracic (ET), tracheobronchial (TB), and pulmonary (PUL) regions of exposed Chinese in Beijing. Our results show that under ambient conditions, particle number concentration (NC) deposition in PUL is the highest in the three major regions of human airway. The total particle NC deposition in human airway in winter is higher than that in spring, especially for ultrafine particles (1.8 times higher) while particle mass concentration (MC) deposition is higher in spring. Although particle MC in clean days are much lower than that in heavily polluted days, total particle NC deposition in human airway in clean days is comparable to that in heavily polluted days. NC deposition for nucleation mode particles (10-20 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in clean days is higher than that in heavily polluted days. MC deposition for accumulation mode particles (100-641 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in heavily polluted days is much higher than that in clean days, while that of nucleation mode is negligible. The temporal variation shows that the arithmetic mean and the median values of particle NC and MC depositions in the evening are both the highest, followed by morning and noon, and it is most likely due to increased contribution from traffic emissions.

  3. Metallic Nickel Nanoparticles May Exhibit Higher Carcinogenic Potential than Fine Particles in JB6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Linda; Zou, Baobo; Mao, Guochuan; Xu, Jin; Castranova, Vincent; Zhao, Jinshun; Ding, Min

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies have described the pathogenic and carcinogenic effects of nickel compounds, little has been done on the biological effects of metallic nickel. Moreover, the carcinogenetic potential of metallic nickel nanoparticles is unknown. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) have been shown to play pivotal roles in tumor initiation, promotion, and progression. Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is considered to be one of the steps leading to the neoplastic state. The present study examines effects of metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles on tumor promoter or suppressor gene expressions as well as on cell transformation in JB6 cells. Our results demonstrate that metallic nickel nanoparticles caused higher activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, and a greater decrease of p53 transcription activity than fine particles. Western blot indicates that metallic nickel nanoparticles induced a higher level of protein expressions for R-Ras, c-myc, C-Jun, p65, and p50 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, both metallic nickel nano- and fine particles increased anchorage-independent colony formation in JB6 P+ cells in the soft agar assay. These results imply that metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles are both carcinogenetic in vitro in JB6 cells. Moreover, metallic nickel nanoparticles may exhibit higher carcinogenic potential, which suggests that precautionary measures should be taken in the use of nickel nanoparticles or its compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24691273

  4. Settling velocities of fine suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, Z.; Zhou, H.J.; Eittreim, S.L.; Winterwerp, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Point-sampled suspended sediment concentration profiles (grain size largely < 32 ??m) were measured in August 1978, April 1990, and May 1990 in the Changjiang Estuary. They were selectively fit with the Rouse equation in order to calculate the median settling velocities ws,50 of fine suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary, East China Sea. Calculated settling velocities ranged from 0.4 to 4.1 mm s-1. Furthermore, ws values increased with the mean concentration C?? of sediment in suspension. The best-fit equation for the field settling velocity of fine particles in the Changjiang Estuary can be expressed by the power law: ws = 2.37 C??0.84 (r2 < 0.3). ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activity testing of fine-particle size, iron catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Gugliotta, T.P.

    1993-10-01

    The use of fine-particle size (< 40 nm) unsupported catalysts in direct coal liquefaction may result in improved economics due to possible enhanced yields of desired products, the potential for decreasing reaction severity, and the possibility of using less catalyst. Sandia has developed a standard testing procedure for evaluating and comparing the fine-particle catalysts. The test procedure uses phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, the DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, and a statistical experimental design to enable evaluation of the catalysts over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt % on a dmmf coal basis). Product analyses include tetrahydrofuran (THF) conversion, heptane conversion, solvent recovery, and gas analyses. Phenanthrene as the solvent in the testing procedure yielded significant differences between thermal and catalytic reactions, whereas using a good hydrogen donor such as 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) showed no catalytic effects.

  6. Evaluation of Dielectric Properties of Ferroelectric Fine Particles Fabricated by Focused Ion Beam Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, Hisato; Yoshida, Mikiko; Akedo, Jun

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we propose a method for evaluating the dielectric property of a single fine particle using the focused ion beam technieque. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) particles (Sakai Chemical Industry LQ) were sintered at 1473 K for 2 h to fabricate bulk PZT. The bulk PZT was milled to fabricate sample particles. The particles were dispersed on a Au surface substrate, and were shaped into a parallel-plate capacitor using the focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The FIB technique was used to deposite tungsten, W, with a square shape on top of the particle sample as an upper electrode, and the particles were shaved into a rectangular shape; the area of the electrode was 2× 10-12 m2 and the thickness of the PZT segment was 2× 10-6 m. The capacitance of the fabricated PZT particle sample was successfully measured by compensating the parasitic capacitance of the experimental setup. Consequently, the relative permittivity of the PZT particle sample was 1250 at 105 Hz. This value was comparably close to the 1750 of the bulk PZT. The issue of electric contact between the particles and the substrate should be overcome in order to discuss permittivity quantitatively.

  7. Measurements of fine particle size using image processing of a laser diffraction image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of fine particle size is important in spray systems, minimum quantity lubrication, and weather observation. Introducing the recent progress of imaging techniques, the authors developed a portable measurement system. To overcome the large light intensity difference between the incident laser light and diffracted light and the limitation of the dynamic range of imaging devices, the event correlation was adopted. The growth of droplets in fog was experimentally measured.

  8. Variations of fine particle physiochemical properties during a heavy haze episode in the winter of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Guo, Song; Pian, Wei; Cheng, Wenjing; Hu, Min

    2016-11-15

    Chemical composition, morphology, size and mixture of fine particles were measured in a heavy haze and the post-haze air in Beijing in January 2012. With the occurrence of haze, the concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium grew gradually. The hourly averaged PM2.5 concentration increased from 118μgm(-3) to 402μgm(-3) within 12h. In contrast, it was less than 10μgm(-3) in the post-haze air. Occupying approximately 46% in mass, organics were the major component of PM1 in both the haze and post-haze air. Analysis of individual particles in the size range of 0.2-1.1μm revealed that secondary-like particles and soot particles were always the majority, and most soot particles had a core-shell structure. The number ratio of secondary-like particles to soot particles in accumulation mode in the haze air was about 2:1, and that in the post-haze air was 8:1. These results indicate both secondary particle formation and primary emission contributed substantially to the haze. The mode size of the haze particles was about 0.7μm, and the mode size of the post-haze particles was 0.4μm, indicating the remarkable growth of particles in haze. However, the ratios of the core size to shell size of core-shell structure soot particles in the haze were similar to those in the post-haze air, suggesting a quick aging of soot particles in either the haze air or the post-haze air. PMID:27470669

  9. Formation of fine particle emulsions by high-dose-rate polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kijima, T.; Okamura, S.; Egusa, S.; Makuuchi, K.

    1982-12-01

    Emulsion of chloroprene, acrylic acid, styrene, n-butyl methacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers mixed with sodium lauryl sulfate as an emulsifier were polymerized or copolymerized in a flow system for control of temperature and for mixing of the emulsion under irradiation. Electron beams of a dose rate of 0.1 to 10 Mrad/s was used as a radiation source to produce very fine particle emulsions. Significant decreases in particle diameter were noted for polymers aged for as much as 5 weeks. (BLM)

  10. Monitoring of fine particle air pollutants at FWS Class 1 air quality areas

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, E.

    1995-12-31

    Fine particle samplers have been installed at five FWS wilderness areas, all Class 1 air quality areas. The samplers are designed primarily to measure the fine particles in ambient air responsible for visibility impairment and are part of the national IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) network. Filters in the samplers are analyzed for trace elements, soil elements, sulfur, hydrogen, nitrate, chloride, organic carbon, and inorganic carbon. Several composite parameters are derived from the measured parameters and include sulfate, nitrate, organic mass, light-absorbing carbon, and soil. Data indicate that fine particle concentrations at FWS sites are consistent with geographical trends observed in the national IMPROVE network. For instance, concentrations of most parameters are higher in the eastern US than in the western US, reflecting the pattern or greater air pollution and lower visibility in the east. Of the five FWS sites, Brigantine Wilderness Area experiences the greatest air pollution, receiving polluted air masses from the Ohio Valley and eastern metropolitan areas, including Philadelphia and Washington, DC. As the data record lengthens, attributing air pollution and visibility impairment at the wilderness areas to specific source types and regions will be more accurate.

  11. Fine particles on Mars: observations with the viking 1 lander cameras.

    PubMed

    Mutch, T A; Arvidson, R E; Binder, A B; Huck, F O; Levinthal, E C; Liebes, S; Morris, E C; Nummedal, D; Pollack, J B; Sagan, C

    1976-10-01

    Drifts of fine-grained sediment are present in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander. Many drifts occur in the lees of large boulders. Morphologic analysis indicates that the last dynamic event was one of general deflation for at least some drifts. Particle cohesion implies that there is a distinct small-particle upturn in the threshold velocity-particle size curve; the apparent absence of the most easily moved particles (150 micrometers in diameter) may be due to their preferential transport to other regions or their preferential collisional destruction. A twilight rescan with lander cameras indicates a substantial amount of red dust with mean radius on the order of 1 micrometer in the atmosphere. PMID:17793087

  12. Thermal changes in texture of aggregates of ultra-fine crystallites in hydrolysed zirconia particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yoshio; Kato, Etsuro

    1980-10-01

    Zirconia particles of about 1000 × 1000 × 300 Å in size, which were aggregates of rectangular shaped and regularly oriented ultra-fine crystallites of about 30 × 100 Å, were prepared by hydrolysis from 0.1 moll -1 ZrOCl 2 solution. Changes in the texture of the particles on heating were studied by electron microscopy. The growth of the crystallites occurred predominantly at peripheries of the particles at 500°C and in the whole particles at 600°C, resulting in crystallites of 160-360 Å in diameter at 800°C. The voids which were present initially among the crystallites, coalesced and increased in size at temperatures up to 600°C, but diminished above 800°C. Single crystals and (100) twins were formed at 1000°C.

  13. Fine particles on mars: Observations with the viking 1 lander cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mutch, T.A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Binder, A.B.; Huck, F.O.; Levinthal, E.C.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Morris, E.C.; Nummedal, D.; Pollack, James B.; Sagan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Drifts of fine-grained sediment are present in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander. Many drifts occur in the lees of large boulders. Morphologic analysis indicates that the last dynamic event was one of general deflation for at least some drifts. Particle cohesion implies that there is a distinct small-particle upturn in the threshold velocity-particle size curve; the apparent absence of the most easily moved particles (150 micrometers in diameter) may be due to their preferential transport to other regions or their preferential collisional destruction. A twilight rescan with lander cameras indicates a substantial amount of red dust with mean radius on the order of 1 micrometer in the atmosphere.

  14. Magnetization reversal in cobalt-aluminum fine-particle ferromagnets: Microstructure and coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltser, A. M.; Soffa, W. A.

    1990-06-01

    The magnetic age hardening produced by decomposition of a β-CoAl(B2) alloy has been studied by correlating the microstructure with the changes in magnetic properties during aging. A model based on coherent rotation has been developed to describe quantitatively the intrinsic coercivity of these fine-particle ferromagnets as well as the temperature dependence of the coercivity over the temperature range from 77 to 757 K. The model incorporates both magnetocrystalline anisotropy constants K1 and K2 in addition to the shape anisotropy of the elongated single-domain particles of metastable HCP cobalt which precipitate from solid solution during heat treatment. The magnetic properties of the particles are shown to depend critically on the crystallography of the solid-state transformation and particle morphology which were determined by transmission electron microscopy and diffraction.

  15. Deposition Behavior of Copper Fine Particles onto Flat Substrate Surface in Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, M.; Mashiko, M.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Cold spray is a promising process to fabricate high-quality metallic coatings. However, it is necessary to improve some properties, especially the adhesive strength of the coating to the substrate to clarify deposition mechanism of the solid particles onto substrate surface. In this study, deposition behavior of the cold sprayed copper fine particles was observed precisely and the adhesive strength of the coating was evaluated. The deposition behavior of the sprayed individual copper particles on mirror polished stainless steel substrate was fundamentally investigated. The interface microstructure between sprayed particle and substrate revealed that an amorphous-like band region was recognized at interface during coating fabrication at high power conditions. For the deposition mechanism of the cold sprayed particles onto substrate surface, it was indicated that the deformation of the particles initially induce the destruction of its surface oxide and an appearance of the active fresh surface of the material may enhance the bonding between particles and substrate. On the other hand, in coating fabrication at high power condition, bonding between particle and substrate may be possibly formed via oxygen-rich amorphous-like layer at interface.

  16. The exposure to coarse, fine and ultrafine particle emissions from concrete mixing, drilling and cutting activities.

    PubMed

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant; Mulheron, Mike

    2014-08-30

    Building activities generate coarse (PM10≤10μm), fine (PM2.5≤2.5μm) and ultrafine particles (<100nm) making it necessary to understand both the exposure levels of operatives on site and the dispersion of ultrafine particles into the surrounding environment. This study investigates the release of particulate matter, including ultrafine particles, during the mixing of fresh concrete (incorporating Portland cement with Ground Granulated Blastfurnace Slag, GGBS or Pulverised Fuel Ash, PFA) and the subsequent drilling and cutting of hardened concrete. Particles were measured in the 5-10,000nm size range using a GRIMM particle spectrometer and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS50). The mass concentrations of PM2.5-10 fraction contributed ∼52-64% of total mass released. The ultrafine particles dominated the total particle number concentrations (PNCs); being 74, 82, 95 and 97% for mixing with GGBS, mixing with PFA, drilling and cutting, respectively. Peak values measured during the drilling and cutting activities were 4 and 14 times the background. Equivalent emission factors were calculated and the total respiratory deposition dose rates for PNCs for drilling and cutting were 32.97±9.41×10(8)min(-1) and 88.25±58.82×10(8)min(-1). These are a step towards establishing number and mass emission inventories for particle exposure during construction activities. PMID:25068443

  17. Production of hydroxyl radicals from Fe-containing fine particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Ren, Ke; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Laiguo; Li, Mei; Li, Xiaoying; Yang, Jian; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei; Xu, Zhencheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from ambient fine particles has been correlated with the soluble transition metal content of PM2.5, which also has clear association with particle-mediated cardiopulmonary toxicity. Hydroxyl radical (rad OH) is the most harmful ROS species through chemical reactions of redox-active particle components. Atmospheric Fe, as the dominant species of the transition metals in the atmosphere, is associated with rad OH generation in ambient particle extracts. Our results revealed that Fe-containing particles (18,730 in total number) contributed approximately 3.7% on average to all detected particles throughout the summer and winter sampling period in Guangzhou, which was clustered into four distinct particle classes, including Fe-rich, Metal-rich, NaK-rich and Dust-rich. Fe-rich class was the dominant one with a fraction of 61%, followed by Dust-rich (14%), Metal-rich (13%). and NaK-rich (12%). The iron oxide was enriched in the Fe-rich class. rad OH generation induced by Fe-containing fine particles collected in Guangzhou (GZ) was quantified in a surrogate lung fluid (SLF), and it was found that Fe-containing fine particles were generally much reactive in generating rad OH in the presence of four antioxidants (200 μM ascorbate, 300 μM citrate, 100 μM reduced L-glutathione, and 100 μM uric acid). The annual average rad OH amount produced in our samples was 132.98 ± 27.43 nmol rad OH mg-1 PM2.5. rad OH production had a clear seasonal pattern with higher amount in summer and lower in winter. By measuring the amount of total and SLF-soluble metal in our PM2.5 samples using ICP-MS, we found that ROS activities were associated with the ionizable Fe through Fenton type reactions in the Guangzhou PM2.5. Expected burdens of PM2.5 derived rad OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily particulate matter exposure in Guangzhou is already a concern, and it could produce much higher levels of rad OH, leading to higher

  18. Production of hydroxyl radicals from Fe-containing fine particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Ren, Ke; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Laiguo; Li, Mei; Li, Xiaoying; Yang, Jian; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei; Xu, Zhencheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from ambient fine particles has been correlated with the soluble transition metal content of PM2.5, which also has clear association with particle-mediated cardiopulmonary toxicity. Hydroxyl radical (rad OH) is the most harmful ROS species through chemical reactions of redox-active particle components. Atmospheric Fe, as the dominant species of the transition metals in the atmosphere, is associated with rad OH generation in ambient particle extracts. Our results revealed that Fe-containing particles (18,730 in total number) contributed approximately 3.7% on average to all detected particles throughout the summer and winter sampling period in Guangzhou, which was clustered into four distinct particle classes, including Fe-rich, Metal-rich, NaK-rich and Dust-rich. Fe-rich class was the dominant one with a fraction of 61%, followed by Dust-rich (14%), Metal-rich (13%). and NaK-rich (12%). The iron oxide was enriched in the Fe-rich class. rad OH generation induced by Fe-containing fine particles collected in Guangzhou (GZ) was quantified in a surrogate lung fluid (SLF), and it was found that Fe-containing fine particles were generally much reactive in generating rad OH in the presence of four antioxidants (200 μM ascorbate, 300 μM citrate, 100 μM reduced L-glutathione, and 100 μM uric acid). The annual average rad OH amount produced in our samples was 132.98 ± 27.43 nmol rad OH mg-1 PM2.5. rad OH production had a clear seasonal pattern with higher amount in summer and lower in winter. By measuring the amount of total and SLF-soluble metal in our PM2.5 samples using ICP-MS, we found that ROS activities were associated with the ionizable Fe through Fenton type reactions in the Guangzhou PM2.5. Expected burdens of PM2.5 derived rad OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily particulate matter exposure in Guangzhou is already a concern, and it could produce much higher levels of rad OH, leading to higher

  19. Physicochemical characterization of fine particles from small-scale wood combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberg, Heikki; Nuutinen, Kati; Tissari, Jarkko; Ruusunen, Jarno; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Sippula, Olli; Tapanainen, Maija; Jalava, Pasi; Makkonen, Ulla; Teinilä, Kimmo; Saarnio, Karri; Hillamo, Risto; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2011-12-01

    Emissions from small-scale wood combustion appliances are of special interest since fine particles have been consistently associated with adverse health effects. It has been reported that the physicochemical characteristics of the emitted particles affect also their toxic properties but the mechanisms behind these phenomena and the causative role of particles from wood combustion sources are still mostly unknown. Combustion situations vary significantly in small-scale appliances, especially in batch combustion. Combustion behaviour is affected by fuel properties, appliance type and operational practice. Particle samples were collected from six appliances representing different combustion situations in small-scale combustion. These appliances were five wood log fuelled stoves, including one stove equipped with modern combustion technology, three different conventional combustion appliances and one sauna stove. In addition, a modern small-scale pellet boiler represented advanced continuous combustion technology. The aim of the study was to analyze gas composition and fine particle properties over different combustion situations. Fine particle (PM 1) emissions and their chemical constituents emerging from different combustion situations were compared and this physicochemical data was combined with the toxicological data on cellular responses induced by the same particles (see Tapanainen et al., 2011). There were significant differences in the particle emissions from different combustion situations. Overall, the efficient combustion in the pellet boiler produced the smallest emissions whereas inefficient batch combustion in a sauna stove created the largest emissions. Improved batch combustion with air-staging produced about 2.5-fold PM 1 emissions compared to the modern pellet boiler (50.7 mg MJ -1 and 19.7 mg MJ -1, respectively), but the difference in the total particulate PAH content was 750-fold (90 μg MJ -1 and 0.12 μg MJ -1, respectively). Improved batch

  20. The role of pH on the particle size and magnetic consequence of cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Rohollah; Ghasemi, Ali; Shoja-Razavi, Reza; Tavousi, Majid

    2015-12-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles with various size distributions were prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method at different pH condition from 8 to 13. The structural characterizations of the prepared samples were carried out using powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope. The XRD results revealed that a single cubic CoFe2O4 phase with the average crystallite sizes of about 5-24 nm were formed. Cation distribution occupancy in tetrahedral and octahedral sites were estimated by employing Rietveld refinement technique. The results showed that the whole series of samples contain a partial inverse spinel structure. FTIR measurements between 370 and 4000 cm-1 confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of spinel structure of the samples. The room temperature magnetic properties of the samples have been examined using vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that with increasing the pH of reaction, the magnetization and coercive field could be increased. The sample synthesized at pH~8 and 9 showed superparamagnetic behavior and highest coercive field up to 650 Oe is attributed to the sample synthesized with pH~13.

  1. Comparison of physicochemical properties between fine (PM2.5) and coarse airborne particles at cold season in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Oh, Jungsun; Han, Weon Shik; Chon, Chul-Min; Kwon, Youngsang; Kim, Do Yeon; Shin, Woosik

    2016-01-15

    Although it has been well-known that atmospheric aerosols affect negatively the local air quality, human health, and climate changes, the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols are not fully understood yet. This study experimentally measured the physiochemical characteristics of fine and coarse aerosol particles at the suburban area to evaluate relative contribution to environmental pollution in consecutive seasons of autumn and winter, 2014-2015, using XRD, SEM-EDX, XNI, ICP-MS, and TOF-SIMS. For these experimental works, the fine and coarse aerosols were collected by the high volume air sampler for 7 days each season. The fine particles contain approximately 10 μg m(-3) of carbonaceous aerosols consisting of 90% organic and 10% elemental carbon. The spherical-shape carbonaceous particles were observed for the coarse samples as well. Interestingly, the coarse particles in winter showed the increased frequency of carbon-rich particles with high contents of heavy metals. These results suggest that, for the cold season, the coarse particles could contribute relatively more to the conveyance of toxic contaminants compared to the fine particles in the study area. However, the fine particles showed acidic properties so that their deposition to surface may cause facilitate the increase of mobility for toxic heavy metals in soil and groundwater environments. The fine and coarse particulate matters, therefore, should be monitored separately with temporal variation to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols to environmental pollution and human health. PMID:26476059

  2. An observational study of the atmospheric ultra-fine particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, C.; Ondov, J.; Tzanis, C.; Öztürk, F.; Nelson, M.; Ke, H.; Christodoulakis, J.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents results derived from ultra-fine particle observations conducted in urban and semi-rural areas of the Athens basin in Greece. Aerosol particle size spectra were collected at 2.5-min time resolution with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer for approximately two months, along with standard meteorological, NO, NO2 and O3 measurements. The results obtained showed that a 10-fold less maximum number concentration of the mean spectrum was noticed at the semi-rural site compared with that at the urban site. The corresponding maximum for the median spectrum of urban site was only 20% less, indicating that extreme cases had little effect, at least in maximum mean concentration of 9.8 nm particles. The largest number concentration maximum in the mean size distribution spectrum for each area occurred at a modal diameter ≤9.8 nm. For particles ≥13.4 nm, the mean spectrum for Patision contained prominent accumulation particle populations at number median diameters of 13.4, 29.7, and 43.7 nm. In contrast, the major features of the accumulation region of the mean semi-rural spectrum were fit with 5 distribution functions of nearly the same amplitude. The most dominant feature occurred at a number median diameter of 70.1 nm, and thus substantially greater than the 43.7 nm most-dominant in the mean urban spectrum. High ultra-fine particle concentrations at the urban site generally coincided with periods of high NO concentrations and were well correlated with benzene, signifying emissions from motor vehicles.

  3. Contrasting macrophage activation by fine and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles is associated with different uptake mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of (nano)particles may lead to pulmonary inflammation. However, the precise mechanisms of particle uptake and generation of inflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages (AM) are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between particles and AM and their associated pro-inflammatory effects in relation to particle size and physico-chemical properties. NR8383 rat lung AM were treated with ultrafine (uf), fine (f) TiO2 or fine crystalline silica (DQ12 quartz). Physico-chemical particle properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis and thermogravimetry. Aggregation and agglomeration tendency of the particles were determined in assay-specific suspensions by means of dynamic light scattering. All three particle types were rapidly taken up by AM. DQ12 and ufTiO2 , but not fTiO2 , caused increased extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) mRNA expression and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased most strongly by ufTiO2 , while DQ12 exclusively triggered interleukin (IL) 1β release. However, oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration and increased intracellular ROS were observed with all three samples. Uptake inhibition experiments with cytochalasin D, chlorpromazine and a Fcγ receptor II (FcγRII) antibody revealed that the endocytosis of fTiO2 by the macrophages involves actin-dependent phagocytosis and macropinocytosis as well as clathrin-coated pit formation, whereas the uptake of ufTiO2 was dominated by FcγIIR. The uptake of DQ12 was found to be significantly reduced by all three inhibitors. Our findings suggest that the contrasting AM responses to fTiO2 , ufTiO2 and DQ12 relate to differences in the involvement of specific uptake mechanisms. PMID:21995556

  4. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a. PMID:25766014

  5. Removal of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments by the unipolar ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Lee, Byung; Yermakov, Mikhail; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2004-09-01

    The continuous emission of unipolar ions was evaluated in order to determine its ability to remove fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments. The evolution of the indoor aerosol concentration and particle size distribution was measured in real time with the ELPI in a room-size (24.3 m3) test chamber where the ion emitter was operating. After the results were compared with the natural decay, the air cleaning factor was determined. The particle aerodynamic size range of ∼0.04-2 μm was targeted because it represents many bioaerosol agents that cause emerging diseases, as well as those that can be used for biological warfare or in the event of bioterrorism. The particle electric charge distribution (also measured in the test chamber with the ELPI) was rapidly affected by the ion emission. It was concluded that the corona discharge ion emitters (either positive or negative), which are capable of creating an ion density of 105-106 e± cm-3, can be efficient in controlling fine and ultrafine aerosol pollutants in indoor air environments, such as a typical office or residential room. At a high ion emission rate, the particle mobility becomes sufficient so that the particle migration results in their deposition on the walls and other indoor surfaces. Within the tested ranges of the particle size and ion density, the particles were charged primarily due to the diffusion charging mechanism. The particle removal efficiency was not significantly affected by the particle size, while it increased with increasing ion emission rate and the time of emission. The performance characteristics of three commercially available ionic air purifiers, which produce unipolar ions by corona discharge at relatively high emission rates, were evaluated. A 30-minute operation of the most powerful device among those tested resulted in the removal of about 97% of 0.1 μm particles and about 95% of 1 μm particles from the air in addition to the natural decay effect.

  6. Composition of fine and ultrafine particles and source identification by stable isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Jec-Kong

    Fine (da < 2.1 μm) and ultra-fine (da < 0.1μm) atmosphere particulate samples collected from two sites in the United States were analyzed for elemental compositions by Instrumental, Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The eastern site samples were collected at the Great Smoky Mountain National Park from July 15 to August 25, 1995. The western site samples were collected from a rooftop in Pasadena, California over one winter month in January/February, 1996. Elemental concentrations determined by INAA for the eastern site samples were compared with results from samples (da < 2.4 μm) collected concurrently but analyzed by other techniques. The results showed consistency between different analytical techniques. Factor Analysis (FA) and Absolute Factor Score-Multiple Linear Regression (AFS-MLR) methods were used to identify sources and their contributions to fine particulate samples at the eastern site. The results showed that the crustal contribution to fine aerosol mass was significant around July 24-26, 1995, and the coal combustion contribution peaked around August 14-18, 1995. The average contribution from crustal sources to the fine particulate mass was 7 +/- 3% for the 2.1 μm samples and 11 +/- 4% for the 2.4 μm samples. The mass difference may be due to the different maximum size of the particles. The average contribution from combustion sources was 77 +/- 4% for the 2.1 μm samples and 90 +/- 6% for the 2.4 μm samples. Elemental patterns were used to identify sources of ultra-fine particles. Motor vehicle emissions might be the cause of the increase in the ultra-fine particle concentration of Al and Fe at the western site. Variations in stable isotope ratios of 130Ba/138 Ba, 121Sb/123Sb, 84Sr/ 86Sr and 79Br/81Br were investigated using INAA. This technique was applied to fine particulate samples with sources identified by FA. The results showed that the 130Ba/ 138Ba ratio of the dust sample was 0.00151 +/- 0

  7. Composition and Sources of Fine and Coarse Particles Collected during 2002–2010 in Boston, MA

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Shahir; Kang, Choong-Min; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the sources, composition, and temporal variability of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particles is a crucial component in understanding PM toxicity and establishing proper PM regulations. In this study, a Harvard Impactor was used to collect daily integrated fine and coarse particle samples every third day for nine years at a single site in Boston, MA. A total of 1,960 filters were analyzed for elements, black carbon (BC), and total PM mass. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to identify source types and quantify their contributions to ambient PM2.5 and PM2.5-10. BC and 17 elements were identified as the main constituents in our samples. Results showed that BC, S, and Pb were associated exclusively with the fine particle mode, while 84% of V and 79% of Ni were associated with this mode. Elements mostly found in the coarse mode, over 80%, included Ca, Mn (road dust), and Cl (sea salt). PMF identified six source types for PM2.5 and three source types for PM2.5-10. Source types for PM2.5 included regional pollution, motor vehicles, sea salt, crustal/road dust, oil combustion, and wood burning. Regional pollution contributed the most, accounting for 48% of total PM2.5 mass, followed by motor vehicles (21%) and wood burning (19%). Source types for PM2.5-10 included crustal/road dust (62%), motor vehicles (22%), and sea salt (16%). A linear decrease in PM concentrations with time was observed for both fine (−5.2%/yr) and coarse (−3.6%/yr) particles. The fine-mode trend was mostly related to oil combustion and regional pollution contributions. Average PM2.5 concentrations peaked in summer (10.4 μg/m3) while PM2.5-10 concentrations were lower and demonstrated little seasonal variability. The findings of this study show that PM25 is decreasing more sharply than PM2.5-10 over time. This suggests the increasing importance of PM2.5-10 and traffic-related sources for PM exposure and future policies. PMID:25947125

  8. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  9. The size dependence of chloride depletion in fine and coarse sea-salt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Fang, Ming; Chan, Chak K.

    The size dependence of the percentage of chloride depletion (%Cl dep) in sea-salt aerosols was investigated using 16 sets of 48-96 h size distribution measurements of atmospheric aerosols, collected from June 2000 to May 2001 in Hong Kong. Chloride and sodium in HK are predominantly from sea-salt aerosols because the prevailing wind is from the sea. In the particles larger than 1.8 μm (coarse particles), the %Cl dep generally decreased with increasing particle size, consistent with the literature. In the particles smaller than 1.8 μm (fine particles), the mode diameter of %Cl dep was associated with the mode diameter of sulfate in the droplet mode. When the sulfate peak appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm, the %Cl dep peaked at 0.54-1.0 μm. Heterogeneous reactions between sea-salt particles and acidic gases are the major routes of the sulfate formation and chloride depletion, leading to a decrease in the %Cl dep with increasing particle size. When the sulfate peak appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm, the maximum %Cl dep appeared at 1.0-1.8 μm and the %Cl dep increased with increasing particle size in the fine mode. Both heterogeneous reactions and in-cloud processes occurred to form sulfate and to deplete chloride. However, heterogeneous reactions, sampling artifacts, and anthropogenic emissions of chloride cannot explain this observed size dependence. Cloud processing including the activation of sea-salt particles with subsequent SO 42- formation, the neutralization by NH 3 and the evaporation of HCl in conjunction with NH 3 during water evaporation from cloud droplets can cause chloride depletion in the droplet mode. The smaller amount of evaporation of NH 3 and HCl from cloud droplets in forming the 0.54-1.0 μm particles than the 1.0-1.8 μm particles can account for the observed size dependence of %Cl dep although direct evidence based on cloud measurements is not available.

  10. Tribological Properties of Aluminum Alloy treated by Fine Particle Peening/DLC Hybrid Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Y.; Nanbu, H.; Kameyama, Y.; Komotori, J.

    2010-06-01

    In order to improve the adhesiveness of the DLC coating, Fine Particle Peening (FPP) treatment was employed as pre-treatment of the DLC coating process. FPP treatment was performed using SiC shot particles, and then AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was DLC-coated. A SiC-rich layer was formed around the surface of the aluminum alloy by the FPP treatment because small chips of shot particles were embedded into the substrate surface. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted to measure the friction coefficients. While the DLC coated specimen without FPP treatment showed a sudden increase in friction coefficient at the early stage of the wear cycles, the FPP/DLC hybrid treated specimen maintained a low friction coefficient value during the test period. Further investigation revealed that the tribological properties of the substrate after the DLC coating were improved with an increase in the amount of Si at the surface.

  11. Benthic biofilm structure controls the deposition-resuspension dynamics of fine clay particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, W. R.; Roche, K. R.; Drummond, J. D.; Boano, F.; Packman, A. I.; Battin, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In fluvial ecosystems the alternation of deposition and resuspension of particles represents an important pathway for the downstream translocation of microbes and organic matter. Such particles can originate from algae and microbes, the spontaneous auto-aggregation of organic macromolecules (e.g., "river sown"), terrestrial detritus (traditionally classified as "particulate organic matter"), and erosive mineral and organo-mineral particles. The transport and retention of particles in headwater streams is associated with biofilms, which are surface-attached microbial communities. Whilst biofilm-particle interactions have been studied in bulk, a mechanistic understanding of these processes is lacking. Parallel macroscale/microscale observations are required to unravel the complex feedbacks between biofilm structure, coverage and the dynamics of deposition and resuspension. We used recirculating flume mesocosms to test how changes in biofilm structure affected the deposition and resuspension of clay-sized (< 10 μm) particles. Biofilms were grown in replicate 3-m-long recirculating flumes over variable lengths of time (0, 14, 21, 28, and 35) days. Fixed doses of fluorescent clay-sized particles were introduced to each flume and their deposition was traced over 30 minutes. A flood event was then simulated via a step increase in flowrate to quantify particle resuspension. 3D Optical Coherence Tomography was used to determine roughness, areal coverage and height of biofilms in each flume. From these measurements we characterised particle deposition and resuspension rates, using continuous time random walk modelling techniques, which we then tested as responses to changes in biofilm coverage and structure under both base-flow and flood-flow scenarios. Our results suggest that biofilm structural complexity is a primary control upon the retention and downstream transport of fine particles in stream mesocosms.

  12. XRF-analysis of fine and ultrafine particles emitted from laser printing devices.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Mathias; Pedan, Vasilisa; Hahn, Oliver; Rothhardt, Monika; Bresch, Harald; Jann, Oliver; Seeger, Stefan

    2011-09-15

    In this work, the elemental composition of fine and ultrafine particles emitted by ten different laser printing devices (LPD) is examined. The particle number concentration time series was measured as well as the particle size distributions. In parallel, emitted particles were size-selectively sampled with a cascade impactor and subsequently analyzed by the means of XRF. In order to identify potential sources for the aerosol's elemental composition, materials involved in the printing process such as toner, paper, and structural components of the printer were also analyzed. While the majority of particle emissions from laser printers are known to consist of recondensated semi volatile organic compounds, elemental analysis identifies Si, S, Cl, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Fe as well as traces of Ni and Zn in different size fractions of the aerosols. These elements can mainly be assigned to contributions from toner and paper. The detection of elements that are likely to be present in inorganic compounds is in good agreement with the measurement of nonvolatile particles. Quantitative measurements of solid particles at 400 °C resulted in residues of 1.6 × 10(9) and 1.5 × 10(10) particles per print job, representing fractions of 0.2% and 1.9% of the total number of emitted particles at room temperature. In combination with the XRF results it is concluded that solid inorganic particles contribute to LPD emissions in measurable quantities. Furthermore, for the first time Br was detected in significant concentrations in the aerosol emitted from two LPD. The analysis of several possible sources identified the plastic housings of the fuser units as main sources due to substantial Br concentrations related to brominated flame retardants. PMID:21809840

  13. 78 FR 55225 - Determination of Attainment for the Chico Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Fine Particle Implementation Rule'' (72 FR 20586, April 25, 2007) and the ``Implementation of the New... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Determination of Attainment for the Chico Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine... Executive Order Reviews I. Summary of EPA's Proposed Action On October 30, 2012 (77 FR 65651), EPA...

  14. Ambient exposure to coarse and fine particle emissions from building demolition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-07-01

    Demolition of buildings produce large quantities of particulate matter (PM) that could be inhaled by on-site workers and people living in the neighbourhood, but studies assessing ambient exposure at the real-world demolition sites are limited. We measured concentrations of PM10 (≤10 μm), PM2.5 (≤2.5 μm) and PM1 (≤1 μm) along with local meteorology for 54 working hours over the demolition period. The measurements were carried out at (i) a fixed-site in the downwind of demolished building, (ii) around the site during demolition operation through mobile monitoring, (iii) different distances away from the demolition site through sequential monitoring, and (iv) inside an excavator vehicle cabin and on-site temporary office for engineers. Position of the PM instrument was continuously recorded using a Global Positioning System on a second basis during mobile measurements. Fraction of coarse particles (PM2.5-10) contributed 89 (with mean particle mass concentration, PMC ≈ 133 ± 17 μg m-3), 83 (100 ± 29 μg m-3), and 70% (59 ± 12 μg m-3) of total PMC during the fixed-site, mobile monitoring and sequential measurements, respectively, compared with only 50% (mean 12 ± 6 μg m-3) during the background measurements. The corresponding values for fine particles (PM2.5) were 11, 17 and 30% compared with 50% during background, showing a much greater release of coarse particles during demolition. The openair package in R and map source software (ArcGIS) were used to assess spatial variation of PMCs in downwind and upwind of the demolition site. A modified box model was developed to determine the emission factors, which were 210, 73 and 24 μg m-2 s-1 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The average respiratory deposited doses to coarse (and fine) particles inside the excavator cabin and on-site temporary office increased by 57- (and 5-) and 13- (and 2-) times compared with the local background level, respectively. The monitoring stations in downwind direction

  15. Fine-particle magnetic granulometry in an ash-flow tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Jackson, M. J.; Rosenbaum, J. G.; Solheid, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff at Yucca Mountain in the southwestern U.S. is a welded ashflow deposit containing nanoscale Fe-oxide grains that approximate ideal assemblages of narrowly sized non-interacting magnetic particles. The low-impurity magnetite microcrystals exsolved from volcanic glass in the basal 5 m section of the tuff and display a continuous variation in grain size with stratigraphic height due to differential cooling rates in the unit. These rocks can potentially serve as useful reference material for determining fine magnetic particle grain size from size-sensitive magnetic properties in environmental and rock magnetic studies. A detailed magnetic characterization of this section revealed a distinctive magnetic signature at each stratigraphic level in the section corresponding to different grain-size distributions, with salient transitions in room temperature magnetic susceptibility and remanence that denote the spatial limits of stable single domain behavior. The progression in magnetic grain size and domain state from superparamagnetic grains near the base to pseudo-single domain grains near the top of the section, inferred from fundamental magnetic properties, are also indicated by thermal fluctuation tomography as well as previous electron microscope observations. These rocks constitute a unique natural example of weakly interacting fine magnetic particle assemblages that display clear grain-size-dependent magnetic properties over a broad range of grain sizes.

  16. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical report, May 9, 1991--August 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  17. Source apportionment of fine particles in Tennessee using a source-oriented model.

    PubMed

    Doraiswamy, Prakash; Davis, Wayne T; Miller, Terry L; Fu, Joshua S

    2007-04-01

    Source apportionment of fine particles (PM2.5, particulate matter < 2 microm in aerodynamic diameter) is important to identify the source categories that are responsible for the concentrations observed at a particular receptor. Although receptor models have been used to do source apportionment, they do not fully take into account the chemical reactions (including photochemical reactions) involved in the formation of secondary fine particles. Secondary fine particles are formed from photochemical and other reactions involving precursor gases, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ammonia, and volatile organic compounds. This paper presents the results of modeling work aimed at developing a source apportionment of primary and secondary PM2.5. On-road mobile source and point source inventories for the state of Tennessee were estimated and compiled. The national emissions inventory for the year 1999 was used for the other states. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Models3/Community Multi-Scale Air Quality modeling system was used for the photochemical/secondary particulate matter modeling. The modeling domain consisted of a nested 36-12-4-km domain. The 4-km domain covered the entire state of Tennessee. The episode chosen for the modeling runs was August 29 to September 9, 1999. This paper presents the approach used and the results from the modeling and attempts to quantify the contribution of major source categories, such as the on-road mobile sources (including the fugitive dust component) and coal-fired power plants, to observed PM2.5 concentrations in Tennessee. The results of this work will be helpful in policy issues targeted at designing control strategies to meet the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards in Tennessee. PMID:17458460

  18. High volume electrostatic field-sampler for collection of fine particle bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Sharma, Anoop; Wallin, Håkan; Alstrup Jensen, Keld

    A high volume electrostatic field-sampler was developed for collection of fine particles, which easily can be recovered for subsequent sample characterisation and bioassays. The sampler was based on a commercial office air cleaner and consisted of a prefilter followed by electrostatic collection plates operating at 2.7 kV. The sampler performance was characterised for 26 nm to 5.4 μm-size particles in urban street air. The collection efficiency reached a maximum (60-70%) between 0.2 and 0.8 μm and dropped to ˜25% at 30 nm and 2.5 μm, respectively. After extraction in water, the particle loss was<2%. The extraction efficiency for dry lyophilised particulate matter was above 80%, allowing retrievement of ˜12 mg day -1 in urban street air at PM 10 levels of ˜24 μg m -3. The ozone generating capacity of the corona discharge during operation was on the order of 10 ppb. A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) degradation test using benzo[a]pyrene as a model showed that ˜85% was degraded after 24 h. However, similar results were observed when the corona discharge was switched off. Hence, the ozone and other corona discharge reactants do not appear to contribute considerably to PAH-degradation. The overall results show that the sampler type is a promising alternative to traditional sampling of fine particles for bulk analysis and bioassays. The main advantages are simple operation, high stability, high quantifiable particle recovery rates and low cost.

  19. Source characterization of fine and coarse particles at the East Mediterranean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Yaacov; Perrino, Cinzia; Yossef, Osnat; Catrambone, Maria

    Fine and coarse atmospheric particles were collected in Ashdod—a midsize industrial city on the southeastern Mediterranean coast, and in Gedera—a rural site, to characterize ambient particles and to determine their long-range transport during two major seasons—winter and summer. Manual PM2.5 and PM10 samplers, dichotomous samplers, continuous automated PM10 samplers, and denuders were used to sample particulate and gaseous pollutants. Fine and coarse concentrations in Ashdod were 21.2 and 39.6 μg m -3, and 23.9 and 30.5 μg m -3 in the fall-winter and summer campaigns, respectively. Crustal material, as calcites or dolomites mixed with silicates, dominated the coarse fraction and also the fine fraction on dusty days. In the fall-winter, S, P, and Ni were coupled with minerals. Coarse Ni was associated with crustal material during dust storms, while P originated from shipping and deposition of phosphates in the urban area around. Sulfates dominated the fine fractions in the summer season averaging 12 μg m -3. Multivariate analysis indicated that S was associated with As and Se, V and Ni, both associated with heavy fuel combustion, and Zn and Pb. In winter, those mixed sources were local, but in summer they were part of long-range transport. In the fall-winter, Zn and Pb were strongly associated with Mn, Ga, and Cu—elements emitted from either traffic or metal processing plants. Although the influence of crustal material on both size fractions was significant, most heavy metals were associated with PM2.5. Higher concentrations were linked to a larger number of particles in this fraction, to a larger surface area available for biochemical reaction [Harrison, R., Shi, J., Xi, S., Khan, A., Mark, D., Kinnersley, R., Yin, J., Philos, T., 2000. Measurement of number, mass and size distribution of particles in the atmosphere. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 358, 2567-2579], and finally to a larger concern in regards to health effects.

  20. The Contribution of Fine Particle Sulfates to Light Scattering in ST. Louis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossler, Teri Lynn

    In this study the extent to which sulfates produce visibility reduction in the St. Louis area was examined. The contribution of fine aerosol sulfates to total light scattering was calculated from measured sulfur size distributions and Mie theory of light scattering. The aerosol was collected during both a summer and a winter season. Short sampling intervals (10 minutes to 3 hours) permitted observation of the fine structure of the sulfur size distribution and concentration, and involved only small changes in meteorology. Size separation was accomplished with an 8 stage low pressure impactor which yielded size fractions in the range of 4 (mu)m (GREATERTHEQ) d (GREATERTHEQ) 0.05 (mu)m. Elemental sulfur was measured by flash volatilization and flame photometric detection. All fine sulfur was assumed to be in the form of (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4). Water which might be associated with this deliquescent aerosol was estimated. The measured light scattering coefficient, b(,scat), and (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4) were extremely well correlated (r = 0.97) in the summer, but not as well correlated (r = 0.63) in the winter. Conversely, b(,scat) and non-sulfate fine mass were well correlated (r = 0.85) in the winter, but poorly correlated (r = 0.24) in the summer. The light scattering efficiency of (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4) plus associated water calculated from Mie theory and size distributions was 4.2 m('2)/g for the summer aerosol, but only 2.0 m('2)/g for the dry winter (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4). Two basic types of sulfur size distributions were observed. The most common type observed during the summer had a major sulfur mass peak between 0.5 (mu)m and 1.0 (mu)m in diameter. This size particle scatters light more efficiently than other particles. Its prevalence in the summer aerosol accounts for the high scattering efficiency of sulfates in the summer aerosol when compared to winter sulfate aerosol, which did not have such prominent mass peaks between 0.5 (mu)m and 1.0 (mu)m in diameter. Calculation of

  1. [Influence of nanosize particles of cobalt ferrite on contractile responses of smooth muscle segment of airways].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaĭtseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; D'iakova, E Iu; Petlina, Z R; Ogorodova, L M; Ageev, B G; Magaeva, A A; Itin, V I; Terekhova, O G; Medvedev, M A

    2012-02-01

    Contractile responses of airways segments of porpoises inhaling nanopowder CoFe2O4 were stidued by means of a mechanographic method. Inhalation of the nanosize particles of CoFe2O4 in vivo and in vitro testing the nanomaterial on isolated smooth muscles led to potentiation histaminergic, cholinergic contractile activity in airways of porpoises and to strengthening of adrenergic relaxing answers. Nanosize particles vary amplitude of hyperpotassium reductions in smooth muscle segments of airways similarly to the effect of depolymerizing drug colchicine. PMID:22650066

  2. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The program objective is to generate ultra-fine catalyst particles (20 to 400 {Angstrom} in size) and quantify their potential for improving coal dissolution in the solubilization stage of two-stage catalytic-catalytic liquefaction systems. It has been shown that catalyst activity increases significantly with decreasing particle size for particle sizes in the submicron range. Ultra-fine catalyst particle generation will be accomplished using a novel two-step process. First, the severe conditions produced by a supercritical fluid (e.g., supercritical H{sub 2}O or CO{sub 2}) will be used to dissolve suitable catalyst compounds (e.g., Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeS{sub 2}, and/or Fe(CO){sub 5}). Sulfur containing compounds may be added to the supercritical solvent during catalyst dissolution to enhance the catalytic activity of the resulting ultra-fine, iron based, catalyst particles.

  3. Accretion of Fine Particles: Sticking Probability Estimated by Optical Sizing of Fractal Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, N.; Higuchi, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Sticking probability of fine particles is an important parameter that determines (1) the settling of fine particles to the equatorial plane of the solar nebula and hence the formation of planetesimals, and (2) the thermal structure of the nebula, which is dependent on the particle size through opacity. It is generally agreed that the sticking probability is 1 for submicrometer particles, but at sizes larger than 1 micrometer, there exist almost no data on the sticking probability. A recent study [1] showed that aggregates (with radius from 0.2 to 2 mm) did not stick when collided at a speed of 0.15 to 4 m/s. Therefore, somewhere between 1 micrometer and 200 micrometers, sticking probabilities of fine particles change from nearly 1 to nearly 0. We have been studying [2,3] sticking probabilities of dust aggregates in this size range using an optical sizing method. The optical sizing method has been well established for spherical particles. This method utilizes the fact that the smaller the size, the larger the angle of the scattered light. For spheres with various sizes, the size distribution is determined by solving Y(i) = M(i,j)X(j), where Y(i) is the scattered light intensity at angle i, X(j) is the number density of spheres with size j, and M(i,j) is the scattering matrix, which is determined by Mie theory. Dust aggregates, which we expect to be present in the early solar nebula, are not solid spheres, but probably have a porous fractal structure. For such aggregates the scattering matrix M(i,j) must be determined by taking account of all the interaction among constituent particles (discrete dipole approximation). Such calculation is possible only for very small aggregates, and for larger aggregates we estimate the scattering matrix by extrapolation, assuming that the fractal nature of the aggregates allows such extrapolation. In the experiments using magnesium oxide fine particles floating in a chamber at ambient pressure, the size distribution (determined by

  4. Reduction of fine particle emissions from wood combustion with optimized condensing heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Gröhn, Arto; Suonmaa, Valtteri; Auvinen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2009-08-15

    In this study, we designed and built a condensing heat exchanger capable of simultaneous fine particle emission reduction and waste heat recovery. The deposition mechanisms inside the heat exchanger prototype were maximized using a computer model which was later compared to actual measurements. The main deposition mechanisms were diffusio- and thermophoresis which have previously been examined in similar conditions only separately. The obtained removal efficiency in the experiments was measured in the total number concentration and ranged between 26 and 40% for the given pellet stove and the heat exchanger. Size distributions and number concentrations were measured with a TSI Fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The computer model predicts that there exists a specific upper limit for thermo- and diffusiophoretic deposition for each temperature and water vapor concentration in the flue gas. PMID:19746724

  5. Influence of milling time on fineness of Centella Asiatica particle size produced using planetary ball mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhan, M. Z.; Ahmad, R.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2012-11-01

    Centella Asiatica (C. Asiatica)contains asiaticoside as bioactive constituent which can be potentially used in skin healing process. Unfortunately, the normal powders are difficult to be absorbed by the body effectively. In order to improve the value of use, nano C. Asiatica powder was prepared. The influence of milling time was carried out at 0.5, 2, 4, 6, 8 hours and 10 hours. The effect of ball milling at different times was characterized using particles size analysis and FTIR Spectroscopy. The fineness of ground product was evaluated by recording the z-Average (nm), undersize distribution and polydispersity index (PdI). The results show that the smallest size particles by mean is 233 nm while FTIR spectra shows that there is no changing in the major component in the C. Asiatica powders with milling time.

  6. Source appointment of fine particle number and volume concentration during severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yuesi; Hu, Bo; Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; Wu, Fangkun; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-04-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, particle number size distribution (PNSD) and particle chemical composition (PCC) data collected in an intensive winter campaign in an urban site of Beijing were used to investigate the sources of ambient fine particles. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resolved a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, combustion factors, secondary aerosol, two accumulation mode aerosol factors, road dust, and long-range transported (LRT) dust. Traffic emissions (54 %) and combustion aerosol (27 %) were found to be the most important sources for particle number concentration, whereas combustion aerosol (33 %) and accumulation mode aerosol (37 %) dominated particle volume concentrations. Chemical compositions and sources of fine particles changed dynamically in the haze episodes. An enhanced role of secondary inorganic species was observed in the formation of haze pollution. Regional transport played an important role for high particles, contribution of which was on average up to 24-49 % during the haze episodes. Secondary aerosols from urban background presented the largest contributions (45 %) for the rapid increase of fine particles in the severest haze episode. In addition, the invasion of LRT dust aerosols further elevated the fine particles during the extreme haze episode. Our results showed a clear impact of regional transport on the local air pollution, suggesting the importance of regional-scale emission control measures in the local air quality management of Beijing. PMID:26667647

  7. Characterization of Source Signatures of Fine Roadway Particles by Pyrolysis-GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergen, S. K.; Holmén, B. A.

    2001-12-01

    Fine particulate matter, defined as particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μ m (PM2.5), is of growing concern due to its detrimental effects on human health and the environment. Roadway traffic generates a significant fraction of PM2.5 in urban areas. Since exposure to fine particles derived from mobile sources commonly occurs, understanding the physicochemical processes that contribute to the generation, transport and atmospheric reactivity of roadway PM is important. Factors that influence the properties of roadway PM include: the mass, number and size distribution of the particles as well as their chemical composition. These factors are partially determined by the sources of the roadway particles. The focus of this effort is to identify unique organic chemical profiles of known roadway sources of PM using a new rapid characterization technique. A pyrolysis GC-MS analytical method is being developed to uniquely characterize the sources of roadway PM2.5 such as brake dust, tire wear, and direct emissions from diesel and gasoline engines. The source profiles will be used in conjunction with measurements of the composition of ambient roadway PM to determine the importance of the various roadway sources. The advantages of this technique over conventional solvent extractions include: smaller (mg) sample mass requirements, short extraction times and minimal sample handing. Preliminary two-step pyrolysis results will be presented for PM samples from individual sources and an ambient roadway. Specific analytical issues that will be discussed include: modifications of commercial pyrolysis hardware to improve reproducibility; desorption versus pyrolysis; developing appropriate pyrolysis programs for heterogenous sample materials; and method detection limits.

  8. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of gas-to-particle conversion between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Bok-Haeng

    Since 1990, the population of hogs in eastern North Carolina has increased sharply resulting in increased emissions of ammonia. An Annular Denuder System (ADS) was used, which consisted of a cyclone separator, two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively, and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series. The ADS measured ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in ambient atmosphere at a commercial hog farm in Eastern North Carolina from April 1998 to March 1999. The sodium carbonate coated denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 mug/m 3 HCl (+/-0.20 mug/m3); 1.10 mug/m 3 HONO (+/-1.17 mug/m3); 1.14 mug/m 3 HNO3 (+/-0.81 mug/m3), and 1.61 mug/m 3 SO2 (+/-1.58 mug/m3). The citric acid coated denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 mug/m 3 NH3 (+/-15.03 mug/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol (i.e., fine particular matter, Dp ≤ 2.5 mum) concentrations of 1.64 mug/m3 NH4+ (+/-1.26 mug/m3); 0.26 mug/m3 Cl - (+/-0.69 mug/m3); 1.92 mug/m 3 NO3- (+/-1.09 mug/m 3), and 3.18 mug/m3 SO42- (+/-3.12 mug/m3). Using the data collected from the study sites, we evaluated the seasonal variations and the effects of relative humidity on fine particle species. Based on the measurements of ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles, the mean pseudo-first-order rate constant, kS, between NH3 and H2SO4 aerosol is estimated to be 3.70 (+/-2.99) x 10-3 sec-1. The rate constant was found to increase as temperature increases, and decrease with increasing relative humidity. The equilibrium time constant was determined based on the estimated kinetic rate constants and the observed inorganic components of atmospheric aerosols. The average value of equilibrium time constant was determined to be 17.01 (+/-12.19) minutes for ambient equilibrium time between ammonia, nitric acid gas and ammonium nitrate aerosol; and 10.83 (+/-8.97) minutes for ammonia, hydrochloric acid, and ammonium chloride. The aerosol

  9. Structure analysis and magnetic properties of nano-sized lithium-copper ferrite particles classified by using ultrasonic floating-sedimentation method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong; Lee, Sang Heon

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasonic floating-sedimentation (UFS) method was applied to classify nano-sized lithium-copper ferrite particles with about 30 nm in size. The nano-sized ferrite particles were prepared by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction with different initial composition ratio of lithium peroxide to copper oxide followed by mechanical milling, which combustion temperature and combustion rate at 1.0 MP of oxygen pressure were in the ranges of 870 degrees C to 930 degrees C and 4.2 to 5.5 mm sec(-1), respectively. Neutron diffraction analysis revealed that the final products of the SHS reaction with initial molar ratios of lithium peroxide to copper oxide of 0.5 and 1.0 were mainly Li0.29Cuo.61Fe,2O4 and Li0.42Cu0.58Fe2O4 with Fd3m structure, which lattice parameters were 0.8340 nm and 0.8332 nm, respectively. As the molar ratio of lithium peroxide to copper oxide increased from 0.5 to 1.0, the maximum magnetization (Ms), residual magnetization (Mr) and coercive force (iHc) were increased about 35%, 18% and 17%, respectively, which were related to non-stoichiometry of the ferrites. Complex permeability of the ferrite-rubber composites specimen decreased with the increase of frequency with peak real value of at about 0.8 GHz, and their dielectric constant were epsilon'r = 10.9 and epsilon'r" = 0.2, respectively. PMID:24205595

  10. Laser trapped single fine particle as a probe of plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Daisuke; Soejima, Masahiro; Ito, Teppei; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Here we report evaluation of electron density and temperature using optically trapped single fine particle. Experiments were carried out with a radio frequency low pressure plasma reactor, where we set two quartz windows as top and bottom flanges to irradiate an infrared laser light of 1064 nm wavelength from the bottom side. Ar plasmas were generated between a powered ring-electrode set at the bottom of the reactor and a grounded mesh placed at the center of the reactor at 100 Pa by applying 13.56 MHz voltage. The particles injected into the plasmas were monodisperse methyl methacrylate-polymer spheres of 10 μm in diameter. A negatively charged particle, which is suspended plasma sheath boundary, was trapped at the focal point of the irradiated laser light due to the transfer of momentum from the scattering of incident photons. At the beginning of the trapping, particle of 10 μm in size was trapped above 505 μm from the bottom window. After 230 min, the size and position were 9.56 μm and 520 μm, respectively. From the results, the electron density and temperature are deduced to be 1.7×109 cm-3 and 1.9 eV.

  11. Environmental and health impacts of fine and ultrafine metallic particles: assessment of threat scores.

    PubMed

    Goix, Sylvaine; Lévêque, Thibaut; Xiong, Tian-Tian; Schreck, Eva; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Geret, Florence; Uzu, Gaëlle; Austruy, Annabelle; Dumat, Camille

    2014-08-01

    This study proposes global threat scores to prioritize the harmfulness of anthropogenic fine and ultrafine metallic particles (FMP) emitted into the atmosphere at the global scale. (Eco)toxicity of physicochemically characterized FMP oxides for metals currently observed in the atmosphere (CdO, CuO, PbO, PbSO(4), Sb(2)O(3), and ZnO) was assessed by performing complementary in vitro tests: ecotoxicity, human bioaccessibility, cytotoxicity, and oxidative potential. Using an innovative methodology based on the combination of (eco)toxicity and physicochemical results, the following hazard classification of the particles is proposed: CdCl2~CdO>CuO>PbO>ZnO>PbSO(4)>Sb(2)O(3). Both cadmium compounds exhibited the highest threat score due to their high cytotoxicity and bioaccessible dose, whatever their solubility and speciation, suggesting that cadmium toxicity is due to its chemical form rather than its physical form. In contrast, the Sb(2)O(3) threat score was the lowest due to particles with low specific area and solubility, with no effects except a slight oxidative stress. As FMP physicochemical properties reveal differences in specific area, crystallization systems, dissolution process, and speciation, various mechanisms may influence their biological impact. Finally, this newly developed and global approach could be widely used in various contexts of pollution by complex metal particles and may improve risk management. PMID:24959986

  12. Structures and properties of Fe-C fine particles prepared by AC arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Cunye; Zhao, Baogang; Lin, Yaoqiang; Deng, Zhaojing

    1999-05-01

    Fe-C fine particles are produced by an alternating arc discharge between iron and carbon electrodes in an Ar gas atmosphere at pressures of 8, 14 and 18 kPa. The crystal structure, morphology and surface composition have been studied, respectively, by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetic properties and Curie temperatures have also been determined by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Results show that the particles are of two different crystal structures, one is hexagonal FeC and the other is cubic iron. The iron particles have a multi-layered structure composed of an α-Fe core wrapped by Fe 3O 4, FeO and FeO(OH) shells. It is found that the compositions and the specific saturation magnetization of the Fe-C particles prepared in different pressures of Ar gas are not the same, but their Curie temperatures are all 580±5°C.

  13. Fine and ultrafine particles generated during fluidized bed combustion of different solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Urciuolo, M.; Barone, A.; D'Alessio, A.; Chirone, R.

    2008-12-15

    The paper reports an experimental study carried out with a 110-mm ID fluidized bed combustor focused on the characterization of particulates formation/emission during combustion of coal and non-fossil solid fuels. Fuels included: a bituminous coal, a commercial predried and granulated sludge (GS), a refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and a biomass waste (pine seed shells). Stationary combustion experiments were carried out analyzing the fate of fuel ashes. Fly ashes collected at the combustor exhaust were characterized both in terms of particle size distribution and chemical composition, with respect to both trace and major elements. Tapping-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) technique and high-efficiency cyclone-type collector devices were used to characterize the size and morphology of the nanometric-and micronic-size fractions of fly ash emitted at the exhaust respectively. Results showed that during the combustion process: I) the size of the nanometric fraction ranges between 2 and 65 nm; ii) depending on the fuel tested, combustion-assisted attrition or the production of the primary ash particles originally present in the fuel particles, are responsible of fine particle generation. The amount in the fly ash of inorganic compounds is larger for the waste-derived fuels, reflecting the large inherent content of these compounds in the parent fuels.

  14. Insights into metals in individual fine particles from municipal solid waste using synchrotron radiation-based micro-analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yumin; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive inter-contamination with heavy metals hampers the application of biological treatment products derived from mixed or mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW). In this study, we investigated fine particles of <2mm, which are small fractions in MSW but constitute a significant component of the total heavy metal content, using bulk detection techniques. A total of 17 individual fine particles were evaluated using synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction. We also discussed the association, speciation and source apportionment of heavy metals. Metals were found to exist in a diffuse distribution with heterogeneous intensities and intense hot-spots of <10 μm within the fine particles. Zn-Cu, Pb-Fe and Fe-Mn-Cr had significant correlations in terms of spatial distribution. The overlapped enrichment, spatial association, and the mineral phases of metals revealed the potential sources of fine particles from size-reduced waste fractions (such as scraps of organic wastes or ceramics) or from the importation of other particles. The diverse sources of heavy metal pollutants within the fine particles suggested that separate collection and treatment of the biodegradable waste fraction (such as food waste) is a preferable means of facilitating the beneficial utilization of the stabilized products. PMID:25597689

  15. Incipient flow properties of two-component fine powder mixtures: Changing the flowability of smaller particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takehiro; Elliott, James A.

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the flow properties of two-component fine powder systems with micrometre-sized constituents is important for the quality control of electrophotographic printing applications such as photocopiers. In previous work, we studied the incipient flow properties of model powder mixtures of large (d50 ˜ 70 μm) and small (d50 ˜ 6-8 μm) particles under a consolidation stress of 2 kPa, and reported that they were strongly related to the properties of the small particles where the volume ratio of small powder (xs) exceeds ˜0.1 [1]. In this follow-up study, we examine the effect of changing the flowability of the smaller components on the structure and flow properties of the binary mixtures. For the smaller particles, we used poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) microspheres (d50 = 7.84 μm). The particle surfaces were modified by adding silica nanoparticles in order to prepare PS-DVB powders with a range of flowabilities. These were then mixed with glass ballotini (d50 = 71.9 μm), and the flow properties of these mixtures were evaluated using the shear testing technique. The cohesion of the mixtures showed essentially the same trend as reported in [1] in terms of their dependence on xs and was related to the number of contacts between the PS-DVB particles. Also, it was strongly dependent on the cohesion of the PS-DVB powders despite a very small xs (xs < 0.01). As for the internal angle of friction, although its value for each PS-DVB powder was similar, it also showed a correlation with the number of contacts between PS-DVB particles.

  16. The impact of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fine particles on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Dejmek, J; Solanský, I; Benes, I; Lenícek, J; Srám, R J

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and exposure to particulate matter [less than/equal to] 10 microm (PM(10)) and particulate matter [less than and equal to] 2.5 microm (PM(2.5))( )in early pregnancy was recently studied in the highly polluted district of Teplice (Northern Bohemia). From this observation rose the question about the possible role of the carcinogenic fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs), which are usually bound to fine particles. The impact of c-PAHs and fine particles on IUGR was analyzed in Teplice and in Prachatice, a region with similarly high c-PAH but low particle levels. All European, single live births occurring in a 4-year period in Teplice (n = 3,378) and Prachatice (n = 1,505) were included. Detailed personal data were obtained via questionnaires and medical records. Mean PM(10), PM(2.5,) and c-PAHs levels during the 9 gestational months (GM) were estimated for each mother. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of IUGR for three levels of c-PAHs (low, medium, and high) and for continuous data were estimated after adjustment for a range of covariates using logistic regression models. In the present 4-year sample from Teplice, previously published results about increasing IUGR risk after exposure to particles in the first GM were fully confirmed, but no such effects were found in Prachatice. The AOR of IUGR for fetuses from Teplice exposed to medium levels of c-PAHs in the first GM was 1.60 [confidence interval (CI), 1.06-2. 15], and to high levels 2.15 (CI, 27-3.63). An exposure-response relationship was established by analyzing the continuous data. For each 10 ng increase of c-PAHs in the first GM, the AOR was 1.22 (CI, 1.07-1.39). About the same relationship was observed in Prachatice in spite of the low particle levels. The results prove that exposure to c-PAHs in early gestation may influence fetal growth. The particulate matter-IUGR association observed earlier may be at least partly explained by the

  17. Chronic Social Stress and Susceptibility to Concentrated Ambient Fine Particles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Clougherty, Jane E.; Rossi, Christina A.; Lawrence, Joy; Long, Mark S.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Lim, Robert H.; McEwen, Bruce; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests that chronic stress may alter susceptibility to air pollution. However, persistent spatial confounding between these exposures may limit the utility of epidemiologic methods to disentangle these effects and cannot identify physiologic mechanisms for potential differential susceptibilities. Objectives Using a rat model of social stress, we compared respiratory responses to fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) and examined biological markers of inflammation. Methods Twenty-four 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups [stress/CAPs, stress/filtered air (FA), nonstress/CAPs, nonstress/FA]. Stress-group animals were individually introduced into the home cage of a dominant male twice weekly. Blood drawn at sacrifice was analyzed for immune and inflammatory markers. CAPs were generated using the Harvard ambient particle concentrator, which draws real-time urban ambient fine particles, enriching concentrations approximately 30 times. CAPs/FA exposures were delivered in single-animal plethysmographs, 5 hr/day for 10 days, and respiratory function was continuously monitored using a Buxco system. Results Stressed animals displayed higher average C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, and white blood cell counts than did nonstressed animals. Only among stressed animals were CAPs exposures associated with increased respiratory frequency, lower flows, and lower volumes, suggesting a rapid, shallow breathing pattern. Conversely, in animals with elevated CAPs exposures alone, we observed increased inspiratory flows and greater minute volumes (volume of air inhaled or exhaled per minute). Conclusions CAPs effects on respiratory measures differed significantly, and substantively, by stress group. Higher CAPs exposures were associated with a rapid, shallow breathing pattern only under chronic stress. Blood measures provided evidence of inflammatory responses. Results support epidemiologic

  18. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  19. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  20. [Evaluation of Cellular Effects Caused by Lunar Regolith Simulant Including Fine Particles].

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanori; Miki, Takeo; Honma, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Shigeru; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced a plan to establish a manned colony on the surface of the moon, and our country, Japan, has declared its participation. The surface of the moon is covered with soil called lunar regolith, which includes fine particles. It is possible that humans will inhale lunar regolith if it is brought into the spaceship. Therefore, an evaluation of the pulmonary effects caused by lunar regolith is important for exploration of the moon. In the present study, we examine the cellular effects of lunar regolith simulant, whose components are similar to those of lunar regolith. We focused on the chemical component and particle size in particular. The regolith simulant was fractionated to < 10 μm, < 25 μm and 10-25 μm by gravitational sedimentation in suspensions. We also examined the cellular effects of fine regolith simulant whose primary particle size is 5.10 μm. These regolith simulants were applied to human lung carcinoma A549 cells at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/ml. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and immune response were examined after 24 h exposure. Cell membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) were observed at the concentration of 1.0 mg/ml. The cellular effects of the regolith simulant at the concentration of 0.1 mg/ml were small, as compared with crystalline silica as a positive control. Secretion of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was observed at the concentration of 1.0 mg/ml, but induction of gene expression was not observed at 24 h after exposure. Induction of cellular oxidative stress was small. Although the cellular effects tended to be stronger in the < 10 μm particles, there was no remarkable difference. These results suggest that the chemical components and particle size have little relationship to the cellular effects of lunar regolith simulant such as cell membrane damage, induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory effect. PMID

  1. Attenuation of Gas Turbulence by a Nearly Stationary Dispersion of Fine Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, A. D.; Eaton, J. K.; Hwang, W.

    1999-01-01

    particles fall through the measurement volume. Measurements will be acquired using a high resolution image velocimetry (PIV) system being developed specifically for work in particle-laden flows. The measurements will include the decay of the turbulence kinetic energy under various particle loadings. The spatial spectra of the turbulence will also be measured. In a second set of experiments, the interaction of a single eddy with a collection of nearly stationary particles will be examined. The eddy will be a vortex ring emitted by a jet pulse through an orifice. The distortion of the vortex under the influence of the particles will be examined to gain a better understanding of how fine particles can cause such large reductions in turbulence levels. This experiment could not be conducted in terrestrial gravity because the high particle velocities would overwhelm the relatively low speed motion of the vortex ring. This experimental program is just getting underway. The initial challenge is to build a closed facility containing reasonably homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with zero mean velocity. Our approach is to use a set of synthetic jets mounted on the periphery of a transparent plexiglass box to create the turbulence. A synthetic jet is a plenum chamber with an orifice open to the volume of interest. The volume of the chamber fluctuates periodically so alternately a jet is ejected from the volume or flow is drawn back in as a sink. The asymmetry of this situation results in a net transport of momentum and kinetic energy into the volume of interest. The present apparatus includes eight synthetic jets each powered independently by a six inch loudspeaker. The synthetic jets discharge through ejector tubes to increase the scale of the turbulence. Construction of the apparatus is now complete and preliminary flow visualization studies have been conducted. The PIV system is also under development. A compact dual-pulse YAG laser has been acquired as the light source and

  2. Observations of fine and coarse particle nitrate at several rural locations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Nitrate comprises an important part of aerosol mass at many non-urban locations during some times of the year. Little is known, however, about the chemical form and size distribution of particulate nitrate in these environments. While submicron ammonium nitrate is often assumed to be the dominant species, this assumption is rarely tested. Properties of aerosol nitrate were characterized at several IMPROVE monitoring sites during a series of field studies. Study sites included Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area, California (April and July 2003), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May 2003), Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee (July/August 2004). Nitrate was found predominantly in submicron ammonium nitrate particles during the Bondville and San Gorgonio (April) campaigns. Coarse mode nitrate particles, resulting from reactions of nitric acid or its precursors with sea salt or soil dust, were more important at Grand Canyon and Great Smoky Mountains. Both fine and coarse mode nitrate were important during the studies at Brigantine and San Gorgonio (July). These results, which complement earlier findings about the importance of coarse particle nitrate at Yosemite and Big Bend National Parks, suggest a need to more closely examine common assumptions regarding the importance of ammonium nitrate at non-urban sites, to include pathways for coarse mode nitrate formation in regional models, and to consider impacts of coarse particle nitrate on visibility. Because coarse particle nitrate modes often extend well below 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter, measurements of PM 2.5 nitrate in these environments should not automatically be assumed to contain only ammonium nitrate.

  3. Environmental and health impacts of fine and ultrafine metallic particles: Assessment of threat scores

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, Sylvaine; Lévêque, Thibaut; Xiong, Tian-Tian; Schreck, Eva; and others

    2014-08-15

    This study proposes global threat scores to prioritize the harmfulness of anthropogenic fine and ultrafine metallic particles (FMP) emitted into the atmosphere at the global scale. (Eco)toxicity of physicochemically characterized FMP oxides for metals currently observed in the atmosphere (CdO, CuO, PbO, PbSO{sub 4}, Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZnO) was assessed by performing complementary in vitro tests: ecotoxicity, human bioaccessibility, cytotoxicity, and oxidative potential. Using an innovative methodology based on the combination of (eco)toxicity and physicochemical results, the following hazard classification of the particles is proposed: CdCl{sub 2}∼CdO>CuO>PbO>ZnO>PbSO{sub 4}>Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Both cadmium compounds exhibited the highest threat score due to their high cytotoxicity and bioaccessible dose, whatever their solubility and speciation, suggesting that cadmium toxicity is due to its chemical form rather than its physical form. In contrast, the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} threat score was the lowest due to particles with low specific area and solubility, with no effects except a slight oxidative stress. As FMP physicochemical properties reveal differences in specific area, crystallization systems, dissolution process, and speciation, various mechanisms may influence their biological impact. Finally, this newly developed and global approach could be widely used in various contexts of pollution by complex metal particles and may improve risk management. - Highlights: • Seven micro- and nano- monometallic characterized particles were studied as references. • Bioaccessibility, eco and cytotoxicity, and oxidative potential assays were performed. • According to calculated threat scores: CdCl{sub 2}∼CdO>CuO>PbO>ZnO>PbSO{sub 4}>Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. Geochemical and petrographical characterization of fine-grained carbonate particles along proximal to distal transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, Mélanie; Emmanuel, Laurent; Immenhauser, Adrian; Renard, Maurice

    2012-12-01

    The origin of carbonate ooze particles is often poorly understood. This is due to their polygenic origin and potential post-depositional alteration. Here, the outcome of a physical separation study with regard to different component classes of micritic carbonates is shown. The focus is on grain size and morphology, mineralogy and isotope signatures. Two contrasting proximal-to-distal transects were investigated: (1) the Miocene leeward margin of Great Bahama Bank (ODP Leg 166) and (2) the transition between the Maiella platform and the Umbria-Marche basin in central Italy near the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary. In both case settings, carbonate particles of biogenic origin include at least three groups of organisms: (i) planktonic foraminifera, (ii) calcareous nannofossils and (iii) fragments of unspecified neritic skeletal material. Two further particle types lack diagnostic structures, and based on particle size and mineralogy, are here referred to as (iv) macroparticles (5-20 μm, mainly xenomorphic) and (v) microparticles (< 12 μm, mainly automorphic to sub-automorphic). Macro- and microparticles represent 50 to 80% of the carbonate phase in slope and toe-of-slope domains and share characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope signatures. Macro- and microparticles are considered shallow-water precipitation products subsequently exported into the slope and toe-of-slope domains. Macroparticles are probably related to the fragmentation of neritic skeletal components while microparticles point to inorganic and/or bioinduced precipitation in the water column. In some cases, macro- and microparticles may have an early diagenetic origin. The identification of the origin of fine-grained particles allows for a quantitative assessment of exported, in situ and diagenetic carbonate materials in periplatform environments. The data shown here represent an important step towards a more complete characterization of carbonate ooze and micrite.

  5. Observations of Fine and Coarse Particle Nitrate at Several Rural Locations in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehyoung; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2008-04-01

    Nitrate comprises an important part of aerosol mass at many non-urban locations during some times of the year. Little is known, however, about the chemical form and size distribution of particulate nitrate in these environments. While submicron ammonium nitrate is often assumed to be the dominant species, this assumption is rarely tested. Properties of aerosol nitrate were characterized at several IMPROVE monitoring sites during a series of field studies. Study sites included Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area, California (April and July 2003), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May 2003), Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee (July/August 2004). Nitrate was found predominantly in submicron ammonium nitrate particles during the Bondville and San Gorgonio (April) campaigns. Coarse mode nitrate particles, resulting from reactions of nitric acid or its precursors with sea salt or soil dust, were more important at Grand Canyon and Great Smoky Mountains. Both fine and coarse mode nitrate were important during the studies at Brigantine and San Gorgonio (July). These results, which complement earlier findings about the importance of coarse particle nitrate at Yosemite and Big Bend National Parks, suggest a need to more closely examine common assumptions regarding the importance of ammonium nitrate at non-urban sites, to include pathways for coarse mode nitrate formation in regional models, and to consider impacts of coarse particle nitrate on visibility. Because coarse particle nitrate modes often extend well below 2.5 µm aerodynamic diameter, measurements of PM2.5 nitrate in these environments should not automatically be assumed to contain only ammonium nitrate.

  6. Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Potential between pH-Responsive Hydrogels and Cell-Sized Particles.

    PubMed

    Monzel, Cornelia; Veschgini, Mariam; Madsen, Jeppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-08-11

    We quantitatively determined interfacial potentials between cell-sized particles and stimulus-responsive hydrogels using a microinterferometer. The hydrogel is based on physically interconnected ABA triblock copolymer micelles comprising an inner biocompatible PMPC block and two outer pH-responsive PDPA blocks. The out-of-plane temporal fluctuation in the position of the cell-sized particles was calculated from changes in the interference pattern measured by Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (RICM), thus yielding the particle-substrate interaction potential V (Δh). Measurements in pH buffers ranging from 7.0 to 7.8 resulted in a systematic reduction in height of the potential minima ⟨Δh⟩ and a concomitant increase in the potential curvature V″ (Δh). The experimental data were analyzed by applying the modified Ross and Pincus model for polyelectrolytes, while accounting for gravitation, lubrication and van der Waals interactions. Elastic moduli calculated from V″ (Δh) were in good agreement with those measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. The ability to fine-tune both the gel elasticity and the interfacial potential at around physiological pH makes such triblock copolymer hydrogels a promising biocompatible substrate for dynamic switching of cell-material interactions. PMID:26190346

  7. Enhanced control of fine particles following Title IV coal switching and NOx control

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Martin, C.

    1997-12-31

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) serve as the primary particle control devices for a majority of coal-fired power generating units in the United States. ESPs are used to collect particulate matter that range in size from less than one micrometer in diameter to several hundred micrometers. Many of the options that utilities will use to respond to Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments will result in changes to the ash that will be detrimental to the performance of the ESP causing increased emissions of fine particles and higher opacity. For example, a switch to low-sulfur coal significantly increases particle resistivity while low-NO{sub x} burners increase the carbon content of ashes. Both of these changes could result in derating of the boiler to comply with emissions standards. ADA has developed a chemical additive that is designed to improve the operation of ESI`s to bring these systems into compliance operation without the need for expensive capital modifications. The additives provide advantages over competing technologies in terms of low capital cost, easy to handle chemicals, and relatively non-toxic chemicals. In addition, the new additive is insensitive to ash chemistry which will allow the utility complete flexibility to select the most economical coal. Results from full-scale and pilot plant demonstrations are reported.

  8. The grape cluster, metal particle 63344,1. [in lunar coarse fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Axon, H. J.; Agrell, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    The grape cluster metal particle 63344,1 found in lunar coarse fines is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe, and an optical microscope. This metal particle is approximately 0.5 cm in its largest dimension and consists of hundreds of metallic globules welded together to form a structure somewhat like a bunch of grapes. Electron microprobe analysis for Fe, Ni, Co, P, and S in the metal was carried out using wavelength dispersive detectors. No primary solidification structure is observed in the globules, and the particle is slow cooled from the solidification temperature (nearly 1300 C) taking days to probably months to reach 600 C. Two mechanisms for the formation of globules are proposed. One mechanism involves the primary impact of an iron meteorite which produces a metallic liquid and vapor phase. The second mechanism involves the formation of a liquid pool of metal after impact of an iron meteorite projectile followed by a secondary impact in the liquid metal pool.

  9. Synthesis of Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 ferrite powder by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Salma; Ajaz-un-Nabi, M.; Jamil, Yasir; Amin, Nasir

    2014-06-01

    Ferrimagnetic substances referred to as ferrites are ionic crystals whose chemical composition is of the form XFe2 O4 where X signifies a divalent metal. Magnetic Nano sized ferrites have found a significant potential in many applications, such as magnetic recording media, Ferro fluids and radar absorbing coating. Ferrites are widely used in many industrial applications due to their spontaneous magnetization. Soft ferrites of Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn and Mg-Mn are well known for their high magnetic permeability. In the present research work we have prepared fine Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 ferrite powder with varying x concentrations (0.25-0.75) by metal chloride precursors through a co-precipitation technique by pipette drop method using aqueous NaOH solution for comparing their spontaneous magnetization and particle size. The co-precipitation technique is a high way to produce chemically homogeneous powder with fine particle size in nanometers (22.5nm-74.5nm).The effect of x-concentration on the particle size of the Mn(1-x) Zn(x) ferrite has been discussed on the basis of XRD. The crystalline phases have been identified by X-ray diffraction with Cu-Kα radiations. The XRD patterns have verified that the specimen has spinal type structure. The observable peaks are broad since the size of the particles is small. We have concluded that at constants temperature particle size increases with increasing x-concentrations. Effect of different concentrations of x (Zn+2) on the spontaneous magnetization of different Mn(1-x) Zn(x) Fe2O4 sample is determined. We have reached the conclusion that all the samples of Mn(1-x) Zn(x) Fe2 O4 ferrites were magnetic either of low or high magnetization. The maximum spontaneous magnetization and minimum particle size is obtained at x=0.25 (at digestion temperature=65°C).

  10. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2003-06-02

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Fine-Particle NTO and Its Formulation with Al Nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.-Y.; Kennedy, J. E.; Asay, B. W.; Son, S. F.; Martin, E. S.

    2004-07-01

    We have initiated study of the effect of nano-aluminum on the detonation performance of NTO. A novel method for the preparation of both fine-particle NTO (UF-NTO) and its formulation with Al nanopowder has been developed. Results from small-scale sensitivity tests on both the UF-NTO and aluminized NTO composite indicated that they are insensitive to impact, friction and HESD. The performance of both UF-NTO and NTO/Al mix was evaluated by detonation-spreading floret tests. At the same pressed density, it was found that, when initiated by a 3-mm-diameter flyer plate, the aluminized NTO composite produced a shallower dent on a copper witness plate than neat UF-NTO and thus was inferior to UF-NTO in detonation spreading.

  12. Aerosol Measurements of the Fine and Ultrafine Particle Content of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Chen, Da-Ren; Smith, Sally A.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first quantitative measurements of the ultrafine (20 to 100 nm) and fine (100 nm to 20 m) particulate components of Lunar surface regolith. The measurements were performed by gas-phase dispersal of the samples, and analysis using aerosol diagnostic techniques. This approach makes no a priori assumptions about the particle size distribution function as required by ensemble optical scattering methods, and is independent of refractive index and density. The method provides direct evaluation of effective transport diameters, in contrast to indirect scattering techniques or size information derived from two-dimensional projections of high magnification-images. The results demonstrate considerable populations in these size regimes. In light of the numerous difficulties attributed to dust exposure during the Apollo program, this outcome is of significant importance to the design of mitigation technologies for future Lunar exploration.

  13. Fine particle coal as a source of energy in small-user applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, S.

    1990-11-01

    The use of fine particle micronized coal as a source of energy for home heating applications has been explored in previous years under this program in a 150,000 Btu/hr pulse combustor. Experimental studies have been conducted on the combustion characteristics of micronized coal and combustion efficiencies have been measured. Emission levels of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} have been measured. In this final year of the program, the combustion and emissions characteristics of micronized coal were further explored in terms of the influence of stoichiometric ratio and frequency effects. Also, a model has been proposed which has potential for incorporating the unsteady mixing occurring in pulse combustors. 31 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. A comparative study of the number and mass of fine particles emitted with diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Md. Nurun; Brown, Richard J.; Ristovski, Zoran; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-09-01

    The current investigation reports on diesel particulate matter emissions, with special interest in fine particles from the combustion of two base fuels. The base fuels selected were diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO). The experiments were conducted with a four-stroke, six-cylinder, direct injection diesel engine. The results showed that the fine particle number emissions measured by both SMPS and ELPI were higher with MGO compared to diesel fuel. It was observed that the fine particle number emissions with the two base fuels were quantitatively different but qualitatively similar. The gravimetric (mass basis) measurement also showed higher total particulate matter (TPM) emissions with the MGO. The smoke emissions, which were part of TPM, were also higher for the MGO. No significant changes in the mass flow rate of fuel and the brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were observed between the two base fuels.

  15. Transformation Characteristics of Ferrite/Carbide Aggregate in Continuously Cooled, Low Carbon-Manganese Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Thewlis, G.

    2014-02-01

    Transformation characteristics and morphological features of ferrite/carbide aggregate (FCA) in low carbon-manganese steels have been investigated. Work shows that FCA has neither the lamellae structure of pearlite nor the lath structure of bainite and martensite. It consists of a fine dispersion of cementite particles in a smooth ferrite matrix. Carbide morphologies range from arrays of globular particles or short fibers to extended, branched, and densely interconnected fibers. Work demonstrates that FCA forms over similar cooling rate ranges to Widmanstätten ferrite. Rapid transformation of both phases occurs at temperatures between 798 K and 973 K (525 °C and 700 °C). FCA reaction is not simultaneous with Widmanstätten ferrite but occurs at temperatures intermediate between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite. Austenite carbon content calculations verify that cementite precipitation is thermodynamically possible at FCA reaction temperatures without bainite formation. The pattern of precipitation is confirmed to be discontinuous. CCT diagrams have been constructed that incorporate FCA. At low steel manganese content, Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite bay sizes are significantly reduced so that large amounts of FCA are formed over a wide range of cooling rates.

  16. Fine-particle water and pH in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Bougiatioti, A.; Cerully, K. M.; Capps, S. L.; Hite, J. R., Jr.; Carlton, A. G.; Lee, S.-H.; Bergin, M. H.; Ng, N. L.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    Particle water and pH are predicted using meteorological observations (relative humidity (RH), temperature (T)), gas/particle composition, and thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II). A comprehensive uncertainty analysis is included, and the model is validated. We investigate mass concentrations of particle water and related particle pH for ambient fine-mode aerosols sampled in a relatively remote Alabama forest during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in summer and at various sites in the southeastern US during different seasons, as part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE) study. Particle water and pH are closely linked; pH is a measure of the particle H+ aqueous concentration and depends on both the presence of ions and amount of particle liquid water. Levels of particle water, in turn, are determined through water uptake by both the ionic species and organic compounds. Thermodynamic calculations based on measured ion concentrations can predict both pH and liquid water but may be biased since contributions of organic species to liquid water are not considered. In this study, contributions of both the inorganic and organic fractions to aerosol liquid water were considered, and predictions were in good agreement with measured liquid water based on differences in ambient and dry light scattering coefficients (prediction vs. measurement: slope = 0.91, intercept = 0.5 μg m-3, R2 = 0.75). ISORROPIA-II predictions were confirmed by good agreement between predicted and measured ammonia concentrations (slope = 1.07, intercept = -0.12 μg m-3, R2 = 0.76). Based on this study, organic species on average contributed 35% to the total water, with a substantially higher contribution (50%) at night. However, not including contributions of organic water had a minor effect on pH (changes pH by 0.15 to 0.23 units), suggesting that predicted pH without consideration of organic water could be sufficient for the purposes of aqueous

  17. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  18. Ultra Fine Particles from Diesel Engines Induce Vascular Oxidative Stress via JNK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Ning, Zhi; Cui, Jeffery; Khalsa, Bhavraj; Ai, Lisong; Takabe, Wakako; Beebe, Tyler; Majumdar, Rohit; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of particulate air pollution is linked to increased incidences of cardiovascular diseases. Ambient ultra fine particles (UFP) from diesel vehicle engines have been shown to be pro-atherogenic in apoE knockout mice and may constitute a major cardiovascular risk in humans. We posited that circulating nano-sized particles from traffic pollution sources induced vascular oxidative stress via JNK activation in endothelial cells. Diesel UFP were collected from a 1998 Kenworth truck. Intra-cellular superoxide assay revealed that these UFP dose-dependently induced superoxide (O2·-) production in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Flow cytometry (FACS) showed that UFP increased MitoSOX Red intensity specific for mitochondrial superoxide. Protein carbonyl content is increased by UFP as an indication of vascular oxidative stress. UFP also up-regulated hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and tissue factor (TF) mRNA expression, and pre-treatment with antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), significantly decreased their expression. Furthermore, UFP transiently activated JNK in HAEC. Treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 and silencing of both JNK1 and JNK2 with siRNA inhibited UFP stimulated O2·- production and mRNA expression of HO-1 and TF. Our findings suggest that JNK activation play an important role in UFP-induced oxidative stress and stress response gene expression. PMID:19154785

  19. Multimodal particle size distributions of fine-grained sediments: mathematical modeling and field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Toorman, Erik; Fettweis, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Multimodal particle size distributions (PSDs) of fine-grained cohesive sediments are common in marine and coastal environments. The curve-fitting software in this study decomposed such multimodal PSDs into subordinate log-normal PSDs. Four modal peaks, consisting of four-level ordered structures of primary particles, flocculi, microflocs, and macroflocs, were identified and found to alternately rise and sink in a flow-varying tidal cycle due to shear-dependent flocculation. The four modal PSD could be simplified further into two discrete size groups of flocculi and flocs. This allowed the development of a two-class population balance equation (TCPBE) model with flocculi and flocs to simulate flocculation involving multimodal PSDs. The one-dimensional vertical (1-DV) TCPBE model further incorporated the Navier-Stokes equation with the k- ɛ turbulence closure and the sediment mass balance equations. Multimodal flocculation as well as turbulent flow and sediment transport in a flow-varying tidal cycle could be simulated well using the proposed model. The 1-DV TCPBE was concluded to be the simplest model that is capable of simulating multimodal flocculation in the turbulent flow field of marine and coastal zones.

  20. Chemical characteristics of fine particles emitted from different gas cooking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Siao Wei; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    Gas cooking is an important indoor source of fine particles (PM 2.5). The chemical characteristics of PM 2.5 emitted from different cooking methods, namely, steaming, boiling, stir-frying, pan-frying and deep-frying were investigated in a domestic kitchen. Controlled experiments were conducted to measure the mass concentration of PM 2.5 and its chemical constituents (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals and ions) arising from these five cooking methods. To investigate the difference in particle properties of different cooking emissions, the amount and type of food, and the heat setting on the gas stove were kept constant during the entire course of the experiments. Results showed that deep-frying gave rise to the largest amount of PM 2.5 and most chemical components, followed by pan-frying, stir-frying, boiling, and steaming. Oil-based cooking methods released more organic pollutants (OC, PAHs, and organic ions) and metals, while water-based cooking methods accounted for more water-soluble (WS) ions. Their source profiles are also presented and discussed.

  1. Ventilation dependence of concentration metrics of Ultra-fine Particles in a coagulating household smoke.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Sreekanth, B; Mayya, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Role of Ultra-fine Particles (UFPs) in causing adverse health effects among large population across the world, attributable to household smoke, is being increasingly recognized. However, there is very little theoretical perspective available on the complex behavior of the UFP metrics with respect to controlling factors, such as ventilation rate and particle emission rate from the combustion sources. This numerical study examines through coagulation dynamics, the dependence of UFP metrics, viz., number (PN), mass (PM(0.1)) and surface area (PA(0.1)) concentrations below 0.1 μm diameter, on ventilation and the number emission rate from household smoke. For strong sources, the steady-state concentrations of these metrics are found to increase initially with increasing Air Exchange Rate (AER), reach a peak value and then decrease. Counter correlations are seen between UFP metric and PM(2.5) concentrations. The concepts of Critical Air Exchange Rate (CAER) and Half-Value Air Exchange Rate (HaVAER) have been introduced which indicate a feasibility of mitigation of PM(0.1) and PA(0.1), unlike PN, by ventilation techniques. The study clearly brings forth complex differential behavior of the three UFP metrics. The results are further discussed. PMID:26795205

  2. [Influence of inhaler and fine particle on efficacy of inhalation therapy in COPD].

    PubMed

    Sliwiński, Paweł; Chazan, Ryszarda; Dąbrowiecki, Piotr; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina; Mróz, Robert; Pirożyński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Orally inhaled products delivered via inhalation exert their effect directly to the target organ. This allows to administer a very low dose of a drug compared with an oral route with similar clinical effect and significantly reduced toxicity. However inhalation therapy is also limited by several factors. Delivery of the desired dose of the drug to the airways depends on a type of the inhaler - pressurised metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or dry powder inhaler (DPI), inhaler characteristics (low or high internal resistance, diameter of particles and distribution of the generated aerosol fine particles), thermal conditions of air, and ability of patient to generate sufficient inspiratory flow (for DPI) or to coordinate actuation with inhalation (for pMDI). Unlike pMDIs, DPIs are breath- -actuated, hence avoiding the need for the patient to coordinate actuation with inspiration. Furthermore, DPIs are propellant-free and do not produce the cold sensation on inhalation. Currently available DPIs vary widely in design, operating characteristics and performance. And poor inhalation technique may compromise treatment efficacy. Hence, there is a clear need for a careful selection of DPIs for different patient groups, including children, elderly patients and those with severe airway obstruction. PMID:24793155

  3. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2003-01-31

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research results have demonstrated that the inhalation of coal/MSS ash particles cause an increase in lung permeability than coal ash particles alone. Elemental analysis of the coal/MSS ash particles showed that Zn was more abundant in these ash particles than the ash particles of coal ash alone.

  4. Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Suriyawong, Achariya; Daukoru, Michael; Zhuang, Ye; Biswas, Pratim

    2009-05-01

    Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 microm at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 microm, and 10 microm. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. PMID:19583155

  5. Use of micro-XANES to speciate chromium in airborne fine particles in the Sacramento Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle L. Werner; Peter S. Nico; Matthew A. Marcus; Cort Anastasio

    2007-07-15

    While particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere can lead to a wide array of negative health effects, the cause of toxicity is largely unknown. One aspect of PM that likely affects health is the chemical composition, in particular the transition metals within the particles. Chromium is one transition metal of interest due to its two major oxidation states, with Cr(III) being much less toxic compared to Cr(VI). Using microfocused X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES), we analyzed the Cr speciation in fine particles (diameters {le} 2.5 {mu}m) collected at three sites in the Sacramento Valley of northern California: Sacramento, a large urban area, Davis, a small city, and Placerville, a rural area. These are several major stationary sources of Cr within 24 km of the site including chrome-plating plants, power plants and incinerators. The microfocused X-ray beam enables us to look at very small areas on the filter with a resolution of typically 5-7 micrometers. With XANES we are able to not only distinguish between Cr(VI) and Cr(III), but also to identify different types of Cr(III) and more reduced Cr species. At all of our sampling sites the main Cr species were Cr(III), with Cr(OH){sub 3} or a Cr-Fe, chromite-like, phase being the dominant species. Cr(VI)-containing particles were found only in the most urban site. All three sites contained some reduced Cr species, either Cr(0) or Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, although these were minor components. This work demonstrates that micro-XANES can be used as a minimally invasive analytical tool to investigate the composition of ambient PM. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Exposure to ultrafine and fine particles and noise during cycling and driving in 11 Dutch cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogaard, Hanna; Borgman, Frank; Kamminga, Jaap; Hoek, Gerard

    Recent studies have suggested that exposures during traffic participation may be associated with adverse health effects. Traffic participation involves relatively short but high exposures. Potentially relevant exposures include ultrafine particles, fine particles (PM 2.5) and noise. Simultaneously, detailed real time exposure of particle number concentration (PNC), PM 2.5 and noise has been measured while driving and cycling 12 predefined routes of approximately 10-20 min duration. Sampling took place in eleven medium-sized Dutch cities on eleven weekdays in August till October 2006. To investigate variability in cyclists exposure, we systematically collected information on meteorology, GPS coordinates, type of road, traffic intensity, passing vehicles and mopeds while cycling. The overall mean PNC of car drivers was 5% higher than the mean PNC of cyclists. The overall mean concentration of PM 2.5 in the car was 11% higher than during cycling. Slightly higher 1-min peak concentrations were measured in the car (PNC 14%; PM 2.5 29% for 95-percentiles). Shorter duration peaks of PNC were higher during cycling (43% for 99-percentile of 1-s averages). Peaks in PNC typically last for less than 10 s. A large variability of exposure was found within and between routes. Factors that significantly predicted PNC variability during cycling were: passing vehicles (mopeds, cars), waiting for traffic lights, passing different types of (large) intersections and bicycle lanes and bike paths close to motorized traffic. No relation was found between PM 2.5 and those predictor variables. The correlation between PNC and noise was moderate (median 0.34). PM 2.5 had very low correlations with PNC and noise. PNC and PM 2.5 exposure of car drivers was slightly higher than that of cyclists. PNC was largely uncorrelated with PM 2.5 and reflected local traffic variables more than PM 2.5. Different factors were associated with high PNC and high noise exposures.

  7. Fine-tuning of process conditions to improve product uniformity of polystyrene particles used for wind tunnel velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asit K.

    1990-01-01

    Monodisperse polymer particles (having uniform diameter) were used for the last two decades in physical, biological, and chemical sciences. In NASA Langley Research Center monodisperse polystyrene particles are used in wind tunnel laser velocimeters. These polystyrene (PS) particles in latex form were formulated at the Engineering Laboratory of FENGD using emulsion-free emulsion polymerization. Monodisperse PS latices particles having different particle diameters were formulated and useful experimental data involving effects of process conditions on particle size were accumulated. However, similar process conditions and chemical recipes for polymerization of styrene monomer have often yielded monodisperse particles having varying diameters. The purpose was to improve the PS latex product uniformity by fine-tuning the process parameters based on the knowledge of suspension and emulsion polymerization.

  8. Size distribution, chemical composition, and hygroscopicity of fine particles emitted from an oil-fired heating plant.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Matti; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Frey, Anna; Saarikoski, Sanna; Carbone, Samara; Hillamo, Risto; Pirjola, Liisa; Häyrinen, Anna; Kytömäki, Jorma; Niemi, Jarkko V; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2013-12-17

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is a commonly used fuel in industrial heating and power generation and for large marine vessels. In this study, the fine particle emissions of a 47 MW oil-fired boiler were studied at 30 MW power and with three different fuels. The studied fuels were HFO, water emulsion of HFO, and water emulsion of HFO mixed with light fuel oil (LFO). With all the fuels, the boiler emitted considerable amounts of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Further, these small particles were quite hygroscopic even as fresh and, in the case of HFO+LFO emulsion, the hygroscopic growth of the particles was dependent on particle size. The use of emulsions and the addition of LFO to the fuel had a reducing effect on the hygroscopic growth of particles. The use of emulsions lowered the sulfate content of the smallest particles but did not affect significantly the sulfate content of particles larger than 42 nm and, further, the addition of LFO considerably increased the black carbon content of particulate matter. The results indicate that even the fine particles emitted from HFO based combustion can have a significant effect on cloud formation, visibility, and air quality. PMID:24245691

  9. Fireplace and woodstove fine particle emissions from combustion of western Mediterranean wood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Célia; Gonçalves, Cátia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Tarelho, Luís; Pio, Casimiro

    2011-08-01

    Wood from seven species of trees grown in the Portuguese forest ( Pinus pinaster, Eucalyptus globulus, Quercus suber, Acacia longifolia, Quercus faginea, Olea europea and Quercus ilex rotundifolia), and briquettes produced from forest biomass waste were burned in a fireplace and in a woodstove to determine the chemical composition of fine particle (PM 2.5) emissions. Samples were analysed for organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC), water soluble ions (Na +, NH 4+, K +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42-) and 67 elements. The PM 2.5 emission factors (g kg - 1 fuel burned, dry basis) were in the ranges 9.9-20.2 and 4.2-16.3, respectively, for the fireplace and the woodstove. Organic carbon contributed to about 50% of the fine particle mass in the emissions from every wood species studied in both burning appliances. The carbonaceous component of PM 2.5 was dominated by organic carbon, accounting for more than 85% of the total carbon (TC): OC/TC ranged from 0.85 to 0.96 (avg. 0.92) for the fireplace and from 0.86 to 0.97 (avg. 0.93) for the woodstove. The water-soluble ions accounted for 0.64 to 11.3% of the PM 2.5 mass emitted from the fireplace, whereas mass fractions between 0.53 and 13.6% were obtained for the woodstove. The golden wattle wood smoke showed a much higher ionic content than the emissions from the other wood types. Trace elements represented 0.4 to 2.5% and 0.2 to 2.2% of the PM 2.5 mass emitted, respectively, from the fireplace and the woodstove, which corresponded to average total emissions of 132 ± 77.3 mg kg - 1 and 93.4 ± 60.8 mg kg - 1 of wood burned. Among these, K, Pb, Al, Mn and Sr were present in all samples. From the emission profiles of the individual experiments, composite wood combustion profiles are suggested with the aid of a cluster analysis.

  10. High retention of N P nutrients, soil organic carbon, and fine particles by cover crops under tropical climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation of soil and water is fundamental to the development of sustainable agriculture. Transport of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and fine soil particles down the soil profile of a gravelly loam soil (loamy-skeletal, carbonatic, hyperthermic Lithic Udorthents) was investigated under various...

  11. DETERMINATION OF THE STRONG ACIDITY OF ATMOSPHERIC FINE PARTICLES (<2.5 UM) USING ANNULAR DENUDER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a standardized methodology description for the determination of strong acidity of fine particles (less than 2.5 microns) in ambient air using annular denuder technology. his methodology description includes two parts: art A - Standard Method and Part B - Enhanced M...

  12. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES IN A RESIDENCE FOR 18 MONTHS IN 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous monitors were employed for 18 months in an occupied townhouse to measure ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles; air change rates; wind speed and direction; temperature; and relative humidity (RH). A main objective was to document short-term and long-term variation in...

  13. Effect of atmospheric fine particles on epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in mouse skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liang, W L; Zhang, Y; Sun, L D; Liang, W Y

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of atmospheric fine particles on epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) mRNA expression in mouse skin tissue and explored the effect of atmospheric fine particles on skin aging. Forty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (each comprising 10 mice) as follows: a saline control group and low-, medium-, and high-dose atmospheric fine particle groups (1.6, 8.0, and 40.0 mg/kg, respectively) (fine particles were defined as those with a diameter of £2.5 mm, i.e., PM2.5). Each dose group was exposed to intratracheal instillation for 3 days. Twenty-four hours after the last exposure, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of Egfr mRNA in the skin tissue of each mouse. The expression levels of Egfr mRNA in the medium- and high-dose PM2.5 groups were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the control group, and were positively correlated with the dose. Medium and high concentrations of PM2.5 can induce the expression of Egfr mRNA and promote skin aging. PMID:27050971

  14. 77 FR 65310 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... the 2006 24-hour Fine Particle (PM 2.5 ) National Ambient Air Quality Standards,'' 74 FR 58688... Federal Regulations DC District of Columbia EO Executive Order EPA Environmental Protection Agency FR... EPA finalized designations for the 2006 24-hour PM 2.5 NAAQS (74 FR 58688, November 13, 2009), the...

  15. Pulmonary effects of inhaled concentrated fine particles (PM2.5) in somkers and patients with chronic obstructive lung disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although numerous field and epidemiological studies of particulate matter (PM) have strongly suggested that patients with COPD and smokers may be susceptible to fine particles (PM2.5), very little is known about the health effects on such sub-populations. In a randomized double...

  16. Cardiac oxidative stress and dysfunction by fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) are mediated by angiotensin-II.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine particulate matter (PM) exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB; valsartan) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard fine particle concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 +/- 80 microg/m(3)). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pre-treatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARS), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  17. Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Dysfunction by Fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) are Mediated by Angiotensin-II

    PubMed Central

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine PM exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (Benazepril ®), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB, Valsartan ®) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard Fine Particle Concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 ± 80 μg/m3). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, TBARS and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous ECG measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pretreatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARs), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  18. Inviscid behaviour of fines-rich pyroclastic flows inferred from experiments on gas-particle mixtures [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Gilbertson, M. A.; Phillips, J. C.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments were carried out on granular flows generated by instantaneous release of gas-fluidised, bidisperse mixtures and propagating into a horizontal channel. The mixture consists of fine (< 100 μm) and coarse (> 100 μm) particles of same density, with corresponding grain size ratios of ˜ 2 to 9. Initial fluidisation of the mixture destroys the interparticle frictional contacts, and the flow behaviour then depends on the initial bed packing and on the timescale required to re-establish strong frictional contacts. At a fines mass fraction ( α) below that of optimal packing (˜ 40%), the initial mixtures consist of a continuous network of coarse particles with fines in interstitial voids. Strong frictional contacts between the coarse particles are probably rapidly re-established and the flows steadily decelerate. Some internal friction reduction appears to occur as α and the grain size ratio increases, possibly due to particle rolling and the lower roughness of internal shear surfaces. Segregation only occurs at large grain size ratio due to dynamical sieving with fines concentrated at the flow base. In contrast, at α above that for optimal packing, the initial mixtures consist of coarse particles embedded in a matrix of fines. Flow velocities and run-outs are similar to that of the monodisperse fine end-member, thus showing that the coarse particles are transported passively within the matrix whatever their amount and grain size are. These flows propagate at constant height and velocity as inviscid fluid gravity currents, thus suggesting negligible interparticle friction. We have determined a Froude number of 2.61 ± 0.08 consistent with the dam-break model for fluid flows, and with no significant variation as a function of α, the grain size ratio, and the initial bed expansion. Very little segregation occurs, which suggests low intensity particle interactions during flow propagation and that active fluidisation is not taking place. Strong frictional

  19. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of nine engine models were sampled during the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (AP...

  20. Fine particle and organic vapor emissions from staged tests of an in-use aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presto, Albert A.; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Ranjan, Manish; Reeder, Aaron J.; Lipsky, Eric M.; Hennigan, Christopher J.; Miracolo, Marissa A.; Riemer, Daniel D.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2011-07-01

    Staged tests were conducted to measure the particle and vapor emissions from a CFM56-2B1 gas-turbine engine mounted on a KC-135T Stratotanker airframe at different engine loads. Exhaust was sampled using a rake inlet installed 1-m downstream of the engine exit plane of a parked and chocked aircraft and a dilution sampler and portable smog chamber were used to investigate the particulate matter (PM) emissions. Total fine PM mass emissions were highest at low (4%) and high (85%) load and lower at intermediate loads (7% and 30%). PM mass emissions at 4% load are dominated by organics, while at 85% load elemental carbon is dominant. Quantifying the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions is complicated by substantial filter sampling artifacts. Partitioning experiments reveal that the majority of the POA is semivolatile; for example, the POA emission factor changed by a factor of two when the background organic aerosol concentration was increased from 0.7 to 4 μg m -3. Therefore, one cannot define a single non-volatile PM emission factor for aircraft exhaust. The gas- and particle-phase organic emissions were comprehensively characterized by analyzing canister, sorbent and filter samples with gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Vapor-phase organic emissions are highest at 4% load and decrease with increasing load. Low-volatility organics (less volatile than a C 12n-alkane) contributed 10-20% of the total organic emissions. The low-volatility organic emissions contain signatures of unburned fuel and aircraft lubricating oil but are dominated by an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of presumably branched and cyclic alkanes. Emissions at all loads contain more low-volatility organic vapors than POA; thus secondary organic aerosol formation in the aging plume will likely exceed POA emissions.

  1. Source apportionment of size segregated fine/ultrafine particle by PMF in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ji-hua; Duan, Jing-chun; Chai, Fa-he; He, Ke-bin; Hao, Ji-Ming

    2014-03-01

    Considering the adverse health effects to human body, the number concentration of atmospheric PM (particulate material) is more important than the mass concentration. CO, NO, NO2, SO2 and number concentrations of PM were obtained from a remote site (Miyun), a roadside site (North Fourth Ring Road) and an urban residential site (Tsinghua University) in Beijing in winter. The size distribution and the possible sources of number concentrations were examined using EPA PMF (positive matrix factorization) model. A data set of totally 9610 of number concentration with the size range of 0.028 μm to 0.948 μm was included in the PMF analysis. The highest total particle number, mass and area of fine particles concentrations were observed at the North Fourth Ring Road site and the lowest were observed at Miyun site. Four factors were identified at Miyun site, as Factor 1 and Factor 4 may be related to long distance transportation, and Factor 2 and Factor 3 may be assigned as coal combustion and locomotive emission nearby, respectively; three factors were identified at North Fourth Ring Road, of which Factor 1 and Factor 3 are traffic related and Factor 2 may be coal combustion related. Compared with Factor 1, the contributions of Factor 3 to NOx and SO2 were 4-5 times higher. Additionally, Factor 3 was also a major contributor to CO. It suggested that Factor 1 and Factor 3 had the same source emission of motor vehicle, but different engine types, fuel types or exhaust treatments. Three factors were identified at Tsinghua site, as Factor 1 may come from aging vehicle emission, and Factor 2 and Factor 3 may be coal combustion related.

  2. Sources of personal exposure to fine particles in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    David Kim; Andrea Sass-Kortsak; James T. Purdham; Robert E. Dales; Jeffrey R. Brook

    2005-08-01

    Individuals are exposed to particulate matter from both indoor and outdoor sources. The aim of this study was to compare the relative contributions of three sources of personal exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) by using chemical tracers. The study design incorporated repeated 24-hr personal exposure measurements of air pollution from 28 cardiac-compromised residents of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Each study participant wore the Rupprecht & Patashnick ChemPass Personal Sampling System 1 day a week for a maximum of 10 weeks. During their individual exposure measurement days the subjects reported to have spent an average of 89% of their time indoors. Particle phase elemental carbon, sulfate, and calcium personal exposure data were used in a mixed-effects model as tracers for outdoor PM2.5 from traffic-related combustion, regional, and local crustal materials, respectively. These three sources were found to contribute 13% {+-} 10%, 17% {+-}16%, and 7% {+-} 6% of PM2.5 exposures. The remaining fraction of the personal PM2.5 is hypothesized to be predominantly related to indoor sources. For comparison, central site outdoor PM2.5 measurements for the same dates as personal measurements were used to construct a receptor model using the same three tracers. In this case, traffic-related combustion, regional, and local crustal materials were found to contribute 19% {+-} 17%, 52% {+-} 22%, and 10% {+-} 7%, respectively. The results indicate that the three outdoor PM2.5 sources considered are statistically significant contributors to personal exposure to PM2.5. The results also suggest that among the Toronto subjects, who spent a considerable amount of time indoors, exposure to outdoor PM2.5 includes a greater relative contribution from combustion sources compared with outdoor PM2.5 measurements where regional sources are the dominant contributor. 56 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. [Determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yan; Yang, Haiying; Yang, Yongtan

    2004-09-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The dispersion and stabilization conditions of ultra-fine beta zeolite powder in suspensions were investigated by measuring the isoelectric point (IEP) of the powder suspension. Stable dispersion condition of beta zeolite ultrafine particles in aqueous solution was obtained by adding beta zeolite into the buffer (1.25 mmol/L NaHCO3-5 mmol/L Na2CO3, pH 10.82). The calibration equation between migration time and particle size was established to obtain the data of particle diameter by relating the beta zeolite diameters determined by laser particle sizer with the migration time from electropherogram of beta zeolite through the cumulative percentage of particle distribution. The calibration equation between particle size and amount was also established to correct the deviation of the response caused by particle size as the special relating principle suggested in the paper. The method is advantageous in small sample quantity required, low cost and short measurement period for each individual analysis. PMID:15706938

  4. Fine particles and oxidant pollution: developing an agenda for cooperative research.

    PubMed

    Hidy, G M; Hales, J M; Roth, P M; Scheffe, R

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a background for the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO) cooperative program integrating studies of O3 and PM2.5. It discusses several important aspects for rationalizing NARSTO's trinational investigative approach, including (1) an outlook on the state of knowledge about fine particles in the troposphere and their origins in Canada, Mexico, and the United States; (2) the need for enhancement and strengthening of key field measurements in relation to tropospheric chemistry and a health effects component; and (3) the use of a central theme for advancing air quality modeling using evolving techniques to integrate and guide key process-oriented field campaigns. The importance of organizing a scientific program to acquire "policy-relevant" information is stressed, noting cooperative research directions that address combined PM2.5 and O3 issues, illustrated through exploration of hypothetical pathways of PM2.5 response to choices of O3 and PM precursor emission reductions. The information needed for PM2.5 research is noted to intersect in many cases with those of O3, but diverge in other cases. Accounting for these distinctions is important for developing NARSTO's strategy over the next decade. PMID:10786013

  5. Electreted polyetherimide-silica fibrous membranes for enhanced filtration of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqi; Wang, Na; Fan, Gang; Yu, Jianyong; Gao, Jing; Sun, Gang; Ding, Bin

    2015-02-01

    Development of technologies for air filtration and purification is critical to meet the global challenges of threatened human health and accelerated greenhouse effect, especially for point-of-use applications. Here, we report a novel electreted polyetherimide-silica (PEI-SiO2) fibrous membrane by a single-step strategy to achieve effective filtration of fine particles. The hierarchical structured PEI-SiO2 membranes were endowed with promising superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 152°, allowing their better self-cleaning performance compared with commercial polypropylene (PP) filter media. Morphology, electric charge property, porous structure, and filtration performance could be regulated by tuning the type and concentration of electrets as well as the solution properties. Furthermore, unlike the commercial PP-based filter media, the as-prepared membranes can be treated at 200°C for 30min without sacrificing filtration efficiency (99.992%) and pressure drop (61Pa) owing to the combined contribution of polarization and space charges. We anticipate that this promising electreted fibrous medium will act as a core part of numerous air filtration systems, including ultra-low penetration air filters, clean room, respirator, and protective clothing. PMID:25463170

  6. Assessment of Inter-Individual, Geographic, and Seasonal Variability in Estimated Human Exposure to Fine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wan; Frey, H. Christopher; Cao, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Health effects associated with ambient fine particle (PM2.5) exposure are typically estimated based on concentration-response (C-R) functions using area-wide concentration as an exposure surrogate. Persons 65 and older are particularly susceptible to adverse effects from PM2.5 exposure. Using a stochastic microenvironmental simulation model, distributions of daily PM2.5 exposures were estimated based on ambient concentration, air exchange rate, penetration factor, deposition rate, indoor emission sources, census data, and activity diary data, and compared for selected regions and seasons. Even though the selected subpopulation spends an average of over 20 hours per day indoors, the ratio of daily average estimated exposure to ambient concentration (Ea/C) is approximately 0.5. The daily average Ea/C ratio varies by a factor of 4 to 5 over a 95% frequency range among individuals, primarily from variability in air exchange rates. The mean Ea/C varies by 6 to 36% among selected NC, TX and NYC domains, and 15 to 34% among four seasons, as a result of regional differences in housing stock and seasonal differences in air exchange rates. Variability in Ea/C is a key factor that may help explain heterogeneity in C-R functions across cities and seasons. Priorities for improving exposure estimates are discussed. PMID:23095102

  7. Chemical composition and quantitative relationship between meteorological condition and fine particles in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Hang; Shao, Min; Liu, Xu-Lin; Zeng, Li-Min; Cheng, Cong-Lan; Xu, Xiao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    The recent year's monitor results of Beijing indicated that the pollution level of fine particles PM2.5 showed an increasing trend. To understand pollution characteristics of PM2.5 and its relationship with the meteorological conditions in Beijing, a one-year monitoring of PM2.5 mass concentration and correspondent meteorological parameters was performed in Beijing in 2001. The PM2.5 levels in Beijing were very high, the annual average PM2.5 concentration in 2001 was 7 times of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards proposed by US EPA. The major chemical compositions were organics, sulfate, crustals and nitrate. It was found that the mass concentrations of PM2.5 were influenced by meteorological conditions. The correlation between the mass concentrations of PM2.5 and the relative humidity was found. And the correlation became closer at higher relative humidity. And the mass concentrations of PM2.5 were negtive-correlated to wind speeds, but the correlation between the mass concentration of PM2.5 and wind speed was not good at stronger wind. PMID:15559829

  8. Dynamics of fine particles and photo-oxidants in the Eastern Mediterranean (SUB-AERO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, M.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Smolik, J.; Colbeck, I.; Kallos, G.; Drossinos, Y.; Zdimal, V.; Vecera, Z.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mikuska, P.; Bryant, C.; Housiadas, C.; Spyridaki, A.; Astitha, Marina; Havranek, V.

    As part of the European project SUB-AERO, comprehensive aerosol and gaseous pollutant measurement campaigns were performed at the Finokalia station (July 2000 and January 2001) on the island of Crete (Greece) in combination with boat measurements in the eastern part of the Mediterranean area. The measurements were performed with the participation of nine European research institutions. The objective of the measurement campaigns was to evaluate and assess the spatial and temporal variability of photochemical pollutants and fine particles. The current overview paper presents the framework and main results of the measurements and modelling studies performed during the project. Extensive measurements of gaseous and atmospheric-aerosol physical, chemical and optical characteristics were performed during the measurement campaigns in conjunction with detailed chemical analyses of the aerosol species. Along with the experimental work mesoscale modelling, using a combination of the UAM-AERO air quality model together with the RAMS prognostic meteorological model, was used to reveal the dynamics of particulate matter and photo-oxidants. Furthermore, regional chemistry transport models were applied to determine the background and initial conditions for the mesoscale modelling.

  9. Characterization of carbon fractions for atmospheric fine particles and nanoparticles in a highway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chong-Shu; Chen, Cheng-Chieh; Cao, Jun-Ji; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Liu, Shaw-Chen; Roam, Gwo-Dong

    2010-07-01

    Fine particles (PM 2.5) and nanoparticles (PM 0.1) were sampled using Dichotomous sampler and MOUDI, respectively, in Xueshan Tunnel, Taiwan. Eight carbon fractions were analyzed using IMPROVE thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) method. The concentrations of different temperature carbon fractions (OC1-OC4, EC1-EC3) in both PM 2.5 and PM 0.1 were measured and the correlations between OC and EC were discussed. Results showed that the ratios of OC/EC were 1.26 and 0.67 for PM 2.5 and PM 0.1, respectively. The concentration of EC1 was found to be more abundant than other elemental carbon fractions in PM 2.5, while the most abundant EC fraction in PM 0.1 was found to be EC2. The variation of contributions for elemental carbon fractions was different among PM 2.5 and PM 0.1 samples, which was partly owing to the metal catalysts for soot oxidation. The correlations between char-EC and soot-EC showed that char-EC dominated EC in PM 2.5 while soot-EC dominated EC in PM 0.1. Using eight individual carbon fractions, the gasoline and diesel source profiles of PM 0.1 and PM 2.5 were extracted and analyzed with the positive matrix factorization (PMF) method.

  10. Increase in relative deposition of fine particles in the rat lung periphery in the absence of gravity

    PubMed Central

    Borja, Maria G.; Oakes, Jessica M.; Breen, Ellen C.; Olfert, I. Mark; Scadeng, Miriam; Prisk, G. Kim

    2014-01-01

    While it is well recognized that pulmonary deposition of inhaled particles is lowered in microgravity (μG) compared with gravity on the ground (1G), the absence of sedimentation causes fine particles to penetrate deeper in the lung in μG. Using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we determined the effect of gravity on peripheral deposition (DEPperipheral) of fine particles. Aerosolized 0.95-μm-diameter ferric oxide particles were delivered to spontaneously breathing rats placed in plethysmographic chambers both in μG aboard the NASA Microgravity Research Aircraft and at 1G. Following exposure, lungs were perfusion fixed, fluid filled, and imaged in a 3T MR scanner. The MR signal decay rate, R2*, was measured in each voxel of the left lung from which particle deposition (DEP) was determined based on a calibration curve. Regional deposition was assessed by comparing DEP between the outer (DEPperipheral) and inner (DEPcentral) areas on each slice, and expressed as the central-to-peripheral ratio. Total lung deposition tended to be lower in μG compared with 1G (1.01 ± 0.52 vs. 1.43 ± 0.52 μg/ml, P = 0.1). In μG, DEPperipheral was larger than DEPcentral (P < 0.03), while, in 1G, DEPperipheral was not significantly different from DEPcentral. Finally, central-to-peripheral ratio was significantly less in μG than in 1G (P ≤ 0.05). These data show a larger fraction of fine particles depositing peripherally in μG than in 1G, likely beyond the large- and medium-sized airways. Although not measured, the difference in the spatial distribution of deposited particles between μG and 1G could also affect particle retention rates, with an increase in retention for particles deposited more peripherally. PMID:25170069

  11. Symptoms and Medication Use in Children with Asthma and Traffic-Related Sources of Fine Particle Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Gent, Janneane F.; Koutrakis, Petros; Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth; Holford, Theodore R.; Bracken, Michael B.; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposure to ambient fine particles [particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm diameter (PM2.5)] is a potential factor in the exacerbation of asthma. National air quality particle standards consider total mass, not composition or sources, and may not protect against health impacts related to specific components. Objective We examined associations between daily exposure to fine particle components and sources, and symptoms and medication use in children with asthma. Methods Children with asthma (n = 149) 4–12 years of age were enrolled in a year-long study. We analyzed particle samples for trace elements (X-ray fluorescence) and elemental carbon (light reflectance). Using factor analysis/source apportionment, we identified particle sources (e.g., motor vehicle emissions) and quantified daily contributions. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on study diaries. Repeated measures logistic regression models examined associations between health outcomes and particle exposures as elemental concentrations and source contributions. Results More than half of mean PM2.5 was attributed to traffic-related sources motor vehicles (42%) and road dust (12%). Increased likelihood of symptoms and inhaler use was largest for 3-day averaged exposures to traffic-related sources or their elemental constituents and ranged from a 10% increased likelihood of wheeze for each 5-μg/m3 increase in particles from motor vehicles to a 28% increased likelihood of shortness of breath for increases in road dust. Neither the other sources identified nor PM2.5 alone was associated with increased health outcome risks. Conclusions Linking respiratory health effects to specific particle pollution composition or sources is critical to efforts to protect public health. We associated increased risk of symptoms and inhaler use in children with asthma with exposure to traffic-related fine particles. PMID:19654929

  12. Metal contamination of short-term snow cover near urban crossroads: correlation analysis of metal content and fine particles distribution.

    PubMed

    Vasić, Milica Vučinić; Mihailović, Aleksandra; Kozmidis-Luburić, Uranija; Nemes, Tomas; Ninkov, Jordana; Zeremski-Škorić, Tijana; Antić, Bratislav

    2012-02-01

    Snow samples were collected near crossroads in Novi Sad, Serbia, during December 2009 to assess metal concentrations (Ca, K, Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, Al, Pb and Na), fine particle distribution and pH value. The filtered samples of melted snow were analysed, with a focus on particles smaller than a few μm. The most common values of the frequency number distribution curve were either in the range of 0.05-0.07 μm or one order of magnitude higher (0.2-0.5 μm). At examined locations metal concentrations varied from 0.0004 mg L(-1) for Pb to 18.9 mg L(-1) for Na. Besides Na, which mostly originated from de-icing salt, Ca is found to be the most abundant element in snow indicating the dominant influence of natural factors on snow chemistry. No significant difference was found in concentration of the elements at locations near crossroads with either low or high traffic volume, except for Na and Zn. To investigate how metals were related a correlation analysis was done for the concentrations of metals and with respect to the particle size distribution parameters and pH values. The major influence on the fine particle volume (mass) was concluded to be due to the elements from anthropogenic sources. This conclusion was based on the significant positive correlation between Fe, Zn and Al and the fine particle volume based distribution parameters. PMID:22094049

  13. Traveling electric field probed by a fine particle above voltage-modulated strips in a striped electrode device

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Jiang Ke; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Zhang Wengui; Ma, J. X.

    2010-03-15

    It is described that the distribution of the horizontal electric field above a striped electrode can be inferred from the trajectory of a single fine particle with known mass and diameter. The striped electrode consists of 100 segmented stainless steel strips, each electrically insulated. A traveling periodic potential profile is produced above the striped electrode by modulating the voltage signals on the strips. When the voltage modulation is on, the fine particle, which is originally levitated in the sheath region above the striped electrode, experiences a periodic oscillation along both the vertical and the horizontal directions because of the periodic electric force arising from the modulation voltages. Tracking the motion of the fine particles, the electric force is obtained from the momentum equation including the gravity and the neutral gas friction. With the particle charge estimated by the vertical oscillation method, the electric field can be derived. The horizontal electric field obtained by this method is in agreement with the result predicted by a collisional particle-in-cell simulation.

  14. Impact of superplasticizer concentration and of ultra-fine particles on the rheological behaviour of dense mortar suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Artelt, C. Garcia, E.

    2008-05-15

    This work aims at investigating the impact of the addition of superplasticizer and of ultra-fine particles, namely of silica fume and of precipitated titania, on the rheological behaviour of water-lean mortar pastes. The pastes are characterised in terms of their spread, their flowing behaviour and by means of performing a shear test, giving access to viscosity/shear gradient correlations. Adding superplasticizer is shown to shift the onset of shear thickening of the referring pastes to higher shear rates and to attenuate its otherwise rapid evolution, possibly by means of favouring steric particle-particle interactions. The workability of these mortars, which is characterised in terms of spread values and draining, is also improved. For the case of fly ash based mortars, adding ultra-fine particles is another way of (slightly) 'retarding' shear thickening and of attenuating its evolution, possibly because of resulting in - on the average - lower hydrodynamic forces and reduced attractive Van der Waals interactions between particles. However, at the same time these mortars are characterised by a worsening in workability which is attributed to the huge amount of surface area provided by the ultra-fines.

  15. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The program objective is to generate ultra-fine catalyst particles (20 to 400 {Angstrom} in size) and quantify their potential for improving coal dissolution in the solubilization stage of two-stage catalytic-catalytic liquefaction systems. In the first quarterly report for this program the concept behind our approach was detailed, the structure of the program was presented, key technical issues were identified, preliminary designs were outlined, and technical progress was discussed. All progress made during the second quarter of this program related to experiment design of the proposed supercritical expansion technique for generating ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles. This second quarterly report, therefore, presents descriptions of the final designs for most system components; diagnostic approaches and designs for determining particles size and size distributions, and the composition of the pre-expansion supercritical solution; and the overall technique progress made during this reporting period. 6 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) was held in Perpignan from 24 to 27 June 2013, and was the continuation of the previous meetings held in Bangor (1996), Rome (1991), Barcelona (1999), Pittsburg (2002), London (2004), Rome (2007) and Uppsala (2010). The next meeting will be organized by Profs. Robert D. Shull, George Hadjipanayis and Cindi Dennis, in 2016 at NIST, Gaithersburg (USA). ICFPM is a small-sized conference focused on the magnetism of nanoparticles. It provides an international forum for discussing the state-of-the-art understanding of physics of these systems, of their properties and the underlying phenomena, as approached from a variety of directions: theory and modelling, experiments on well characterized or model systems (both fabricated and synthetised), as well as experiments on technologically-relevant non-ideal systems. This meeting brought together about 120 participants working on experimental, theoretical and applied topics of the multidisciplinary research areas covered by magnetic nanoparticles, with focused interest on either single-particle or collective phenomena. The technical program of the conference was based on keynote conferences, invited talks, oral contributions and poster sessions, covering the following aspects: . Fabrication, synthesis, characterization . Single particle, surface and finite-size effects on magnetic properties . Magnetization dynamics, micro-wave assisted switching, dynamical coupling . Assemblies, collective effects, self-assembling and nanostructuring . Applications : hyperthermia, drug delivery, magneto-caloric, magneto-resistance, magneto-plasmonics, magnetic particle imaging This ICFPM edition was organized by the group Nanoscale Spin Systems of the laboratory PROMES of the CNRS (UPR8521), and Université de Perpignan Via Domitia. The meeting took place at the Congress Center of the city of Perpignan providing high-quality facilities for the technical program as well for the

  17. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) was held in Perpignan from 24 to 27 June 2013, and was the continuation of the previous meetings held in Bangor (1996), Rome (1991), Barcelona (1999), Pittsburg (2002), London (2004), Rome (2007) and Uppsala (2010). The next meeting will be organized by Profs. Robert D. Shull, George Hadjipanayis and Cindi Dennis, in 2016 at NIST, Gaithersburg (USA). ICFPM is a small-sized conference focused on the magnetism of nanoparticles. It provides an international forum for discussing the state-of-the-art understanding of physics of these systems, of their properties and the underlying phenomena, as approached from a variety of directions: theory and modelling, experiments on well characterized or model systems (both fabricated and synthetised), as well as experiments on technologically-relevant non-ideal systems. This meeting brought together about 120 participants working on experimental, theoretical and applied topics of the multidisciplinary research areas covered by magnetic nanoparticles, with focused interest on either single-particle or collective phenomena. The technical program of the conference was based on keynote conferences, invited talks, oral contributions and poster sessions, covering the following aspects: . Fabrication, synthesis, characterization . Single particle, surface and finite-size effects on magnetic properties . Magnetization dynamics, micro-wave assisted switching, dynamical coupling . Assemblies, collective effects, self-assembling and nanostructuring . Applications : hyperthermia, drug delivery, magneto-caloric, magneto-resistance, magneto-plasmonics, magnetic particle imaging This ICFPM edition was organized by the group Nanoscale Spin Systems of the laboratory PROMES of the CNRS (UPR8521), and Université de Perpignan Via Domitia. The meeting took place at the Congress Center of the city of Perpignan providing high-quality facilities for the technical program as well for the

  18. Physicochemical properties and ability to generate free radicals of ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles in the atmosphere of Xuanwei, China, an area of high lung cancer incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Yi, Fei; Hao, Xiaojie; Yu, Shang; Ren, Jingjing; Wu, Minghong; Jialiang, Feng; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2014-11-01

    The link between the high incidence of lung cancer and harmful pollutants emitted by local coal combustion in Xuanwei, Yunnan province, China, has been a focus of study since the 1980s. However, the mechanisms responsible for the high lung cancer rate remain unclear, necessitating further study. Since a close relationship between ambient air particle pollution and respiratory diseases exists, we sampled size-resolved ambient particles from the atmosphere of Xuanwei. In our indoor experiment, cutting-edge methods, including scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray detection (SEM/EDX), particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and the cell-free DCFH-DA assay, were employed to investigate the physicochemical properties, the potential to generate free radicals and the oxidative potential of ambient coarse (diameter, 1.8-10 μm), fine (diameter, 0.1-1.8 μm), and ultrafine (diameter, <0.1 μm) particles. We found the total mass concentrations of the size-resolved particles collected in spring were higher than that in early winter. Mass percentage of fine particles accounted for 68% and 61% of the total particulate mass in spring and in early winter samples, respectively, indicating that fine particles were the major component of the Xuanwei ambient particulate matters. On the other hand, the results of SEM/EDX analysis showed that the coarse particles were dominated by minerals, the fine particles by soot aggregates and fly ashes, and the ultrafine particles by soot particles and unidentified particles. Our PIXE results revealed that crustal elements (Ca, Ti Si, Fe) were mainly distributed in coarse particles, while trace metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) dominated in the fine particle fraction, and S, a typical element emitted by coal combustion, mainly resided in fine particles collected from the winter atmosphere. EPR results indicated that the magnitude of free radical intensity caused by size

  19. SWeRF—A Method for Estimating the Relevant Fine Particle Fraction in Bulk Materials for Classification and Labelling Purposes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the European regulation for classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP) as well as the criteria as set out in the Globally Harmonized System (GHS), fine fraction of crystalline silica (CS) has been classified as a specific target organ toxicity, the specific organ in this case being the lung. Generic cut-off values for products containing a fine fraction of CS trigger the need for a method for the quantification of the fine fraction of CS in bulk materials. This article describes the so-called SWeRF method, the size-weighted relevant fine fraction. The SWeRF method combines the particle size distribution of a powder with probability factors from the EN 481 standard and allows the relevant fine fraction of a material to be calculated. The SWeRF method has been validated with a number of industrial minerals. This will enable manufacturers and blenders to apply the CLP and GHS criteria for the classification of mineral products containing RCS a fine fraction of CS. PMID:24389081

  20. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2001-05-04

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end we shall use an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined.

  1. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2001-08-01

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. For the Third Quarter of this project we present our data on trace metal partitioning obtained from combustion of MSS and Gas, MSS and Coal and Coal and Gas alone.

  2. Improving Simulations of Fine Dust Surface Concentrations over the Western United States by Optimizing the Particle Size Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li; Kok, Jasper F.; Henze, Daven; Li, Qinbin; Zhao, Chun

    2013-06-28

    To improve estimates of remote contributions of dust to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the western United States, new dust particle size distributions (PSDs) based upon scale-invariant fragmentation theory (Kok_PSD) with constraints from in situ measurements (IMP_PSD) are implemented in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Compared to initial simulations, this leads to reductions in the mass of emitted dust particles with radii <1.8 mm by 40%-60%. Consequently, the root-mean-square error in simulated fine dust concentrations compared to springtime surface observations in the western United States is reduced by 67%-81%. The ratio of simulated fine to coarse PM mass is also improved, which is not achievable by reductions in total dust emissions. The IMP_PSD best represents the PSD of dust transported from remote sources and reduces modeled PM2.5 concentrations up to 5 mg/m3 over the western United States, which is important when considering sources contributing to nonattainment of air quality standards. Citation: Zhang, L., J. F. Kok, D. K. Henze, Q. Li, and C. Zhao (2013), Improving simulations of fine dust surface concentrations over the western United States by optimizing the particle size distribution, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 3270-3275, doi:10.1002/grl.50591.

  3. Separation and recovery of fine particles from waste circuit boards using an inflatable tapered diameter separation bed.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chenlong; Sheng, Cheng; Wu, Lingling; Zhao, Yuemin; He, Jinfeng; Zhou, Enhui

    2014-01-01

    Recovering particle materials from discarded printed circuit boards can enhance resource recycling and reduce environmental pollution. Efficiently physically separating and recovering fine metal particles (-0.5 mm) from the circuit boards are a key recycling challenge. To do this, a new type of separator, an inflatable tapered diameter separation bed, was developed to study particle motion and separation mechanisms in the bed's fluid flow field. For 0.5-0.25 mm circuit board particles, metal recovery rates ranged from 87.56 to 94.17%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 87.71 to 94.20%. For 0.25-0.125 mm particles, metal recovery rates ranged from 84.76 to 91.97%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 84.74 to 91.86%. For superfine products (-0.125 mm), metal recovery rates ranged from 73.11 to 83.04%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 73.00 to 83.14%. This research showed that the inflatable tapered diameter separation bed achieved efficient particle separation and can be used to recover fine particles under a wide range of operational conditions. The bed offers a new mechanical technology to recycle valuable materials from discarded printed circuit boards, reducing environmental pollution. PMID:25379546

  4. Characterization of non-exhaust coarse and fine particles from on-road driving and laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji-hyun; Kim, Hongsuk; Lee, Janghee; Lee, Seokhwan

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical properties of non-exhaust coarse and fine particles generated by on-road driving and in a laboratory setting using a mobile sampling system. The on-road driving and laboratory measurements performed under constant speed driving revealed that particles produced by tire wear had a size distribution in the range of 2-3 μm, while roadway particles (RWPs) measured behind the front tire during on-road driving largely comprised crustal materials such as road surface wear particles and road dust as well as tire wear particles (TWPs). The mode diameters of particles obtained from on-road driving under cornering conditions were similar to those obtained under constant speed conditions, but with higher concentrations of crustal elements. Under braking conditions, the particulate matter (PM) concentrations of brake wear particles (BWPs) sampled near the brake pad increased significantly and were much higher than the concentration of RWPs during deceleration, indicating that BWPs are one of the main sources of non-exhaust emissions. In addition, BWPs observed from on-road and laboratory measurements had a broader PM size range (1-10 μm) than RWPs. Size-segregated chemical analysis of PM samples indicated that the concentrations of Fe and Ca were highest in the coarse fraction emitted under constant speed and cornering conditions, while Fe, Ba, and Ti were most abundant in the fine fraction emitted during braking events. PMID:23664985

  5. Separation and Recovery of Fine Particles from Waste Circuit Boards Using an Inflatable Tapered Diameter Separation Bed

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Cheng; Wu, Lingling; Zhao, Yuemin; He, Jinfeng; Zhou, Enhui

    2014-01-01

    Recovering particle materials from discarded printed circuit boards can enhance resource recycling and reduce environmental pollution. Efficiently physically separating and recovering fine metal particles (−0.5 mm) from the circuit boards are a key recycling challenge. To do this, a new type of separator, an inflatable tapered diameter separation bed, was developed to study particle motion and separation mechanisms in the bed's fluid flow field. For 0.5–0.25 mm circuit board particles, metal recovery rates ranged from 87.56 to 94.17%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 87.71 to 94.20%. For 0.25–0.125 mm particles, metal recovery rates ranged from 84.76 to 91.97%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 84.74 to 91.86%. For superfine products (−0.125 mm), metal recovery rates ranged from 73.11 to 83.04%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 73.00 to 83.14%. This research showed that the inflatable tapered diameter separation bed achieved efficient particle separation and can be used to recover fine particles under a wide range of operational conditions. The bed offers a new mechanical technology to recycle valuable materials from discarded printed circuit boards, reducing environmental pollution. PMID:25379546

  6. Measurement of fine particles and smoking activity in a statewide survey of 36 California Indian casinos

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ru O-Ting; Cheng, Ka I-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Klepeis, Neil E; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2011-01-01

    Despite California's 1994 statewide smoking ban, exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) continues in California's Indian casinos. Few data are available on exposure to airborne fine particles (PM2.5) in casinos, especially on a statewide basis. We sought to measure PM2.5 concentrations in Indian casinos widely distributed across California, exploring differences due to casino size, separation of smoking and non-smoking areas, and area smoker density. A selection of 36 out of the 58 Indian casinos throughout California were each visited for 1–3 h on weekend or holiday evenings, using two or more concealed monitors to measure PM2.5 concentrations every 10 s. For each casino, the physical dimensions and the number of patrons and smokers were estimated. As a preliminary assessment of representativeness, we also measured eight casinos in Reno, NV. The average PM2.5 concentration for the smoking slot machine areas (63 μg/m3) was nine times as high as outdoors (7 μg/m3), whereas casino non-smoking restaurants (29 μg/m3) were four times as high. Levels in non-smoking slot machine areas varied: complete physical separation reduced concentrations almost to outdoor levels, but two other separation types had mean levels that were 13 and 29 μg/m3, respectively, higher than outdoors. Elevated PM2.5 concentrations in casinos can be attributed primarily to SHS. Average PM2.5 concentrations during 0.5–1 h visits to smoking areas exceeded 35 μg/m3 for 90% of the casino visits. PMID:20160761

  7. A biopersistence study following exposure to chrysotile asbestos alone or in combination with fine particles.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, D M; Donaldson, K; Decker, U; Gaering, S; Kunzendorf, P; Chevalier, J; Holm, S E

    2008-09-01

    In designing a study to evaluate the inhalation biopersistence of a chrysotile asbestos that was used as a component of a joint-compound, a feasibility study was initiated to evaluate the short-term biopersistence of the chrysotile alone and of the chrysotile in combination with the sanded reformulated joint-compound. Two groups of Wistar rats were exposed to either 7RF3 chrysotile (Group 2) or to 7RF3 chrysotile combined with aerosolized sanded joint-compound (Group 3). In addition, a control group was exposed to filtered-air. The chrysotile used in the Ready Mix joint compound is rapidly removed from the lung. The chrysotile alone exposure group had a clearance half-time of fibers L > 20 microm of 2.2 days; in the chrysotile plus sanded exposure group the clearance half-time of fibers L > 20 microm was 2.8 days. However, across all size ranges there was approximately an order of magnitude decrease in the mean number of fibers remaining in the lungs of Group 3 as compared to Group 2 despite similiar aerosol exposures. Histopathological examination showed that the chrysotile exposed lungs had the same appearance as the filtered-air controls. This study uniquely illustrates that additional concurrent exposure to an aerosol of the sanded joint-compound, with large numbers of fine-particles depositing in the lungs, accelerates the recruitment of macrophages, resulting in a tenfold decrease in the number of fibers remaining in the lung. The increased number of macrophages in the chrysotile/sanded joint exposure group was confirmed histologically, with this being the only exposure-related histological finding reported. PMID:18788018

  8. A Biopersistence Study following Exposure to Chrysotile Asbestos Alone or in Combination with Fine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, D. M.; Donaldson, K.; Decker, U.; Gaering, S.; Kunzendorf, P.; Chevalier, J.; Holm, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    In designing a study to evaluate the inhalation biopersistence of a chrysotile asbestos that was used as a component of a joint-compound, a feasibility study was initiated to evaluate the short-term biopersistence of the chrysotile alone and of the chrysotile in combination witht the sanded reformulated joint-compound. Two groups of Wistar rats were exposed to either 7RF3 chrysotile (Group 2) or to 7RF3 chrysotile combined with aerosolized sanded joint-compound (Group 3). In addition, a control group was exposed to flltered-air. The chrysotile used in the Ready Mix joint compound is rapidly removed from the lung. The chrysotile alone exposure group had a clearance half-time of fibers L > 20 μm of 2.2 days; in the chrysotile plus sanded exposure group the clearance half-time of fibers L > 20 μm was 2.8 days. However, across all size ranges there was approximately an order of magnitude decrease in the mean number of fibers remaining in the lungs of Group 3 as compared to Group 2 despite similiar aerosol exposures. Histopathological examination showed that the chrysotile exposed lungs had the same appearance as the flltered-air controls. This study uniquely illustrates that additional concurrent exposure to an aerosol of the sanded joint-compound, with large numbers of fine-particles depositing in the lungs, accelerates the recruitment of macrophages, resulting in a tenfold decrease in the number of fibers remaining in the lung. The increased number of macrophages in the chrysotile/sanded joint exposure group was confirmed histologically, with this being the only exposure-related histological finding reported. PMID:18788018

  9. Highly time resolved fine particle nitrate measurements at the Baltimore Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, David; Shik Park, Seung; Ondov, John; Buckley, Timothy; Roul Kim, Sung; Jayanty, R. K. M.

    2004-10-01

    Nitrate in particles smaller than 2.5 μm was measured at 10-min intervals at the Baltimore Supersite in east Baltimore from 14 February through 30 November 2002, using the R&P 8400N semicontinuous monitor to determine its contributions to fine-particle aerosol mass concentrations. Comparison with 24-h filter-based measurements, revealed a discrepancy of 33% between the 24-h averages derived from the two methods, for most of the 9.5 month study period, despite corrections for conversion efficiency and Reaction Cell Pressure deviations, suggesting a true conversion efficiency of 68%. Estimates of precision in individual 10-min measurements averaged 8.7% and ranged from 6.3% to 23%, excluding uncertainty encompassing dissociation losses. Uncertainties in 24-h averages of the 10-min measurements were generally larger (median of 9.1%) owing to missing or invalid values. The detection limits for 24-h averaged and 10-min concentrations were typically 0.17 and 0.24 μg m-3, respectively, during the study (both after slope correction to achieve agreement with 24-h speciation measurements). Regression slopes were statistically equivalent for all months except February and October (an outlier not understood). Intercepts were generally small and insignificant. Good agreement between the 24-h data sets was achieved after the monthly mean regression slopes were applied to the 10-min data. In February, when flat flash strips were used and instrument compartment/outdoor ambient temperature differences were often severe, the regression slope was statistically larger than the average for the remaining months and the intercept was positive and significant. Results of a nonlinear least squares model used to estimate dissociation losses suggest that the largest errors occurred when concentrations are near the detection limit, instrument-outdoor temperature differences were large, and ambient RH low (< 40%), i.e., conditions which most frequently and severely occurred in February and

  10. The fine structure constant alpha: relevant for a model of a self-propelling photon and for particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl O.

    2015-09-01

    A model for a self propelling (i.e. massless) photon1 is based on oscillations of a pair of charges amounting to elementary charge divided by SQRT alpha, where alpha is the fine structure (Sommerfeld) constant. When one assumes a similar model for particles that do have rest mas (i.e. which are non- self propelling), alpha plays also a role in the rest masses of elementary particles. Indeed all fundamental elementary particle masses can be described by the alpha / beta rule2 --> m(particle) = alpha-n * betam* 27.2 eV /c2 where beta is the proton to electron mass ratio 183612 and n= 0….14, m= -1,0 or Thus, photons and particle masses are intimately related to the fine structure constant. If the latter would not have been strictly constant throughout all times, this would have had consequences for the nature of light and for all masses including those of elementary particles.

  11. The triggering of myocardial infarction by fine particles is enhanced when particles are enriched in secondary species

    PubMed Central

    Rich, David Q.; Özkaynak, Halûk; Crooks, James; Baxter, Lisa; Burke, Janet; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Kipen, Howard M.; Zhang, Junfeng; Kostis, John B.; Lunden, Melissa; Hodas, Natasha; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) associated with acute increases in PM concentration. Recently, we reported that MI/fine particle (PM2.5) associations may be limited to transmural infarctions. In this study, we retained data on hospital discharges with a primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (using International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision [ICD-9] codes), for those admitted January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006, who were ≥18 years of age, and were residents of New Jersey at the time of their MI. We excluded MI with a diagnosis of a previous MI and MI coded as a subendocardial infarction, leaving n=1563 transmural infarctions available for analysis. We coupled these health data with PM2.5 species concentrations predicted by the Community Multiscale Air Quality chemical transport model, ambient PM2.5 concentrations, and used the same case-crossover methods to evaluate whether the relative odds of transmural MI associated with increased PM2.5 concentration is modified by the PM2.5 composition/mixture (i.e. mass fractions of sulfate, nitrate, elemental carbon, organic carbon, and ammonium). We found the largest relative odds estimates on the days with the highest tertile of sulfate mass fraction (OR=1.13; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.27), nitrate mass fraction (OR=1.18; 95% CI = 0.98, 1.35), and ammonium mass fraction (OR=1.13; 95% CI = 1.00 1.28), and the lowest tertile of EC mass fraction (OR=1.17; 95% CI = 1.03, 1.34). Air pollution mixtures on these days were enhanced in pollutants formed through atmospheric chemistry (i.e., secondary PM2.5) and depleted in primary pollutants (e.g., EC). When mixtures were laden with secondary PM species (sulfate, nitrate, and/or organics) we observed larger relative odds of myocardial infarction associated with increased PM2.5 concentrations. Further work is needed to confirm these findings and examine which secondary PM2.5 component(s) is/are responsible for an acute MI

  12. Fine sediment and nutrient dynamics related to particle size and floc formation in a Burdekin River flood plume, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Zoe T; Wolanski, Eric; Alvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Lewis, Stephen E; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    The extreme 2010-2011 wet season resulted in highly elevated Burdekin River discharge into the Great Barrier Reef lagoon for a period of 200 days, resulting in a large flood plume extending >50km offshore and >100km north during peak conditions. Export of suspended sediment was dominated by clay and fine silt fractions and most sediment initially settled within ∼10km of the river mouth. Biologically-mediated flocculation of these particles enhanced deposition in the initial low salinity zone. Fine silt and clay particles and nutrients remaining in suspension, were carried as far as 100km northward from the mouth, binding with planktonic and transparent exopolymer particulate matter to form large floc aggregates (muddy marine snow). These aggregates, due to their sticky nature, likely pose a risk to benthic organisms e.g. coral and seagrass through smothering, and also by contributing to increased turbidity during wind-induced resuspension events. PMID:22364951

  13. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed. PMID:24346588

  14. Energy-filtered TEM imaging and EELS study of ODS particles and argon-filled cavities in ferritic-martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Klimiankou, M; Lindau, R; Möslang, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels with yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) have been produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing for use as advanced material in fusion power reactors. Argon gas, usually widely used as inert gas during mechanical alloying, was surprisingly detected in the nanodispersion-strengthened materials. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) led to the following results: (i) chemical composition of ODS particles, (ii) voids with typical diameters of 1-6 nm are formed in the matrix, (iii) these voids are filled with Ar gas, and (iv) the high-density nanosized ODS particles serve as trapping centers for the Ar bubbles. The Ar L(3,2) energy loss edge at 245 eV as well as the absorption features of the ODS particle elements were identified in the EELS spectrum. The energy resolution in the EEL spectrum of about 1.0 eV allows to identify the electronic structure of the ODS particles. PMID:15582472

  15. Source apportionment of ambient fine particle from combined size distribution and chemical composition data during summertime in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. R.; Wang, Y. S.; Liu, Q.; Hu, B.; Sun, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous particle number concentration and chemical composition data were collected over one month during summertime in Beijing to investigate the source apportionment of ambient fine particles. Particle size distributions from 15 nm to 2.5 μm in diameter and composition data, such as organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chlorine, and gaseous pollutants, were analyzed using positive matrix factorisation (PMF) which indentified eight factors: cooking, solid mode exhaust, nucleation mode exhaust, accumulation mode, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, coal-fired power plant and road dust. Nearly two-thirds of particle number concentrations were attributed to cooking (22.8%) and motor vehicle (37.5%), whereas road dust, coal-fired power plant and regional sources contributed 69.0% to particle volume concentrations. Local and remote sources were distinguished using size distributions associated with each factor. Local sources were generally characterised by unimodal or bimodal number distributions, consisting mostly of particles less 0.1 μm in diameter, and regional sources were defined by mostly accumulation mode particles. Nearly one third of secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate was transported from the surrounding areas of Beijing during study period. Overall the introduction of combination of particle number concentration and chemical composition in PMF model is successful at separating the components and quantifying relative contributions to the particle number and volume population in a complex urban atmosphere.

  16. Fabrication of carbon nano-tubes decorated with ultra fine superparamagnetic nano-particles under continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Chin, Suk Fun; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Raston, Colin L

    2008-03-01

    Ultra fine (2-3 nm) magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nano-particles are uniformly deposited on single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWCNTs) pre-functionalised with carboxylic acid groups using microwave radiation. The deposition process involves chemical precipitation associated with continuous flow spinning disc processing (SDP), as a rapid, environmentally friendly approach which is readily scalable for large scale synthesis. The resulting decorated SWCNTs are superparamagnetic with specific saturated magnetization of 30 emu g(-1). PMID:18305862

  17. Use of the electrical aerosol detector as an indicator of the surface area of fine particles deposited in the lung.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William E; Stanek, John; Han, Hee-Siew Ryan; Johnson, Tim; Sakurai, Hiromu; Pui, David Y H; Turner, Jay; Chen, Da-Ren; Duthie, Scott

    2007-02-01

    Because of recent concerns about the health effects of ultrafine particles and the indication that particle toxicity is related to surface area, we have been examining techniques for measuring parameters related to the surface area of fine particles, especially in the 0.003- to 0.5-microm size range. In an earlier study, we suggested that the charge attached to particles, as measured by a prototype of the Electrical Aerosol Detector (EAD, TSI Inc., Model 3070), was related to the 1.16 power of the mobility diameter. An inspection of the pattern of particle deposition in the lung as a function of particle size suggested that the EAD measurement might be a useful indicator of the surface area of particles deposited in the lung. In this study, we calculate the particle surface area (micrometer squared) deposited in the lung per cubic centimeter of air inhaled as a function of particle size using atmospheric particle size distributions measured in Minneapolis, MN, and East St. Louis, IL. The correlations of powers of the mobility diameter, Dx, were highest for X = 1.1-1.6 for the deposited surface area and for X = 1.25 with the EAD signal. This overlap suggested a correspondence between the EAD signal and the deposited surface area. The correlation coefficients of the EAD signal and particle surface area deposited in the alveolar and tracheobronchial regions of the lung for three breathing patterns are in the range of Pearson's r = 0.91-0.95 (coefficient of determination, R2 = 0.82-0.90). These statistical relationships suggest that the EAD could serve as a useful indicator of particle surface area deposited in the lung in exposure and epidemiologic studies of the human health effects of atmospheric particles and as a measure of the potential surface area dose for the characterization of occupational environments. PMID:17355082

  18. Comparison of fine particles emissions of light-duty gasoline vehicles from chassis dynamometer tests and on-road measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiezhu; Chen, Xudong; Yan, Zhenxing

    2013-04-01

    Fine particles are highly related to human health, especially ultrafine particles and nanoparticles. The mass of emissions from a gasoline vehicle is relatively lower than that of a diesel vehicle, but the number of gasoline vehicles in China is so huge that the number of fine particles can't be ignored. An on-board measurement system was established to measure the instantaneous number and mass size distributions of fine particles emitted from a light-duty gasoline vehicle under a real-world driving condition. The exhaust gas was sampled from the inside of the tailpipe. Measurements were carried out using a light-duty gasoline vehicle for goods on a chassis dynamometer and on urban streets in a downtown area of Nanjing. Size and time resolved data were obtained from an Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS). The system was operated under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and steady-state speed tests. The comparisons of size distribution and number concentration (NC) in different driving cycles in the real-world with the results from the chassis dynamometer are shown. The time proportion of operating modes in NEDC is different from that on real urban roads. The particle sizes for the NCs obey a bimodal distribution from the on-road data with mode sizes of 10.8 nm and 39.2 nm, while those from the chassis dynamometer tests obey a unimodal distribution with a mode size of 10.8 nm. The maximum NCs of particles were increased as the vehicle operating modes changed from idling, cursing to deceleration and acceleration from the on-board measurements, while compared to that from the on-board measurements, the maximum concentrations at the mode size were however in different order and the cruising mode became the second highest peak instead of the deceleration mode. The ratios of the NCs from the chassis dynamometers to that from on-road data in the speed of 15 km h-1, 32 km h-1, and 50 km h-1 are 2.78, 2.19, and 0.48, respectively. Similarly for the mass concentration

  19. Fine-particle sodium tracer for long-range transport of the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Borys, R.D.; Rogers, C.F.; Chow, J.C.; Stevens, R.K.

    1993-04-23

    Evidence for long-range transport of the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke during the months following the Persian Gulf War has been more or less indirect. However, more-recent data on the aerosol chemistry of Kuwaiti oil-fire plumes provides a direct link between those fires and aerosols collected at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) during the late spring and summer of 1991. By itself, temporal covariation of fine-particle concentrations of elemental carbon, sulfur, and the noncrustal V/Zn ratio in MLO aerosols suggested a link to large-scale oil-combustion sources, but not necessarily to Kuwait. However, high concentrations of fine-particle (0.1-1.0 microm diameter) NaCl were observed in the 'white' oil-fire plumes over Kuwait during the summer of 1991. In the absence of other demonstratable sources of fine-particle Na, these relationships provide a direct link between the Kuwaiti oil-fires and aerosol composition observed at MLO. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Geophysical Union.)

  20. Novel Wire-on-Plate Electrostatic Precipitator (WOP-EP) for Controlling Fine Particle and Nanoparticle Pollution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyi; Liu, Yingshu; Xing, Yi; Tran, Thi-Minh-Phuong; Le, Thi-Cuc; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2015-07-21

    A new wire-on-plate electrostatic precipitator (WOP-EP), where discharge wires are attached directly on the surface of a dielectric plate, was developed to ease the installation of the wires, minimize particle deposition on the wires, and lower ozone emission while maintaining a high particle collection efficiency. For a lab-scale WOP-EP (width, 50 mm; height, 20 mm; length, 180 mm) tested at the applied voltage of 18 kV, experimental total particle collection efficiencies were found as high as 90.9-99.7 and 98.8-99.9% in the particle size range of 30-1870 nm at the average air velocities of 0.50 m/s (flow rate, 30 L/min; residence time, 0.36 s) and 0.25 m/s (flow rate, 15 L/min; residence time, 0.72 s), respectively. Particle collection efficiencies calculated by numerical models agreed well with the experimental results. The comparison to the traditional wire-in-plate EP showed that, at the same applied voltage, the current WOP-EP emitted 1-2 orders of magnitude lower ozone concentration, had cleaner discharge wires after heavy particle loading in the EP, and recovered high particle collection efficiency after the grounded collection plate was cleaned. It is expected that the current WOP-EP can be scaled up as an efficient air-cleaning device to control fine particle and nanoparticle pollution. PMID:26114902

  1. Spatial Variation and Land Use Regression Modeling of the Oxidative Potential of Fine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Eeftens, Marloes; Beelen, Rob; Dons, Evi; Leseman, Daan L.A.C.; Brunekreef, Bert; Cassee, Flemming R.; Janssen, Nicole A.H.; Hoek, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative potential (OP) has been suggested to be a more health-relevant metric than particulate matter (PM) mass. Land use regression (LUR) models can estimate long-term exposure to air pollution in epidemiological studies, but few have been developed for OP. Objectives We aimed to characterize the spatial contrasts of two OP methods and to develop and evaluate LUR models to assess long-term exposure to the OP of PM2.5. Methods Three 2-week PM2.5 samples were collected at 10 regional background, 12 urban background, and 18 street sites spread over the Netherlands/Belgium in 1 year and analyzed for OP using electron spin resonance (OPESR) and dithiothreitol (OPDTT). LUR models were developed using temporally adjusted annual averages and a range of land-use and traffic-related GIS variables. Results Street/urban background site ratio was 1.2 for OPDTT and 1.4 for OPESR, whereas regional/urban background ratio was 0.8 for both. OPESR correlated moderately with OPDTT (R2 = 0.35). The LUR models included estimated regional background OP, local traffic, and large-scale urbanity with explained variance (R2) of 0.60 for OPDTT and 0.67 for OPESR. OPDTT and OPESR model predictions were moderately correlated (R2 = 0.44). OP model predictions were moderately to highly correlated with predictions from a previously published PM2.5 model (R2 = 0.37–0.52), and highly correlated with predictions from previously published models of traffic components (R2 > 0.50). Conclusion LUR models explained a large fraction of the spatial variation of the two OP metrics. The moderate correlations among the predictions of OPDTT, OPESR, and PM2.5 models offer the potential to investigate which metric is the strongest predictor of health effects. Citation Yang A, Wang M, Eeftens M, Beelen R, Dons E, Leseman DL, Brunekreef B, Cassee FR, Janssen NA, Hoek G. 2015. Spatial variation and land use regression modeling of the oxidative potential of fine particles. Environ Health Perspect 123

  2. Characterizing chemical transport of ozone and fine particles in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, Scott N.

    This dissertation presents a science framework relevant to evaluating impacts of land use policy scenarios, energy technologies, and climate on urban and regional air quality. Emerging from collaboration with urban planners, this work provides a means for employing atmospheric chemical transport modeling to understand environmental ramifications of long-term, spatially disaggregated changes in population and automobile emissions at the census tract level, and to assess the sensitivity of these changes to densification strategies. Toward these goals, the framework is used to evaluate model skill in resolving contemporary characteristics of ozone (O3) and speciated fine particles (PM2.5) in the Great Lakes region of North America, and to quantitatively explore meteorological processes that bring about observed features of these pollutants in the region. The Great Lakes were chosen due to a population concentrated in sprawling metropolitan areas, consistently high and widespread pollutant burdens, and seasonal effects of the lakes on the atmosphere. In annual simulation at 36 km resolution, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model is evaluated using speciated PM2.5 measurements taken at regulatory monitoring networks orientated to sample urban, rural, and remote areas. Performance relative to ad-hoc regional modeling goals and prior studies is average to excellent for most species throughout the year. Both pollution episodes and seasonality are captured. The Great Lakes affect pollution seasonality: strong winds advect aerosols around the deep marine boundary layer to lower surface PM2.5 in fall and winter, while O3 over the lakes is enhanced throughout the year, driven by temperature in the cool seasons and lake breeze circulation in spring and summer. Simulations confirm observational evidence that rural and small-city sources are responsible for most regional PM2.5. Sensitivities to urban and rural reductions are of comparable magnitude on a percentage basis

  3. The contribution of air-fluidization to the mobility of rapid flowslides involving fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilmant, Frédéric; Dewals, Benjamin; Archambeau, Pierre; Erpicum, Sébastien; Pirotton, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Air-fluidization can be the origin of the long runout of gravitational flows involving fine particles such as ash. An excessive air pore pressure dramatically reduces the friction angle of the material as long as this pressure has not been dissipated, which occurs during the flow. This phenomenon can be modelled thanks to the 2D depth-averaged equations of mass and momentum conservation and an additional transport equation for basal pore pressure evolution (Iverson and Denlinger, 2001). In this contribution, we discuss the application of this model in relation to recent experimental results on air-fluidized flows by Roche et al. (2008) and Roche (2012). The experimental results were used to set a priori the value of the diffusion coefficient in the model, taking into account the difference of scale between the experiments and real-world applications. We also compare the model predictions against detailed observations of a well-documented historical event, the collapse of a fly-ash heap in Belgium (Stilmant et al., 2015). In particular, we analyse the influence of the different components of the model on the results (pore pressure dissipation vs. pore pressure generation). The diffusion coefficient which characterizes the dissipation of air pore pressure is found sufficiently low for maintaining a fluidized flow over hundreds of meters. The study concludes that an air-fluidization theory is consistent with the field observations. These findings are particularly interesting as they seem not in line with the mainstream acceptation in landslide modelling that air generally plays a secondary role (e.g., Legros, 2002). References Iverson, R.M., Denlinger, R.P., 2001. Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain - 1. Coulomb mixture theory. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 537 552. Legros, F., 2002. The mobility of long-runout landslides. Eng. Geol. 63, 301-331. Roche, O., 2012. Depositional processes and gas pore pressure in pyroclastic flows: an

  4. Effects of Ambient Coarse, Fine, and Ultrafine Particles and Their Biological Constituents on Systemic Biomarkers: A Controlled Human Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Urch, Bruce; Poon, Raymond; Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw; Speck, Mary; Gold, Diane R.; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Scott, James A.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Thorne, Peter S.; Silverman, Frances S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles have been associated with mortality and morbidity. Few studies have compared how various particle size fractions affect systemic biomarkers. Objectives We examined changes of blood and urinary biomarkers following exposures to three particle sizes. Methods Fifty healthy nonsmoking volunteers, mean age of 28 years, were exposed to coarse (2.5–10 μm; mean, 213 μg/m3) and fine (0.15–2.5 μm; mean, 238 μg/m3) concentrated ambient particles (CAPs), and filtered ambient and/or medical air. Twenty-five participants were exposed to ultrafine CAP (< 0.3 μm; mean, 136 μg/m3) and filtered medical air. Exposures lasted 130 min, separated by ≥ 2 weeks. Blood/urine samples were collected preexposure and 1 hr and 21 hr postexposure to determine blood interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (inflammation), endothelin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; vascular mediators), and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation); as well as urinary VEGF, 8-hydroxy-deoxy-guanosine (DNA oxidation), and malondialdehyde. Mixed-model regressions assessed pre- and postexposure differences. Results One hour postexposure, for every 100-μg/m3 increase, coarse CAP was associated with increased blood VEGF (2.41 pg/mL; 95% CI: 0.41, 4.40) in models adjusted for O3, fine CAP with increased urinary malondialdehyde in single- (0.31 nmol/mg creatinine; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.60) and two-pollutant models, and ultrafine CAP with increased urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in single- (0.69 ng/mg creatinine; 95% CI: 0.09, 1.29) and two-pollutant models, lasting < 21 hr. Endotoxin was significantly associated with biomarker changes similar to those found with CAPs. Conclusions Ambient particles with various sizes/constituents may influence systemic biomarkers differently. Endotoxin in ambient particles may contribute to vascular mediator changes and oxidative stress. Citation Liu L, Urch B, Poon R, Szyszkowicz M, Speck M, Gold DR, Wheeler AJ, Scott

  5. Determining contributions of biomass burning and other sources to fine particle contemporary carbon in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Amanda S.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Munchak, Leigh A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.

    2011-02-01

    Six-day integrated fine particle samples were collected at urban and rural sampling sites using Hi-Volume samplers during winter and summer 2004-2005 as part of the IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments) Radiocarbon Study. Filter samples from six sites (Grand Canyon, Mount Rainier, Phoenix, Puget Sound, Rocky Mountain National Park, and Tonto National Monument) were analyzed for levoglucosan, a tracer for biomass combustion, and other species by High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography with Pulsed Amperometric Detection (HPAEC-PAD). Contemporary carbon concentrations were available from previous carbon isotope measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary contributions of biomass burning to measured fine particle contemporary carbon were estimated for residential wood burning (winter) and wild/prescribed fires (summer). Calculated contributions ranged from below detection limit to more than 100% and were typically higher at rural sites and during winter. Mannitol, a sugar alcohol emitted by fungal spores, was analyzed and used to determine contributions of fungal spores to fine particle contemporary carbon. Contributions reached up to 13% in summer samples, with higher contributions at rural sites. Concentrations of methyltetrols, oxidation products of isoprene, were also measured by HPAEC-PAD. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from isoprene oxidation was estimated to contribute up to 22% of measured contemporary carbon. For each sampling site, a substantial portion of the contemporary carbon was unexplained by primary biomass combustion, fungal spores, or SOA from isoprene oxidation. This unexplained fraction likely contains contributions from other SOA sources, including oxidation products of primary smoke emissions and plant emissions other than isoprene, as well as other primary particle emissions from meat cooking, plant debris, other biological aerosol particles, bio-diesel combustion, and other sources. Loss

  6. Health impacts due to personal exposure to fine particles caused by insulation of residential buildings in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, Alexandra; Hurley, J. Fintan; Tuomisto, Jouni T.; Friedrich, Rainer

    2014-02-01

    The insulation of residential buildings affects human exposure to fine particles. According to current EU guidelines, insulation is regulated for energy saving reasons. As buildings become tighter, the air exchange rate is reduced and, thus, the indoor concentration of pollutants is increased if there are significant indoor sources. While usually the effects of heat insulation and increase of the air-tightness of buildings on greenhouse gas emissions are highlighted, the negative impacts on human health due to higher indoor concentrations are not addressed. Thus, we investigated these impacts using scenarios in three European countries, i. e. Czech Republic, Switzerland and Greece. The assessment was based on modelling the human exposure to fine particles originating from sources of particles within outdoor and indoor air, including environmental tobacco smoke. Exposure response relationships were derived to link (adverse) health effects to the exposure. Furthermore, probable values for the parameters influencing the infiltration of fine particles into residential buildings were modelled. Results show that the insulation and increase of the air-tightness of residential buildings leads to an overall increase of the mean population exposure - and consequently adverse health effects - in all considered countries (ranging for health effects from 0.4% in Czech Republic to 11.8% in Greece for 100% insulated buildings) due to an accumulation of particles indoors, especially from environmental tobacco smoke. Considering only the emission reductions in outdoor air (omitting changes in infiltration parameters) leads to a decrease of adverse health effects. This study highlights the importance of ensuring a sufficient air exchange rate when insulating buildings, e. g. by prescribing heat ventilation and air conditioning systems in new buildings and information campaigns on good airing practice in renovated buildings. It also shows that assessing policy measures based on the

  7. Characteristics of water-soluble ions and carbon in fine and coarse particles collected near an open burning site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chen, Shui-Jen; Lin, Shao-Kai

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the chemical characteristics of particles that were collected from the open burning of wax apple agricultural waste, and evaluates the impact of such burning on regional air quality. The water-soluble ions, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) in fine (Dp ≤ 2.5 μm) and coarse (2.5 < Dp ≤ 10 μm) particles were collected using a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) and two Dichot samplers. The average PM2.5/PM10 ratio during open burning (0.90) was higher than those both before and after burning (0.57 and 0.55, respectively). The particle distributions before and during burning were bi-modal and uni-modal, respectively. During the open burning, the OC or K+ content markedly increased; however, that of secondary aerosol (NH4+, NO3- and SO42-) decreased. The Na+/Cl- molar ratios of fine particles before, after, and during the open burning 0.40, 0.18, and 0.24, respectively; however, the corresponding (Na+ + K+)/Cl- molar ratios were 0.74, 0.99, and 0.39, respectively. OC, K+ and Cl- were quite abundant in the open burning of agricultural waste (wax apple), and the OC/Na+, K+/Na+, and Cl-/Na+ (mass) ratios in fine particles (318, 10.2, and 10.5, respectively) may be used as reference indexes associated with the open burning of wax apple waste.

  8. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-02-05

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Progress in the Sixth Quarter (January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002) was slow because of slagging problems in the combustor. These required the combustor to be rebuilt, a job that is not yet complete. A paper describing our results heretofore has been accepted by the Journal Environmental Science and Technology.

  9. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2001-01-31

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end we shall use an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. For the First Quarter of this three year project work has centered around recruiting a graduate student to take responsibility for execution of portions of the research, and modifying the furnace and supporting equipment to allow the combustion of coal/MMS mixtures. We have readied the analytical panel for measuring NO{sub x} and other gaseous pollutants. We expect initial experiments for data gathering for coal/MSS mixtures to commence in the next Quarter.

  10. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-02-05

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. For the Fifth Quarter of this project we focus on determining whether certain trace metals are associated with certain major species, such as calcium and iron. To this end we present data showing correlations between As, Se,and Sb and major species, such as Ca and Fe. Conversely, lack of correlation between trace metals and elements, such as aluminum can also be used to infer lack of chemical association.

  11. Ultra-fine particles release from hardcopy devices: sources, real-room measurements and efficiency of filter accessories.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Michael; Schripp, Tobias; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2008-12-15

    The release of ultra-fine particles (UFP, d < 0.1 microm) from hardcopy devices such as laser printers into the indoor environment is currently a topic of high concern. The general emission behavior of a printer can be examined by conducting emission test chamber measurements with particle-counting devices. Chamber experiments with modified laser printers operated without toner or paper also revealed UFP emissions. On the basis of these results we reasonably doubt the opinion that UFPs primarily originate from the toner. Instead, the high-temperature fuser unit is assumed to be one source for ultra-fine particle emission. UFP release typically follows the flow path of the cooling air which may leave the printer casing at various points (e.g. the paper tray). This limits the usability of the commercial filter systems available because the released particles could leave the printer without passing through the filter. Chamber measurements with various filter systems retrofitted to a laser printer demonstrate different efficiencies of UFP reduction. Complementary experiments were carried out in an office room. Here the decay of the particle concentration after a print job was about ten times slower than in the test chamber. A toxicological assessment of the emitted particles requires that their chemical composition be known. Due to the low mass of the released UFPs chemical analysis needs a prior enrichment on a feasible media. Experiments using electrostatic precipitation showed a flame retardant (tri-xylyl phosphate) whose concentration on the media was dependent on the number of pages printed. Whether this compound was particle-bound could not be determined. PMID:18809204

  12. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-01

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained. PMID:25578046

  13. Fine-particle water and pH in the southeastern United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle water and pH are predicted using meteorological observations (relative humidity (RH), temperature (T)), gas/particle composition, and thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II). A comprehensive uncertainty analysis is included, and the model is validated. We investigate mass ...

  14. ASSESSMENT OF REGIONAL DEPOSITION DISTRIBUTION OF INHALED ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deposition site and dose of inhaled particles are key determinants in health risk assessment of particulate pollutants. Previous lung deposition studies have dealt largely with total lung deposition measurement. However, particle deposition does not take place uniformly in the lu...

  15. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  16. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Michelic, S.K.; Loder, D.; Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A.; Bernhard, C.

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  17. Effect of wood combustion conditions on the morphology of freshly emitted fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvela, T.; Tissari, J.; Sippula, O.; Kaivosoja, T.; Leskinen, J.; Virén, A.; Lähde, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    The physical and chemical properties of biomass combustion-originated particles produced under controlled conditions (efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion) were studied. Transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to study the morphology and chemical composition of the size-classified samples collected from the flue gas. In addition, online-measured particle number size distributions, chemical analyses of the PM samples, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were used to interpret the results. The particles were composed of inorganic species and carbonaceous matter. Zinc oxide particles with an average diameter of <13 nm acted as seeds for the condensation of inorganic vapours and organic material, forming ash particles with a nested structure. The outer layer was composed mainly of alkali salts. Soot and gaseous hydrocarbons were formed in high concentrations during the impaired combustion conditions. Two modes of particle size distribution were observed, with each exhibiting distinctive features. The main particle type found in the ultrafine particle size mode (<100 nm) was ash. Impairing the combustion conditions increased the release of soot and condensable organics into the PM, found mainly in the accumulation particle size mode (>100 nm). TEM observations of the size-classified samples revealed that condensed organic matter influenced the ash particle size and appearance. The soot morphology was also found to change, even after short periods of time, due to the presence of OM; changes in the primary particle diameter and the appearance of the agglomerates were observed. As external mixtures, the soot and ash particles were separated into two particle size modes, but both could be found as internally mixed from the accumulation mode. This result extends the current knowledge of particle formation in wood combustion, showing that the particle formation processes of ash and soot particles are largely

  18. Effect of the flame temperature on the characteristics of zirconium oxide fine particle synthesized by flame assisted spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2013-09-01

    Zirconium oxide fine particles were synthesized by flame assisted spray pyrolysis using zirconium chloride solution as precursor. Propane gas and air were used as a fuel and an oxidizer, respectively. The ratio of flow rate of oxidizer and fuel was maintained constant at 10:1 to ensure a complete combustion. Increasing fuel flow rate led to the increase of temperature distribution in the flame reactor. The intensity of XRD patterns increased with temperature and precursor concentration. Phase composition of zirconium oxide produced by this process consisted of monoclinic and tetragonal phases. The volume fraction of monoclinic phase of zirconium oxide increased with temperature and precursor concentration. The morphology particles observed by SEM resulted in spherical particles with size in the submicron range depending on the precursor concentration.

  19. EFFECTS OF INTERFACIAL PROPERTIES ON COLLECTION OF FINE PARTICLES BY WET SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of typical wet scrubber models to determine the effects of surface tension on particle removal efficiency. Particle capture (removal) is a two-step process: collision of a particle with a spray droplet, and coalescence with the droplet. A c...

  20. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated. PMID:23028013

  1. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ particle generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The research conducted by Textron Defense Systems (TDS) represents a potential new and innovative concept for dispersed coal liquefaction. The technical approach is generation of ultra-fine catalyst particles from supercritical solutions by rapid expansion of either catalyst only, or mixtures of catalyst and coal material in supersaturated solvents. The process of rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions was developed at Battelle`s Pacific Northwest Laboratories for the intended purpose of providing a new analytical technique for characterizing supercritical fluids. The concept forming the basis of this research is that ultra-fine particles can be generated from supercritical solutions by rapid expansion of either catalyst or catalyst/coal-material mixtures in supersaturated solvents, such as carbon dioxide or water. The focal point of this technique is the rapid transfer of low vapor pressure solute (i.e., catalyst), dissolved in the supercritical fluid solvent, to the gas phase as the solution is expanded through an orifice. The expansion process is characterized by highly nonequilibrium conditions which cause the solute to undergo extremely rapid supersaturation with respect to the solvent, leading to nucleation and particle growth resulting in nanometer size catalyst particles. A supercritical expansion system was designed and built by TDS at their Haverhill facility.

  2. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes.

  3. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes.

  4. A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-04

    A high strength ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of grains. The dual precipitate structure of finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix and coarse M23C6 at grain boundaries provides combined matrix and grain boundary strengthening. The calculated amount of precipitation strengthening by the carbides was approximately 450 ~ 630 MPa, depending on the average size of nanoscale precipitates. This value is two or three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, espectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The effect of the particle size, particle distribution and intrinsic particle strength have been investigated through dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and the relationship for resolved shear stress for single crystal under this condition has been presented using simulation data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results also show that strengthening is not only a function of the density of the nano-scale precipitates but also of their size.

  5. Role of mode of heating on the synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Prashant R.; Gaikwad, V. M.; Acharya, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, microwave-assisted coprecipitation route was used for synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite and results were compared with conventionally prepared zinc ferrite. Synthesis conditions were kept uniform in both cases, except that the mode of heating was changed. The effects of mode of heating on the material properties were studied systematically. Microstructures of both samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and the particle size was found to be in the range of 3-4 nm. Particle size distribution in microwave-processed MS-ZnFe2O4 is found to be highly uniform compared to conventionally processed samples (CS-ZnFe2O4). XRD data confirmed the presence of single-phase face-centered cubic structure for both the samples. The XRD data fitted well with Reitveld refinement. The functional groups were analyzed by FT-IR. Local distortions in the structures were studied by FT-Raman spectra of zinc ferrites at room temperature. This study concludes that the microwave-assisted synthesis route reduced the time of reaction by around 23 h and developed uniformly distributed fine-scaled particles. This method has high potential to synthesize other ferrite materials also.

  6. The 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR-1): instrumental intercomparisons and fine particle composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docherty, K. S.; Aiken, A. C.; Huffman, J. A.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.; Snyder, D. C.; Peltier, R. E.; Weber, R. J.; Grover, B. D.; Eatough, D. J.; Williams, B. J.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple state-of-the-art instruments sampled ambient aerosol in Riverside, California during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR) to investigate the chemical composition and potential sources of fine particles (PMf) in the inland region of Southern California. In this paper, we briefly summarize the spatial, meteorological and gas-phase conditions during SOAR-1 (15 July-15 August), provide detailed intercomparisons of high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) measurements against complementary measurements, and report the average composition of PMf including the composition of the organic fraction measured by the HR-AMS. Daily meteorology and gas-phase species concentrations were highly consistent, displaying clear diurnal cycles and weekday/weekend contrast. HR-AMS measurements of non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) mass are consistent and highly correlated with those from a filter dynamics measurement system tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), while the correlation between HR-AMS and heated TEOM measurements is lower due to loss of high volatility species including ammonium nitrate from the heated TEOM. Speciated HR-AMS measurements are also consistent with complementary measurements as well as with measurements from a collocated compact AMS while HR-AMS OC is similar to standard semi-continuous Sunset measurements within the combined uncertainties of both instruments. A correction intended to account for the loss of semi-volatile OC from the Sunset, however, yields measurements ~30% higher than either HR-AMS or standard Sunset measurements. On average, organic aerosol (OA) was the single largest component of PMf. OA composition was investigated using both elemental analysis and positive matrix factorization (PMF) of HR-AMS OA spectra. Oxygen is the main heteroatom during SOAR-1, with O/C exhibiting a diurnal minimum of 0.28 during the morning rush hour and maximum of 0.42 during the afternoon. O/C is broadly anti

  7. The 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR-1): instrumental intercomparisons and fine particle composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docherty, K. S.; Aiken, A. C.; Huffman, J. A.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.; Snyder, D. C.; Grover, B. D.; Eatough, D. J.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-02-01

    Multiple state-of-the-art instruments sampled ambient aerosol in Riverside, California during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR) to investigate sources and chemical composition of fine particles (PMf) in the inland region of Southern California. This paper briefly summarizes the spatial, meteorological and gas-phase conditions during SOAR-1 (15 July-15 August) and provides detailed intercomparisons of complementary measurements and average PMf composition during this period. Daily meteorology and gas-phase species concentrations were highly repetitive with meteorological and gas-phase species concentrations displaying clear diurnal cycles and weekday/weekend contrast, with organic aerosol (OA) being the single largest component contributing approximately one-third of PMf mass. In contrast with historical characterizations of OA in the region, several independent source apportionment efforts attributed the vast majority (~80%) of OA mass during SOAR-1 to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Given the collocation of complementary aerosol measurements combined with a dominance of SOA during SOAR-1, this paper presents new results on intercomparisons among several complementary measurements and on PMf composition during this period. Total non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) measurements from a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) are compared with measurements by tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOM) including a filter dynamics measurement system (TEOMFDMS). NR-PM1 is highly correlated with PM2.5 TEOMFDMS measurements and accounts for the bulk of PM2.5 mass with the remainder contributed primarily by refractory material. In contrast, measurements from a heated TEOM show substantial losses of semi-volatile material, including ammonium nitrate and semi-volatile organic material. Speciated HR-AMS measurements are also consistent and highly correlated with several complementary measurements, including those of a collocated compact AMS

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF FINE PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON AND DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic chemicals adsorbed to fine particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air account for a major component of the mass and include source tracers as well as toxic compounds that may contribute to adverse human health effects. The US EPA has established a PM 2.5 research progr...

  9. 78 FR 887 - Determination of Attainment for the Nogales Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Determination of Attainment for the Nogales Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine.... Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Summary of Proposed Action On October 30, 2012 (77 FR 65656), EPA... FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information collection burden under the provisions...

  10. 77 FR 65656 - Determination of Attainment for the Nogales Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Determination of Attainment for the Nogales Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine... secondary\\1\\ annual and 24-hour standards for PM 2.5 (62 FR 38652). The annual standard was set at 15.0... air pollutant in the ambient air. See CAA section 109(b). On October 17, 2006 (71 FR 61144),...

  11. POLAR ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN FINE PARTICLES FROM THE NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, AND CONNECTICUT REGIONAL AIRSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five key scientific questions guiding this research were explored. They are given here with results generated from the project.
     
    B.1.        How can polar organic compounds be measured in atmospheric fine particulate matter? Is there potential a...

  12. A study of ambient fine particles at Tianjin International Airport, China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianlin; Liu, Junjie; Li, Fei; Cao, Xiaodong; Ren, Shengxiong; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Yifang

    2016-06-15

    The total count number concentration of particles from 10 to 1000nm, particle size distribution, and PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter≤2.5μm) mass concentration were measured on a parking apron next to the runway at Tianjin International Airport in China. The data were collected 250, 270, 300, 350, and 400m from the runway. Wind direction and wind speed played important roles in determining the characteristics of the atmospheric particles. An inverted U-shaped relationship was observed between the measured particle number concentration and wind speed, with an average peak concentration of 2.2×10(5)particles/cm(3) at wind speeds of approximately 4-5m/s. The atmospheric particle number concentration was affected mainly by aircraft takeoffs and landings, and the PM2.5 mass concentration was affected mainly by the relative humidity (RH) of the atmosphere. Ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter<100nm), with the highest number concentration at a particle size of approximately 16nm, dominated the measured particle size distributions. The calculated particle emission index values for aircraft takeoff and landing were nearly the same, with mean values of 7.5×10(15)particles/(kg fuel) and 7.6×10(15)particles/(kg fuel), respectively. The particle emission rate for one aircraft during takeoff is two orders of magnitude higher than for all gasoline-powered passenger vehicles in Tianjin combined. The particle number concentrations remained much higher than the background concentrations even beyond 400m from the runway. PMID:26974567

  13. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  14. Method for making fine and ultrafine spherical particles of zirconium titanate and other mixed metal oxide systems

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2006-05-23

    Disclosed is a method for making amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate and crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate comprising the steps of mixing an aqueous solution of zirconium salt and an aqueous solution of titanium salt into a mixed solution having equal moles of zirconium and titanium and having a total salt concentration in the range from 0.01 M to about 0.5 M. A stearic dispersant and an organic solvent is added to the mixed salt solution, subjecting the zirconium salt and the titanium salt in the mixed solution to a coprecipitation reaction forming a solution containing amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate wherein the volume ratio of the organic solvent to aqueous part is in the range from 1 to 5. The solution of amorphous spherical particles is incubated in an oven at a temperature .ltoreq.100.degree. C. for a period of time .ltoreq.24 hours converting the amorphous particles to fine or ultrafine crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate.

  15. Size-resolved fine and ultrafine particle composition in Baltimore, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolocka, Michael P.; Lake, Derek A.; Johnston, Murray V.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2005-04-01

    The third-generation real-time single-particle mass spectrometer (RSMS-3) was deployed from March to December 2002 in Baltimore, Maryland, as part of the Baltimore Particulate Matter Supersite. The site was located to the east of the downtown area and northwest of many local industrial emission sites. RSMS-3 actively sampled and analyzed over 380,000 individual particles within the 48-770 nm size range. The resulting positive and negative ion spectra for each particle were classified using a neural network algorithm, adaptive resonance theory ART 2-a. A subset of these data, particles analyzed between 1 April and 30 November 2003, is presented here. Over 99% of these particles could be described by 10 major composition types. Ambient number concentrations were determined for each type and correlated with particle size, wind direction, and time of day/year. On the basis of this information, local and regional sources of different composition classes are postulated. Almost 40% of all particles in the Baltimore aerosol are internally mixed, consisting primarily of organic carbon, ammonium nitrate, and ammonium sulfate. Most of these particles are likely derived from regional sources. The remaining particles appear to be derived mainly from local sources and processes and include elemental carbon (almost 30%), ammonium nitrate (over 10%), and various metals (over 20%). The particle composition types found in Baltimore aerosol are compared to previous measurements in Houston and Atlanta.

  16. Biosynthesis of silver fine particles and particles decorated with nanoparticles using the extract of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Chávez, V. H. G.; Barriga-Castro, Enrique Díaz; Núñez, Nuria O.; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel

    2015-04-01

    Given the upsurge of new technologies based on nanomaterials, the development of sustainable methods to obtain functional nanostructures has become an imperative task. In this matter, several recent researches have shown that the biodegradable natural antioxidants of several plant extracts can be used simultaneously as reducing and stabilizing agents in the wet chemical synthesis of metallic nanoparticles, opening new opportunities to design greener synthesis. However, the challenge of these new techniques is to produce stable colloidal nanoparticles with controlled particle uniformity, size, shape and aggregation state, in similar manner than the well-established synthetic methods. In the present work, colloidal metallic silver nanoparticles have been synthesized using silver nitrate and extracts of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds at room temperature in a facile one-step procedure. The resulting products were colloidal suspensions of two populations of silver nanoparticles, one of them with particle sizes of few nanometers and the other with particles of tens of nm. Strikingly, the variation of the AgNO3/extract weight ratio in the reaction medium yielded to the variation of the spatial distribution of the nanoparticles: high AgNO3/extract concentration ratios yielded to randomly dispersed particles, whereas for lower AgNO3/extract ratios, the biggest particles appeared coated with the finest nanoparticles. This biosynthesized colloidal system, with controlled particle aggregation states, presents plasmonic and SERS properties with potential applications in molecular sensors and nanophotonic devices.

  17. Biosynthesis of silver fine particles and particles decorated with nanoparticles using the extract of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds.

    PubMed

    Luna, Carlos; Chávez, V H G; Barriga-Castro, Enrique Díaz; Núñez, Nuria O; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel

    2015-04-15

    Given the upsurge of new technologies based on nanomaterials, the development of sustainable methods to obtain functional nanostructures has become an imperative task. In this matter, several recent researches have shown that the biodegradable natural antioxidants of several plant extracts can be used simultaneously as reducing and stabilizing agents in the wet chemical synthesis of metallic nanoparticles, opening new opportunities to design greener synthesis. However, the challenge of these new techniques is to produce stable colloidal nanoparticles with controlled particle uniformity, size, shape and aggregation state, in similar manner than the well-established synthetic methods. In the present work, colloidal metallic silver nanoparticles have been synthesized using silver nitrate and extracts of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds at room temperature in a facile one-step procedure. The resulting products were colloidal suspensions of two populations of silver nanoparticles, one of them with particle sizes of few nanometers and the other with particles of tens of nm. Strikingly, the variation of the AgNO3/extract weight ratio in the reaction medium yielded to the variation of the spatial distribution of the nanoparticles: high AgNO3/extract concentration ratios yielded to randomly dispersed particles, whereas for lower AgNO3/extract ratios, the biggest particles appeared coated with the finest nanoparticles. This biosynthesized colloidal system, with controlled particle aggregation states, presents plasmonic and SERS properties with potential applications in molecular sensors and nanophotonic devices. PMID:25659741

  18. Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Adel, Gregory T.; Luttrell, Gerald H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator.

  19. Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator. 23 figures.

  20. Source apportionment of ambient fine particle size distribution using positive matrix factorization in Erfurt, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wei; Stölzel, Matthias; Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Heinrich, Joachim; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Peters, Annette; Wang, Sheng; Hopke, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Particle size distribution data collected between September 1997 and August 2001 in Erfurt, Germany were used to investigate the sources of ambient particulate matter by positive matrix factorization (PMF). A total of 29,313 hourly averaged particle size distribution measurements covering the size range of 0.01 to 3.0 μm were included in the analysis. The particle number concentrations (cm−3) for the 9 channels in the ultrafine range, and mass concentrations (ng m−3) for the 41 size bins in the accumulation mode and particle up to 3 μm in aerodynamic diameter were used in the PMF. The analysis was performed separately for each season. Additional analyses were performed including calculations of the correlations of factor contributions with gaseous pollutants (O3, NO, NO2, CO and SO2) and particle composition data (sulfate, organic carbon and elemental carbon), estimating the contributions of each factor to the total number and mass concentration, identifying the directional locations of the sources using the conditional probability function, and examining the diurnal patterns of factor scores. These results were used to assist in the interpretation of the factors. Five factors representing particles from airborne soil, ultrafine particles from local traffic, secondary aerosols from local fuel combustion, particles from remote traffic sources, and secondary aerosols from multiple sources were identified in all seasons. PMID:18433834

  1. Fine and ultrafine TiO2 particles in aerosol in Kraków (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczyńska-Michalik, Wanda; Rzeźnikiewicz, Kamil; Pietras, Bartłomiej; Michalik, Marek

    2014-12-01

    During single particle analysis of aerosol in Kraków (Poland) we noticed a new component, that is, aggregates of TiO2 particles. These aggregates are from 0.5 to 4 μm and are composed of individual particles whose size typically varies from between 100 and 350 nm. Smaller particles (below 100 nm) also occur. TiO2 particles are relatively abundant in the summer. The size distribution of the particles corresponds to "pigmentary" TiO2, which indicates that they could be derived from paints and building materials. TiO2 particles were not previously identified in aerosol samples in Kraków, and therefore this phenomenon is likely to be related to the common usage of new building materials and paints. A review of the literature suggests that TiO2 particles, especially within the nanosize range, could result in health and environmental impacts; however, evaluation of the actual threat is difficult.

  2. Investigation of fine atmospheric particle surfaces and lung lining fluid interactions using XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michaela; Hutton, Bernie M.; Tetley, Terry D.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Wigzell, Edward; Jones, Frances H.

    2001-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine surface chemical composition of atmospheric particles before and after immersion in saline and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Atmospheric particulate matter (PM 2.5) was collected on PTFE filters from clean air, outdoor urban and smoke-filled indoor sites. Low particle loads were present from the clean air site and the particle surface consisted of carbon, Cl - and oxide species. An increase in particle load was observed for the outdoor urban site with C(C, H) compounds dominating the particle surface. There was a significant contribution from C(O, N) and CO/COO-functionalities as well as oxides with traces of NO 3-, NH 4+, amide, SiC and SO 42- present. A further increase in particle load was observed for the smoke-filled indoor site. The surface consisted of 97% C(C, H) compounds with traces of oxide, amide and SiO 2. The particle load was reduced in all cases after immersion in saline mainly due to removal of loosely bound particles, especially for carbon. Changes in surface composition of the particles were also observed with removal of Cl - from the clean air site, NO 3-, NH 4+, amide, SO 42- and SiC from the urban air site and SiO 2 from the indoor smoke site; these species were deemed to be bio-available. Similar results were obtained after immersion in BALF. However, there was evidence of interaction of constituents from BALF with particles collected from the outdoor urban and indoor smoke sites. A strong amide signal was observed on particles remaining on the filter after immersion in BALF suggesting that possibly proteins or other N-containing biomolecular species from BALF were adsorbed on the surface of these particles. The surface concentrations of amide, oxide, C(O, N) and CO/COO - varied between outdoor urban and indoor smoke particles after immersion in BALF. This infers that a different interaction is occurring between BALF constituents and outdoor urban and indoor

  3. Study of water-oil emulsion combustion in large pilot power plants for fine particle matter emission reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Allouis, C.; Beretta, F.; L'Insalata, A.; Fortunato, L.; Saponaro, A.

    2007-04-15

    The combustion of heavy fuel oil for power generation is a great source of carbonaceous and inorganic particle emissions, even though the combustion technologies and their efficiency are improving. The information about the size distribution function of the particles originated by trace metals present into the fuels is not adequate. In this paper, we focused our attention the influence of emulsion oil-water on the larger distribution mode of both the carbonaceous and metallic particles. Isokinetic sampling was performed at the exhausts of flames of a low-sulphur content heavy oil and its emulsion with water produced in two large pilot plants. The samples were size-segregated by mean of an 8-stages Andersen impactor. Further investigation performed on the samples using electronic microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX) evidenced the presence of solid spherical particles, plerosphere, with typical dimensions ranging between 200 nm and 2-3 {mu}m, whose atomic composition contains a large amount of the trace metals present in the parent oils (Fe, V, Ni, etc.). EDX analyses revealed that the metal concentration increases as the plerosphere dimension decreases. We also observed that the use of emulsion slightly reduce the emission of fine particles (D{sub 50} < 8 {mu}m) in the large scale plant. (author)

  4. Stochastic model for photon noise induced by charged particles in multiplier phototubes of the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.; Kennel, H. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Telescope (ST) is subjected to charged particle strikes in its space environment. ST's onboard fine guidance sensors utilize multiplier phototubes (PMT) for attitude determination. These tubes, when subjected to charged particle strikes, generate spurious photons in the form of Cerenkov radiation and fluorescence which give rise to unwanted disturbances in the pointing of the telescope. A stochastic model for the number of these spurious photons which strike the photocathodes of the multiplier phototube which in turn produce the unwanted photon noise are presented. The model is applicable to both galactic cosmic rays and charged particles trapped in the earth's radiation belts. The model which was programmed allows for easy adaption to a wide range of particles and different parameters for the phototube of the multiplier. The probability density functions for photons noise caused by protons, alpha particles, and carbon nuclei were using thousands of simulated strikes. These distributions are used as part of an overall ST dynamics simulation. The sensitivity of the density function to changes in the window parameters was also investigated.

  5. A stochastic model for photon noise induced by charged particles in multiplier phototubes of the space telescope fine guidance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.; Kennel, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Space Telescope (ST) is subjected to charged particle strikes in its space environment. ST's onboard fine guidance sensors utilize multiplier phototubes (PMT) for attitude determination. These tubes, when subjected to charged particle strikes, generate spurious photons in the form of Cerenkov radiation and fluorescence which give rise to unwanted disturbances in the pointing of the telescope. A stochastic model for the number of these spurious photons which strike the photocathode of the multiplier phototube which in turn produce the unwanted photon noise are presented. The model is applicable to both galactic cosmic rays and charged particles trapped in the Earth's radiation belts. The model which was programmed allows for easy adaption to a wide range of particles and different parameters for the phototube of the multiplier. The probability density functions for photons noise caused by protons, alpha particles, and carbon nuclei were using thousands of simulated strikes. These distributions are used as part of an overall ST dynamics simulation. The sensitivity of the density function to changes in the window parameters was also investigated.

  6. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  7. A study of multistage multifunction column for fine particle separation: Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Shiao Hung

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of the research program is to explore the potential application of a new invention involving a multistage column equipped with concentric draft-tubes (hereafter referred to as the multistage column) for fine coal cleaning and other fluid/particle separation processes. The research work will identify the design parameters and their effects on the performance of the separation process. The results of this study will provide an engineering basis for further development of this technology in coal cleaning and in the general areas of fluid/particle separation. In the last quarter, we initiated the wastewater treatment tests program to verify the multifunction features of the multistage column. The set-up of the test equipment and analytic instrument were completed. During this period, we performed a series of oily water cleaning tests.

  8. A study of multi-stage/multifunction column for fine particle separation. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    The overall objective of the research program is to explore the potential application of a new invention involving a multistage column equipped with concentric draft-tubes (hereafter referred to as the multistage column) for fine coal cleaning and other fluid/particle separation processes. The research work will identify the design parameters and their effects on the performance of the separation process. The results of this study will provide an engineering basis for further development of this technology in coal cleaning and in the general areas of fluid/particle separation. Wastewater treatment tests program was conducted during this quarter. Preliminary tests showed that the multistage column had superior performance to conventional column. In both batch and continuous operations, the oil removal efficiencies were higher than 90%. The results were also compared with data reported in the open literature. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Physical properties and structure of fine core-shell particles used as packing materials for chromatography relationships between particle characteristics and column performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of new brands of packing materials made of fine porous-shell particles, e.g., Halo and Kinetex, has brought great improvements in potential column efficiency, demanding considerable progress in the design of chromatographic instruments. Columns packed with Halo and Kinetex particles provide minimum values of their reduced plate heights of nearly 1.5 and 1.2, respectively. These packing materials have physical properties that set them apart from conventional porous particles. The kinetic performance of 4.6 mm I.D. columns packed with these two new materials is analyzed based on the results of a series of nine independent and complementary experiments: low-temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), Coulter counter particle size distributions, pycnometry, height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP), peak parking method (PP), total pore blocking method (TPB), and local electrochemical detection across the column exit section (LED). The results of this work establish links between the physical properties of these superficially porous particles and the excellent kinetic performance of columns packed with them. It clarifies the fundamental origin of the difference in the chromatographic performances of the Halo and the Kinetex columns.

  10. Enrichment of heavy metals in fine particles of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash and associated health risk.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jizhi; Wu, Simiao; Pan, Yun; Zhang, Lingen; Cao, Zhenbang; Zhang, Xiaoqiao; Yonemochi, Shinichi; Hosono, Shigeo; Wang, Yao; Oh, Kokyo; Qian, Guangren

    2015-09-01

    During the pretreatment and recycling processes, the re-suspended dust from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash might pose a significant health risk to onsite workers due to its toxic heavy metal content. In this work, the morphological and mineralogical characteristics of fly ash in different particle sizes are presented. The concentrations of seven trace elements (Zn, Pb, Cu, Cd, Cr, Fe and Mn) in these samples were determined. The results show that volatile metals, such as Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd, were easily concentrated in the fine particles, especially in Dp2.5-1 and Dp1, with soluble and exchangeable substances as the main chemical species. The health risk assessment illustrated that the cumulative hazard indexes for non-carcinogenic metals in Dp10-5, Dp5-2.5, Dp2.5-1, and Dp1 were 1.69, 1.41, 1.78 and 2.64, respectively, which were higher than the acceptable threshold values (1.0). The cumulative carcinogenic risk was also higher than the threshold value (10(-6)). For the onsite workers, the relatively apparent non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic effects were from Pb and Cr, respectively. The above findings suggest that fine-grained fly ash contained a considerable amount of heavy metals and exhibited a great health risk. PMID:26148642

  11. Seasonal variation of source contributions to atmospheric fine and coarse particles at suburban area in Istanbul, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Karaca, F.; Alagha, O.; Erturk, F.; Yilmaz, Y.Z.; Ozkara, T.

    2008-06-15

    Daily samples of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particles were collected from July 2002 to July 2003 to provide a better understanding of the elemental concentration and source contribution to both PM fractions. Sampling location represents suburban part of Istanbul metropolitan city. Samples were collected on Teflon filters using a 'Dichotomous Sampler.' Concentrations of Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were measured by GFAAS, FAAS, and FAES techniques. Elemental variations of heating and nonheating seasons were discussed. Fossil fuel-related atmospheric metals dramatically increased during the heating season, while natural originated atmospheric metals increased during the nonheating season. Seasonal variations of source contributions were evaluated using factor analysis, which was separately applied to the collected fine and coarse particles data sets during heating and nonheating seasons (four data sets: PM2.5 heating, PM2.5 nonheating, PM2.5-10 heating, and PM2.5-10 nonheating). Significant seasonal differences in source contributions were observed. Four factor groups were extracted for PM2.5 dataset during the nonheating season, while five factor groups were extracted for all the other cases. Mineral dust transportation, traffic, and industry-related activities were classified as different factor groups in all the cases.

  12. On-surface and laboratory size measurements of fine lunar particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Strand, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of particle size distribution in Apollo 12 sample 12029-8 in the laboratory and in Surveyor 3 scoop material by remote photometry. A table is compiled to summarize the data obtained by various authors from all Surveyor missions.

  13. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-08-15

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO2 control, NOx control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research has yielded data on trace metal partitioning for MSS by itself, with natural gas assist, for coal plus MSS combustion together, and for coal alone. We have re-evaluated the inhalation health effects of ash aerosol from combustion of MSS both by itself and also together with coal. We have concluded that ash from the co-combustion of MSS and coal is very much worse from an inhalation health point of view, than ash from either MSS by itself or coal by itself. The reason is that ZnO is not the ''bad actor'' as had been suspected before, but the culprit is, rather, sulfated Zn. The MSS supplies the Zn and the coal supplies the sulfur, and so it is the combination of coal and MSS that makes that process environmentally bad. If MSS is to be burned, it should be burned without coal, in the absence of sulfur.

  14. Dynamic variations of ultrafine, fine and coarse particles at the Lu-Lin background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Chieh; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Lin, Neng-Huei; Lee, Chung-Te; Roam, Gwo-Dong; Pui, David Y. H.

    2013-10-01

    The characteristics of atmospheric ultrafine particles (i.e. <100 nm, nanoparticles or PM0.1), PM2.5 and PM10 were studied at the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (LABS, 2862 m a.s.l., Taiwan) as part of the 7SEAS/Dongsha campaign. Sampling was conducted in July and August of 2009 and September to November of 2010, during which two 96-h and four 72-h PM samples were taken. Real-time particle size distributions were measured continuously from July to August of 2009 and July to November of 2010. PM0.1, PM2.5 and PM10 were collected by using two MOUDIs (micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor, MSP 110) and a Dichotomous PM10 sampler (Andersen SA-241) while real-time size distributions of particles of 5.5-350 nm in diameter were measured by an SMPS (scanning mobility particle sizer, TSI 3936). Filter samples were analyzed for gravimetric mass and chemical compositions, including organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), water-soluble ions and trace elements. Meteorology parameters and gaseous O3 and CO concentrations were also monitored along with the SMPS data for studying particle nucleation, condensation, SOA (secondary organic aerosol) formation and long-range air pollutant transport at the LABS. SMPS data showed that nanoparticle concentrations at the LABS remained relatively stable at low level (˜300-500 #/cm3) during the nighttime (22:00-04:00), increased during daytime, and reached a maximum (˜2000-4000 #/cm3) in the afternoon (12:00-16:00). The NMD (number median diameter) showed an opposite trend with the peak number concentrations observed in the afternoon corresponding to the smallest NMD (20-40 nm). These results indicate the dominance of local sources rather than the transport from other atmospheric air because that the lifetime of nanoparticles was only few minutes. Chemical analysis of filter samples showed that the concentrations of trace elements K and Mn, which serve as biomass burning markers, were elevated in the fine particle fractions during

  15. Strategies for testing the irritation-signaling model for chronic lung effects of fine acid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hattis, D.; Abdollahzadeh, S.; Franklin, C.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The irritation signaling model proposed that a long term contribution to chronic bronchitis might result from the repeated delivery of signals resulting from temporary localized acidification of the bronchial epithelium by the action of individual particles. This led to a prediction that the effectiveness of particles in inducing changes in mucus secreting cell numbers/types should depend on the number of particles deposited that contained a particular amount of acid--implying that particles below a certain size cutoff (and therefore lacking a minimum amount of acid) should be ineffective; and that particle potency per unit weight should be greatest at the cutoff and decline strongly above the cutoff. Since the development of this hypothesis both epidemiological observations and some experimental studies have tended to reinforce the notion that acid particles can make a contribution to relatively long lasting bronchitic-like changes, and enhance the desirability of more direct testing of the model. In this paper we develop a general theoretical framework for the contributions of environmental agents to chronic obstructive lung disease, and a series of alternative hypotheses against which the predictions of the irritant signaling model can be compared. Based on this, we suggest a research program that could be used to further develop and test the model and reasonable alternatives. 82 references.

  16. Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.H.; Saiers, J.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Noe, G.B.; Mylon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of particulate matter within wetland surface waters affects nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility, and the evolution of the wetland landscape. Despite the importance of particle transport in influencing wetland form and function, there are few data sets that illuminate, in a quantitative way, the transport behavior of particulate matter within surface waters containing emergent vegetation. We report observations from experiments on the transport of 1 ??m latex microspheres at a wetland field site located in Water Conservation Area 3A of the Florida Everglades. The experiments involved line source injections of particles inside two 4.8-m-long surface water flumes constructed within a transition zone between an Eleocharis slough and Cladium jamaicense ridge and within a Cladium jamaicense ridge. We compared the measurements of particle transport to calculations of two-dimensional advection-dispersion model that accounted for a linear increase in water velocities with elevation above the ground surface. The results of this analysis revealed that particle spreading by longitudinal and vertical dispersion was substantially greater in the ridge than within the transition zone and that particle capture by aquatic vegetation lowered surface water particle concentrations and, at least for the timescale of our experiments, could be represented as an irreversible, first-order kinetics process. We found generally good agreement between our field-based estimates of particle dispersion and water velocity and estimates determined from published theory, suggesting that the advective-dispersive transport of particulate matter within complex wetland environments can be approximated on the basis of measurable properties of the flow and aquatic vegetation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Transport of intranasally instilled fine Fe2O3 particles into the brain: micro-distribution, chemical states, and histopathological observation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Feng, Wei Y; Wang, Meng; Shi, Jun W; Zhang, Fang; Ouyang, Hong; Zhao, Yu L; Chai, Zhi F; Huang, Yu Y; Xie, Ya N; Wang, Hai F; Wang, Jing

    2007-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that inhaled fine (d < 2.5 microm) and ultrafine (d < 100 nm) particles produce more severe toxicity than coarse particles. Some recent data support the concept that the central nervous system (CNS) may be a target for the inhaled fine particulates. This work describes initial observation of the transport of intranasally instilled fine ferric oxide (Fe2O3) particles in animal brain. The iron micro-distribution and chemical state in the mice olfactory bulb and brain stem on day 14 after intranasal instillation of fine Fe2O3 particle (280 +/- 80 nm) suspension at a single dose of 40 mg/kg body weight were analyzed by synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The micro-distribution map of iron in the olfactory bulb and brain stem shows an obvious increase of Fe contents in the olfactory nerve and the trigeminus of brain stem, suggesting that Fe2O3 particles were possibly transported via uptake by sensory nerve endings of the olfactory nerve and trigeminus. The XANES results indicate that the ratios of Fe (III)/Fe (II) were increased in the olfactory bulb and brain stem. The further histopathological observation showed that the neuron fatty degeneration occurred in the CA3 area of hippocampus. Such results imply an adverse impact of inhalation of fine Fe2O3 particles on CNS. PMID:17916926

  18. Development of Historical Coefficient-of-Haze Datasets as a Surrogate for Fine Particle Air Quality Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. C.

    2002-05-01

    Recent developments in the instrumentation methods for measuring airborne fine particles have permitted the comparison of the Coefficient-of-Haze (COH) parameter with Black Carbon (BC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) continuous measurements via Aethalometer. The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) performed a field study in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during 1992 which revealed a strong linear relationship between COH and BC (R=0.994, p-value<0.001). An earlier HSPH study in Uniontown, Pennsylvania (1990) demonstrated that BC is a reliable surrogate for EC. Elemental Carbon is produced only by combustion of carbon-based fuels. EC is persistent in the atmosphere with no known contribution from atmospheric reactions. As a result EC is an indicator of the fine particulate mass contributed by all combustion sources including power plants, automobiles, incineration, and residential heating systems. The Coefficient-of-Haze parameter was developed in 1953 to describe the atmospheric particulate burden from "smoke". The basic measurement consists of drawing a volume of air through a filter. The deposited particles form a spot on the filter, which is then evaluated for light transmission. This system was capable of limited automation through the application of a roll of filter paper, which could be automatically advanced by a timer to allow data collection on an hourly basis. Until very recently all other generally available particle measurement methods were limited to a 24-hour composite sample. In 1998 the authors of the HSPH study proposed that the analysis of historical COH datasets in urban areas in the post-WWII era would be useful in retrospective epidemiological studies concerning the health effects of fine particles. The City of Philadelphia operated six COH monitoring sites during the period 1956 through 1975. All of the datasets were in paper format. The Philadelphia Department of Public Health in cooperation with the Hahnemann University Medical School (now managed

  19. [Pollution characteristics and source of the atmospheric fine particles and secondary inorganic compounds at Mount Dinghu in autumn season].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Rui; Wang, Yue-Si; Liu, Quan; Liu, Lu-Ning; Zhang, De-Qiang

    2011-11-01

    Real-time measurements of PM2.5, secondary inorganic compounds in PM2.5 (SO4(2-), NH4(+), and NO3(-)) and related gaseous pollutants were conducted at Mount Dinghu, a regional background station of the Pearl River Delta (PRD), in October and November 2008 by using a conventional R&P TEOM and a system of rapid collection of fine particles and ion chromatography (RCFP-IC). Sources and transportation of atmospheric particles during the experiment were discussed with principal component analysis and backward trajectories calculated using HYSPLIT model. The average daily mass concentrations of PM2.5 were 76.9 microg x m(-3) during sampling period, and average daily mass concentrations of SO4(2-), NH4(+), and NO3(-) were 20.0 microg x m(-3), 6.8 microg x m(-3) and 2.6 microg x m(-3), respectively. The sum of these three secondary inorganic compounds accounted for more than one third of the PM2.5 mass concentration, which had become the major source of atmospheric fine particles at Mount Dinghu. The diurnal variation of PM2.5, SO4(2-), and NH4(+) all showed a "bimodal" distribution with two peaks appeared at 10:00 am and at 16:00 pm, respectively, whereas NO3(-s) howed "single peak" distribution peaked at 10:00 am. The mass concentrations of SO4(2-) in PM2.5 had the similar diurnal variation with that of SO2, SO4(2-) in PM2.5 was mainly transformed from SO2, whereas NO3(-) showed difference diurnal variation with that of NO2, and the second conversion rate of NO2 was far lower than that of SO2. NH4(+) in PM2.5 existed mainly in the form of sulfate, nitrate and chloride. Both of principal component analysis and back trajectory analysis showed that the variations of PM2.5 and secondary inorganic compounds at Mount Dinghu were mainly affected by the long-range transport air mass passed over Guangzhou, Huizhou and other highly industrialized areas which carried air pollutants to the observation site, at the same time local sulfate originated from secondary formation also

  20. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  1. Adhesion of finely dispersed particles to the surface of coating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petryanov, I.V.; Lyashkevich, I.M.; Sadovskii, B.F.; Chernaya, L.G.; Chernyaeva, G.A.

    1986-12-01

    It was established experimentally that compressed gypsums with added organosilicon liquids GKZh-10 and GKZh-94 have the lowest values of the molecular and capillary components of adhesive strength of particles to surface. The specific bulk and surface electrical conductivities of natural marble are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than those of the gypsums. Thus the high-strength gypsums with the special additives have significantly lower adhesive strength toward dust particles than does natural marble. The dependence of the adhesive properties of materials on surface structure was estimated by scanning electron microscopy. The dust-retentive capability of the sample surfaces was determined by blow-off of precipitated particles by a current of filtered air.

  2. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.

    1991-02-22

    The first task in our proposed study of catalysts for coal liquefaction was to prepare ultrafine dispersed metal sulfide particles by reactive precipitation from solutions of appropriate metal precursors. At this point, equipment to allow us to prepare these air-sensitive materials in an anaerobic environment has been acquired and assembled. Initial experiments aimed at synthesizing iron sulfide particles have been initiated. As part of the investigation of short contact time catalytic coal liquefaction, initial efforts focused on the noncatalytic pyrolysis reactions of coal and a model compound, Dibenzyl ether (DBE). Two different reactor configurations were examined; catalytic experiments are planned for the coming month.

  3. Measurements of fine and ultrafine particles formation in photocopy centers in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Der-Jen

    This study investigates the levels of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM 2.5) and some selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 12 photocopy centers in Taiwan from November 2004 to June 2005. The results of BTEXS (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene) measurements indicated that toluene had the highest concentration in all photocopy centers, while the concentration of the other four compounds varied among the 12 photocopy centers. The average background-corrected eight-hour PM 2.5 in the 12 photocopy centers ranged from 10 to 83 μg m -3 with an average of 40 μg m -3. The 24-h indoor PM 2.5 at the photocopy centers was estimated and at two photocopy centers exceeded 100 μg m -3, the 24-h indoor PM 2.5 guideline recommended by the Taiwan EPA. The ozone level and particle size distribution at another photocopy center were monitored and indicated that the ozone level increased when the photocopying started and the average ozone level at some photocopy centers during business hour may exceed the value (50 ppb) recommended by the Taiwan EPA. The particle size distribution monitored during photocopying indicated that the emitted particles were much smaller than the original toner powders. Additionally, the number concentration of particles that were smaller than 0.5 μm was found to increase during the first hour of photocopying and it increased as the particle size decreased. The ultrafine particle (UFP, <100 nm) dominated the number concentration and the peak concentration appeared at sizes of under 50 nm. A high number concentration of UFP was found with a peak value of 1E+8 particles cm -3 during photocopying. The decline of UFP concentration was observed after the first hour and the decline is likely attributable to the surface deposition of charged particles, which are charged primarily by the diffusion charging of corona devices in the photocopier. This study concludes that ozone and UFP concentrations in photocopy centers should be

  4. Response of spontaneously hypertensive rats to inhalation of fine and ultrafine particles from traffic: experimental controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kooter, Ingeborg M; Boere, A John F; Fokkens, Paul HB; Leseman, Daan LAC; Dormans, Jan AMA; Cassee, Flemming R

    2006-01-01

    Background Many epidemiological studies have shown that mass concentrations of ambient particulate matter (PM) are associated with adverse health effects in the human population. Since PM is still a very crude measure, this experimental study has explored the role of two distinct size fractions: ultrafine (<0.15 μm) and fine (0.15- 2.5 μm) PM. In a series of 2-day inhalation studies, spontaneously hypersensitive (SH) rats were exposed to fine, concentrated, ambient PM (fCAP) at a city background location or a combination of ultrafine and fine (u+fCAP) PM at a location dominated by traffic. We examined the effect on inflammation and both pathological and haematological indicators as markers of pulmonary and cardiovascular injury. Exposure concentrations ranged from 399 μg/m3 to 3613 μg/m3 for fCAP and from 269μg/m3 to 556 μg/m3 for u+fCAP. Results Ammonium, nitrate, and sulphate ions accounted for 56 ± 16% of the total fCAP mass concentrations, but only 17 ± 6% of the u+fCAP mass concentrations. Unambiguous particle uptake in alveolar macrophages was only seen after u+fCAP exposures. Neither fCAP nor u+fCAP induced significant changes of cytotoxicity or inflammation in the lung. However, markers of oxidative stress (heme oxygenase-1 and malondialdehyde) were affected by both fCAP and u+fCAP exposure, although not always significantly. Additional analysis revealed heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels that followed a nonmonotonic function with an optimum at around 600 μg/m3 for fCAP. As a systemic response, exposure to u+fCAP and fCAP resulted in significant decreases of the white blood cell concentrations. Conclusion Minor pulmonary and systemic effects are observed after both fine and ultrafine + fine PM exposure. These effects do not linearly correlate with the CAP mass. A greater component of traffic CAP and/or a larger proportion ultrafine PM does not strengthen the absolute effects. PMID:16700918

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FINE PARTICLE AND GASEOUS EMISSIONS DURING SCHOOL BUS IDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The particulate matter (PM) and gaseous emissions from six diesel school buses were determined over a simulated idling period typical of schools in the northeastern U.S. Testing was conducted for both continuous idle and hot restart conditions using particle and gas analyzers. Th...

  6. Saltation thresholds and entrainment of fine particles at Earth and Martian pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Rodman; Greeley, Ronald; Pollack, James

    1989-01-01

    An open circuit wind tunnel designed to operate in a large vacuum chamber was built at NASA-Ames to investigate saltation threshold, flux, deflation rates, and other aeolian phenomena on the planet Mars. The vacuum chamber will operate at pressures as low as 4 mbar, and the tunnel operates at windspeeds as high as 150 m/sec. Either air or CO2 can be used as a working fluid. It was found that, to a first order approximation, the same dynamic pressure was required at Martian pressure to entrain or saltate particles as was required on Earth, although wind and particle speed are considerably higher at Martian pressure. A 2nd wind tunnel, designed to operate aboard the NASA KC-135 0-g aircraft to obtain information on the effect of gravity on saltation threshold and the interparticle force at 0-g, is also described and test data presented. Some of the experiments are summarized and various aspects of low pressure aeolian entrainment for particles 12 to 100 micron in diameter are discussed, some of them unique to low pressure testing and some common in Earth pressure particle transport testing. The facility, the modes of operation, and the materials used are described.

  7. TRACE ELEMENT CONCENTRATIONS ON FINE PARTICLES IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particles were collected from May, 1980 to Dec., 1981 at 3 sampling sites in the Ohio River Valley (ORV). The collected samples were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for elemental concentrations and their masses determined by beta gauging. The XRF data and associa...

  8. Fine particle emission potential from loam soils in a semiarid region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion and fugitive dust emission from agricultural lands is a concern in the inland U.S. Pacific Northwest because emission of particles with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and 10 µm (PM10) are stringently regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  9. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar machrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient pollutant particles (APP) increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to APP. Upon contact with APP, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope ofthis ox...

  10. Spinel cobalt ferrite by complexometric synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thang, Pham D.; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H. A.

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O 4) have been synthesized using complexometric method in which ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid C 10H 16N 2O 8 (EDTA) acts as a complexing agent. The crystallographic structure, microstructure and magnetic properties of the synthesized powder were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The material crystallized in cubic spinel structure with lattice parameter of about 8.38 Å. Depending on the calcining temperature, the particle size of the powders varies in the range of hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers. A desired relative density above 95% of the theoretical value is obtained for the bulk sample after sintering. The calcined powders and sintered sample exhibit saturation magnetizations around 80 Am 2/kg which is expected for inverse CoFe 2O 4. With increasing calcining temperature the coercivity of these samples decreases. This simple synthesis route leads to a reproducible and stoichiometric material.

  11. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  12. Estimates of HVAC filtration efficiency for fine and ultrafine particles of outdoor origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Parham; Zhao, Dan; Stephens, Brent

    2014-12-01

    This work uses 194 outdoor particle size distributions (PSDs) from the literature to estimate single-pass heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) filter removal efficiencies for PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFPs: <100 nm) of outdoor origin. The PSDs were first fitted to tri-modal lognormal distributions and then mapped to size-resolved particle removal efficiency of a wide range of HVAC filters identified in the literature. Filters included those with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16, as well as HEPA filters. We demonstrate that although the MERV metric defined in ASHRAE Standard 52.2 does not explicitly account for UFP or PM2.5 removal efficiency, estimates of filtration efficiency for both size fractions increased with increasing MERV. Our results also indicate that outdoor PSD characteristics and assumptions for particle density and typical size-resolved infiltration factors (in the absence of HVAC filtration) do not drastically impact estimates of HVAC filter removal efficiencies for PM2.5. The impact of these factors is greater for UFPs; however, they are also somewhat predictable. Despite these findings, our results also suggest that MERV alone cannot always be used to predict UFP or PM2.5 removal efficiency given the various size-resolved removal efficiencies of different makes and models, particularly for MERV 7 and MERV 12 filters. This information improves knowledge of how the MERV designation relates to PM2.5 and UFP removal efficiency for indoor particles of outdoor origin. Results can be used to simplify indoor air quality modeling efforts and inform standards and guidelines.

  13. Simultaneous removal of mercury, PCDD/F, and fine particles from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Korell, Jens; Paur, Hanns-R; Seifert, Helmut; Andersson, Sven

    2009-11-01

    A multifunctional scrubber (MFS) has been developed to reduce the complexity of flue gas cleaning plants. The MFS integrates an oxidizing scrubber equipped with a dioxin-absorbing tower packing material and a space charge electrostatic precipitator. All these processes have been previously developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In the described multifunctional scrubber, mercury, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and submicrometer particles are removed simultaneously. A MFS pilot plant with a flue gas volume flow of 250 m(3)/h has been installed in a slipstream of a waste incineration pilot plant. Pilot scale testing was performed to measure mercury, particles, and PCDD/F in the raw and clean gas. After optimization of the process these three flue gas components were separated from the flue gas in the range 87-97%. PMID:19924961

  14. Magnetically modulated refractive index of a magnetic fluid film based on cigar-shaped ferrite submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mormile, P.; Petti, L.; Rippa, M.; Guo, J.; Song, W.; Zhou, J.

    2010-10-01

    Light beam propagation at a prism-magnetic fluid film interface is experimentally studied. The magnetic fluid is made through dispersion of synthesized cigar-shaped sub-micron particles of Fe2O3 in an oil solution. This was injected into a glass cell with an active area of 10mm2 and a depth ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns whose base is a glass microscope slide and on the top it was covered with a glass prism. The set up was developed by one of the authors to measure light switching at a prism-liquid crystal interface in a previous publication.1 Polarized Light (TE or TM) from a He-Ne laser impinges at the prism-magnetic film interface. The external reflected light is detected by a photodiode connected to a data acquisition system. Since the properties of the magnetic fluid can be modulated by external magnetic fields, we investigated the effects of the magnetic field on the refractive index of the magnetic fluid. For our magnetic fluid, the reflection of light has been investigated as a function of particles concentration and thickness of the films with a wavelength of 633nm and both TE and TM polarization, and applied magnetic fields up to 25 Oe. It was found that the intensity of reflected light increases with increasing magnetic field up to 4 times the initial value, and saturates at 20 Oe for TE light, while decreases with increasing magnetic field up to 4 times less for TM light with the same saturation value. Moreover, under a given magnetic field, the output light increases with the increasing film thickness in TE polarization, and decreases with the increasing film thickness in TM case. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid depends on the concentration of the dilute oil-based magnetic fluid under zero field. These behaviors are explained in terms of the organization of the submicron particles when the magnetic field is applied.2 The cigar-shaped sub-micron particles are oriented along their long axis to form an organized mesostructure. The

  15. Fine Ambient Particles Induce Oxidative Stress and Metal Binding Genes in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T.; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D.; Soukup, Joleen M.; Schwartz, David A.; Yang, Ivana V.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-μm diameter or smaller (PM2.5; 1 μg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P ≤ 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (∼30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 at 1 μg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM2.5 and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM2.5, both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM2.5 induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  16. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D; Soukup, Joleen M; Schwartz, David A; Yang, Ivana V

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-microm diameter or smaller (PM(2.5); 1 microg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P < or = 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (approximately 30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) at 1 microg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM(2.5) and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM(2.5), both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM(2.5) induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  17. Intraurban Variation of Fine Particle Elemental Concentrations in New York City.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuhiko; Johnson, Sarah; Kheirbek, Iyad; Clougherty, Jane; Pezeshki, Grant; Ross, Zev; Eisl, Holger; Matte, Thomas D

    2016-07-19

    Few past studies have collected and analyzed within-city variation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) elements. We developed land-use regression (LUR) models to characterize spatial variation of 15 PM2.5 elements collected at 150 street-level locations in New York City during December 2008-November 2009: aluminum, bromine, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, manganese, sodium, nickel, lead, sulfur, silicon, titanium, vanadium, and zinc. Summer- and winter-only data available at 99 locations in the subsequent 3 years, up to November 2012, were analyzed to examine variation of LUR results across years. Spatial variation of each element was modeled in LUR including six major emission indicators: boilers burning residual oil; traffic density; industrial structures; construction/demolition (these four indicators in buffers of 50 to 1000 m), commercial cooking based on a dispersion model; and ship traffic based on inverse distance to navigation path weighted by associated port berth volume. All the elements except sodium were associated with at least one source, with R(2) ranging from 0.2 to 0.8. Strong source-element associations, persistent across years, were found for residual oil burning (nickel, zinc), near-road traffic (copper, iron, and titanium), and ship traffic (vanadium). These emission source indicators were also significant and consistent predictors of PM2.5 concentrations across years. PMID:27331241

  18. Identification of ultra-fine magnetic particles in weakly magnetic carbonates using time-decay of viscous remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, M.; Chadimova, L.

    2015-12-01

    In some geological and environmental processes, such as diagenesis, very low grade metamorphism, pedogenesis, anthropogenic pollution, new ultra-fine magnetic minerals may be formed. The variation in content of these minerals has been routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility. Although being quite reliable for most rocks, frequency-dependent susceptibility reaches its limit when applied to very weakly magnetic rock types, e.g. carbonates. Assuming a broad size distribution of the ultra-fine magnetic particles spanning across the SP/SSD boundary we suggest assessing their content by quantification of time-decay of viscous remanent magnetization. Using artificially-imparted magnetization we usually obtain much stronger signal compared to that of magnetic susceptibility. For that purpose we employed a LDA5/PAM1 Pulse Magnetizer coupled with a JR6 Spinner Magnetometer (both manufactured by Agico, Inc.). Both instruments are simultaneously controlled thus they work in the same time frame. Magnetic remanence is measured repeatedly as a function of time and exponential decay curves are fitted on the acquired data and the relative ratio of viscous and non-viscous particles is estimated. The proposed method is tested on two sets of samples representing biostratigraphically well-established sections across Silurian shallow-water limestone facies in the Prague Synform (Czech Republic). Sampling interval comprises so-called Lau Event which belongs to one of the major environmental and biological perturbances in the Phanerozoic Ocean. This level is also associated with very strong geochemical changes, so-called global Middle Ludfordian Carbon Isotope Excursion, recognized in numerous areas worldwide. Other geophysical methods applied include high-resolution magnetic susceptibility measurements and gamma-ray spectrometry, supplemented by rock magnetic measurements (ARM/IRM) and frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility.

  19. Measurement and analysis of the relationship between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Baek, Bok Haeng; Aneja, Viney P

    2004-05-01

    An annular denuder system, which consisted of a cyclone separator; two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively; and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series, was used to measure acid gases, ammonia (NH3), and fine particles in the atmosphere from April 1998 to March 1999 in eastern North Carolina (i.e., an NH3-rich environment). The sodium carbonate denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 microg/m3 hydrochloric acid (standard deviation [SD] +/- 0.2 microg/m3); 1.14 microg/m3 nitric acid (SD +/- 0.81 microg/m3), and 1.61 microg/m3 sulfuric acid (SD +/- 1.58 microg/m3). The citric acid denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 microg/m3 NH3 (SD +/- 15.03 microg/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol concentrations of 1.64 microg/m3 ammonium (NH4+; SD +/- 1.26 microg/m3); 0.26 microg/m3 chloride (SD +/- 0.69 microg/m3), 1.92 microg/m3 nitrate (SD +/- 1.09 microg/m3), and 3.18 microg/m3 sulfate (SO4(2-); SD +/- 3.12 microg/m3). From seasonal variation, the measured particulates (NH4+, SO4(2-), and nitrate) showed larger peak concentrations during summer, suggesting that the gas-to-particle conversion was efficient during summer. The aerosol fraction in this study area indicated the domination of ammonium sulfate particles because of the local abundance of NH3, and the long-range transport of SO4(2-) based on back trajectory analysis. Relative humidity effects on gas-to-particle conversion processes were analyzed by particulate NH4+ concentration originally formed from the neutralization processes with the secondary pollutants in the atmosphere. PMID:15149049

  20. Spatial variability of fine and coarse particle composition and sources in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, Souzana; Wolfson, Jack M.; Ferguson, Stephen T.; Kang, Choong-Min; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Hadjicharalambous, Marios; Achilleos, Constantia; Christodoulou, Andri; Nisanzti, Argyro; Papoutsa, Christiana; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Athanasatos, Spyros; Perdikou, Skevi; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-03-01

    Southern and Eastern European countries exceed WHO and EU air quality standards very often, and are influenced by both local and external sources from Europe, Asia and Africa. However, there are limited data on particle composition and source profiles. We collected PM2.5 and PM10 samples (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) in four cities in Cyprus using Harvard Impactors. Measurements were conducted between January 2012 and January 2013. We analyzed these samples for mass concentration and chemical composition, and conducted a source apportionment analysis using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). All sites complied with PM2.5 and PM10 WHO daily standards for most of the days. As in other Eastern European countries, we found higher sulfate contribution and less organic carbon than in the Western and central Europe. For PM2.5, seven source types were identified including regional sulfur, traffic emissions, biomass, re-suspended soil, oil combustion, road dust, and sea salt. In all four sites, regional sulfur was the predominant source (> 30%). High inter-site correlations were observed for both PM2.5 component concentrations and source contributions, may be because a large fraction of PM2.5 is transported. Finally, for PM10 -2.5 (coarse particles with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm) three sources were identified, which include road dust, soil, and sea salt. Significant inter-site correlations were also observed for coarse particles. All dust storm samples, except one, had PM levels below the daily standard. However, mineral dust, defined as the total mass of crustal metal oxides, increased up to ten times during the dust events.

  1. Poorly soluble particulates: searching for a unifying denominator of nanoparticles and fine particles for DNEL estimation.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2011-01-11

    Under the new European chemicals regulation, REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) a Derived No-Effect Level (DNEL), i.e., the level of exposure above which humans should not be exposed, is defined. The focus of this paper is to develop a weight-of-evidence-based DNEL-approach for inhaled poorly soluble particles. Despite the common mode of action of inhaled insoluble, spherical particulate matter (PM), a unifying, most appropriate metric conferring pulmonary biopersistence and toxicity has yet not been demonstrated. Nonetheless, there is compelling evidence from repeated rat inhalation exposure studies suggesting that the particle displacement volume is the most prominent unifying denominator linking the pulmonary retained dose with toxicity. Procedures were developed to analyze and model the pulmonary toxicokinetics from short-term to long-term exposure. Six different types of poorly soluble nano- to submicron PMs were compared: ultrafine and pigmentary TiO₂, synthetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄, magnetite), two aluminum oxyhydroxides (AlOOH, Boehmite) with primary isometric particles approximately of either 10 or 40 nm, and MWCNT. The specific agglomerate densities of these materials ranged from 0.1 g/cm³ (MWCNT) to 5 g/cm³ (Fe₃O₄). Along with all PM, due to their long retention half-times and associated biopersistence in the lung, even short-term inhalation studies may require postexposure periods of at least 3 months to reveal PM-specific dispositional and toxicological characteristics. This analysis provides strong evidence that pulmonary toxicity (sustained inflammation) is dependent on the volume-based cumulative lung exposure dose. Lung toxicity, evidenced by PMN in BAL occurred at lung doses exceeding 10-times the overload threshold. Furthermore, the conclusion is supported that repeated inhalation studies on rats should utilize an experimental window of cumulative volume loads of respirable PM in the range of 1

  2. Influence of a cement industry on the fine and ultrafine particles composition in a rural area.

    PubMed

    Predicatori, F; Intini, B; Frontero, P; Martinelli, C; Culmone, L R; Brunelli, S; Salomoni, A; Mosconi, C; Mattiolo, G

    2009-12-01

    The cement industry of this work is located in the Fumane valley, in the north of Verona. The environmental impact of the air emissions from the plant was studied using different methods: the characterisation of the raw materials utilised in the production process and of the emissions from the chimney of the clinker kiln; the sampling of the air particles on filter in the region around the plant; the biomonitoring using transplanted mosses; the study of the air pollution dispersion using a model. PMID:19864329

  3. Surface preparation of substances for continuous convective assembly of fine particles

    DOEpatents

    Rossi, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A method for producing periodic nanometer-scale arrays of metal or semiconductor junctions on a clean semiconductor substrate surface is provided comprising the steps of: etching the substrate surface to make it hydrophilic, forming, under an inert atmosphere, a crystalline colloid layer on the substrate surface, depositing a metal or semiconductor material through the colloid layer onto the surface of the substrate, and removing the colloid from the substrate surface. The colloid layer is grown on the clean semiconductor surface by withdrawing the semiconductor substrate from a sol of colloid particles.

  4. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, January 26, 1992--April 25, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.

    1992-05-22

    An investigation aimed at devising a procedure for preparing alkyl-or aryl-capped iron sulfide particles continues. An initial attempt to prepare fine-particle, aryl-capped iron sulfides (S-31) involved the competitive reaction of thiophenol (PhSH) and sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) with Fe(II). However, SEM examination of the particles formed by this procedure indicated that no size control had been attained. It was thought that the phenyl group of thiophenol was not bulky enough to prevent thiolate bridging and consequent particle size growth of the metal sulfide. So the bulkier thiol 1-adamantanethiol was synthesized and used in synthesis S-33 in the next attempt to prepare fine-particle, capped iron sulfides.

  5. Endothelial Dysfunction: Associations with Exposure to Ambient Fine Particles in Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Alexandra; Neas, Lucas; Herbst, Margaret C.; Case, Martin; Williams, Ronald W.; Cascio, Wayne; Hinderliter, Alan; Holguin, Fernando; Buse, John B.; Dungan, Kathleen; Styner, Maya; Peters, Annette; Devlin, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine airborne particulate matter [≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] has been associated with cardiovascular and hematologic effects, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that adults with diabetes also may be a particularly susceptible population. Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of ambient PM2.5 on markers of endothelial function in diabetic volunteers. Methods We conducted a prospective panel study in 22 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chapel Hill, North Carolina (USA), from November 2004 to December 2005. We acquired daily measurements of PM2.5 and meteorologic data at central monitoring sites. On 4 consecutive days, we measured endothelial function by brachial artery ultrasound in all participants and by pulsewave measurements in a subgroup. Data were analyzed using additive mixed models with a random participant effect and adjusted for season, day of the week, and meteorology. Results Flow-mediated dilatation decreased in association with PM2.5 during the first 24 hr, whereas small-artery elasticity index decreased with a delay of 1 and 3 days. These PM2.5-associated decrements in endothelial function were greater among participants with a high body mass index, high glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, low adiponectin, or the null polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1. However, high levels of myeloperoxidase on the examination day led to strongest effects on endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions These data demonstrate that PM2.5 exposure may cause immediate endothelial dysfunction. Clinical characteristics associated with insulin resistance were associated with enhanced effects of PM on endothelial function. In addition, participants with greater oxidative potential seem to be more susceptible. PMID:19079718

  6. Anomalous magnetic behaviour of zinc and chromium ferrites without any hyperfine splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B.; Verma, H. C.

    2008-04-01

    Two groups of ferrite namely zinc ferrite and chromium ferrite were synthesized by citrate precursor route in the size range of 8 to 35 nm. We have studied the structural and magnetic behaviour of these ferrites using X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Our studies show that the nanocrystalline ferrites interact with the hand magnet strongly and give large magnetization in the VSM measurement. The maximum magnetization in the samples sensitively depends on the particle size of synthesized ferrites. We observed as large as 28 Am2/kg of magnetization in the zinc ferrite nanoparticles while that in chromium ferrite is around 11 Am2/kg. In spite of the large magnetization in the zinc ferrite nanoparticles we did not observe any hyperfine splitting even down to 12 K of temperature. Similar behaviour is also observed for chromium ferrite down to 16 K.

  7. Complex permeability spectra of PbO and Ta2O5 added nanocrystalline MgCuZn ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Seetha Rama Raju

    2015-05-01

    PbO and Ta2O5 added MgCuZn ferrites are prepared by the Microwave-Hydrothermal (M-H) processing. The nanocrystalline ferrites are sintered to a temperature of 900 °C/4 h. SEM pictures reveal that, the addition of PbO causes a small amount of grain growth, whereas the addition of Ta2O5 causes a fine-grained microstructure. The complex permeability spectra (μ*=μ‧-iμ″) of the prepared samples were measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 1.8 GHz, the μ* spectra are analyzed into two magnetization processes with focus on the particle size of ferrite samples. In addition to the spin rotation relaxation in 130-200 MHz, it is initially identified the contribution from reversible domain wall bowing rising at 6-40 MHz. The magnetic state of the ferrite is also influenced by the addition of PbO and Ta2O5. The spin rotation mechanism of the present ferrites is enhanced by the preparation of nanocrystalline samples.

  8. HONO and Inorganic Fine Particle Composition in Typical Monsoon Region with Intensive Anthropogenic Emission: In-situ Observations and Source Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Nie, W.; Ding, A.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is one of the most typical monsoon area with probably the most largest population intensity in the world. With sharply economic development and the large anthropogenic emissions, fine particle pollution have been one of the major air quality problem and may further have impact on the climate system. Though a lot of control policy (sulfur emission have been decreasing from 2007) have been conducted in the region, studies showed the sulfate in fine particles still take major fraction as the nitrate from nitrogen oxides increased significantly. In this study, the role of inorganic chemical compositions in fine particles was investigated with two years in-situ observation. Sulfate and Nitrate contribute to fine particle mass equally in general, but sulfate contributes more during summer and nitrate played more important role in winter. Using lagrangian dispersion backward modeling and source contribution clustering method, the impact of airmass coming from different source region (industrial, dust, biogenic emissions, etc) on fine particle inorganic compositions were discussed. Furthermore, we found two unique cases showing in-situ implications for sulfate formation by nitrogen dioxide oxidation mechanisms. It was showed that the mixing of anthropogenic pollutants with long-range transported mineral dust and biomass burning plume would enhance the sulfate formation by different chemistry mechanisms. This study focus on the complex aspects of fine particle formation in airmasses from different source regions: . It highlights the effect of NOx in enhancing the atmospheric oxidization capacity and indicates a potentially very important impact of increasing NOx on air pollution formation and regional climate change in East Asia.

  9. Copper(0) nanoparticles supported on silica-coated cobalt ferrite magnetic particles: cost effective catalyst in the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane with an exceptional reusability performance.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Ozkar, Saim; Volkan, Mürvet

    2012-08-01

    Herein we report the development of a new and cost-effective nanocomposite catalyst for the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane (NH(3)BH(3)), which is considered to be one of the most promising solid hydrogen carriers because of its high gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (19.6% wt) and low molecular weight. The new catalyst system consisting of copper nanoparticles supported on magnetic SiO(2)/CoFe(2)O(4) particles was reproducibly prepared by wet-impregnation of Cu(II) ions on SiO(2)/CoFe(2)O(4) followed by in situ reduction of the Cu(II) ions on the surface of magnetic support during the hydrolysis of NH(3)BH(3) and characterized by ICP-MS, XRD, XPS, TEM, HR-TEM and N(2) adsorption-desorption technique. Copper nanoparticles supported on silica coated cobalt(II) ferrite SiO(2)/CoFe(2)O(4) (CuNPs@SCF) act as highly active catalyst in the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane, providing an initial turnover frequency of TOF = 2400 h(-1) at room temperature, which is not only higher than all the non-noble metal catalysts but also higher than the majority of the noble metal based homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts employed in the same reaction. More importantly, they were easily recovered by using a permanent magnet in the reactor wall and reused for up to 10 recycles without losing their inherent catalytic activity significantly, which demonstrates the exceptional reusability of the CuNPs@SCF catalyst. PMID:22856878

  10. Source apportionment of fine atmospheric particles in Marseille: a one year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Salameh, Dalia; Detournay, Anais; Wortham, Henri; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; Piot, Christine; Armengaud, Alexandre; Piga, Damien; Parra, Michael; Deveze, Magali

    2013-04-01

    Marseille is the second most populated city in France with more than one million inhabitants. With traffic of about 88 million tons (Mt) in 2011, Marseille is also the most important port of the Mediterranean Sea, and also in the vicinity of the large petrochemical and industrial area of Fos-Berre, located 40 km northwest of the metropolitan area. For these reasons, Marseille area represents a challenging case study for source apportionment exercises, combining an active photochemistry and multiple emission sources, including fugitive emissions from industrial sources and shipping. In order to develop strategies for controlling and reducing air pollution, there is a need of source apportionment studies in order to better understand the influence of the different sources of aerosol particles. Within the framework of the EU-MED APICE project (Common Mediterranean strategy and local practical Actions for the mitigation of Port, Industries and Cities Emissions ; www.apice-project.eu), sources of atmospheric particles in Marseille were evaluated for a one-year period by a long monitoring campaign conducted at two sampling sites. PM2.5 were collected continuously on a 24h-basis in an urban background site from July 2011 to July 2012 and on a 48h-basis for the Eastern dock from November 2011 to July 2012 using high volume samplers (DA80) operating at a flow rate of 30m3 h-1. In this work, two different source apportionment models were used to explain the chemical observations, and to investigate the sources of organic aerosol in Marseille. Two sources apportionment models were used and combined to quantify the contribution of the main aerosol particles sources: CMB (Chemical Mass Balance) and PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization). Both models were used with organic molecular markers and metals/trace elements. Both approaches are able to identify major sources, the combination of these two commonly used receptor models offer interesting perspective, especially when the

  11. Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: contribution of erosion particles from fine sediments.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Chevesich, Pablo A; Alvarado, Sergio; Neary, Daniel G; Valdes, Rodrigo; Valdes, Juan; Aguirre, Juan José; Mena, Marcelo; Pizarro, Roberto; Jofré, Paola; Vera, Mauricio; Olivares, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Air pollution in Santiago is a serious problem every winter, causing thousands of cases of breathing problems within the population. With more than 6 million people and almost two million vehicles, this large city receives rainfall only during winters. Depending on the frequency of storms, statistics show that every time it rains, air quality improves for a couple of days, followed by extreme levels of air pollution. Current regulations focus mostly on PM10 and PM2.5, due to its strong influence on respiratory diseases. Though more than 50% of the ambient PM10s in Santiago is represented by soil particles, most of the efforts have been focused on the remaining 50%, i.e. particulate material originating from fossil and wood fuel combustion, among others. This document emphasizes the need for the creation of erosion/sediment control regulations in Chile, to decrease respiratory diseases on Chilean polluted cities. PMID:24485904

  12. Risk remaining from fine particle contaminants after vacuum cleaning of hard floor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Andrew; Johnson, David L; Brooks, J; Griffith, Daniel A

    2008-12-01

    In the indoor environment, settled surface dust often functions as a reservoir of hazardous particulate contaminants. In many circumstances, a major contributing source to the dust pool is exterior soil. Young children are particularly susceptible to exposure to both outdoor derived soil and indoor derived dust present in the indoor dust pool. This is because early in life the exploratory activities of the infant are dominated by touching and mouthing behavior. Inadvertent exposure to dust through mouth contact and hand-to-mouth activity is an inevitable consequence of infant development. Clean-up of indoor dust is, in many circumstances, critically important in efforts to minimize pediatric exposure. In this study, we examine the efficiency of vacuum cleaner removal of footwear-deposited soil on vinyl floor tiles. The study utilized a 5 x 10 foot (c. 152.5 x 305 cm) test surface composed of 1-foot-square (c. 30.5 x 30.5 cm) vinyl floor tiles. A composite test soil with moderately elevated levels of certain elements (e.g., Pb) was repeatedly introduced onto the floor surface by footwear track-on. The deposited soil was subsequently periodically removed from randomly selected tiles using a domestic vacuum cleaner. The mass and loading of soil elements on the tiles following vacuuming were determined both by wet wipe collection and by subsequent chemical analysis. It was found that vacuum cleaner removal eliminated much of the soil mass from the floor tiles. However, a small percentage of the mass was not removed and a portion of this residual mass could be picked up by moistened hand-lifts. Furthermore, although the post-vacuuming tile soil mass was sizably reduced, for some elements (notably Pb) the concentration in the residual soil was increased. We interpret this increased metal concentration to be a particle size effect with smaller particles (with a proportionately higher metal content) remaining in situ after vacuuming. PMID:18566895

  13. African Anthropogenic Combustion Emissions: Estimate of Regional Mortality Attributable to Fine Particle Concentrations in 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liousse, C.; Roblou, L.; Assamoi, E.; Criqui, P.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Rosset, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fossil fuel (traffic, industries) and biofuel (domestic fires) emissions of gases and particles in Africa are expected to significantly increase in the near future, particularly due to rapid growth of African cities and megacities. In this study, we will present the most recent developments of African combustion emission inventories, including African specificities. Indeed, a regional fossil fuel and biofuel inventory for gases and particulates described in Liousse et al. (2014) has been developed for Africa at a resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° for the years 2005 and 2030. For 2005, the original database of Junker and Liousse (2008) was used after modification for updated regional fuel consumption and emission factors. Two prospective inventories for 2030 are derived based on Prospective Outlook on Long-term Energy Systems (POLES) model (Criqui, 2001). The first is a reference scenario (2030ref) with no emission controls and the second is for a "clean" scenario (2030ccc*) including Kyoto policy and African specific emission control. This inventory predicts very large increases of pollutant emissions in 2030 (e.g. contributing to 50% of global anthropogenic organic particles), if no emission regulations are implemented. These inventories have been introduced in RegCM4 model. In this paper we will focus on aerosol modelled concentrations in 2005, 2030ref and 2030ccc*. Spatial distribution of aerosol concentrations will be presented with a zoom at a few urban and rural sites. Finally mortality rates (respiratory, cardiovascular) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 increase from 2005 to 2030, calculated following Lelieveld et al. (2013), will be shown for each scenarios. To conclude, this paper will discuss the effectiveness of scenarios to reduce emissions, aerosol concentrations and mortality rates, underlining the need for further measurements scheduled in the frame of the new DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions) program.

  14. Influences of fireworks on chemical characteristics of atmospheric fine and coarse particles during Taiwan's Lantern Festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Chien, Li-Hsing; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Jen, Yi-Hsiu; Ie, Iau-Ren

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, the celebration activities of various folk-custom festivals have been getting more and more attention from the citizens in Taiwan. Festivities throughout the whole island are traditionally accompanied by loud and brightly colored firework displays. Among these activities, the firework displays during Taiwan's Lantern Festival in Kaohsiung harbor is one of the largest festivals in Taiwan each year. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the influence of fireworks displays on the ambient air quality during the Taiwan's Lantern Festival. Field measurements of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) were conducted on February 9th-11th, 2009 during Taiwan's Lantern Festival in Kaohsiung City. Moreover, three kinds of fireworks powders obtained from the same manufacturing factory producing Kaohsiung Lantern Festival fireworks were burned in a self-designed combustion chamber to determine the physicochemical properties of the fireworks' particles and to establish the source profile of firework burning. Several metallic elements of PM during the firework display periods were notably higher than those during the non-firework periods. The concentrations of Mg, K, Pb, and Sr in PM2.5 during the firework periods were 10 times higher than those during the non-firework periods. Additionally, the Cl-/Na+ ratio was approximately 3 during the firework display periods as Cl- came from the chlorine content of the firework powder. Moreover, the OC/EC ratio increased up to 2.8. Results obtained from PCA and CMB receptor modeling showed that major sources of atmospheric particles during the firework display periods in Kaohsiung harbor were fireworks, vehicular exhausts, soil dusts and marine sprays. Particularly, on February 10th, the firework displays contributed approximately 25.2% and 16.6% of PM10 at two downwind sampling sites, respectively.

  15. Sources and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Fine Particles in Rabigh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebare, S. R.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Hussain, M. M.; Zeb, J.; Khwaja, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution research in Saudi Arabia and the whole of Middle East is at its inception, making air pollution in the region a significant problem. This study presents the first detailed data on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations of Black Carbon (BC), ions, and trace metals at Rabigh, Saudi Arabia, and assesses their sources. Results showed several characteristic aspects of air pollution at Rabigh. Daily levels of PM2.5 and BC showed significant temporal variability ranging from 12.2 - 75.9 µg/m3 and 0.39 - 1.31 µg/m3, respectively. More than 90% of the time, the daily PM2.5 exceeded the 24 h WHO guideline of 20 µg/m3. Sulfate, NO3-, and NH4+ dominated the identifiable components. Trace metals with significantly higher concentrations included Si, S, Ca, Al, Fe, Na, Cl, Mg, K, and Ti, with average concentrations of 3.1, 2.2, 1.6, 1.2, 1.1, 0.7, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4 and 0.1 µg/m3, respectively. Based on the Air Quality Index (AQI), there were 44% days of moderate air quality, 33% days of unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups, and 23% days of unhealthy air quality throughout the study period. Two categories of aerosol trace metal sources were defined: anthropogenic (S, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Cd, Sb, and Pb) and naturally derived elements (Si, Al, and Fe). The extent of anthropogenic contribution was estimated by the degree of enrichment of these elements compared to the crustal composition. Soil resuspension and/or mobilization is an important source of "natural" elements, while "anthropogenic" elements originate primarily from fossil fuel combustion and industries. Ni and V correlated strongly pointing to combustion of heavy fuel oil as the likely source. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to obtain information about possible sources. Our study highlights the need for stringent laws on PM2.5 emission control to protect human health and the environment.

  16. [Comparison of Monitoring Methods of Organic Carbon and Element Carbon in Atmospheric Fine Particles].

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Ji, Dong-sheng; Liu, Zi-rui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yue-si

    2016-04-15

    Accurate measurement of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in atmospheric fine particulate is an important scientific basis for studying the formation and source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol. The selection of different analysis programs will lead to difference in the OC and EC concentrations, and further result in the misjudgment of the results. The OC and EC concentrations observed using three temperature protocols including RT-Quartz ( R) , NIOSH 5040 (N) and Fast-TC (F) were compared and analyzed in combination with the degree of air pollution in Beijing. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the TC (TC = OC + EC), OC and EC concentrations observed using R, N and F protocols and certain deviation was found among the TC (TC = OC + EC) , OC and EC concentrations. For TC, the results observed using R protocol were 5% lower than those using N protocol; hut 1% higher than those using F protocol. For OC, the results obtained using R were 9% lower than those using N protocol and 1% higher than those using F protocol. For EC, the results obtained using R were 20% higher than those using N protocol and 11% lower than those using F protocol. The variation coefficients for TC, OC and EC obtained based on R protocol were less than the other two temperature protocols under different air quality degrees. The slopes of regression curves of TC, OC and EC between on-line analysis using R protocol and off-line analysis were 1.21,1. 14 and 1.35, respectively. The correlation coefficients of TC, OC and EC were 0.99, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. In contrast with the Black carbon ( BC) concentrations monitored by multi-angle absorption spectrophotometer (MAAP), the EC concentrations measured by on-line OC/EC analyzer using R protocol were obviously lower. When the BC concentrations were less than or equal to 8 gg*m3, the EC/BC ratio was 0.39. While the EC/BC ratio was 0.88, when the BC concentrations were greater than 8 ggm3. The variation

  17. Cardiovascular effects of sub-daily levels of ambient fine particles: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While the effects of daily fine particulate exposure (PM) have been well reviewed, the epidemiological and physiological evidence of cardiovascular effects associated to sub-daily exposures has not. We performed a theoretical model-driven systematic non-meta-analytical literature review to document the association between PM sub-daily exposures (≤6 hours) and arrhythmia, ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI) as well as the likely mechanisms by which sub-daily PM exposures might induce these acute cardiovascular effects. This review was motivated by the assessment of the risk of exposure to elevated sub-daily levels of PM during fireworks displays. Methods Medline and Elsevier's EMBase were consulted for the years 1996-2008. Search keywords covered potential cardiovascular effects, the pollutant of interest and the short duration of the exposure. Only epidemiological and experimental studies of adult humans (age > 18 yrs) published in English were reviewed. Information on design, population and PM exposure characteristics, and presence of an association with selected cardiovascular effects or physiological assessments was extracted from retrieved articles. Results Of 231 articles identified, 49 were reviewed. Of these, 17 addressed the relationship between sub-daily exposures to PM and cardiovascular effects: five assessed ST-segment depression indicating ischemia, eight assessed arrhythmia or fibrillation and five considered MI. Epidemiologic studies suggest that exposure to sub-daily levels of PM is associated with MI and ischemic events in the elderly. Epidemiological studies of sub-daily exposures suggest a plausible biological mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system while experimental studies suggest that vasomotor dysfunction may also relate to the occurrence of MI and ischemic events. Conclusions Future studies should clarify associations between cardiovascular effects of sub-daily PM exposure with PM size fraction and concurrent

  18. Photo-induced valence-number changes and defects in Eu2O3 fine particle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Shosuke; Fujishiro, Fumito; Ishiwata, Ken'ichiro

    2005-01-01

    Different Eu2O3 fine particle films were prepared by the laser ablation method. Under a continuous wave (CW) 325 nm laser light irradiation, their photoluminescence spectra are measured both in vacuum and in O2 gas atmosphere. All the specimens display reversible spectral change and clear luminescence colour changes (red luminescence leftrightarrow white luminescence) for changing specimen atmosphere. Moreover, the white-luminescent state is stored for more than several years at room temperature in air under room light. The obtained results suggest that the spectral changes arise from both the photo-induced valence (Eu3+ → Eu2+) change of europium ions and the photo-generated oxygen defect structure at Eu2O3 particle surfaces in vacuum, which is expressed by the following reaction, Eu2O3 in lattice + CW 325 nm photon → (Eu2+-oyygen vacancy-Eu2+) complex +½O2. The obtained results are discussed in the light of the exciton theory.

  19. Diurnal and seasonal trends in the apparent density of ambient fine and coarse particles in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Pakbin, Payam; Delfino, Ralph J.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Diurnal and seasonal variations in the apparent density of ambient fine and coarse particulate matter (PM2.5 and CPM [PM2.5-10], respectively) were investigated in a location near downtown Los Angeles. The apparent densities, determined by particle mass-to-volume ratios, showed strong diurnal and seasonal variations, with higher values during the warm phase (June to August 2013) compared to cold phase (November 2012 to February 2013). PM2.5 apparent density showed minima during the morning and afternoon rush hours of the cold phase (1.20 g cm−3), mainly due to the increased contribution of traffic-emitted soot particles, and highest values were found during the midday in the warm phase (2.38 g cm−3). The lowest CPM apparent density was observed during the morning rush hours of the cold phase (1.41 g cm−3), while highest in early afternoon during the warm phase (2.91 g cm−3), most likely due to the increased wind-induced resuspension of road dust. PMID:24413160

  20. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period was devoted to experimental design and fabrication tasks.

  1. Speciation of ambient fine organic carbon particles and source apportionment of PM2.5 in Indian cities - article no. D15303

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Z.; Zheng, M.; Schauer, J.J.; Sheesley, R.J.; Salmon, L.G.; Cass, G.R.; Russell, A.G.

    2007-08-15

    Fine particle organic carbon in Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, and Chandigarh is speciated to quantify sources contributing to fine particle pollution. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of 29 particle-phase organic compounds, including n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, steranes, and levoglucosan along with quantification of silicon, aluminum, and elemental carbon are used in a molecular-marker based source apportionment model to quantify the primary source contributions to the PM2.5 mass concentrations for four seasons in three sites and for the summer in Chandigarh. Five primary sources are identified and quantified: diesel engine exhaust, gasoline engine exhaust, road dust, coal combustion, and biomass combustion. Important trends in the seasonal and spatial patterns of the impact of these five sources are observed. On average, primary emissions from fossil fuel combustion (coal, diesel, and gasoline) are responsible for about 25-33% of PM2.5 mass in Delhi, 21-36% in Mumbai, 37-57% in Kolkata, and 28% in Chandigarh. These figures can be compared to the biomass combustion contributions to ambient PM2.5 of 7-20% for Delhi, 7-20% for Mumbai, 13-18% for Kolkata, and 8% for Chandigarh. These measurements provide important information about the seasonal and spatial distribution of fine particle phase organic compounds in Indian cities as well as quantifying source contributions leading to the fine particle air pollution in those cities.

  2. Surface area of particle administered versus mass in determining the pulmonary toxicity of ultrafine and fine carbon black: comparison to ultrafine titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Tina M; Castranova, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles are characterized by having a high surface area per mass. Particulate surface area has been reported to play an important role in determining the biological activity of nanoparticles. However, recent reports have questioned this relationship. This study was conducted to determine whether mass of particles or surface area of particles is the more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In this study, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to various doses of ultrafine and fine carbon black. At 1, 7, or 42 days post-exposure, inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of each particle type was compared on both a mass dosage (mg/rat) as well as an equal surface area dosage (cm2 of particles per cm2 of alveolar epithelium). In an additional study, the pulmonary responses to instillation of ultrafine carbon black were compared to equivalent particle surface area doses of ultrafine titanium dioxide. Results Ultrafine carbon black particles caused a dose dependent but transient inflammatory and cytotoxic response. On a mass basis, these responses were significantly (65 fold) greater than those for fine sized carbon black. However, when doses were equalized based on surface area of particles given, the ultrafine carbon black particles were only slightly (non-significantly) more inflammogenic and cytotoxic compared to the fine sized carbon black. At one day post-exposure, inflammatory potencies of the ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles were similar. However, while the pulmonary reaction to ultrafine carbon black resolved with time, the inflammatory effects of ultrafine titanium dioxide were more persistent over a 42 day post-exposure period. Conclusion These results indicate that for low toxicity low solubility materials, surface area of particles administered rather than mass burden of particles may be a more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In addition, ultrafine titanium

  3. Optical properties of atmospheric fine particles near Beijing during the HOPE-J3A campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuezhe; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Qilei; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Bo; Chen, Weidong; Venables, Dean S.; Wang, Xinfeng; Pu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties and chemical composition of PM1.0 particles in a suburban environment (Huairou) near the megacity of Beijing were measured during the HOPE-J3A (Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing-Jin-Ji Area) field campaign. The campaign covered the period November 2014 to January 2015 during the winter coal heating season. The average values and standard deviations of the extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at λ = 470 nm during the measurement period were 201 ± 240, 164 ± 202, 37 ± 43 Mm-1, and 0.80 ± 0.08, respectively. The average values for the real and imaginary components of the effective complex refractive index (CRI) over the campaign were 1.40 ± 0.06 and 0.03 ± 0.02, while the average mass scattering and absorption efficiencies (MSEs and MAEs) of PM1.0 were 3.6 and 0.7 m2 g-1, respectively. Highly time-resolved air pollution episodes clearly show the dramatic evolution of the PM1.0 size distribution, extensive optical properties (extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients), and intensive optical properties (SSA and CRI) during haze formation, development, and decline. Time periods were classified into three different pollution levels (clear, slightly polluted, and polluted) for further analysis. It was found that (1) the relative contributions of organic and inorganic species to observed aerosol composition changed significantly from clear to polluted days: the organic mass fraction decreased from 50 to 43 % while the proportion of sulfates, nitrates, and ammonium increased strongly from 34 to 44 %. (2) Chemical apportionment of extinction, calculated using the IMPROVE algorithm, tended to underestimate the extinction compared to measurements. Agreement with measurements was improved by modifying the parameters to account for enhanced absorption by elemental carbon (EC). Organic mass was the largest contributor (52 %) to the total extinction of PM1.0, while EC

  4. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  5. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mckay, David S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  6. PIXE identification of fine and coarse particles of aerosol samples and their distribution across Beirut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumié, M.; Saliba, N.; Nsouli, B.; Younes, M.; Noun, M.; Massoud, R.

    2011-12-01

    This study is the first national attempt to assess the levels of PMs in Beirut city and consequently understand air pollution distribution. Aerosol sampling was carried out using three PM 10 and three PM 2.5 samplers which were installed at three locations lying along the SE-NW direction over Beirut. The sampling of PM 10 and PM 2.5 was done during a period extending from May till December 2009. The random collection of the particles (1 in 6 days) was carried out on Teflon filters, for a period of 24-h. The elemental analysis of particulate matter was performed using proton induced X-ray emission technique PIXE at the Lebanese 1.7 MV Tandem-Pelletron accelerator of Beirut. Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S and Cl were quantified using 1 MeV proton beam, while K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were determined using 3 MeV-energy of proton beam.

  7. Biologically Induced Deposition of Fine Suspended Particles by Filter-Feeding Bivalves in Land-Based Industrial Marine Aquaculture Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67±0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43±0.98 cm) was 77.84±7.77 and 6.37±0.67 mg ind−1•d−1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73±0.27 and 2.76±0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P<0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P<0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products. PMID:25250730

  8. Chemical composition of fine particles in fresh smoke plumes from boreal wild-land fires in Europe.

    PubMed

    Saarnio, Karri; Aurela, Minna; Timonen, Hilkka; Saarikoski, Sanna; Teinilä, Kimmo; Mäkelä, Timo; Sofiev, Mikhail; Koskinen, Jarkko; Aalto, Pasi P; Kulmala, Markku; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Hillamo, Risto

    2010-05-15

    A series of smoke plumes was detected in Helsinki, Finland, during a one-month-lasting period in August 2006. The smoke plumes originated from wildfires close to Finland, and they were short-term and had a high particulate matter (PM) concentration. Physical and chemical properties of fine particles in those smokes were characterised by a wide range of real-time measurements that enabled the examination of individual plume events. Concurrently PM(1) filter samples were collected and analysed off-line. Satellite observations employing MODIS sensor on board of NASA EOS Terra satellite with the dispersion model SILAM and the Fire Assimilation System were used for evaluation of the emission fluxes from wildfires. The model predicted well the timing of the plumes but the predicted PM concentrations differed from the observed. The measurements showed that the major growth in PM concentration was caused by submicrometer particles consisting mainly of particulate organic matter (POM). POM had not totally oxidised during the transport based on the low WSOC-to-OC ratio. The fresh plumes were compared to another major smoke episode that was observed in Helsinki during April-May 2006. The duration and the source areas of the two episode periods differed. The episode in April-May was a period of nearly constantly upraised level of long-range transported PM and it was composed of aged particles when arriving in Helsinki. The two episodes had differences also in the chemical composition of PM. The mass concentrations of biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan, potassium, and oxalate) increased during both the episodes but different concentration levels of elemental carbon and potassium indicated that the episodes differed in the form of burning as well as in the burning material. In spring dry crop residue and hay from the previous season were burnt whereas in August smokes from smouldering and incomplete burning of fresh vegetation were detected. PMID:20359735

  9. Examining intra-urban variation in fine particle mass constituents using GIS and constrained factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Jane E.; Houseman, E. Andres; Levy, Jonathan I.

    Recent studies have used land use regression (LUR) techniques to explain spatial variability in exposures to PM 2.5 and traffic-related pollutants. Factor analysis has been used to determine source contributions to measured concentrations. Few studies have combined these methods, however, to construct and explain latent source effects. In this study, we derive latent source factors using confirmatory factor analysis constrained to non-negative loadings, and develop LUR models to predict the influence of outdoor sources on latent source factors using GIS-based measures of traffic and other local sources, central site monitoring data, and meteorology. We collected 3-4 day samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and PM 2.5 outside of 44 homes in summer and winter, from 2003 to 2005 in and around Boston, Massachusetts. Reflectance analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and high-resolution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were performed on particle filters to estimate elemental carbon (EC), trace element, and water-soluble metals concentrations. Within our constrained factor analysis, a five-factor model was optimal, balancing statistical robustness and physical interpretability. This model produced loadings indicating long-range transport, brake wear/traffic exhaust, diesel exhaust, fuel oil combustion, and resuspended road dust. LUR models largely corroborated factor interpretations through covariate significance. For example, 'long-range transport' was predicted by central site PM 2.5 and season; 'brake wear/traffic exhaust' and 'resuspended road dust' by traffic and residential density; 'diesel exhaust' by percent diesel traffic on nearest major road; and 'fuel oil combustion' by population density. Results suggest that outdoor residential PM 2.5 source contributions can be partially predicted using GIS-based terms, and that LUR techniques can support factor interpretation for source apportionment. Together, LUR and factor analysis

  10. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, β-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  11. Impact of smoking on in-vehicle fine particle exposure during driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hongji; Lee, Kiyoung

    2010-09-01

    Indoor smoking ban in public places can reduce secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. However, smoking in cars and homes has continued. The purpose of this study was to assess particulate matter less than 2.5 μm (PM 2.5) concentration in moving cars with different window opening conditions. The PM 2.5 level was measured by an aerosol spectrometer inside and outside moving cars simultaneously, along with ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentration, speed, temperature and humidity inside cars. Two sport utility vehicles were used. Three different ventilation conditions were evaluated by up to 20 repeated experiments. In the pre-smoking phase, average in-vehicle PM 2.5 concentrations were 16-17 μg m -3. Regardless of different window opening conditions, the PM 2.5 levels promptly increased when smoking occurred and decreased after cigarette was extinguished. Although only a single cigarette was smoked, the average PM 2.5 levels were 506-1307 μg m -3 with different window opening conditions. When smoking was ceased, the average PM 2.5 levels for 15 min were several times higher than the US National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 μg m -3. It took longer than 10 min to reach the level of the pre-smoking phase. Although UFP levels had a similar temporal profile of PM 2.5, the increased levels during the smoking phase were relatively small. This study demonstrated that the SHS exposure in cars with just a single cigarette being smoked could exceed the US EPA NAAQS under realistic window opening conditions. Therefore, the findings support the need for public education against smoking in cars and advocacy for a smoke-free car policy.

  12. Characterization of Fine Airborne Particulate Collected in Tokyo and Major Atmospheric Emission Sources by Using Single Particle Measurement of SEM-EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Iijima, A.; Furuta, N.

    2008-12-01

    In our long-term monitoring of size-classified Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) in Tokyo since 1995, it had been demonstrated that toxic elements such as As, Se, Cd, Sb and Pb were extremely enriched in fine APM (PM2.5). However, in that study, total sampled APM on a filter was digested with acids, and thus only averaged elemental composition in fine APM could be obtained. One of the effective methods to determine the origin of APM is single particle measurement by using SEM-EDX. By using characteristic shapes observed by SEM and marker elements contained in APM measured by EDX, detailed information for source identification can be obtained. In this study, fine APM (PM2.5) was collected at various locations such as roadside, diesel vehicle exhaust, a heavy oil combustion plant and a waste incineration plant as well as ambient atmosphere in Tokyo, and characteristics of fine particles that will be utilized for identification of emission sources are elucidated. Fine particles can be classified into 3 main characteristic shape groups; edge-shaped, cotton-like and spherical. Shape of particles collected in a heavy oil combustion plant and a waste incineration plant was mostly spherical, and these particles may be associated with thermal process. Diesel exhaust particles were predominantly cotton-like which may consist of coagulated nano-sized particles. Most of brake abrasion dusts were edge-shaped, which may be associated with mechanical abrasion of brake pads. In the elemental analysis of fine particles, high concentrations of Sb, Cu, Ti and Ba were detected in brake abrasion dusts. Since these elements are major constituents of brake pads, these can be used for marker elements of brake abrasion dusts. High concentration of C was detected in diesel exhaust particles and oil combustion particles, and thus C can be used for marker elements of their origin. Furthermore, high concentrations of C, Ca and K were detected in fly ash from a waste incineration plant, which

  13. Optical properties of atmospheric fine particles near Beijing during the HOPE-J3A Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Zhao, W.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, S.; Fang, B.; Chen, W.; Venables, D. S.; Wang, X.; Pu, W.; Wang, X.; Gao, X.; Zhang, W.

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties and chemical composition of PM1.0 (particulate with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 1.0 μm) particles in a suburban environment (Huairou) near the mega-city Beijing were measured during the HOPE-J3A (Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing-Jin-Ji Area) field campaign. The campaign covered the period November 2014 to January 2015 during the winter coal heating season. The average and standard deviations for the extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at λ = 470 nm during the measurement period were 201 ± 240, 164 ± 202, 37 ± 43 Mm-1, and 0.80 ± 0.08, respectively. The mean mass scattering (MSE) and absorption (MAE) efficiencies were 4.77 ± 0.01 and 0.87 ± 0.03 m2g-1, respectively. Highly time-resolved air pollution episodes clearly show the dramatic evolution of the PM1.0 size distribution, extensive optical properties (extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients) and intensive optical properties (single scattering albedo and complex refractive index) during haze formation, development and decline. Time periods were classified into three different pollution levels (clear, slightly polluted, and polluted) for further analysis. It was found that: (1) The diurnal patterns of the aerosol extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and SSA differed for the three pollution classes. (2) The real and imaginary part of complex refractive index (CRI) increased, while the SSA decreased from clear to polluted days. (3) The relative contributions of organic and inorganic species to observed aerosol composition changed significantly from clear to polluted days: the organic mass fraction decreased (50 to 43 %) while the proportion of sulfates, nitrates, and ammonium increased strongly (34 to 44 %). (4) The fractional contribution of chemical components to extinction coefficients was calculated by using the modified IMPROVE algorithm. Organic mass was the largest

  14. The Influence of the Induced Ferrite and Precipitates of Ti-bearing Steel on the Ductility of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guoyu; Cheng, Guoguang; Hou, Zibing

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the loss of the ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel under 1000 °C, where the ductility begins to reduce rapidly, so the hot ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel has been obtained using the Gleeble 1500 thermal-mechanical simulator and also the studies about the effect of grain boundary ferrite films and precipitates containing Ti on the ductility has been carried out. The result showed that the TiN particles precipitating at 950 °C with a larger size and smaller volume fraction cannot effectively suppress the occurrence of recrystallization and the ductility still retains at a high level, although R.A. value presents a certain degree of decline compared with 1000 °C. A large number of smaller Ti(C,N) particles precipitate at 900 °C and can induce the formation of a very small amount of fine grain boundary ferrite, which deteriorates the adhesion strength of the grain boundary, so the R.A. value rapidly reduces to less than 50%. When the temperature falls to close Ae3 (827 °C), the amount of the grain boundary ferrite films increase due to the ferrite phase transformation, but the ferrite film thickness becomes more uneven at the same time, which results in the increase of strain concentration and plays a leading role in causing the decrease of ductility, so the R.A. value has been kept less than 40% as the temperature cooling to 800 °C from 850 °C. When the temperature further decreases, the ductility starts to recover due to the increase of average ferrite film thickness to a greater degree which greatly reduces the strain concentration of the grain boundary.

  15. FREE AND COMBINED AMINO COMPOUNDS IN ATMOSPHERIC FINE PARTICLES (PM2.5) AND FOG WATERS FROM NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) collected during August 1997–July 1998 and wintertime fog waters collected during 1997–1999 at Davis, California were analyzed for free and combined amino compounds. In both PM2.5 and fog waters, the averag...

  16. USE OF INNOVATIVE MONITORING TECHNIQUES TO ESTIMATE SOURCE STRENGTHS AND DECAY RATES FOR IMPORTANT SOURCES OF FINE PARTICLES: APPLICATION TO INDOOR AIR AND PERSONAL EXPOSURE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a continuation of an Internal Grant research project with a focus on analyzing and reporting the research results. This project will carry out controlled experiments to investigate human exposure to fine and coarse particles, black carbon (soot), and PAHs from several im...

  17. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October 26, 1991--January 25, 1992: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.

    1992-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the kinetics-assisted design, synthesis and characterization of fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. The goal is to develop a fundamental understanding of coal catalysis and catalysts that will, in turn, allow for the specification of a novel optical catalyst for coal liquefaction.

  18. APPLICATION OF A DUAL FINE PARTICLE SEQUENTIAL SAMPLER, A TAPERED ELEMENT OSCILLATING MICROBALANCE, AND OTHER AIR MONITORING METHODS TO ASSESS TRANSBOUNDARY INFLUENCE OF PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transboundary influences of paniculate matter less than or equal to 2.5 um in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5,) have been investigated in a U.S.-Mexican border region using a dual fine particle sequential sampler (DFPSS) and tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). Daily me...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER SYMPOSIUM (2ND) HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MAY 2-3, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the proceedings, including introductory remarks and 16 technical papers, of the Second Fine Particle Scrubber Symposium, held May 2-3, 1977, in New Orleans. Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the symposium was held to stimulate and generate...

  20. Population exposure to fine particles and estimated excess mortality in Finland from an East European wildfire episode.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Otto O; Salonen, Raimo O; Koistinen, Kimmo; Lanki, Timo; Barregard, Lars; Jantunen, Matti

    2009-05-01

    Long-range transported particulate matter (PM) air pollution episodes associated with wildfires in the Eastern Europe are relatively common in Southern and Southeastern Finland. In severe cases such as in August-September 2002, the reduced visibility and smell of the smoke, and symptoms such as irritation of eyes and airways experienced by the population raise the issue into the headlines. Because PM air pollution, in general, has been identified as a major health risk, and the exposures are of repeating nature, the issue warrants a risk assessment to estimate the magnitude of the problem. The current work uses the available air quality data in Finland to estimate population exposures caused by one of the worst episodes experienced in this decade. This episode originated from wildfires in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, and the Baltic countries. The populations of 11 Southern Finnish provinces were exposed between 26 August and 8 September 2002, for 2 weeks to an additional population-weighted average PM(2.5) level of 15.7 microg/m(3). Assuming similar effect on mortality for these particles as observed in epidemiological time series studies on urban particles (0.5%-2% increase in mortality per 10 microg/m(3), central estimate 1%), this exposure level would be associated with 9-34 cases (17 cases central estimate) of additional mortality. Epidemiological evidence specific to particles from biomass combustion is scarce, affecting also the reliability of the current risk assessment. Do the wildfire aerosols exhibit the same level of toxicity as the urban particles? To shed light on this question, it is interesting to look at the exposure data in relationship to the observed daily mortality in Finland, even though the limited duration of the episode allows only for a weak statistical power. The percentage increases observed (0.8%-2.1% per 10 microg/m(3) of fine PM) are in line with the more general estimates for urban PM and those used in the current risk assessment. PMID

  1. Predictors of concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and particle constituents inside of lower socioeconomic status urban homes.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Lisa K; Clougherty, Jane E; Laden, Francine; Levy, Jonathan I

    2007-08-01

    Air pollution exposure patterns may contribute to known spatial patterning of asthma morbidity within urban areas. While studies have evaluated the relationship between traffic and outdoor concentrations, few have considered indoor exposure patterns within low socioeconomic status (SES) urban communities. In this study, part of a prospective birth cohort study assessing asthma etiology in urban Boston, we collected indoor and outdoor 3-4 day samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in 43 residences across multiple seasons from 2003 to 2005. Homes were chosen to represent low SES households, including both cohort and non-cohort residences in similar neighborhoods, and consisted almost entirely of multiunit residences. Reflectance analysis and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy were performed on the particle filters to determine elemental carbon (EC) and trace element concentrations, respectively. Additionally, information on home characteristics (e.g. type, age, stove fuel) and occupant behaviors (e.g. smoking, cooking, cleaning) were collected via a standardized questionnaire. The contributions of outdoor and indoor sources to indoor concentrations were quantified with regression analyses using mass balance principles. For NO2 and most particle constituents (except outdoor-dominated constituents like sulfur and vanadium), the addition of selected indoor source terms improved the model's predictive power. Cooking time, gas stove usage, occupant density, and humidifiers were identified as important contributors to indoor levels of various pollutants. A comparison between cohort and non-cohort participants provided another means to determine the influence of occupant activity patterns on indoor-outdoor ratios. Although the groups had similar housing characteristics and were located in similar neighborhoods, cohort members had significantly higher indoor concentrations of PM2.5 and NO2, associated with indoor activities. We conclude that the

  2. Temperature- and pH-Responsive Benzoboroxole-Based Polymers for Flocculation and Enhanced Dewatering of Fine Particle Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Han; Wang, Yinan; Li, Lin; Kotsuchibashi, Yohei; Narain, Ravin; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-12-16

    Random copolymers based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) containing 2-aminoethyl methacrylamide hydrochloride (AEMA) and 5-methacrylamido-1,2-benzoboroxole (MAAmBo) were synthesized and subsequently evaluated for their performance in solid-liquid separation at various pH and temperatures. The strong interactions between benzoboroxole residues and kaolin hydroxyl groups were evaluated for the first time in the flocculation of fine particle suspensions. The lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) of PAMN decreases because of the hydrophobic nature of the benzoboroxole moieties, resulting in strong hydrophobic interaction at temperatures higher than the LCSTs. Temperature and pH responsive polymer, P(AEMA51-st-MAAmBo76-st-NIPAM381) (denoted as PAMN) shows the ability to induce fastest settling at a low dosage of 25 ppm and under the condition of pH 9 and 50 °C. The accelerated settling rate is considered to be due to the strong adhesion of benzoboroxole residues to the kaolin hydroxyl groups, the electrical double layer force, and the hydrophobic force. During condensation phase, increasing the pH of sediment to pH 11 could attain the most compact structure. Random copolymers containing benzoboroxole groups act as dispersants (due to pH-responsive character) rather than flocculants at pH 11, providing repulsive force that enables particles to rearrange their position and consolidate well. Through a two-step solid-liquid separation including settling phase and consolidation phase, rapid settling and compact sediment are feasible simultaneously. PMID:26592529

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the toxicities induced by metallic nickel nano and fine particles.

    PubMed

    Magaye, Ruth; Gu, Yuanliang; Wang, Yafei; Su, Hong; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Guochuan; Shi, Hongbo; Yue, Xia; Zou, Baobo; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jinshun

    2016-06-01

    Nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) have been applied in various fields along with the rapid development of nanotechnology. However, the potential adverse health effects of the Ni NPs are unclear. To investigate the cyto- and genotoxicity and compare the differences between the Ni NPs and the nickel fine particles (Ni FPs), Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and A549 cells were treated with different doses of Ni NPs or FPs. Intra-tracheal instillation of Ni NPs and FPs caused acute toxicity in the lungs, liver and kidneys of the SD rats. Even though the histology of the lungs showed hyperplastic changes and the protein expression of HO-1 and Nrf2 detected by western blot showed lung burden overload, no significant increase was observed to the expression level of oncoprotein C-myc. The results from cell titer-Glo assay and comet assay indicated that Ni NPs were more potent in causing cell toxicity and genotoxicity in vitro than Ni FPs. In addition, Ni NPs increased the expression of C-myc in vitro, but these increases may not have been due to oxidative stress since no significant dose-dependent changes were seen in HO-1 and Nrf2 expressions. Although Ni NPs have the potential to cause DNA damage in A549 cells in vitro, the molecular mechanisms that led to these changes and their tumorigenic potential is still debatable. In short, Ni NPs were more potent in causing cell toxicity and genotoxicity in vitro than Ni FPs, and intra-tracheal instillation of Ni NPs and FPs caused toxicity in organs of the SD rats, while it showed similar to the effects for both particle types. These results suggested that both Ni NPs and FPs have the potential to be harmful to human health, and Ni NPs may have higher cyto- and genotoxic effects than Ni FPs under the same treatment dose. PMID:27010930

  4. Mutagenicity of fine airborne particles: diurnal variation in community air determined by a Salmonella micro preincubation (microsuspension) procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kado, N.Y.; Guirguis, G.N.; Flessel, C.P.; Chan, R.C.; Chang, K.I.; Wesolowski, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A simple modification of the Salmonella liquid incubation assay previously developed for detecting mutagens in urine was used to determine mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter. The modification consists of adding ten times more bacteria and five to ten times less metabolic enzymes compared to the plate incorporation method. The mixture volume is approximately 0.2 ml, and the mixture is incubated for 90 min before pouring it according to the standard protocol. The modified procedure was approximately ten times more sensitive than the standard plate incorporation test for detecting mutagens in air particulate extracts and approximately ten to 31 times more sensitive for the chemical mutagens 2-nitrofluorene, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, 2-aminofluorene, and benzo(a)pyrene in bacterial strain TA98. Mutagenic activity was associated exclusively with fine particles (aerodynamic diameters of less than 2.5 ..mu..m). Diurnal patterns of mutagenic activity were investigated by measuring filter extracts from 2-hr samples collected in three San Francisco Bay Area cities during the summer or fall of 1982. Four criteria pollutants - lead, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and sulfur dioxide - were simultaneously sampled at one location.

  5. Subway construction activity influence on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine particles: Comparison with a background mountainous site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Li, Xuxu; Li, Qi; Yin, Yan; Li, Li; Chen, Kui; Liu, Dantong; Yuan, Liang; Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-07-01

    Intensive construction activities worsened the surrounding atmospheric environment in China. Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine particles (PM2.5) were collected at a subway construction site (SC) of Nanjing and compared with a regional background mountainous site (BM) to examine the influence of anthropogenic activities on concentrations, sources and health risks of PAHs. Average PAH concentrations at SC were higher than BM at a factor of about 5.9. All PAH species at SC were higher than BM, with the SC/BM ratios ranging from 1.3 (NaP) to 10.3 (BaP). PAH profiles differed for the two sites. The SC site had higher mass fractions of PAHs from coal combustion and vehicle emission, while the BM site held higher mass percentages of PAHs from long-range transported wood combustion and industrial activities. Lower temperature at BM may lead to the higher mass percentages of low ring PAHs. Coal combustion, traffic emissions and biomass burning were the common sources for PAHs at both SC and BM. Construction workers were exposed to higher BaPeq concentrations, nearly ten times of the background site and their lifetime cancer risk reached to 0.6 per 1,000,000 exposed worker, owing to the influence of coal combustion, vehicle emission and industrial activities at the surroundings of SC.

  6. Fine particle emissions in three different combustion conditions of a wood chip-fired appliance - Particulate physico-chemical properties and induced cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskinen, J.; Tissari, J.; Uski, O.; Virén, A.; Torvela, T.; Kaivosoja, T.; Lamberg, H.; Nuutinen, I.; Kettunen, T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Jalava, P. I.; Sippula, O.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    A biomass combustion reactor with a moving grate was utilised as a model system to produce three different combustion conditions corresponding to efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion. The efficient conditions (based on a CO level of approximately 7 mg MJ-1) corresponded to a modern pellet boiler. The intermediate conditions (CO level of approximately 300 mg MJ-1) corresponded to non-optimal settings in a continuously fired biomass combustion appliance. The smouldering conditions (CO level of approximately 2200 mg MJ-1) approached a batch combustion situation. The gaseous and particle emissions were characterised under each condition. Moreover, the ability of fine particles to cause cell death was determined using the particle emissions samples. The physico-chemical properties of the emitted particles and their toxicity were considerably different between the studied combustion conditions. In the efficient combustion, the emitted particles were small in size and large in number. The PM1 emission was low, and it was composed of ash species. In the intermediate and smouldering combustion, the PM1 emission was higher, and the particles were larger in size and smaller in number. In both of these conditions, there were high-emission peaks that produced a significant fraction of the emissions. The PAH emissions were the lowest in the efficient combustion. The smouldering combustion conditions produced the largest PAH emissions. In efficient combustion conditions, the emitted fine particles had the highest potential to cause cell death. This finding was most likely observed because these fine particles were mainly composed of inorganic ash species, and their relative contents of Zn were high. Thus, even the PM1 from optimal biomass combustion might cause health effects, but in these conditions, the particle emissions per energy unit produced were considerably lower.

  7. Mixing state, composition, and sources of fine aerosol particles in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and the influence of agricultural biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Chen, S. R.; Xu, Y. S.; Guo, X. C.; Sun, Y. L.; Yang, X. Y.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhao, X. D.; Chen, J. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-09-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to obtain morphology, size, composition, and mixing state of background fine particles with diameter less than 1 μm in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) during 15 September to 15 October 2013. Individual aerosol particles mainly contained secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA-sulfate and nitrate) and organics during clean periods (PM2.5: particles less than 2.5 μg m-3). The presence of KCl-NaCl associated with organics and an increase of soot particles suggest that an intense biomass burning event caused the highest PM2.5 concentrations (> 30 μg m-3) during the study. A large number fraction of the fly ash-containing particles (21.73 %) suggests that coal combustion emissions in the QTP significantly contributed to air pollutants at the median pollution level (PM2.5: 10-30 μg m-3). We concluded that emissions from biomass burning and from coal combustion both constantly contribute to anthropogenic particles in the QTP atmosphere. Based on size distributions of individual particles in different pollution levels, we found that gas condensation on existing particles is an important chemical process for the formation of SIA with organic coating. TEM observations show that refractory aerosols (e.g., soot, fly ash, and visible organic particles) likely adhere to the surface of SIA particles larger than 200 nm due to coagulation. Organic coating and soot on surface of the aged particles likely influence their hygroscopic and optical properties in the QTP, respectively. To our knowledge, this study reports the first microscopic analysis of fine particles in the background QTP air.

  8. The Interrelationship Between Microstructure, Coercivity and Magnetic Viscosity in Cobalt-Aluminum and Cobalt-Nickel Fine-Particle Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Adam J.

    In this investigation, Co-24.8 wt.% Al and Co -17.7 at.% Ni-26.8 at.% Al beta-phase (B2, CsCl-type crystal structure) alloys have been studied using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and magnetic measurements in an attempt to correlate the development of specific magnetic properties with the evolution of microstructure. In particular, the temperature dependence of coercivity and magnetic viscosity (time-dependence of magnetization) have been examined. The as-quenched Co-Ni-Al alloy exhibits characteristic tweed contrast and diffuse < 110> _beta and < 112 >_beta streaking in the TEM. It is concluded that a fine-scale decomposition occurs on the quench resulting in a dispersion of very small, acicular particles of a metastable Sato phase with an orthorhombic crystal structure. A preferential strain relaxation due to C^' softening combined with tetragonal strain centers produced by decomposition on the quench is suggested as the cause of tweed contrast. Upon aging, the Sato phase particles enrich in cobalt and transform to a metastable hcp varepsilon-phase. These single-domain Co-rich hcp particles have a slightly elongated plate-shaped morphology, an irregular {112 }_beta interface and a high density of internal faults on the basal planes. Aging the binary alloy results in similar microstructures and both HREM and a crystallographic analysis based on an invariant line hypothesis indicate an additional rotation around the close-packed directions away from an exact Burgers and toward a Potter orientation relationship. High resolution imaging reveals a high density of stacking faults on the basal plane and the presence of ledges on the {110}_beta and {112}_beta interphase interfaces. The age hardening curve for the ternary alloy has been found to be similar to binary alloy; however, the temperature dependence of coercivity curve exhibits a flattening at elevated temperatures rather than an increase. Magnetic

  9. Public health risks of prolonged fine particle events associated with stagnation and air quality index based on fine particle matter with a diameter <2.5 μm in the Kaoping region of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The increasing frequency of droughts in tropical and sub-tropical areas since 1970 due to climate change requires a better understanding of the relationship between public health and long-duration fine particle events (FPE; defined as a day with an average PM2.5 ≥ 35.5 μg/m3) associated with rainfall and wind speed. In the Kaoping region of Taiwan, 94.46 % of the daily average PM2.5 in winter exceeds the limit established by 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. This study investigated the differences in winter weather characteristics and health effects between non-FPE and FPE days, and the performance of air quality indexes on FPE days. Z-statistics for one-tailed tests, multiplicative decomposition models, logarithmic regression, and product-moment correlations were used for the analysis. The results indicate that mean wind speeds, rainfall hours, and air temperature were significantly decreased on FPE days. Daily mean PM2.5 concentrations were positively correlated to the duration of FPE days. The duration of FPE days was positively related to the length of drought (r = 0.97, P < 0.05). The number of respiratory admissions was positively correlated with the FPE duration (r 2 = 0.60). The age groups >15 years experienced the largest average reduction in asthma admissions on lag-days. Compared to the pollutant standard index (PSI) and revised air quality index (RAQI), the PM2.5 index is more representative and sensitive to changes in PM2.5 concentrations.

  10. Fine particle pollution

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-01-10

    ... decade ago, a pioneering study by Harvard's School of Public Health showed that one of the most dangerous forms of air pollution is ... 2.5 are acceptable, based on studies of its effect on human health. For the scientists studying these health effects and for regulators ...

  11. Magnetocaloric effect in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, P.; Gass, J.; Rebar, D. J.; Srinath, S.; Srikanth, H.; Morrison, S. A.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2006-12-01

    A comparative study of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is reported in two different types of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticle systems—cobalt ferrite and manganese zinc ferrite with mean size around 5 and 15 nm, respectively. While CoFe 2O 4 nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation, the Mn 0.68Zn 0.25Fe 2.07O 4 (MZFO) nanoparticles were prepared by reverse micelle technique using AOT as surfactant. Our results indicate that the change in entropy with the change in applied magnetic field (d S/d H) is reasonably large for this class of nanoparticles and has a wide distribution over a broad temperature range covering the region above and below the blocking temperature. The maximum entropy change is influenced by the particle size, overall distribution in anisotropy and magnetic moments.

  12. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period focused on assembling the supercritical particle generation/collection system. Effort was applied to constructing a shakedown testing plan also.

  13. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the inversion degree in zinc ferrite nanocrystals dispersed on a highly porous silica aerogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Carta, D; Marras, C; Loche, D; Mountjoy, G; Ahmed, S I; Corrias, A

    2013-02-01

    The structural properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles with spinel structure dispersed in a highly porous SiO(2) aerogel matrix were compared with a bulk zinc ferrite sample. In particular, the details of the cation distribution between the octahedral (B) and tetrahedral (A) sites of the spinel structure were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The analysis of both the X-ray absorption near edge structure and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure indicates that the degree of inversion of the zinc ferrite spinel structures varies with particle size. In particular, in the bulk microcrystalline sample, Zn(2+) ions are at the tetrahedral sites and trivalent Fe(3+) ions occupy octahedral sites (normal spinel). When particle size decreases, Zn(2+) ions are transferred to octahedral sites and the degree of inversion is found to increase as the nanoparticle size decreases. This is the first time that a variation of the degree of inversion with particle size is observed in ferrite nanoparticles grown within an aerogel matrix. PMID:23406136

  14. Determination of the strong acidity of atmospheric fine-particles (<2. 5 mum) using annular denuder technology. Standard method, enhanced method

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue, L.J.

    1992-11-01

    The report is a standardized methodology description for the determination of strong acidity of fine particles (less than 2.5 micrometers) in ambient air using annular denuder technology. The methodology description includes two parts: Part A - Standard Method and Part B - Enhanced Method. The Standard Method utilizes a denuder for removing ammonia and a filter assembly for determination of atmospheric strong acidity fine particle aerosols in ambient air, but does not account for potential interferences from nitric acid, ammonium nitrate aerosol or other ammonium salts which might bias the acidity measurement. The Enhanced Method adds an additional denuder upstream of the filter assembly to selectively remove acid gases (nitric acid vapors, nitrous acid and sulfur dioxide) from the gas stream prior to filtration. In addition, backup nylon and citric acid impregnated filters are used to correct for biases due to the dissociation of ammonium nitrate aerosol.

  15. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  16. Effects of coarse grain size distribution and fine particle content on pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in experimental debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa C.; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Debris flows are typically a saturated mixture of poorly sorted particles and interstitial fluid, whose density and flow properties depend strongly on the presence of suspended fine sediment. Recent research suggests that grain size distribution (GSD) influences excess pore pressures (i.e., pressure in excess of predicted hydrostatic pressure), which in turn plays a governing role in debris flow behaviors. We report a series of controlled laboratory experiments in a 4 m diameter vertically rotating drum where the coarse particle size distribution and the content of fine particles were varied independently. We measured basal pore fluid pressures, pore fluid pressure profiles (using novel sensor probes), velocity profiles, and longitudinal profiles of the flow height. Excess pore fluid pressure was significant for mixtures with high fines fraction. Such flows exhibited lower values for their bulk flow resistance (as measured by surface slope of the flow), had damped fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress, and had velocity profiles where the shear was concentrated at the base of the flow. These effects were most pronounced in flows with a wide coarse GSD distribution. Sustained excess fluid pressure occurred during flow and after cessation of motion. Various mechanisms may cause dilation and contraction of the flows, and we propose that the sustained excess fluid pressures during flow and once the flow has stopped may arise from hindered particle settling and yield strength of the fluid, resulting in transfer of particle weight to the fluid. Thus, debris flow behavior may be strongly influenced by sustained excess fluid pressures controlled by particle settling rates.

  17. The Effect of the Second Phase Particle Size on Fracture Behavior of Cu - 0.1% Sn Ultra-Fine-Grained Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizova, S. N.; Raab, G. I.; Faizov, I. A.; Aksenov, D. A.; Zaripov, N. G.; Faizov, R. A.; Semenov, V. I.; Zemlyakova, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    The fracture behavior of Cu - 0.1% Sn alloy in samples of two types, namely with similar characteristics of ultra-fine-grained structure, but different in the second phase particle size has been investigated. These two types of samples were obtained by means of equal channel angular pressing with different number of passes. It has been found that with increase in the total strain the morphology and orientation of the fracture surface demonstrate changes corresponding to the development of shear mode. The arguments for the hypothesis that the fracture behavior change is connected with the decrease of the particle size and increase of their distribution density are given.

  18. 4 °C preparation of ferrite nanoparticles having protein molecules immobilized on their surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Ogura, Y.; Nishi, T.; Kataoka, K.; Handa, H.; Abe, M.

    2002-05-01

    Trypsin, a proteolytic enzyme or a protein, was immobilized onto the surfaces of ferrite (a Fe3O4-γFe2O3 mixed solution) fine particles, ˜8 nm in size, during the process in which the particles were synthesized from an aqueous solution. The process was performed in the open air at a temperature as low as 4 °C and on near-neutral condition of pH⩽9, which is compatible with most of the bioactive molecules as well as trypsin. Therefore this technique is advantageous for preparing magnetite particles having biomolecules immobilized on their surfaces, which will be used for biomedical applications utilizing magnetic separation technique.

  19. Elemental composition of atmospheric fine-particles emitted from coal burned in a modern electric power plant equipped with a flue-gas desulfurization system

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Biermann, A.H.; Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1981-07-01

    Improved control devices now frequently installed on conventional coal-utility boilers drastically affect the quantity, chemical composition, and physical characteristics of fine-particles emitted to the atmosphere from these sources. Fly-ash aerosols were sampled upstream and downstream from a modern lime-slurry, spray-tower system installed on a 430-Mw(e) coal utility boiler. Particulate samples were collected in situ on membrane filters and in University of Washington MKIII and MKV cascade impactors. The MKV impactor, operated at reduced pressure and with a cyclone preseparator, provided 13 discrete particle-size fractions with median diameters ranging from 0.07 to 20 mu m; with up to 6 of the fractions in the highly respirable submicron particle range. The concentrations of up to 35 elements and estimates of the size distributions of particles in each of the fly-ash fractions were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and by electron microscopy, respectively. Mechanisms of fine-particle formation and chemical enrichment in the flue-gas desulfurization system are discussed.

  20. Fine particle Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Tb phosphor for the plasma display panel prepared by a combined approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, HongMei; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 ; Gong, MengLian; Liang, Hongbin

    2010-07-15

    Sol-gel with microwave heating was employed to prepare fine particles Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Tb phosphor. X-ray diffractometer was used to characterize the structural of the samples. The Scanning Electron Microscope image shows that the particle size is about 300 nm. The phosphor particles have several advantages in the morphology, such as excellent surface quality, spherical shape, and narrow size distribution with no aggregation. The VUV luminescence measurements indicate that the phosphor presents an intense excitation band at 173 nm. Because the wavelength of excitation source in PDP is mainly at 147 and 172 nm, it makes Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Tb a potential candidate for green emitting phosphor for plasma display panel (PDP) application. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements indicate that the Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Tb particles present excellent green emission at 542 and 547 nm excitated at 236 and 172 nm, respectively.

  1. Lithium ferrite nanoparticles for ferrofluid applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, V. K.; Prakash, Om; Pant, R. P.; Islam, Mohammad

    2002-11-01

    Nanoparticles of Lithium ferrite in the particle size range of 10 nm have been prepared by a citrate precursor method at a relatively low temperature of 200°C. The particles show characteristic infra red (IR) spectrum of lithium ferrite and broadened X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns typical of the nanoparticle nature. The sample decomposed at 200°C has the β-LiFe 5O 8 type (a disordered type of spinel) structure which on annealing at 350°C transforms to the α-LiFe 5O 8 type (an ordered type spinel) structure as shown by both IR spectra and XRD studies. Magnetization curves indicate a particle size distribution consisting of both ferromagnetic particles and a superparamagnetic fraction. With 4 ΠMs values of 2000 G these particles could be useful for applications in certain low magnetization ferrofluids.

  2. Commuting-Adjusted Short-Term Health Impact Assessment of Airborne Fine Particles with Uncertainty Quantification via Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Grisotto, Laura; Catelan, Dolores; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biggeri, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to air pollution is associated with a short-term increase in mortality, and this field has begun to focus on health impact assessment. Objectives: Our aim was to estimate the impact of PM10 on mortality within 2 days from the exposure in the Italian region of Lombardy for the year 2007, at the municipality level, examining exposure entailed by daily intermunicipality commuting and accounting for uncertainty propagation. Methods: We combined data from different sources to derive probabilistic distributions for all input quantities used to calculate attributable deaths (mortality rates, PM10 concentrations, estimated PM10 effects, and commuting flows) and applied a Monte Carlo procedure to propagate uncertainty and sample the distribution of attributable deaths for each municipality. Results: We estimated that annual average PM10 concentrations above the World Health Organization-recommended threshold of 20 μg/m3 were responsible for 865 short-term deaths (80% credibility interval: 475, 1,401), 26% of which were attributable to PM10 above the European Union limit of 40 μg/m3. Reducing annual average PM10 concentrations > 20 μg/m3 by 20% would have reduced the number of attributable deaths by 36%. The largest estimated impacts were along the basin of the Po River and in the largest cities. Commuting contributed to the spatial distribution of the estimated impact. Conclusions: Our estimates, which incorporated uncertainty quantification, indicate that the short-term impact of PM10 on mortality in Lombardy in 2007 was notable, and that reduction in air pollution would have had a substantial beneficial effect on population health. Using commuting data helped to identify critical areas for prioritizing intervention. Citation: Baccini M, Grisotto L, Catelan D, Consonni D, Bertazzi PA, Biggeri A. 2015. Commuting-adjusted short-term health impact assessment of airborne fine particles with uncertainty quantification via Monte Carlo simulation. Environ

  3. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  4. Fine particle water and pH in the Eastern Mediterranean: Sources, variability and implications for nutrients availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Nikolaou, Panayiota; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Kanakidou, Maria; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particles have the ability to absorb significant amounts of water, which greatly impacts on their physical and chemical properties. Direclty linked to aerosol pH and LWC is the bioavailability of nutrients contained within mineral dust, involving pH-dependent catalyzed redox-reaction pathways. Liquid water content (LWC) and pH, even though are important constituents of the aerosol phase, are rarely monitored. Direct measurements of aerosol pH "in situ" are scarce and require considerations owing to the non-conserved nature of the hydronium ion and partial dissociation of inorganic and organic electrolytes in the aerosol. To overcome these challenges, indirect alternatives such as measuring the semi-volatile partitioning of key species sensitive to pH, combined with comprehensive models are used to provide a reasonably accurate estimate of pH that can be carried out with routine measurements. Using concurrent measurements of aerosol chemical composition, tandem light scattering coefficients and the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA-II, LWC mass concentrations associated with the aerosol inorganic and organic components are determined for the remote background site of Finokalia, Crete. The predicted water was subsequently compared to the one measured by the ambient versus dry light scattering coefficients. The sum of Winorg and Worg was highly correlated and in close agreement with the measured LWC (on average within 10%), with slope 0.92 (R2=0.8) for the whole measurement period between August and November 2012 (n=5201 points). As expected, the highest fine aerosol water values are observed during night-time, when RH is at its maximum, resulting in important water uptake. The average concentration of total aerosol water was found to be 2.19±1.75 μg m-3, which according to the dry mass measurements, can contribute on average up to 33% to the total aerosol submicron mass. The average Worg was found to be 0.56±0.37 μg m-3, which constitutes about 28% of the

  5. XXIst Century Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaleyrat, F.; Zehani, K.; Pasko, A.; Loyau, V.; LoBue, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Ørsted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the downsizing of ceramics microstucture to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba2+Fe12O19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  6. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of low-activation ferritic alloys*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    Microstructures of low-activation ferritic alloys, such as 2.25% Cr-2% W, 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys, were observed after FFTF irradiation at 698 K to a dose of 36 dpa. Martensite in 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys and bainite in 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy were fairly stable after the irradiation. Microvoids were observed in the martensite in each alloy but not in bainite and δ-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. An addition of 0.02% Ti to 9% Cr-2% W alloy considerably reduced the void density. Spherical (Ta, W) and Ti-rich precipitates were observed in the Ti-added 9% Cr-2% W alloy. Precipitates observed in 9% Cr-2% W and 7% Cr-2% W alloys are mainly Cr-rich M 23C 6 (Ta, W) and Ta(W)-rich M 6C and Fe-rich Laves phase. In 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy, high density of fine (Ta, W)-rich M 2C type precipitates as well as M 6C were observed. Spherical small α' Cr-rich particles were observed in both martensite and α-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. Correlation between postirradiation microstructure and irradiation hardening is shown and discussed for these alloys.

  7. Fe and Mn oxidation states by TEM-EELS in fine-particle emissions from a Fe-Mn alloy making plant.

    PubMed

    Marris, Hélène; Deboudt, Karine; Flament, Pascal; Grobéty, Bernard; Gieré, Reto

    2013-10-01

    Fine particles were sampled both inside the chimneys and in the near-field of an Fe-Mn-alloy manufacturing plant. The transfer from one point to another point in the environment, as well as the bioavailability and toxicity of these two metals, depend above all on their speciation. The oxidation states of iron and manganese in the collected particles were determined by using transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (TEM-EELS). The mineralogical identity of these metal-rich particles was determined by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This study shows that both iron and manganese in metallic particles are prone to oxidation reactions via gas/particle conversion mechanisms, which take place in the flue gases within the smoke stacks. This phenomenon is more pronounced for the smallest Fe-rich particles. However, no further change of oxidation state of the two elements was observed in the near-field of the plant, after emission into the atmosphere (within <2000 m of the smoke stacks). The oxidation states of iron and manganese remain mainly between +II and +III, which is probably due to short residence time of these particles in the pollution plume. PMID:24000787

  8. Impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: a numerical study with the WRF-Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vara-Vela, A.; Andrade, M. F.; Kumar, P.; Ynoue, R. Y.; Muñoz, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 µm in diameter) in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) in Brazil, where ethanol is used intensively as a fuel in road vehicles. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model, which simulates feedbacks between meteorological variables and chemical species, is used as a photochemical modelling tool to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to the evolution of number and mass size distribution of particles through gas-to-particle conversion. A vehicular emission model based on statistical information of vehicular activity is applied to simulate vehicular emissions over the studied area. The simulation has been performed for a 1-month period (7 August-6 September 2012) to cover the availability of experimental data from the NUANCE-SPS (Narrowing the Uncertainties on Aerosol and Climate Changes in Sao Paulo State) project that aims to characterize emissions of atmospheric aerosols in the SPMA. The availability of experimental measurements of atmospheric aerosols and the application of the WRF-Chem model made it possible to represent some of the most important properties of fine particles in the SPMA such as the mass size distribution and chemical composition, besides allowing us to evaluate its formation potential through the gas-to-particle conversion processes. Results show that the emission of primary gases, mostly from vehicles, led to a production of secondary particles between 20 and 30 % in relation to the total mass concentration of PM2.5 in the downtown SPMA. Each of PM2.5 and primary natural aerosol (dust and sea salt) contributed with 40-50 % of the total PM10 (i.e. those ≤ 10 µm in diameter) concentration. Over 40 % of the formation of fine particles, by mass, was due to the emission of hydrocarbons, mainly aromatics. Furthermore, an increase in the number of small particles impaired the

  9. Associations of Mortality with Long-Term Exposures to Fine and Ultrafine Particles, Species and Sources: Results from the California Teachers Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianlin; Goldberg, Debbie; Reynolds, Peggy; Hertz, Andrew; Bernstein, Leslie; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although several cohort studies report associations between chronic exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) and mortality, few have studied the effects of chronic exposure to ultrafine (UF) particles. In addition, few studies have estimated the effects of the constituents of either PM2.5 or UF particles. Methods We used a statewide cohort of > 100,000 women from the California Teachers Study who were followed from 2001 through 2007. Exposure data at the residential level were provided by a chemical transport model that computed pollutant concentrations from > 900 sources in California. Besides particle mass, monthly concentrations of 11 species and 8 sources or primary particles were generated at 4-km grids. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the association between the pollutants and all-cause, cardiovascular, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and respiratory mortality. Results We observed statistically significant (p < 0.05) associations of IHD with PM2.5 mass, nitrate, elemental carbon (EC), copper (Cu), and secondary organics and the sources gas- and diesel-fueled vehicles, meat cooking, and high-sulfur fuel combustion. The hazard ratio estimate of 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31) for IHD in association with a 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 is consistent with findings from the American Cancer Society cohort. We also observed significant positive associations between IHD and several UF components including EC, Cu, metals, and mobile sources. Conclusions Using an emissions-based model with a 4-km spatial scale, we observed significant positive associations between IHD mortality and both fine and ultrafine particle species and sources. Our results suggest that the exposure model effectively measured local exposures and facilitated the examination of the relative toxicity of particle species. Citation Ostro B, Hu J, Goldberg D, Reynolds P, Hertz A, Bernstein L, Kleeman MJ. 2015. Associations of mortality with long-term exposures to fine and ultrafine

  10. TOTAL RESPIRATORY TRACT DEPOSITION OF FINE MICRON-SIZED PARTICLES IN HEALTHY ADULTS: EMPIRICIAL EQUATIONS FOR GENDER AND BREATHING PATTERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An accurate dose estimation under various inhalation conditions is important for assessing both the potential health effects of pollutant particles and the therapeutic efficacy of medical aerosols. We measured total deposition fraction (TDF) of monodisperse micron-sized particles...

  11. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  12. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  13. Development of Bimodal Ferrite-Grain Structures in Low-Carbon Steel Using Rapid Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, A.; Karani, A.; Patra, S.; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2013-05-01

    Mixed ferrite grain structures, which have fine- and coarse-grain regions and showing "bimodal" grain size distributions, have been produced by rapid intercritical annealing of warm-rolled (or cold-rolled) samples. Microstructural changes have been analyzed using dilatometric studies, size prediction of transformed and recrystallized grains, and microtexture measurements. Fine austenite grains (<5 μm) developed during rapid annealing and transformed into fine-ferrite grains (2 to 4 μm) after cooling. Coarse-ferrite grains (28 to 42 μm) resulted from the recrystallization and growth of deformed ferrite. The effect of heating rate on microstructural morphologies during intercritical annealing has also been studied. A slow rate of heating (30 K/s) developed a uniform distribution of fine-ferrite grains and austenitic islands, while rapid heating (300 K/s) generated coarse blocks of austenite, elongated along the prior-pearlitic regions, in the ferrite matrix. As expected, bimodal ferrite grain structures or fine-scale dual-phase structures showed superior combination of tensile strength and ductility, compared to the ultrafine-grained steels.

  14. Low temperature synthesis of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, A.; Ghosh, C. K.; Mitra, M. K.; Das, G. C.; Mukherjee, S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2010-05-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) nanocrystalline powder materials with various particle sizes were prepared by a unique solid-state combustion method. Phase purity of ZnFe 2O 4 was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. High resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis and selected area diffraction pattern also confirmed the correct crystalline phase formation. Particle size was determined from both the transmission electron microscopic images and also from the XRD peak broadening analysis. Oxidation states of different elements present in ZnFe 2O 4 were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Frequency dependent dielectric constant and a.c. conductivity were measured as a function of particle size and both of them were found to decrease with decreasing particle size. These studies indicated that good quality zinc ferrite nanocrystalline powdered materials can be synthesized at low temperature.

  15. Relations between magneto-optical properties and reactivity in cobalt-manganese ferrite thin films and powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, Laurence; Tailhades, Philippe; Rousset, Abel

    1996-02-01

    Co-Mn spinel ferrites were prepared as submicron powders and thin films. Because of their finely divided state, these spinels could be oxidized at low temperatures to give novel cation-deficient ferrites. For these two material forms, the magneto-optical properties were found to be strongly dependent on the ferrite oxidation state. The highest coercivities and Faraday rotations were obtained when the ferrites were partially oxidized. These phenomena are attributed to the mechanical stress effect developed during the oxidation of the manganese ions. The properties of these ferrites could be of interest for magneto-optical recording applications. The first static recording tests were performed at 780 nm wavelength.

  16. Impacts of Roadway Emissions on Urban Fine Particle Exposures: the Nairobi Area Traffic Contribution to Air Pollution (NATCAP) Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatari, Michael; Ngo, Nicole; Ndiba, Peter; Kinney, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Air quality is a serious and worsening problem in the rapidly growing cities of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), due to rapid urbanization, growing vehicle fleets, changing life styles, limited road infrastructure and land use planning, and high per-vehicle emissions. However, the absence of ambient monitoring data, and particularly urban roadside concentrations of particulate matter in SSA cities, severely limits our ability to assess the real extent of air quality problems. Emitted fine particles by on-road vehicles may be particularly important in SSA cities because large concentrations of poorly maintained vehicles operate in close proximity to commercial and other activities of low-income urban residents. This scenario provokes major air quality concerns and its investigation should be of priority interest to policy makers, city planners and managers, and the affected population. As part of collaboration between Columbia University and the University of Nairobi, a PM2.5 air monitoring study was carried out over two weeks in July 2009. The objectives of the study were 1) to assess average daytime PM2.5 concentrations on a range of Nairobi streets that represent important hot-spots in terms of the joint distribution of traffic, commercial, and resident pedestrian activities, 2) to relate those concentrations to motor vehicle counts, 3) to compare urban street concentrations to urban and rural background levels, and 4) to assess vertical and horizontal dispersion of PM2.5 near roadways. Portable, battery-operated PM2.5 samplers were carried by field teams at each of the five sites (three urban, one commuter highway, and one rural site), each of which operated from 7 AM to 7 PM during 10 weekdays in July 2009. Urban background monitoring took place on a rooftop at the University of Nairobi. Preliminary findings suggest highly elevated PM2.5 concentrations at the urban sites where the greatest pedestrian traffic was observed. These findings underscore the need for air

  17. Evaluation of Methods for Physical Characterization of the Fine Particle Emissions from Two Residential Wood Combustion Appliances

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fine particulate matter (PM) emissions from a U. S. certified non-catalytic wood stove and a zero clearance fireplace burning Quercus rubra L. (northern red oak) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir) cordwood each at two different moisture levels were determined. Emission t...

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF COARSE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development and field evaluation of a compact high-volume dichotomous sampler (HVDS) that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. In its primary configuration as tested, the sampler size-fractionates PM10 into...

  19. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials. PMID:23360082

  20. Respiratory effects of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor sources--a randomized sham-controlled exposure study of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Vanessa J; Schins, Roel P F; Hennig, Frauke; Hellack, Bryan; Quass, Ulrich; Kaminski, Heinz; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Hoffmann, Barbara; Weinmayr, Gudrun

    2014-07-01

    Particulate air pollution is linked to impaired respiratory health. We analyzed particle emissions from common indoor sources (candles burning (CB), toasting bread (TB), frying sausages (FS)) and lung function in 55 healthy volunteers (mean age 33.0 years) in a randomized cross-over controlled exposure study. Lung-deposited particle surface area concentration (PSC), size-specific particle number concentration (PNC) up to 10 µm, and particle mass concentration (PMC) of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 were determined during exposure (2 h). FEV1, FVC and MEF25%-75% was measured before, 4 h and 24 h after exposure. Wilcoxon-rank sum tests (comparing exposure scenarios) and mixed linear regression using particle concentrations and adjusting for personal characteristics, travel time and transportation means before exposure sessions were performed. While no effect was seen comparing the exposure scenarios and in the unadjusted model, inverse associations were found for PMC from CB and FS in relation to FEV1 and MEF25%-75%. with a change in 10 µg/m3 in PM2.5 from CB being associated with a change in FEV1 of -19 mL (95%-confidence interval:-43; 5) after 4 h. PMC from TB and PNC of UFP were not associated with lung function changes, but PSC from CB was. Elevated indoor fine particles from certain sources may be associated with small decreases in lung function in healthy adults. PMID:25000149

  1. Water-soluble ions in nano/ultrafine/fine/coarse particles collected near a busy road and at a rural site.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Liao, Chiu-Jung; Chaung, Hso-Chi; Chiu, Chuen-Huey

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated water-soluble ions in the sized particles (particularly nano (PM(0.01-0.056))/ultrafine (PM(0.01-0.1))) collected using MOUDI and Nano-MOUDI samplers near a busy road site and at a rural site. The analytical results demonstrate that nano and coarse particles exhibited the highest (16.3%) and lowest (8.37%) nitrate mass ratios, respectively. The mass ratio of NO(3)(-) was higher than that of SO(4)(2-) in all the sized particles at the traffic site. The secondary aerosols all displayed trimodal distributions. The aerosols in ultrafine particles collected at the roadside site exhibited Aitken mode distributions indicating they were of local origin. This finding was not observed for those ultrafine particles collected at the rural site. The mass median diameters (MMDs) of the nano, ultrafine, and fine particles were smaller at the traffic site than at the rural site, possibly related to the contribution of mobile engine emissions. PMID:16772108

  2. Respiratory Effects of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from Indoor Sources—A Randomized Sham-Controlled Exposure Study of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Soppa, Vanessa J.; Schins, Roel P. F.; Hennig, Frauke; Hellack, Bryan; Quass, Ulrich; Kaminski, Heinz; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Hoffmann, Barbara; Weinmayr, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Particulate air pollution is linked to impaired respiratory health. We analyzed particle emissions from common indoor sources (candles burning (CB), toasting bread (TB), frying sausages (FS)) and lung function in 55 healthy volunteers (mean age 33.0 years) in a randomized cross-over controlled exposure study. Lung-deposited particle surface area concentration (PSC), size-specific particle number concentration (PNC) up to 10 µm, and particle mass concentration (PMC) of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 were determined during exposure (2 h). FEV1, FVC and MEF25%–75% was measured before, 4 h and 24 h after exposure. Wilcoxon-rank sum tests (comparing exposure scenarios) and mixed linear regression using particle concentrations and adjusting for personal characteristics, travel time and transportation means before exposure sessions were performed. While no effect was seen comparing the exposure scenarios and in the unadjusted model, inverse associations were found for PMC from CB and FS in relation to FEV1 and MEF25%–75%. with a change in 10 µg/m3 in PM2.5 from CB being associated with a change in FEV1 of −19 mL (95%-confidence interval:−43; 5) after 4 h. PMC from TB and PNC of UFP were not associated with lung function changes, but PSC from CB was. Elevated indoor fine particles from certain sources may be associated with small decreases in lung function in healthy adults. PMID:25000149